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Sample records for advanced tnm stage

  1. TNM Staging of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Wei-guo; Wang, Li; Ke, Neng-wen; Liu, Xu-bao; Tian, Bo-le

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics and compare the surgical outcome of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) using the 2 tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) systems by both the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Staging Manual (seventh edition) and the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS). Moreover, we sought to validate the prognostic value of the new AJCC criterion. Data of 145 consecutive patients who were all surgically treated and histologically diagnosed as p-NETs from January 2002 to June 2013 in our single institution were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates for AJCC classifications of stages I, II, III, and IV were 79.5%, 63.1%, 15.0%, and NA, respectively, (P < 0.005). As for the ENETS system, the OS rates at 5 years for stages I, II, III, and IV were 75.5%, 72.7%, 29.0%, and NA, respectively, (P < 0.005). Both criteria present no statistically notable difference between stage I and stage II (P > 0.05) but between stage I and stages III and IV (P < 0.05), as well as those between stage II and stages III and IV (P < 0.05). Difference between stage III and IV by ENETS was significant (P = 0.031), whereas that by the AJCC was not (P = 0.144). What's more, the AJCC Staging Manual (seventh edition) was statistically significant in both uni- and multivariate analyses by Cox regression (P < 0.005 and P = 0.025, respectively). Our study indicated that the ENETS TNM staging system might be superior to the AJCC Staging Manual (seventh edition) for the clinical practice of p-NETs. Together with tumor grade and radical resection, the new AJCC system was also validated to be an independent predictor for p-NETs. PMID:25816036

  2. [Locally advanced carcinoma of the cervix uteri (stage IIB-IIIB TNM-UICC): radiotherapy combined with simultaneous daily low-dose platinum. Phase II study].

    PubMed

    Micheletti, E; La Face, B; Bianchi, E; Cagna, E; Sartori, E

    1996-05-01

    A prospective, single arm, phase-II trial was performed to assess the efficacy and local toxicity of the combination of low doses of platin and pelvic radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced carcinoma of the cervix. January, 1993, through August, 1994, twenty-three previously untreated patients with squamous carcinoma (stages IIB-IIIB UICC) entered the study. All patients were examined by a gynecologist and by a radiation oncologist and then submitted to conventional pretreatment staging procedures. Nine patients were classified as stage IIB and 14 patients as stage IIIB. Radiotherapy consisted of 60 Gy external beam irradiation (46 Gy to pelvis + 14 Gy boost to cervix uteri and parametria) plus one low dose rate intracavitary treatment to a dose of 8 Gy to point A. Cisplatin (3 mg/m2/day) or carboplatin (12 mg/m2/day) was also given for 6 weeks starting on radiotherapy day 1. The treatment was well tolerated and no patient required radiotherapy discontinuation. With a median follow-up time of 20 months, complete response was seen in 74% (17/23) of the patients. One of the 17 patients who achieved a complete remission, during follow-up, relapsed in the pelvis and one developed lung metastases. Total failure rate in the pelvis was 30.5% (7/23). Distant metastases were observed in 17.5% (4/23) of the patients. Actuarial overall and disease-free survival rates at 33 months were 69.1% and 65.2%, respectively. Late gastrointestinal toxicity (grade 3) occurred in 8.6% (2/23) of patients, with one patient developing a rectal ulcer-which was submitted to colostomy- and one patient a vaginal necrosis. The combination of platin and radiotherapy appears to be an effective regimen for the patients with locally advanced carcinoma of the cervix and caused a relatively low rate of late gastrointestinal complications.

  3. Comparative study between two different staging systems (AJCC TNM VS BALLANTYNE’S) for mucosal melanomas of the Head & Neck

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Romero, Madeleine; Villavicencio-Valencia, Verónica; Zepeda-Castilla, Ernesto; Vidrio-Morgado, Horacio; Peteuil, Nathalie; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Mucosal melanoma (MM) of head and neck (H &N) is a rare entity with a quite poor prognosis. Ballantyne’s staging system has been commonly used since 1970. In the 7th edition of the AJCC Staging Manual a new chapter for the staging of TNM Classification system for mucosal melanoma (MM) of the head and neck (H &N) has been introduced to reflect the particularly aggressive biological behavior of this neoplasm. The aim of this study was to analyze and compare among Ballantyne’s staging system vs TNM H &N in terms of overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in a consecutive population of patients with MM in a cancer centre. Material and Methods Descriptive analysis of demographic, clinical and pathological variables of MM of the Head & Neck were performed. We compared the survival curves for both systems according to the Kaplan-Meier method using the Log-rank test. Results An up-staging migration effect from Ballantyne’s localized disease to moderately and very advanced disease according to AJCC staging system. The 5-year DFS and OS for Ballantyne’s Localized Disease and AJCC Stage III were 31% and 36% vs. 47% and 50%, respectively. For locoregional disease the 5-year DFS / OS were 5% / 10% for Bal-lantyne’s system vs. 13.8% / 17.8% and 0 / 0% for AJCC Stages IVA and IVB, respectively. Conclusions In this series, the TNM staging system for MM of the H &N predicted better the prognosis of the disease when comparing with Ballantyne’s system. Key words:Head and neck, mucosal melanoma, AJCC TNM, Ballantynes´s staging system. PMID:27031071

  4. TNM-Like Classification: A New Proposed Method for Heart Failure Staging

    PubMed Central

    Fedele, Francesco; D'Ambrosi, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Heart Failure (HF) is an acute or chronic syndrome, that causes a lot of damaging effects to every system. The involvement of different systems is variably related to age and others comorbidities. The severity of organ damage is often proportional to the duration of heart failure. The typology of HF and the duration determine which organs will be affected and vice versa the severity of organ damage supplies precious information about prognosis and outcome of patients with heart failure. Moreover, a classification based not only on symptomatic and syndromic typical features of heart failure, but also on functional data of each system, could allow us to apply the most appropriate therapies, to obtain a more accurate prognosis, and to employ necessary and not redundant human and financial resources. With an eye on the TNM staging used in oncology, we drawn up a classification that will consider the different involvement of organs such as lungs, kidneys, and liver in addition to psychological pattern and quality of life in HF patients. For all these reasons, it is our intention to propose a valid and more specific classification available for the clinical staging of HF that takes into account pathophysiological and structural changes that can remark prognosis and management of HF. PMID:24376377

  5. Prognostic factors in advanced pharyngeal and oral cavity cancer; significance of multimodality imaging in terms of 7th edition of TNM

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    As with most cancers the prognosis in pharyngeal and oral cavity cancer largely depends on tumour stage. Physical examination, including endoscopy should be combined with technical radiologic imaging to record the precise extent of tumour. The TNM staging system of the head and neck region is, in fact, an anatomic staging system that describes the anatomic extent of the primary tumour as well as the involvement of regional lymph nodes and distant metastases. Modifications in the TNM staging system should consider not only the expert opinions and published reports in the literature but the technical advances in technology for improved assessment of tumour extent and the shifting paradigms in therapeutic strategies. “T” stage of the tumour is defined by its size, the depth of the invasion and the involvement of vital structures. In the 7th edition of TNM classification, for stage T4 tumors (larger than 4 cm), subcategories a and b were introduced to indicate the involvement of vital structures and their suitability for surgical resection (except for nasopharynx cancer). Nodal metastasis is the most important predictor of outcome for squamous cell cancer of the head and neck. Better and more reliable methods of pretreatment tumour assessment are therefore crucial to ensure that the clinical assessment of tumor approximates its actual pathologic extent. CT and MRI are both useful for assessing extensions of pharyngeal- and oral cavity cancer in advanced stage. MRI is superior in visualizing most primary tumour sites. PMID:25608735

  6. Correlation Analysis of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma TNM Staging with Serum EA IgA and VCA IgA in EBV and VEGF-C and -D

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ruimei; Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaojiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma often occurs in humans in the nasopharyngeal epithelium area. Ebstein-Barr (EB) virus plays a key role in the process of nasopharyngeal carcinoma lesions. Early antigen antibody (EA-IgA) and viral capsid antigen IgA (VCA-IgA) of EB virus detection in serum can effectively monitor the process of nasopharyngeal carcinoma lesions. Serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) -C and VEGF-D expression detection can reflect the distant metastases ability of human tumor cells. Material/Methods 153 cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients in our hospital were enrolled, while 148 cases of healthy adults were selected as control. ELISA was used to detect serum EA-IgA, VCA-IgA, VEGF-C and -D expression levels. Spearman rank correlation analysis was applied to test the correlation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma TNM clinical stage and different indexes. Results Serum EA-IgA, VCA-IgA, VEGF-C and -D expression in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients was 43.74±2.6 U·mL−1, 62.5±2.7 U·mL−1, 473.25±3.4 pg·mL−1, and 498.36±2.3 pg·mL−1, respectively, which was significantly higher than in the control group as 18.65±3.7 U·mL−1, 23.74±1.5 U·mL−1, 225.42±2.3 pg·mL−1, and 257.24±3.5 pg·mL−1 (P<0.05). Nasopharyngeal carcinoma TNM clinical staging was obviously correlated with serum EA-IgA, VCA-IgA, and VEGF-C (P<0.05), but not VEGF-D (P>0.05). Conclusions Nasopharyngeal carcinoma patient serum EA-IgA and VCA-IgA expression levels were significantly correlated with TNM staging. The high levels of these 3 indicators suggest advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma TNM staging and serious lesions. PMID:26191775

  7. Gastric Stump Cancer: More Than Just Another Proximal Gastric Cancer and Demanding a More Suitable TNM Staging System

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Pinho, André; Pinto-de-Sousa, J.; Barbosa, José; Costa-Maia, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Considerable controversy persists about the biological behavior of gastric stump cancer (GSC). The aim of this study is to clarify if this cancer is just another proximal gastric cancer or if it emerges as a distinctive clinicopathologic entity. Methods. This review of a prospectively collected gastric cancer database identified 73 patients with GSC in a single institution between January 1980 and June 2012 and compared them with 328 patients with proximal gastric cancer (PGC) and 291 patients with esophagogastric junction cancer (EGJC). Results. Patients with GSC were predominantly males. Eighty-three percent of GSC penetrated the subserosal or the serosal layers. The median number of lymph nodes retrieved in GSC patients was significantly lower than in PGC patients or in EGJC patients. Cumulative survival curves were not different between GSC, PGC, or EGJC patients. Unlike that observed in PGC and in EGJC, no significant differences in cumulative survival according to the TNM staging system were observed in GSC cases. Conclusions. The outcome of patients with GSC displayed significant differences when compared to those with other proximal gastric cancers concerning the lack of survival association with the TNM staging system. Therefore a more suitable staging system should be designed for these unique cancers. PMID:24151622

  8. Prognosis Evaluation in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Hepatectomy: Comparison of BCLC, TNM and Hangzhou Criteria Staging Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wu-sheng; Yan, Lu-nan; Xiao, Guang-qin; Jiang, Li; Yang, Jian; Yang, Jia-yin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study is to evaluate the Hangzhou criteria (HC) for patients with HCC undergoing surgical resection and to identify whether this staging system is superior to other staging systems in predicting the survival of resectable HCC. Method 774 HCC patients underwent surgical resection between 2007 and 2009 in West China Hospital were enrolled retrospectively. Predictors of survival were identified using the Kaplan–Meier method and the Cox model. The disease state was staged by the HC, as well as by the TNM and BCLC staging systems. Prognostic powers were quantified using a linear trend χ2 test, c-index, and the likelihood ratio (LHR) χ2 test and correlated using Cox's regression model adjusted using the Akaike information criterion (AIC). Results Serum AFP level (P = 0.02), tumor size (P<0.001), tumor number (P<0.001), portal vein invasion (P<0.001), hepatic vein invasion (P<0.001), tumor differentiation (P<0.001), and distant organ (P = 0.016) and lymph node metastasis (P<0.001) were identified as independent risk factors of survival after resection by multivariate analysis. The comparison of the different staging system results showed that BCLC had the best homogeneity (likelihood ratio χ2 test 151.119, P<0.001), the TNM system had the best monotonicity of gradients (linear trend χ2 test 137.523, P<0.001), and discriminatory ability was the highest for the BCLC (the AUCs for 1-year mortality were 0.759) and TNM staging systems (the AUCs for 3-, and 5-year mortality were 0.738 and 0.731, respectively). However, based on the c-index and AIC, the HC was the most informative staging system in predicting survival (c-index 0.6866, AIC 5924.4729). Conclusions The HC can provide important prognostic information after surgery. The HC were shown to be a promising survival predictor in a Chinese cohort of patients with resectable HCC. PMID:25133493

  9. New TNM staging system for esophageal cancer: what chest radiologists need to know.

    PubMed

    Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Tae Jung; Nam, Kyung Bum; Lee, In Sun; Yang, Hee Chul; Cho, Sukki; Kim, Kwhanmien; Jheon, Sanghoon; Lee, Kyung Won

    2014-10-01

    Esophageal cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and the 5-year relative survival rate remains less than 20% in the United States. The treatment of esophageal cancer should be stage specific for better clinical outcomes. Recent treatment paradigms tend to involve a multimodality approach to management, which includes surgical resection and preoperative or definitive chemoradiation therapy. Accurate pretreatment staging of esophageal cancer is integral for assessing operability and determining a suitable treatment plan. The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) have published the seventh edition of the staging manual for cancer in the esophagus and esophagogastric junction. Unlike the sixth edition, the revised staging manual is data driven and harmonized with the staging of stomach cancer. Improvements include new definitions for the anatomic classifications Tis, T4, regional lymph node, N, and M and the addition of nonanatomic cancer characteristics (histopathologic cell type, histologic grade, and cancer location). Given the recent increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus, esophagogastric junction, and gastric cardia, the staging of tumors in the esophagogastric junction has been addressed. Radiologists must understand the details of the seventh edition of the AJCC-UICC staging system for esophageal cancer and use appropriate imaging modalities, such as computed tomography (CT), endoscopic ultrasonography, and positron emission tomography/CT, for initial staging.

  10. The 7th lung cancer TNM classification and staging system: Review of the changes and implications

    PubMed Central

    Mirsadraee, Saeed; Oswal, Dilip; Alizadeh, Yalda; Caulo, Andrea; van Beek, Edwin JR

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of death from cancer in males, accounting for more than 1.4 million deaths in 2008. It is a growing concern in China, Asia and Africa as well. Accurate staging of the disease is an important part of the management as it provides estimation of patient’s prognosis and identifies treatment sterategies. It also helps to build a database for future staging projects. A major revision of lung cancer staging has been announced with effect from January 2010. The new classification is based on a larger surgical and non-surgical cohort of patients, and thus more accurate in terms of outcome prediction compared to the previous classification. There are several original papers regarding this new classification which give comprehensive description of the methodology, the changes in the staging and the statistical analysis. This overview is a simplified description of the changes in the new classification and their potential impact on patients’ treatment and prognosis. PMID:22590666

  11. Metallothionein 2A inhibits NF-κB pathway activation and predicts clinical outcome segregated with TNM stage in gastric cancer patients following radical resection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metallothionein 2A (MT2A) as a stress protein, plays a protective role in gastric mucosal barrier. Its role in the development of gastric cancer (GC) is unclear. The mechanism of MT2A will be investigated in gastric tumorigenesis. Methods MT2A expression was detected in 973 gastric specimens. The biological function was determined through ectopic expressing MT2A in vitro and in vivo. The possible downstream effectors of MT2A were investigated in NF-κB signaling. The protein levels of MT2A, IκB-α and p-IκB-α (ser32/36) expression were analyzed in a subset of 258 patients by IHC staining. The prognostic effects of MT2A, status of IκB-α and TNM stage were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Results Decreased MT2A expression was detected in cell lines and primary tumors of GC. In clinical data, loss of MT2A (MT2A + in Normal (n =171, 76.0%); Intestinal metaplasia (n = 118, 50.8%); GC (n = 684. 22.4%, P < 0.001)) was associated with poor prognosis (P < 0.001), advanced TNM stage (P = 0.05), and down-regulation of IκB-α expression (P < 0.001). Furthermore, MT2A was the independent prognostic signature segregated from the status of IκB-α and pathological features. In addition, MT2A inhibited cell growth through apoptosis and G2/M arrest, which negatively regulated NF-κB pathway through up-regulation of IκB-α and down-regulation of p-IκB-α and cyclin D1 expression. Conclusions MT2A might play a tumor suppressive activity through inhibiting NF-κB signaling and may be a prognostic biomarker and potential target for individual therapy of GC patients. PMID:23870553

  12. [A new classification of pancreatic cancer to guide operative decisions and the comparison with the TNM stage].

    PubMed

    Qin, Renyi

    2015-07-01

    Despite the worldwide application of various terminological and classification systems used for pancreatic cancer, such as UICC classification and JPS classification based on the TNM system, however, little information on their use in operative decision-making is available. A new classification system according to the relationship with the tumor and key vasculature around the pancreas is described, and the pancreatic carcinomas are divided into eight types to provide operative decisions for different types of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the relationship between the classification system and TNM system is discussed. The new classification is the first time to discuss the classification for the operative decisions for the pancreatic cancer and this formalized type of approach may provide the best chance of achieving R0 resection and providing improved safety results. PMID:26359069

  13. Clarifying the TNM staging of rectal cancer in the context of modern imaging and neo-adjuvant treatment: 'y''u' and 'p' need 'mr' and 'ct'.

    PubMed

    Moran, B; Brown, G; Cunningham, D; Daniels, I; Heald, R; Quirke, P; Sebag-Montefiore, D

    2008-03-01

    Recent developments in cross-sectional imaging, particularly computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have provided increasingly accurate noninvasive preoperative staging, especially for rectal cancer. Image-based TNM staging, by definition a pathological system, has entered both the literature and everyday usage with no universal agreement as to the exact terminology. Clarification of the current terminology and suggestions to reflect recent developments are outlined to facilitate multidisciplinary team decision processes and objective stratification for entry to, and monitoring of, future clinical trials in rectal cancer. PMID:17498205

  14. TNM staging of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: an observational analysis and comparison by both AJCC and ENETS systems from 1 single institution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Wei-guo; Wang, Li; Ke, Neng-wen; Liu, Xu-bao; Tian, Bo-le

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics and compare the surgical outcome of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) using the 2 tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) systems by both the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Staging Manual (seventh edition) and the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS). Moreover, we sought to validate the prognostic value of the new AJCC criterion. Data of 145 consecutive patients who were all surgically treated and histologically diagnosed as p-NETs from January 2002 to June 2013 in our single institution were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates for AJCC classifications of stages I, II, III, and IV were 79.5%, 63.1%, 15.0%, and NA, respectively, (P < 0.005). As for the ENETS system, the OS rates at 5 years for stages I, II, III, and IV were 75.5%, 72.7%, 29.0%, and NA, respectively, (P < 0.005). Both criteria present no statistically notable difference between stage I and stage II (P > 0.05) but between stage I and stages III and IV (P < 0.05), as well as those between stage II and stages III and IV (P < 0.05). Difference between stage III and IV by ENETS was significant (P = 0.031), whereas that by the AJCC was not (P = 0.144). What's more, the AJCC Staging Manual (seventh edition) was statistically significant in both uni- and multivariate analyses by Cox regression (P < 0.005 and P = 0.025, respectively). Our study indicated that the ENETS TNM staging system might be superior to the AJCC Staging Manual (seventh edition) for the clinical practice of p-NETs. Together with tumor grade and radical resection, the new AJCC system was also validated to be an independent predictor for p-NETs. PMID:25816036

  15. Prognostic Impact of the 6th and 7th American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM Staging Systems on Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Motoo; Shitara, Kohei; Kodaira, Takeshi; Hatooka, Shunzo; Mizota, Ayako; Kondoh, Chihiro; Yokota, Tomoya; Takahari, Daisuke; Ura, Takashi; Muro, Kei

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The new 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system is based on pathologic data from esophageal cancers treated by surgery alone. There is no information available on evaluation of the new staging system with regard to prognosis of patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of the new staging system on esophageal cancer patients treated with CRT. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 301 consecutive esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with CRT. Comparisons were made of the prognostic impacts of the 6th and 7th staging systems and the prognostic impacts of stage and prognostic groups, which were newly defined in the 7th edition. Results: There were significant differences between Stages I and III (p < 0.01) according to both editions. However, the 7th edition poorly distinguishes the prognoses of Stages III and IV (p = 0.36 by multivariate analysis) in comparison to the 6th edition (p = 0.08 by multivariate analysis), although these differences were not significant. For all patients, T, M, and gender were independent prognostic factors by multivariate analysis (p < 0.05). For the Stage I and II prognostic groups, survival curves showed a stepwise decrease with increase in stage, except for Stage IIA. However, there were no significant differences seen between each prognostic stage. Conclusions: Our study indicates there are several problems with the 7th TNM staging system regarding prognostic factors in patients undergoing CRT.

  16. Differential expression of Yes-associated protein is correlated with expression of cell cycle markers and pathologic TNM staging in non-small-cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Man; Kang, Dong Wook; Long, Liang Zhe; Huang, Song-Mei; Yeo, Min-Kyung; Yi, Eunhee S; Kim, Kyung-Hee

    2011-03-01

    Yes-associated protein, a downstream effector of the Hippo signaling pathway, has been linked to progression of non-small-cell lung carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate expression of Yes-associated protein in lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Associations of Yes-associated protein expression with clinicopathologic parameters, expression of cell cycle-specific markers, and epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification were also analyzed. In a univariate analysis of the 66 adenocarcinomas, high nuclear expression of Yes-associated protein was significantly correlated with expression of cyclin A and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Multivariate analysis, including age and sex, showed that cyclin A expression was independently correlated with nuclear expression of Yes-associated protein in adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, high nuclear expression of Yes-associated protein was also a significant predictor of epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification for adenocarcinoma. For the 102 squamous cell carcinomas, univariate analysis revealed that high cytoplasmic expression of Yes-associated protein was correlated with the low pathologic TNM staging (stage I) and histologic grading. Multivariate analysis, including age and sex, showed that cytoplasmic expression of Yes-associated protein was an independent predictor of low pathologic TNM staging. These results indicate that nuclear overexpression of Yes-associated protein contributes to pulmonary adenocarcinoma growth and that high cytoplasmic expression of Yes-associated protein is an independent predictor of low pathologic TNM staging and histologic grading. The differential effects of Yes-associated protein expression patterns in adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas suggest that Yes-associated protein may play important roles in different pathways in distinct tumor subtypes. These observations may, therefore, lead to new perspectives on therapeutic targeting of these tumor

  17. Comparison of the 7th and proposed 8th editions of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for non-small cell lung cancer undergoing radical surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ying; Chen, Ming; Yu, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to compare the 7th and the proposed 8th edition of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for NSCLC in a cohort of patients from a single institution. A total of 408 patients with NSCLC who underwent radical surgery were analyzed retrospectively. Survivals were analyzed using the Kaplan –Meier method and were compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed by the Cox proportional hazard model. The Akaike information criterion (AIC) and C-index were applied to compare the two prognostic systems with different numbers of stages. The 7th AJCC T categories, the proposed 8th AJCC T categories, N categories, visceral pleural invasion, and vessel invasion were found to have statistically significant associations with disease-free survival (DFS) on univariate analysis. In the 7th edition staging system as well as in the proposed 8th edition, T categories, N categories, and pleural invasion were independent factors for DFS on multivariate analysis. The AIC value was smaller for the 8th edition compared to the 7th edition staging system. The C-index value was larger for the 8th edition compared to the 7th edition staging system. Based on the data from our single center, the proposed 8th AJCC T classification seems to be superior to the 7th AJCC T classification in terms of DFS for patients with NSCLC underwent radical surgery. PMID:27641932

  18. Comparison of the 7(th) and proposed 8(th) editions of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for non-small cell lung cancer undergoing radical surgery.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ying; Chen, Ming; Yu, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to compare the 7(th) and the proposed 8(th) edition of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for NSCLC in a cohort of patients from a single institution. A total of 408 patients with NSCLC who underwent radical surgery were analyzed retrospectively. Survivals were analyzed using the Kaplan -Meier method and were compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed by the Cox proportional hazard model. The Akaike information criterion (AIC) and C-index were applied to compare the two prognostic systems with different numbers of stages. The 7(th) AJCC T categories, the proposed 8(th) AJCC T categories, N categories, visceral pleural invasion, and vessel invasion were found to have statistically significant associations with disease-free survival (DFS) on univariate analysis. In the 7(th) edition staging system as well as in the proposed 8(th) edition, T categories, N categories, and pleural invasion were independent factors for DFS on multivariate analysis. The AIC value was smaller for the 8(th) edition compared to the 7(th) edition staging system. The C-index value was larger for the 8(th) edition compared to the 7(th) edition staging system. Based on the data from our single center, the proposed 8(th) AJCC T classification seems to be superior to the 7(th) AJCC T classification in terms of DFS for patients with NSCLC underwent radical surgery. PMID:27641932

  19. The IASLC lung cancer staging project: the new database to inform the eighth edition of the TNM classification of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rami-Porta, Ramón; Bolejack, Vanessa; Giroux, Dorothy J; Chansky, Kari; Crowley, John; Asamura, Hisao; Goldstraw, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The analyses of the retrospective database of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), consisting of more than 81,000 evaluable patients diagnosed with lung cancer between 1990 and 2000, formed the basis of recommendations to the Union for International Cancer Control and the American Joint Committee on Cancer for the revision of the sixth edition of the tumor, node, and metastasis (TNM) classification of lung cancer. However, despite the large number of patients, not all descriptors could be validated. This prompted a new collection of retrospective and prospective data to overcome the limitations of the original retrospective database. The new IASLC database has information on 94,708 new patients diagnosed of lung cancer between 1999 and 2010. They originated from 35 sources in 16 countries, and 4,667 were submitted via the online electronic data capture system. Europe contributed 46,560 patients, Asia: 41,705, North America: 4,660, Australia: 1,593, and South America: 190. After exclusions, 77,156 (70,967 with nonsmall cell lung cancer and 6,189 with small cell lung cancer) remained for analysis. This database will be analyzed according to established objectives for the T, the N, and the M components to inform the eighth edition of the TNM classification of lung cancer due to be published in 2016. The IASLC hopes for the continuing contribution of our partners around the world to improve the classification of anatomical extent of disease, but also to create prognostic groups in a parallel project of the IASLC Staging and Prognostic Factors Committee.

  20. hERG1 positivity and Glut-1 negativity identifies high-risk TNM stage I and II colorectal cancer patients, regardless of adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Muratori, Leonardo; Petroni, Giulia; Antonuzzo, Lorenzo; Boni, Luca; Iorio, Jessica; Lastraioli, Elena; Bartoli, Gianluca; Messerini, Luca; Di Costanzo, Francesco; Arcangeli, Annarosa

    2016-01-01

    Background The identification of early-stage colorectal cancer (CRC) with high risk of progression is one major clinical challenge, mainly due to lack of validated biomarkers. The aims of the present study were to analyze the prognostic impact of three molecular markers belonging to the ion channels and transporters family: the ether-à-go-go-related gene 1 (hERG1) and the calcium-activated KCa3.1 potassium channels, as well as the glucose transporter 1 (Glut-1); and to define the impact of adjuvant chemotherapy in conjunction with the abovementioned biomarkers, in a cohort of radically resected stage I–III CRC patients. Patients and methods The expressions of hERG1, KCa3.1, and Glut-1 were tested by immunohistochemistry on 162 surgical samples of nonmetastatic, stage I–III CRC patients. The median follow-up was 32 months. The association between biological markers, clinicopathological features, and survival outcomes was investigated by evaluating both disease-free survival and overall survival. Results Although no prognostic valence emerged for KCa3.1, evidence of a negative impact of hERG1 expression on survival outcomes was provided. On the contrary, Glut-1 expression had a positive impact. According to the results of the multivariate analysis, patients were stratified in four risk groups, based on TNM stage and hERG1/Glut-1 expression. After adjusting for adjuvant therapy, stage I and II, Glut-1-negative, and hERG1-positive patients showed the worst survival experience. Conclusion This study strongly indicates that the combination of hERG1 positivity and Glut-1 negativity behaves as a prognostic biomarker in radically resected CRC patients. This combination identifies a group of stage I and II CRC patients with a bad prognosis, even worse than that of stage III patients, regardless of adjuvant therapy accomplishment.

  1. Comparison of the Masaoka-Koga staging and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/the International Thymic Malignancies Interest Group proposal for the TNM staging systems based on the Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas retrospective database

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Guanghui; Gu, Zhitao; Fu, Jianhua; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Han, Yongtao; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Chen, Keneng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Pang, Liewen; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare the predictive effect of the Masaoka-Koga staging system and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/the International Thymic Malignancies Interest Group (ITMIG) proposal for the new TNM staging on prognosis of thymic malignancies using the Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART) retrospective database. Methods From 1992 to 2012, 2,370 patients in ChART database were retrospectively reviewed. Of these, 1,198 patients with complete information on TNM stage, Masaoka-Koga stage, and survival were used for analysis. Cumulative incidence of recurrence (CIR) was assessed in R0 patients. Overall survival (OS) was evaluated both in an R0 resected cohort, as well as in all patients (any R status). CIR and OS were first analyzed according to the Masaoka-Koga staging system. Then, they were compared using the new TNM staging proposal. Results Based on Masaoka-Koga staging system, significant difference was detected in CIR among all stages. However, no survival difference was revealed between stage I and II, or between stage II and III. Stage IV carried the highest risk of recurrence and worst survival. According to the new TNM staging proposal, CIR in T1a was significantly lower comparing to all other T categories (P<0.05) and there is a significant difference in OS between T1a and T1b (P=0.004). T4 had the worst OS comparing to all other T categories. CIR and OS were significantly worse in N (+) than in N0 patients. Significant difference in CIR and OS was detected between M0 and M1b, but not between M0 and M1a. OS was almost always statistically different when comparison was made between stages I–IIIa and stages IIIb–IVb. However, no statistical difference could be detected among stages IIIb to IVb. Conclusions Compared with Masaoka-Koga staging, the IASLC/ITMIG TNM staging proposal not only describes the extent of tumor invasion but also provides information on lymphatic involvement and tumor dissemination

  2. Efficacy of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Early Stage of Esophageal Carcinoma;

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-30

    Esophageal Neoplasm; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T2; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T3; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Regional Lymph Nodes (N) N0; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Distal Metastasis (M) M0

  3. Relationships among serum CA15-3 tumor marker, TNM staging, and estrogen and progesterone receptor expression in benign and malignant breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Atoum, Manar; Nimer, Nisreen; Abdeldayem, Sawsan; Nasr, Hamzah

    2012-01-01

    Serum tumor marker CA15-3 is widely used in follow-up for assessment of breast cancer prognosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate levels among healthy females and patients, to assess differences with tumor stage and grade, and to determine the relationship with estrogen and progesterone receptor expression. One hundred and thirty six Jordanian females were enrolled in this study: Forty-five were healthy females; seventy-two were diagnosed with breast cancer and nineteen diagnosed with benign breast lesions. Elevated serum CA15-3 level was significantly observed among breast cancer patients (37.95±6.65) compared to both healthy (14.97±0.8) and benign females (12.30±1.55), but no significant association was detected between serum CA15-3 level and age of cancer onset, menarche age, menopause age, parity and BMI. Decreased CA15-3 level was significantly associated with hormone therapy and oral contraceptive consumption among breast cancer patients. Significantly elevated CA15-3 serum levels were found among grade II, III and stage II and III breast cancer females compared to normal healthy females. Elevated CA15-3 serum levels were also found among ER+/PR+ (54.242±7.89) and ER+/PR- (37.08±8.22) compared to healthy control females.

  4. Advanced two-stage incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rehmat, A.; Khinkis, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is developing an advanced incinerator that combines the fluidized-bed agglomeration/incineration and cyclonic combustion/incineration technologies that have been developed separately at IGT over many years. This combination results in a unique and extremely flexible incinerator for solid, sludge, liquid, and gaseous wastes. This system can operate over a wide range of conditions in the first stage, from low temperature (desorption) to high temperature (agglomeration), including gasification of high-Btu wastes. In the combined system, solid, liquid, and gaseous organic wastes would be easily and efficiently destroyed (>99.99% destruction and removal efficiency (DRE)), whereas solid inorganic contaminants would be contained within a glassy matrix, rendering them benign and suitable for disposal in an ordinary landfill. This technology is different from other existing technologies because of its agglomeration and encapsulation capability and its flexibility with respect to the types wastes it can handle. Both the fluidized-bed as well as the cyclonic incineration technologies have been fully developed and tested separately at pilot scales. 12 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Factors related to advanced stage oral squamous cell carcinoma in southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kerdpon, D; Sriplung, H

    2001-04-01

    A critical factor that indicates a poor prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is advanced stage disease. This study, therefore, aimed to identify the factors related to advanced stage (TNM staging III, IV) OSCC in Thailand. There were 161 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and lip (ICD-9 140, 141, 143-5), included in the study. Sixty-two per cent of the patients presented with advanced stage disease. Information on demographic characteristics, risk habits, health-seeking behaviour prior to health care professional (HCP) consultation, tumour characteristics and patient and professional delay was obtained by questionnaire-based interview of the patients. These variables were included as initial variables in a logistic regression to calculate the odds ratio (OR) of advanced versus early stage OSCC. Having traditional herbal medication before HCP consultation significantly increased the risk of advanced stage OSCC (OR 5.77; 95% C.I. 1.25-26.62). Floor of mouth location of tumour was associated with a lower risk of advanced stage disease (OR 0.27; 95% C.I. 0.09-0.82) as was having an ulcer (OR 0.43, 95% C.I. 0.02-0.89). The findings indicate that having traditional herbal medication before HCP consultation increased the risk of advanced stage disease. The lower risk of advanced stage OSCC associated with ulcerative tumours and those on the floor of the mouth may be due to their being more readily detected by the patients. PMID:11287274

  6. Differential oxidative status and immune characterization of the early and advanced stages of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Panis, C; Victorino, V J; Herrera, A C S A; Freitas, L F; De Rossi, T; Campos, F C; Simão, A N Colado; Barbosa, D S; Pinge-Filho, P; Cecchini, R; Cecchini, A L

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer is the malignant neoplasia with the highest incidence in women worldwide. Chronic oxidative stress and inflammation have been indicated as major mediators during carcinogenesis and cancer progression. Human studies have not considered the complexity of tumor biology during the stages of cancer advance, limiting their clinical application. The purpose of this study was to characterize systemic oxidative stress and immune response parameters in early (ED; TNM I and II) and advanced disease (AD; TNM III and IV) of patients diagnosed with infiltrative ductal carcinoma breast cancer. Oxidative stress parameters were evaluated by plasmatic lipoperoxidation, carbonyl content, thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS), nitric oxide levels (NO), total radical antioxidant parameter (TRAP), superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities and GSH levels. Immune evaluation was determined by TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12, and IL-10 levels and leukocytes oxidative burst evaluation by chemiluminescence. Tissue damage analysis included heart (total CK and CKMB), liver (AST, ALT, GGT), and renal (creatinine, urea, and uric acid) plasmatic markers. C-reactive protein (CRP) and iron metabolism were also evaluated. Analysis of the results verified different oxidative stress statuses occur at distinct cancer stages. ED was characterized by reduction in catalase, 8-isoprostanes, and GSH levels, with enhanced lipid peroxidation and TBARS levels. AD exhibited more pronounced oxidative status, with reduction in catalase activity and TRAP, intense lipid peroxidation and high levels of NO, TBARs, and carbonyl content. ED patients presented a Th2 immune pattern, while AD exhibited Th1 status. CRP levels and ferritin were increased in both stages of disease. Leukocytes burst impairment was observed in both the groups. Plasma iron levels were significantly elevated in AD. The data obtained indicated that oxidative stress enhancement and immune response impairment may be necessary to ensure

  7. Lymph node staging in colorectal cancer: Old controversies and recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Resch, Annika; Langner, Cord

    2013-01-01

    Outcome prediction based on tumor stage reflected by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC)/Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) tumor node metastasis (TNM) system is currently regarded as the strongest prognostic parameter for patients with colorectal cancer. For affected patients, the indication for adjuvant therapy is mainly guided by the presence of regional lymph node metastasis. In addition to the extent of surgical lymph node removal and the thoroughness of the pathologist in dissecting the resection specimen, several parameters that are related to the pathological work-up of the dissected nodes may affect the clinical significance of lymph node staging. These include changing definitions of lymph nodes, involved lymph nodes, and tumor deposits in different editions of the AJCC/UICC TNM system as well as the minimum number of nodes to be dissected. Methods to increase the lymph node yield in the fatty tissue include methylene blue injection and acetone compression. Outcome prediction based on the lymph node ratio, defined as the number of positive lymph nodes divided by the total number of retrieved nodes, may be superior to the absolute numbers of involved nodes. Extracapsular invasion has been identified as additional prognostic factor. Adding step sectioning and immunohistochemistry to the pathological work-up may result in higher accuracy of histological diagnosis. The clinical value of more recent technical advances, such as sentinel lymph node biopsy and molecular analysis of lymph nodes tissue still remains to be defined. PMID:24379568

  8. Treatment of advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros P; Johnson, Peter W M

    2016-07-01

    There is now good evidence that the escalated BEACOPP regimen (bleomycin, etoposide, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone) is more effective in controlling advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) than the widely used ABVD regimen (adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine), but the extra efficacy comes at the expense of both short- and long-term toxicity, and there is debate as to whether overall survival is affected. Baseline prognostic factors have proven of limited utility for determining which patients require more intensive therapy and recent studies have sought to use interim fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) evaluation as a means to guide the modulation of treatment, both upwards and downwards in intensity. These suggest that if treatment starts with ABVD then patients remaining PET-positive after 2 months can be salvaged with escalated BEACOPP in around 65% of cases, but those becoming PET-negative may still experience recurrences in 15%-20%, an event that is more common in those with more advanced disease at presentation. There are early data to suggest that starting with escalated BEACOPP may reduce the rate of recurrence after a negative interim PET to less than 10%. This may be an attractive approach for those with very high-risk features at presentation, but risks overtreating many patients if applied nonselectively. New regimens incorporating antibody-drug conjugates may shift the balance of efficacy and toxicity once again, and further studies are underway to evaluate this. PMID:27496308

  9. The ITMIG/IASLC Thymic Epithelial Tumors Staging Project: A Proposed Lymph Node Map for Thymic Epithelial Tumors in the Forthcoming 8th Edition of the TNM Classification of Malignant Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bhora, Faiz Y; Chen, David J; Detterbeck, Frank C; Asamura, Hisao; Falkson, Conrad; Filosso, Pier Luigi; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Huang, James; Kim, Jhingook; Kondo, Kazuya; Lucchi, Marco; Marino, Mirella; Marom, Edith M; Nicholson, Andrew G; Okumura, Meinoshin; Ruffini, Enrico; Van Schil, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Although the presence of nodal disease is prognostic in thymic malignancy, the significance of the extent of nodal disease has yet to be defined. Lymph node dissection has not been routinely performed, and there is currently no node map defined for thymic malignancy. To establish a universal language for reporting as well as characterize the staging of this disease more accurately, an empiric node map is proposed here. This was developed using prior classification systems, series reporting specifics of nodal involvement, anatomical studies of lymphatic drainage, and preexisting node maps of the chest as defined by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer and the neck as defined by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and the American Society for Head and Neck Surgery. The development of this node map was a joint effort by the International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group and the Thymic Domain of the IASLC Staging and Prognostic Factors Committee. It was reviewed and subsequently approved by the members of ITMIG. This map will be used as an adjunct to define node staging as part of a universal stage classification for thymic malignancy. As more data are gathered using definitions set forth by this node map, a revision may be undertaken in the future.

  10. Tumor Volume Combined With Number of Positive Lymph Node Stations Is a More Important Prognostic Factor Than TNM Stage for Survival of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With (Chemo)radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dehing-Oberije, Cary Ruysscher, Dirk de; Weide, Hiska van der; Hochstenbag, Monique; Bootsma, Gerben; Geraedts, Wiel; Pitz, Cordula; Simons, Jean; Teule, Jaap; Rahmy, Ali; Thimister, Paul; Steck, Harald; Lambin, Philippe

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: The current tumor, node, metastasis system needs refinement to improve its ability to predict survival of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with (chemo)radiation. In this study, we investigated the prognostic value of tumor volume and N status, assessed by using fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET). Patients and Methods: Clinical data from 270 consecutive patients with inoperable NSCLC Stages I-IIIB treated radically with (chemo)radiation were collected retrospectively. Diagnostic imaging was performed using either integrated PET-computed tomography or computed tomography and PET separately. The Kaplan-Meier method, as well as Cox regression, was used to analyze data. Results: Univariate survival analysis showed that number of positive lymph node stations (PLNSs), as well as N stage on PET, was associated significantly with survival. The final multivariate Cox model consisted of number of PLNSs, gross tumor volume (i.e., volume of the primary tumor plus lymph nodes), sex, World Health Organization performance status, and equivalent radiation dose corrected for time; N stage was no longer significant. Conclusions: Number of PLNSs, assessed by means of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, was a significant factor for survival of patients with inoperable NSCLC treated with (chemo)radiation. Risk stratification for this group of patients should be based on gross tumor volume, number of PLNSs, sex, World Health Organization performance status, and equivalent radiation dose corrected for time.

  11. The IASLC Lung Cancer Staging Project: Proposals for Coding T Categories for Subsolid Nodules and Assessment of Tumor Size in Part-Solid Tumors in the Forthcoming Eighth Edition of the TNM Classification of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Travis, William D; Asamura, Hisao; Bankier, Alexander A; Beasley, Mary Beth; Detterbeck, Frank; Flieder, Douglas B; Goo, Jin Mo; MacMahon, Heber; Naidich, David; Nicholson, Andrew G; Powell, Charles A; Prokop, Mathias; Rami-Porta, Ramón; Rusch, Valerie; van Schil, Paul; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2016-08-01

    This article proposes codes for the primary tumor categories of adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) and a uniform way to measure tumor size in part-solid tumors for the eighth edition of the tumor, node, and metastasis classification of lung cancer. In 2011, new entities of AIS, MIA, and lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma were defined, and they were later incorporated into the 2015 World Health Organization classification of lung cancer. To fit these entities into the T component of the staging system, the Tis category is proposed for AIS, with Tis (AIS) specified if it is to be distinguished from squamous cell carcinoma in situ (SCIS), which is to be designated Tis (SCIS). We also propose that MIA be classified as T1mi. Furthermore, the use of the invasive size for T descriptor size follows a recommendation made in three editions of the Union for International Cancer Control tumor, node, and metastasis supplement since 2003. For tumor size, the greatest dimension should be reported both clinically and pathologically. In nonmucinous lung adenocarcinomas, the computed tomography (CT) findings of ground glass versus solid opacities tend to correspond respectively to lepidic versus invasive patterns seen pathologically. However, this correlation is not absolute; so when CT features suggest nonmucinous AIS, MIA, and lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma, the suspected diagnosis and clinical staging should be regarded as a preliminary assessment that is subject to revision after pathologic evaluation of resected specimens. The ability to predict invasive versus noninvasive size on the basis of solid versus ground glass components is not applicable to mucinous AIS, MIA, or invasive mucinous adenocarcinomas because they generally show solid nodules or consolidation on CT.

  12. Improving the TNM classification: findings from a 10-year continuous literature review.

    PubMed

    Webber, Colleen; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Sobin, Leslie H; Wittekind, Christian; Greene, Frederick L; Mason, Malcolm D; Compton, Carolyn; Brierley, James; Groome, Patti A

    2014-07-15

    The Union for International Cancer Control's (UICC) TNM classification is a globally accepted system to describe the anatomic extent of malignant tumors. Since its development seventy years ago, the TNM classification has undergone significant revisions to reflect the current understanding of extent of disease and its role in prognosis. To ensure that revisions are evidence-based, the UICC implemented a process for continuous improvement of the TNM classification that included a formalized system for submitting proposals for revisions directly to the UICC and an annual review of the scientific literature on staging that assessed, criticized or made suggestions for changes. The process involves review of the proposals and literature by a group of international, multidisciplinary Expert Panels. The process has been in place for 10 years and informed the development of the 7th edition of the TNM classification published in 2009. The purpose of this article is to provide a description of the annual literature review process, including the search strategy, article selection process and the roles and requirements of the Expert Panels in the review of the literature. Since 2002, 147 Expert Panel members in 11 cancer sites have reviewed over 770 articles. The results of the annual literature reviews, Expert Panel feedback and documentation and dissemination of results are described.

  13. Advances take stage - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Regulatory advances in proteomics will be taking center stage at a Symposia scheduled to occur at the 2011 American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Meeting. The symposium entitled "Enabling Translational Proteomics with NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer" is scheduled for July 25, 2011 at AACC's annual Meeting.

  14. Advanced statistical methods for the definition of new staging models.

    PubMed

    Kates, Ronald; Schmitt, Manfred; Harbeck, Nadia

    2003-01-01

    Adequate staging procedures are the prerequisite for individualized therapy concepts in cancer, particularly in the adjuvant setting. Molecular staging markers tend to characterize specific, fundamental disease processes to a greater extent than conventional staging markers. At the biological level, the course of the disease will almost certainly involve interactions between multiple underlying processes. Since new therapeutic strategies tend to target specific processes as well, their impact will also involve interactions. Hence, assessment of the prognostic impact of new markers and their utilization for prediction of response to therapy will require increasingly sophisticated statistical tools that are capable of detecting and modeling complicated interactions. Because they are designed to model arbitrary interactions, neural networks offer a promising approach to improved staging. However, the typical clinical data environment poses severe challenges to high-performance survival modeling using neural nets, particularly the key problem of maintaining good generalization. Nonetheless, it turns out that by using newly developed methods to minimize unnecessary complexity in the neural network representation of disease course, it is possible to obtain models with high predictive performance. This performance has been validated on both simulated and real patient data sets. There are important applications for design of studies involving targeted therapy concepts and for identification of the improvement in decision support resulting from new staging markers. In this article, advantages of advanced statistical methods such as neural networks for definition of new staging models will be illustrated using breast cancer as an example.

  15. Advanced technologies for rocket single-stage-to-orbit vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhite, Alan W.; Bush, Lance B.; Cruz, Christopher I.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Morris, W. Douglas; Stanley, Douglas O.; Wurster, Kathryn E.

    1991-01-01

    A single-stage-to-orbit vertical takeoff/horizontal landing rocket vehicle was studied to determine the benefits of advanced technology. Advanced technologies that were included in the study were variable mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen rocket engines and materials, structures, and subsystem technologies currently being developed in the National Aero-Space Plane Program. The application of advanced technology results in an 85 percent reduction in vehicle dry weight. With advanced materials, an external thermal protection system, like the Space Shuttle tiles, was not required. Compared to an all-airbreathing horizontal takeoff/horizontal landing vehicle using the same advanced technologies and mission requirements, the rocket vehicle is lighter in dry weight and has fewer subsystems. To increase reliability and safety, operational features were included in the rocket vehicle-robust subsystems, 5 percent additional margin, no slush hydrogen, fail-operational with an engine out, and a crew escape module. The resulting vehicle grew in dry weight and was still lower in dry weight than the airbreathing vehicle.

  16. Evaluation of the 5th edition of the TNM classification for gastric cancer: improved prognostic value

    PubMed Central

    Kranenbarg, E Klein; Hermans, J; van Krieken, J H J M; van de Velde, C J H

    2001-01-01

    The main change in the 5th edition (1997) of the TNM classification for gastric cancer compared to the 4th edition (1987) is the use of the number of involved nodes instead of the location of positive nodes. As a result stage grouping is also altered. A second change is the requirement for the examination of at least 15 nodes to justify the N0 status. Patients with fewer examined negative nodes are unclassifiable (Nx). Data were retrieved from a randomized trial database comparing D1 and D2 dissection and 633 curatively operated patients were included. According to the criteria of the 5th edition, 39% of the node-positive patients had another N stage compared to the 4th: 21% had a lower and 18% had a higher stage. 5-year survival rates according to the 4th edition N0, N1 and N2 groups were respectively 72%, 34% and 27%. According to the 5th edition these percentages were for the N0, N1, N2, N3 and Nx groups respectively 75%, 38%, 19%, 8% and 65%. The former 1987 N1 and N2 group were significantly split into three new N 1997 groups (P = 0.006, respectively P< 0.0005). The Cox's regression analysis showed the N 1997 classification to be the most important prognostic variable, with a higher prognostic value than N 1987. In addition, the new TNM stage was also a better prognosticator. The requirement for examining at least 15 nodes, however, could not be fulfilled in 38% of all node-negative patients and we found that a minimum of 5 consecutive negative lymph nodes is a reliable number for staging purposes. We conclude that the 5th edition of the TNM classification provides a better estimation of prognosis, however, examination of at least 15 negative regional lymph nodes is too high a threshold and 5 gives similar prognostic value. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11139315

  17. Advanced Low-Noise Research Fan Stage Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubert, Robert; Bock, Larry; Malmborg, Eric; Owen-Peer, William

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the design of the Advanced Low-Noise Research Fan stage. The fan is a variable pitch design, which is designed at the cruise pitch condition. Relative to the cruise setting, the blade is closed at takeoff and opened for reverse thrust operation. The fan stage is a split flow design with fan exit guide vanes (FEGVs) and core stators. The fan stage design is combined with a nacelle and engine core duct to form a powered fan/nacelle subscale model. This model is intended for use in combined aerodynamic, acoustic, and structural testing in a wind tunnel. The fan has an outer diameter of 22 in. and a hub-to-tip of 0.426 in., which allows the use of existing NASA fan and cowl force balance and rig drive systems. The design parameters were selected to permit valid acoustic and aerodynamic comparisons with the Pratt & Whitney (P&W) 17- and 22-in. rigs previously tested under NASA contract. The fan stage design is described in detail. The results of the design axisymmetric and Navier-Stokes aerodynamic analysis are presented at the critical design conditions. The structural analysis of the fan rotor and attachment is included. The blade and attachment are predicted to have adequate low-cycle fatigue life and an acceptable operating range without resonant stress or flutter. The stage was acoustically designed with airfoil counts in the FEGV and core stator to minimize noise. A fan/FEGV tone analysis developed separately under NASA contract was used to determine the optimum airfoil counts. The fan stage was matched to the existing nacelle, designed under the previous P&W low-noise contract, to form a fan/nacelle model for wind tunnel testing. It is an axisymmetric nacelle for convenience in testing and analysis. Previous testing confirmed that the nacelle performed as required at various aircraft operating conditions.

  18. Neuropsychological resiliency after treatment for advanced stage neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Carpentieri, S C; Diller, L R

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the neuropsychological functioning of survivors of advanced stage neuroblastoma. In all, 16 survivors, diagnosed at a median of 2.8 years, who had received intensive chemotherapy and surgical treatments, were identified; 11 had received myeloablative consolidation therapy, eight with total body irradiation (TBI). All patients were evaluated with a neuropsychological assessment battery at a median age of 8.8 years. Analyses included comparison of the performances of the TBI group vs the no-TBI group; determination of whether the proportion of individuals with impaired or superior performance on each measure exceeded normative expectations; and performance indexes reflecting patterns of performance. Results indicate no significant deleterious impact of TBI and/or presence or absence of myeloablative therapy on neurocognitive and neurobehavioral functioning. For this cohort, resilience to neuropsychological vulnerability was observed, which included the emergence of a profile of full-scale IQ, verbal IQ, and mathematical achievement well above average expectations. We concluded that the results document a lack of neuropsychological morbidity among this cohort of survivors of advanced stage neuroblastoma, regardless of the inclusion of TBI. Moreover, a striking pattern of excellent neurocognitive functioning with intact neurobehavioral functioning was observed.

  19. Can advanced-stage ovarian cancer be cured?

    PubMed

    Narod, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Approximately 20% of women with advanced-stage ovarian cancer survive beyond 12 years after treatment and are effectively cured. Initial therapy for ovarian cancer comprises surgery and chemotherapy, and is given with the goal of eradicating as many cancer cells as possible. Indeed, the three phases of therapy are as follows: debulking surgery to remove as much of the cancer as possible, preferably to a state of no visible residual disease; chemotherapy to eradicate any microscopic disease that remains present after surgery; and second-line or maintenance therapy, which is given to delay disease progression among patients with tumour recurrence. If no cancer cells remain after initial therapy is completed, a cure is expected. By contrast, if residual cancer cells are present after initial treatment, then disease recurrence is likely. Thus, the probability of cure is contingent on the combination of surgery and chemotherapy effectively eliminating all cancer cells. In this Perspectives article, I present the case that the probability of achieving a cancer-free state is maximized through a combination of maximal debulking surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. I discuss the evidence indicating that by taking this approach, cures could be achieved in up to 50% of women with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. PMID:26787282

  20. Cyberknife treatment for advanced or terminal stage hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hideo; Taniguch, Hiroyoshi; Nomura, Ryutaro; Sato, Kengo; Suzuki, Ichiro; Nakata, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety and efficacy of the Cyberknife treatment for patients with advanced or terminal stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Patients with HCC with extrahepatic metastasis or vascular or bile duct invasion were enrolled between May 2011 and June 2015. The Cyberknife was used to treat each lesion. Treatment response scores were based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1. The trends of tumor markers, including alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and proteins induced by vitamin K absence II (PIVKA II) were assessed. Prognostic factors for tumor response and tumor markers were evaluated with Fisher’s exact test and a logistic regression model. Survival was evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: Sixty-five patients with 95 lesions were enrolled. Based on the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer classification, all patients were either in the advanced or terminal stage of the disease. The target lesions were as follows: 52 were bone metastasis; 9, lung metastasis; 7, brain metastasis; 9, portal vein invasion; 4, hepatic vein invasion; 4, bile duct invasion; and 10 other lesion types. The response rate and disease control rate were 34% and 53%, respectively. None of the clinical factors correlated significantly with tumor response. Fiducial marker implantation was associated with better control of both AFP (HR = 0.152; 95%CI: 0.026-0.887; P = 0.036) and PIVKA II (HR = 0.035; 95%CI: 0.003-0.342; P = 0.004). The median survival time was 9 mo (95%CI: 5-15 mo). Terminal stage disease (HR = 9.809; 95%CI: 2.589-37.17, P < 0.001) and an AFP of more than 400 ng/mL (HR = 2.548; 95%CI: 1.070-6.068, P = 0.035) were associated with worse survival. A radiation dose higher than 30 Gy (HR = 0.274; 95%CI: 0.093-0.7541, P = 0.012) was associated with better survival. In the 52 cases of bone metastasis, 36 patients (69%) achieved pain relief. One patient had cerebral

  1. Esophageal cancer: anatomic particularities, staging, and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Encinas de la Iglesia, J; Corral de la Calle, M A; Fernández Pérez, G C; Ruano Pérez, R; Álvarez Delgado, A

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the esophagus is a tumor with aggressive behavior that is usually diagnosed in advanced stages. The absence of serosa allows it to spread quickly to neighboring mediastinal structures, and an extensive lymphatic drainage network facilitates tumor spread even in early stages. The current TNM classification, harmonized with the classification for gastric cancer, provides new definitions for the anatomic classification, adds non-anatomic characteristics of the tumor, and includes tumors of the gastroesophageal junction. Combining endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging provides greater accuracy in determining the initial clinical stage, and these imaging techniques play an essential role in the selection, planning, and evaluation of treatment. In this article, we review some particularities that explain the behavior of this tumor and we describe the current TNM staging system; furthermore, we discuss the different imaging tests available for its evaluation and include a diagnostic algorithm.

  2. Esophageal cancer: anatomic particularities, staging, and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Encinas de la Iglesia, J; Corral de la Calle, M A; Fernández Pérez, G C; Ruano Pérez, R; Álvarez Delgado, A

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the esophagus is a tumor with aggressive behavior that is usually diagnosed in advanced stages. The absence of serosa allows it to spread quickly to neighboring mediastinal structures, and an extensive lymphatic drainage network facilitates tumor spread even in early stages. The current TNM classification, harmonized with the classification for gastric cancer, provides new definitions for the anatomic classification, adds non-anatomic characteristics of the tumor, and includes tumors of the gastroesophageal junction. Combining endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging provides greater accuracy in determining the initial clinical stage, and these imaging techniques play an essential role in the selection, planning, and evaluation of treatment. In this article, we review some particularities that explain the behavior of this tumor and we describe the current TNM staging system; furthermore, we discuss the different imaging tests available for its evaluation and include a diagnostic algorithm. PMID:27469407

  3. Advances in Medical Management of Early Stage and Advanced Breast Cancer: 2015.

    PubMed

    Witherby, Sabrina; Rizack, Tina; Sakr, Bachir J; Legare, Robert D; Sikov, William M

    2016-01-01

    Standard management of early stage and advanced breast cancer has been improved over the past few years by knowledge gained about the biology of the disease, results from a number of eagerly anticipated clinical trials and the development of novel agents that offer our patients options for improved outcomes or reduced toxicity or both. This review highlights recent major developments affecting the systemic therapy of breast cancer, broken down by clinically relevant patient subgroups and disease stage, and briefly discusses some of the ongoing controversies in the treatment of breast cancer and promising therapies on the horizon.

  4. Time-to-Progression of NSCLC from Early to Advanced Stages: An Analysis of data from SEER Registry and a Single Institute

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ping; Cao, Jin Lin; Rustam, Azmat; Zhang, Chong; Yuan, Xiao Shuai; Bao, Fei Chao; Lv, Wang; Hu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The average time required for cancers to progress through stages can be reflected in the average age of the patients diagnosed at each stage of disease. To estimate the time it takes for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to progress through different tumor, node and metastasis (TNM) stages and sizes, we compared the mean adjusted age of 45904 NSCLC patients with different stages and tumor sizes from Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry database and our institute. Multiple-linear-regression models for age were generated adjusting for various factors. Caucasian, African-American and Asian patients with stage IA cancers were on average 0.8, 1.0 and 1.38 adjusted years younger, respectively, than those with stage IIIB cancers (p < 0.001). And these with T1a cancers were on average 0.84, 0.92 and 1.21 adjusted years younger, respectively, than patients with T3 cancers (p < 0.001). Patients with tumors measuring larger than 8 cm in diameter were on average 0.85 adjusted years older than these with tumors smaller than 1 cm (p < 0.001), with Caucasian demonstrating the shortest age span (0.79 years, P < 0.001). In conclusion, the time-to-progression of NSCLC from early to advanced stages varied among ethnicities, Caucasian patients demonstrating a more rapid progression nature of tumor than their African-American and Asian counterparts. PMID:27346236

  5. Advanced bronchoscopic techniques in diagnosis and staging of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zaric, Bojan; Stojsic, Vladimir; Sarcev, Tatjana; Stojanovic, Goran; Carapic, Vladimir; Perin, Branislav; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Kesisis, Georgios; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Stylianaki, Aikaterini; Foroulis, Christophoros N; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-09-01

    The role of advanced brochoscopic diagnostic techniques in detection and staging of lung cancer has steeply increased in recent years. Bronchoscopic imaging techniques became widely available and easy to use. Technical improvement led to merging in technologies making autofluorescence or narrow band imaging incorporated into one bronchoscope. New tools, such as autofluorescence imagining (AFI), narrow band imaging (NBI) or fuji intelligent chromo endoscopy (FICE), found their place in respiratory endoscopy suites. Development of endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) improved minimally invasive mediastinal staging and diagnosis of peripheral lung lesions. Linear EBUS proven to be complementary to mediastinoscopy. This technique is now available in almost all high volume centers performing bronchoscopy. Radial EBUS with mini-probes and guiding sheaths provides accurate diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary lesions. Combining EBUS guided procedures with rapid on site cytology (ROSE) increases diagnostic yield even more. Electromagnetic navigation technology (EMN) is also widely used for diagnosis of peripheral lesions. Future development will certainly lead to new improvements in technology and creation of new sophisticated tools for research in respiratory endoscopy. Broncho-microscopy, alveoloscopy, optical coherence tomography are some of the new research techniques emerging for rapid technological development.

  6. Racial disparities in advanced stage colorectal cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Kristin; Hill, Elizabeth G.; Lewin, David N.; Williamson, Grace; Oppenheimer, Stephanie; Ford, Marvella E.; Wargovich, Michael J.; Berger, Franklin G.; Bolick, Susan W.; Thomas, Melanie B.; Alberg, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose African Americans (AA) have a higher incidence and lower survival from colorectal cancer (CRC) compared to European Americans (EA). In the present study, statewide, population-based data from South Carolina Central Cancer Registry (SCCCR) is used to investigate the relationship between race and age on advanced stage CRC survival. Methods The study population was comprised of 3865 advanced pathologically documented colon and rectal adenocarcinoma cases diagnosed between 01 January 1996 and 31 December 2006: 2673 (69%) EA and 1192 (31%) AA. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to generate median survival time and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) by race, age, and gender. Factors associated with survival were evaluated by fitting Cox proportional hazards (CPH) regression models to generate Hazard Ratios (HR) and 95% CI. Results We observed a significant interaction between race and age on CRC survival (p = 0.04). Among younger patients (< 50 years), AA race was associated with a 1.34 (95% CI 1.06-1.71) higher risk of death compared to EA. Among older patients, we observed a modest increase risk of death among AA men compared to EA (HR 1.16 (95% CI 1.01-1.32) but no difference by race among women (HR 0.94 (95% CI 0.82-1.08)). Moreover, we observed that the disparity in survival has worsened over the past 15 years. Conclusions Future studies that integrate clinical, molecular, and treatment-related data are needed for advancing understanding of the racial disparity in CRC survival, especially for those < 50 years old. PMID:23296454

  7. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research. PMID:26925962

  8. The changing hope trajectory in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Judith Brown; Seda, Julie S; Kardinal, Carl G

    2012-06-01

    As patients with advanced-stage cancer move from the initial diagnosis through treatment, remission, recurrence, and advanced-stage disease, the hope trajectory undergoes a dynamic transformation. By identifying the hope trajectory, nurses can help patients focus on obtainable hope objects while balancing the need to present a realistic prognosis. This, in turn, may help patients find meaning and purpose in advanced-stage cancer and facilitate realistic hope when faced with a life-threatening illness.

  9. Lung Cancer Staging and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Gavitt A; Jones, Kirk D; Jablons, David M

    2016-01-01

    The seventh edition of the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) TNM staging system was developed by the International Association for the Staging of Lung Cancer (IASLC) Lung Cancer Staging Project by a coordinated international effort to develop data-derived TNM classifications with significant survival differences. Based on these TNM groupings, current 5-year survival estimates in NSLCC range from 73 % in stage IA disease to 13 % in stage IV disease. TNM stage remains the most important prognostic factor in predicting recurrence rates and survival times, followed by tumor histologic grade, and patient sex, age, and performance status. Molecular prognostication in lung cancer is an exploding area of research where interest has moved beyond TNM stage and into individualized genetic tumor analysis with immunohistochemistry, microarray, and mutation profiles. However, despite intense research efforts and countless publications, no molecular prognostic marker has been adopted into clinical use since most fail in subsequent cross-validation with few exceptions. The recent interest in immunotherapy for NSCLC has identified new biomarkers with early evidence that suggests that PD-L1 is a predictive marker of a good response to new immunotherapy drugs but a poor prognostic indicator of overall survival. Future prognostication of outcomes in NSCLC will likely be based on a combination of TNM stage and molecular tumor profiling and yield more precise, individualized survival estimates and treatment algorithms. PMID:27535389

  10. Advanced two-stage incineration: Research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Rehmat, A.; Khinkis, M.

    1991-01-01

    IGT is currently developing a two-stage fluidized-bed/cyclonic agglomerating incineration system that is based on combining the fluidized-bed agglomeration/incineration and cyclonic combustion technologies, both of which have been developed individually at IGT over many years. This combination has resulted in a unique and extremely flexible incinerator for solid, liquid, and gaseous wastes. The system can operate over a wide range of conditions in the first stage, from low temperature (desorption) to high temperature (agglomeration), including gasification of high-Btu wastes. In the combined system, solid, liquid, and gaseous organic wastes are expected to be easily and efficiently destroyed (>99.99% destruction and removal efficiency (DRE)) while solid inorganic contaminants are expected to be contained within a glassy matrix, rendering them benign and suitable for disposal in an ordinary landfill. The development of the two-stage incinerator is a culmination of extensive research and development efforts on each stage of the incinerator. A variety of data obtained for both stages includes agglomeration of ash, incineration and reclamation of used blast grit and foundry sand, partial combustion of carbonaceous fuels, in-situ desulfurization, combustion of low-Btu gases, incineration of industrial wastewater, and incineration of carbon tetrachloride.

  11. Evaluation of the 7th edition of the TNM classification in patients with resected esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Wu, Nan; Zheng, Qing-Feng; Yan, Shi; Lv, Chao; Li, Shao-Lei; Yang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prognostic factors and tumor stages of the 7th edition TNM classification for esophageal cancer. METHODS: In total, 1033 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) who underwent surgical resection with or without (neo)adjuvant therapy between January 2003 and June 2012 at the Thoracic Surgery Department II of the Beijing Cancer Hospital, Beijing, China were included in this study. The following eligibility criteria were applied: (1) squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction identified by histopathological examination; (2) treatment with esophagectomy plus lymphadenectomy with curative intent; and (3) complete pathologic reports and follow-up data. Patients who underwent non-curative (R1) resection and patients who died in hospital were excluded. Patients who received (neo)adjuvant therapy were also included in this analysis. All patients were restaged using the 7th edition of the Union for International Cancer Control and the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging systems. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the prognostic factors for survival. Survival curves were plotted using the Kaplan-Meier method, and the log-rank test was used to evaluate differences between the subgroups. RESULTS: Of the 1033 patients, 273 patients received (neo)adjuvant therapy, and 760 patients were treated with surgery alone. The median follow-up time was 51.6 mo (range: 5-112 mo) and the overall 5-year survival rate was 36.4%. Gender, “pT” and “pN” descriptors, (neo)adjuvant therapy, and the 7th edition TNM stage grouping were independent prognostic factors in the univariate and multivariate analyses. However, neither histologic grade nor cancer location were independent prognostic factors in the univariate and multivariate analyses. The 5-year stage-based survival rates were as follows: IA, 84.9%; IB, 70.9%; IIA, 56.2%; IIB, 43.3%; IIIA, 37.9%; IIIB, 23.3%; IIIC,12.9% and IV, 3

  12. Exprimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency for large gas turbine engines. Under ERA, the highly loaded core compressor technology program attempts to realize the fuel burn reduction goal by increasing overall pressure ratio of the compressor to increase thermal efficiency of the engine. Study engines with overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70 are now being investigated. This means that the high pressure compressor would have to almost double in pressure ratio while keeping a high level of efficiency. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by testing the first two stages of an advanced GE compressor designed to meet the requirements of a very high pressure ratio core compressor. Previous test experience of a compressor which included these front two stages indicated a performance deficit relative to design intent. Therefore, the current rig was designed to run in 1-stage and 2-stage configurations in two separate tests to assess whether the bow shock of the second rotor interacting with the upstream stage contributed to the unpredicted performance deficit, or if the culprit was due to interaction of rotor 1 and stator 1. Thus, the goal was to fully understand the stage 1 performance under isolated and multi-stage conditions, and additionally to provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to understand fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to rotor shock interaction and endwall losses. This paper will present the description of the compressor test article and its measured performance and operability, for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the paper on measurements at 97% corrected speed with design intent vane setting angles.

  13. The Critical Technologies and Applications on Advanced Upper Stage Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Feng; Wang, Guo-hui

    2016-07-01

    Upper Stage Vehicle(USV) is a kind of independent one-stop-into-space launching vehicles. In this article, different new-conception USVs are mentioned and out of them, on basis of the possibility in future application, laser propelling USV and nuclear-thermal propelling USV are selected and discussed in technical details, especially in critical technologies and recent relative technical improvements about new propelling methods within these two kinds. Furthermore, laser propelled USV and nuclear-thermal propelled USV both seem to have important roles to play in future space exploring projects. And several possible applications of the two kinds of USVs emphasized above are carried out at the end of this piece of article.

  14. Experimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency of large gas turbine engines. Under ERA the task for a High Pressure Ratio Core Technology program calls for a higher overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70. This mean that the HPC would have to almost double in pressure ratio and keep its high level of efficiency. The challenge is how to match the corrected mass flow rate of the front two supersonic high reaction and high corrected tip speed stages with a total pressure ratio of 3.5. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by using the initial geometry of an advanced GE compressor design to meet the requirements of the first 2 stages of the very high pressure ratio core compressor. The rig was configured to run as a 2 stage machine, with Strut and IGV, Rotor 1 and Stator 1 run as independent tests which were then followed by adding the second stage. The goal is to fully understand the stage performances under isolated and multi-stage conditions and fully understand any differences and provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to isolate fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to interaction and endwalls. The paper will present the description of the compressor test article, its predicted performance and operability, and the experimental results for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the detailed measurements on 97 and 100 of design speed at 3 vane setting angles.

  15. Bronchial involvement in advanced stage lymphangioleiomyomatosis: histopathologic and molecular analyses.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takuo; Kumasaka, Toshio; Mitani, Keiko; Okada, Yoshinori; Kondo, Takashi; Date, Hiroshi; Chen, Fengshi; Oto, Takahiro; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Akinori; Hara, Kieko; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Ando, Katsutoshi; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Gunji-Niitsu, Yoko; Kunogi, Makiko; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yao, Takashi; Seyama, Kuniaki

    2016-04-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), a rare progressive disease that almost exclusively affects women, is characterized by pulmonary cysts and neoplastic proliferation of smooth muscle-like cells (LAM cells). Airflow obstruction is a physiologic consequence that is commonly observed in LAM and has been attributed to narrowing of peripheral airways. However, histopathologic examinations of the entire airway have been precluded by the limited availability of such specimens. Here, we used explanted lung tissues from 30 LAM patients for a thorough histologic analysis with a special emphasis on the bronchi. We found bronchial involvement by LAM cells and lymphatics in all patients examined. Furthermore, a moderate to severe degree of chronic inflammation (73%), goblet cell hyperplasia (97%), squamous cell metaplasia (83%) of the epithelium, and thickening of basal lamina (93%) were identified in the bronchi. Because LAM cells are transformed by the functional loss of the TSC genes leading to a hyperactivated mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway, we confirmed the expression of phospho-p70S6K, phospho-S6, phospho-4E-BP1, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-D in LAM cells from all of the patients examined. In contrast, no protein expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, a downstream molecule indicative of mTORC1 activation and leading to VEGF production, was detected in any patient. Our study indicates that late-stage LAM patients commonly have bronchi involved by the proliferation of both LAM cells and lymphatics and that chronic inflammation complicated their disease. Furthermore, the up-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, a common event in mTORC1-driven tumor cells, does not occur in LAM cells and plays no role in VEGF-D expression in LAM cells. PMID:26997436

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/MRI for Lung Cancer Staging.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-07-01

    Tumor, lymph node, and metastasis (TNM) classification of lung cancer is typically performed with the TNM staging system, as recommended by the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC), the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). Radiologic examinations for TNM staging of lung cancer patients include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography with 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG-PET), and FDG-PET combined with CT (FDG-PET/CT) and are used for pretherapeutic assessments. Recent technical advances in MR systems, application of fast and parallel imaging and/or introduction of new MR techniques, and utilization of contrast media have markedly improved the diagnostic utility of MRI in this setting. In addition, FDG-PET can be combined or fused with MRI (PET/MRI) for clinical practice. This review article will focus on these recent advances in MRI as well as on PET/MRI for lung cancer staging, in addition to a discussion of their potential and limitations for routine clinical practice in comparison with other modalities such as CT, FDG-PET, and PET/CT.

  17. BRAF Mutation Is Rare in Advanced-Stage Low-Grade Ovarian Serous Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Tsang, Yvonne T.M.; Deavers, Michael T.; Mok, Samuel C.; Zu, Zhifei; Sun, Charlotte; Malpica, Anais; Wolf, Judith K.; Lu, Karen H.; Gershenson, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Low-grade ovarian serous carcinomas are believed to arise via an adenoma-serous borderline tumor-serous carcinoma sequence. In this study, we found that advanced-stage, low-grade ovarian serous carcinomas both with and without adjacent serous borderline tumor shared similar regions of loss of heterozygosity. We then analyzed 91 ovarian tumor samples for mutations in TP53, BRAF, and KRAS. TP53 mutations were not detected in any serous borderline tumors (n = 30) or low-grade serous carcinomas (n = 43) but were found in 73% of high-grade serous carcinomas (n = 18). BRAF (n = 9) or KRAS (n = 5) mutation was detected in 47% of serous borderline tumors, but among the low-grade serous carcinomas (39 stage III, 2 stage II, and 2 stage I), only one (2%) had a BRAF mutation and eight (19%) had a KRAS mutation. The low frequency of BRAF mutations in advanced-stage, low-grade serous carcinomas, which contrasts with previous findings, suggests that aggressive, low-grade serous carcinomas are more likely derived from serous borderline tumors without BRAF mutation. In addition, advanced-stage, low-grade carcinoma patients with BRAF or KRAS mutation have a better apparent clinical outcome. However, further investigation is needed. PMID:20802181

  18. Systematic genomic identification of colorectal cancer genes delineating advanced from early clinical stage and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. The initial assessment of colorectal cancer involves clinical staging that takes into account the extent of primary tumor invasion, determining the number of lymph nodes with metastatic cancer and the identification of metastatic sites in other organs. Advanced clinical stage indicates metastatic cancer, either in regional lymph nodes or in distant organs. While the genomic and genetic basis of colorectal cancer has been elucidated to some degree, less is known about the identity of specific cancer genes that are associated with advanced clinical stage and metastasis. Methods We compiled multiple genomic data types (mutations, copy number alterations, gene expression and methylation status) as well as clinical meta-data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We used an elastic-net regularized regression method on the combined genomic data to identify genetic aberrations and their associated cancer genes that are indicators of clinical stage. We ranked candidate genes by their regression coefficient and level of support from multiple assay modalities. Results A fit of the elastic-net regularized regression to 197 samples and integrated analysis of four genomic platforms identified the set of top gene predictors of advanced clinical stage, including: WRN, SYK, DDX5 and ADRA2C. These genetic features were identified robustly in bootstrap resampling analysis. Conclusions We conducted an analysis integrating multiple genomic features including mutations, copy number alterations, gene expression and methylation. This integrated approach in which one considers all of these genomic features performs better than any individual genomic assay. We identified multiple genes that robustly delineate advanced clinical stage, suggesting their possible role in colorectal cancer metastatic progression. PMID:24308539

  19. Dietary flavonoid intake, black tea consumption, and risk of overall and advanced stage prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Geybels, Milan S; Verhage, Bas A J; Arts, Ilja C W; van Schooten, Frederik J; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; van den Brandt, Piet A

    2013-06-15

    Flavonoids are natural antioxidants found in various foods, and a major source is black tea. Some experimental evidence indicates that flavonoids could prevent prostate cancer. We investigated the associations between flavonoid intake, black tea consumption, and prostate cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort study, which includes 58,279 men who provided detailed baseline information on several cancer risk factors. From 1986 to 2003, 3,362 prostate cancers were identified, including 1,164 advanced (stage III/IV) cancers. Cox proportional hazards regression using the case-cohort approach was used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Intake of total catechin, epicatechin, kaempferol, and myricetin and consumption of black tea were associated with a decreased risk of stage III/IV or stage IV prostate cancer. Hazard ratios of stage III/IV and stage IV prostate cancer for the highest versus the lowest category of black tea consumption (≥5 versus ≤1 cups/day) were 0.75 (95% confidence interval: 0.59, 0.97) and 0.67 (95% confidence interval: 0.50, 0.91), respectively. No associations were observed for overall and nonadvanced prostate cancer. In conclusion, dietary flavonoid intake and black tea consumption were associated with a decreased risk of advanced stage prostate cancer.

  20. Advanced (stage D) heart failure: a statement from the Heart Failure Society of America Guidelines Committee.

    PubMed

    Fang, James C; Ewald, Gregory A; Allen, Larry A; Butler, Javed; Westlake Canary, Cheryl A; Colvin-Adams, Monica; Dickinson, Michael G; Levy, Phillip; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Sweitzer, Nancy K; Teerlink, John R; Whellan, David J; Albert, Nancy M; Krishnamani, Rajan; Rich, Michael W; Walsh, Mary N; Bonnell, Mark R; Carson, Peter E; Chan, Michael C; Dries, Daniel L; Hernandez, Adrian F; Hershberger, Ray E; Katz, Stuart D; Moore, Stephanie; Rodgers, Jo E; Rogers, Joseph G; Vest, Amanda R; Givertz, Michael M

    2015-06-01

    We propose that stage D advanced heart failure be defined as the presence of progressive and/or persistent severe signs and symptoms of heart failure despite optimized medical, surgical, and device therapy. Importantly, the progressive decline should be primarily driven by the heart failure syndrome. Formally defining advanced heart failure and specifying when medical and device therapies have failed is challenging, but signs and symptoms, hemodynamics, exercise testing, biomarkers, and risk prediction models are useful in this process. Identification of patients in stage D is a clinically important task because treatments are inherently limited, morbidity is typically progressive, and survival is often short. Age, frailty, and psychosocial issues affect both outcomes and selection of therapy for stage D patients. Heart transplant and mechanical circulatory support devices are potential treatment options in select patients. In addition to considering indications, contraindications, clinical status, and comorbidities, treatment selection for stage D patients involves incorporating the patient's wishes for survival versus quality of life, and palliative and hospice care should be integrated into care plans. More research is needed to determine optimal strategies for patient selection and medical decision making, with the ultimate goal of improving clinical and patient centered outcomes in patients with stage D heart failure.

  1. Reusable launch vehicles, enabling technology for the development of advanced upper stages and payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, John D.

    1998-01-01

    In the near future there will be classes of upper stages and payloads that will require initial operation at a high-earth orbit to reduce the probability of an inadvertent reentry that could result in a detrimental impact on humans and the biosphere. A nuclear propulsion system, such as was being developed under the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program, is an example of such a potential payload. This paper uses the results of a reusable launch vehicle (RLV) study to demonstrate the potential importance of a Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) to test and implement an advanced upper stage (AUS) or payload in a safe orbit and in a cost effective and reliable manner. The RLV is a horizontal takeoff and horizontal landing (HTHL), two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) vehicle. The results of the study shows that an HTHL is cost effective because it implements airplane-like operation, infrastructure, and flight operations. The first stage of the TSTO is powered by Rocket-Based-Combined-Cycle (RBCC) engines, the second stage is powered by a LOX/LH rocket engine. The TSTO is used since it most effectively utilizes the capability of the RBCC engine. The analysis uses the NASA code POST (Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories) to determine trajectories and weight in high-earth orbit for AUS/advanced payloads. Cost and reliability of an RLV versus current generation expandable launch vehicles are presented.

  2. Reusable launch vehicles, enabling technology for the development of advanced upper stages and payloads

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, John D.

    1998-01-15

    In the near future there will be classes of upper stages and payloads that will require initial operation at a high-earth orbit to reduce the probability of an inadvertent reentry that could result in a detrimental impact on humans and the biosphere. A nuclear propulsion system, such as was being developed under the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program, is an example of such a potential payload. This paper uses the results of a reusable launch vehicle (RLV) study to demonstrate the potential importance of a Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) to test and implement an advanced upper stage (AUS) or payload in a safe orbit and in a cost effective and reliable manner. The RLV is a horizontal takeoff and horizontal landing (HTHL), two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) vehicle. The results of the study shows that an HTHL is cost effective because it implements airplane-like operation, infrastructure, and flight operations. The first stage of the TSTO is powered by Rocket-Based-Combined-Cycle (RBCC) engines, the second stage is powered by a LOX/LH rocket engine. The TSTO is used since it most effectively utilizes the capability of the RBCC engine. The analysis uses the NASA code POST (Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories) to determine trajectories and weight in high-earth orbit for AUS/advanced payloads. Cost and reliability of an RLV versus current generation expandable launch vehicles are presented.

  3. The Influence of Social Norms on Advancement Through Bystander Stages for Preventing Interpersonal Violence.

    PubMed

    Deitch-Stackhouse, Jacqueline; Kenneavy, Kristin; Thayer, Richard; Berkowitz, Alan; Mascari, Janine

    2015-10-01

    This research evaluates the impact of social norms on the advancement through the bystander stages toward prosocial (active) intervention in interpersonal violence (IPV): emotional abuse, physical violence, controlling behavior, sexual violence, and stalking. The influence of social norms on bystander behavior across stages and types of violence varies. Accurate social norms perceptions are associated with routine intervention, although social norms misperceptions are not always a strong deterrent to intervention. Interpretation of a violent situation as problematic predicts increased willingness to intervene. Implications for the development of social norms antiviolence campaigns and strategies for reducing barriers to prosocial intervention are discussed. PMID:26175519

  4. Prospects in cancer immunotherapy: treating advanced stage disease or preventing tumor recurrence?

    PubMed

    Manjili, Masoud H; Payne, Kyle K

    2015-06-01

    Human vaccines against infectious agents are often effective in a prophylactic setting. However, they are usually not effective when used post-exposure. Rabies vaccine is one of the exceptions, which can be used post-exposure, but is effective only when used in combination with other treatments. Similar results have been obtained with cancer vaccines and immunotherapies. Cancer immunotherapies generally prolong patients' survival when they are used during advanced stage disease. The potential of immunotherapy to cure cancer could be revealed when it is applied in a prophylactic setting. This article provides a brief overview of cancer immunotherapeutics and suggests that immunotherapy can cure cancer if used at the right time against the right target; we suggest that targeting cancer during dormancy in order to prevent tumor recurrence as advanced stage disease is potentially curative.

  5. The experience of living with advanced-stage cancer: a thematic synthesis of the literature.

    PubMed

    García-Rueda, N; Carvajal Valcárcel, A; Saracíbar-Razquin, M; Arantzamendi Solabarrieta, M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to understand the experience of people living with advanced-stage cancer through literature. The search included The Cochrane Library, PubMed, PsycInfo, CINAHL and Cuiden. Thirteen studies were included. A qualitative meta-synthesis was conducted. One thread emerged from the thematic synthesis: the desire to live as normally as possible, despite being aware of the proximity of death. Three themes also emerged: "a process that is unique" with its four sub-themes; "support network" and "health context," each of them having two sub-themes. This study concludes that living with advanced-stage cancer is a unique and complex process which has both positive and negative aspects. The review provides a comprehensive view of the experience, which considers the importance of the support network and the health context in which the person lives. In this study, "normalcy" is the adjustment to the new reality and living as closely as possible to the way one lived before the disease, while developing a new relationship with being finite and death. A better understanding of the experience of living with advanced-stage cancer will help health professionals to identify the needs of the patients in order to plan individual, high-quality care. PMID:27297131

  6. Physical activity in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tara A; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2012-06-01

    The importance of physical activity for chronic disease prevention and management has become generally well accepted. The number of research interventions and publications examining the benefits of physical activity for patients with cancer has been rising steadily. However, much of that research has focused on the impact of physical activity either prior to or early in the cancer diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship process. Research focusing on the effects of physical activity, specifically for patients with advanced-stage cancer and poorer prognostic outcomes, has been addressed only recently. The purpose of this article is to examine the state of the science for physical activity in the advanced-stage disease subset of the cancer population. Exercise in a variety of intensities and forms, including yoga, walking, biking, and swimming, has many health benefits for people, including those diagnosed with cancer. Research has shown that, for people with cancer (including advanced-stage cancer), exercise can decrease anxiety, stress, and depression while improving levels of pain, fatigue, shortness of breath, constipation, and insomnia. People diagnosed with cancer should discuss with their oncologist safe, easy ways they can incorporate exercise into their daily lives. PMID:22641322

  7. Treatment of Children with Advanced-Stage Lymphoblastic Lymphoma with Pegaspargase

    PubMed Central

    Yu-tong, Zhang; Li-hua, FENG; Xiao-dan, Zhong; Li-zhe, Wang; Jian, Chang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of Pegaspargase instead of L-asparaginase to treat children with advanced-stage lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL) on the Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster (BFM)-95 protocol. Methods: Fifty-four newly diagnosed patients with stage III or IV LBL and without any treatment were enrolled in this study. Pegaspargase took place of L-asparaginase in BFM-95. The complications and treatment responses of patients treated on the BFM-95 protocol and modified BFM-95 protocol were then evaluated respectively. Findings : For LBL patients treated with BFM-95 protocol or modified BFM-95 protocol, the complete response, event-free survival, overall survival were similar. Stage 4 myelosuppression was the most common complication in both groups. Besides that, among 31 patients receiving modified BFM-95 protocol, coagulation defects were the most common complication. In contrast, anaphylactic reaction was the most common complication in the other 23 patients receiving BFM-95 protocol. Conclusion: Modified BFM-95 protocol is available to children with advanced-stage LBL with an equal outcome and enhances its compliance and decreases the incidence of anaphylactic reaction, compared to BFM-95 protocol. Coagulation defects are the major complication and tolerable in modified one. PMID:25793049

  8. Ares First Stage "Systemology" - Combining Advanced Systems Engineering and Planning Tools to Assure Mission Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiler, James; Brasfield, Fred; Cannon, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Ares is an integral part of NASA s Constellation architecture that will provide crew and cargo access to the International Space Station as well as low earth orbit support for lunar missions. Ares replaces the Space Shuttle in the post 2010 time frame. Ares I is an in-line, two-stage rocket topped by the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. The Ares I first stage is a single, five-segment reusable solid rocket booster derived from the Space Shuttle Program's reusable solid rocket motor. The Ares second or upper stage is propelled by a J-2X main engine fueled with liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. This paper describes the advanced systems engineering and planning tools being utilized for the design, test, and qualification of the Ares I first stage element. Included are descriptions of the current first stage design, the milestone schedule requirements, and the marriage of systems engineering, detailed planning efforts, and roadmapping employed to achieve these goals.

  9. Two-stage, low noise advanced technology fan. 5: Acoustic final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofrin, T. G.; Riloff, N., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The NASA Q2S(quiet two-stage) fan is a 0.836m (32.9 in.) diameter model of the STF 433 engine fan, selected in a 1972 study for an Advanced Technology Transport (ATT) airplane. Noise-control features include: low tip speed, moderate stage pressure rise, large blade-vane spacings, no inlet guide vanes, and optimum blade and vane numbers. Tests were run on the baseline Q2S fan with standard inlet and discharge ducts. Further tests were made of a translating centerbody sonic inlet device and treated discharge ducts. Results were scaled to JT8D and JT3D engine fan size for comparison with current two-stage fans, and were also scaled to STF 433 fan size to compare calculated ATT flyover noise with FAR 36 limits. Baseline Q2S results scaled to JT8D and JT3D engine fan sizes showed substantial noise reductions. Calculated unsuppressed baseline ATT flyovers averaged about 2.5 EPNdB below FAR 36 limits. Using measured sonic inlet results, scaled baseline Q2S fan results, and calculated attenuations for a 1975 technology duct liner, projected flyover noise calculations for the ATT averaged about FAR 36 limits minus 10 EPNdB. Advances in suppression technology required to meet the 1985 goal of FAR 36 limits minus 20 EPNdB are discussed.

  10. A Two Stage Solution Procedure for Production Planning System with Advance Demand Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Nobuyuki; Kadomoto, Kiyotaka; Hasuike, Takashi; Okuhara, Koji

    We model for ‘Naiji System’ which is a unique corporation technique between a manufacturer and suppliers in Japan. We propose a two stage solution procedure for a production planning problem with advance demand information, which is called ‘Naiji’. Under demand uncertainty, this model is formulated as a nonlinear stochastic programming problem which minimizes the sum of production cost and inventory holding cost subject to a probabilistic constraint and some linear production constraints. By the convexity and the special structure of correlation matrix in the problem where inventory for different periods is not independent, we propose a solution procedure with two stages which are named Mass Customization Production Planning & Management System (MCPS) and Variable Mesh Neighborhood Search (VMNS) based on meta-heuristics. It is shown that the proposed solution procedure is available to get a near optimal solution efficiently and practical for making a good master production schedule in the suppliers.

  11. Long-Term Results of Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Advanced N2-3 Stage Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Chen, Meng; Wu, Jing; Xu, Jian-Hua; Qian, Pu-Dong; Guo, Wen-Jie; Jiang, Xue-Song; Zhu, Huan-Feng; Gu, Jia-Jia; Wu, Jian-Feng; Zhang, Ye-wei; He, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Background N-stage is related to distant metastasis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of different nedaplatin-based chemotherapy regimens in advanced N2-3 stage NPC patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Patients and Methods Between April 2005 and December 2009, a total of 128 patients with N2-3 advanced NPC were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were treated with IMRT concurrent with 2 cycles of chemotherapy consisting of either nedaplatin plus paclitaxel (NP group, n = 67) or nedaplatin plus fluorouracil and paclitaxel (NFP group, n = 61). Two to four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy were then administered every 21 days following concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Results With a median follow-up of 60 months, the 5-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local-regional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) for all patients were 81.4%, 71.5%, 87.8% and 82.0%, respectively. No significant difference in PFS (66.6% vs. 76.7%, P = 0.212) and LRRFS rates (89.0% vs. 86.3%, P = 0.664) was observed between the NP and NFP groups. The 5-year OS (75.4% vs. 88.5%, P = 0.046) and DMFS (75.1% vs. 89.0%, P = 0.042) rate were superior in the NFP group compared with the NP group. The NFP group had a higher incidence of grade 3–4 acute toxicities including bone marrow suppression (leukopenia: χ2 = 3.935, P = 0.047; anemia: χ2 = 9.760, P = 0.002; thrombocytopenia: χ2 = 8.821, P = 0.003), and both liver and renal dysfunction (χ2 = 5.206, P = 0.023) compared with the NP group. Late toxicities were moderate and no difference was observed between the two groups. Conclusion IMRT concurrent with nedaplatin-based chemotherapy is an advocated regimen for patients with advanced N2-3 stage NPC. Patients with advanced N2-3 stage may be better candidates for the NFP regimen although this regimen was associated with a high acute

  12. Selecting the best strategy of treatment in newly diagnosed advanced-stage ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Minig, Lucas; Zorrero, Cristina; Iserte, Pablo Padilla; Poveda, Andres

    2015-12-26

    Although it is assumed that the combination of chemotherapy and radical surgery should be indicated in all newly diagnosed advanced-stage ovarian cancer patients, one of the main raised questions is how to select the best strategy of initial treatment in this group of patients, neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by interval debulking surgery or primary debulking surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. The selection criteria to offer one strategy over the other as well as a stepwise patient selection for initial treatment are described. Selecting the best strategy of treatment in newly diagnosed advanced stage ovarian cancer patients is a multifactorial and multidisciplinary decision. Several factors should be taken into consideration: (1) the disease factor, related to the extension and localization of the disease as well as tumor biology; (2) the patient factor, associated with patient age, poor performance status, and co-morbidities; and (3) institutional infrastructure factor, related to the lack of prolonged operative time, an appropriate surgical armamentarium, as well as well-equipped intensive care units with well-trained personnel.

  13. Impact of underweight after treatment on prognosis of advanced-stage ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Ik; Kim, Hee Seung; Kim, Tae Hun; Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Kidong; No, Jae Hong; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Kim, Yong Beom; Song, Yong Sang

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of underweight status on the prognosis of advanced-stage ovarian cancer. A total of 360 patients with stage III-IV epithelial ovarian cancer were enrolled and divided into three groups by body mass indexes (BMIs): underweight (BMI < 18.5 kg/m(2)); normal weight to overweight (18.5 kg/m(2) BMI < 27.5 kg/m(2)); obesity (BMI ≥ 27.5 kg/m(2)). Progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), CA-125, and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) as a marker reflecting host inflammation and immunity were compared among the three groups according to the three treatment times: at diagnosis; after surgery; and after treatment. Only underweight status after treatment was associated with poor OS in comparison with normal weight to overweight or obesity (mean value, 44.9 versus 78.8 or 67.4 months; P = 0.05); it was also an unfavorable factor for OS (adjusted HR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.08-4.85). Furthermore, NLR was higher in patients with underweight than in those with obesity after treatment (median value, 2.15 versus 1.47; P = 0.03), in spite of no difference in CA-125 among the three groups at the three treatment times. In conclusion, underweight status after treatment may be a poor prognostic factor in patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer, which accompanies increased host inflammation and decreased immunity.

  14. Two-stage, low noise advanced technology fan. Volume 2: Aerodynamic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harley, K. G.; Odegard, P. A.

    1975-01-01

    Aerodynamic data from static tests of a two-stage advanced technology fan designed to minimize noise are presented. Fan design conditions include delivery of 209.1kg/sec/sq m (42.85 lbm/sec/sq ft) specific corrected flow at an overall pressure ratio of 1.9 and an adiabatic efficiency of 85.3 percent. The 0.836m (2.74ft) diameter first stage rotor has a hub/tip ratio of 0.4 and 365.8m/sec (1200ft/sec) design tip speed. In addition to the moderate tip speed and pressure rise per stage, other noise control design features involve widely spaced blade rows and proper selection of blade-vane ratios. Aerodynamic data are presented for tests with unifrom and with hub and tip radially distorted inlet flow. Aerodynamic data are also presented for tests of this fan with acoustic treatments, including acoustically treated casing walls, a flowpath exit acoustic ring, and a translating centerbody sonic inlet device. A complete tabulation of the overall performance data, the blade element data, and the power spectral density information relating to turbulence levels generated by the sonic inlet obtained during these tests is included. For vol. 1, see N74-33789.

  15. Lymphadenectomy in locally advanced cervical cancer study (LiLACS): Phase III clinical trial comparing surgical with radiologic staging in patients with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Frumovitz, Michael; Querleu, Denis; Gil-Moreno, Antonio; Morice, Philippe; Jhingran, Anuja; Munsell, Mark F; Macapinlac, Homer A; Leblanc, Eric; Martinez, Alejandra; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2014-01-01

    Radiation treatment planning for women with locally advanced cervical cancer (stages IB2-IVA) is often based on positron emission tomography (PET). PET, however, has poor sensitivity in detecting metastases in aortocaval nodes. We have initiated a study with the objective of determining whether pre-therapeutic laparoscopic surgical staging followed by tailored chemoradiation improves survival as compared with PET/computed tomography (CT) radiologic staging alone followed by chemoradiation. This international, multicenter phase III trial will enroll 600 women with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer and PET/CT findings showing fluorodeoxyglucose-avid pelvic nodes and fluorodeoxyglucose-negative para-aortic nodes. Eligible patients will be randomized to undergo either pelvic radiotherapy with chemotherapy (standard-of-care arm) or surgical staging via a minimally invasive extraperitoneal approach followed by tailored radiotherapy with chemotherapy (experimental arm). The primary end point is overall survival. Secondary end points are disease-free survival, short- and long-term morbidity with pre-therapeutic surgical staging, and determination of anatomic locations of metastatic para-aortic nodes in relationship to the inferior mesenteric artery. We believe this study will show that tailored chemoradiation after pre-therapeutic surgical staging improves survival as compared with chemoradiation based on PET/CT in women with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer.

  16. Exome sequencing identifies early gastric carcinoma as an early stage of advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Guhyun; Hwang, Woo Cheol; Do, In-Gu; Wang, Kai; Kang, So Young; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Kang, Won Ki; Jang, Jiryeon; Choi, Min-Gew; Lee, Jun Ho; Sohn, Tae Sung; Bae, Jae Moon; Kim, Sung; Kim, Min Ji; Kim, Seonwoo; Park, Cheol Keun; Kim, Kyoung-Mee

    2013-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma is one of the major causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Early detection and treatment leads to an excellent prognosis in patients with early gastric cancer (EGC), whereas the prognosis of patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC) remains poor. It is unclear whether EGCs and AGCs are distinct entities or whether EGCs are the beginning stages of AGCs. We performed whole exome sequencing of four samples from patients with EGC and compared the results with those from AGCs. In both EGCs and AGCs, a total of 268 genes were commonly mutated and independent mutations were additionally found in EGCs (516 genes) and AGCs (3104 genes). A higher frequency of C>G transitions was observed in intestinal-type compared to diffuse-type carcinomas (P = 0.010). The DYRK3, GPR116, MCM10, PCDH17, PCDHB1, RDH5 and UNC5C genes are recurrently mutated in EGCs and may be involved in early carcinogenesis.

  17. Single stage, low noise, advanced technology fan. Volume 5: Fan acoustics. Section 1: Results and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutras, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    The acoustic tests and data analysis for a 0.508-scale fan vehicle of a 111,300 newton (25,000 pound) thrust, full-size engine, which would have application on an advanced transport aircraft, is described. The single-stage advanced technology fan was designed to a pressure ratio of 1.8 at a tip speed of 503 m/sec (1,650 ft/sec) to achieve the desired pressure ratio in a single-stage fan with low radius ratio (0.38), and to maintain adequate stall margin. The fan has 44 tip-shrouded rotor blades and 90 outlet guide vanes. The two basic approaches taken in the acoustic design were: (1) minimization of noise at the source, and (2) suppression of the generated noise in the inlet and bypass exhaust duct. Suppression of the generated noise was accomplished in the inlet through use of the hybrid concept (wall acoustic treatment plus airflow acceleration suppression) and in the exhaust duct with extensive acoustic treatment including a splitter. The goal of the design was attainment of twenty effective perceived noise decibels (20 EPNdB) below current Federal Air Regulation noise standards for a full-scale fan at the takeoff, cutback, and approach conditions. The suppression goal of FAR 36-20 was not reached, but improvements in the technology of both front and aft fan-noise suppression were realized. The suppressed fan noise was shown to be consistent with the proposed federal regulation on aircraft noise.

  18. Dual-Fuel Propulsion in Single-Stage Advanced Manned Launch System Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepsch, Roger A., Jr.; Stanley, Douglas O.; Unal, Resit

    1995-01-01

    As part of the United States Advanced Manned Launch System study to determine a follow-on, or complement, to the Space Shuttle, a reusable single-stage-to-orbit concept utilizing dual-fuel rocket propulsion has been examined. Several dual-fuel propulsion concepts were investigated. These include: a separate-engine concept combining Russian RD-170 kerosene-fueled engines with space shuttle main engine-derivative engines: the kerosene- and hydrogen-fueled Russian RD-701 engine; and a dual-fuel, dual-expander engine. Analysis to determine vehicle weight and size characteristics was performed using conceptual-level design techniques. A response-surface methodology for multidisciplinary design was utilized to optimize the dual-fuel vehicles with respect to several important propulsion-system and vehicle design parameters, in order to achieve minimum empty weight. The tools and methods employed in the analysis process are also summarized. In comparison with a reference hydrogen- fueled single-stage vehicle, results showed that the dual-fuel vehicles were from 10 to 30% lower in empty weight for the same payload capability, with the dual-expander engine types showing the greatest potential.

  19. Single stage, low noise, advanced technology fan. Volume 1: Aerodynamic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. J.; Younghans, J. L.; Little, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic design for a half-scale fan vehicle, which would have application on an advanced transport aircraft, is described. The single stage advanced technology fan was designed to a pressure ratio of 1.8 at a tip speed of 503 m/sec 11,650 ft/sec). The fan and booster components are designed in a scale model flow size convenient for testing with existing facility and vehicle hardware. The design corrected flow per unit annulus area at the fan face is 215 kg/sec sq m (44.0 lb m/sec sq ft) with a hub-tip ratio of 0.38 at the leading edge of the fan rotor. This results in an inlet corrected airflow of 117.9 kg/sec (259.9 lb m/sec) for the selected rotor tip diameter if 90.37 cm (35.58 in.). The variable geometry inlet is designed utilizing a combination of high throat Mach number and acoustic treatment in the inlet diffuser for noise suppression (hybrid inlet). A variable fan exhaust nozzle was assumed in conjunction with the variable inlet throat area to limit the required area change of the inlet throat at approach and hence limit the overall diffusion and inlet length. The fan exit duct design was primarily influenced by acoustic requirements, including length of suppressor wall treatment; length, thickness and position on a duct splitter for additional suppressor treatment; and duct surface Mach numbers.

  20. Alternative staging of regional lymph nodes in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanik, Antoni M.; Paszko, Agata; Szura, Miroslaw; Scully-Horner, Thecla; Kulig, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The TNM pN stage based on the number of metastatic lymph nodes is an independent prognostic factor in gastric cancer. Many studies have highlighted the phenomenon of stage migration and problems in comparing groups of patients with different numbers of total lymph nodes harvested within TNM staging. The current version of UICC/AJCC and JGCA TNM classifications postulates a minimal number of 16 lymph nodes as the base for N stage determination. Alternative systems such as lymph node ratio (LNR), positive to negative lymph node ratio (PNLNR), and LOGODDS (or LODDS), were implemented to increase the quality of LN assessment. These methods have reached the background in the literature, but to date no standard approach according to the cut-offs for the stages has been implemented. LOGODDS is the method that most reflects the number of harvested lymph nodes. The rationale for alternative staging methods, their correlations, and limitations are presented. PMID:27713774

  1. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein is associated with advanced-stage prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wan, Fangning; Qin, Xiaojian; Zhang, Guiming; Lu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Yao; Zhang, Hailiang; Dai, Bo; Shi, Guohai; Ye, Dingwei

    2015-05-01

    Clinical and epidemiological data suggest coronary artery disease shares etiology with prostate cancer (PCa). The aim of this work was to assess the effects of several serum markers reported in cardiovascular disease on PCa. Serum markers (oxidized low-density lipoprotein [ox-LDL], apolipoprotein [apo] B100, and apoB48) in peripheral blood samples from 50 patients from Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center (FUSCC) with localized or lymph node metastatic PCa were investigated in this study. Twenty-five samples from normal individuals were set as controls. We first conducted enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis to select candidate markers that were significantly different between these patients and controls. Then, the clinical relevance between OLR1 (the ox-LDL receptor) expression and PCa was analyzed in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cohort. We also investigated the function of ox-LDL in PCa cell lines in vitro. Phosphorylation protein chips were used to analyze cell signaling pathways in ox-LDL-treated PC-3 cells. The ox-LDL level was found to be significantly correlated with N stage of prostate cancer. OLR1 expression was correlated with lymph node metastasis in the TCGA cohort. In vitro, ox-LDL stimulated the proliferation, migration, and invasion of LNCaP and PC-3 in a dose-dependent manner. The results of phosphoprotein microarray illustrated that ox-LDL could influence multiple signaling pathways of PC-3. Activation of proliferation promoting signaling pathways (including β-catenin, cMyc, NF-κB, STAT1, STAT3) as well as apoptosis-associating signaling pathways (including p27, caspase-3) demonstrated that ox-LDL had complicated effects on prostate cancer. Increased serum ox-LDL level and OLR1 expression may indicate advanced-stage PCa and lymph node metastasis. Moreover, ox-LDL could stimulate PCa proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro.

  2. Results of two different surgical techniques in the treatment of advanced-stage Freiberg's disease

    PubMed Central

    Özkul, Emin; Gem, Mehmet; Alemdar, Celil; Arslan, Hüseyin; Boğatekin, Ferit; Kişin, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Background: Freiberg's disease is an osteochondrosis most commonly seen in adolescent women and characterized by pain, swelling and motion restriction in the second metatarsal. The early stages of this disease can be managed with semirigid orthoses, metatarsal bars and short leg walking cast. Number of operative methods are suggested which can be used depending on the pathophysiology of the disease, including abnormal biomechanics, joint congruence and degenerative process. We evaluated the outcomes of the patients with Freiberg's disease who were treated with dorsal closing-wedge osteotomy and resection of the metatarsal head. Patients and Methods: 16 patients (11 female, 5 male) with a mean age of 24.5 (range 13–49 years) years who underwent dorsal closing wedge osteotomy or resection of the metatarsal head were included in this retrospective study. Second metatarsal was affected in 13 and third metatarsal in three patients. According to the Smillie's classification system, ten patients had type IV osteonecrosis and six patients had type V. The results of the patients were evaluated using the lesser metatarsophalangeal-interphalangeal (LMPI) scale. Results: According to the LMPI scale, the postoperative scores for the osteotomy and excision groups were 86 (range 64–100) and 72.6 (range 60–85), respectively. In the osteotomy group, mean passive flexion restriction was 18° (range 0°–35°) and mean passive extension restriction was 12° (range 0°–25°). Mean metatarsal shortening was 2.2 mm (range 2–4 mm) in the osteotomy group as opposed to 9.8 mm (range 7–14 mm) in the excision group. Significant pain relief was obtained in both groups following the surgery. Conclusions: The decision of performing osteotomy or resection arthroplasty in the patients with advanced-stage Freiberg's disease should be based on the joint injury and the patients should be informed about the cosmetic problems like shortening which may arise from resection. PMID:26955180

  3. The role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with advanced (stage IIIC) epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Škof, Erik; Merlo, Sebastjan; Pilko, Gasper

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Primary treatment of patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer consists of chemotherapy either before (neoadjuvant chemotherapy, NACT) or after primary surgery (adjuvant chemotherapy). The goal of primary treatment is no residual disease after surgery (R0 resection) what is associated with an improvement in survival of patients. There is, however, no evidence of survival benefits in patients with R0 resections after prior NACT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who were treated with diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer at Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in the years 2005–2007. The differences in the rates of R0 resections, progression free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and in five-year and eight-year survival rates between patients treated with NACT and patients who had primary surgery were compared. Results Overall 160 patients had stage IIIC epithelial ovarian cancer. Eighty patients had NACT and eighty patients had primary surgery. Patients in NACT group had higher rates of R0 resection (42% vs. 20%; p = 0.011) than patients after primary surgery. PFS was 14.1 months in NACT group and 17.7 months after primary surgery (p = 0.213). OS was 24.8 months in NACT group and 31.6 months after primary surgery (p = 0.012). In patients with R0 resections five-year and eight-year survival rates were 20.6% and 17.6% in NACT group compared to 62.5% and 62.5% after primary surgery (p < 0.0001), respectively. Conclusions Despite higher rates of R0 resections achieved by NACT, survival of patients treated with NACT was inferior to survival of patients who underwent primary surgery. NACT should only be offered to patients with advanced epithelial cancer who are not candidates for primary surgery. PMID:27679552

  4. The role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with advanced (stage IIIC) epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Škof, Erik; Merlo, Sebastjan; Pilko, Gasper

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Primary treatment of patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer consists of chemotherapy either before (neoadjuvant chemotherapy, NACT) or after primary surgery (adjuvant chemotherapy). The goal of primary treatment is no residual disease after surgery (R0 resection) what is associated with an improvement in survival of patients. There is, however, no evidence of survival benefits in patients with R0 resections after prior NACT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who were treated with diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer at Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in the years 2005–2007. The differences in the rates of R0 resections, progression free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and in five-year and eight-year survival rates between patients treated with NACT and patients who had primary surgery were compared. Results Overall 160 patients had stage IIIC epithelial ovarian cancer. Eighty patients had NACT and eighty patients had primary surgery. Patients in NACT group had higher rates of R0 resection (42% vs. 20%; p = 0.011) than patients after primary surgery. PFS was 14.1 months in NACT group and 17.7 months after primary surgery (p = 0.213). OS was 24.8 months in NACT group and 31.6 months after primary surgery (p = 0.012). In patients with R0 resections five-year and eight-year survival rates were 20.6% and 17.6% in NACT group compared to 62.5% and 62.5% after primary surgery (p < 0.0001), respectively. Conclusions Despite higher rates of R0 resections achieved by NACT, survival of patients treated with NACT was inferior to survival of patients who underwent primary surgery. NACT should only be offered to patients with advanced epithelial cancer who are not candidates for primary surgery.

  5. Advanced Imaging and Receipt of Guideline Concordant Care in Women with Early Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Buist, Diana S. M.; Gold, Laura S.; Zeliadt, Steven; Hunter Merrill, Rachel; Etzioni, Ruth; Ramsey, Scott D.; Sullivan, Sean D.; Kessler, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Objective. It is unknown whether advanced imaging (AI) is associated with higher quality breast cancer (BC) care. Materials and Methods. Claims and Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results data were linked for women diagnosed with incident stage I-III BC between 2002 and 2008 in western Washington State. We examined receipt of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or AI (defined as computed tomography [CT]/positron emission tomography [PET]/PET/CT) versus mammogram and/or ultrasound (M-US) alone and receipt of guideline concordant care (GCC) using multivariable logistic regression. Results. Of 5247 women, 67% received M-US, 23% MRI, 8% CT, and 3% PET/PET-CT. In 2002, 5% received MRI and 5% AI compared to 45% and 12%, respectively, in 2008. 79% received GCC, but GCC declined over time and was associated with younger age, urban residence, less comorbidity, shorter time from diagnosis to surgery, and earlier year of diagnosis. Breast MRI was associated with GCC for lumpectomy plus radiation therapy (RT) (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.08–2.26, and p = 0.02) and AI was associated with GCC for adjuvant chemotherapy for estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) BC (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.17–2.59, and p = 0.01). Conclusion. GCC was associated with prior receipt of breast MRI and AI for lumpectomy plus RT and adjuvant chemotherapy for ER+ BC, respectively. PMID:27525122

  6. HLA-G Expression and Role in Advanced-Stage Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Caocci, G.; Greco, M.; Fanni, D.; Senes, G.; Littera, R.; Lai, S.; Risso, P.; Carcassi, C.; Faa, G.; La Nasa, G.

    2016-01-01

    Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp) deletion-insertion (del-ins) polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy) patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS) of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2. PMID:27349312

  7. Advanced Imaging and Receipt of Guideline Concordant Care in Women with Early Stage Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Loggers, Elizabeth Trice; Buist, Diana S M; Gold, Laura S; Zeliadt, Steven; Hunter Merrill, Rachel; Etzioni, Ruth; Ramsey, Scott D; Sullivan, Sean D; Kessler, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Objective. It is unknown whether advanced imaging (AI) is associated with higher quality breast cancer (BC) care. Materials and Methods. Claims and Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results data were linked for women diagnosed with incident stage I-III BC between 2002 and 2008 in western Washington State. We examined receipt of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or AI (defined as computed tomography [CT]/positron emission tomography [PET]/PET/CT) versus mammogram and/or ultrasound (M-US) alone and receipt of guideline concordant care (GCC) using multivariable logistic regression. Results. Of 5247 women, 67% received M-US, 23% MRI, 8% CT, and 3% PET/PET-CT. In 2002, 5% received MRI and 5% AI compared to 45% and 12%, respectively, in 2008. 79% received GCC, but GCC declined over time and was associated with younger age, urban residence, less comorbidity, shorter time from diagnosis to surgery, and earlier year of diagnosis. Breast MRI was associated with GCC for lumpectomy plus radiation therapy (RT) (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.08-2.26, and p = 0.02) and AI was associated with GCC for adjuvant chemotherapy for estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) BC (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.17-2.59, and p = 0.01). Conclusion. GCC was associated with prior receipt of breast MRI and AI for lumpectomy plus RT and adjuvant chemotherapy for ER+ BC, respectively. PMID:27525122

  8. A Positive Prospective Trial of Antibiotic Therapy in Advanced Stage, Non-Bulky Indolent Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Portlock, Carol S; Hamlin, Paul A; Gerecitano, John F; Noy, Ariela; Palomba, Maria Lia; Walkley, Janelle; Corcoran, Stacie; Migliacci, Jocelyn; Schoder, Heiko; Papanicolaou, Genovefa; Markowitz, Arnold J

    2016-01-01

    Background We have prospectively studied a three month course of clarithromycin (substituted by Prevpac®, lansoprazole/ amoxicillin/ clarithromycin, in the first two wks when stool H pylori+) for non-bulky, advanced stage indolent lymphoma. These patients are often candidates for expectant monitoring and it is during this period that a window of opportunity may exist to identify and treat associated infections. Methods All previously untreated patients with a new diagnosis of indolent lymphoma (FL and non-FL) meeting GELF criteria were treated with 12 weeks of clarithromycin. There were 32 evaluable patients, 4 of whom had stool H pylori. Results At one month post-antibiotic therapy, we have observed lymphoma responses in 7 of 32 patients (21.9%). Two additional patients had objective response during followup (28.1% overall response). The median treatment free survival for antibiotic responders is 69.9 months and for non-responders, 30.6 months (p = 0.019). Conclusion Three response patterns have been noted, perhaps suggestive of an immune-mediated response -- prompt PET negative; flair with delayed PET negative response; and gradual continuous improvement. This prospective study appears promising, may be a step toward developing a lymphoma prevention strategy by reducing “antigen drive,” and deserves further clinical/biological study. http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00461084 PMID:26798624

  9. Cost-utility analysis of imatinib mesilate for the treatment of advanced stage chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Gordois, A; Scuffham, P; Warren, E; Ward, S

    2003-08-18

    Imatinib mesilate (Glivec), Novartis Pharmaceuticals) is a novel therapy for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of imatinib (600 mg daily) when used for the treatment of patients in advanced stages of CML (accelerated phase and blast crisis) against conventional therapies of combination chemotherapy (DAT) and palliative care in hospital or at home. A Markov model simulated the transitions of hypothetical patient cohorts and outcomes were modelled for 5 years from the start of treatment. Costs were estimated from the perspective of the UK National Health Service. Over 5 years, a patient in accelerated phase will, on average, accrue an additional 2.09 QALYs with imatinib compared to conventional therapies, while patients in blast crisis will accrue an additional 0.58 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) with imatinib compared to conventional therapies. The costs per additional QALY gained from treatment with imatinib compared with conventional therapies were pound 29344 (accelerated phase) and pound 42239 (blast crisis). The results were particularly sensitive to the price of imatinib, improvements in quality of life, and the duration of haematological responses. We conclude that treatment of CML with imatinib confers considerably greater survival and quality of life than conventional treatments but at a cost. PMID:12915870

  10. The potential role of bevacizumab in early stages and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schettino, Clorinda; Bareschino, Maria Anna; Rossi, Antonio; Maione, Paolo; Castaldo, Vincenzo; Mazzeo, Nicole; Sacco, Paola Claudia; Ferrara, Marianna Luciana; Palazzolo, Giovanni; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Gridelli, Cesare

    2009-01-01

    Improving outcomes for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a major research area considering that a significant percentage of such patients develop recurrent disease within 5 years of complete lung resection. Adjuvant chemotherapy prolongs survival, with an absolute improvement in 5-year overall survival of about 5% with drawbacks such as treatment toxicity. Approximately, one third of patients with newly diagnosed NSCLC have locally advanced disease not amenable for surgical resection – in this setting of patients concurrent chemoradiation is the standard of therapy. However, the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC is still controversial and clinical outcomes are disappointing, and so new approaches are required to improve the clinical benefit in this setting of patients. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key angiogenic factor implicated in tumor blood vessels formation and permeability, and tumor VEGF overexpression in patients with early stage lung cancer has been associated with worse relapse free and overall survival. Several agents have been developed that inhibit VEGF or its receptor signalling system. Bevacizumab is the first recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody binding VEGF to demonstrate clinical benefit or rather a survival prolongation in combination with chemotherapy in the treatment of non-squamous advanced NSCLC patients. These positive results led to a large number of clinical trials to evaluate bevacizumab in combination with other targeted agents in advanced disease, and to define the role of this agent in early stage NSCLC such as the impact of bevacizumab integration in chemoradiotherapy strategy for locally advanced disease. PMID:21789109

  11. The potential role of bevacizumab in early stages and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Schettino, Clorinda; Bareschino, Maria Anna; Rossi, Antonio; Maione, Paolo; Castaldo, Vincenzo; Mazzeo, Nicole; Sacco, Paola Claudia; Ferrara, Marianna Luciana; Palazzolo, Giovanni; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Gridelli, Cesare

    2009-07-01

    Improving outcomes for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a major research area considering that a significant percentage of such patients develop recurrent disease within 5 years of complete lung resection. Adjuvant chemotherapy prolongs survival, with an absolute improvement in 5-year overall survival of about 5% with drawbacks such as treatment toxicity. Approximately, one third of patients with newly diagnosed NSCLC have locally advanced disease not amenable for surgical resection - in this setting of patients concurrent chemoradiation is the standard of therapy. However, the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC is still controversial and clinical outcomes are disappointing, and so new approaches are required to improve the clinical benefit in this setting of patients. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key angiogenic factor implicated in tumor blood vessels formation and permeability, and tumor VEGF overexpression in patients with early stage lung cancer has been associated with worse relapse free and overall survival. Several agents have been developed that inhibit VEGF or its receptor signalling system. Bevacizumab is the first recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody binding VEGF to demonstrate clinical benefit or rather a survival prolongation in combination with chemotherapy in the treatment of non-squamous advanced NSCLC patients. These positive results led to a large number of clinical trials to evaluate bevacizumab in combination with other targeted agents in advanced disease, and to define the role of this agent in early stage NSCLC such as the impact of bevacizumab integration in chemoradiotherapy strategy for locally advanced disease.

  12. Requirement for a standardised definition of advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    DE SOL, ANGELO; TRASTULLI, STEFANO; GRASSI, VERONICA; CORSI, ALESSIA; BARILLARO, IVAN; BOCCOLINI, ANDREA; DI PATRIZI, MICOL SOLE; DI ROCCO, GIORGIO; SANTORO, ALBERTO; CIROCCHI, ROBERTO; BOSELLI, CARLO; REDLER, ADRIANO; NOYA, GIUSEPPE; KONG, SEONG-HO

    2014-01-01

    Each year, ~988,000 new cases of stomach cancer are reported worldwide. Uniformity for the definition of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) is required to ensure the improved management of patients. Various classifications do actually exist for gastric cancer, but the classification determined by lesion depth is extremely important, as it has been shown to correlate with patient prognosis; for example, early gastric cancer (EGC) has a favourable prognosis when compared with AGC. In the literature, the definition of EGC is clear, however, there is heterogeneity in the definition of AGC. In the current study, all parameters of the TNM classification for AGC reported in each previous study were individually analysed. It was necessary to perform a comprehensive systematic literature search of all previous studies that have reported a definition of ACG to guarantee homogeneity in the assessment of surgical outcome. It must be understood that the term ‘advanced gastric cancer’ may implicate a number of stages of disease, and studies must highlight the exact clinical TNM stages used for evaluation of the study. PMID:24348842

  13. Staging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Bostwick, David G; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Berney, Daniel M

    2012-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma (PCa) is a significant cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. Accurate staging is critical for prognosis assessment and treatment planning for PCa. Despite the large volume of clinical activity and research, the challenge to define the most appropriate and clinically relevant staging system remains. The pathologically complex and uncertain clinical course of prostate cancer further complicates the design of staging classification and a substaging system suitable for individualized care. This review will focus on recent progress and controversial issues related to prostate cancer staging. The 2010 revision of the American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (AJCC/UICC) tumour, node and metastasis (TNM) system is the most widely used staging system at this time. Despite general acceptance of the system as a whole, there is controversy and uncertainty about its application, particularly for T2 subclassification. The three-tiered T2 classification system for organ-confined prostate cancer is superfluous, considering the biology and anatomy of PCa. A tumour size-based substaging system may be considered in the future TNM subclassification of pT2 cancer. Lymph node status is one of the most important prognostic factors for prostate cancer. Nevertheless, clinical outcomes in patients with positive lymph nodes are variable. Identification of patients at the greatest risk of systemic progression helps in the selection of appropriate therapy. The data suggest that the inherent aggressiveness of metastatic prostate cancer is closely linked to the tumour volume of lymph node metastasis. We recommend that a future TNM staging system should consider subclassification of node-positive cancer on the basis of nodal cancer volume, using the diameter of the largest nodal metastasis and/or the number of positive nodes.

  14. Staging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Bostwick, David G; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Berney, Daniel M

    2012-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma (PCa) is a significant cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. Accurate staging is critical for prognosis assessment and treatment planning for PCa. Despite the large volume of clinical activity and research, the challenge to define the most appropriate and clinically relevant staging system remains. The pathologically complex and uncertain clinical course of prostate cancer further complicates the design of staging classification and a substaging system suitable for individualized care. This review will focus on recent progress and controversial issues related to prostate cancer staging. The 2010 revision of the American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (AJCC/UICC) tumour, node and metastasis (TNM) system is the most widely used staging system at this time. Despite general acceptance of the system as a whole, there is controversy and uncertainty about its application, particularly for T2 subclassification. The three-tiered T2 classification system for organ-confined prostate cancer is superfluous, considering the biology and anatomy of PCa. A tumour size-based substaging system may be considered in the future TNM subclassification of pT2 cancer. Lymph node status is one of the most important prognostic factors for prostate cancer. Nevertheless, clinical outcomes in patients with positive lymph nodes are variable. Identification of patients at the greatest risk of systemic progression helps in the selection of appropriate therapy. The data suggest that the inherent aggressiveness of metastatic prostate cancer is closely linked to the tumour volume of lymph node metastasis. We recommend that a future TNM staging system should consider subclassification of node-positive cancer on the basis of nodal cancer volume, using the diameter of the largest nodal metastasis and/or the number of positive nodes. PMID:22212080

  15. Effects of amifostine in a patient with an advanced-stage myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, A; Kaufmann, C C; Binder, C; Wörmann, B; Haase, D

    2001-01-01

    We report on a 63-year-old man with myelodysplastic syndrome at the stage of a refractory anemia with an excess of blasts in transformation (MDS-RAEB-T), first diagnosed in December 1996. After a period of stability, with no need for transfusions, the MDS progressed into acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in August 1998 with the emergence of a cytogenetic abnormality (11q-). Two courses of chemotherapy were given, resulting in prolonged pancytopenia; however, no clearance of bone marrow (BM) blasts was achieved. At that time, severe infections and daily epistaxis occurred. Frequent transfusions of packed red blood cells (RBC) and platelets (2-3/week) were necessary. After 2 months of persisting severe pancytopenia, we started a therapy with amifostine: 4 x 250 mg intravenously (i.v.) weekly for 1 month, followed by a maintenance therapy with 500 mg once weekly. After 2 weeks of amifostine therapy, hematopoiesis began to improve. In the subsequent 2 months, the patient became completely independent of the platelet transfusions; the transfusion frequency of RBC was permanently reduced (2 RBC transfusions/month) and a significant decrease of BM blasts was achieved. After 30 weeks of amifostine therapy, the morphology of the MDS switched to a chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML)-like appearance, with continuously increasing leukocytes, so that we discontinued amifostine therapy for 1 month to exclude a possible side effect of amifostine. At that time, leukocytes further increased to 74,000/microl; thus, we decided to perform a cytoreductive chemotherapy (hydroxycarbamide) and continued weekly amifostine infusions. During 1 year of amifostine therapy, the patient had a good quality of life, with no need for hospitalization and a complete cytogenetic remission. We conclude that, in this case, amifostine had two effects: a significant improvement of impaired hematopoiesis and a slowing down of disease progression. Thus, amifostine might be a therapeutic option in older

  16. HLA-G expression and role in advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Caocci, G; Greco, M; Fanni, D; Senes, G; Littera, R; Lai, S; Risso, P; Carcassi, C; Faa, G; La Nasa, G

    2016-01-01

    Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp) deletion-insertion (del-ins) polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy) patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS) of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2.These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2. PMID:27349312

  17. Efficacy of short-term nivolumab treatment in a Chinese patient with relapsed advanced-stage lung squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Guoliang; He, Hanping; Bi, Jianping; Li, Ying; Li, Yanping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Mingwei; Han, Guang; Lin, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Currently, the options are limited for the treatment of patients who have failed 2 lines of chemotherapy for advanced lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Recently, nivolumab, a fully human IgG4 programmed death 1 immune checkpoint inhibitor antibody, was approved to treat patients with advanced stage, relapsed/refractory lung SCC. Although nivolumab has demonstrated antitumor activity with survival benefit in Caucasian patients, its efficacy in Asian patients is unknown. Case Report: In this report, we describe a Chinese patient with relapsed advanced stage lung SCC who had an excellent response to nivolumab after only 2 doses without any adverse effects. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated the tumor was stained positive for programmed death-ligand 1. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report of satisfactory efficacy of short-term nivolumab treatment in a Chinese patient with relapsed advanced-stage lung SCC. Further clinical trials in Asian countries are needed to test whether nivolumab immunotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for Asian patients with lung SCC. PMID:27749580

  18. Advanced Launch Vehicle Upper Stages Using Liquid Propulsion and Metallized Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1990-01-01

    Metallized propellants are liquid propellants with a metal additive suspended in a gelled fuel or oxidizer. Typically, aluminum (Al) particles are the metal additive. These propellants provide increase in the density and/or the specific impulse of the propulsion system. Using metallized propellant for volume-and mass-constrained upper stages can deliver modest increases in performance for low earth orbit to geosynchronous earth orbit (LEO-GEO) and other earth orbital transfer missions. Metallized propellants, however, can enable very fast planetary missions with a single-stage upper stage system. Trade studies comparing metallized propellant stage performance with non-metallized upper stages and the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) are presented. These upper stages are both one- and two-stage vehicles that provide the added energy to send payloads to altitudes and onto trajectories that are unattainable with only the launch vehicle. The stage designs are controlled by the volume and the mass constraints of the Space Transportation System (STS) and Space Transportation System-Cargo (STS-C) launch vehicles. The influences of the density and specific impulse increases enabled by metallized propellants are examined for a variety of different stage and propellant combinations.

  19. Advanced launch vehicle upper stages using liquid propulsion and metallized propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, B. A.

    1990-01-01

    Metallized propellants are liquid propellants with a metal additive suspended in a gelled fuel or oxidizer. Typically, aluminum particles are the metal additives. These propellants provide increase in the density and/or the specific impulse of the propulsion system. Using metallized propellants for volume- and mass-constrained upper stages can deliver modest increases in performance for Low Earth Orbit to Geosynchronous Earth Orbit and other Earth orbital transfer missions. Metallized propellants, however, can enable very fast planetary missions with a single-stage upper stage system. Trade studies comparing metallized propellant stage performance with non-metallized upper stages and the Inertial Upper Stage are presented. These upper stages are both one- and two-stage vehicles that provide the added energy to send payloads to altitudes and onto trajectories that are unattainable with only the launch vehicle. The stage designs are controlled by the volume and the mass constraints of the Space Transportation System and Space Transportation System-Cargo launch vehicles. The influences of the density and specific impulse increases enabled by metallized propellants are examined for a variety of different stage and propellant combinations.

  20. [Clinical aspect of new international gastric cancer staging system].

    PubMed

    Liang, Han

    2013-02-01

    The 7th UICC/AJCC Gastric Cancer TNM Staging System includes major revisions of pT and pN classification. The Japanese Classification and UICC/AJCC TNM System have reached consistency in staging of gastric cancer. There are some new topics of lymphadenectomy in the new guidelines. The new TNM system accepts the database from Japan and Korea and it will be more accurate to predict the prognosis of gastric cancer patients. The rationality of splenectomy, total bursectomy, dissection of No.13 and No.14 lymph nodes is still not very clear and needs more evidences. D2 lymphadenectomy is the recommended surgical approach both in Eastern and Western countries. The benefit of paraaortic lymphadenectmoy for selected patients needs further evidences as well. The international gastric cancer staging project will collect the data from 23 countries and the new staging system will be applicable worldwide. PMID:23446465

  1. Is uniportal thoracoscopic surgery a feasible approach for advanced stages of non-small cell lung cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Fieira, Eva; Delgado, Maria; Mendez, Lucía; Fernandez, Ricardo; de la Torre, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Conventional video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) lobectomy for advanced lung cancer is a feasible and safe surgery in experienced centers. The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of uniportal VATS approach in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and compare the perioperative outcomes and survival with those in early-stage tumors operated through the uniportal approach. Methods From June 2010 to December 2012, we performed 163 uniportal VATS major pulmonary resections. Only NSCLC cases were included in this study (130 cases). Patients were divided into two groups: (A) early stage and (B) advanced cases (>5 cm, T3 or T4, or tumors requiring neoadjuvant treatment). A descriptive and retrospective study was performed, comparing perioperative outcomes and survival obtained in both groups. A survival analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier curves and the log-rank test was used to compare survival between patients with early and advanced stages. Results A total of 130 cases were included in the study: 87 (A) vs. 43 (B) patients (conversion rate 1.1 vs. 6.5%, P=0.119). Mean global age was 64.9 years and 73.8% were men. The patient demographic data was similar in both groups. Upper lobectomies (A, 52 vs. B, 21 patients) and anatomic segmentectomies (A, 4 vs. B, 0) were more frequent in group A while pneumonectomy was more frequent in B (A, 1 vs. B, 6 patients). Surgical time was longer (144.9±41.3 vs. 183.2±48.9, P<0.001), and median number of lymph nodes (14 vs. 16, P=0.004) were statistically higher in advanced cases. Median number of nodal stations (5 vs. 5, P=0.165), days of chest tube (2 vs. 2, P=0.098), HOS (3 vs. 3, P=0.072), and rate of complications (17.2% vs. 14%, P=0.075) were similar in both groups. One patient died on the 58th postoperative day. The 30-month survival rate was 90% for the early stage group and 74% for advanced cases Conclusions Uniportal VATS lobectomy for advanced cases of NSCLC is a safe and

  2. Method and apparatus for advanced staged combustion utilizing forced internal recirculation

    DOEpatents

    Rabovitser, Iosif K.; Knight, Richard A.; Cygan, David F.; Nester, Serguei; Abbasi, Hamid A.

    2003-12-16

    A method and apparatus for combustion of a fuel in which a first-stage fuel and a first-stage oxidant are introduced into a combustion chamber and ignited, forming a primary combustion zone. At least about 5% of the total heat output produced by combustion of the first-stage fuel and the first-stage oxidant is removed from the primary combustion zone, forming cooled first-stage combustion products. A portion of the cooled first-stage combustion products from a downstream region of the primary combustion zone is recirculated to an upstream region of primary combustion zone. A second-stage fuel is introduced into the combustion chamber downstream of the primary combustion zone and ignited, forming a secondary combustion zone. At least about 5% of the heat from the secondary combustion zone is removed. In accordance with one embodiment, a third-stage oxidant is introduced into the combustion chamber downstream of the secondary combustion zone, forming a tertiary combustion zone.

  3. Optimization of two-stage production/inventory systems under order base stock policy with advance demand information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakade, Koichi; Yokozawa, Shiori

    2016-08-01

    It is important to share demand information among the members in supply chains. In recent years, production and inventory systems with advance demand information (ADI) have been discussed, where advance demand information means the information of demand which the decision maker obtains before the corresponding actual demand arrives. Appropriate production and inventory control using demand information leads to the decrease of inventory and backlog costs. For a single stage system, the optimal base stock and release lead time have been discussed in the literature. In practical production systems the manufacturing system has multiple processes. The multiple stage production and inventory system with ADI, however, has been analyzed by simulation or assuming exponential processing time. That is, their theoretical analysis and optimization of release lead time and base stock level have little been obtained because of its difficulty. In this paper, theoretical analysis of a two-stage production inventory system with advance demand information is developed, where the processing time is assumed deterministic and identical; demand arrival process is Poisson, and an order base stock policy is adopted. Using the analytical results, optimal release lead time and optimal base stock levels for minimizing the average cost on the holding and backlog costs are explicitly derived.

  4. 2nd ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer: locally advanced stage III non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, W E E; De Ruysscher, D; Weder, W; Le Péchoux, C; De Leyn, P; Hoffmann, H; Westeel, V; Stahel, R; Felip, E; Peters, S

    2015-08-01

    To complement the existing treatment guidelines for all tumour types, ESMO organises consensus conferences to focus on specific issues in each type of tumour. The 2nd ESMO Consensus Conference on Lung Cancer was held on 11-12 May 2013 in Lugano. A total of 35 experts met to address several questions on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in each of four areas: pathology and molecular biomarkers, first-line/second and further lines of treatment in advanced disease, early-stage disease and locally advanced disease. For each question, recommendations were made including reference to the grade of recommendation and level of evidence. This consensus paper focuses on locally advanced disease.

  5. TNM classification system for primary cutaneous lymphomas other than mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome: a proposal of the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas (ISCL) and the Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force of the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC).

    PubMed

    Kim, Youn H; Willemze, Rein; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Whittaker, Sean; Olsen, Elise A; Ranki, Annamari; Dummer, Reinhard; Hoppe, Richard T

    2007-07-15

    Currently availabel staging systems for non-Hodgkin lymphomas are not useful for clinical staging classification of most primary cutaneous lymphomas. The tumor, node, metastases (TNM) system used for mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS) is not appropriate for other primary cutaneous lymphomas. A usable, unified staging system would improve the communication about the state of disease, selection of appropriate management, standardization of enrollment/response criteria in clinical trials, and collection/analysis of prospective survival data. Toward this goal, during the recent meetings of the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas (ISCL) and the cutaneous lymphoma task force of the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), the representatives have established a consensus proposal of a TNM classification system applicable for all primary cutaneous lymphomas other than MF and SS. Due to the clinical and pathologic heterogeneity of the cutaneous lymphomas, the currently proposed TNM system is meant to be primarily an anatomic documentation of disease extent and not to be used as a prognostic guide.

  6. Delayed type hypersensitivity response to recall antigens does not accurately reflect immune competence in advanced stage breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Kathy; Rinn, Kristine; Disis, Mary L

    2002-07-01

    The development of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to recall antigens has long been utilized as a measure of immune competence. It is assumed that because patients with advanced stage cancers exhibit multiple immune system defects they may not be responsive to immunization. We pre-selected patients with advanced HER-2/neu (HER2) overexpressing breast and ovarian cancers for enrolment into a phase I trial designed to evaluate the immunogenicity of a HER2 peptide vaccine based on the patient's immune competence as assessed by DTH skin testing to common recall antigens (Multitest CMI, Institut Merieux, Lyon, France). At the time of a positive DTH response to tetanus toxoid (tt) peripheral blood was obtained to measure T cell responses to tt. Of 53 patients evaluated, 38 (72%) were not anergic. Among the 15 (28%) who were, seven patients with advanced stage breast cancer were re-tested a median of 26 days (range 12-150 days) after receiving a tt bopster vaccination. Five of the seven had positive DTH responses when re-challenged with tt and six had peripheral blood tetanus specific T cell response with stimulation index >2.0. Thus, the majority of patients studied with advanced stage breast or ovarian cancer were able to mount a DTH response to common recall antigens. Moreover, a negative response by DTH testing to a battery of common recall antigens was not a reflection of the breast cancer patient's ability to mount a cell-mediated immune response to a vaccinated antigen, tt.

  7. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage and locally advanced small bulk squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx.

    PubMed

    Tichler, T; Ramon, Y; Rath, P; Hendler, S; Brenner, H J

    1988-01-01

    Thirty patients with Stages I, II and III squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx (6, 12 and 12 patients, respectively) were entered into a combined modality protocol using preoperative chemotherapy, followed by resection with or without radical neck dissection and radiotherapy. None of the patients received prior treatment and all had good performance status. Primary sites included alveolar ridge (in nine patients), buccal mucosa (in eight), tongue (in six), floor of mouth (in five), and hard palate and tonsillar fossa in one each. Chemotherapy was given as a neoadjuvant debulking procedure using two courses of the Price-Hill regimen (5FU, methotrexate with citrovorum rescue, vincristine, bleomycin, and hydrocortisone) followed in 10 to 14 days by local resection for Stage I-II patients and radical neck dissection plus radiotherapy for Stage III patients. Response to chemotherapy alone was observed in 70% (21 of 30), with 17% (5 of 30) complete responders. Responses were seen in 100% of Stage I, 75% of Stage II, and 50% of Stage III patients. Age greater than 80 years was a poor prognostic indicator. Both men and women responded equally well. Of the 25 patients not entering CR with chemotherapy, a further 75% (11 of 15) did so after local resection and 50% (5 of 10) after local resection, radical neck dissection, and radiotherapy. Overall salvage rate post chemotherapy was 64% (16 of 25). All five patients in CR with chemotherapy alone are alive at a median follow-up time of greater than or equal to 43 months; full survival data are discussed. Toxicity was minimal and did not affect change in treatment course in any patient. These results show that further investigations on the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage and locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx are indicated.

  8. Could S6K1 immunopositivity be used to distinguish early and advanced stages of endometrioid endometrial adenocarcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Gün, İsmet; Özdamar, Özkan; Küçükodacı, Zafer; Muhçu, Murat; Demirel, Dilaver

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the immunopositivity of S6K1, a crucial effector of the mTOR signaling pathway, varies between early-stage low-grade and advanced-stage high-grade endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma (EEA) as well as to discuss its prognostic significance. Material and Methods A total of 22 normal endometrial tissue samples (Control group) and 41 EEA specimens (Study group) were enrolled in the study, and all the samples underwent immunohistochemical staining for S6 kinase alpha (S6K1). The study group was further evaluated in two subgroups; stage 1A, grade 1 (Group 1) and stage ≥1A, grade 2 or 3 (Group 2). Group 2 patients were considered as a poor prognosis for EEA. The samples were examined by two independent pathologists. Statistical analyses were performed using the Student’s t-test for continuous variables, the Chi-square test for categorical variables, and one-way analysis of variance for the comparison of multiple variables. Results The immunopositivity rate for all the included EEA patients was 56.1%, whereas none of the 22 normal endometrial tissue samples revealed immunoreactivity for S6K1. The immunopositivity rates were significantly different between Groups 1 and 2 [38.1% (8/21) and 75.0% (15/20), respectively, p=0.039]. When S6K1 positivity was used as a criterion of poor prognosis in EEA, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated to be 62%, 75%, 72%, and 65%, respectively (OR: 4.9 and 95% CI: 1.3–18.7). Conclusion S6K1 was positive in the majority of EEAs and malignancies at an advanced stage. Higher grade disease had a significantly higher rate of S6K1 positivity. S6K1 immunopositivity appears to be a promising method to predict poor prognosis in EEA.

  9. Could S6K1 immunopositivity be used to distinguish early and advanced stages of endometrioid endometrial adenocarcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Gün, İsmet; Özdamar, Özkan; Küçükodacı, Zafer; Muhçu, Murat; Demirel, Dilaver

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the immunopositivity of S6K1, a crucial effector of the mTOR signaling pathway, varies between early-stage low-grade and advanced-stage high-grade endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma (EEA) as well as to discuss its prognostic significance. Material and Methods A total of 22 normal endometrial tissue samples (Control group) and 41 EEA specimens (Study group) were enrolled in the study, and all the samples underwent immunohistochemical staining for S6 kinase alpha (S6K1). The study group was further evaluated in two subgroups; stage 1A, grade 1 (Group 1) and stage ≥1A, grade 2 or 3 (Group 2). Group 2 patients were considered as a poor prognosis for EEA. The samples were examined by two independent pathologists. Statistical analyses were performed using the Student’s t-test for continuous variables, the Chi-square test for categorical variables, and one-way analysis of variance for the comparison of multiple variables. Results The immunopositivity rate for all the included EEA patients was 56.1%, whereas none of the 22 normal endometrial tissue samples revealed immunoreactivity for S6K1. The immunopositivity rates were significantly different between Groups 1 and 2 [38.1% (8/21) and 75.0% (15/20), respectively, p=0.039]. When S6K1 positivity was used as a criterion of poor prognosis in EEA, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated to be 62%, 75%, 72%, and 65%, respectively (OR: 4.9 and 95% CI: 1.3–18.7). Conclusion S6K1 was positive in the majority of EEAs and malignancies at an advanced stage. Higher grade disease had a significantly higher rate of S6K1 positivity. S6K1 immunopositivity appears to be a promising method to predict poor prognosis in EEA. PMID:27651726

  10. Efficacy Comparison Between Total Laryngectomy and Nonsurgical Organ-Preservation Modalities in Treatment of Advanced Stage Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaoyuan; Zhou, Qi; Zhang, Xianquan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It remains unclear whether the efficacy of nonsurgical organ-preservation modalities (NOP) in the treatment of advanced-stage laryngeal cancer was noninferiority compared with that of total laryngectomy (TL). The objective of this study was to compare the curative effects between TL and NOP in the treatment of advanced-stage laryngeal cancer through a meta-analysis. Clinical studies were retrieved from the electronic databases of PubMed, Embase, Wanfang, and Chinese National Knowledge infrastructure. A meta-analysis was performed to investigate the differences in the curative efficacy of advanced-stage laryngeal cancer between TL and the nonsurgical method. Two reviewers screened all titles and abstracts, and independently assessed all articles. All identified studies were retrospective. Sixteen retrospective studies involving 8308 patients (4478 in the TL group and 3701 in the nonsurgical group) were included in this meta-analysis. The analysis results displayed the advantage of TL for 2-year and 5-year overall survival (OS)(OR 2.79, 95% CI 1.85–4.23 and OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.09–2.14) as well as in 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS)(OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.61–1.98), but no significant difference in 2-year DSS was detected between the 2 groups (OR = 2.09,95% CI0.69–6.40). Additionally, there were no significant differences between TL and NOP for 5-year local control (LC) either (OR = 1.75, 95% CI 0.87–3.53). When we carried out subgroup analyses, the advantage of TL was especially obvious in T4 subgroups, but not in T3 subgroups. This is the first study to compare the curative effects on advanced-stage laryngeal cancer using meta-analytic methodology. Although there was a trend in favor of TL for OS and DSS, there is no clear difference in oncologic outcome between TL and NOP. Therefore, other factors such as tumor T-stage and size, lymph node metastasis, and physical condition are also important indicators for treatment choice. PMID:27057837

  11. Modeling of an advanced concept of a double stage Hall effect thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Garrigues, L.; Boniface, C.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2008-11-15

    We present a study of the principle and operation of a two-stage Hall effect thruster, the SPT-MAG, using a two-dimensional quasineutral hybrid model coupled with a Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport. The purpose of the two-stage design is the separation of ion production and acceleration in two separate chambers, the ionization stage and the acceleration stage, with separate control of acceleration voltage and total ionization. The originality of the SPT-MAG lies in the magnetic field configuration in the ionization chamber. Electrons are confined by this magnetic field while ions are supposed to be trapped in the electric potential well supposedly resulting from the magnetic configuration, and guided toward the acceleration stage. The acceleration stage is similar to the channel of a conventional Hall effect thruster. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the physics of the SPT-MAG and to understand the formation of the positive ion trap in the ionization chamber. Using a hybrid model and a Monte Carlo simulation we show that under typical operating conditions most of the ionization in the chamber is due to high energy electrons accelerated in the channel and entering the chamber rather than to electrons accelerated by the voltage applied in the ionization chamber. We also raise the question of the possible role of an additional emissive cathode inside the ionization chamber. The model predicts that an electric potential well guiding the ions to the channel entrance forms in the chamber only if the intermediate electrode inside the chamber is an emissive cathode (which is not the case in recent configurations used for this thruster)

  12. Prognosis and Clinicopathologic Features of Patients With Advanced Stage Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (IDH) Mutant and IDH Wild-Type Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Lipika; Govindan, Aparna; Sheth, Rahul A.; Nardi, Valentina; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Faris, Jason E.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Ryan, David P.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Allen, Jill N.; Murphy, Janet E.; Saha, Supriya K.; Hong, Theodore S.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Chong, Dawn Q.; Deshpande, Vikram; Borger, Darrell R.; Iafrate, A. John; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Zheng, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background. Conflicting data exist regarding the prognostic impact of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), and limited data exist in patients with advanced-stage disease. Similarly, the clinical phenotype of patients with advanced IDH mutant (IDHm) ICC has not been characterized. In this study, we report the correlation of IDH mutation status with prognosis and clinicopathologic features in patients with advanced ICC. Methods. Patients with histologically confirmed advanced ICC who underwent tumor mutational profiling as a routine part of their care between 2009 and 2014 were evaluated. Clinical and pathological data were collected by retrospective chart review for patients with IDHm versus IDH wild-type (IDHwt) ICC. Pretreatment tumor volume was calculated on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Results. Of the 104 patients with ICC who were evaluated, 30 (28.8%) had an IDH mutation (25.0% IDH1, 3.8% IDH2). The median overall survival did not differ significantly between IDHm and IDHwt patients (15.0 vs. 20.1 months, respectively; p = .17). The pretreatment serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) level in IDHm and IDHwt patients was 34.5 and 118.0 U/mL, respectively (p = .04). Age at diagnosis, sex, histologic grade, and pattern of metastasis did not differ significantly by IDH mutation status. Conclusion. The IDH mutation was not associated with prognosis in patients with advanced ICC. The clinical phenotypes of advanced IDHm and IDHwt ICC were similar, but patients with IDHm ICC had a lower median serum CA19-9 level at presentation. Implications for Practice: Previous studies assessing the prognostic impact of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutation in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) mainly focused on patients with early-stage disease who have undergone resection. These studies offer conflicting results. The target population for clinical trials of IDH inhibitors is patients with

  13. Contemporary surgical management of advanced end stage emphysema: an evidence based review.

    PubMed

    Sachithanandan, Anand; Badmanaban, Balaji

    2012-06-01

    Emphysema is a progressive unrelenting component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a major source of mortality and morbidity globally. The prevalence of moderate to severe emphysema is approximately 5% in Malaysia and likely to increase in the future. Hence advanced emphysema will emerge as a leading cause of hospital admission and a major consumer of healthcare resources in this country in the future. Patients with advanced disease have a poor quality of life and reduced survival. Medical therapy has been largely ineffective for many patients however certain subgroups have disease amenable to surgical palliation. Effective surgical therapies include lung volume reduction surgery, lung transplantation and bullectomy. This article is a comprehensive evidence based review of the literature evaluating the rationale, efficacy, safety and limitations of surgery for advanced emphysema highlighting the importance of meticulous patient selection and local factors relevant to Malaysia.

  14. A population-based study of prognosis in advanced stage follicular lymphoma managed by watch and wait.

    PubMed

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Bilgrau, Anders E; de Nully Brown, Peter; Mylam, Karen J; Ahmad, Syed A; Pedersen, Lars M; Gang, Anne O; Bentzen, Hans H; Juul, Maja B; Bergmann, Olav J; Pedersen, Robert S; Nielsen, Berit J; Johnsen, Hans E; Dybkaer, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin; Hutchings, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Watch and wait (WAW) is a common approach for asymptomatic, advanced stage follicular lymphoma (FL), but single-agent rituximab is an alternative for these patients. In this nationwide study we describe the outcome of patients selected for WAW. A cohort of 286 out of 849 (34%) stage III-IVA FL patients seen between 2000 and 2011, were managed expectantly and included. The 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 35% [95% confidence interval (CI) 29-42]. The 10-year overall survival (OS) was 65% (95%CI 54-78), and the cumulative risk of dying from lymphoma within 10 years of diagnosis was 13% (95%CI 7-20). Elevated lactate dehydrogenase and > four nodal regions involved were associated with a higher risk of lymphoma treatment and death from lymphoma. The WAW patients and a matched background population had similar OS during the first 50 months after diagnosis (P = 0·7), but WAW patients had increased risk of death after 50 months (P < 0·001). The estimated loss of residual life after 10 years was 6·8 months. The 10-year cumulative risk of histological transformation was 22% (95%CI 15-29) and the 3-year OS after transformation was 71% (95%CI 58-87%). In conclusion, advanced stage FL managed by WAW had a favourable outcome and abandoning this strategy could lead to overtreatment in some patients.

  15. A heartrending burden of gynaecological cancers in advance stage at nuclear institute of medicine and radiotherapy Jamshoro Sindh

    PubMed Central

    Bibi, Seema; Ashfaque, Sanober; Laghari, Naeem Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: In Pakistan gynaecological cancers are among the leading causes of women’s morbidity and mortality posing huge financial burden on families, communities and state. Due to lack of national cancer registry exact facts and figures are unknown therefore this study was planned to find out prevalence, age, site and stage of presentation of gynaecological cancers at Nuclear Institute of Medicine and Radiotherapy (NIMRA), Jamshoro. Methods: A retrospective, cross sectional study was conducted from 1st January 2011 to 31st December 2011 at NIMRA Jamshoro. All cases of genital tract cancers were evaluated, required data was entered on predesigned performa and results were analyzed manually. Results: Out of 2401 total registered cancer cases, 231 (9.6%) patients were suffering from gynaecological cancer making it third most common cancer. Ovary was commonest site followed by cervix and uterus. More than 60% cases presented in advanced stage, mostly during 4th and 5th decade of life. Conclusion: Gynecological cancer was among top three cancers at one of the busiest public sector cancer institute in Sindh province and significant number presented in advance stage making treatment difficult and expensive. There is urgent need for development and implementation of an effective health policy regarding cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:27022358

  16. “EXHALE”: exercise as a strategy for rehabilitation in advanced stage lung cancer patients: a randomized clinical trial comparing the effects of 12 weeks supervised exercise intervention versus usual care for advanced stage lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in North America and Western Europe. Patients with lung cancer in general have reduced physical capacity, functional capacity, poor quality of life and increased levels of anxiety and depression. Intervention studies indicate that physical training can address these issues. However, there is a lack of decisive evidence regarding the effect of physical exercise in patients with advanced lung cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of a twelve weeks, twice weekly program consisting of: supervised, structured training in a group of advanced lung cancer patients (cardiovascular and strength training, relaxation). Methods/Design A randomized controlled trial will test the effects of the exercise intervention in 216 patients with advanced lung cancer (non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stage IIIb - IV and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) extensive disease (ED)). Primary outcome is maximal oxygen uptake (VO2peak). Secondary outcomes are muscle strength (1RM), functional capacity (6MWD), lung capacity (Fev1) and patient reported outcome (including anxiety, depression (HADS) and quality of life (HRQOL)). Discussion The present randomized controlled study will provide data on the effectiveness of a supervised exercise intervention in patients receiving systemic therapy for advanced lung cancer. It is hoped that the intervention can improve physical capacity and functional level, during rehabilitation of cancer patients with complex symptom burden and help them to maintain independent function for as long as possible. Trial registration http://ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01881906 PMID:24124893

  17. Comparison of weight changes following unilateral and staged bilateral STN DBS for advanced PD

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eric M; Kurundkar, Ashish; Cutter, Gary R; Huang, He; Guthrie, Barton L; Watts, Ray L; Walker, Harrison C

    2011-01-01

    Unilateral and bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) result in weight gain in the initial postoperative months, but little is known about the changes in weight following unilateral and staged bilateral STN DBS over longer time intervals. A case–control comparison evaluated weight changes over 2 years in 43 consecutive unilateral STN DBS patients, among whom 25 elected to undergo staged bilateral STN DBS, and 21 age-matched and disease severity matched PD controls without DBS. Regression analyses incorporating age, gender, and baseline weight in case or control were conducted to assess weight changes 2 years after the initial unilateral surgery. Unilateral STN DBS and staged bilateral STN DBS patients gained 3.9 ± 2.0 kg and 5.6 ± 2.1 kg versus their preoperative baseline weight (P < 0.001, respectively) while PD controls without DBS lost 0.8 ± 1.1 kg. Although bilateral STN DBS patients gained 1.7 kg more than unilateral STN DBS patients at 2 years, this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.885). Although there was a trend toward greater weight gain in staged bilateral STN DBS patients versus unilateral patients, we found no evidence for an equivalent or synergistic increase in body weight following placement of the second DBS electrode. PMID:22398977

  18. Two stage low noise advanced technology fan. 1: Aerodynamic, structural, and acoustic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, H. E.; Ruschak, J. T.; Sofrin, T. G.

    1974-01-01

    A two-stage fan was designed to reduce noise 20 db below current requirements. The first-stage rotor has a design tip speed of 365.8 m/sec and a hub/tip ratio of 0.4. The fan was designed to deliver a pressure ratio of 1.9 with an adiabatic efficiency of 85.3 percent at a specific inlet corrected flow of 209.2kg/sec/sq m. Noise reduction devices include acoustically treated casing walls, a flowpath exit acoustic splitter, a translating centerbody sonic inlet device, widely spaced blade rows, and the proper ratio of blades and vanes. Multiple-circular-arc rotor airfoils, resettable stators, split outer casings, and capability to go to close blade-row spacing are also included.

  19. Advancements in Estimating Crop Growth Stages Using RADARSAT-2 and Terrasar-X Polarimetric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampropoulos, G.; Li, Y.; Liu, T.

    2015-04-01

    This paper uses RADARSAT-2 quad Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) and TerraSAR-X dual polarimetric SAR data to monitor agriculture crop growth stages. Two RADARSAT-2 Fine Quad Wide (FQW) beam modes FQ2W and FQ10W, each with 5 sets of data and 13 sets of Stripmap TerraSAR-X data were used in the study. Both RADARSAT-2 POLSAR data and TerraSARX data were acquired in summer 2012 outside Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. The study was carried out to two crop types: canola and wheat, each contains 5 regions of interest from ground truth crop classification map in the image scene. Polarimetric features such as differential reflectivity bands ratio, entropy, anisotropy, alpha angle, lambda, scattering diversity and polarization index were evaluated for two crop types. The results from both RADARSAT-2 and TerraSAR-X data were compared and they demonstrated clear relationships between crop growth stages and polarimetric parameters. It is observed that entropy, lambda and differential reflectivity from both data have similar responses to crop growth stages in their common coverage period. The results were also validated using ground truth information.

  20. Technology requirements for advanced earth-orbital transportation systems: Summary report. [single stage to orbit vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haefeli, R. C.; Littler, E. G.; Hurley, J. B.; Winter, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    Areas of advanced technology that are either critical or offer significant benefits to the development of future Earth-orbit transportation systems were identified. Technology assessment was based on the application of these technologies to fully reusable, single-state-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle concepts with horizontal landing capability. Study guidelines included mission requirements similar to space shuttle, an operational capability beginning in 1995, and main propulsion to be advanced hydrogen-fueled rocket engines. The technical and economic feasibility of this class of SSTO concepts were evaluated as well as the comparative features of three operational take-off modes, which were vertical boost, horizontal sled launch, and horizontal take-off with subsequent inflight fueling. Projections of both normal and accelerated technology growth were made. Figures of merit were derived to provide relative rankings of technology areas. The influence of selected accelerated areas on vehicle design and program costs was analyzed by developing near-optimum point designs.

  1. Two-Stage Axial Compressor Rig Designed To Develop and Validate Advanced Aerodynamic Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, Louis M.

    2003-01-01

    Future aeropropulsion gas turbine engines must be affordable in addition to being energy efficient and environmentally benign. Progress in aerodynamic design capability is required not only to maximize the specific thrust of next-generation engines without sacrificing fuel consumption, but also to reduce parts count by increasing the aerodynamic loading of the compression system. To meet future compressor requirements, the NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating advanced aerodynamic design concepts that will lead to more compact, higher efficiency, and wider operability configurations than are currently in operation.

  2. Image Guided Hypofractionated 3-Dimensional Radiation Therapy in Patients With Inoperable Advanced Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Osti, Mattia Falchetto; Agolli, Linda; Valeriani, Maurizio; Falco, Teresa; Bracci, Stefano; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (HypoRT) can potentially improve local control with a higher biological effect and shorter overall treatment time. Response, local control, toxicity rates, and survival rates were evaluated in patients affected by inoperable advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received HypoRT. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled; 27% had stage IIIA, 50% had stage IIIB, and 23% had stage IV disease. All patients underwent HypoRT with a prescribed total dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions of 3 Gy each. Radiation treatment was delivered using an image guided radiation therapy technique to verify correct position. Toxicities were graded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity score. Survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months (range, 4-56 months). All patients completed radiation therapy and received the total dose of 60 Gy to the primary tumor and positive lymph nodes. The overall response rate after radiation therapy was 83% (3 patients with complete response and 22 patients with partial response). The 2-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 38.1% and 36%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence/persistence occurred in 11 (37%) patients. Distant metastasis occurred in 17 (57%) patients. Acute toxicities occurred consisting of grade 1 to 2 hematological toxicity in 5 patients (17%) and grade 3 in 1 patient; grade 1 to 2 esophagitis in 12 patients (40%) and grade 3 in 1 patient; and grade 1 to 2 pneumonitis in 6 patients (20%) and grade 3 in 2 patients (7%). Thirty-three percent of patients developed grade 1 to 2 late toxicities. Only 3 patients developed grade 3 late adverse effects: esophagitis in 1 patient and pneumonitis in 2 patients. Conclusions: Hypofractionated curative radiation therapy is a feasible and well-tolerated treatment for patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Randomized

  3. [Diagnosis and treatment of depression in the advanced stage of cancer].

    PubMed

    Ronson, A

    2002-10-01

    The diagnosis of depression in patients with advanced cancer is a particularly complex task. The lack of diagnostic tools specifically developed for this patient population, the difficulty of interpreting neurovegetative symptoms of depression--which can result from the neoplastic disease--and the "normal and understandable" nature of many symptoms or signs of psychological distress are among the main obstacles to a clear-cut diagnosis of depression. Things go even more complex when it comes about to discuss whether one should treat patients displaying psychological distress that does not meet established criteria for the diagnosis of a depressive illness. When the indication to treat is finally acknowledged, the choice of the optimal antidepressant will depend upon a series of parameters including survival expectancy, tolerance profile and drug interactions. Though we currently lack prospective data about the efficacy and safety of antidepressants in depressed patients with advanced cancer, extrapolation of data available from other patient populations with severe medical conditions and clinical experience allow to draw guidelines aimed at helping healthcare professionals faced with those problems to improve the quality of life of their patients. These elements are presented and discussed in this paper in the light of the recent developments resulting from the growing interest of the medical community to the care to patients with terminal illness. PMID:12474322

  4. Non-albuminuric renal disease among subjects with advanced stages of chronic kidney failure related to type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Boronat, Mauro; García-Cantón, César; Quevedo, Virginia; Lorenzo, Dionisio L; López-Ríos, Laura; Batista, Fátima; Riaño, Marta; Saavedra, Pedro; Checa, María D

    2014-03-01

    Urinary albumin excretion has been consistently found to be normal in a significant number of subjects with early stages of diabetic kidney disease. This study was aimed to estimate the prevalence and characteristics of non-albuminuric chronic kidney disease associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus among subjects who reach advanced stages of renal failure. Study population was composed of incident patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min) related to type 2 diabetes in a tertiary hospital from Gran Canaria (Spain) during a period of 2 years. Subjects were classified as normoalbuminuric (urinary albumin-to-creatine ratio [UACR] <30 mg/g), microalbuminuric (UACR ≥30 and <300 mg/g), or proteinuric (UACR ≥300 mg/g). Of 78 eligible patients, 21.8% had normoalbuminuria, 20.5% had microalbuminuria, and 57.7% had proteinuria. Individuals with normoalbuminuria were mostly women and had a lower prevalence of smoking and polyneuropathy than subjects with microalbuminuria or proteinuria. They also presented greater measures of body mass index and waist circumference, higher values of total and LDL cholesterol, and lower values of HbA1c and serum creatinine than subjects with microalbuminuria or proteinuria. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that female sex (positively) and HbA1c and polyneuropathy (negatively) were independently associated with absence of albuminuria. In conclusion, around 20% of subjects with diabetes-related advanced chronic kidney disease, characteristically women, have normal urinary albumin excretion. HbA1c and polyneuropathy are inversely related to this non-albuminuric form of nephropathy.

  5. Sulfur removal in advanced two-stage fluidized-bed combustion. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Wangerow, J.R.; Rue, D.M.

    1994-06-01

    The objective of this study is to obtain data on the rates of reaction between, hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and uncalcined calcium-based sorbents under operating conditions relevant to first stage (carbonizer) of Advanced Two-Stage Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustors (PFBC). In these systems the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in the first stage generally exceeds the equilibrium value for calcium carbonate decomposition. Therefore, removal of sulfur compounds takes place through the reaction between H{sub 2}S and calcium carbonate. To achieve this objective the rates of reaction between hydrogen sulfide and uncalcined calcium-based sorbents will be determined by conducting tests in pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and high-pressure/high-temperature fluidized-bed reactor (HPTR) units. The effects of sorbent type, sorbent particle size, reactor temperature and pressure, and CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S partial pressures on the sulfidation reaction rate will be determined. During this quarter, the high-pressure thermogravimetric analyzer (HPTGA) unit was installed and the shakedown process was completed. Several tests were conducted in the HPTGA unit to establish the operating procedure and the repeatability of the experimental results. Sulfidation by conducting the baseline sulfidation tests. The results are currently being analyzed.

  6. Sulfur removal in advanced two-staged pressurized fluidized-bed combustion; [Quarterly] report, September 1--November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Wangerow, J.R.; Rue, D.M.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this study is to obtain data on the rates of reaction between hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and uncalcined calcium-based sorbents under operating conditions relevant to first stage (carbonizer) of Advanced Two-Stage Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustors (PFBC). In these systems the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in the first stage generally exceeds the equilibrium value for calcium carbonate decomposition. Therefore, removal of sulfur compounds takes place through the reaction between H{sub 2}S and calcium carbonate. To achieve this objective, the rates of reaction between hydrogen sulfide and uncalcined calcium-based sorbents will be determined by conducting tests in pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and high-pressure/high-temperature fluidized-bed reactor (HPTR) units. The effects of sorbent type, sorbent particle size, reactor temperature and pressure, and CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S partial pressures on the sulfidation reaction rate will be determined. A pressurized TGA unit has been purchased by IGT for use in this project.

  7. Advanced Stage Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Ovary is both Rare and Highly Lethal: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Zaino, Richard J.; Brady, Mark F.; Lele, Subodh M.; Michael, Helen; Greer, Benjamin; Bookman, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Primary mucinous adenocarcinomas of the ovary are uncommon and their biologic behavior uncertain. Retrospective studies suggest that many mucinous carcinomas diagnosed as primary to the ovary were actually metastatic from another site. A prospective randomized trial provided an opportunity to estimate the frequency of mucinous tumors, diagnostic reproducibility, and clinical outcomes. Methods A phase III trial enrolled 4000 women with stage III or IV ovarian carcinoma, treated by surgical staging and debulking, with randomization to one of five chemotherapeutic arms. Slides and pathology reports classified as primary mucinous carcinoma were reviewed independently by three pathologists. Cases were re-classified as primary or metastatic to the ovary according to two methods. Overall survival (OS) of reclassified groups was compared with each other and with that of patients with serous carcinomas. Results Forty-four cases were classified as mucinous adenocarcinoma at review. Using either method, only about one third were interpreted by the three reviewers as primary mucinous carcinomas. Reproducibility of interpretations among the reviewers was high with unanimity of opinion in 30 of the 44 (68%) cases. The median survival (MS) did not differ significantly between the groups interpreted as primary or metastatic, but the OS was significantly less than that for women with serous carcinoma (14 vs 42 months, p<0.001). Conclusion Advanced stage mucinous carcinoma of the ovary is very rare and is associated with poor OS. Many mucinous adenocarcinomas that are diagnosed as primary ovarian neoplasms appear to be metastatic to the ovary. PMID:20862744

  8. Design and development of an advanced two-stage centrifugal compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.L.; Waterman, W.F.

    1995-04-01

    Small turboshaft engines require high-pressure-ratio, high-efficiency compressors to provide low engine fuel consumption. This paper describes the aeromechanical design and development of a 3.3 kg/s (7.3 lb/sec), 14:1 pressure ratio two-stage centrifugal compressor, which is used in the T800-LHT-800 helicopter engine. The design employs highly nonradial, splitter bladed impellers with swept leading edges and compact vaned diffusers to achieve high performance in a small and robust configuration. The development effort quantified the effects of impeller diffusion and passive inducer shroud bleed on surge margin as well as the effects of impeller loading on tip clearance sensitivity and the impact of sand erosion and shroud roughness on performance. The developed compressor exceeded its performance objectives with a minimum of 23% surge margin without variable geometry. The compressor provides a high-performance, rugged, low-cost configuration ideally suited for helicopter applications.

  9. Survival analysis of patients with advanced-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma according to the Epstein-Barr virus status

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Rui; Li, Wen-Fei; Mao, Yan-Ping; Tan, Ling-Long; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Li-Zhi; Tian, Li; Lin, Ai-Hua; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The main aim of this study is to analyze the prognostic differences in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients who are positive and negative for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Results Of the 1106 patients, 248 (22.4%) had undetectable pre-treatment plasma EBV DNA levels. The total distant metastasis rate for EBV-negative group vs. EBV-positive group were 3.6% (9/248) vs. 15.0% (128/858) (P < 0.001). The estimated 4-year disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and locoregional relapse-free survival (LRRFS) for EBV-negative group vs. EBV-positive group were 88.9% vs. 76.9% (P < 0.001), 93.6% vs. 85.9% (P = 0.001), 96.7% vs. 84.8% (P < 0.001) and 94.1% vs. 90.0% (P = 0.1), respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the EBV status was an independent prognostic factor for DFS (HR, 1.813; 95% CI, 1.219-2.695; P = 0.003), OS (HR, 1.828; 95% CI, 1.075-3.107; P = 0.026) and DMFS (HR, 3.678; 95% CI, 1.859-7.277; P <0.001), and overall stage still remained the most important prognostic factor in patients with stage III-IVB NPC. Methods and Materials Data on 1106 patients with non-metastatic, histologically proven advanced-stage (III-IVB) NPC who underwent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were retrospectively reviewed. Patient survival between different EBV status groups were compared. Conclusions EBV status was an independent prognostic factor for patients with stage III–IVB NPC. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) plus concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) should be better treatment regimen for EBV-positive patients since distant metastasis was the main failure pattern, and CCRT may be enough for EBV-negative patients. PMID:27008701

  10. Primary Tumor Site as a Predictor of Treatment Outcome for Definitive Radiotherapy of Advanced-Stage Oral Cavity Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Kang, Chung-Jan; Lee, Li-Yu; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of definitive radiotherapy (RT) for oral cavity cancers and to assess prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: Definitive RT was performed on 115 patients with oral cavity cancers at Stages III, IVA, and IVB, with a distribution of 6%, 47%, and 47%, respectively. The median dose of RT was 72Gy (range, 62-76Gy). Cisplatin-based chemotherapy was administered to 95% of the patients. Eleven patients underwent salvage surgery after RT failure. Results: Eight-eight (76.5%) patients responded partially and 23 (20%) completely; of the patients who responded, 18% and 57%, respectively, experienced a durable effect of treatment. The 3-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and progression-free survival were 22%, 27%, and 25%, respectively. The 3-year PFS rates based on the primary tumor sites were as follows: Group I (buccal, mouth floor, and gum) 51%, Group II (retromolar and hard palate) 18%, and Group III (tongue and lip) 6% (p < 0.0001). The 3-year progression-free survival was 41% for N0 patients and 19% for patients with N+ disease (p = 0.012). The T stage and RT technique did not affect survival. The patients who underwent salvage surgery demonstrated better 3-year overall survival and disease-specific survival (53% vs. 19%, p = 0.015 and 53% vs. 24%, p = 0.029, respectively). Subsite group, N+, and salvage surgery were the only significant prognostic factors for survival after multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The primary tumor site and neck stage are prognostic predictors in advanced-stage oral cancer patients who received radical RT. The primary tumor extension and RT technique did not influence survival.

  11. Trousseau’s syndrome in a patient with advanced stage gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Tai-Long; Rau, Kung-Ming; Chung, Wen-Jung; Tai, Wei-Chen; Wang, Shih-Ho; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chou, Yeh-Pin; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Yen-Hao; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2015-01-01

    Patients with cancer are at high risk for thrombotic events, which are known collectively as Trousseau’s syndrome. Herein, we report a 66-year-old male patient who was diagnosed with terminal stage gastric cancer and liver metastasis and who had an initial clinical presentation of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Acute ischemia of the left lower leg that resulted in gangrenous changes occurred during admission. Subsequent angiography of the left lower limb was then performed. This procedure revealed arterial thrombosis of the left common iliac artery with extension to the external iliac artery, the left common iliac artery, the posterior tibial artery, and the peroneal artery, which were occluded by thrombi. Aspiration of the thrombi demonstrated that these were not tumor thrombi. The interesting aspect of our case was that the disease it presented as arterial thrombotic events, which may correlate with gastric adenocarcinoma. In summary, we suggested that the unexplained thrombotic events might be one of the initial presentations of occult malignancy and that thromboprophylaxis should always be considered. PMID:26379411

  12. Limited genomic heterogeneity of circulating melanoma cells in advanced stage patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Carmen; Li, Julia; Luttgen, Madelyn S.; Kolatkar, Anand; Kendall, Jude T.; Flores, Edna; Topp, Zheng; Samlowski, Wolfram E.; McClay, Edward; Bethel, Kelly; Ferrone, Soldano; Hicks, James; Kuhn, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Purpose. Circulating melanoma cells (CMCs) constitute a potentially important representation of time-resolved tumor biology in patients. To date, genomic characterization of CMCs has been limited due to the lack of a robust methodology capable of identifying them in a format suitable for downstream characterization. Here, we have developed a methodology to detect intact CMCs that enables phenotypic, morphometric and genomic analysis at the single cell level. Experimental design. Blood samples from 40 metastatic melanoma patients and 10 normal blood donors were prospectively collected. A panel of 7 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4)-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was used to immunocytochemically label CMCs. Detection was performed by automated digital fluorescence microscopy and multi-parametric computational analysis. Individual CMCs were captured by micromanipulation for whole genome amplification and copy number variation (CNV) analysis. Results. Based on CSPG4 expression and nuclear size, 1-250 CMCs were detected in 22 (55%) of 40 metastatic melanoma patients (0.5-371.5 CMCs ml-1). Morphometric analysis revealed that CMCs have a broad spectrum of morphologies and sizes but exhibit a relatively homogeneous nuclear size that was on average 1.5-fold larger than that of surrounding PBMCs. CNV analysis of single CMCs identified deletions of CDKN2A and PTEN, and amplification(s) of TERT, BRAF, KRAS and MDM2. Furthermore, novel chromosomal amplifications in chr12, 17 and 19 were also found. Conclusions. Our findings show that CSPG4 expressing CMCs can be found in the majority of advanced melanoma patients. High content analysis of this cell population may contribute to the design of effective personalized therapies in patients with melanoma.

  13. Limited Genomic Heterogeneity of Circulating Melanoma Cells in Advanced Stage Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Carmen; Li, Julia; Luttgen, Madelyn S.; Kolatkar, Anand; Kendall, Jude T.; Flores, Edna; Topp, Zheng; Samlowski, Wolfram E.; McClay, Ed; Bethel, Kelly; Ferrone, Soldano; Hicks, James; Kuhn, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Circulating melanoma cells (CMCs) constitute a potentially important representation of time-resolved tumor biology in patients. To date, genomic characterization of CMCs has been limited due to the lack of a robust methodology capable of identifying them in a format suitable for downstream characterization. Here, we have developed a methodology to detect intact CMCs that enables phenotypic, morphometric and genomic analysis at the single cell level. Experimental design Blood samples from 40 metastatic melanoma patients and 10 normal blood donors (NBD) were prospectively collected. A panel of 7 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4)-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) was used to immunocytochemically label CMCs. Detection was performed by automated digital fluorescence microscopy and multi-parametric computational analysis. Individual CMCs were captured by micromanipulation for whole genome amplification (WGA) and copy number variation (CNV) analysis. Results Based on CSPG4 expression and nuclear size, 1 to 250 CMCs were detected in 22 (55%) of 40 metastatic melanoma patients (0.5 to 371.5 CMCs/ml). Morphometric analysis revealed that CMCs have a broad spectrum of morphologies and sizes but exhibit a relatively homogeneous nuclear size that was on average 1.5-fold larger than that of surrounding PBMCs. CNV analysis of single CMCs identified deletions of CDKN2A and PTEN, and amplification(s) of TERT, BRAF, KRAS and MDM2. Furthermore, novel chromosomal amplifications in chr12, 17 and 19 were also found. Conclusions Our findings show that CSPG4 expressing CMCs can be found in the majority of advanced melanoma patients. High content analysis of this population may contribute to develop effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:25574741

  14. [A Case of HER2-Positive Stage IV Advanced Gastric Cancer Treated with Chemotherapy Combined with Trastuzumab].

    PubMed

    Takaya, Kai; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Honma, Satoru; Horii, Shinichiro; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Hagiwara, Motohisa; Chin, Masahiro; Hashizume, Eiji

    2016-09-01

    We report a case of human epidermal growth factor receptor(HER)2 positive stage IV advanced gastric cancer successfully treated with chemotherapy combined with trastuzumab. A 50-year-old man was diagnosed with type 3 gastric cancer complicated by liver and lymph node metastases. Owing to a HER2 immunohistochemistry tumor score of 3+, we initiated capecitabine plus CDDP plus trastuzumab chemotherapy. After 6 chemotherapy courses, computed tomography showed the liver metastasis had disappeared and the paraaortic lymph nodes had shrunk. We continued the capecitabine plus trastuzumab chemotherapy, which resulted in a progression free survival of 31 months. After 38 chemotherapy courses, the primary tumor progressed; therefore, the patient underwent surgery. Chemotherapy combined with trastuzumab can allow for resec- tion of the primary tumor. PMID:27628555

  15. Understanding the Racial and Ethnic Differences in Cost and Mortality Among Advanced Stage Prostate Cancer Patients (STROBE).

    PubMed

    Chhatre, Sumedha; Bruce Malkowicz, Stanley; Sanford Schwartz, J; Jayadevappa, Ravishankar

    2015-08-01

    The aims of the study were to understand the racial/ethnic differences in cost of care and mortality in Medicare elderly with advanced stage prostate cancer.This retrospective, observational study used SEER-Medicare data. Cohort consisted of 10,509 men aged 66 or older and diagnosed with advanced-stage prostate cancer between 2001and 2004. The cohort was followed retrospectively up to 2009. Racial/ethnic variation in cost was analyzed using 2 part-models and quantile regression. Step-wise GLM log-link and Cox regression was used to study the association between race/ethnicity and cost and mortality. Propensity score approach was used to minimize selection bias.Pattern of cost and mortality varies between racial/ethnic groups. Compared with other racial/ethnic groups, non-Hispanic white patients had higher unadjusted costs in treatment and follow-up phases. Quintile regression results indicated that in treatment phase, Hispanics had higher costs in the 95th quantile and non-Hispanic blacks had lower cost in the 95th quantile, compared with non-Hispanic white men. In terminal phase non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics had higher cost. After controlling for treatment, all-cause and prostate cancer-specific mortality was not significant for non-Hispanic black men, compared with non-Hispanic white men. However, for Asians, mortality remained significantly lower compared with non-Hispanic white men.In conclusion, relationship between race/ethnicity, cost of care, and mortality is intricate. For non-Hispanic black men, disparity in mortality can be attributed to treatment differences. To reduce racial/ethnic disparities in prostate cancer care and outcomes, tailored policies to address underuse, overuse, and misuse of treatment and health services are necessary. PMID:26266389

  16. The Modern Role of Radiation Therapy in Treating Advanced-Stage Retinoblastoma: Long-Term Outcomes and Racial Differences

    SciTech Connect

    Orman, Amber; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Miao, Feng; Markoe, Arnold; Panoff, Joseph E.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To evaluate the effects of various patient characteristics and radiation therapy treatment variables on outcomes in advanced-stage retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review of 41 eyes of 30 patients treated with external beam radiation therapy between June 1, 1992, and March 31, 2012, with a median follow-up time of 133 months (11 years). Outcome measures included overall survival, progression-free survival, local control, eye preservation rate, and toxicity. Results: Over 90% of the eyes were stage V. Definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) was delivered in 43.9% of eyes, adjuvant EBRT in 22% of eyes, and second-line/salvage EBRT in 34.1% of eyes. A relative lens sparing (RLS) technique was used in 68.3% of eyes and modified lens sparing (MLS) in 24.4% of eyes. Three eyes were treated with other techniques. Doses ≥45 Gy were used in 68.3% of eyes. Chemotherapy was a component of treatment in 53.7% of eyes. The 10-year overall survival was 87.7%, progression-free survival was 80.5%, and local control was 87.8%. White patients had significantly better overall survival than did African-American patients in univariate analysis (hazard ratio 0.09; 95% confidence interval 0.01-0.84; P=.035). Toxicity was seen in 68.3% of eyes, including 24.3% with isolated acute dermatitis. Conclusions: External beam radiation therapy continues to be an effective treatment modality for advanced retinoblastoma, achieving excellent long-term local control and survival with low rates of treatment-related toxicity and secondary malignancy.

  17. Staging of transitional cell carcinoma: Has anything changed?

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, J. N.; Bakshi, G. K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article is a systematic review of various changes in the evolution of the contemporary clinico-pathological staging of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Materials and Methods: A thorough search of the literature was done by Medline and other internet references. Results: Accurate staging of TCC is necessary for designing optimal therapy in clinical practice. Further, the current emphasis on bladder conservation and improved long-term disease free survival (DFS) necessitates minimal errors in staging and it's predictability towards recurrence and progression. Traditionally, the staging of TCC revolves around clinical and pathological findings. The staging has evolved through the understanding of various clinico- pathological factors like tumor appearance, number, size, grade, depth of invasion, muscle substratification, lymphovascular invasion and has reached the standard TNM classification. Cystoscopy and transurethral resection still remain the mainstay of staging and noninvasive imaging techniques have further enhanced the accuracy. Conclusion: The TNM classification for bladder cancer is currently the gold standard for TCC. PMID:19468363

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound for the characterization and staging of rectal cancer. Current state of the method. Technological advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gersak, Mariana M; Badea, Radu; Graur, Florin; Hajja, Nadim Al; Furcea, Luminita; Dudea, Sorin M

    2015-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound is the most accurate type of examination for the assessment of rectal tumors. Over the years, the method has advanced from gray-scale examination to intravenous contrast media administration and to different types of elastography. The multimodal approach of tumors (transrectal, transvaginal) is adapted to each case. 3D ultrasound is useful for spatial representation and precise measurement of tumor formations, using CT/MR image reconstruction; color elastography is useful for tumor characterization and staging; endoscopic ultrasound using intravenous contrast agents can help study the amount of contrast agent targeted at the level of the tumor formations and contrast wash-in/wash-out time, based on the curves displayed on the device. The transvaginal approach often allows better visualization of the tumor than the transrectal approach. Performing the procedure with the rectal ampulla distended with contrast agent may be seen as an optimization of the examination methodology. All these aspects are additional methods for gray-scale endoscopic ultrasound, capable of increasing diagnostic accuracy. This paper aims at reviewing the progress of transrectal and transvaginal ultrasound, generically called endoscopic ultrasound, for rectal tumor diagnosis and staging, with emphasis on the current state of the method and its development trends.

  19. Sulfur removal in advanced two stage pressurized fluidized bed combustion. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasian, J.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study is to obtain data on the rates and the extent of sulfation reactions involving partially sulfided calcium-based sorbents, and oxygen as well as sulfur dioxide, at operating conditions closely simulating those prevailing in the second stage (combustor) of Advanced Two-Stage Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustors. In these systems the CO{sub 2} partial pressure generally exceeds the equilibrium value for calcium carbonate decomposition. Therefore, calcium sulfate is produced through the reactions between SO{sub 2} and calcium carbonate as well as the reaction between calcium sulfide and oxygen. To achieve this objective, the rates of reaction involving SO{sub 2} and oxygen, calcium sulfide and calcium carbonate will be determined by conducting tests in a pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer unit. The sulfate tests conducted during this quarter, focused on the determination of the rate of sulfation reaction involving partially sulfided half-calcined dolomite and oxygen. The test parameters included CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} concentrations, reaction temperature and pressure, as well as the sorbent particle size. The results obtained during this quarter suggest that the rate of sulfation reaction involving partially sulfided half-calcined dolomite and oxygen is very fast at temperatures above 850 C which rapidly increases with increasing temperature, achieving more than 85% conversion in less than a few minutes. The reaction appears to continue to completion, however, above 85% conversion, the rate of reaction appears to be low, requiring long residence time to reach complete conversion.

  20. Sulfur removal in advanced two stage pressurized fluidized bed combustion. Technical report, December 1, 1994--February 28, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasian, J.

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this study is to obtain data on the rates and the extent of sulfation reactions involving partially sulfided calcium-based sorbents, and oxygen as well as sulfur dioxide, at operating conditions closely simulating those prevailing in the second stage (combustor) of Advanced Two-Stage Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustors (PFBC). In these systems the CO{sub 2} partial pressure generally exceeds the equilibrium value for calcium carbonate decomposition. Therefore, calcium sulfate is produced through the reactions between SO{sub 2} and calcium carbonate as well as the reaction between calcium sulfide and oxygen. To achieve this objective, the rates of reaction involving SO{sub 2} and oxygen (gaseous reactant); and calcium sulfide and calcium carbonate (solid reactants), will be determined by conducting tests in a pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer (HPTGA) unit. The effects of sorbent type, sorbent particle size, reactor temperature and pressure; and O{sub 2} as well as SO{sub 2} partial pressures on the sulfation reactions rate will be determined. During this quarter, samples of the selected limestone and dolomite, sulfided in the fluidized-bed reactor during last quarter, were analyzed. The extent of sulfidation in these samples was in the range of 20 to 50%, which represent carbonizer discharge material at different operating conditions. The high pressure thermogravimetric analyzer (BPTGA) unit has been modified and a new pressure control system was installed to eliminate pressure fluctuation during the sulfation tests.

  1. Sulfur removal in advanced two stage pressurized fluidized bed combustion. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.; Wangerow, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this study is to obtain data on the rates and the extent of sulfation reactions involving partially sulfided calcium-based sorbents, and oxygen as well as sulfur dioxide, at operating conditions closely simulating those prevailing in the second stage (combustor) of Advanced Two-Stage Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustors (PFBC). In these systems the CO{sub 2} partial pressure generally exceeds the equilibrium value for calcium carbonate decomposition. Therefore, calcium sulfate is produced through the reactions between SO{sub 2} and calcium carbonate as well as the reaction between calcium sulfide and oxygen. To achieve this objective, the rates of reaction involving SO{sub 2} and oxygen (gaseous reactant); and calcium sulfide and calcium carbonate (solid reactants), will be determined by conducting tests in a pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer (HPTGA) unit. The effects of sorbent type, sorbent particle size, reactor temperature and pressure; and O{sub 2} as well as SO{sub 2} partial pressures on the sulfation reactions rate will be determined. During this quarter, samples of the selected limestone and dolomite were sulfided in the fluidized-bed reactor. These tests were conducted in both calcining and non-calcining operating conditions to produce partially-sulfided sorbents containing calcium oxide and calcium carbonate, respectively. These samples which represent the carbonizer discharge material, will be used as the feed material in the sulfation tests to be conducted in the HPTGA unit during the next quarter.

  2. Results of Two-Stage Light-Gas Gun Development Efforts and Hypervelocity Impact Tests of Advanced Thermal Protection Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelison, C. J.; Watts, Eric T.

    1998-01-01

    Gun development efforts to increase the launching capabilities of the NASA Ames 0.5-inch two-stage light-gas gun have been investigated. A gun performance simulation code was used to guide initial parametric variations and hardware modifications, in order to increase the projectile impact velocity capability to 8 km/s, while maintaining acceptable levels of gun barrel erosion and gun component stresses. Concurrent with this facility development effort, a hypervelocity impact testing series in support of the X-33/RLV program was performed in collaboration with Rockwell International. Specifically, advanced thermal protection system materials were impacted with aluminum spheres to simulate impacts with on-orbit space debris. Materials tested included AETB-8, AETB-12, AETB-20, and SIRCA-25 tiles, tailorable advanced blanket insulation (TABI), and high temperature AFRSI (HTA). The ballistic limit for several Thermal Protection System (TPS) configurations was investigated to determine particle sizes which cause threshold TPS/structure penetration. Crater depth in tiles was measured as a function of impact particle size. The relationship between coating type and crater morphology was also explored. Data obtained during this test series was used to perform a preliminary analysis of the risks to a typical orbital vehicle from the meteoroid and space debris environment.

  3. Sulfur removal in advanced two stage pressurized fluidized bed combustion. Technical report, 1 March--31 May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasian, J.; Chowdiah, P.; Hill, A.H.; Rue, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this study is to obtain data on the rates of reaction between hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and uncalcined calcium-based sorbents under operating conditions relevant to first stage (carbonizer) of Advanced Two-Stage Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustors (PFBC). In these systems the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in the first stage generally exceeds the equilibrium value for calcium carbonate decomposition. Therefore, removal of sulfur compounds takes place through the reaction between H{sub 2}S and calcium carbonate. To achieve this objective, the rates of reaction between hydrogen sulfide and uncalcined calcium-based sorbents will be determined by conducting tests in pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and high-pressure/high-temperature fluidized-bed reactor (HPTR) units. The effects of sorbent type, sorbent particle size, reactor temperature and pressure, and CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S partial pressures on the sulfidation reaction rate will be determined. During this quarter a series of sulfidation tests were conducted in the high-pressure/high-temperature fluidized-bed reactor (HPTR) units. The effects of sorbent type, sorbent particle size, reactor temperature and pressure, and CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S partial pressures on the sulfidation reaction rate will be determined. During this quarter a series of sulfidation tests were conducted in the high-pressure high-temperature thermogravimetric analyzer (HPTGA unit) using limestone and dolomite. The results suggest that half-calcined dolomite is much more reactive than uncalcined limestone. Also, temperature in the range of 800 to 950 C did not significantly affect the sulfidation reaction rates for both limestone and dolomite.

  4. Low podoplanin expression in pretreatment biopsy material predicts poor prognosis in advanced-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated by primary radiation.

    PubMed

    Dumoff, Kimberly L; Chu, Christina S; Harris, Eleanor E; Holtz, David; Xu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Paul J; Acs, Geza

    2006-05-01

    Lymphatic invasion and nodal metastasis are predictors of poor outcome in cervix carcinoma. We have recently found that low podoplanin immunoreactivity in cervix carcinoma correlated with the presence of lymphatic invasion and nodal metastasis. In the current study, we examined whether podoplanin expression in pretreatment cervical biopsies can predict the presence lymphatic invasion, nodal metastasis, and outcome in advanced-stage tumors treated by nonsurgical means. Podoplanin expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 48 cervical biopsies and corresponding hysterectomy specimens of early-stage invasive squamous cell carcinoma and in 74 pretreatment biopsies from advanced-stage tumors treated with primary radiation. We found a highly significant correlation between podoplanin expression obtained in biopsy and corresponding hysterectomy materials (r = 0.8962, P < 0.0001). Low podoplanin expression showed a significant correlation with lymphatic invasion (P < 0.0001) and nodal metastasis (P = 0.0058). Low podoplanin expression in pretreatment biopsy material showed a significant correlation with poor disease-free (P = 0.0009) and overall (P = 0.0002) survival in advanced-stage tumors. Our results suggest that in advanced-stage cervix carcinomas treated by radiation, when traditional prognostic indicators are not available and treatment decisions are based on biopsy material and clinical staging parameters, examination of podoplanin expression in pretreatment biopsy material may be a useful marker to predict lymphatic metastasis and patient outcome. Prospective studies involving larger numbers of patients are needed to further evaluate the clinical utility of examination of podoplanin expression in patients with cervix carcinoma.

  5. Tail-flick test response in 3×Tg-AD mice at early and advanced stages of disease.

    PubMed

    Baeta-Corral, Raquel; Defrin, Ruti; Pick, Chagi G; Giménez-Llort, Lydia

    2015-07-23

    Despite the impact of pain in cognitive dysfunctions and affective disorders has been largely studied, the research that examines pain dimensions in cognitive impairment or dementia is still scarce. In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementias, management of pain is challenging. While the sensory-discriminative dimension of pain is preserved, the cognitive-evaluative and the affective-motivational pain dimensions are affected. Due to the complexity of the disease and the poor self-reports, pain is underdiagnosed and undertreated. In confluence with an impaired thermoregulatory behavior, the patients' ability to confront environmental stressors such as cold temperature can put them at risk of fatal accidental hypothermia. Here, 3xTg-AD mice demonstrate that the sensorial-discriminative threshold to a noxious cold stimulus, as measured by the latency of tail-flicking, was preserved at early and advances stages of disease (7 and 11 month-old, respectively) as compared to age-matched (adulthood and middle aged, respectively) non-transgenic mice (NTg). In both genotypes, the sensory deterioration and poor thermoregulatory behavior associated to age was observed as an increase of tail-flick response and poor sensorimotor performance. At both stages studied, 3xTg-AD mice exhibited BPSD (Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia)-like alterations in the corner, open-field, dark-light box and the T-maze tests. In the adult NTg mice, this nociceptive withdrawal response was correlated with copying with stress-related behaviors. This integrative behavioral profile was lost in both groups of 3xTg-AD mice and middle aged controls, suggesting derangements in their subjacent networks and the complex interplay between the pain dimensions in the elderly with dementia. PMID:26091881

  6. Recruitment of natural killer cells in advanced stages of endogenously arising B-cell lymphoma: implications for therapeutic cell transfer.

    PubMed

    Przewoznik, Margarethe; Hömberg, Nadine; Naujoks, Marcella; Pötzl, Johann; Münchmeier, Niklas; Brenner, Christoph D; Anz, David; Bourquin, Carole; Nelson, Peter J; Röcken, Martin; Mocikat, Ralph

    2012-04-01

    During inflammation and in transplantable tumor models, natural killer (NK) cells are recruited to pathologic tissues and activated to produce proinflammatory cytokines favoring adaptive immune responses of the T-helper type 1 (Th1) type. Interferon (IFN)-γ is needed to induce chemokines that attract NK cells in transplanted tumors. Nothing, however, is known on NK-cell migration in spontaneous tumors. As effective recruitment is a prerequisite for therapeutic NK-cell transfer, we investigated the cytokine milieu and the mechanisms that are instrumental for NK-cell accumulation in an endogenous tumor model. We make use of λ-myc transgenic mice that harbor the c-myc oncogene and develop spontaneous B-cell lymphoma. In contrast to lymphomas induced by tumor cell injection, virtually no IFN-γ produced by NK or by other cells was present in the tumor environment, particularly in advanced stages. Dendritic cells showed an impaired expression of interleukin-12, which is suggestive of deficient Th1 priming. The IFN-γ-dependent chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 were pivotal for NK-cell migration in the endogenous lymphoma model. Although IFN-γ was absent in late tumor stages, there was still expression of CXCL9 and CXCL10 with an ongoing influx of NK cells. The results demonstrate that transplantable tumor models do not reflect the situation as found in endogenously arising neoplasia, because in the latter, effective Th1 and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses are presumably not induced because of impaired IFN-γ production. The data also suggest that CXCL9 and CXCL10 production and NK-cell migration become independent of IFN-γ during tumor progression, and therefore support approaches of adoptive NK-cell transfer that hold promise for treatment of cancer. PMID:22421939

  7. Advanced glycation end products, carotid atherosclerosis, and circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroki; Koyama, Hidenori; Fukumoto, Shinya; Tanaka, Shinji; Shoji, Takuhito; Shoji, Tetsuo; Emoto, Masanori; Tahara, Hideki; Inaba, Masaaki; Kakiya, Ryusuke; Tabata, Tsutomu; Miyata, Toshio; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2011-04-01

    Numbers of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been shown to be decreased in subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the mechanism of which remained poorly understood. In this study, mutual association among circulating EPC levels, carotid atherosclerosis, serum pentosidine, and skin autofluorescence, a recently established noninvasive measure of advanced glycation end products accumulation, was examined in 212 ESRD subjects undergoing hemodialysis. Numbers of circulating EPCs were measured as CD34+ CD133+ CD45(low) VEGFR2+ cells and progenitor cells as CD34+ CD133+ CD45(low) fraction by flow cytometry. Skin autofluorescence was assessed by the autofluorescence reader; and serum pentosidine, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Carotid atherosclerosis was determined as intimal-medial thickness (IMT) measured by ultrasound. Circulating EPCs were significantly and inversely correlated with skin autofluorescence in ESRD subjects (R = -0.216, P = .002), but not with serum pentosidine (R = -0.079, P = .25). Circulating EPCs tended to be inversely associated with IMT (R = -0.125, P = .069). Intimal-medial thickness was also tended to be correlated positively with skin autofluorescence (R = 0.133, P = .054) and significantly with serum pentosidine (R = 0.159, P = .019). Stepwise multiple regression analyses reveal that skin autofluorescence, but not serum pentosidine and IMT, was independently associated with low circulating EPCs. Of note, skin autofluorescence was also inversely and independently associated with circulating progenitor cells. Thus, tissue accumulated, but not circulating, advanced glycation end products may be a determinant of a decrease in circulating EPCs in ESRD subjects.

  8. Advanced glycation end products, carotid atherosclerosis, and circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroki; Koyama, Hidenori; Fukumoto, Shinya; Tanaka, Shinji; Shoji, Takuhito; Shoji, Tetsuo; Emoto, Masanori; Tahara, Hideki; Inaba, Masaaki; Kakiya, Ryusuke; Tabata, Tsutomu; Miyata, Toshio; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2011-04-01

    Numbers of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been shown to be decreased in subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the mechanism of which remained poorly understood. In this study, mutual association among circulating EPC levels, carotid atherosclerosis, serum pentosidine, and skin autofluorescence, a recently established noninvasive measure of advanced glycation end products accumulation, was examined in 212 ESRD subjects undergoing hemodialysis. Numbers of circulating EPCs were measured as CD34+ CD133+ CD45(low) VEGFR2+ cells and progenitor cells as CD34+ CD133+ CD45(low) fraction by flow cytometry. Skin autofluorescence was assessed by the autofluorescence reader; and serum pentosidine, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Carotid atherosclerosis was determined as intimal-medial thickness (IMT) measured by ultrasound. Circulating EPCs were significantly and inversely correlated with skin autofluorescence in ESRD subjects (R = -0.216, P = .002), but not with serum pentosidine (R = -0.079, P = .25). Circulating EPCs tended to be inversely associated with IMT (R = -0.125, P = .069). Intimal-medial thickness was also tended to be correlated positively with skin autofluorescence (R = 0.133, P = .054) and significantly with serum pentosidine (R = 0.159, P = .019). Stepwise multiple regression analyses reveal that skin autofluorescence, but not serum pentosidine and IMT, was independently associated with low circulating EPCs. Of note, skin autofluorescence was also inversely and independently associated with circulating progenitor cells. Thus, tissue accumulated, but not circulating, advanced glycation end products may be a determinant of a decrease in circulating EPCs in ESRD subjects. PMID:20494372

  9. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals Distinct Molecular Characteristics of Hepatitis B-Related Hepatocellular Carcinomas from Very Early to Advanced Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer Stages.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fan-Yun; Wei, Xiao; Zhou, Kai; Hu, Wei; Kou, Yan-Bo; You, Hong-Juan; Liu, Xiao-Mei; Zheng, Kui-Yang; Tang, Ren-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)is the fifth most common malignancy associated with high mortality. One of the risk factors for HCC is chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The treatment strategy for the disease is dependent on the stage of HCC, and the Barcelona clinic liver cancer (BCLC) staging system is used in most HCC cases. However, the molecular characteristics of HBV-related HCC in different BCLC stages are still unknown. Using GSE14520 microarray data from HBV-related HCC cases with BCLC stages from 0 (very early stage) to C (advanced stage) in the gene expression omnibus (GEO) database, differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including common DEGs and unique DEGs in different BCLC stages, were identified. These DEGs were located on different chromosomes. The molecular functions and biology pathways of DEGs were identified by gene ontology (GO) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis, and the interactome networks of DEGs were constructed using the NetVenn online tool. The results revealed that both common DEGs and stage-specific DEGs were associated with various molecular functions and were involved in special biological pathways. In addition, several hub genes were found in the interactome networks of DEGs. The identified DEGs and hub genes promote our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of HBV-related HCC through the different BCLC stages, and might be used as staging biomarkers or molecular targets for the treatment of HCC with HBV infection. PMID:27454179

  10. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals Distinct Molecular Characteristics of Hepatitis B-Related Hepatocellular Carcinomas from Very Early to Advanced Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer Stages

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Kou, Yan-Bo; You, Hong-Juan; Liu, Xiao-Mei; Zheng, Kui-Yang; Tang, Ren-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)is the fifth most common malignancy associated with high mortality. One of the risk factors for HCC is chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The treatment strategy for the disease is dependent on the stage of HCC, and the Barcelona clinic liver cancer (BCLC) staging system is used in most HCC cases. However, the molecular characteristics of HBV-related HCC in different BCLC stages are still unknown. Using GSE14520 microarray data from HBV-related HCC cases with BCLC stages from 0 (very early stage) to C (advanced stage) in the gene expression omnibus (GEO) database, differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including common DEGs and unique DEGs in different BCLC stages, were identified. These DEGs were located on different chromosomes. The molecular functions and biology pathways of DEGs were identified by gene ontology (GO) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis, and the interactome networks of DEGs were constructed using the NetVenn online tool. The results revealed that both common DEGs and stage-specific DEGs were associated with various molecular functions and were involved in special biological pathways. In addition, several hub genes were found in the interactome networks of DEGs. The identified DEGs and hub genes promote our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of HBV-related HCC through the different BCLC stages, and might be used as staging biomarkers or molecular targets for the treatment of HCC with HBV infection. PMID:27454179

  11. Stage-by-Stage and Parallel Flow Path Compressor Modeling for a Variable Cycle Engine, NASA Advanced Air Vehicles Program - Commercial Supersonic Technology Project - AeroServoElasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Cheng, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of stage-by-stage and parallel flow path compressor modeling approaches for a Variable Cycle Engine. The stage-by-stage compressor modeling approach is an extension of a technique for lumped volume dynamics and performance characteristic modeling. It was developed to improve the accuracy of axial compressor dynamics over lumped volume dynamics modeling. The stage-by-stage compressor model presented here is formulated into a parallel flow path model that includes both axial and rotational dynamics. This is done to enable the study of compressor and propulsion system dynamic performance under flow distortion conditions. The approaches utilized here are generic and should be applicable for the modeling of any axial flow compressor design accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  12. Design and overall performance of four highly loaded, high speed inlet stages for an advanced high-pressure-ratio core compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, L.; Moore, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The detailed design and overall performances of four inlet stages for an advanced core compressor are presented. These four stages represent two levels of design total pressure ratio (1.82 and 2.05), two levels of rotor aspect ratio (1.19 and 1.63), and two levels of stator aspect ratio (1.26 and 1.78). The individual stages were tested over the stable operating flow range at 70, 90, and 100 percent of design speeds. The performances of the low aspect ratio configurations were substantially better than those of the high aspect ratio configurations. The two low aspect ratio configurations achieved peak efficiencies of 0.876 and 0.872 and corresponding stage efficiencies of 0.845 and 0.840. The high aspect ratio configurations achieved peak ratio efficiencies of 0.851 and 0.849 and corresponding stage efficiencies of 0.821 and 0.831.

  13. Results of an Advanced Fan Stage Operating Over a Wide Range of Speed and Bypass Ratio. Part 1; Fan Stage Design and Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth L.; Prahst, Patricia S.; Thorp, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program is investigating turbine-based combined cycle (TBCC) propulsion systems for access to space because it provides the potential for aircraft-like, space-launch operations that may significantly reduce launch costs and improve safety. To this end, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and General Electric (GE) teamed to design a Mach 4 variable cycle turbofan/ramjet engine for access to space. To enable the wide operating range of a Mach 4+ variable cycle turbofan ramjet required the development of a unique fan stage design capable of multi-point operation to accommodate variations in bypass ratio (10 ), fan speed (7 ), inlet mass flow (3.5 ), inlet pressure (8 ), and inlet temperature (3 ). In this paper, NASA has set out to characterize a TBCC engine fan stage aerodynamic performance and stability limits over a wide operating range including power-on and hypersonic-unique "windmill" operation. Herein, we will present the fan stage design, and the experimental test results of the fan stage operating from 15 to 100 percent corrected design speed. Whereas, in the companion paper, we will provide an assessment of NASA s APNASA code s ability to predict the fan stage performance and operability over a wide range of speed and bypass ratio.

  14. Photodynamic therapy of advanced malignant tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lian-xing; Dai, Lu-pin; Lu, Wen-qin

    1993-03-01

    Forty patients with advanced tumors were treated by photodynamic therapy (PDT) from May 1991 to August 1991 in our hospital with age ranges from 30 to 81 years old. The pathological diagnosis shows that 13 had tumors in the colon, 3 in the stomach, 2 in the oesophageal, 2 in the palatum, 1 in the cervix, and 19 others with malignant cancers of the skin. The histology was as follows: squamous cell in 20, adenocarcinoma in 19, melanocarcinoma in 1. By TNM classification there were no cases of T1, 5 cases of T2, and 35 cases of T2 - T3. All patients were stage IV. The overall effective rate was 85%, our experience is that the PDT is suitable for the patients with advanced tumor, especially those whose tumor recurrences are hard to treat after conventional treatment (surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy). The PDT appears to be a new and promising possibility to treat advanced tumors and to improve the patients' survival rates.

  15. A Multi-institutional Investigation of the Prognostic Value of Lymph Nodal Yield in Advanced Stage Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OCSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, James J.; Zender, Chad A.; Mehta, Vikas; Davis, Kara; Ferris, Robert L.; Lavertu, Pierre; Rezaee, Rod; Feustel, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although existing literature provides surgical recommendations for treating occult disease (cN0) in early stage oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma, a focus on late stage OCSCC is less pervasive. Methods The records of 162 late stage OCSCC pN0 individuals that underwent primary neck dissections were reviewed. Lymph node yield (LNY) as a prognosticator was examined. Results Despite being staged pN0, patients that had a higher LNY had an improved regional/distant control rates, DFS, DSS, and OS. LNY consistently outperformed all other standard variables as being the single best prognostic factor with a tight risk ratio range (RR = 0.95–0.98) even when correcting for the number of lymph nodes examined. Conclusion The results of this study showed that lower regional recurrence rates and improved survival outcomes were seen as lymph node yield increased for advanced T-stage OCSCC pN0. This suggests that increasing lymph node yield with an extended cervical lymphadenectomy may result in lower recurrence rates and improved survival outcomes for this advanced stage group. PMID:24038739

  16. Progenitor Hematopoietic Cells Implantation Improves Functional Capacity of End Stage Coronary Artery Disease Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Yuniadi, Yoga; Kusnadi, Yuyus; Sandhow, Lakshmi; Erika, Rendra; Hanafy, Dicky A.; Sardjono, Caroline; Kaligis, R. W. M.; Kasim, Manoefris; Harimurti, Ganesja M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Proangiogenic Hematopoietic Cells (PHC) which comprise diverse mixture of cell types are able to secrete proangiogenic factors and interesting candidate for cell therapy. The aim of this study was to seek for benefit in implantation of PHC on functional improvement in end stage coronary artery disease patients with advanced heart failure. Methods. Patients with symptomatic heart failure despite guideline directed medical therapy and LVEF less than 35% were included. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, cultivated for 5 days, and then harvested. Flow cytometry and cell surface markers were used to characterize PHC. The PHC were delivered retrogradely via sinus coronarius. Echocardiography, myocardial perfusion, and clinical and functional data were analyzed up to 1-year observation. Results. Of 30 patients (56.4 ± 7.40 yo) preimplant NT proBNP level is 5124.5 ± 4682.50 pmol/L. Harvested cells characterized with CD133, CD34, CD45, and KDR showed 0.87 ± 0.41, 0.63 ± 0.66, 99.00 ± 2.60, and 3.22 ± 3.79%, respectively. LVEF was improved (22 ± 5.68 versus 26.8 ± 7.93, p < 0.001) during short and long term observation. Myocardial perfusion significantly improved 6 months after treatment. NYHA Class and six-minute walk test are improved during short term and long term follow-up. Conclusion. Expanded peripheral blood PHC implantation using retrograde delivery approach improved LV systolic function, myocardial perfusion, and functional capacity. PMID:27148465

  17. Progenitor Hematopoietic Cells Implantation Improves Functional Capacity of End Stage Coronary Artery Disease Patients with Advanced Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Yuniadi, Yoga; Kusnadi, Yuyus; Sandhow, Lakshmi; Erika, Rendra; Hanafy, Dicky A; Sardjono, Caroline; Kaligis, R W M; Kasim, Manoefris; Harimurti, Ganesja M

    2016-01-01

    Background. Proangiogenic Hematopoietic Cells (PHC) which comprise diverse mixture of cell types are able to secrete proangiogenic factors and interesting candidate for cell therapy. The aim of this study was to seek for benefit in implantation of PHC on functional improvement in end stage coronary artery disease patients with advanced heart failure. Methods. Patients with symptomatic heart failure despite guideline directed medical therapy and LVEF less than 35% were included. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, cultivated for 5 days, and then harvested. Flow cytometry and cell surface markers were used to characterize PHC. The PHC were delivered retrogradely via sinus coronarius. Echocardiography, myocardial perfusion, and clinical and functional data were analyzed up to 1-year observation. Results. Of 30 patients (56.4 ± 7.40 yo) preimplant NT proBNP level is 5124.5 ± 4682.50 pmol/L. Harvested cells characterized with CD133, CD34, CD45, and KDR showed 0.87 ± 0.41, 0.63 ± 0.66, 99.00 ± 2.60, and 3.22 ± 3.79%, respectively. LVEF was improved (22 ± 5.68 versus 26.8 ± 7.93, p < 0.001) during short and long term observation. Myocardial perfusion significantly improved 6 months after treatment. NYHA Class and six-minute walk test are improved during short term and long term follow-up. Conclusion. Expanded peripheral blood PHC implantation using retrograde delivery approach improved LV systolic function, myocardial perfusion, and functional capacity.

  18. Prospective Study of FLT PET for Early Interim Response Assessment in Advanced Stage B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schöder, Heiko; Zelenetz, Andrew D.; Hamlin, Paul; Gavane, Somali; Horwitz, Steven; Matasar, Matthew; Moskowitz, Alison; Noy, Ariela; Palomba, Lia; Portlock, Carol; Straus, David; Grewal, Ravinder; Migliacci, Jocelyn C.; Larson, Steven M.; Moskowitz, Craig H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Current clinical and imaging tools remain suboptimal for early assessment of prognosis and treatment response in aggressive lymphomas. Positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-fluorothymidine (FLT) can be used to measure tumor cell proliferation and treatment response. In a prospective study in patients with advanced stage B-cell lymphoma we investigated the prognostic and predictive value of FLT PET in comparison to standard imaging with FDG PET and clinical outcome. Patients and Methods 65 patients were treated with an induction/consolidation regimen consisting of four cycles of R-CHOP-14 followed by 3 cycles of ICE. FLT PET was performed at baseline and at interim (iPET) after 1–2 cycles of therapy. FDG PET was performed at baseline, after cycle 4, and at the end of therapy. The relationship between PET findings, progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was investigated. Results With a median follow-up of 51 months, PFS and OS were 71% and 86% respectively. FLT iPET, analyzed visually, using a 5-point score, or semi-quantitatively, using SUV and ΔSUV, predicted both PFS and OS (p<0.01 for all parameters). Residual FLT SUVmax on iPET was associated with an inferior PFS (HR: 1.26, p=0.001) and OS (HR: 1.27, p=0.002). Using FDG PET, findings in the end of treatment scan were better predictors of PFS and OS than findings on interim scan. Baseline PET imaging parameters, including SUV, proliferative or metabolic tumor volume, did not correlate with outcome. Conclusion FLT PET after 1–2 cycles of chemotherapy predicts PFS and OS, and a negative FLT iPET may potentially help design risk-adapted therapies in patients with aggressive lymphomas. In contrast, the positive predictive value of FLT iPET remains too low to justify changes in patient management. PMID:26719374

  19. Impedance-Matching Hearing in Paleozoic Reptiles: Evidence of Advanced Sensory Perception at an Early Stage of Amniote Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Johannes; Tsuji, Linda A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Insights into the onset of evolutionary novelties are key to the understanding of amniote origins and diversification. The possession of an impedance-matching tympanic middle ear is characteristic of all terrestrial vertebrates with a sophisticated hearing sense and an adaptively important feature of many modern terrestrial vertebrates. Whereas tympanic ears seem to have evolved multiple times within tetrapods, especially among crown-group members such as frogs, mammals, squamates, turtles, crocodiles, and birds, the presence of true tympanic ears has never been recorded in a Paleozoic amniote, suggesting they evolved fairly recently in amniote history. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, we performed a morphological examination and a phylogenetic analysis of poorly known parareptiles from the Middle Permian of the Mezen River Basin in Russia. We recovered a well-supported clade that is characterized by a unique cheek morphology indicative of a tympanum stretching across large parts of the temporal region to an extent not seen in other amniotes, fossil or extant, and a braincase specialized in showing modifications clearly related to an increase in auditory function, unlike the braincase of any other Paleozoic tetrapod. In addition, we estimated the ratio of the tympanum area relative to the stapedial footplate for the basalmost taxon of the clade, which, at 23∶1, is in close correspondence to that of modern amniotes capable of efficient impedance-matching hearing. Conclusions/Significance Using modern amniotes as analogues, the possession of an impedance-matching middle ear in these parareptiles suggests unique ecological adaptations potentially related to living in dim-light environments. More importantly, our results demonstrate that already at an early stage of amniote diversification, and prior to the Permo-Triassic extinction event, the complexity of terrestrial vertebrate ecosystems had reached a level that proved advanced

  20. Surgical adjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, C M; Abston, S; Fish, J C

    1985-01-01

    The reported incidence of local recurrence after mastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer (TNM Stage III and IV) is between 30% and 50%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of radiation therapy (XRT) followed by total mastectomy on the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Fifty-three patients who presented with locally advanced breast cancer, without distant metastases, were treated with XRT (4500-5000 R) to the breast, chest wall, and regional lymph nodes. Five weeks after completion of XRT, total mastectomy was performed. There were no operative deaths. The complications that occurred in 22 patients after surgery were flap necrosis, wound infection, and seroma. Patients have been followed from 3 to 134 months. Twenty-five patients are alive (3-134 months), 12 free of disease; 28 patients have died with distant metastases (6-67 months). Isolated local recurrence occurred in only two patients. Four patients had local and distant recurrence (total local recurrence is 6/53). The remaining patients all developed distant metastases. We have devised a treatment strategy which significantly decreases the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. However, the rapid appearance of distant metastases emphasizes the need for systemically active therapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:3994434

  1. First human treatment with investigational rhGUS enzyme replacement therapy in an advanced stage MPS VII patient.

    PubMed

    Fox, Joyce E; Volpe, Linda; Bullaro, Josephine; Kakkis, Emil D; Sly, William S

    2015-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII, Sly syndrome) is a very rare lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of the enzyme β-glucuronidase (GUS), which is required for the degradation of three glycosaminoglycans (GAGs): dermatan sulfate, heparan sulfate, and chondroitin sulfate. Progressive accumulation of these GAGs in lysosomes leads to increasing dysfunction in numerous tissues and organs. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been used successfully for other MPS disorders, but there is no approved treatment for MPS VII. Here we describe the first human treatment with recombinant human GUS (rhGUS), an investigational therapy for MPS VII, in a 12-year old boy with advanced stage MPS VII. Despite a tracheostomy, nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure, and oxygen therapy, significant pulmonary restriction and obstruction led to oxygen dependence and end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) levels in the 60-80mmHg range, eventually approaching respiratory failure (ETCO2 of 100mmHg) and the need for full-time ventilation. Since no additional medical measures could improve his function, we implemented experimental ERT by infusing rhGUS at 2mg/kg over 4h every 2 weeks for 24 weeks. Safety was evaluated by standard assessments and observance for any infusion associated reactions (IARs). Urinary GAG (uGAG) levels, pulmonary function, oxygen dependence, CO2 levels, cardiac valve function, liver and spleen size, and growth velocity were assessed to evaluate response to therapy. rhGUS infusions were well tolerated. No serious adverse events (SAEs) or IARs were observed. After initiation of rhGUS infusions, the patient's uGAG excretion decreased by more than 50%. Liver and spleen size were reduced within 2 weeks of the first infusion and reached normal size by 24 weeks. Pulmonary function appeared to improve during the course of treatment based on reduced changes in ETCO2 after off-ventilator challenges and a reduced oxygen requirement. The patient regained the

  2. First human treatment with investigational rhGUS enzyme replacement therapy in an advanced stage MPS VII patient.

    PubMed

    Fox, Joyce E; Volpe, Linda; Bullaro, Josephine; Kakkis, Emil D; Sly, William S

    2015-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII, Sly syndrome) is a very rare lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of the enzyme β-glucuronidase (GUS), which is required for the degradation of three glycosaminoglycans (GAGs): dermatan sulfate, heparan sulfate, and chondroitin sulfate. Progressive accumulation of these GAGs in lysosomes leads to increasing dysfunction in numerous tissues and organs. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been used successfully for other MPS disorders, but there is no approved treatment for MPS VII. Here we describe the first human treatment with recombinant human GUS (rhGUS), an investigational therapy for MPS VII, in a 12-year old boy with advanced stage MPS VII. Despite a tracheostomy, nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure, and oxygen therapy, significant pulmonary restriction and obstruction led to oxygen dependence and end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) levels in the 60-80mmHg range, eventually approaching respiratory failure (ETCO2 of 100mmHg) and the need for full-time ventilation. Since no additional medical measures could improve his function, we implemented experimental ERT by infusing rhGUS at 2mg/kg over 4h every 2 weeks for 24 weeks. Safety was evaluated by standard assessments and observance for any infusion associated reactions (IARs). Urinary GAG (uGAG) levels, pulmonary function, oxygen dependence, CO2 levels, cardiac valve function, liver and spleen size, and growth velocity were assessed to evaluate response to therapy. rhGUS infusions were well tolerated. No serious adverse events (SAEs) or IARs were observed. After initiation of rhGUS infusions, the patient's uGAG excretion decreased by more than 50%. Liver and spleen size were reduced within 2 weeks of the first infusion and reached normal size by 24 weeks. Pulmonary function appeared to improve during the course of treatment based on reduced changes in ETCO2 after off-ventilator challenges and a reduced oxygen requirement. The patient regained the

  3. Putative circulating markers of the early and advanced stages of breast cancer identified by high-resolution label-free proteomics.

    PubMed

    Panis, Carolina; Pizzatti, Luciana; Herrera, Ana Cristina; Cecchini, Rubens; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluated the plasmatic proteomic profile of breast cancer patients in the early (ED) and advanced (AD) stages, employing high-throughput proteomics. We identified 92 differentially expressed proteins in ED and 73 proteins in AD patients. Gelsolin, lumican, clusterin, SALL4 and PMS2, as well hTERT, TNF-α and GRHL3 were chosen for further investigation. ED presented augmented expression of GRHL3 and reduced circulating TNF-α with high expression of GRHL3 in tumors. AD displayed high TNF-α and a significant expression of PMS2 in tumors. These findings suggest processes enrolling stem cell division in ED, with TNF-α signaling and DNA mismatch repair in the advanced stage.

  4. Esophageal cancer: A Review of epidemiology, pathogenesis, staging workup and treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Napier, Kyle J; Scheerer, Mary; Misra, Subhasis

    2014-05-15

    Esophageal cancer is a serious malignancy with regards to mortality and prognosis. It is a growing health concern that is expected to increase in incidence over the next 10 years. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common histological type of esophageal cancer worldwide, with a higher incidence in developing nations. With the increased prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity in developed nations, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has dramatically increased in the past 40 years. Esophageal cancer is staged according to the widely accepted TNM system. Staging plays an integral part in guiding stage specific treatment protocols and has a great impact on overall survival. Common imaging modalities used in staging include computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasound and positron emission tomography scans. Current treatment options include multimodality therapy mainstays of current treatment include surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Tumor markers of esophageal cancer are an advancing area of research that could potentially lead to earlier diagnosis as well as playing a part in assessing tumor response to therapy.

  5. First-line systemic treatment of advanced stage non-small-cell lung cancer in Asia: consensus statement from the Asian Oncology Summit 2009.

    PubMed

    Soo, Ross A; Anderson, Benjamin O; Cho, Byoung Chul; Yang, Chih-Hsin; Liao, Meilin; Lim, Wan-Teck; Goldstraw, Peter; Mok, Tony S

    2009-11-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is an increasing global challenge, especially in low-income countries. Most guidelines for the management of advanced-stage NSCLC have limited effect in countries with resource constraints. Following a systematic literature search, we present an overview of the management of advanced-stage NSCLC in the first-line setting, discuss resources required for systemic therapy, and provide treatment recommendations stratified to four resources levels. Treatment guidelines appropriate for different resource levels offer a realistic approach to management of advanced-stage NSCLC, by recognising the limitations of a particular health-care system. Although there are many barriers to cancer control in low-resource countries, these can be overcome by using measures that are culturally appropriate, economically feasible, and evidence-based. Initiatives include strategic planning, tobacco control, training of health-care workers, access to therapeutic agents, acquisition of information, public education, and alliances with established institutions and international organisations. PMID:19880064

  6. Effects and Safety of Linagliptin as an Add-on Therapy in Advanced-Stage Diabetic Nephropathy Patients Taking Renin–Angiotensin–Aldosterone System Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Yuichiro; Ishii, Hiroki; Kitano, Taisuke; Shindo, Mitsutoshi; Miyazawa, Haruhisa; Ito, Kiyonori; Hirai, Keiji; Kaku, Yoshio; Mori, Honami; Hoshino, Taro; Ookawara, Susumu; Kakei, Masafumi; Tabei, Kaoru; Morishita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We investigated the effects and safety of linagliptin as an add-on therapy in patients with advanced-stage diabetic nephropathy (DMN) taking renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS) blockers. METHOD Twenty advanced-stage DMN patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR): 24.5 ± 13.4 mL/min/1.73 m2) taking RAAS blockers were administered 5 mg/day linagliptin for 52 weeks. Changes in glucose and lipid metabolism and renal function were evaluated. RESULTS Linagliptin decreased glycosylated hemoglobin levels (from 7.32 ± 0.77% to 6.85 ± 0.87%, P < 0.05) without changing fasting blood glucose levels, and significantly decreased total cholesterol levels (from 189.6 ± 49.0 to 170.2 ± 39.2 mg/dL, P < 0.05) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (from 107.1 ± 32.4 to 90.2 ± 31.0 mg/dL, P < 0.05) without changing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Urine protein/creatinine ratio and annual change in eGFR remained unchanged. No adverse effects were observed. CONCLUSION Linagliptin as an add-on therapy had beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism without impairment of renal function, and did not have any adverse effects in this population of patients with advanced-stage DMN taking RAAS blockers.

  7. Effects and Safety of Linagliptin as an Add-on Therapy in Advanced-Stage Diabetic Nephropathy Patients Taking Renin–Angiotensin–Aldosterone System Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Yuichiro; Ishii, Hiroki; Kitano, Taisuke; Shindo, Mitsutoshi; Miyazawa, Haruhisa; Ito, Kiyonori; Hirai, Keiji; Kaku, Yoshio; Mori, Honami; Hoshino, Taro; Ookawara, Susumu; Kakei, Masafumi; Tabei, Kaoru; Morishita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We investigated the effects and safety of linagliptin as an add-on therapy in patients with advanced-stage diabetic nephropathy (DMN) taking renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS) blockers. METHOD Twenty advanced-stage DMN patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR): 24.5 ± 13.4 mL/min/1.73 m2) taking RAAS blockers were administered 5 mg/day linagliptin for 52 weeks. Changes in glucose and lipid metabolism and renal function were evaluated. RESULTS Linagliptin decreased glycosylated hemoglobin levels (from 7.32 ± 0.77% to 6.85 ± 0.87%, P < 0.05) without changing fasting blood glucose levels, and significantly decreased total cholesterol levels (from 189.6 ± 49.0 to 170.2 ± 39.2 mg/dL, P < 0.05) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (from 107.1 ± 32.4 to 90.2 ± 31.0 mg/dL, P < 0.05) without changing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Urine protein/creatinine ratio and annual change in eGFR remained unchanged. No adverse effects were observed. CONCLUSION Linagliptin as an add-on therapy had beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism without impairment of renal function, and did not have any adverse effects in this population of patients with advanced-stage DMN taking RAAS blockers. PMID:27660406

  8. Advanced stages of embryonic development and cotylocidial morphogenesis in the intrauterine eggs of Aspidogaster limacoides Diesing, 1835 (Aspidogastrea), with comments on their phylogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Świderski, Zdzisław; Poddubnaya, Larisa G; Gibson, David I; Młocicki, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Ultrastructural aspects of the advanced embryonic development and cotylocidial morphogenesis of the aspidogastrean Aspidogaster limacoides are described. The posterior or distal regions of the uterus are filled with eggs containing larvae at advanced stages of morphogenesis and fully-formed cotylocidia. Various stages and organs of this larva are described in detail, including the aspects of the developing and fully-differentiated cotylocidium, the body wall (tegument and musculature), glandular regions and the protonephridial excretory system. Blastomere multiplication by means of mitotic divisions takes place simultaneously with the degeneration or apoptosis of some micromeres; this frequently observed characteristic is compared and discussed in relation to corresponding reports for other neodermatans. During the advanced stages of the embryonic development of A. limacoides, the vitelline syncytium disappears and the size of the embryo increases rapidly. Evident polarization of the differentiating larva was observed; towards one pole of the egg, cytodifferentiation of the mouth, surrounded by the oral sucker and cephalic glands, takes place, whereas, towards the opposite pole, differentiation of the posterior sucker (incipient ventral disc) occurs. The oral and posterior suckers are formed from numerous embryonic cells which have differentiated into myocytes. The central part of the oral sucker undergoes invagination and forms the future pharynx and intestine. Fully-developed cotylocidia of A. limacoides have a neodermatan type of tegument, flame cells and two types of glandular structures. These results suggest a sister relationship between the Aspidogastrea and the Digenea, although the systematic position of aspidogastreans in relation to other platyhelminth taxa remains somewhat equivocal.

  9. Antioxidant capacity and structural changes of human serum albumin from patients in advanced stages of diabetic nephropathy and the effect of the dialysis.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Díaz, Marisol; Camarillo-Cadena, Menandro; Hernández-Arana, Andrés; Ramón-Gallegos, Eva; Medina-Navarro, Rafael

    2015-06-01

    Changes in the antioxidant capacity of albumin and alterations of the albumin structural conformation were examined in patients in advanced stages of diabetes nephropathy. Human serum albumin was purified from diabetic patients in pre-dialysis (glomerular filtration rate [GFR] between 15 and 29 ml min(-1) 1.73 m(-2)) and those in dialysis (GFR ≤ 15 ml min(-1) 1.73 m(-2)) and then compared with albumin from patients with a normal GFR (>90 ml min(-1) m(-2)). We evaluated the antioxidant capacity of albumin using an enhanced chemiluminescence-based assay and thiol group content, and the structural changes were evaluated by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. The antioxidant capacity and thiol content of albumin from patients in advanced stages of diabetic nephropathy were markedly reduced. The circular dichroism spectra showed a mean albumin α-helix content reduction from 44 to 37 % and from 44 to 30 % between the control group and pre-dialysis and dialysis patients, respectively. Additionally, the fluorescence intensity was reduced by 4.2 and 13 % for the groups 4 and 5, respectively, in relation with the control. These data provide evidence for the partial denaturation of albumin and exacerbated oxidative stress among patients in advanced stages of diabetes nephropathy before and even after dialysis.

  10. A clinical staging system and treatment guidelines for maxillary osteoradionecrosis in irradiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.-J.; Lee, J.-J.; Ting, L.-L.; Tseng, I.-Y.; Chang, H.-H.; Chen, H.-M.; Kuo, Y.-S.; Hahn, L.-J.; Kok, S.-H. . E-mail: kok@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a clinical staging system for maxillary osteoradionecrosis (ORN) in irradiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. Methods and Materials: The data of maxillary ORN cases among 1,758 irradiated NPC patients were analyzed. A staging system based on the degrees of bone exposure (E), infection (I), and bleeding (B) was developed. Correlations between various clinical parameters and stages of maxillary ORN and relationships between treatment modalities and outcomes at each stage were evaluated. Cumulative success of treatment and risk factors that affect treatment outcomes were analyzed. Results: The incidence of maxillary ORN was 2.7% (48/1,758). TNM stage of NPC (p < 0.001), radiation dose (p = 0.029), and tooth extraction (p < 0.001) appeared to have significant influences on disease severity. Success rates between conservative therapy and surgical treatment were not significantly different for Stage I ORN but differed significantly for Stage II (p = 0.013) and Stage III (p = 0.008) lesions. Grade 3 infection and bleeding significantly jeopardized treatment success (p = 0.043 and 0.015, respectively). The risk ratios of treatment failure for Grade 3 infection and bleeding were 2.523 (p = 0.034) and 3.141 (p = 0.027), respectively. Conclusions: More serious maxillary ORN tended to occur in cases with more advanced NPC, higher radiation dose, and history of tooth extraction. Surgical treatment was usually required in Stage II and III ORN. The grades of infection and bleeding are important factors in guidance of treatment and prediction of outcomes.

  11. The Tumor-Log Odds of Positive Lymph Nodes-Metastasis Staging System, a Promising New Staging System for Gastric Cancer after D2 Resection in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-qiang; Ren, Chao; Wang, De-shen; Zhang, Dong-sheng; Luo, Hui-yan; Li, Yu-hong; Xu, Rui-hua

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study, we established a hypothetical tumor-lodds-metastasis (TLM) and tumor-ratio-metastasis (TRM) staging system. Moreover, we compared them with the 7th edition of American Joint Committee on Cancer tumor-nodes-metastasis (AJCC TNM) staging system in gastric cancer patients after D2 resection. Methods A total of 1000 gastric carcinoma patients receiving treatment in our center were selected for the analysis. Finally, 730 patients who received D2 resection were retrospectively studied. Patients were staged using the TLM, TRM and the 7th edition AJCC TNM system. Survival analysis was performed with a Cox regression model. We used two parameters to compare the TNM, TRM and TLM staging system, the −2log likelihood and the hazard ratio. Results The cut points of lymph node ratio (LNR) were set as 0, 0–0.3, 0.3–0.6, 0.6–1.0. And for the log odds of positive lymph nodes (LODDS), the cut points were established as≤−0.5, −0.5-0, 0-0.5, >0.5. There were significant differences in survival among patients in different LODDS classifications for each pN or LNR groups. When stratified by the LODDS classifications, the prognosis was highly homologous between those in the according pN or LNR classifications. Multivariate analysis showed that TLM staging system was better than the TRM or TNM system for the prognostic evaluation. Conclusions The TLM system was superior to the TRM or TNM system for prognostic assessment of gastric adenocarcinoma patients after D2 resection. PMID:22348125

  12. On the significance of fuzzification of the N and m in cancer staging.

    PubMed

    Yones, Sara A; Moussa, Ahmed S; Hassan, Hesham; Alieldin, Nelly H

    2014-01-01

    The tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) staging system has been regarded as one of the most widely used staging systems for solid cancer. The "T" is assigned a value according to the primary tumor size, whereas the "N" and "M" are dependent on the number of regional lymph nodes and the presence of distant metastasis, respectively. The current TNM model classifies stages into five crisp classes. This is unrealistic since the drastic modification in treatment that is based on a change in one class may be based on a slight shift around the class boundary. Moreover, the system considers any tumor that has distant metastasis as stage 4, disregarding the metastatic lesion concentration and size. We had handled the problem of T staging in previous studies using fuzzy logic. In this study, we focus on the fuzzification of N and M staging for more accurate and realistic modeling which may, in turn, lead to better treatment and medical decisions. PMID:25089089

  13. Once-Weekly, High-Dose Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer: 6-Year Analysis of 60 Early-Stage, 42 Locally Advanced, and 7 Metastatic Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, Omar M. Sandhu, Taljit S.; Lattin, Paul B.; Chang, Jung H.; Lee, Choon K.; Groshko, Gayle A.; Lattin, Cheryl J.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To explore once-weekly stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in nonoperable patients with localized, locally advanced, or metastatic lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 primary (89 untreated plus 13 recurrent) and 7 metastatic tumors were studied. The median follow-up was 38 months, the average patient age was 75 years. Of the 109 tumors studied, 60 were Stage I (45 IA and 15 IB), 9 were Stage II, 30 were Stage III, 3 were Stage IV, and 7 were metastases. SBRT only was given in 73% (40 Gy in four fractions to the planning target volume to a total dose of 53 Gy to the isocenter for a biologically effective dose of 120 Gy{sub 10}). SBRT was given as a boost in 27% (22.5 Gy in three fractions once weekly for a dose of 32 Gy at the isocenter) after 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the primary plus the mediastinum. The total biologically effective dose was 120 Gy{sub 10}. Respiration gating was used in 46%. Results: The overall response rate was 75%; 33% had a complete response. The overall response rate was 89% for Stage IA patients (40% had a complete response). The local control rate was 82%; it was 100% and 93% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The failure rate was 37%, with 17% within the planning target volume. No Grade 3-4 acute toxicities developed in any patient; 12% and 7% of patients developed Grade 1 and 2 toxicities, respectively. Late toxicity, all Grade 2, developed in 3% of patients. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate for Stage I was 70% and was 74% and 64% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The 3-year Stage III cause-specific survival rate was 30%. The patients with metastatic lung cancer had a 57% response rate, a 27% complete response rate, an 86% local control rate, a median survival time of 19 months, and 23% 3-year survival rate. Conclusions: SBRT is noninvasive, convenient, fast, and economically attractive; it achieves results similar to surgery for early or metastatic lung cancer patients who are older

  14. D-Dimer and Carcinoembryonic Antigen Levels: Useful Indicators for Predicting the Tumor Stage and Postoperative Survival.

    PubMed

    Tekeşin, Kemal; Bayrak, Savaş; Esatoğlu, Varol; Özdemir, Ebru; Özel, Leyla; Melih Kara, Veli

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study is to determine the preoperative plasma D-dimer and serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) levels of patients scheduled for curative surgical resection for colorectal cancer and to evaluate the significance of these levels on the prognosis and postoperative survival rate. One hundred sixty-five patients with colorectal cancer, who were scheduled to have elective resection between January 2008 and January 2011, were included in the study. A significant increase was observed in the D-dimer levels, particularly in poorly differentiated tumors. The distance covered by the tumor inside the walls of the colon and rectum (T-stage) was significant for both D-dimer and CEA levels. As the T-stage increased, there was also a significant increase in the D-dimer and CEA levels. A high significance and correlation level was detected between the TNM staging and both D-dimer and CEA. A significant relationship was found between the advanced tumor stage and short postoperative survival rate of patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, the analysis of preoperative D-dimer and CEA levels can be useful in predicting the stage and differentiation of the tumor and the postoperative survival rate. PMID:27651789

  15. D-Dimer and Carcinoembryonic Antigen Levels: Useful Indicators for Predicting the Tumor Stage and Postoperative Survival

    PubMed Central

    Tekeşin, Kemal; Esatoğlu, Varol; Özdemir, Ebru; Özel, Leyla; Melih Kara, Veli

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study is to determine the preoperative plasma D-dimer and serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) levels of patients scheduled for curative surgical resection for colorectal cancer and to evaluate the significance of these levels on the prognosis and postoperative survival rate. One hundred sixty-five patients with colorectal cancer, who were scheduled to have elective resection between January 2008 and January 2011, were included in the study. A significant increase was observed in the D-dimer levels, particularly in poorly differentiated tumors. The distance covered by the tumor inside the walls of the colon and rectum (T-stage) was significant for both D-dimer and CEA levels. As the T-stage increased, there was also a significant increase in the D-dimer and CEA levels. A high significance and correlation level was detected between the TNM staging and both D-dimer and CEA. A significant relationship was found between the advanced tumor stage and short postoperative survival rate of patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, the analysis of preoperative D-dimer and CEA levels can be useful in predicting the stage and differentiation of the tumor and the postoperative survival rate. PMID:27651789

  16. [Incidence of melanoma and changes in stage-specific incidence after implementation of skin cancer screening in Schleswig-Holstein].

    PubMed

    Eisemann, N; Waldmann, A; Katalinic, A

    2014-01-01

    A pilot project in skin cancer screening (SCREEN) was conducted in Schleswig-Holstein from July 2003 to June 2004. Although the impact of this screening on the stage-specific incidence of melanoma is of great importance for screening evaluation, it remains unknown. In theory, an effective skin cancer screening program should result in a medium-term incidence decrease of melanomas with a prognostically unfavorable stage. This is studied on a population-based level by using cancer registry data. Based on data from the Cancer Registry of Schleswig-Holstein for 1999-2009, stage-specific (T-category of the TNM-classification system) age-standardized incidence rates were calculated. After implementation of the SCREEN project, the incidence of prognostically favorable melanomas (in situ and T1) was higher than before, while the incidence of advanced melanomas (T2, T3, and for women also T4) decreased considerably. The classification of tumor stages changed during the project period, which may have contributed to an artificial decrease of the stages with a poor prognosis. Nevertheless, the results are in agreement with the observed decrease of melanoma mortality in the screening region.

  17. A prospective evaluation of the impact of 18-F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography staging on survival for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Blackstock, A. William . E-mail: ablackst@wfubmc.edu; Farmer, Michael R.; Lovato, James; Mishra, Girish; Melin, Susan A.; Oaks, Timothy; Aklilu, Mabea; Clark, Paige B.; Levine, Edward A.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of 18-F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the staging and prognosis of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (LAEC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and October 2004, all patients with LAEC evaluated in the Department of Radiation Oncology were considered for enrollment into a Phase II trial of preoperative chemoradiation. Entry required a staging whole-body FDG-PET scan. Results: One hundred ten consecutive patients were evaluated; 38 were ineligible for reasons including treatment elsewhere, prior malignancy, or refusal of treatment. After conventional staging (clinical examination, endoscopic ultrasound, and chest/abdominal computerized tomography), 33 patients were ineligible because of metastatic disease or poor performance status. Of the remaining 39 patients, 23 were confirmed to have LAEC after FDG-PET staging and were treated in the Phase II trial (Cohort I). Sixteen patients, however, had FDG-PET findings consistent with occult metastatic disease and were deemed ineligible for the trial but were treated with curative intent (Cohort II). The 2-year survival rate for the 23 patients in Cohort I was 64%, compared with 17% (p = 0.003) for patients in Cohort II (FDG-PET positive). Conclusions: More than one-third of patients determined to have LAEC with conventional staging were upstaged with the use of FDG-PET. Despite comparable therapy, upstaging with FDG-PET predicts poor 2-year survival.

  18. Clinicopathologic characteristics of patients with stage III/IV (M(0)) advanced gastric cancer, according to HER2 status assessed by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Min A; Jordan, Bruce; Pickl, Marlene; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Lee, Hyuk Joon; Kim, Tae-You; Kim, Woo Ho; Yang, Han-Kwang; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2011-06-01

    Despite recent advances in chemotherapy, the prognosis for patients with advanced gastric cancer (GC) or gastroesophageal junction cancer remains poor. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a novel target for biologic therapy in metastatic GC. We analyzed the association between HER2 overexpression and the clinicopathologic characteristics of advanced GC. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples were collected from patients with stage III or to IV (M(0)) GC who subsequently underwent curative surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin. All the samples were analyzed for HER2 status by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of 142 samples analyzed, 7.1% scored IHC 2+ and 8.6% scored IHC 3+, whereas 9.3% were HER2-amplified. Of HER2-amplified cases, 76.9% (10/13) scored IHC 3+, showing the correlation between HER2 amplification and overexpression (P=0.01). HER2 IHC 3+ cases were more common in the intestinal-type tumors compared with diffuse-type tumors (16.7% vs. 5.1%, respectively; P=0.049), and a nonsignificant trend was observed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (14.3% vs. 9.2%, respectively; P=0.399). HER2 gene amplification was more frequent in stage IV (M(0)) than stage III disease (15.4% vs. 4.0%, respectively; P=0.037). Interestingly, HER2-amplified disease was more common than nonamplified disease in patients with nodal stage 3 tumors (76.9% vs. 38.6%, respectively; P=0.009); a similar pattern was observed using IHC. HER2 overexpression correlated with nodal stage, and a lymph node ratio greater than 0.5 was more common in HER2-amplified tumors than HER2-nonamplified tumors (69.2% vs. 43.3%, respectively; P=0.086). These findings suggest that further investigations of adjuvant therapy with HER2-targeted therapy for advanced GC are warranted.

  19. Efficacy Comparison Between Total Laryngectomy and Nonsurgical Organ-Preservation Modalities in Treatment of Advanced Stage Laryngeal Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoyuan; Zhou, Qi; Zhang, Xianquan

    2016-04-01

    It remains unclear whether the efficacy of nonsurgical organ-preservation modalities (NOP) in the treatment of advanced-stage laryngeal cancer was noninferiority compared with that of total laryngectomy (TL). The objective of this study was to compare the curative effects between TL and NOP in the treatment of advanced-stage laryngeal cancer through a meta-analysis.Clinical studies were retrieved from the electronic databases of PubMed, Embase, Wanfang, and Chinese National Knowledge infrastructure. A meta-analysis was performed to investigate the differences in the curative efficacy of advanced-stage laryngeal cancer between TL and the nonsurgical method. Two reviewers screened all titles and abstracts, and independently assessed all articles. All identified studies were retrospective.Sixteen retrospective studies involving 8308 patients (4478 in the TL group and 3701 in the nonsurgical group) were included in this meta-analysis. The analysis results displayed the advantage of TL for 2-year and 5-year overall survival (OS)(OR 2.79, 95% CI 1.85-4.23 and OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.09-2.14) as well as in 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS)(OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.61-1.98), but no significant difference in 2-year DSS was detected between the 2 groups (OR = 2.09,95% CI0.69-6.40). Additionally, there were no significant differences between TL and NOP for 5-year local control (LC) either (OR = 1.75, 95% CI 0.87-3.53). When we carried out subgroup analyses, the advantage of TL was especially obvious in T4 subgroups, but not in T3 subgroups.This is the first study to compare the curative effects on advanced-stage laryngeal cancer using meta-analytic methodology. Although there was a trend in favor of TL for OS and DSS, there is no clear difference in oncologic outcome between TL and NOP. Therefore, other factors such as tumor T-stage and size, lymph node metastasis, and physical condition are also important indicators for treatment choice. PMID:27057837

  20. Testing of polyimide second-stage rod seals for single-state applications in advanced aircraft hydraulic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waterman, A. W.

    1977-01-01

    Machined polyimide second-stage rod seals were evaluated to determine their suitability for single-stage applications where full system pressure acts on the upstream side of the seal. The 6.35-cm (2.5-in.) K-section seal was tested in impulse screening tests where peak pressure was increased in 3.448-MPa (500-psi) increments each 20,000 cycles. Seal failure occurred at 37.92 MPa (5,500 psi), indicating a potential for acceptability in a 27.58-MPa (4,000-psi) system. Static pressurization for 600 sec at pressures in excess of 10.34 MPa (1,500 psi) revealed structural inadequacy of the seal cross section to resist fracture and extrusion. Endurance testing showed the seals capable of at least 65,000 1.27-cm (0.5-in.) cycles at 450 K (350 F) without leakage. It was concluded that the second-stage seals were proven to be exceptional in the 1.379-MPa (200-psi) applications for which they were designed, but polyimide material properties are not adequate for use in this design at pressure loading equivalent to that present in single-stage applications.

  1. Loss of heterozygosity on 10q and microsatellite instability in advanced stages of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and possible association with homozygous deletion of PTEN.

    PubMed

    Scarisbrick, J J; Woolford, A J; Russell-Jones, R; Whittaker, S J

    2000-05-01

    Previous cytogenetic studies of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) were based on limited numbers of patients and seldom showed consistent nonrandom chromosomal abnormalities. In this study, 54 tumor DNA samples from patients with CTCL were analyzed for loss of heterozygosity on 10q. Allelic loss was identified in 10 samples, all of which were from the 44 patients with mycosis fungoides (10/44 patients; 23%). Of the patients with allelic loss, 3 were among the 29 patients with early-stage myosis fungoides (T(1) or T(2)) (3/29 patients; 10%), whereas the other 7 were among the 15 patients with advanced cutaneous disease (T(3) or T(4)) (7/15 patients; 47%). The overlapping region of deletion was between 10q23 and 10q24. In addition, microsatellite instability (MSI) was present in 13 of the 54 samples (24%), 12 from patients with mycosis fungoides and 1 from a patient with Sezary syndrome. There was also an association between MSI and disease progression in patients with mycosis fungoides, with 6 of 15 (40%) patients with MSI having advanced cutaneous disease and only 6 of 29 (21%) having early-stage disease. Samples with allelic loss on 10q were analyzed for abnormalities of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (10q23.3). No tumor-specific mutations were detected, but homozygous deletion was found in 2 patients. Thus, we found loss of heterozygosity on 10q and MSI in advanced cutaneous stages of mycosis fungoides. These findings indicate that a tumor suppressor gene or genes in this region may be associated with disease progression. Furthermore, abnormalities of PTEN may be important in the pathogenesis of mycosis fungoides, but our data imply that this gene is rarely inactivated by small deletions or point mutations. (Blood. 2000;95:2937-2942)

  2. Infection in advanced chronic kidney disease leads to increased risk of cardiovascular events, end-stage kidney disease and mortality.

    PubMed

    Cheikh Hassan, Hicham I; Tang, Mila; Djurdjev, Ognjenka; Langsford, David; Sood, Manish M; Levin, Adeera

    2016-10-01

    The risk of infection in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its subsequent impact on adverse outcomes are not well established. Therefore, we determined the association of an infectious episode with the subsequent risk of cardiovascular ischemia, congestive heart failure, end-stage kidney disease or mortality in a Canadian prospective cohort (CanPREDDICT) of patients with advanced CKD (eGFR: 15-45 ml/min/1.73m(2)) followed by nephrologists for up to 5 years. Infectious episodes were classified by anatomic location and identified by positive culture, hospital admission, or use of antibiotics. Competing risk models were used to examine the time-varying risk of infection and the risk of cardiovascular ischemia, congestive heart failure, or end-stage kidney disease accounting for the competing risk of mortality. All outcomes were independently adjudicated. Of 2370 patients (mean age, 68 years; mean baseline eGFR, 28.2 mL/min/1.73m(2)), 575 patients (24.3%) had recorded infections; 378 had 1 infection episode, whereas 197 had 2 or more episodes, the most common being urinary and respiratory. An infectious episode was independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular ischemia (hazard ratio 1.80, 95% confidence interval 1.24-2.60), congestive heart failure (hazard ratio, 3.2; confidence interval, 2.25-4.61), end-stage kidney disease (hazard ratio, 1.58; confidence interval, 1.22-2.05) or mortality (hazard ratio, 3.39; confidence interval, 2.65-4.33). Thus, there is a high risk of infection in advanced CKD being associated with subsequent adverse outcomes. PMID:27591084

  3. Infection in advanced chronic kidney disease leads to increased risk of cardiovascular events, end-stage kidney disease and mortality.

    PubMed

    Cheikh Hassan, Hicham I; Tang, Mila; Djurdjev, Ognjenka; Langsford, David; Sood, Manish M; Levin, Adeera

    2016-10-01

    The risk of infection in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its subsequent impact on adverse outcomes are not well established. Therefore, we determined the association of an infectious episode with the subsequent risk of cardiovascular ischemia, congestive heart failure, end-stage kidney disease or mortality in a Canadian prospective cohort (CanPREDDICT) of patients with advanced CKD (eGFR: 15-45 ml/min/1.73m(2)) followed by nephrologists for up to 5 years. Infectious episodes were classified by anatomic location and identified by positive culture, hospital admission, or use of antibiotics. Competing risk models were used to examine the time-varying risk of infection and the risk of cardiovascular ischemia, congestive heart failure, or end-stage kidney disease accounting for the competing risk of mortality. All outcomes were independently adjudicated. Of 2370 patients (mean age, 68 years; mean baseline eGFR, 28.2 mL/min/1.73m(2)), 575 patients (24.3%) had recorded infections; 378 had 1 infection episode, whereas 197 had 2 or more episodes, the most common being urinary and respiratory. An infectious episode was independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular ischemia (hazard ratio 1.80, 95% confidence interval 1.24-2.60), congestive heart failure (hazard ratio, 3.2; confidence interval, 2.25-4.61), end-stage kidney disease (hazard ratio, 1.58; confidence interval, 1.22-2.05) or mortality (hazard ratio, 3.39; confidence interval, 2.65-4.33). Thus, there is a high risk of infection in advanced CKD being associated with subsequent adverse outcomes.

  4. SU-E-J-87: Ventilation Weighting Effect On Mean Doses of Both Side Lungs for Patients with Advanced Stage Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, H; Xia, P; Yu, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study ventilation weighting effect on radiation doses to both side lungs for patients with advanced stage lung cancer. Methods: Fourteen patients with advanced stage lung cancer were included in this retrospective study. Proprietary software was developed to calculate the lung ventilation map based on 4DCT images acquired for radiation therapy. Two phases of inhale (0%) and exhale (50%) were used for the lung ventilation calculations. For each patient, the CT images were resampled to the same dose calculation resolution of 3mmx3mmx3mm. The ventilation distribution was then normalized by the mean value of the ventilation. The ventilation weighted dose was calculated by applying linearly weighted ventilation to the dose of each pixel. The lung contours were automatically delineated from patient CT image with lung window, excluding the tumor and high density tissues. For contralateral and ipsilateral lungs, the mean lung doses from the original plan and ventilation weighted mean lung doses were compared using two tail t-Test. Results: The average of mean dose was 6.1 ±3.8Gy for the contralateral lungs, and 26.2 ± 14.0Gy for the ipsilateral lungs. The average of ventilation weighted dose was 6.3± 3.8Gy for the contralateral lungs and 24.6 ± 13.1Gy for the ipsilateral lungs. The statistics analysis shows the significance of the mean dose increase (p<0.015) for the contralateral lungs and decrease (p<0.005) for the ipsilateral lungs. Conclusion: Ventilation weighted doses were greater than the un-weighted doses for contralateral lungs and smaller for ipsilateral lungs. This Result may be helpful to understand the radiation dosimetric effect on the lung function and provide planning guidance for patients with advance stage lung cancer.

  5. Intraoperative radiation therapy as adjuvant treatment in locally advanced stage tumours involving the middle ear: a hypothesis-generating retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Cristalli, G; Mercante, G; Marucci, L; Soriani, A; Telera, S; Spriano, G

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety, effectiveness and functional outcomes of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) followed by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in locally advanced stage tumours involving the middle ear. Data on 13 consecutive patients treated for malignant tumor of external auditory canal involving the middle ear were retrospectively reviewed. Median follow-up was 33 months (range 6-133). Five (38%) patients were stage III and 8 (62%) were Stage IV according to the University of Pittsburgh staging system. Lateral temporal bone resection (LTBR) was performed in all cases. LTBR was associated with parotidectomy in 5 (38%) cases, and with neck dissection and parotidectomy in 6 (46%) cases. No patients had gross residual tumour. Surgical treatment was followed by IORT (12 Gy) and IMRT (50 Gy). Adjuvant chemotherapy was used in 4 (30%) cases. Preoperative and postoperative audiometric tests were performed to assess hearing loss. 5-year local-control (LC), 5-year distant-metastasis (DM), 5-year disease-free-survival (DFS) and 5-year overall-survival (OS) were calculated with Kaplan-Meyer method. Significant changes in bone conduction were reported after treatment. Partial flap necrosis was the only early complication observed in three (23%) cases, while meningeal fistula was seen in one (7.6%) case as a late complication. The 5-year LC-rate was 68%. The 5-year DM-rate was 90%. The 5-year DFS-rate was 61%. The 5-year OS-rate was 69%. IORT followed by IMRT for the treatment of advanced external auditory canal and middle ear tumours seems to be safe. No intraoperative death was reported. IORT may reduce the postoperative irradiation of remnant tissue obtaining the same full dose on the tumour bed. No complications of the residual external ear were observed. Detriment of neurosensory hearing may be expected. Future studies are required to confirm the benefit of this procedure in the ear.

  6. Large-Scale Liquid Hydrogen Tank Rapid Chill and Fill Testing for the Advanced Shuttle Upper Stage Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, R. H.; Hedayat, A.; Holt, K. A.; Sims, J.; Johnson, E. F.; Hastings, L. J.; Lak, T.

    2013-01-01

    Cryogenic upper stages in the Space Shuttle program were prohibited primarily due to a safety risk of a 'return to launch site' abort. An upper stage concept addressed this concern by proposing that the stage be launched empty and filled using shuttle external tank residuals after the atmospheric pressure could no longer sustain an explosion. However, only about 5 minutes was allowed for tank fill. Liquid hydrogen testing was conducted within a near-ambient environment using the multipurpose hydrogen test bed 638.5 ft3 (18m3) cylindrical tank with a spray bar mounted longitudinally inside. Although the tank was filled within 5 minutes, chilldown of the tank structure was incomplete, and excessive tank pressures occurred upon vent valve closure. Elevated tank wall temperatures below the liquid level were clearly characteristic of film boiling. The test results have substantial implications for on-orbit cryogen transfer since the formation of a vapor film would be much less inhibited due to the reduced gravity. However, the heavy tank walls could become an asset in normal gravity testing for on-orbit transfer, i.e., if film boiling in a nonflight weight tank can be inhibited in normal gravity, then analytical modeling anchored with the data could be applied to reduced gravity environments with increased confidence.

  7. Pemetrexed for advanced stage nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer: latest evidence about its extended use and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tomasini, Pascale; Barlesi, Fabrice; Mascaux, Celine; Greillier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still the leading cause of cancer-related death, and the treatment of advanced NSCLC relies on systemic treatments. During the last decade, pemetrexed, an antifolate agent, gradually became a key component of the treatment for patients with advanced nonsquamous NSCLC. It has indeed been shown to be efficient for first-line, maintenance and second- or third-line treatment in this subgroup of NSCLC. Moreover, it is usually well tolerated, with few grade 3 and 4 toxicities. Several studies have tried to identify predictive biomarkers of pemetrexed efficacy. Due to pemetrexed’s mechanism of action, thymidilate synthase expression predictive value was investigated but could not be demonstrated. Currently, more than 400 trials of pemetrexed for the treatment of nonsquamous NSCLC are ongoing. PMID:27239238

  8. A two stage launch vehicle for use as an advanced space transportation system for logistics support of the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the preliminary design specifications for an Advanced Space Transportation System consisting of a fully reusable flyback booster, an intermediate-orbit cargo vehicle, and a shuttle-type orbiter with an enlarged cargo bay. It provides a comprehensive overview of mission profile, aerodynamics, structural design, and cost analyses. These areas are related to the overall feasibility and usefullness of the proposed system.

  9. Analyses of advanced concepts in multi-stage gyro-amplifiers and startup in high power gyro-oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr V.

    Gyrotrons are well recognized sources of high-power coherent electromagnetic radiation. The power that gyrotrons can radiate in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wavelength regions exceeds the power of classical microwave tubes by many orders of magnitude. In this work, the author considers some problems related to the operation of gyro-devices and methods of their solution. In particular, the self-excitation conditions for parasitic backward waves and effect of distributed losses on the small-signal gain of gyro-TWTs are analyzed. The corresponding small-signal theory describing two-stage gyro-traveling-wave tubes (gyro-TWTs) with the first stage having distributed losses is presented. The theory is illustrated by using it for the description of operation of a Ka-band gyro-TWT designed at the Naval Research Laboratory. Also, the results of nonlinear studies of this tube are presented and compared with the ones obtained by the use of MAGY, a multi-frequency, self-consistent code developed at the University of Maryland. An attempt to build a large signal theory of gyro-TWTs with tapered geometry and magnetic field profile is made and first results are obtained for a 250 GHz gyro-TWT. A comparative small-signal analysis of conventional four-cavity and three-stage clustered-cavity gyroklystrons is performed. The corresponding point-gap models for these devices are presented. The efficiency, gain, bandwidth and gain-bandwidth product are analyzed for each scheme. Advantages of the clustered-cavity over the conventional design are discussed. The startup scenarios in high-power gyrotrons and the most important physical effects associated with them are considered. The work presents the results of startup simulations for a 140 GHz, MW-class gyrotron developed by Communications and Power Industries (CPI) for electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and current drive experiments on the "Wendelstein 7-X" stellarator plasma. Also presented are the results for a 110 GHz, 1

  10. Single stage, low noise, advanced technology fan. Volume 5: Fan acoustics. Section 2: One-third octave data tabulations and selected narrowband traces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutras, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    The raw-acoustic data corrected to standard day, from acoustic tests performed on a 0.508-scale fan vehicle of a 111,300 newton thrust, full-size engine, which has application on an advanced transport aircraft, are presented. The single-stage advanced technology fan was designed to a pressure ratio of 1.8 at a tip speed of 503 m/sec to achieve the desired pressure ratio in a single-stage fan with low radius ratio, and to maintain adequate stall margin. The two basic approaches taken in the acoustic design were: (1) minimization of noise at the source, and (2) suppression of the generated noise in the inlet and bypass exhaust duct. Suppression of the generated noise was accomplished in the inlet through use of the hybrid concept (wall acoustic treatment plus airflow acceleration suppression) and in the exhaust duct with extensive acoustic treatment including a splitter. The goal of the design was attainment of twenty effective perceived noise decibels. The suppression goal of FAR 36-20 was not reached, but improvements in the technology of both front and aft fan-noise suppression were realized.

  11. Advanced space engine preliminary design. [liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen upper stage engine for space tug application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zachary, A. T.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis and design of an optimum LO2/LH2, combustion topping cycle, 88,964 Newtons (20,000-pound) thrust, liquid rocket engine was conducted. The design selected is well suited to high-energy, upper-stage engine applications such as the Space Tug and embodies features directed toward optimization of vehicle performance. A configuration selection was conducted based on prior Air Force Contracts, and additional criteria for optimum stage performance. Following configuration selection, analyses and design of the major components and engine systems were conducted to sufficient depth to provide layout drawings suitable for subsequent detailing. In addition, engine packaging to a common interface and a retractable nozzle concept were defined. Alternative development plans and related costs were also established. The design embodies high-performance, low-weight, low NPSH requirements (saturated propellant inlet conditions at start), idle-mode operation, and autogenous pressurization. The design is the result of the significant past and current LO2/LH2 technology efforts of the NASA centers and the Air Force, as well as company-funded programs.

  12. Human Leukocyte Antigen G Polymorphism and Expression Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Advanced Disease Stage

    PubMed Central

    Ben Amor, Amira; Beauchemin, Karine; Faucher, Marie-Claude; Hamzaoui, Agnes; Hamzaoui, Kamel; Roger, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G acts as negative regulator of the immune responses and its expression may enable tumor cells to escape immunosurveillance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of HLA-G allelic variants and serum soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) levels on risk of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed 191 Caucasian adults with NSCLC and 191 healthy subjects recruited between January 2009 and March 2014 in Ariana (Tunisia). Serum sHLA-G levels were measured by immunoassay and HLA-G alleles were determined using a direct DNA sequencing procedures. The heterozygous genotypes of HLA-G 010101 and -G 010401 were associated with increased risks of both NSCLC and advanced disease stages. In contrast, the heterozygous genotypes of HLA-G 0105N and -G 0106 were associated with decreased risks of NSCC and clinical disease stage IV, respectively. Serum sHLA-G levels were significantly higher in patients with NSCLC and particularly in those with advanced disease stages compared to healthy subjects. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves was 0.82 for controls vs patients. Given 100% specificity, the highest sensitivity achieved to detect NSCLC was 52.8% at a cutoff value of 24.9 U/ml. Patients with the sHLA-G above median level (≥ 50 U/ml) had a significantly shorter survival time. This study demonstrates that HLA-G allelic variants are independent risk factors for NSCLC. Serum sHLA-G levels in NSCLC patients could be useful biomarkers for the diagnostic and prognosis of NSCLC. PMID:27517300

  13. The Effect of Extrafascial Hysterectomy After Completion of External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Locally Advanced Stages (IIB-III) of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sarraf, Zahra; Hamedi, Bahareh; Hooshmand, Soodabeh; Mosalaie, Ahmad; Robati, Minoo; Momtahan, Mozhdeh; Farhadi, Pouya

    2013-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, cervical cancer is one of the most challenging gynecologic cancers in treatment. Objectives: This study was designed with the aim of comparing patients treated with External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT) and Interactivity Brachytherapy (ICBT) with EBRT and extrafascial hysterectomy in locally advanced stages of cervical cancer (IIB-III). Patients and Methods: The present study was designed as a case-control which was performed on the patients with cervical cancer in locally advanced stages (IIB-III) admitted to Namazi and Faghihi hospitals (university hospitals in Shiraz) between 2008-2011. 51 patients were included in two distinct groups: 25 patients were treated with EBRT and Interactivity Brachytherapy (group A). 26 patients were treated with EBRT and extrafascial hysterectomy group B. Results: In group A, the number of patients with FIGO stage IIb and III were 16 and 9, respectively, and 17 and 9 in group B. The median duration of follow-up was 24 months. There were no significant differences between two groups in metastasis and recurrence rate (P > 0.05). 5-years overall survival rate was 54.8% [95% CI: 39-70.9] in group A and in group B was 50.9% [95% CI: 41.5-60] and The LOG-rank test which controls the effect of treatment modalities on overall survival rate, did not show any significant difference between two groups (P = 0.407). Conclusion: The results of our study showed that the trend of treatment using EBRT along with intracavity brachytherapy may have the same outcome as the method of using EBRT and extrafascial hysterectomy. Overall, it seems that external beam radiation followed by extrafascial hysterectomy could be a proper substitute for brachytherapy. PMID:24693381

  14. Human Leukocyte Antigen G Polymorphism and Expression Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Advanced Disease Stage.

    PubMed

    Ben Amor, Amira; Beauchemin, Karine; Faucher, Marie-Claude; Hamzaoui, Agnes; Hamzaoui, Kamel; Roger, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G acts as negative regulator of the immune responses and its expression may enable tumor cells to escape immunosurveillance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of HLA-G allelic variants and serum soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) levels on risk of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed 191 Caucasian adults with NSCLC and 191 healthy subjects recruited between January 2009 and March 2014 in Ariana (Tunisia). Serum sHLA-G levels were measured by immunoassay and HLA-G alleles were determined using a direct DNA sequencing procedures. The heterozygous genotypes of HLA-G 010101 and -G 010401 were associated with increased risks of both NSCLC and advanced disease stages. In contrast, the heterozygous genotypes of HLA-G 0105N and -G 0106 were associated with decreased risks of NSCC and clinical disease stage IV, respectively. Serum sHLA-G levels were significantly higher in patients with NSCLC and particularly in those with advanced disease stages compared to healthy subjects. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves was 0.82 for controls vs patients. Given 100% specificity, the highest sensitivity achieved to detect NSCLC was 52.8% at a cutoff value of 24.9 U/ml. Patients with the sHLA-G above median level (≥ 50 U/ml) had a significantly shorter survival time. This study demonstrates that HLA-G allelic variants are independent risk factors for NSCLC. Serum sHLA-G levels in NSCLC patients could be useful biomarkers for the diagnostic and prognosis of NSCLC.

  15. Phase I clinical study with multiple peptide vaccines in combination with tetanus toxoid and GM-CSF in advanced-stage HLA-A*0201-positive melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Bins, Adriaan; Mallo, Henk; Sein, Johan; van den Bogaard, Colette; Nooijen, Willem; Vyth-Dreese, Florry; Nuijen, Bastiaan; de Gast, Gijsbert C; Haanen, John B A G

    2007-01-01

    Successful induction of functional tumor-specific T cells by peptide vaccination in animal models has resulted in many clinical trials to test this approach in advanced-stage melanoma patients. In this phase I clinical trial, 11 end-stage melanoma patients were vaccinated intradermally with 3 peptides: MART-1(26-35) E27L (ELAGIGILTV), tyrosinase(368-376) N375Q (YMDGTMSQV), and gp100(209-217) T210M (IMQVPFSV), admixed with tetanus toxoid and granulocyte-monocyte colony stimulating factor. The peptide vaccine was well tolerated at all tested doses, and led to grade 1-2 toxicity only. Although all patients did show a rise in antitetanus IgG titers, in only 3 patients peptide-specific CD8 T-cells were induced. In 2 cases, the response was directed against MART-1(26-35) and consisted of 0.2% and 3.3% of the CD8 population; however, in both instances these cells did not produce interferon-gamma on stimulation with the unmodified peptide. The third patient mounted a small (0.1%) response against gp100. In a fourth patient, a nonfunctional tyrosinase-specific response (0.6%) was found that was present before vaccination, but was not affected in size nor in function by the vaccine. None of the 11 patients responded clinically according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors criteria. Although this study is a small scale phase I clinical trial, the efficacy that was observed was disappointingly low. In accordance with previously published peptide vaccination studies, these results add to the increasing evidence that peptide vaccination in itself is not potent enough as an effective melanoma immunotherapy in advanced-stage patients.

  16. Treatment of liver cancer of middle and advanced stages using ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol injection combined with radiofrequency ablation: A clinical analysis

    PubMed Central

    SUN, XUE; LI, RU; ZHANG, BOTAO; YANG, YUEJIE; CUI, ZHIFEI

    2016-01-01

    Liver cancer is a malignancy of the digestive system and has a high morbidity and mortality rate. Local intervention has become a viable option in identifying liver treatment. The aim of the present study was to analyze the clinical effects of treating liver cancer in middle and advanced stages using ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) in tumors combined with radiofrequency ablation (RFA). A total of 100 patients with stage III–IV liver cancers were selected to participate in the study. Patients were divided into groups. In group A, treatment was initiated with PEI and after 1–2 weeks RFA was applied while in group B treatment was initiated with RFA and after 1–2 weeks PEI was applied. Patients in group C received PEI and RFA simultaneously. The clinical effects in the 3 groups were compared after 6-month follow ups. The volume of tumor ablation necrosis in group A was significantly greater than that in the groups B and C, while the size was significantly smaller compared to groups B and C after ablation. For group A, the complete ablation rate was significantly higher than that in groups B and C, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). Liver damage indices, including raising levels of glutamic-pyruvic transaminase and total bilirubin, were significantly decreased in group A (P<0.05). The survival rate in group A was also significantly higher than in groups B and C (P<0.05). In conclusion, for patients with liver cancer in middle and advanced stages, the treatment method using PEI followed by RFA was more beneficial in terms of improving the tumor ablation rate, alleviating liver damages and increasing survival rates. PMID:26998128

  17. Studies of advanced stages of meditation in the tibetan buddhist and vedic traditions. I: a comparison of general changes.

    PubMed

    Hankey, Alex

    2006-12-01

    This article is the first of two comparing findings of studies of advanced practitioners of Tibetan Buddhist meditation in remote regions of the Himalayas, with established results on long-term practitioners of the Transcendental Meditation programs. Many parallel levels of improvement were found, in sensory acuity, perceptual style and cognitive function, indicating stabilization of aspects of attentional awareness. Together with observed increases in EEG coherence and aspects of brain function, such changes are consistent with growth towards a state of total brain functioning, i.e. development of full mental potential. They are usually accompanied by improved health parameters. How they may be seen to be consistent with growth of enlightenment will be the subject of a second article.

  18. Studies of Advanced Stages of Meditation in the Tibetan Buddhist and Vedic Traditions. I: A Comparison of General Changes

    PubMed Central

    Hankey, Alex

    2006-01-01

    This article is the first of two comparing findings of studies of advanced practitioners of Tibetan Buddhist meditation in remote regions of the Himalayas, with established results on long-term practitioners of the Transcendental Meditation programs. Many parallel levels of improvement were found, in sensory acuity, perceptual style and cognitive function, indicating stabilization of aspects of attentional awareness. Together with observed increases in EEG coherence and aspects of brain function, such changes are consistent with growth towards a state of total brain functioning, i.e. development of full mental potential. They are usually accompanied by improved health parameters. How they may be seen to be consistent with growth of enlightenment will be the subject of a second article. PMID:17173116

  19. Cutaneous Lymphoma International Consortium Study of Outcome in Advanced Stages of Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome: Effect of Specific Prognostic Markers on Survival and Development of a Prognostic Model

    PubMed Central

    Scarisbrick, Julia J.; Prince, H. Miles; Vermeer, Maarten H.; Quaglino, Pietro; Horwitz, Steven; Porcu, Pierluigi; Stadler, Rudolf; Wood, Gary S.; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Pham-Ledard, Anne; Foss, Francine; Girardi, Michael; Bagot, Martine; Michel, Laurence; Battistella, Maxime; Guitart, Joan; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Martinez-Escala, Maria Estela; Estrach, Teresa; Papadavid, Evangelia; Antoniou, Christina; Rigopoulos, Dimitis; Nikolaou, Vassilki; Sugaya, Makoto; Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Gniadecki, Robert; Sanches, José Antonio; Cury-Martins, Jade; Miyashiro, Denis; Servitje, Octavio; Muniesa, Cristina; Berti, Emilio; Onida, Francesco; Corti, Laura; Hodak, Emilia; Amitay-Laish, Iris; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L.; Rodríguez-Peralto, Jose L.; Knobler, Robert; Porkert, Stefanie; Bauer, Wolfgang; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Grandi, Vieri; Cowan, Richard; Rook, Alain; Kim, Ellen; Pileri, Alessandro; Patrizi, Annalisa; Pujol, Ramon M.; Wong, Henry; Tyler, Kelly; Stranzenbach, Rene; Querfeld, Christiane; Fava, Paolo; Maule, Milena; Willemze, Rein; Evison, Felicity; Morris, Stephen; Twigger, Robert; Talpur, Rakhshandra; Kim, Jinah; Ognibene, Grant; Li, Shufeng; Tavallaee, Mahkam; Hoppe, Richard T.; Duvic, Madeleine; Whittaker, Sean J.; Kim, Youn H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Advanced-stage mycosis fungoides (MF; stage IIB to IV) and Sézary syndrome (SS) are aggressive lymphomas with a median survival of 1 to 5 years. Clinical management is stage based; however, there is wide range of outcome within stages. Published prognostic studies in MF/SS have been single-center trials. Because of the rarity of MF/SS, only a large collaboration would power a study to identify independent prognostic markers. Patients and Methods Literature review identified the following 10 candidate markers: stage, age, sex, cutaneous histologic features of folliculotropism, CD30 positivity, proliferation index, large-cell transformation, WBC/lymphocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase, and identical T-cell clone in blood and skin. Data were collected at specialist centers on patients diagnosed with advanced-stage MF/SS from 2007. Each parameter recorded at diagnosis was tested against overall survival (OS). Results Staging data on 1,275 patients with advanced MF/SS from 29 international sites were included for survival analysis. The median OS was 63 months, with 2- and 5-year survival rates of 77% and 52%, respectively. The median OS for patients with stage IIB disease was 68 months, but patients diagnosed with stage III disease had slightly improved survival compared with patients with stage IIB, although patients diagnosed with stage IV disease had significantly worse survival (48 months for stage IVA and 33 months for stage IVB). Of the 10 variables tested, four (stage IV, age > 60 years, large-cell transformation, and increased lactate dehydrogenase) were independent prognostic markers for a worse survival. Combining these four factors in a prognostic index model identified the following three risk groups across stages with significantly different 5-year survival rates: low risk (68%), intermediate risk (44%), and high risk (28%). Conclusion To our knowledge, this study includes the largest cohort of patients with advanced-stage MF/SS and

  20. Development of national reference energy mean emission levels for the FHWA traffic noise model (FHWA TNM (trade name)), version 1.0. Final report, July 1993-November 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, G.G.; Rapoza, A.S.; Lee, C.S.Y.

    1995-11-01

    During the period, July 1993 through November 1995, the U.S. Department of Transportation , Research and Special Programs Administration, John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe Center), Acoustics Facility. This report also presents the results of the study, including the measurement, data reduction and analysis procedures used to develop the Data Base. It discusses data for constant-flow and interrupted-flow roadway traffic, and data related to vehicle subsource heights. This report also presents the statistical methodology used to establish the Data Base for the FHWA TNM. Sound level regressions are presented as a function of several parameters, including vehicle speed, vehicle type, one-third octave-band frequency, roadway pavement type, roadway grade, traffic-flow condition and vehicle subsource height.

  1. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing.

    PubMed

    Liapis, Ioannis; Papayianni, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector. PMID:25261762

  2. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing.

    PubMed

    Liapis, Ioannis; Papayianni, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector.

  3. Description of advanced third-stage larvae of Gnathostoma lamothei Bertoni-Ruiz et al. 2005 (Nematoda: Gnathostomatidae) from experimental hosts and contributions to its life cycle.

    PubMed

    Gaspar-Navarro, Jorge; Almeyda-Artigas, Roberto Javier; Sánchez-Miranda, Elizabeth; Carranza-Calderón, Laura; Mosqueda-Cabrera, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    The advanced third-stage larvae (AdvL(3)) of Gnathostoma lamothei was obtained from experimental hosts. Frogs Lithobates heckscheri and snakes Nerodia fasciata pictiventris were compatible hosts allowing optimal larval development. AdvL(3) are 4,487.94 μm long, have two lateral cervical papillae between rows 10 and 16 and an excretory pore at row 23. The average counts of the cephalic bulb hooklets from the four rows are 39.3, 43.3, 44.2, and 47.3. Larvae show an esophagus that represents 40 % of the body width. These findings indicate that amphibians and reptiles could be involved as G. lamothei natural hosts; nevertheless, their role as etiological agents of human gnathostomiasis is uncertain. This paper reports for the first time the taxonomic description of G. lamothei AdvL(3) obtained from experimental hosts and contributes to the understanding of its life cycle.

  4. Significantly greater expression of ER, PR, and ECAD in advanced-stage low-grade ovarian serous carcinoma as revealed by immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Lu, Karen H; Malpica, Anais; Bodurka, Diane C; Shvartsman, Hyun S; Schmandt, Rosemarie E; Thornton, Angela D; Deavers, Michael T; Silva, Elvio G; Gershenson, David M

    2007-10-01

    A 2-tier system that classifies ovarian serous carcinoma (OSC) as low grade or high grade is gaining acceptance. Women with low-grade OSC generally have higher 5-year survival rates than do women with high-grade OSC. We examined the expression of various markers to further understand the molecular differences between low-grade and high-grade OSCs: the potential therapeutic targets or prognostic markers Her-2/neu, estrogen receptor, and progesterone receptor (PR); the metastasis-associated markers cyclin D1 (BCL1), E-cadherin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2, and MMP-9; and the cell proliferation-associated markers BCL1, Ki-67 antigen (Ki-67), and p53. For this immunohistochemical analysis, we used paraffin-embedded specimens from 47 patients with advanced-stage low-grade OSC and from 49 patients with advanced-stage high-grade OSC. Our results showed that low-grade tumors expressed significantly higher levels of estrogen receptor, PR, and E-cadherin than did high-grade tumors, suggesting the involvement of gonadal steroid hormones, especially in the pathogenesis of low-grade OSC; the PR positivity was also observed in the stromal component of these low-grade tumors. On the other hand, high-grade tumors trended toward increased expression of MMP-9, BCL1, p53, and Ki-67, and robust MMP-9 positivity was observed in the stromal component of these high-grade tumors. These differences may lead to the development of different therapeutic strategies for women with either the low-grade or the high-grade form of OSC.

  5. 6p22.3 amplification as a biomarker and potential therapeutic target of advanced stage bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianmin; Underwood, Willie; Yang, Nuo; Frangou, Costa; Eng, Kevin; Head, Karen; Bollag, Roni J.; Kavuri, Sravan K.; Rojiani, Amyn M.; Li, Yingwei; Yan, Li; Hill, Annette; Woloszynska-Read, Anna; Wang, Jianmin; Liu, Song; Trump, Donald L.; Candace, Johnson S.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic alterations have been identified as to contribute directly or indirectly to the generation of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (TCC-UB). In a comparative fashion much less is known about copy number alterations in TCC-UB, but it appears that amplification of chromosome 6p22 is one of the most frequent changes. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, we evaluated chromosomal 6p22 amplification in a large cohort of bladder cancer patients with complete surgical staging and outcome data. We have also used shRNA knockdown candidate oncogenes in the cell based study. We found that amplification of chromosome 6p22.3 is significantly associated with the muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (TCC-UB) (22%) in contrast to superficial TCC-UB (9%) (p=7.2-04). The rate of 6p22.3 amplification in pN>1 patients (32%) is more than twice that in pN0 (16%) patients (p=0.05). Interestingly, we found that 6p22.3 amplification is as twice as high (p=0.0201) in African American (AA) than European American (EA) TCC-UB patients. Moreover, we showed that the expression of some candidate genes (E2F3, CDKAL1 and Sox4) in the 6p22.3 region is highly correlated with the chromosomal amplification. In particular, knockdown of E2F3 inhibits cell proliferation in a 6p22.3-dependent manner, whereas knockdown of CDKAL1 and Sox4 has no effect on cell proliferation. Using gene expression profiling, we further identified some common as well as distinctive subset targets of the E2F3 family members. In summary, our data indicate that E2F3 is a key regulator of cell proliferation in a subset of bladder cancer and the 6p22.3 amplicon is a biomarker of aggressive phenotype in this tumor type. PMID:24231253

  6. R-CHOP with Iodine-131 Tositumomab Consolidation for Advanced Stage Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL): SWOG S0433

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Unger, Joseph M.; Burack, W. Richard; Gopal, Ajay K.; Raju, Robert N.; Nademanee, Auayporn P.; Kaminski, Mark S.; Li, Hongli; Press, Oliver W.; Miller, Thomas P.; Fisher, Richard I.

    2014-01-01

    Radiolabelled antiCD-20 antibodies have demonstrated single agent activity in relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The S0433 clinical trial enrolled patients with newly diagnosed, advanced stage or bulky stage II, histologically confirmed DLBCL. Patients received six cycles of R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone), two cycles of CHOP, then iodine-131 tositumomab radioimmunotherapy consolidation 30–60 days after completion of chemotherapy. The primary endpoint was two-year progression-free survival (PFS). Eighty-four eligible patients were enrolled, and 56 patients completed the entire course of protocol treatment. Of the 84 patients evaluable for treatment response, 72 (86%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 76%–92%) achieved a partial response (n=21) or a confirmed (n=41) or unconfirmed (n=10) complete response to therapy. With a median follow-up of 3.9 years, the 2-year PFS estimate is 69% and the 2-year overall survival estimate is 77%. Rituximab levels at time of radioimmunotherapy did not correlate with toxicity or outcome. Twenty percent of patients had double hit features (MYC+; BCL2+) by immunohistochemistry, and had inferior outcome. These current results suggest that the incorporation of novel agents earlier in therapy may ultimately have greater impact in DLBCL, as early progressions, deaths and declining performance status during CHOP chemotherapy limited the number of patients who ultimately could benefit from radioimmunotherapy consolidation. PMID:24749780

  7. Modeling and Test Data Analysis of a Tank Rapid Chill and Fill System for the Advanced Shuttle Upper Stage (ASUS) Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, Robin; Hedayat, Ali; Holt, Kimberly A.; Cruit, Wendy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Shuttle Upper Stage (ASUS) concept addresses safety concerns associated .with cryogenic stages by launching empty, and filling on ascent. The ASUS employs a rapid chill and fill concept. A spray bar is used to completely chill the tank before fill, allowing the vent valve to be closed during the fill process. The first tests of this concept, using a flight size (not flight weight) tank. were conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) during the summer of 2000. The objectives of the testing were to: 1) demonstrate that a flight size tank could be filled in roughly 5 minutes to accommodate the shuttle ascent window, and 2) demonstrate a no-vent fill of the tank. A total of 12 tests were conducted. Models of the test facility fill and vent systems, as well as the tank, were constructed. The objective of achieving tank fill in 5 minutes was met during the test series. However, liquid began to accumulate in the tank before it was chilled. Since the tank was not chilled until the end of each test, vent valve closure during fill was not possible. Even though the chill and fill process did not occur as expected, reasonable model correlation with the test data was achieved.

  8. Increased expression of the RIα subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A is associated with advanced stage ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    McDaid, H M; Cairns, M T; Atkinson, R J; McAleer, S; Harkin, D P; Gilmore, P; Johnston, P G

    1999-01-01

    The primary element in the cAMP signal transduction pathway is the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Expression of the RIα subunit of type I PKA is elevated in a variety of human tumours and cancer cell lines. The purpose of this study was to assess the prognostic importance of RIα expression in patients with ovarian cancer. We have evaluated the expression of RIα in a panel of human ovarian tumours (n= 40) and five human ovarian cancer cell lines using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. The human ovarian cell lines OAW42 and OTN14 express high endogenous levels of RIα mRNA and protein (at significantly higher mRNA levels than high tissue expressors, P< 0.05). The ovarian cell line A2780 expresses low endogenous levels of RIα mRNA and protein (also at higher mRNA levels than low tissue expressors, P< 0.05). Quantitative RT-PCR revealed no significant difference in RIα mRNA expression between different ovarian histological subtypes in this study. No associations were found between RIα mRNA expression and differentiation state. RIα mRNA expression was significantly associated with tumour stage (P= 0.0036), and this remained significant in univariate analysis (P= 0.0002). A trend emerged between RIα mRNA expression levels and overall survival in univariate analysis (P= 0.051), however, by multivariate analysis, stage remained the major determinant of overall survival (P= 0.0001). This study indicates that in ovarian epithelial tumours high RIα mRNA expression is associated with advanced stage disease. RIα expression may be of predictive value in ovarian cancer and may be associated with dysfunctional signalling pathways in this cancer type. 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10070893

  9. Evaluation of preoperative staging for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Lin-Na; He, Long-Jun; Gao, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Xin-Xin; Shan, Hong-Bo; Luo, Guang-Yu; Li, Yin; Lin, Shi-Yong; Wang, Guo-Bao; Zhang, Rong; Xu, Guo-Liang; Li, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is known for its rapid progression and poor outcomes. China has the highest incidence and mortality in the world. Diagnoses made at early stages and accurate staging are associated with better outcomes, all of which can play a significant role in the selection of treatment protocols. ESCC is staged according to the widely accepted TNM system. Common imaging modalities used in staging ESCC before treatment include endoscopy, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Endoscopic ultrasound is useful for staging tumor depth and nodal status. Narrow band imaging is valuable for early stage disease assessment. CT and PET provide additional valuable information regarding node and metastasis staging. The ability of MRI to delineate ESCC is continuously being improved and adds information regarding locoregional status to routine examinations. PMID:27547011

  10. Effect of Advancing Age and Multiple Chronic Conditions on Mortality in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease after Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Placement

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswami, Ashok; Kiley, Mary-Lou; Anthony, Faith F; Chen, Yuexin; Chen, Jason; Rajagopal, Sumanth; Liu, Taylor I; Young, Charlie; Paxton, Elizabeth W

    2016-01-01

    Context: There is insufficient information on the effect that advancing age and multiple chronic conditions (MCC) have on mortality after placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) vs non-ESRD. Objective: To assess whether a differential effect of age and MCC exists between ESRD and non-ESRD. Design: Population-based, retrospective cohort study using data from the national Kaiser Permanente Cardiac Device Registry of patients who underwent placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2013. Main Outcome Measures: All-cause mortality. Results: Of 7825 patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement, ESRD-affected patients constituted 4.0% of the cohort (n = 311), were similar in age (p = 0.91), and presented with a larger comorbidity burden (3.3 ± 1.3 vs 2.4 ± 1.5, p < 0.001). The effect of advancing age (every 5 years) on mortality in the ESRD cohort (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03–1.20) was less than in the non-ESRD cohort (HR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.25–1.32). Similarly, the effect of each additional comorbidity in the ESRD cohort was less (HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.91–1.19) than in the non-ESRD group (HR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.16–1.25). Lastly, ESRD was independently associated with a 3-fold greater hazard of mortality. Conclusions: Advancing age and increasing number of MCC have a differential effect on mortality risk in patients with ESRD compared with their non-ESRD counterparts. Future studies should focus on assessment of nonlinear relationships of age, MCC, and naturally occurring clusters of MCC on mortality. PMID:26562307

  11. Downregulation of Six MicroRNAs Is Associated with Advanced Stage, Lymph Node Metastasis and Poor Prognosis in Small Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Long; Lin, Jia-Xin; Yu, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Mei-Yin; Wang, Hui-Yun; Zheng, Min

    2012-01-01

    Background Small cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC) is very rare, and due to the long time period required to recruit sufficient numbers of patients, there is a paucity of information regarding the prognostic factors associated with survival. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been used as cancer-related biomarkers in a variety of tumor types, and the objective of this study was to determine whether microRNA expression profiles can predict clinical outcome in SCCC. Methodology/Principal Findings Forty-four patients with SCCC who underwent radical hysterectomy between January 2000 and October 2009 were enrolled. Using the GeneCopoeia All-in-One™ Customized Human qPCR Primer Array, the expression profiles of 30 miRNAs associated with tumor metastasis was obtained from the formalin-fixed paraffin embedded samples of all 44 patients. Seven miRNAs, has-let-7c, has-miR-10b, has-miR-100, has-miR-125b, has-miR-143, has-miR-145 and has-miR-199a-5p were significantly down-regulated in advanced stage SCCCpatients (FIGO IB2-IV) compared to early stage SCCC patients (FIGOIB1). Among, downregulation of six miRNAs, has-let-7c, has-miR-100, has-miR-125b, has-miR-143, has-miR-145 and has-miR-199a-5p were significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and reduced survival in SCCC. Kaplan–Meier survival analyses revealed that SCCC patients with low expression of has-miR-100 (P = 0.019) and has-miR-125b (P = 0.020) projected a significant tendency towards poorer prognosis. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that downregulation of 7 miRNA associated with advanced stage, 6 miRNAs with metastasis and 2 with poor prognosis in SCCC. Functional analysis of these miRNAs may enhance our understanding of SCCC, as altered expression of specific miRNAs may regulate the metastatic pathway and provide novel targets for therapy. PMID:22438992

  12. SU-E-I-85: Exploring the 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET Characteristics in Staging of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the characteristics derived from 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET image and assess its capacity in staging of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods: 26 patients with newly diagnosed ESCC who underwent 18F-FDG PET scan were included in this study. Different image-derived indices including the standardized uptake value (SUV), gross tumor length, texture features and shape feature were considered. Taken the histopathologic examination as the gold standard, the extracted capacities of indices in staging of ESCC were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. Specificity and sensitivity for each of the studied parameters were derived using receiver-operating characteristic curves. Results: 18F-FDG SUVmax and SUVmean showed statistically significant capability in AJCC and TNM stages. Texture features such as ENT and CORR were significant factors for N stages(p=0.040, p=0.029). Both FDG PET Longitudinal length and shape feature Eccentricity (EC) (p≤0.010) provided powerful stratification in the primary ESCC AJCC and TNM stages than SUV and texture features. Receiver-operating-characteristic curve analysis showed that tumor textural analysis can capability M stages with higher sensitivity than SUV measurement but lower in T and N stages. Conclusion: The 18F-FDG image-derived characteristics of SUV, textural features and shape feature allow for good stratification AJCC and TNM stage in ESCC patients.

  13. Increased Levels of Plasma Epstein Barr Virus DNA Identify a Poor-Risk Subset of Patients With Advanced Stage Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Haverkos, Bradley M.; Gru, Alejandro A.; Geyer, Susan M.; Bingman, Anissa K.; Hemminger, Jessica A.; Mishra, Anjali; Wong, Henry K.; Pancholi, Preeti; Freud, Aharon G.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    Discovering prognostic factors that simultaneously describe tumor characteristics and improve risk stratification is a priority in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). More than a third of advanced stage CTCL patients in this cohort had detectable cell free plasma Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-DNA (pEBVd) using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. An increased level of pEBVd was highly concordant with EBV (ie, Epstein–Barr virus RNAs) in tumor tissue and was associated with inferior survival. Introduction Outcomes in advanced stage (AS) cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) are poor but with great variability. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a subset of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Frequency of plasma EBV-DNA (pEBVd) detection, concordance with EBV RNA (EBER) in tumor tissue, codetection of plasma cytomegalovirus DNA (pCMVd), and prognostic effect in AS CTCL are unknown. Patients and Methods Patients (n = 46; 2006–2013) with AS CTCL (≥IIB) were retrospectively studied. pEBVd and pCMVd were longitudinally measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. EBER in situ hybridization (ISH) was performed on tumor samples. Survival from time of diagnosis (ToD) and time of progression to AS was assessed. Results Plasma EBV-DNA and pCMVd were detected in 37% (17 of 46) and 17% (8 of 46) of AS CTCL patients, respectively. pCMVd detection was significantly more frequent in pEBVd-positive (pEBVd+) than pEBVd− patients (35% vs. 7%; P = .038). Tumor tissue for EBER-ISH was available in 14 of 17 pEBVd+ and 22 of 29 pEBVd− patients; 12 of 14 (85.7%) pEBVd+ patients were EBER+ versus 0 of 22 pEBVd− patients. Frequency of large cell transformation (LCT) tended to be greater in pEBVd+ patients, but was not significant (10 of 14 pEBVd+ vs. 10 of 23 pEBVd−; P = .17). No notable differences in rates of increased levels of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were observed (17 of 17 pEBVd+ vs. 27 of 29 pEBVd−). pEBVd detection was associated with

  14. Prospective assessment of the prognostic value of circulating tumor cells and their clusters in patients with advanced-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mu, Zhaomei; Wang, Chun; Ye, Zhong; Austin, Laura; Civan, Jesse; Hyslop, Terry; Palazzo, Juan P; Jaslow, Rebecca; Li, Bingshan; Myers, Ronald E; Jiang, Juntao; Xing, Jinliang; Yang, Hushan; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    The enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) provides important prognostic values in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Recent studies indicate that individual CTCs form clusters and these CTC-clusters play an important role in tumor metastasis. We aimed to assess whether quantification of CTC-clusters provides additional prognostic value over quantification of individual CTCs alone. In 115 prospectively enrolled advanced-stage (III and IV) breast cancer patients, CTCs and CTC-clusters were counted in 7.5 ml whole blood using the CellSearch system at baseline before first-line therapy. The individual and joint effects of CTC and CTC cluster counts on patients' progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards modeling. Of the 115 patients, 36 (31.3 %) had elevated baseline CTCs (≥5 CTCs/7.5 ml) and 20 (17.4 %) had CTC-clusters (≥2 CTCs/7.5 ml). Patients with elevated CTCs and CTC-clusters both had worse PFS with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.76 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.57-4.86, P log-rank = 0.0005] and 2.83 (1.48-5.39, P log-rank = 0.001), respectively. In joint analysis, compared with patients with <5 CTCs and without CTC-clusters, patients with elevated CTCs but without clusters, and patients with elevated CTCs and with clusters, had an increasing trend of progression risk, with an HR of 2.21 (1.02-4.78) and 3.32 (1.68-6.55), respectively (P log-rank = 0.0006, P trend = 0.0002). The additional prognostic value of CTC-clusters appeared to be more pronounced in patients with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC), the most aggressive form of breast cancer with the poorest survival. Baseline counts of both individual CTCs and CTC-clusters were associated with PFS in advanced-stage breast cancer patients. CTC-clusters might provide additional prognostic value compared with CTC enumeration alone, in patients with elevated CTCs.

  15. Two-Stage Phase I Dose-Escalation Study of Intratumoral Reovirus Type 3 Dearing and Palliative Radiotherapy in Patients with Advanced Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Kevin J.; Karapanagiotou, Eleni M.; Roulstone, Victoria; Twigger, Katie R.; White, Christine L.; Vidal, Laura; Beirne, Debbie; Prestwich, Robin; Newbold, Kate; Ahmed, Merina; Thway, Khin; Nutting, Christopher M.; Coffey, Matt; Harris, Dean; Vile, Richard G.; Pandha, Hardev S.; DeBono, Johann S.; Melcher, Alan A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the safety and feasibility of combining intratumoral reovirus and radiotherapy in patients with advanced cancer and to assess viral biodistribution, reoviral replication in tumors, and antiviral immune responses. Experimental Design Patients with measurable disease amenable to palliative radiotherapy were enrolled. In the first stage, patients received radiotherapy (20 Gy in five fractions) plus two intratumoral injections of RT3D at doses between 1 × 108 and 1 × 1010 TCID50. In the second stage, the radiotherapy dose was increased (36 Gy in 12 fractions) and patients received two, four, or six doses of RT3D at 1 × 1010 TCID50. End points were safety, viral replication, immunogenicity, and antitumoral activity. Results Twenty-three patients with various solid tumors were treated. Dose-limiting toxicity was not seen. The most common toxicities were grade 2 (or lower) pyrexia, influenza-like symptoms, vomiting, asymptomatic lymphopenia, and neutropenia. There was no exacerbation of the acute radiation reaction. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) studies of blood, urine, stool, and sputum were negative for viral shedding. In the low-dose (20 Gy in five fractions) radiation group, two of seven evaluable patients had a partial response and five had stable disease. In the high-dose (36 Gy in 12 fractions) radiation group, five of seven evaluable patients had partial response and two stable disease. Conclusions The combination of intratumoral RT3D and radiotherapy was well tolerated. The favorable toxicity profile and lack of vector shedding means that this combination should be evaluated in newly diagnosed patients receiving radiotherapy with curative intent. PMID:20484020

  16. Advanced maternal age and the risk of Down syndrome characterized by the meiotic stage of the chromosomal error: A population-based study

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, P.W.; Khoury, M.J.; Freeman, S.B.

    1996-03-01

    The identification of DNA polymorphisms makes it possible to classify trisomy 21 according to the parental origin and stage (meiosis I [MI], meiosis II [MII], or postzygotic mitotic) of the chromosomal error. Studying the effect of parental age on these subgroups could shed light on parental exposures and their timing. From 1989 through 1993, 170 infants with trisomy 21 and 267 randomly selected control infants were ascertained in a population-based, case-control study in metropolitan Atlanta. Blood samples for genetic studies were obtained from case infants and their parents. Using logistic regression, we independently examined the association between maternal and paternal age and subgroups of trisomy 21 defined by parental origin and meiotic stage. The distribution of trisomy 21 by origin was 86% maternal (75% MI and 25% MII), 9% paternal (50% MI and 50% MII), and 5% mitotic. Compared with women <25 years of age, women {>=}40 years old had an odds ratio of 5.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-27.4) for maternal MI (MMI) errors and 51.4 (95% confidence interval, 2.3-999.0) for maternal MII (MMII) errors. Birth-prevalence rates for women {>=}40 years old were 4.2/1,000 births for MMI errors and 1.9/1,000 births for MMII errors. These results support an association between advanced maternal age and both MMI and MMII errors. The association with MI does not pinpoint the timing of the error; however, the association with MII implies that there is at least one maternal age-related mechanism acting around the time of conception. 16 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. Impact of Pretreatment Combined {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Staging on Radiation Therapy Treatment Decisions in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Sweet Ping; David, Steven; Alamgeer, Muhammad; Ganju, Vinod

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic performance of pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) and its impact on radiation therapy treatment decisions in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Methods and Materials: Patients with LABC with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status <2 and no contraindication to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant radiation therapy were enrolled on a prospective trial. All patients had pretreatment conventional imaging (CI) performed, including bilateral breast mammography and ultrasound, bone scan, and CT chest, abdomen, and pelvis scans performed. Informed consent was obtained before enrolment. Pretreatment whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans were performed on all patients, and results were compared with CI findings. Results: A total of 154 patients with LABC with no clinical or radiologic evidence of distant metastases on CI were enrolled. Median age was 49 years (range, 26-70 years). Imaging with PET/CT detected distant metastatic disease and/or locoregional disease not visualized on CI in 32 patients (20.8%). Distant metastatic disease was detected in 17 patients (11.0%): 6 had bony metastases, 5 had intrathoracic metastases (pulmonary/mediastinal), 2 had distant nodal metastases, 2 had liver metastases, 1 had pulmonary and bony metastases, and 1 had mediastinal and distant nodal metastases. Of the remaining 139 patients, nodal disease outside conventional radiation therapy fields was detected on PET/CT in 15 patients (10.8%), with involvement of ipsilateral internal mammary nodes in 13 and ipsilateral level 5 cervical nodes in 2. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT provides superior diagnostic and staging information in patients with LABC compared with CI, which has significant therapeutic implications with respect to radiation therapy management. Imaging with PET/CT should be considered in all patients undergoing primary

  18. Clinical Impact of Education Provision on Determining Advance Care Planning Decisions among End Stage Renal Disease Patients Receiving Regular Hemodialysis in University Malaya Medical Centre

    PubMed Central

    Hing (Wong), Albert; Chin, Loh Ee; Ping, Tan Li; Peng, Ng Kok; Kun, Lim Soo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Advance care planning (ACP) is a process of shared decision-making about future health-care plans between patients, health care providers, and family members, should patients becomes incapable of participating in medical treatment decisions. ACP discussions enhance patient's autonomy, focus on patient's values and treatment preferences, and promote patient-centered care. ACP is integrated as part of clinical practice in Singapore and the United States. Aim: To assess the clinical impact of education provision on determining ACP decisions among end-stage renal disease patients on regular hemodialysis at University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC). To study the knowledge and attitude of patients toward ACP and end-of-life issues. Materials and Methods: Fifty-six patients were recruited from UMMC. About 43 questions pretest survey adapted from Lyon's ACP survey and Moss's cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) attitude survey was given to patients to answer. An educational brochure is then introduced to these patients, and a posttest survey carried out after that. The results were analyzed using SPSS version 22.0. Results: Opinion on ACP, including CPR decisions, showed an upward trend on the importance percentage after the educational brochure exposure, but this was statistically not significant. Seventy-five percent of participants had never heard of ACP before, and only 3.6% had actually prepared a written advanced directive. Conclusion: The ACP educational brochure clinically impacts patients’ preferences and decisions toward end-of-life care; however, this is statistically not significant. Majority of patients have poor knowledge on ACP. This study lays the foundation for execution of future larger scale clinical trials, and ultimately, the incorporation of ACP into clinical practice in Malaysia. PMID:27803566

  19. Validation of a Computational Model for the SLS Core Stage Oxygen Tank Diffuser Concept and the Low Profile Diffuser - An Advanced Development Design for the SLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodnick, Jacob; Richardson, Brian; Ramachandran, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    The Low Profile Diffuser (LPD) project originated as an award from the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Development (ADO) office to the Main Propulsion Systems Branch (ER22). The task was created to develop and test an LPD concept that could produce comparable performance to a larger, traditionally designed, ullage gas diffuser while occupying a smaller volume envelope. Historically, ullage gas diffusers have been large, bulky devices that occupy a significant portion of the propellant tank, decreasing the tank volume available for propellant. Ullage pressurization of spacecraft propellant tanks is required to prevent boil-off of cryogenic propellants and to provide a positive pressure for propellant extraction. To achieve this, ullage gas diffusers must slow hot, high-pressure gas entering a propellant tank from supersonic speeds to only a few meters per second. Decreasing the incoming gas velocity is typically accomplished through expansion to larger areas within the diffuser which has traditionally led to large diffuser lengths. The Fluid Dynamics Branch (ER42) developed and applied advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis methods in order to mature the LPD design from and initial concept to an optimized test prototype and to provide extremely accurate pre-test predictions of diffuser performance. Additionally, the diffuser concept for the Core Stage of the Space Launch System (SLS) was analyzed in a short amount of time to guide test data collection efforts of the qualification of the device. CFD analysis of the SLS diffuser design provided new insights into the functioning of the device and was qualitatively validated against hot wire anemometry of the exterior flow field. Rigorous data analysis of the measurements was performed on static and dynamic pressure data, data from two microphones, accelerometers and hot wire anemometry with automated traverse. Feasibility of the LPD concept and validation of the computational model were

  20. Clinical results of high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in children with advanced stage rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Kyun; Kim, Hyo Sun; Suh, Chang-Ok; Kim, Hyun Ok; Lyu, Chuhl Joo

    2012-09-01

    Regardless of improvement in cure of Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), the results in treatment of advanced stage of RMS in children are still dismal. Recently, high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (HDC/APBSCT) has been tried to manage the advanced high-risk RMS patients. We investigated the effectiveness of HDC/APBSCT by reviewing the clinical records of high-risk pediatric RMS patients in single institute database. Over twenty years, 37 patients were diagnosed as RMS with high-risk at the time of first diagnosis. These patients were classified as two groups according to treatment method. The first group was HDC/APBSCT and the other was conventional multi-agent chemotherapy group. Differences of clinical results between the two groups were analyzed. The median age of patients was 5 yr, ranging from 6 months to 15 yr. The 5-yr event free survival rate (EFS) of all patients was 24.8% ± 4.8%. HDC/APBSCT group and conventional multi-agent chemotherapy group were 41.3% ± 17.8% and 16.7% ± 7.6% for 5-yr EFS, respectively (P = 0.023). There was a significant difference in the result of HDC/APBSCT between complete remission or very good partial response group and poor response group (50% ± 20.4% vs 37.5% ± 28.6%, P = 0.018). HDC/APBSCT can be a promising treatment modality in high-risk RMS patients. PMID:22969254

  1. Initial Evaluation of Treatment-Related Pneumonitis in Advanced-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yom, Sue S.; Liao Zhongxing . E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org; Liu, H. Helen; Tucker, Susan L.; Hu, C.-S.; Wei Xiong; Wang Xuanming; Wang Shulian; Mohan, Radhe; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the rate of high-grade treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP) in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: From August 2002 to August 2005, 151 NSCLC patients were treated with IMRT. We excluded patients who did not receive concurrent chemotherapy or who had early-stage cancers, a history of major lung surgery, prior chest RT, a dose <50 Gy, or IMRT combined with three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT). Toxicities were graded by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Grade {>=}3 TRP for 68 eligible IMRT patients was compared with TRP among 222 similar patients treated with 3D-CRT. Results: The median follow-up durations for the IMRT and 3D-CRT patients were 8 months (range, 0-27 months) and 9 months (range, 0-56 months), respectively. The median IMRT and 3D-CRT doses were 63 Gy. The median gross tumor volume was 194 mL (range, 21-911 mL) for IMRT, compared with 142 mL (range, 1.5-1,186 mL) for 3D-CRT (p = 0.002). Despite the IMRT group's larger gross tumor volume, the rate of Grade {>=}3 TRP at 12 months was 8% (95% confidence interval 4%-19%), compared with 32% (95% confidence interval 26%-40%) for 3D-CRT (p = 0.002). Conclusions: In advanced NSCLC patients treated with chemoradiation, IMRT resulted in significantly lower levels of Grade {>=}3 TRP compared with 3D-CRT. Clinical, dosimetric, and patient selection factors that may have influenced rates of TRP require continuing investigation. A randomized trial comparing IMRT with 3D-CRT has been initiated.

  2. Stage IV and age over 45 years are the only prognostic factors of the International Prognostic Score for the outcome of advanced Hodgkin lymphoma in the Spanish Hodgkin Lymphoma Study Group series.

    PubMed

    Guisado-Vasco, Pablo; Arranz-Saez, Reyes; Canales, Miguel; Cánovas, Araceli; Garcia-Laraña, José; García-Sanz, Ramón; Lopez, Andrés; López, José Luis; Llanos, Marta; Moraleda, José Maria; Rodriguez, José; Rayón, Consuelo; Sabin, Pilar; Salar, Antonio; Marín-Niebla, Ana; Morente, Manuel; Sánchez-Godoy, Pedro; Tomás, José Francisco; Muriel, Alfonso; Abraira, Victor; Piris, Miguel A; Garcia, Juán F; Montalban, Carlos

    2012-05-01

    The International Prognostic Score (IPS) is the most widely used system to date for identifying risk groups for the outcome of patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma, although important limitations have been recognized. We analyzed the value of the IPS in a series of 311 patients with advanced classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) (Ann Arbor stage III, IV or stage II with B symptoms and/or bulky masses) treated with first-line chemotherapy including adriamycin (adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine [ABVD] or equivalent variants). In univariate and multivariate analyses, stage IV disease and age ≥ 45 years were the only factors with independent predictive significance for overall survival (OS) (p = 0.002 and p < 0.001, respectively). Stage IV was still significant for freedom from progression (FFP) (p = 0.001) and age ≥ 45 years was borderline significant (p = 0.058). IPS separates prognostic groups, as in the original publication, but this is mainly due to the high statistical significance of stage IV and age ≥ 45 years. Moreover, the combination of these two factors enables a simpler system to be constructed that separates groups with different FFP and OS. In conclusion, in our series, stage IV and age ≥ 45 years are the key prognostic factors for the outcome of advanced cHL.

  3. Transient terahertz photoconductivity measurements of minority-carrier lifetime in tin sulfide thin films: Advanced metrology for an early stage photovoltaic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, R.; Sher, Meng-Ju; Ofori-Okai, Benjamin K.; Steinmann, V.; Yang, Chuanxi; Hartman, Katy; Nelson, Keith A.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.; Gordon, Roy G.; Buonassisi, T.

    2016-01-01

    Materials research with a focus on enhancing the minority-carrier lifetime of the light-absorbing semiconductor is key to advancing solar energy technology for both early stage and mature material platforms alike. Tin sulfide (SnS) is an absorber material with several clear advantages for manufacturing and deployment, but the record power conversion efficiency remains below 5%. We report measurements of bulk and interface minority-carrier recombination rates in SnS thin films using optical-pump, terahertz-probe transient photoconductivity (TPC) measurements. Post-growth thermal annealing in H2S gas increases the minority-carrier lifetime, and oxidation of the surface reduces the surface recombination velocity. However, the minority-carrier lifetime remains below 100 ps for all tested combinations of growth technique and post-growth processing. Significant improvement in SnS solar cell performance will hinge on finding and mitigating as-yet-unknown recombination-active defects. We describe in detail our methodology for TPC experiments, and we share our data analysis routines in the form freely available software.

  4. Rates of cardiovascular events and deaths are associated with advanced stages of HIV-infection: results of the HIV HEART study 7, 5 year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Stefan; Eisele, Lewin; Schwarz, Birte; Schulze, Christina; Holzendorf, Volker; Brockmeyer, Nobert H; Hower, Martin; Kwirant, Friedhelm; Rudolph, Roland; Neumann, Till; Reinsch, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular diseases are increasing in aging HIV-positive patients (HIV+). Impact of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, HIV-specific parameters and antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the incidence of cardiovascular events (CVE) and on the mortality rate are investigated in different HIV+ cohorts. Methods The HIV HEART (HIVH) study is an ongoing prospective observational cohort study in the German Ruhr area to assess the frequency and clinical course of cardiac disorders in 1481 HIV+ by standardized non-invasive cardiovascular screening. CVE were defined as diagnosed or documented myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease, arterial coronary intervention, stent implantation, bypass operation and stroke. Results 1481 HIV+ subjects (mean age: 49.3±10.7 years (y), female: 15.6%) were included. 130 CVE and 90 deaths were documented until the end of 7, 5 year follow-up of HIVH. Mean duration of the HIV-infection was 12.9±6.8 y. HIV+ were treated with ART on average for 8.6±6.8 y. According to the CDC classification of the HIV-infection, HIV+ were distributed over the clinical categories (A:34.6%; B:31.4% and C:33.9%) while more than the half had an advanced immunodeficiency (I:8.3%; II:41.1%; III:50.7%). Advanced clinical and immunological stages were significantly (p<0.001) associated with higher incidences of deaths (A:16.7%; B:26.7%; C:56.7% and I:6.7%; II:27.7%; III:65.6%) and CVE (A:17.7%; B:33.1%; C:49.2% and I:3.1%; II:32.3%; III:64.6%) but not with the duration of HIV-infection (per y: Hazard ratio (HR): 0.91 [0.88–0.94]) and ART (per y: HR: 0.81 [0.79–0.84]) adjusted for age. The proportion of deceased HIV+ with HIV-RNA ≥50 copies/mL and lower CD4-cell counts at their last visit is significantly higher compared with living HIV+ without CVE (HIV-RNA ≥50 copies/mL: 25.6% vs 14.7%). Median CD4-cells: 286.5 cells/µL (IQR: 168.8–482.8) versus 574 cells/µL (IQR: 406–786). 96.1% of the living HIV+ with CVE had HIV-RNA<50 copies

  5. The Unique Dorsal Brood Pouch of Thermosbaenacea (Crustacea, Malacostraca) and Description of an Advanced Developmental Stage of Tulumella unidens from the Yucatan Peninsula (Mexico), with a Discussion of Mouth Part Homologies to Other Malacostraca

    PubMed Central

    Olesen, Jørgen; Boesgaard, Tom; Iliffe, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    The Thermosbaenacea, a small taxon of crustaceans inhabiting subterranean waters, are unique among malacostracans as they brood their offspring dorsally under the carapace. This habit is of evolutionary interest but the last detailed report on thermosbaenacean development is more than 40 years old. Here we provide new observations on an ovigerous female of Tulumella unidens with advanced developmental stages in its brood chamber collected from an anchialine cave at the Yucatan Peninsula, which is only the third report on developmental stages of Thermosbaenacea and the first for the genus Tulumella. Significant in a wider crustacean context, we report and discuss hitherto unexplored lobate structures inside the brood chamber of the female originating at the first (maxilliped) and second thoracic segments, which are most likely modified epipods, perhaps serving as gills. At the posterior margin of carapace of the female are rows of large spines preventing the developing stages from falling out. The external morphology of the advanced developmental stages is described in much detail, providing information on e.g., carapace formation and early limb morphology. Among the hitherto unknown structures in the advanced developmental stages provided by this study are the presence of an embryonic dorsal organ and rudimentary ‘naupliar processes’ of the second antennae. Since most hypotheses on crustacean (and malacostracan and peracaridan) relationship rest on external limb morphology, we use early limb bud morphology of Tulumella to better establish thermosbaenacean limb homologies to those of other crustaceans, which is a necessary basis for future morphology based phylogenetic considerations. PMID:25901753

  6. The Unique Dorsal Brood Pouch of Thermosbaenacea (Crustacea, Malacostraca) and Description of an Advanced Developmental Stage of Tulumella unidens from the Yucatan Peninsula (Mexico), with a Discussion of Mouth Part Homologies to Other Malacostraca.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Jørgen; Boesgaard, Tom; Iliffe, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    The Thermosbaenacea, a small taxon of crustaceans inhabiting subterranean waters, are unique among malacostracans as they brood their offspring dorsally under the carapace. This habit is of evolutionary interest but the last detailed report on thermosbaenacean development is more than 40 years old. Here we provide new observations on an ovigerous female of Tulumella unidens with advanced developmental stages in its brood chamber collected from an anchialine cave at the Yucatan Peninsula, which is only the third report on developmental stages of Thermosbaenacea and the first for the genus Tulumella. Significant in a wider crustacean context, we report and discuss hitherto unexplored lobate structures inside the brood chamber of the female originating at the first (maxilliped) and second thoracic segments, which are most likely modified epipods, perhaps serving as gills. At the posterior margin of carapace of the female are rows of large spines preventing the developing stages from falling out. The external morphology of the advanced developmental stages is described in much detail, providing information on e.g., carapace formation and early limb morphology. Among the hitherto unknown structures in the advanced developmental stages provided by this study are the presence of an embryonic dorsal organ and rudimentary 'naupliar processes' of the second antennae. Since most hypotheses on crustacean (and malacostracan and peracaridan) relationship rest on external limb morphology, we use early limb bud morphology of Tulumella to better establish thermosbaenacean limb homologies to those of other crustaceans, which is a necessary basis for future morphology based phylogenetic considerations.

  7. The Unique Dorsal Brood Pouch of Thermosbaenacea (Crustacea, Malacostraca) and Description of an Advanced Developmental Stage of Tulumella unidens from the Yucatan Peninsula (Mexico), with a Discussion of Mouth Part Homologies to Other Malacostraca.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Jørgen; Boesgaard, Tom; Iliffe, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    The Thermosbaenacea, a small taxon of crustaceans inhabiting subterranean waters, are unique among malacostracans as they brood their offspring dorsally under the carapace. This habit is of evolutionary interest but the last detailed report on thermosbaenacean development is more than 40 years old. Here we provide new observations on an ovigerous female of Tulumella unidens with advanced developmental stages in its brood chamber collected from an anchialine cave at the Yucatan Peninsula, which is only the third report on developmental stages of Thermosbaenacea and the first for the genus Tulumella. Significant in a wider crustacean context, we report and discuss hitherto unexplored lobate structures inside the brood chamber of the female originating at the first (maxilliped) and second thoracic segments, which are most likely modified epipods, perhaps serving as gills. At the posterior margin of carapace of the female are rows of large spines preventing the developing stages from falling out. The external morphology of the advanced developmental stages is described in much detail, providing information on e.g., carapace formation and early limb morphology. Among the hitherto unknown structures in the advanced developmental stages provided by this study are the presence of an embryonic dorsal organ and rudimentary 'naupliar processes' of the second antennae. Since most hypotheses on crustacean (and malacostracan and peracaridan) relationship rest on external limb morphology, we use early limb bud morphology of Tulumella to better establish thermosbaenacean limb homologies to those of other crustaceans, which is a necessary basis for future morphology based phylogenetic considerations. PMID:25901753

  8. Dabrafenib Alone and in Combination With Trametinib Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally or Regionally Advanced Melanoma That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-29

    Recurrent Melanoma; Stage IIB Melanoma (Locally Advanced); Stage IIC Melanoma (Locally Advanced); Stage IIIA Melanoma; Stage IIIB Melanoma; Stage IIIC Melanoma; Stage IV Melanoma (Limited, Resectable)

  9. Comparison of laparoscopy-assisted and open radical gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yingxue; Yu, Peiwu; Qian, Feng; Zhao, Yongliang; Shi, Yan; Tang, Bo; Zeng, Dongzhu; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy (LAG) has gained international acceptance for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC). However, the use of laparoscopic surgery in the management of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) has not attained widespread acceptance. This retrospective large-scale patient study in a single center for minimally invasive surgery assessed the feasibility and safety of LAG for T2 and T3 stage AGC. A total of 628 patients underwent LAG and 579 patients underwent open gastrectomy (OG) from Jan 2004 to Dec 2011. All cases underwent radical lymph node (LN) dissection from D1 to D2+. This study compared short- and long-term results between the 2 groups after stratifying by pTNM stages, including the mean operation time, volume of blood loss, number of harvested LNs, average days of postoperative hospital stay, mean gastrointestinal function recovery time, intra- and post-operative complications, recurrence rate, recurrence site, and 5-year survival curve. Thirty-five patients (5.57%) converted to open procedures in the LAG group. There were no significant differences in retrieved LN number (30.4 ± 13.4 vs 28.1 ± 17.2, P = 0.43), proximal resection margin (PRM) (6.15 ± 1.63 vs 6.09 ± 1.91, P = 0.56), or distal resection margin (DRM) (5.46 ± 1.74 vs 5.40 ± 1.95, P = 0.57) between the LAG and OG groups, respectively. The mean volume of blood loss (154.5 ± 102.6 vs 311.2 ± 118.9 mL, P < 0.001), mean postoperative hospital stay (7.6 ± 2.5 vs 10.7 ± 3.6 days, P < 0.001), mean time for gastrointestinal function recovery (3.3 ± 1.4 vs 3.9 ± 1.5 days, P < 0.001), and postoperative complications rate (6.4% vs 10.5%, P = 0.01) were clearly lower in the LAG group compared to the OG group. However, the recurrence pattern and site were not different between the 2 groups, even they were stratified by the TNM stage. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 85.38%, 79

  10. The Impact of Local and Regional Disease Extent on Overall Survival in Patients With Advanced Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, Daniel S.; Chen, Ronald C.; Tracton, Gregg; Morris, David E.; Halle, Jan; Rosenman, Julian G.; Stefanescu, Mihaela; Pham, Erica; Socinski, Mark A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with advanced stage IIIB or stage IV non-small cell lung carcinoma are typically treated with initial platinum-based chemotherapy. A variety of factors (eg, performance status, gender, age, histology, weight loss, and smoking history) are generally accepted as predictors of overall survival. Because uncontrolled pulmonary disease constitutes a major cause of death in these patients, we hypothesized that clinical and radiographic factors related to intrathoracic disease at diagnosis may be prognostically significant in addition to conventional factors. The results have implications regarding the selection of patients for whom palliative thoracic radiation therapy may be of most benefit. Methods and Materials: We conducted a pooled analysis of 189 patients enrolled at a single institution into 9 prospective phase II and III clinical trials involving first-line, platinum-based chemotherapy. Baseline clinical and radiographic characteristics before trial enrollment were analyzed as possible predictors for subsequent overall survival. To assess the relationship between anatomic location and volume of disease within the thorax and its effect on survival, the pre-enrollment computed tomography images were also analyzed by contouring central and peripheral intrapulmonary disease. Results: On univariate survival analysis, multiple pulmonary-related factors were significantly associated with worse overall survival, including pulmonary symptoms at presentation (P=.0046), total volume of intrathoracic disease (P=.0006), and evidence of obstruction of major bronchi or vessels on prechemotherapy computed tomography (P<.0001). When partitioned into central and peripheral volumes, central (P<.0001) but not peripheral (P=.74) disease was associated with worse survival. On multivariate analysis with known factors, pulmonary symptoms (hazard ratio, 1.46; P=.042), central disease volume (hazard ratio, 1.47; P=.042), and bronchial/vascular compression (hazard ratio, 1

  11. Factors associated with initiation of antiretroviral therapy in the advanced stages of HIV infection in six Ethiopian HIV clinics, 2012 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Denis; Tymejczyk, Olga; Gadisa, Tsigereda; Kulkarni, Sarah Gorrell; Hoffman, Susie; Yigzaw, Muluneh; Elul, Batya; Remien, Robert H; Lahuerta, Maria; Daba, Shalo; El Sadr, Wafaa; Melaku, Zenebe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Most HIV-positive persons in sub-Saharan Africa initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) with advanced infection (late ART initiation). Intervening on the drivers of late ART initiation is a critical step towards achieving the full potential of HIV treatment scale-up. This study aimed to identify modifiable factors associated with late ART initiation in Ethiopia. Methods From 2012 to 2013, Ethiopian adults (n=1180) were interviewed within two weeks of ART initiation. Interview data were merged with HIV care histories to assess correlates of late ART initiation (CD4+ count <150 cells/µL or World Health Organization Stage IV). Results The median CD4 count at enrolment in HIV care was 263 cells/µL (interquartile range (IQR): 140 to 390) and 212 cells/µL (IQR: 119 to 288) at ART initiation. Overall, 31.2% of participants initiated ART late, of whom 85.1% already had advanced HIV disease at enrolment. Factors associated with higher odds of late ART initiation included male sex (vs. non-pregnant females; adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 2.02; 95% CI: 1.50 to 2.73), high levels of psychological distress (vs. low/none, aOR: 1.96; 95% CI: 1.34 to 2.87), perceived communication barriers with providers (aOR: 2.42, 95% CI: 1.24 to 4.75), diagnosis via provider initiated testing (vs. voluntary counselling and testing, aOR: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.07 to 2.04), tuberculosis (TB) treatment prior to ART initiation (aOR: 2.16, 95% CI: 1.43 to 3.25) and a gap in care of six months or more prior to ART initiation (aOR: 2.02, 95% CI: 1.10 to 3.72). Testing because of partner illness/death (aOR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.42 to 0.95) was associated with lower odds of late ART initiation. Conclusions Programmatic initiatives promoting earlier diagnosis, engagement in pre-ART care, and integration of TB and HIV treatments may facilitate earlier ART initiation. Men and those experiencing psychological distress may also benefit from targeted support prior to ART initiation. PMID:27113335

  12. Phase I/II Study of Postoperative Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Advanced-Stage Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck (cSCCHN)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-17

    Recurrent Skin Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity

  13. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for locally advanced (Stage II and worse) head-and-neck cancer: Dosimetric and clinical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Portaluri, Maurizio . E-mail: portaluri@hotmail.com; Fucilli, Fulvio I.M.; Castagna, Roberta; Bambace, Santa; Pili, Giorgio; Tramacere, Francesco; Russo, Donatella; Francavilla, Maria Carmen

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric parameters of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in locally advanced head-and-neck tumors (Stage II and above) and the effects on xerostomia. Methods and Materials: A total of 49 patients with histologically proven squamous cell cancer of the head and neck were consecutively treated with 3D-CRT using a one-point setup technique; 17 had larynx cancer, 12 oropharynx, 12 oral cavity, and 6 nasopharynx cancer; 2 had other sites of cancer. Of the 49 patients, 41 received postoperative RT and 8 definitive treatment. Also, 13 were treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy before and during RT; in 6 cases, 5-fluorouracil was added. The follow-up time was 484-567 days (median, 530 days). Results: One-point setup can deliver 96% of the prescribed dose to the isocenter, to the whole planning target volume, including all node levels of the neck and without overdosages. The mean dose to the primary planning target volume was 49.54 {+-} 4.82 Gy (51.53 {+-} 5.47 Gy for larynx cases). The average dose to the contralateral parotid gland was approximately 38 Gy (30 Gy for larynx cases). The maximal dose to the spinal cord was 46 Gy. A Grade 0 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer xerostomia score corresponded to a mean dose of 30 Gy to one parotid gland. A lower xerostomia score with a lower mean parotid dose and longer follow-up seemed to give rise to a sort of functional recovery phenomenon. Conclusion: Three dimensional-CRT in head-and-neck cancers permits good coverage of the planning target volume with about 10-11 segments and one isocenter. With a mean dose of approximately 30 Gy to the contralateral parotid, we observed no or mild xerostomia.

  14. Electrochemotherapy in combination with chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of oral carcinomas in advanced stages of disease: efficacy, safety, and clinical outcomes in a small number of selected cases

    PubMed Central

    Domanico, Rossana; Trapasso, Serena; Santoro, Mariaquila; Pingitore, Domenico; Allegra, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Electrochemotherapy (ECT) is a new therapeutic method that is used in oncology as palliative treatment in patients with recurrent head and neck tumors and who are not candidates for standard therapeutic options. The aim of our study was to evaluate the cytoreductive effect of ECT in patients subjected to chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. The primary endpoint of the study was to verify tumor debulking after ECT treatment as neoadjuvant, before conventional chemoradiotherapy. The secondary endpoint was to assess the safety and tolerability of ECT treatment. Materials and methods This experimental study was conducted at the Division of Otolaryngology, University of Catanzaro, Italy. From February 2013 to February 2014, four patients were enrolled, two males and two females, with a mean age of 56 years (range: 47–65 years), and with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity in advanced stages of disease (T3–T4). All patients, with their informed consent, received ECT treatment in accordance with the Standard Operating Procedures defined in the European Standard Operating Procedures on Electrochemotherapy (ESOPE) study, followed by conventional chemoradiotherapy. Their response to ECT treatment was assessed after 30 days. For each patient, the following parameters were evaluated with the appropriate forms: local tumor control, control of pain (analgesia postsurgery scale [APS]), and quality of life (Short Form [36] Health Survey [SF-36]; v1). Results Three of four patients (75%) showed a partial response, whereas in one patient (25%), the disease remained stable. The treatment was well-tolerated by all patients, according to the APS and SF-36 results. Conclusion Although the study was conducted on a small number of cases, data from this study show that ECT represents a safe and effective treatment in terms of tumor cytoreduction and locoregional control of the disease. It also allows good control of postoperative pain

  15. Regional albedo of Arctic first-year drift ice in advanced stages of melt from the combination of in situ measurements and aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divine, D. V.; Granskog, M. A.; Hudson, S. R.; Pedersen, C. A.; Karlsen, T. I.; Divina, S. A.; Gerland, S.

    2014-07-01

    The paper presents a case study of the regional (≈ 150 km) broadband albedo of first year Arctic sea ice in advanced stages of melt, estimated from a combination of in situ albedo measurements and aerial imagery. The data were collected during the eight day ICE12 drift experiment carried out by the Norwegian Polar Institute in the Arctic north of Svalbard at 82.3° N from 26 July to 3 August 2012. The study uses in situ albedo measurements representative of the four main surface types: bare ice, dark melt ponds, bright melt ponds and open water. Images acquired by a helicopter borne camera system during ice survey flights covered about 28 km2. A subset of > 8000 images from the area of homogeneous melt with open water fraction of ≈ 0.11 and melt pond coverage of ≈ 0.25 used in the upscaling yielded a regional albedo estimate of 0.40 (0.38; 0.42). The 95% confidence interval on the estimate was derived using the moving block bootstrap approach applied to sequences of classified sea ice images and albedo of the four surface types treated as random variables. Uncertainty in the mean estimates of surface type albedo from in situ measurements contributed some 95% of the variance of the estimated regional albedo, with the remaining variance resulting from the spatial inhomogeneity of sea ice cover. The results of the study are of relevance for the modeling of sea ice processes in climate simulations. It particularly concerns the period of summer melt, when the optical properties of sea ice undergo substantial changes, which existing sea ice models have significant diffuculty accurately reproducing.

  16. Somatic DNA Hypomethylation in H. pylori-Associated High-Risk Gastritis and Gastric Cancer: Enhanced Somatic Hypomethylation Associates with Advanced Stage Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leodolter, Andreas; Alonso, Sergio; González, Beatriz; Ebert, Matthias P; Vieth, Michael; Röcken, Christoph; Wex, Thomas; Peitz, Ullrich; Malfertheiner, Peter; Perucho, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Helicobacter pylori-related high-risk gastritis (HRG) is a severe risk factor for gastric cancer (GC). The link between HRG and long-term risk for GC may involve genetic and epigenetic alterations underlying a field defect, i.e. a region of the mucosa prone to cancer development. Global DNA hypomethylation is a pervasive alteration in GC that associates with chromosomal instability and poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to determine the chronology of this alteration along the progression of HRG to GC, to test the hypothesis that it occurs early in the chronology of this pathway and plays a mechanistic role in the long-term cancer risk. Methods: We comparatively measured the genomic methylation level in gastric biopsies from 94 GC patients and 16 of their cancer-free relatives, 38 HRG patients, and 17 GERD patients, using a quantitative enzymatic method. Results: GC biopsies were hypomethylated compared to their matching non-tumor mucosa (P=9.4 × 10−12), irrespective of the tumor location or patients' country of origin. Genome-wide hypomethylation was also found in gastric mucosa of GC (P=1.5 × 10−5) and HRG (P=0.004) patients compared with healthy donors and GC relatives, regardless of the biopsy location within the stomach or previous H. pylori eradication therapy. An enhanced hypomethylation, distinguished by a bi-slope distribution of the differences in methylation between tumor and normal tissues, associated with a more invasive (P=0.005) and advanced stage (P=0.017) type of GC. Conclusions: Universal DNA demethylation in normal gastric mucosa in GC patients appears sporadic rather than familial. Genomic hypomethylation in HRG possibly contributes to a field defect for cancerization that is not reversed by bacterial eradication. Enhanced somatic hypomethylation may stratify GC for prognostic purposes. PMID:25928808

  17. Oral cancer staging established by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Rogério Ribeiro de; Figueiredo, Paulo Tadeu de Souza; Leite, André Ferreira; Silva, Maria Alves Garcia; Guerra, Eliete Neves Silva

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare clinical staging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) staging for oral cancer, and to assess inter-observer agreement between oral and medical radiologists. A total of 10 patients diagnosed with oral cancer were assessed before treatment. A head and neck surgeon performed clinical TNM staging. Two medical radiologists and two oral radiologists performed a new staging assessment by interpreting MRI scans, without prior knowledge of the clinical staging. They evaluated the extent of the primary tumor (T), metastasis to regional lymph nodes (N) and grouping by stages. The data were analyzed using the Kappa Index. There was significant agreement (p < 0.05) between the clinical and MRI staging assessments made by one oral radiologist for N stage, and between those made by one medical radiologist for the T and N stages and for the grouping by stages. In the MRI assessment, there was significant agreement among all four observers for both T stage and grouping by stages. For the N stage, there was no significant agreement between one oral radiologist and one medical radiologist or between both medical radiologists. There was significant agreement among the remaining radiologists. There was no agreement between the clinical and MRI staging. These results indicate the importance of using MRI for the diagnosis of oral cancer. Training initiatives and calibration of medical and oral radiologists should be promoted to provide an improved multidisciplinary approach to oral cancer.

  18. Promoter CpG island methylation of RET predicts poor prognosis in stage II colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Draht, Muriel X G; Smits, Kim M; Tournier, Benjamin; Jooste, Valerie; Chapusot, Caroline; Carvalho, Beatriz; Cleven, Arjen H G; Derks, Sarah; Wouters, Kim A D; Belt, Eric J T; Stockmann, Hein B A C; Bril, Herman; Weijenberg, Matty P; van den Brandt, Piet A; de Bruïne, Adriaan P; Herman, James G; Meijer, Gerrit A; Piard, Françoise; Melotte, Veerle; van Engeland, Manon

    2014-05-01

    Improved prognostic stratification of patients with TNM stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) is desired, since 20-30% of high-risk stage II patients may die within five years of diagnosis. This study was conducted to investigate REarranged during Transfection (RET) gene promoter CpG island methylation as a possible prognostic marker for TNM stage II CRC patients. The utility of RET promoter CpG island methylation in tumors of stage II CRC patients as a prognostic biomarker for CRC related death was studied in three independent series (including 233, 231, and 294 TNM stage II patients, respectively) by using MSP and pyrosequencing. The prognostic value of RET promoter CpG island methylation was analyzed by using Cox regression analysis. In the first series, analyzed by MSP, CRC stage II patients (n = 233) with RET methylated tumors had a significantly worse overall survival as compared to those with unmethylated tumors (HRmultivariable = 2.51, 95%-CI: 1.42-4.43). Despite a significant prognostic effect of RET methylation in stage III patients of a second series, analyzed by MSP, the prognostic effect in stage II patients (n = 231) was not statistically significant (HRmultivariable = 1.16, 95%-CI 0.71-1.92). The third series (n = 294), analyzed by pyrosequencing, confirmed a statistically significant association between RET methylation and poor overall survival in stage II patients (HRmultivariable = 1.91, 95%-CI: 1.04-3.53). Our results show that RET promoter CpG island methylation, analyzed by two different techniques, is associated with a poor prognosis in stage II CRC in two independent series and a poor prognosis in stage III CRC in one series. RET methylation may serve as a useful and robust tool for clinical practice to identify high-risk stage II CRC patients with a poor prognosis. This merits further investigation. PMID:24560444

  19. SEPAR guidelines for lung cancer staging.

    PubMed

    Sánchez de Cos, Julio; Hernández, Jesús Hernández; López, Marcelo F Jiménez; Sánchez, Susana Padrones; Gratacós, Antoni Rosell; Porta, Ramón Rami

    2011-09-01

    The latest tumour, lymph node and metastasis (TNM) classification by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), based on the analysis of patients from all over the world, has incorporated changes in the descriptors, especially those regarding tumor size, while proposing new group staging. A new lymph node map has also been developed with the intention of facilitating the classification of the "N" component. SEPAR recommends using this new classification. As for the procedures recommended for staging, in addition to the generalized use of computed tomography (CT), it points to the role of positron emission tomography (PET) or image fusion methods (PET/CT), which provide a better evaluation of the mediastinum and extrathoracic metastases. Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) and esophageal ultrasound (EUS) for obtaining cytohistological samples have been incorporated in the staging algorithm, and it emphasizes the importance of precise re-staging after induction treatment in order to make new therapeutic decisions. Comment is made on the foreseeable incorporation in the near future of molecular staging, and systematic lymph node dissection is recommended with the intention of making a more exact surgical-pathological classification.

  20. Metabolomics provide new insights on lung cancer staging and discrimination from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Deja, Stanislaw; Porebska, Irena; Kowal, Aneta; Zabek, Adam; Barg, Wojciech; Pawelczyk, Konrad; Stanimirova, Ivana; Daszykowski, Michal; Korzeniewska, Anna; Jankowska, Renata; Mlynarz, Piotr

    2014-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are widespread lung diseases. Cigarette smoking is a high risk factor for both the diseases. COPD may increase the risk of developing lung cancer. Thus, it is crucial to be able to distinguish between these two pathological states, especially considering the early stages of lung cancer. Novel diagnostic and monitoring tools are required to properly determine lung cancer progression because this information directly impacts the type of the treatment prescribed. In this study, serum samples collected from 22 COPD and 77 lung cancer (TNM stages I, II, III, and IV) patients were analyzed. Then, a collection of NMR metabolic fingerprints was modeled using discriminant orthogonal partial least squares regression (OPLS-DA) and further interpreted by univariate statistics. The constructed discriminant models helped to successfully distinguish between the metabolic fingerprints of COPD and lung cancer patients (AUC training=0.972, AUC test=0.993), COPD and early lung cancer patients (AUC training=1.000, AUC test=1.000), and COPD and advanced lung cancer patients (AUC training=0.983, AUC test=1.000). Decreased acetate, citrate, and methanol levels together with the increased N-acetylated glycoproteins, leucine, lysine, mannose, choline, and lipid (CH3-(CH2)n-) levels were observed in all lung cancer patients compared with the COPD group. The evaluation of lung cancer progression was also successful using OPLS-DA (AUC training=0.811, AUC test=0.904). Based on the results, the following metabolite biomarkers may prove useful in distinguishing lung cancer states: isoleucine, acetoacetate, and creatine as well as the two NMR signals of N-acetylated glycoproteins and glycerol.

  1. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Borowski, S. K.; George, J. A.; Kim, T.; Emrich, W. J.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.; Gerrish, H. P.; Adams, R. B.

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced NEP.

  2. Results of an Advanced Fan Stage Operating Over a Wide Range of Speed and Bypass Ratio. Part 2; Comparison of CFD and Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celestina, Mark L.; Suder, Kenneth L.; Kulkarni, Sameer

    2010-01-01

    NASA and GE teamed to design and build a 57 percent engine scaled fan stage for a Mach 4 variable cycle turbofan/ramjet engine for access to space with multipoint operations. This fan stage was tested in NASA's transonic compressor facility. The objectives of this test were to assess the aerodynamic and aero mechanic performance and operability characteristics of the fan stage over the entire range of engine operation including: 1) sea level static take-off; 2) transition over large swings in fan bypass ratio; 3) transition from turbofan to ramjet; and 4) fan wind-milling operation at high Mach flight conditions. This paper will focus on an assessment of APNASA, a multistage turbomachinery analysis code developed by NASA, to predict the fan stage performance and operability over a wide range of speeds (37 to 100 percent) and bypass ratios.

  3. Locally Advanced Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Impact of Pre-Radiotherapy Hemoglobin Level and Interruptions During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Stoehr, Monika; Kazic, Nadja; Hakim, Samer G.; Walz, Annette; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Stage IV head and neck cancer patients carry a poor prognosis. Clear understanding of prognostic factors can help to optimize care for the individual patient. This study investigated 11 potential prognostic factors including pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level and interruptions during radiotherapy for overall survival (OS), metastases-free survival (MFS), and locoregional control (LC) after radiochemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven factors were investigated in 153 patients receiving radiochemotherapy for Stage IV squamous cell head and neck cancer: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), tumor site, grading, T stage, N stage, pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level, surgery, chemotherapy type, and interruptions during radiotherapy >1 week. Results: On multivariate analysis, improved OS was associated with KPS 90-100 (relative risk [RR], 2.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-4.93; p = .012), hemoglobin {>=}12 g/dL (RR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.01-3.53; p = .048), and no radiotherapy interruptions (RR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.15-5.78; p = .021). Improved LC was significantly associated with lower T stage (RR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.16-4.63; p = .013), hemoglobin {>=}12 g/dL (RR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.92-9.09; p < .001), surgery (RR, 2.67; 95% CI, 1.28-5.88; p = .008), and no radiotherapy interruptions (RR, 3.32; 95% CI, 1.26-8.79; p = .015). Improved MFS was associated with KPS 90-100 (RR, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.46-8.85; p = .012). Conclusions: Significant predictors for outcome in Stage IV head and neck cancer were performance status, stage, surgery, pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level, and interruptions during radiotherapy >1 week. It appears important to avoid anemia and radiotherapy interruptions to achieve the best treatment results.

  4. Seventh tumor-node-metastasis staging of gastric cancer: Five-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Rausei, Stefano; Ruspi, Laura; Galli, Federica; Pappalardo, Vincenzo; Di Rocco, Giuseppe; Martignoni, Francesco; Frattini, Francesco; Rovera, Francesca; Boni, Luigi; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo

    2016-09-14

    Seventh tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification for gastric cancer, published in 2010, introduced changes in all of its three parameters with the aim to increase its accuracy in prognostication. The aim of this review is to analyze the efficacy of these changes and their implication in clinical practice. We reviewed relevant Literature concerning staging systems in gastric cancer from 2010 up to March 2016. Adenocarcinoma of the esophago-gastric junction still remains a debated entity, due to its peculiar anatomical and histological situation: further improvement in its staging are required. Concerning distant metastases, positive peritoneal cytology has been adopted as a criterion to define metastatic disease: however, its search in clinical practice is still far from being routinely performed, as staging laparoscopy has not yet reached wide diffusion. Regarding definition of T and N: in the era of multimodal treatment these parameters should more influence both staging and surgery. The changes about T-staging suggested some modifications in clinical practice. Differently, many controversies on lymph node staging are still ongoing, with the proposal of alternative classification systems in order to minimize the extent of lymphadenectomy. The next TNM classification should take into account all of these aspects to improve its accuracy and the comparability of prognosis in patients from both Eastern and Western world. PMID:27678357

  5. Seventh tumor-node-metastasis staging of gastric cancer: Five-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Rausei, Stefano; Ruspi, Laura; Galli, Federica; Pappalardo, Vincenzo; Di Rocco, Giuseppe; Martignoni, Francesco; Frattini, Francesco; Rovera, Francesca; Boni, Luigi; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Seventh tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification for gastric cancer, published in 2010, introduced changes in all of its three parameters with the aim to increase its accuracy in prognostication. The aim of this review is to analyze the efficacy of these changes and their implication in clinical practice. We reviewed relevant Literature concerning staging systems in gastric cancer from 2010 up to March 2016. Adenocarcinoma of the esophago-gastric junction still remains a debated entity, due to its peculiar anatomical and histological situation: further improvement in its staging are required. Concerning distant metastases, positive peritoneal cytology has been adopted as a criterion to define metastatic disease: however, its search in clinical practice is still far from being routinely performed, as staging laparoscopy has not yet reached wide diffusion. Regarding definition of T and N: in the era of multimodal treatment these parameters should more influence both staging and surgery. The changes about T-staging suggested some modifications in clinical practice. Differently, many controversies on lymph node staging are still ongoing, with the proposal of alternative classification systems in order to minimize the extent of lymphadenectomy. The next TNM classification should take into account all of these aspects to improve its accuracy and the comparability of prognosis in patients from both Eastern and Western world. PMID:27678357

  6. Seventh tumor-node-metastasis staging of gastric cancer: Five-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Rausei, Stefano; Ruspi, Laura; Galli, Federica; Pappalardo, Vincenzo; Di Rocco, Giuseppe; Martignoni, Francesco; Frattini, Francesco; Rovera, Francesca; Boni, Luigi; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Seventh tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification for gastric cancer, published in 2010, introduced changes in all of its three parameters with the aim to increase its accuracy in prognostication. The aim of this review is to analyze the efficacy of these changes and their implication in clinical practice. We reviewed relevant Literature concerning staging systems in gastric cancer from 2010 up to March 2016. Adenocarcinoma of the esophago-gastric junction still remains a debated entity, due to its peculiar anatomical and histological situation: further improvement in its staging are required. Concerning distant metastases, positive peritoneal cytology has been adopted as a criterion to define metastatic disease: however, its search in clinical practice is still far from being routinely performed, as staging laparoscopy has not yet reached wide diffusion. Regarding definition of T and N: in the era of multimodal treatment these parameters should more influence both staging and surgery. The changes about T-staging suggested some modifications in clinical practice. Differently, many controversies on lymph node staging are still ongoing, with the proposal of alternative classification systems in order to minimize the extent of lymphadenectomy. The next TNM classification should take into account all of these aspects to improve its accuracy and the comparability of prognosis in patients from both Eastern and Western world.

  7. [A Case of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer with a Pathological Complete Response to Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Akahoshi, Shin-ichi; Iizaka, Masayoshi; Murakami, Seiichi; Nimura, Satoshi; Takeguchi, Touichirou

    2015-11-01

    A 61-year-old woman presented with the chief complaint of melena. She was diagnosed with rectal cancer via colonoscopy. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a rectal cancer with wall thickening, accompanied by several regional lymph node metastases with no distant metastasis. The tumor stage was cT3, cN2a, cM0 according to the TNM Classification of Malignant Tumors (7th Edition, UICC). Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) (UFT 400 mg/day tegafur-uracil and 75 mg/day Leucovorin; 1.8 Gy in 25 fractions, total 45 Gy) was administered. Eight weeks after CRT, laparoscopy-assisted low anterior resection was performed. A pathological examination revealed that both the primary site and regional lymph nodes had no residual cancer cells, and a diagnosis of pathological complete response was made. The patient has been disease-free for 4 years since the operation. We report a case of rectal cancer that was successfully treated via preoperative CRT. This case may aid the development of a standard therapy for advanced rectal cancer.

  8. Stage design

    DOEpatents

    Shacter, J.

    1975-12-01

    A method is described of cycling gases through a plurality of diffusion stages comprising the steps of admitting the diffused gases from a first diffusion stage into an axial compressor, simultaneously admitting the undiffused gases from a second diffusion stage into an intermediate pressure zone of said compressor corresponding in pressure to the pressure of said undiffused gases, and then admitting the resulting compressed mixture of diffused and undiffused gases into a third diffusion stage.

  9. Comparison of laparoscopy-assisted and open radical gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer: A retrospective study in a single minimally invasive surgery center.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yingxue; Yu, Peiwu; Qian, Feng; Zhao, Yongliang; Shi, Yan; Tang, Bo; Zeng, Dongzhu; Zhang, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy (LAG) has gained international acceptance for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC). However, the use of laparoscopic surgery in the management of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) has not attained widespread acceptance. This retrospective large-scale patient study in a single center for minimally invasive surgery assessed the feasibility and safety of LAG for T2 and T3 stage AGC. A total of 628 patients underwent LAG and 579 patients underwent open gastrectomy (OG) from Jan 2004 to Dec 2011. All cases underwent radical lymph node (LN) dissection from D1 to D2+. This study compared short- and long-term results between the 2 groups after stratifying by pTNM stages, including the mean operation time, volume of blood loss, number of harvested LNs, average days of postoperative hospital stay, mean gastrointestinal function recovery time, intra- and post-operative complications, recurrence rate, recurrence site, and 5-year survival curve. Thirty-five patients (5.57%) converted to open procedures in the LAG group. There were no significant differences in retrieved LN number (30.4 ± 13.4 vs 28.1 ± 17.2, P = 0.43), proximal resection margin (PRM) (6.15 ± 1.63 vs 6.09 ± 1.91, P = 0.56), or distal resection margin (DRM) (5.46 ± 1.74 vs 5.40 ± 1.95, P = 0.57) between the LAG and OG groups, respectively. The mean volume of blood loss (154.5 ± 102.6 vs 311.2 ± 118.9 mL, P < 0.001), mean postoperative hospital stay (7.6 ± 2.5 vs 10.7 ± 3.6 days, P < 0.001), mean time for gastrointestinal function recovery (3.3 ± 1.4 vs 3.9 ± 1.5 days, P < 0.001), and postoperative complications rate (6.4% vs 10.5%, P = 0.01) were clearly lower in the LAG group compared to the OG group. However, the recurrence pattern and site were not different between the 2 groups, even they were stratified by the TNM stage. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 85.38%, 79.70%, 57

  10. Locally Advanced Stage High-Grade Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of Salivary Gland in a 9-Year-Old Girl: The Controversy of Adjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Olga Micol; Dorado, Elena Daghoum; García, María Dolores Amorós; Ramírez, María Isabel Oviedo; de la Fuente Muñoz, Isabel; Soler, Jose Luis Fuster

    2016-01-01

    Malignant salivary gland tumors are rare in children, mostly represented by low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinomas. For these patients, long-term survival rates above 95% are reported after surgical resection. Here we report a case of a 9-year-old girl with a high grade locally advanced mucoepidermoid carcinoma undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy after surgery. We emphasize the controversy and lack of evidence-based indication for these highly toxic adjuvant therapy modalities in children. PMID:27746885

  11. Upper stage technology evaluation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Studies to evaluate advanced technology relative to chemical upper stages and orbit-to-orbit stages are reported. The work described includes: development of LH2/LOX stage data, development of data to indicate stage sensitivity to engine tolerance, modified thermal routines to accommodate storable propellants, added stage geometries to computer program for monopropellant configurations, determination of the relative gain obtainable through improvement of stage mass fraction, future propulsion concepts, effect of ultrahigh chamber-pressure increases, and relative gains obtainable through improved mass fraction.

  12. Fibre intake and incident colorectal cancer depending on fibre source, sex, tumour location and Tumour, Node, Metastasis stage.

    PubMed

    Vulcan, Alexandra; Brändstedt, Jenny; Manjer, Jonas; Jirström, Karin; Ohlsson, Bodil; Ericson, Ulrika

    2015-09-28

    Studies on fibre intake and incident colorectal cancer (CRC) indicate inverse associations. Differences by tumour stage have not been examined. We examined associations between fibre intake and its sources, and incidental CRC. Separate analyses were carried out on the basis of sex, tumour location and the Tumour, Node, Metastasis (TNM) classification. The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study is a population-based cohort study, including individuals aged 45-74 years. Dietary data were collected through a modified diet history method. The TNM classification was obtained from pathology/clinical records and re-evaluated. Among 27 931 individuals (60% women), we found 728 incident CRC cases during 428 924 person-years of follow-up. Fibre intake was inversely associated with CRC risk (P(trend) = 0.026). Concerning colon cancer, we observed borderline interaction between fibre intake and sex (P = 0.052) and significant protective association restricted to women (P(trend) = 0.013). Intake of fruits and berries was inversely associated with colon cancer in women (P(trend) = 0.022). We also observed significant interactions between intakes of fibre (P = 0.048) and vegetables (P = 0.039) and sex on rectal cancer, but no significant associations were seen between intake of fibre, or its sources, in either of the sexes. Except for inverse associations between intake of fibre-rich cereal products and N0- and M0-tumours, we did not observe significant associations with different TNM stages. Our findings suggest different associations between fibre intake and CRC depending on sex, tumour site and fibre source. High fibre intake, especially from fruits and berries, may, above all, prevent tumour development in the colon in women. No clear differences by TNM classification were detected. PMID:26281852

  13. Combined pulmonary and thoracic wall resection for stage III lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Shah, S. S.; Goldstraw, P.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Carcinoma of the lung with thoracic wall involvement constitutes stage III disease. The management of patients with this condition is complicated. However, improvement in perioperative care coupled with advances in surgical technique have enabled a more aggressive approach to the problem to be adopted. METHODS--A retrospective review was carried out of 58 patients (40 men) of mean age 63 years who underwent thoracotomy for lung cancer with chest wall invasion between 1980 and 1993. RESULTS--Chest wall resection was performed in 55 patients (94.8%); in three patients the discovery of N2 disease at operation precluded resection. The TNM status was T3N0M0 in 38 patients, T3N1M0 in 13, and T3N2M0 in seven. Squamous cell carcinoma was the commonest cell type (26 patients). Reconstruction of the chest wall was performed in 29 patients (Marlex mesh in six, Marlex-methacrylate in 22, myocutaneous flap in one patient). The morbidity and mortality were 22.4% and 3.4% respectively. Follow up was complete in 51 patients. Nineteen (37.2%) survived > or = 5 years. The absolute five year survival for N0 and N1 disease was 44.7% and 38.4%, respectively. No patients with N2 disease survived five years. CONCLUSIONS--In patients with carcinoma of the lung and chest wall invasion, combined pulmonary and thoracic wall resection offers the prospect of cure with minimal morbidity and mortality. The prognosis of patients with coexistent N2 disease remains poor. PMID:7570416

  14. Expression of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fibroblast growth factor 2, phosphatidyl inositol 3 phosphate kinase and their clinical and prognostic significance in early and advanced stage of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Usul Afsar, Cigdem; Sahin, Berksoy; Gunaldi, Meral; Kılıc Bagir, Emine; Gumurdulu, Derya; Burgut, Refik; Erkisi, Melek; Kara, Ismail Oguz; Paydas, Semra; Karaca, Feryal; Ercolak, Vehbi

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Non-small cell lung carcinoma is the leading cause of cancer related to death in the world. Squamous cell lung carcinoma (SqCLC) is the second most frequent histological subtype of lung carcinomas. Recently, growth factors, growth factor receptors, and signal transduction system-related gene amplifications and mutations are extensively under investigation to estimate the prognosis and to develop individualized therapies in SqCLC. In this study, besides the signal transduction molecule phosphatidyl inositol-3-phosphate kinase (IP3K) p110α, we explored the expressions of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and receptor-1 (FGFR1) in tumor tissue and also their clinical and prognostic significance in patients with early/advanced SqCLC. Materials and methods: From 2005 to 2013, 129 patients (23 early, 106 advanced disease) with a histopathological SqCLC diagnosis were selected from the hospital files of Cukurova University Medical Faculty for this study. Two independent pathologists evaluated FGFR1, FGF2, and PI3K (p110α) expressions in both tumor and stromal tissues from 99 of the patients with sufficient tissue samples, using immunohistochemistry. Considering survival analysis separately for patients with both early and advanced stage diseases, the relationship between the clinical features of the patients and expressions were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: FGFR1 expression was found to be low in 59 (60%) patients and high in 40 (40%) patients. For FGF2; 12 (12%) patients had high, 87 (88%) patients had low expression and for IP3K; 31 (32%) patients had high and 66 (68%) patients had low expressions. In univariate analysis, overall survival (OS) was significantly associated with stage of the disease and the performance status of the patient (P<0.0001 and P<0.001). There was no significant difference in OS of the patients with either low or high expressions of FGFR1, FGF2, and IP3K. When the patients with early or advanced stage

  15. Staging Early Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Old, O J; Isabelle, M; Barr, H

    2016-01-01

    Staging esophageal cancer provides a standardized measure of the extent of disease that can be used to inform decisions about therapy and guide prognosis. For esophageal cancer, the treatment pathways vary greatly depending on stage of disease, and accurate staging is therefore crucial in ensuring the optimal therapy for each patient. For early esophageal cancer (T1 lesions), endoscopic resection can be curative and simultaneously gives accurate staging of depth of invasion. For tumors invading the submucosa or more advanced disease, comprehensive investigation is required to accurately stage the tumor and assess suitability for curative resection. A combined imaging approach of computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) offers complementary diagnostic information and gives the greatest chance of accurate staging. Staging laparoscopy can identify peritoneal disease and small superficial liver lesions that could be missed on CT or PET, and alters management in up to 20 % of patients. Optical diagnostic techniques offer the prospect of further extending the possibilities of endoscopic staging in real time. Optical coherence tomography can image superficial lesions and could provide information on depth of invasion for these lesions. Real-time lymph node analysis using optical diagnostics such as Raman spectroscopy could be used to support immediate endoscopic therapy without waiting for results of cytology or further investigations. PMID:27573772

  16. Therapy of advanced-stage mature B-cell lymphoma and leukemia in children and adolescents with rituximab and reduced intensity induction chemotherapy (B-NHL 2004M protocol): the results of a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Samochatova, Elena V; Maschan, Alexey A; Shelikhova, Larisa N; Myakova, Natalia V; Belogurova, Margarita B; Khlebnikova, Olga P; Shamardina, Anastasia V; Ryskal, Olga V; Roumiantseva, Julia V; Konovalov, Dmitriy M; Dubrovina, Maria E; Rumyantsev, Alexander G

    2014-07-01

    Pediatric mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (B-NHLs) are highly aggressive malignant tumors that are curable with chemotherapy (ChT). High-dose methotrexate (MTX) is considered indispensable for successful treatment, but this therapy frequently induces severe mucositis and infectious complications, especially in induction, which can cause treatment failure. A prospective multicenter trial of combined immunochemotherapy for advanced-stage B-NHL with rituximab and the modified NHL-BFM-90 protocol was conducted. The major differences from the original protocol were a decrease in the dose of MTX from 5000 to 1000 mg/m/24 h in the first 2 ChT blocks and the addition of rituximab at 375 mg/m to each of the first 4 blocks of ChT. Eighty-three newly diagnosed patients with a median age of 8.84 years with Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas stage III to IV were included. Four patients died during induction ChT due to tumor lysis syndrome and infection. Two additional patients died subsequently due to tumor resistance. Complete remission was achieved in 77 (92.8%) patients; 2 patients relapsed at 1 and 3 months, and 2 developed secondary malignancies at 1 and 6.5 years, respectively, after the completion of therapy. The overall survival probability was 82%±8% with a median follow-up of 65.2 months. Combined therapy with rituximab and intensive ChT with a reduced MTX dose of 1 g/m in the 2 induction courses was feasible and produced high cure rates in patients with pediatric advanced-stage mature B-NHL. PMID:23823112

  17. Efficacy of combined gemcitabine, oxaliplatin and pegaspargase (P-gemox regimen) in patients with newly diagnosed advanced-stage or relapsed/refractory extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhong-jun; Huang, Hui-qiang; Lin, Tong-yu; Jiang, Wen-qi; Lu, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL) is an aggressive neoplasm with a poor outcome. Asparaginase-based regimens are recommended for patients with advanced-stage or relapsed/refractory ENKTL. We retrospectively investigated the efficacy and toxicity of combined gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and pegaspargase (P-gemox) in these patients. A total of 35 patients with newly diagnosed stage III–IV, relapsed or refractory ENKTL were treated with 2 to 8 cycles of P-gemox: gemcitabine (1250 mg/m2) and oxaliplatin (85 mg/m2) injected intravenously and pegaspargase (2500 IU/m2) injected intramuscularly on day 1 and repeated every 2 weeks. Upon completion of treatment, the overall response rate was 80.0%, with a complete response in 51.4% of patients. The 1-, 2- and 3- year progression-free survival rates were 45.0%, 38.6% and 38.6%, and overall survival rates were 76.8%, 64.7% and 64.7%, respectively. Patients who attained a complete response showed better progression-free survival than those without a complete response (p = 0.01). The major adverse effects were hematologic toxicity and liver dysfunction. Grade 3/4 leucopenia and neutropenia occurred in 40.0% of patients. No treatment-related deaths occurred. These results indicate the P-gemox regimen is a safe and effective treatment for patients with newly diagnosed advanced-stage or relapsed/refractory ENKTL. We anticipate future prospective trials will confirm the efficacy. PMID:27093153

  18. [Comparison of the Masaoka-Koga and The IASLC/ITMIG Proposal for The TNMStaging Systems Based on the Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART)
Retrospective Database].

    PubMed

    Liang, Guanghui; Gu, Zhitao; Li, Yin; Fu, Jianhua; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Han, Yongtao; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Chen, Ke-Neng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Pang, Liewen; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Liu, Yuan; Fang, Wentao

    2016-07-20

    背景与目的 使用中国胸腺协作组(Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas, ChART)回顾性数据,比较Masaoka-Koga分期系统和国际肺癌协会(International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, IASLC)/国际胸腺肿瘤协作组(International Thymic Malignancies Interest Group, ITMIG)推荐的新TNM分期对胸腺肿瘤预后的预测作用。方法 我们回顾分析了1992年-2012年ChART数据库共2,370例患者。其中1,198例信息完整的患者被纳入研究,按照TNM及Masaoka-Koga分期系统进行分期,并进行生存分析。评估指标为R0患者的累积复发率(cumulative incidence of recurrence, CIR)以及患者总生存率(overall survival, OS)。对比分析Masaoka-Koga分期系统和新的TNM分期系统。结果 根据Masaoka-Koga分期系统,不同分期CIR差异具有统计学意义,其中I期和II期或者II期和III期之间累积复发率无差异,IV期的患者具有更高的复发率,预后最差。根据新的TNM分期系统,T1a患者的累积复发率低于其他患者(P<0.05),T1a患者总生存高于T1b患者(P=0.004),T4患者总生存率差于其它患者。N(+)患者累及复发率及总生存率差于N0患者。在M0患者与M1b患者之间总体累积复发率和总体生存率差异具有统计学意义,但在M0和M1b患者之间二者无差异。I期-IIIa期与IIIb 期-IVb期患者之间总生存率具有差异,然而IIIb期与IVb期患者之间总生存率无差异。结论 与Masaoka-Koga分期相比,IASLC/ITMIG TNM分期系统不仅描述了肿瘤侵犯的范围,也提供了有关淋巴结转移和肿瘤播散的情况。使用新的TNM分期系统进行前瞻性研究有助于更好的对胸腺肿瘤分组,预测预后,并指导治疗。.

  19. Radiotherapy Does Not Influence the Severe Pulmonary Toxicity Observed With the Administration of Gemcitabine and Bleomycin in Patients With Advanced-Stage Hodgkin's Lymphoma Treated With the BAGCOPP Regimen: A Report by the German Hodgkin's Lymphoma Study Group

    SciTech Connect

    Macann, Andrew; Bredenfeld, Henning; Mueller, Rolf-Peter; Diehl, Volker; Engert, Andreas; Eich, Hans Theodor

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of radiotherapy on the severe pulmonary toxicity observed in the pilot study of BAGCOPP (bleomycin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone, and gemcitabine) for advanced-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage III or IV Hodgkin's lymphoma or Stage IIB with risk factors participated in this single-arm, multicenter pilot study. Results: Twenty-seven patients were enrolled on the study before its premature closure as a result of the development of serious pulmonary toxicity in 8 patients. The pulmonary toxicity occurred either during or immediately after the BAGCOPP chemotherapy course. Pulmonary toxicity contributed to one early fatality but resolved in the other 7 patients after cessation of gemcitabine and bleomycin, allowing continuation of therapy. Fifteen patients received consolidative radiotherapy, including 4 who previously had pulmonary toxicity. There were no reported cases of radiation pneumonitis and no exacerbation of pulmonary symptoms in the 4 patients who had had previous pulmonary toxicity. Conclusions: The severe pulmonary toxicity observed in this study has been attributed to an interaction between gemcitabine and bleomycin. Gemcitabine (when administered without bleomycin) remains of interest in Hodgkin's lymphoma and is being incorporated into a new German Hodgkin's Lymphoma Study Group protocol that also includes consolidative radiotherapy. This study supports the concept of the integration of radiotherapy in gemcitabine-containing regimens in Hodgkin's lymphoma if there is an interval of at least 4 weeks between the two modalities and with a schedule whereby radiotherapy follows the chemotherapy.

  20. An A/C germline single-nucleotide polymorphism in the TNFAIP3 gene is associated with advanced disease stage and survival in only surgically treated esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ghadban, Tarik; Schmidt-Yang, Magdalena; Smif, Magdalena; Uzunoglu, Faik G; Perez, Daniel R; Tsui, Tung Y; El Gammal, Alexander T; Erbes, Peter J; Zilbermints, Veacheslav; Wellner, Ulrich; Pantel, Klaus; Izbicki, Jakob R; Vashist, Yogesh K

    2014-12-01

    Prognostication of disease relapse and survival is essential for cancer patients and genetic variations in cancer patients may serve as important indicators. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping to the tumor necrosis factor, alpha-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3) gene at position 138241110 displays three genotypes (AA, AC and CC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential prognostic value of the TNFAIP3-SNP in esophageal cancer (EC). Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes of 173 patients who underwent complete surgical resection for EC and did not receive any neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy. For SNP detection, a 260- bp fragment was PCR amplified, purified and sequenced with tested primers. The product was analyzed by automatic DNA sequencer.The TNFAIP3 genotypes were correlated with clinico-pathological parameters, tumor cell dissemination in bone marrow and clinical outcome. The C-allele carrier presented with higher disease stage (P<0.001). This was predominantly because of the presence of lymph node metastasis (P<0.001). The recurrence rate was higher in C-allele carriers (AC and CC genotype; P=0.004). Kaplan-Meier plots for disease-free (P=0.017) and overall survival (P<0.001) displayed a gene dosage-associated outcome with AA genotype patients presenting the longest and CC genotype patients the poorest survival. In disease stage-adjusted multivariate analysis the TNFAIP3-SNP was identified as an independent prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio 1.9; P=0.008). The TNFAIP3-SNP allows risk stratification of EC patients and may be a useful tool to identify patients eligible for multimodal therapy concepts.

  1. A Decade of Experience in Developing Preclinical Models of Advanced- or Early-Stage Spontaneous Metastasis to Study Antiangiogenic Drugs, Metronomic Chemotherapy, and the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kerbel, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    The clinical circumstance of treating spontaneous metastatic disease, after resection of primary tumors, whether advanced/overt or microscopic in nature, is seldom modeled in mice and may be a major factor in explaining the frequent discordance between preclinical and clinical therapeutic outcomes where the trend is "overprediction" of positive results in preclinical mouse model studies. To evaluate this hypothesis, a research program was initiated a decade ago to develop multiple models of metastasis in mice, using variants of human tumor cell lines selected in vivo for enhanced spontaneous metastatic aggressiveness after surgical resection of established orthotopic primary tumors. These models have included breast, renal, and colorectal carcinomas; ovarian cancer (but without prior surgery); and malignant melanoma. They have been used primarily for experimental therapeutic investigations involving various antiangiogenic drugs alone or with chemotherapy, especially "metronomic" low-dose chemotherapy. The various translational studies undertaken have revealed a number of clinically relevant findings. These include the following: (i) the potential of metronomic chemotherapy, especially when combined with a vascular endothelial growth factor pathway targeting drug to successfully treat advanced metastatic disease; (ii) the development of relapsed spontaneous brain metastases in mice with melanoma or breast cancer whose systemic metastatic disease is successfully controlled for a period with a given therapy; (iii) foreshadowing the failure of adjuvant antiangiogenic drug-based phase III trials; (iv) recapitulating the failure of oral antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors plus standard chemotherapy in contrast to the modest successes of antiangiogenic antibodies plus chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer; and (v) revealing "vessel co-option" and absence of angiogenesis as a determinant of intrinsic resistance or minimal responsiveness to antiangiogenic therapy

  2. The seventh tumour-node-metastasis staging system for lung cancer: Sequel or prequel?

    PubMed

    van Meerbeeck, Jan P; Janssens, Annelies

    2013-09-01

    Anatomical cancer extent is an important predictor of prognosis and determines treatment choices. In non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) the tumour-node-metastasis (TNM) classification developed by Pierre Denoix replaced in 1968 the Veterans Administration Lung cancer Group (VALG) classification, which was still in use for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Clifton Mountain suggested several improvements based on a database of mostly surgically treated United States (US) patients from a limited number of centres. This database was pivotal for a uniform reporting of lung cancer extent by the American Joint Committee of Cancer (AJCC) and the International Union against Cancer (IUCC), but it suffered increasingly from obsolete diagnostic and staging procedures and did not reflect new treatment modalities. Moreover, its findings were not externally validated in large Japanese and European databases, resulting in persisting controversies which could not be solved with the available database. The use of different mediastinal lymph-node maps in Japan, the (US) and Europe facilitated neither the exchange nor the comparison of treatment results. Peter Goldstraw, a United Kingdom (UK) thoracic surgeon, started the process of updating the sixth version in 1996 and brought it to a good end 10 years later. His goals were to improve the TNM system in lung cancer by addressing the ongoing controversies, to validate the modifications and additional descriptors, to validate the TNM for use in staging SCLC and carcinoid tumours, to propose a new uniform lymph-node map and to investigate the prognostic value of non-anatomical factors. A staging committee was formed within the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) - which supervised the collection of the retrospective data from >100,000 patients with lung cancer - treated throughout the world between 1990 and 2000, analyse them with the help of solid statistics and validate externally with the Surveillance

  3. A Phase II First-Line Study of Gemcitabine, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab in Advanced Stage Non-squamous Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Clément-Duchêne, Christelle; Krupitskaya, Yelena; Ganjoo, Kristen; Lavori, Philip; McMillan, Alex; Kumar, Atul; Zhao, Gary; Padda, Sukhmani; Zhou, Lisa; Pedro-Salcedo, Melanie San; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Wakelee, Heather A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bevacizumab improves responses and progression-free survival when added to first-line paclitaxel/carboplatin or cisplatin/gemcitabine for patients with advanced nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer. This study was designed to evaluate toxicities and efficacy of gemcitabine/carboplatin/bevacizumab. Methods Patients with untreated advanced nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer, with no evidence of brain metastases and not on anticoagulation were eligible. Patients received gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8; carboplatin area under the curve 5 day 1; and bevacizumab 15 mg/kg day 1 every 3 weeks for up to six cycles. Bevacizumab was then continued every 3 weeks until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Results From July 2006 to December 2008, 48 patients were enrolled: 23 (48%) men, 25 (52%) women, and 19 (40%) never smokers. One patient never received therapy and is not included in the analysis. Median cycle number was 8 (1– 42) with 37 patients (78.7%) completing ≥4 cycles of three drugs. Dose reductions occurred in 34 (72.3%) patients. Grade 3/4 toxicities included neutropenia (47%/15%), thrombocytopenia (11%/15%), anemia (6%/0%), dyspnea (6%/2%), bacterial pneumonia (4%/0%), and hypertension (4%/2%). No neutropenic fevers occurred. One patient died of hemoptysis. Grade 3 bleeding occurred in three other patients. There were seven (14.9%) partial responses. Median time to first event (progression/death/toxicity requiring discontinuation) was 6.4 months (95% confidence interval: 4.8 –7.9 months). The median overall survival (OS) was 12.8 months (95% confidence interval: 10.0 –16.5). The OS is 57% at 1 year and 10% at 2 years. Conclusions Although perhaps skewed by a high proportion of nonsmokers and women, treatment with gemcitabine/carboplatin/bevacizumab has an acceptable toxicity profile with promising median OS despite a low response rate. PMID:20881641

  4. Two-Stage Mucogingival Surgery with Free Gingival Autograft and Biomend Membrane and Coronally Advanced Flap in Treatment of Class III Millers Recession.

    PubMed

    Rath, Avita; Varma, Smrithi; Paul, Renny

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Gingival recession is an apical shift of the gingival margin with exposure of the root surface. This migration of the marginal tissue leads to esthetic concerns, dentin hypersensitivity, root caries, and cervical wear. It is, paradoxically, a common finding in patients with a high standard of oral hygiene, as well as in periodontally untreated populations with poor oral hygiene. Changing the topography of the marginal soft tissue in order to facilitate plaque control is a common indication for root coverage procedures and forms a major aspect of periodontal plastic surgeries. The regeneration of a new connective tissue attachment to denuded root surface is by allowing the selective coronal regrowth of periodontal ligament cells while excluding the gingival tissues from the root during wound healing by means of a barrier membrane. Case Presentation. This case reports a two-stage surgical technique for treatment of Miller's class III defect using free gingival autograft and type I absorbable collagen membrane (BioMend®, Zimmer Dental, USA)(§). Conclusions. The 6-month follow-up of the case showed a significant increase in attached gingiva suggesting it as a predictable alternative in the treatment of Millers class III defects. PMID:27525131

  5. Intact PTEN Expression by Immunohistochemistry is Associated With Decreased Survival in Advanced Stage Ovarian/Primary Peritoneal High-grade Serous Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bakkar, Rania M; Xie, Su-Su; Urbauer, Diana L; Djordjevic, Bojana; Vu, Kim; Broaddus, Russell R

    2015-11-01

    Ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis. Optimal surgical debulking and tumor sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy are 2 well-established prognostics for this tumor type. Molecular markers that identify more clinically aggressive tumors would potentially allow for the development of individualized treatment options. PTEN is a key negative regulator of the PI3K signaling pathway. Loss of PTEN expression in endometrial carcinoma is associated with endometrioid histology; women with endometrioid tumors have a better prognosis than those with nonendometrioid tumors. The prognostic and predictive value for PTEN has not been effectively explored in ovarian/peritoneal high-grade serous carcinoma. PTEN immunohistochemistry was assessed in 126 women with Stage III, high-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary/peritoneum treated with surgery and then a platinum-based regimen. Compared with PTEN-negative or PTEN-reduced tumors, positive PTEN immunohistochemistry, detected in 58% of tumors, was associated with decreased pS6 and increased PTEN mRNA levels. Positive PTEN expression was independent of surgical debulking status or platinum sensitivity. PTEN-positive tumors were associated with significantly decreased recurrence-free survival. Importantly, the devised PTEN immunohistochemistry scoring system was reproducible among pathologists.

  6. Treatment of advanced stage ovarian carcinoma with a combination of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and radiosensitizer: report of a pilot study from the National Cancer Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Lichter, A.S.; Ozols, R.F.; Myers, C.C.; Ostechega, Y.; Young, R.C.

    1987-08-01

    Twenty-eight patients with Stage III or IV ovarian carcinoma were treated with combined chemotherapy-radiotherapy employing a unique protocol. Four cycles of cyclophosphamide and hexamethylmelamine alternated with four cycles of concurrent cisplatin, whole abdominal radiotherapy, and intraperitoneal misonidazole. The entire treatment program lasted six months. Clinical complete responses were seen in 50% of the patients with an overall response rate of 61%. Pathologic complete response (PCR) confirmed at second look surgery occurred in 18% of the group (5 patients). Median survival of the entire group was 15.2 months with all PCR's alive NED. This outcome was no different than our previous experience with combination chemotherapy alone. Toxicities seen included leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. However, these side effects were manageable. Two non-tumor deaths occurred. This study demonstrates the feasibility of combining drug and radiation therapy concurrently in the treatment of ovarian cancer; further research is needed to explore different sequencing and dose levels that could improve the outcome.

  7. Two-Stage Mucogingival Surgery with Free Gingival Autograft and Biomend Membrane and Coronally Advanced Flap in Treatment of Class III Millers Recession

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Renny

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Gingival recession is an apical shift of the gingival margin with exposure of the root surface. This migration of the marginal tissue leads to esthetic concerns, dentin hypersensitivity, root caries, and cervical wear. It is, paradoxically, a common finding in patients with a high standard of oral hygiene, as well as in periodontally untreated populations with poor oral hygiene. Changing the topography of the marginal soft tissue in order to facilitate plaque control is a common indication for root coverage procedures and forms a major aspect of periodontal plastic surgeries. The regeneration of a new connective tissue attachment to denuded root surface is by allowing the selective coronal regrowth of periodontal ligament cells while excluding the gingival tissues from the root during wound healing by means of a barrier membrane. Case Presentation. This case reports a two-stage surgical technique for treatment of Miller's class III defect using free gingival autograft and type I absorbable collagen membrane (BioMend®, Zimmer Dental, USA)§. Conclusions. The 6-month follow-up of the case showed a significant increase in attached gingiva suggesting it as a predictable alternative in the treatment of Millers class III defects. PMID:27525131

  8. Third Stage

    NASA Video Gallery

    Once the third stage finishes its work, Kepler will have sufficient energy to leave the gravitational pull of Earth and go into orbit around the Sun, trailing behind Earth and slowly drifting away ...

  9. Does Aggressive Surgery Improve Outcomes? Interaction Between Preoperative Disease Burden and Complex Surgery in Patients With Advanced-Stage Ovarian Cancer: An Analysis of GOG 182

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Neil S.; Miller, Austin; Rungruang, Bunja; Richard, Scott D.; Rodriguez, Noah; Bookman, Michael A.; Hamilton, Chad A.; Krivak, Thomas C.; Maxwell, G. Larry

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effects of disease burden, complex surgery, and residual disease (RD) status on progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) or primary peritoneal cancer (PPC) and complete surgical resection (R0) or < 1 cm of RD (MR) after surgical cytoreduction. Patients and Methods Demographic, pathologic, surgical, and outcome data were collected from 2,655 patients with EOC or PPC enrolled onto the Gynecologic Oncology Group 182 study. The effects of disease distribution (disease score [DS]) and complexity of surgery (complexity score [CS]) on PFS and OS were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method and multivariable regression analysis. Results Consistent with existing literature, patients with MR had worse prognosis than R0 patients (PFS, 15 v 29 months; P < .01; OS, 41 v 77 months; P < .01). Patients with the highest preoperative disease burden (DS high) had shorter PFS (15 v 23 or 34 months; P < .01) and OS (40 v 71 or 86 months; P < .01) compared with those with DS moderate or low, respectively. This relationship was maintained in the subset of R0 patients with PFS (18.3 v 33.2 months; DS moderate or low: P < .001) and OS (50.1 v 82.8 months; DS moderate or low: P < .001). After controlling for DS, RD, an interaction term for DS/CS, performance status, age, and cell type, CS was not an independent predictor of either PFS or OS. Conclusion In this large multi-institutional sample, initial disease burden remained a significant prognostic indicator despite R0. Complex surgery does not seem to affect survival when accounting for other confounding influences, particularly RD. PMID:25667285

  10. Expression of receptors of advanced glycation end product (RAGE) and types I, III and IV collagen in the vastus lateralis muscle of men in early stages of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Serrão, Paula Regina M S; Vasilceac, Fernando A; Gramani-Say, Karina; Lessi, Giovanna C; Reiff, Rodrigo B M; Mattiello-Sverzut, Ana Cláudia; Mattiello, Stela M

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in the contractile and non-contractile proteins of the skeletal muscle may reduce muscle function in knee osteoarthritis (OA), and the formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end products, particularly in collagen, can influence the quality of these muscle proteins. The objective of this study was to evaluate the reactivity of types I, III and IV collagen and the expression and localization of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in the vastus lateralis (VL) muscle in early stages of knee OA. The hypothesis was that these patients present a higher expression of RAGE and increased immunoreactivity in the collagen. Thirty-five men were divided into two groups: the control group (CG; n = 17) and the osteoarthritis group (OAG; n = 18). All participants were submitted to a biopsy of the VL. The muscle samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for collagen and for RAGE and laminin. The expression of RAGE was counted (intracellular, extracellular and total). Student's t-test for independent samples and Mann-Whitney U test were used for the RAGE's intergroup analysis (α ≤ 0.05). A semiquantitative analysis was performed to assess the collagen reactivity. No significant differences were observed in the intracellular, extracellular or total localization of RAGE (p > 0.05). Higher immunoreactivity was observed in the OAG for all types of collagen, with more reactivity for collagen III and IV. We concluded that in the initial stages of knee OA, no differences were observed for RAGE levels between the groups. However, the OAG's higher collagen expression may represent adaptations for reducing muscle stiffness and avoiding injury.

  11. Comparison of dose–volume histograms between proton beam and X-ray conformal radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Toshiki; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Mizumoto, Masashi; Numajiri, Haruko; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the parameters of the dose–volume histogram (DVH) between proton beam therapy (PBT) and X-ray conformal radiotherapy (XCRT) for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to the tumor conditions. A total of 35 patients having NSCLC treated with PBT were enrolled in this analysis. The numbers of TNM stage and lymph node status were IIB (n = 3), IIIA (n = 15) and IIIB (n = 17), and N0 (n = 2), N1 (n = 4), N2 (n = 17) and N3 (n = 12), respectively. Plans for XCRT were simulated based on the same CT, and the same clinical target volume (CTV) was used based on the actual PBT plan. The treatment dose was 74 Gy-equivalent dose (GyE) for the primary site and 66 GyE for positive lymph nodes. The parameters were then calculated according to the normal lung dose, and the irradiation volumes of the doses (Vx) were compared. We also evaluated the feasibility of both plans according to criteria: V5 ≥ 42%, V20 ≥ 25%, mean lung dose ≥ 20 Gy. The mean normal lung dose and V5 to V50 were significantly lower in PBT than in XCRT. The differences were greater with the more advanced nodal status and with the larger CTV. Furthermore, 45.7% of the X-ray plans were classified as inadequate according to the criteria, whereas 17.1% of the proton plans were considered unsuitable. The number of inadequate X-ray plans increased in cases with advanced nodal stage. This study indicated that some patients who cannot receive photon radiotherapy may be able to be treated using PBT. PMID:25368341

  12. Prediction of Pathological Stage in Patients with Prostate Cancer: A Neuro-Fuzzy Model

    PubMed Central

    Acampora, Giovanni; Brown, David; Rees, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of cancer staging in prostate cancer is a process for estimating the likelihood that the cancer has spread before treatment is given to the patient. Although important for determining the most suitable treatment and optimal management strategy for patients, staging continues to present significant challenges to clinicians. Clinical test results such as the pre-treatment Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) level, the biopsy most common tumor pattern (Primary Gleason pattern) and the second most common tumor pattern (Secondary Gleason pattern) in tissue biopsies, and the clinical T stage can be used by clinicians to predict the pathological stage of cancer. However, not every patient will return abnormal results in all tests. This significantly influences the capacity to effectively predict the stage of prostate cancer. Herein we have developed a neuro-fuzzy computational intelligence model for classifying and predicting the likelihood of a patient having Organ-Confined Disease (OCD) or Extra-Prostatic Disease (ED) using a prostate cancer patient dataset obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network. The system input consisted of the following variables: Primary and Secondary Gleason biopsy patterns, PSA levels, age at diagnosis, and clinical T stage. The performance of the neuro-fuzzy system was compared to other computational intelligence based approaches, namely the Artificial Neural Network, Fuzzy C-Means, Support Vector Machine, the Naive Bayes classifiers, and also the AJCC pTNM Staging Nomogram which is commonly used by clinicians. A comparison of the optimal Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) points that were identified using these approaches, revealed that the neuro-fuzzy system, at its optimal point, returns the largest Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC), with a low number of false positives (FPR = 0.274, TPR = 0.789, AUC = 0.812). The proposed approach is also an improvement over the AJCC pTNM Staging Nomogram (FPR = 0.032, TPR

  13. Chemoradiation for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Potential for Improving Results to Match Those of Current Treatment Modalities for Early-Stage Tumors-Long-Term Results of Hyperfractionated Chemoradiation With Carbogen Breathing and Anemia Correction With Erythropoietin

    SciTech Connect

    Villar, Alfonso Martinez, Jose Carlos; Serdio, Jose Luis de

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To attempt to improve results of chemoradiation for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: From March 1996 to April 2007, 98 patients with head and neck cancer (15 Stage III and 83 Stage IV) were treated with a twice-daily hyperfractionated schedule. Eleven patients presented with N0, 11 with N1, 13 with N2A, 17 with N2B, 24 with N2C, and 22 with N3. Each fraction of treatment consisted of 5 mg/m{sup 2} of carboplatin plus 115 cGy with carbogen breathing. Treatment was given 5 days per week up to total doses of 350 mg/m{sup 2} of carboplatin plus 8050 cGy in 7 weeks. Anemia was corrected with erythropoietin. Results: Ninety-six patients tolerated the treatment as scheduled. All patients tolerated the planned radiation dose. Local toxicity remained at the level expected with irradiation alone. Chemotherapy toxicity was moderate. Ninety-seven complete responses were achieved. After 11 years of follow-up (median, 81 months), actuarial locoregional control, cause-specific survival, overall survival, and nodal control rates at 5 and 10 years were, respectively, 83% and 83%, 68% and 68%, 57% and 55%, and 100% and 100%. Median follow-up of disease-free survivors was 80 months. No significant differences in survival were observed between the different subsites or between the pretreatment node status groups (N0 vs. N+, N0 vs. N1, N0 vs. N2A, N0 vs. N2B, N0 vs. N2C, and N0 vs. N3). Conclusions: Improving results of chemoradiation for advanced head and neck cancer up to the level obtained with current treatments for early-stage tumors is a potentially reachable goal.

  14. Treatment Patterns, Costs, and Survival among Medicare-Enrolled Elderly Patients Diagnosed with Advanced Stage Gastric Cancer: Analysis of a Linked Population-Based Cancer Registry and Administrative Claims Database

    PubMed Central

    Karve, Sudeep; Liepa, Astra M; Hess, Lisa M; Kaye, James A; Calingaert, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess real-world treatment patterns, health care utilization, costs, and survival among Medicare enrollees with locally advanced/unresectable or metastatic gastric cancer receiving standard first-line chemotherapy. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database (2000~2009). The inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) first diagnosed with locally advanced/unresectable or metastatic gastric cancer between July 1, 2000 and December 31, 2007 (first diagnosis defined the index date); (2) ≥65 years of age at index; (3) continuously enrolled in Medicare Part A and B from 6 months before index through the end of follow-up, defined by death or the database end date (December 31, 2009), whichever occurred first; and (4) received first-line treatment with fluoropyrimidine and/or a platinum chemo-therapy agent. Results In total, 2,583 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean age at index was 74.8±6.0 years. Over 90% of patients died during follow-up, with a median survival of 361 days for the overall post-index period and 167 days for the period after the completion of first-line chemotherapy. The mean total gastric cancer-related cost per patient over the entire post-index follow-up period was United States dollar (USD) 70,808±56,620. Following the completion of first-line chemotherapy, patients receiving further cancer-directed treatment had USD 25,216 additional disease-related costs versus patients receiving supportive care only (P<0.001). Conclusions The economic burden of advanced gastric cancer is substantial. Extrapolating based on published incidence estimates and staging distributions, the estimated total disease-related lifetime cost to Medicare for the roughly 22,200 patients expected to be diagnosed with this disease in 2014 approaches USD 300 millions. PMID:26161282

  15. Utility of [18F] Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (FDG PET/CT) in the Initial Staging and Response Assessment of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hulikal, Narendra; Gajjala, Sivanath Reddy; Kalawat, Teck Chand; Kottu, Radhika; Amancharla Yadagiri, Lakshmi

    2015-12-01

    In India up to 50 % of breast cancer patients still present as locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). The conventional methods of metastatic work up include physical examination, bone scan, chest & abdominal imaging, and biochemical tests. It is likely that the conventional staging underestimates the extent of initial spread and there is a need for more sophisticated staging procedure. The PET/CT can detect extra-axillary and occult distant metastases and also aid in predicting response to chemotherapy at an early point in time. To evaluate the utility of FDG PET/CT in initial staging and response assessment of patients with LABC receiving NACT. A prospective study of all biopsy confirmed female patients diagnosed with LABC receiving NACT from April 2013 to May 2014. The conventional work up included serum chemistry, CECT chest and abdomen and bone scan. A baseline whole body PET/CT was done in all patients. A repeat staging evaluation and a whole body PET/CT was done after 2/3rd cycle of NACT in non-responders and after 3/4 cycles in clinical responders. The histopathology report of the operative specimen was used to document the pathological response. The FDG PET/CT reported distant metastases in 11 of 38 patients, where as conventional imaging revealed metastases in only 6. Almost all the distant lesions detected by conventional imaging were detected with PET/CT, which showed additional sites of metastasis in 3 patients. In 2 patients, PET/CT detected osteolytic bone metastasis which were not detected by bone scan. In 5 patients PET CT detected N3 disease which were missed on conventional imaging. A total of 14 patients had second PET/CT done to assess the response to NACT and 11 patients underwent surgery. Two patients had complete pathological response. Of these 1 patient had complete metabolic and morphologic response and other had complete metabolic and partial morphologic response on second PET/CT scan. The 18 FDG PET/CT can detect more number of

  16. Utility of [18F] Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (FDG PET/CT) in the Initial Staging and Response Assessment of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hulikal, Narendra; Gajjala, Sivanath Reddy; Kalawat, Teck Chand; Kottu, Radhika; Amancharla Yadagiri, Lakshmi

    2015-12-01

    In India up to 50 % of breast cancer patients still present as locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). The conventional methods of metastatic work up include physical examination, bone scan, chest & abdominal imaging, and biochemical tests. It is likely that the conventional staging underestimates the extent of initial spread and there is a need for more sophisticated staging procedure. The PET/CT can detect extra-axillary and occult distant metastases and also aid in predicting response to chemotherapy at an early point in time. To evaluate the utility of FDG PET/CT in initial staging and response assessment of patients with LABC receiving NACT. A prospective study of all biopsy confirmed female patients diagnosed with LABC receiving NACT from April 2013 to May 2014. The conventional work up included serum chemistry, CECT chest and abdomen and bone scan. A baseline whole body PET/CT was done in all patients. A repeat staging evaluation and a whole body PET/CT was done after 2/3rd cycle of NACT in non-responders and after 3/4 cycles in clinical responders. The histopathology report of the operative specimen was used to document the pathological response. The FDG PET/CT reported distant metastases in 11 of 38 patients, where as conventional imaging revealed metastases in only 6. Almost all the distant lesions detected by conventional imaging were detected with PET/CT, which showed additional sites of metastasis in 3 patients. In 2 patients, PET/CT detected osteolytic bone metastasis which were not detected by bone scan. In 5 patients PET CT detected N3 disease which were missed on conventional imaging. A total of 14 patients had second PET/CT done to assess the response to NACT and 11 patients underwent surgery. Two patients had complete pathological response. Of these 1 patient had complete metabolic and morphologic response and other had complete metabolic and partial morphologic response on second PET/CT scan. The 18 FDG PET/CT can detect more number of

  17. Increased frequency and suppressive activity of CD127(low/-) regulatory T cells in the peripheral circulation of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma are associated with advanced stage and nodal involvement.

    PubMed

    Drennan, Samantha; Stafford, Nicholas D; Greenman, John; Green, Victoria L

    2013-11-01

    The presence of regulatory T (Treg) cells is thought to be an important mechanism by which head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) successfully evades the immune system. Using multicolour flow cytometry, the frequency and functional capacity of two CD4(+)  CD127(low/-) Treg cell populations, separated on the basis of different levels of CD25 expression (CD25(inter) and CD25(high) ), from the peripheral circulation of newly presenting HNSCC patients were assessed with regard to clinicopathological features and healthy controls. The frequency of circulating Treg cells was similar between HNSCC patients and healthy controls, and for patients with HNSCC developing from different subsites (laryngeal compared with oropharyngeal). However, patients with advanced stage tumours and those with nodal involvement had significantly elevated levels of CD4(+)  CD25(high)  CD127(low/-) Treg cells compared with patients who had early stage tumours (P = 0·03) and those without nodal involvement (P = 0·03), respectively. CD4(+)  CD25(high)  CD127(low/-) Treg cells from the entire HNSCC patient cohort and from patients whose tumours had metastasized to the lymph nodes were also shown to suppress the proliferation of effector T cells significantly more, compared with those from healthy controls (P = 0·04) or patients with no nodal involvement (P = 0·04). Additionally, CD4(+)  CD25(inter)  CD127(low/-) Treg cells consistently induced greater suppressive activity than CD4(+)  CD25(high)  CD127(low/-) Treg cells on the proliferation of the effector T-cell populations (CD4(+)  CD25(-)  CD127(-/+) and CD4(+)  CD25(+)  CD127(+) ). Peripheral Treg cells, identified by the CD127(low/-) phenotype, have been shown to be influenced by a patient's tumour stage and/or nodal status in HNSCC; suggesting a role in tumour progression that could be manipulated by future immunotherapy.

  18. Patterns of Failure in Advanced Stage Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Patients After Complete Response to R-CHOP Immunochemotherapy and the Emerging Role of Consolidative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zheng; Das, Satya; Okwan-Duodu, Derick; Esiashvili, Natia; Flowers, Christopher; Chen, Zhengjia; Wang, Xiaojing; Jiang, Kun; Nastoupil, Loretta J.; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: The role of consolidative radiation therapy (RT) after complete response (CR) to rituximab combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) for stage III-IV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients is unclear. We aimed to evaluate our institutional experience when consolidative RT is delivered to initial presenting sites or bulky sites in these patients. Methods and Materials: We identified 211 histologically confirmed stage III-IV DLBCL patients who received R-CHOP from January 2000 to May 2012 at our institution. Patterns of failure for patients who achieved CR to R-CHOP were analyzed. Local control (LC), distant control (DC), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier method and compared between patients who received R-CHOP alone versus R-CHOP plus consolidative RT using the log–rank test. Multivariate analyses were also performed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Detailed treatment records were available for 163 patients. After a median 6 cycles of R-CHOP, 110 patients (67.5%) achieved CR and were entered for analysis. Fourteen patients (12.7%) received consolidative RT. After median follow-up of 32.9 months, 43.8% of patients who received R-CHOP alone failed at the initial sites with or without distant recurrence (DR), whereas isolated DR only occurred in 3.7% of these patients. Consolidative RT was associated with significantly improved LC (91.7% vs 48.8%), DC (92.9% vs 71.9%), PFS (85.1% vs 44.2%), and OS (92.3% vs 68.5%; all Ps<.0001) at 5 years compared with patients with R-CHOP alone. On multivariate analysis, consolidative RT and nonbulky disease were predictive of increased LC and PFS, whereas bone marrow involvement was associated with increased risk of DR and worse OS. Consolidative RT was also associated with marginal improved OS. Conclusions: Forty-four percent of patients with advanced stage DLBCL failed at initial presenting sites after

  19. Brachytherapy boost in loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a prospective randomized trial of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstact Background The purpose was to determine whether a brachytherapy boost improves outcomes in patients with advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with standard chemo-radiotherapy. Methods Patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma WHO grades I-III and TNM stages III or non-metastatic stage IV were eligible for this phase III study. Patients were randomized to either arm (A) induction chemotherapy, followed by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with concomitant cisplatin (n = 139) or arm (B), the same schedule plus a brachytherapy boost to the nasopharynx (n = 135). The EBRT doses given were 70 Gy to the primary tumour and positive lymph nodes and 46 Gy to the negative neck. The additional brachytherapy boost in arm (B) was given by either low dose-rate (LDR – 11 Gy) or high dose-rate (HDR – 3 fractions of 3.0 Gy) brachytherapy. The primary endpoint was 3-year overall survival (OS) and secondary endpoints were: local control, regional control, distant metastasis and grade 3–4 adverse events. Results 274 patients were randomized between September 2004 and December 2008. The two arms were comparable with regard to age, gender, stage and grade. 273 patients completed treatment. Median follow-up was 29 months (0.2-67 months). The effect of treatment arm, country, age, gender, WHO pathology, stage (T3-4, N2-3 versus other) and chemotherapy on overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) was studied. Stage significantly affected OS (p = 0.024) and DFS (p = 0.018) while age significantly affected OS (p = 0.014). None of the other factors studied were significant. The 3-year LRFS was 60.5% and 54.4% in arms A and B respectively (p = 0.647). The 3-year regional control rate in the neck was 59.7% and 54.3% respectively (p = 0.7). Distant metastasis developed in 59.7% of patients in arm A and 55.4% in arm B (p = 0.377). Patients with T1/T2 N + had a 3 year LRFS of 51.8% in Arm A (62 patients) versus 57.9% in Arm B (67

  20. Advances in surgery.

    PubMed

    Weder, W

    2012-09-01

    In the last decade, technological advances, new staging tools, better understanding the role of surgery within multimodal treatment concepts in advanced stages and progress in the functional assessment of surgical candidates improved the quality of surgery in the management of patients with lung cancer. Lung resection with video-assisted thoracoscopic access gained wide acceptance, the indication for lobectomy or sublobar resection in early stages was applied based on new data and selection for multimodal treatment in stage III is better understood based on the data. a major impact on the outcome of patients with lung cancer has the treatment in specialized high-volume centers.

  1. Effect of preoperative chemoradiotherapy on outcome of patients with locally advanced esophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma—a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Orditura, M.; Galizia, G.; Di Martino, N.; Ancona, E.; Castoro, C.; Pacelli, R.; Morgillo, F.; Rossetti, S.; Gambardella, V.; Farella, A.; Laterza, M.M.; Ruol, A.; Fabozzi, A.; Napolitano, V.; Iovino, F.; Lieto, E.; Fei, L.; Conzo, G.; Ciardiello, F.; De Vita, F.

    2014-01-01

    Background To date, few studies of preoperative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (crt) in gastroesophageal junction (gej) cancer have been statistically powered; indeed, gej tumours have thus far been grouped with esophageal or gastric cancer in phase iii trials, thereby generating conflicting results. Methods We studied 41 patients affected by locally advanced Siewert type i and ii gej adenocarcinoma who were treated with a neoadjuvant crt regimen [folfox4 (leucovorin–5-fluorouracil–oxaliplatin) for 4 cycles, and concurrent computed tomography–based three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy delivered using 5 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy per week for a total dose of 45 Gy], followed by surgery. Completeness of tumour resection (performed approximately 6 weeks after completion of crt), clinical and pathologic response rates, and safety and outcome of the treatment were the main endpoints of the study. Results All 41 patients completed preoperative treatment. Combined therapy was well tolerated, with no treatment-related deaths. Dose reduction was necessary in 8 patients (19.5%). After crt, 78% of the patients showed a partial clinical response, 17% were stable, and 5% experienced disease progression. Pathology examination of surgical specimens demonstrated a 10% complete response rate. The median and mean survival times were 26 and 36 months respectively (95% confidence interval: 14 to 37 months and 30 to 41 months respectively). On multivariate analysis, TNM staging and clinical response were demonstrated to be the only independent variables related to long-term survival. Conclusions In our experience, preoperative chemoradiotherapy with folfox4 is feasible in locally advanced gej adenocarcinoma, but shows mild efficacy, as suggested by the low rate of pathologic complete response. PMID:24940093

  2. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in the preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Guinet, C; Buy, J N; Ghossain, M A; Sézeur, A; Mallet, A; Bigot, J M; Vadrot, D; Ecoiffier, J

    1990-03-01

    Nineteen patients with middle and lower rectal carcinomas were operated on, with abdominoperineal resection in 10 patients, lower anterior resection with coloanal anastomosis in 6 patients, and colorectal anastomosis in 3 patients. The distance of the lower margin of the tumor to insertion of the levator ani on the rectal wall was correctly evaluated by computed tomography in 12 (63%) of 19 patients and by magnetic resonance imaging in 13 (68%) of 19 patients, while digital examination correctly assessed the distance in 15 (79%) of 19 patients. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were unable to assess extension through the rectal wall. No significant difference was observed between computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in assessing extension to the perivesical fat, adjacent organs, pelvic side wall, or lymph nodes. According to the TNM classification, magnetic resonance imaging correctly staged 74% (14/19) of carcinomas, while computed tomography correctly staged 68% (13/19).

  3. Chinese Herbal Formulation PHY906 and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage B Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage C Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  4. Dosimetric Comparison Between 2-Dimensional Radiation Therapy and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Treatment of Advanced T-Stage Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: To Treat Less or More in the Planning Organ-At-Risk Volume of the Brainstem and Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Chau, Ricky Teo, Peter; Kam, Michael; Leung, S.F.; Cheung, K.Y.; Chan, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the deficiencies in target coverage and organ protection of 2-dimensional radiation therapy (2DRT) in the treatment of advanced T-stage (T3-4) nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and assess the extent of improvement that could be achieved with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), with special reference to of the dose to the planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) of the brainstem and spinal cord. A dosimetric study was performed on 10 patients with advanced T-stage (T3-4 and N0-2) NPC. Computer tomography (CT) images of 2.5-mm slice thickness of the head and neck were acquired with the patient immobilized in semi-extended-head position. A 2D plan based on Ho's technique, and an IMRT plan based on a 7-coplanar portals arrangement, were established for each patient. 2DRT was planned with the field borders and shielding drawn on the simulator radiograph with reference to bony landmarks, digitized, and entered into a planning computer for reconstruction of the 3D dose distribution. The 2DRT and IMRT treatment plans were evaluated and compared with respect to the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the targets and the organs-at-risk (OARs), tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs). With IMRT, the dose coverage of the target was superior to that of 2DRT. The mean minimum dose of the GTV and PTV were increased from 33.7 Gy (2DRT) to 62.6 Gy (IMRT), and 11.9 Gy (2DRT) to 47.8 Gy (IMRT), respectively. The D{sub 95} of the GTV and PTV were also increased from 57.1 Gy (2DRT) to 67 Gy (IMRT), and 45 Gy (2DRT) to 63.6 Gy (IMRT), respectively. The TCP was substantially increased to 78.5% in IMRT. Better protection of the critical normal organs was also achieved with IMRT. The mean maximum dose delivered to the brainstem and spinal cord were reduced significantly from 61.8 Gy (2DRT) to 52.8 Gy (IMRT) and 56 Gy (2DRT) to 43.6 Gy (IMRT), respectively, which were within the conventional dose limits of 54

  5. Paradigm shift redefining molecular, metabolic and structural events in Alzheimer's disease involves a proposed contribution by transition metals. Defined lengthy preclinical stage provides new hope to circumvent advancement of disease- and age-related neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Cavaleri, Franco

    2015-05-01

    It is estimated that 5.5 Million North Americans suffer from varying degrees of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and by the year 2050 it may be one in 85 people globally (100 Million). It will be shown that heavy metal toxicity plays a significant role in sporadic AD. Although current literature speaks to involvement of metal ions (via Fenton reaction), studies and reviewers have yet to link cellular events including known structural changes such as amyloid plaque development to this metal toxicity the way it is proposed here. Contrary to the current AD model which positions BACE1 (β-secretase) as an aberrant or AD-advancing enzyme, it is proposed herein that the neuron's protective counteraction to this metal toxicity is, in fact, a justified increase in BACE1 activity and amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing to yield more secreted APP (sAPP) and β-amyloid peptide in response to metal toxicity. This new perspective which justifies a functional role for APP, BACE1 enzyme activity and the peptide products from this activity may at first appear to be counterintuitive. Compelling evidence, however, is presented and a mechanism is shown herein that validate BACE1 recruitment and the resulting β-amyloid protein as strategic countermeasures serving the cell effectively against neuro-impeding disease. It is proposed that β-amyloid peptide chelates and sequesters free heavy metals in the extracellular medium to aggregate as amyloid plaque while unchelated β-amyloid migrates across the cell membrane to chelate intracellular free divalent metals. The sequestered intracellular metal is subsequently chaperoned as a metallo-peptide to cross the plasma membrane and aggregate as amyloid plaques extracellularly. The BACE1 countermeasure is not genetic or metabolic aberration; and this novel conclusion demonstrates that it must not be inhibited as currently targeted. APP, BACE1, β-amyloid peptide, and sAPP play positive roles against the preclinical oxidative load that predates

  6. Paradigm shift redefining molecular, metabolic and structural events in Alzheimer's disease involves a proposed contribution by transition metals. Defined lengthy preclinical stage provides new hope to circumvent advancement of disease- and age-related neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Cavaleri, Franco

    2015-05-01

    It is estimated that 5.5 Million North Americans suffer from varying degrees of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and by the year 2050 it may be one in 85 people globally (100 Million). It will be shown that heavy metal toxicity plays a significant role in sporadic AD. Although current literature speaks to involvement of metal ions (via Fenton reaction), studies and reviewers have yet to link cellular events including known structural changes such as amyloid plaque development to this metal toxicity the way it is proposed here. Contrary to the current AD model which positions BACE1 (β-secretase) as an aberrant or AD-advancing enzyme, it is proposed herein that the neuron's protective counteraction to this metal toxicity is, in fact, a justified increase in BACE1 activity and amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing to yield more secreted APP (sAPP) and β-amyloid peptide in response to metal toxicity. This new perspective which justifies a functional role for APP, BACE1 enzyme activity and the peptide products from this activity may at first appear to be counterintuitive. Compelling evidence, however, is presented and a mechanism is shown herein that validate BACE1 recruitment and the resulting β-amyloid protein as strategic countermeasures serving the cell effectively against neuro-impeding disease. It is proposed that β-amyloid peptide chelates and sequesters free heavy metals in the extracellular medium to aggregate as amyloid plaque while unchelated β-amyloid migrates across the cell membrane to chelate intracellular free divalent metals. The sequestered intracellular metal is subsequently chaperoned as a metallo-peptide to cross the plasma membrane and aggregate as amyloid plaques extracellularly. The BACE1 countermeasure is not genetic or metabolic aberration; and this novel conclusion demonstrates that it must not be inhibited as currently targeted. APP, BACE1, β-amyloid peptide, and sAPP play positive roles against the preclinical oxidative load that predates

  7. Prognostic Significance of 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]-Fluoro-D-Glucose PET/CT in Patients With Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer Undergoing Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy Before Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Giorgetti, Assuero; Pallabazzer, Giovanni; Ripoli, Andrea; Solito, Biagio; Genovesi, Dario; Lencioni, Monica; Fabrini, Maria Grazia; D’Imporzano, Simone; Pieraccini, Laura; Marzullo, Paolo; Santi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the prognostic value of tumor metabolism measurements on serial 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography scans in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Forty-five patients (63 ± 7 years, 6 female) treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy before surgery were followed up for 24 ± 18 months (range 4–71). Positron emission tomography and computed tomography scans were obtained within 1 week before the start (PET1) and 1 month after the completion of the treatment (PET2). Total body tumor metabolic activity was measured as the sum of the parameters: SUVmax, SUV corrected for lean body mass, and total lesion glycolysis (TLG40/50/70%). Then, delta values for the parameters between PET1 and PET2 were calculated and expressed as percentage of PET1 results. At the time of the analysis, 27 patients were dead and 18 were alive. There was no difference between the 2 groups in terms of age, sex, site of the disease, histology, and the presence/absence of linfonodal metastases (P = NS). Survival random forest analysis (20,000 trees) resulted in an estimate of error rate of 36%. The nonparametric approach identified ΔTLG40 as the most predictive factor of survival (relative importance 100%). Moreover, T (17%), N (5%), and M (5%) stage of the disease, cancer histology (11%), TLG70 (5%) at the end of chemioradioterapy, and ΔTLG50–70 (17%–5%) were positively associated with patient outcome. The nonparametric analysis confirmed the prognostic importance of some clinical parameters, such as TNM stage and cancer histology. Moreover, ΔTLG resulted to be the most important factor in predicting outcome and should be considered in risk stratification of patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. PMID:27043676

  8. The Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J.; Hickman, Robert R.; Broadway, Jeramie W.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Doughty, Glen; Belvin, Anthony; Borowski, Stanley K.; Scott, John

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP). Nuclear propulsion can be affordable and viable compared to other propulsion systems and must overcome a biased public fear due to hyper-environmentalism and a false perception of radiation and explosion risk.

  9. The Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J.; Hickman, Robert R.; Broadway, Jeramie W.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Doughty, Glen; Belvin, Anthony; Borowski, Stanley K.; Scott, John

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progres made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP).

  10. Oncologic Impact of Fewer Than 12 Lymph Nodes in Patients Who Underwent Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Followed by Total Mesorectal Excision for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Ram; Han, Yoon Dae; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A minimum of 12 harvested lymph nodes (hLNs) are recommended in colorectal cancer. However, a paucity of hLNs is frequently presented after preoperative chemoradiation (pCRT) in rectal cancer and the significance of this is still uncertain. The aim of this study is to analyze the impact of hLNs on long-term oncologic outcomes. A total of 302 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent pCRT and curative resection between 1989 and 2009 were reviewed. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to the number of hLNs: <12 versus ≥12 LN. The 2 groups were compared with respect to 5-year disease-free and overall survival. The optimal number or ratio of hLNs was investigated in subgroup analysis according to LN status. The median follow-up was 57 months. Patient characteristics other than age did not differ between the 2 groups. The group with <12 LNs had more favorable ypTNM and ypN stage than those with ≥12 LNs. However, the long-term oncologic outcomes were not significantly different between the 2 groups. In subgroup analysis of ypN(−), the group with <5 hLNs had the most favorable oncologic outcomes. In ypN(+) cases, a higher LN ratio tended to be associated with poorer 5-year overall survival. The paucity of hLNs in locally advanced rectal cancer after chemoradiation did not imply poor oncologic outcomes in this study. In addition, <5 hLNs in ypN(−) patients could reflect a good tumor response rather than suboptimal radicality. PMID:26181550

  11. Second Stage Separation

    NASA Video Gallery

    When the second stage burn is complete, the spacecraft and third stage are spun up to 55 rpm to stabilize the third stage during its short firing. The second stage is then jettisoned and the third ...

  12. [ADHERING TO MEDICAL STANDARTS, EVIDENCE-BASED STAGING IN GYNECOLOGICAL CANCER].

    PubMed

    Chakalova, G

    2016-01-01

    Among the key factors that influence the survival of patients is adherence to medical treatment standards. Indicators are assessing the degree of adherence to medical standards and represent the relative shares (%) of patients who fulfilled the relevant aspect of any subject. Data from the BNCR of 9842 cases of patients with malignant diseases of the female reproductive diagnosed in 2011-2013 in Bulgaria has been analyzed. Patients with tumors of the vulva were incorrectly staged in 15% to 30% of the cases, and those with vaginal tumors were incorrectly staged in 20% to 23% of cases. In patients with malignant tumors of the cervix incorrect staging was established in 19% to 47% of the cases. Patients with tumors of the uterus were incorrectly staged in 6% to 26% of the cases. Among the patients with ovarian tumors were incorrectly staged in 18% to 43%. Our results show that one in three patients with gynecological cancer in Bulgaria was incorrectly staged. We recommend using the current TNM and FIGO systems. PMID:27514165

  13. Single-Stage Minimally Invasive Surgery for Synchronous Primary Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma and Left Atrial Myxoma.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Johan; Beelen, Roel; Martens, Sebastiaan; Van Praet, Frank

    2015-12-01

    We report the first successful short-term outcome of single-stage combined video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lobectomy and port access surgery in a patient with operable primary right lower lobe adenocarcinoma and a synchronous cardiac myxoma. The video-assisted thoracic surgery right lower lobectomy with systematic lymph node dissection was performed first, followed by myxoma excision by port access surgery through the same working port incision. The histopathologic analysis confirmed a pT2a N0 M0 R0 (TNM 7th edition) primary poorly differentiated pulmonary adenocarcinoma and a completely excised cardiac myxoma. Postoperative recovery was uneventful, and follow-up at 6 weeks confirmed an excellent surgical and oncologic outcome.

  14. Applications of a novel tumor-grading-metastasis staging system for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Tan, Chun-Lu; Zhang, Yi; Ke, Neng-Wen; Zeng, Lin; Li, Ang; Zhang, Hao; Xiong, Jun-Jie; Guo, Zi-Heng; Tian, Bo-Le; Liu, Xu-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ability to stratify patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) into prognostic groups has been hindered by the absence of a commonly accepted staging system. Both the 7th tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging guidelines by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the 2010 grading classifications by the World Health Organization (WHO) were validated to be unsatisfactory. We aim to evaluate the feasibility of combining the latest AJCC and WHO criteria to devise a novel tumor-grading-metastasis (TGM) staging system. We also sought to examine the stage-specific survival rates and the prognostic value of this new TGM system for p-NETs. Data of 120 patients with surgical resection and histopathological diagnosis of p-NETs from January 2004 to February 2014 in our institution were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Based on the AJCC and WHO criteria, we replaced the stage N0 and N1 with stage Ga (NET G1 and NET G2) and Gb (NET G3 and MANEC) respectively, without changes of the definition of T or M stage. The present novel TGM staging system was grouped as follows: stage I was defined as T1–2, Ga, M0; stage II as T3, Ga, M0 or as T1–3, Gb, M0; stage III as T4, Ga–b, M0 and stage IV as any T, M1. The new TGM staging system successfully distributed 55, 42, 12, and 11 eligible patients in stage I to IV, respectively. Differences of survival compared stage I with III and IV for patients with p-NETs were both statistically significant (P < 0.001), as well as those of stage II with III and IV (P < 0.001). Patients in stage I showed better a survival than those in stage II, whereas difference between stages III and IV was not notable (P = 0.001, P = 0.286, respectively). In multivariate models, when the TGM staging system was evaluated in place of the individual T, G, and M variables, this new criteria were proven to be an independent predictor of survival for surgically resected p-NETs (P < 0.05). Stratifying patients well

  15. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer ...

  16. Prognostic Significance of 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]-Fluoro-D-Glucose PET/CT in Patients With Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer Undergoing Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy Before Surgery: A Nonparametric Approach.

    PubMed

    Giorgetti, Assuero; Pallabazzer, Giovanni; Ripoli, Andrea; Solito, Biagio; Genovesi, Dario; Lencioni, Monica; Fabrini, Maria Grazia; D'Imporzano, Simone; Pieraccini, Laura; Marzullo, Paolo; Santi, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the prognostic value of tumor metabolism measurements on serial 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography scans in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Forty-five patients (63 ± 7 years, 6 female) treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy before surgery were followed up for 24 ± 18 months (range 4-71). Positron emission tomography and computed tomography scans were obtained within 1 week before the start (PET1) and 1 month after the completion of the treatment (PET2). Total body tumor metabolic activity was measured as the sum of the parameters: SUVmax, SUV corrected for lean body mass, and total lesion glycolysis (TLG40/50/70%). Then, delta values for the parameters between PET1 and PET2 were calculated and expressed as percentage of PET1 results. At the time of the analysis, 27 patients were dead and 18 were alive. There was no difference between the 2 groups in terms of age, sex, site of the disease, histology, and the presence/absence of linfonodal metastases (P = NS). Survival random forest analysis (20,000 trees) resulted in an estimate of error rate of 36%. The nonparametric approach identified ΔTLG40 as the most predictive factor of survival (relative importance 100%). Moreover, T (17%), N (5%), and M (5%) stage of the disease, cancer histology (11%), TLG70 (5%) at the end of chemioradioterapy, and ΔTLG(50-70) (17%-5%) were positively associated with patient outcome. The nonparametric analysis confirmed the prognostic importance of some clinical parameters, such as TNM stage and cancer histology. Moreover, ΔTLG resulted to be the most important factor in predicting outcome and should be considered in risk stratification of patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. PMID:27043676

  17. MR staging of bladder carcinoma: correlation with pathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Buy, J N; Moss, A A; Guinet, C; Ghossain, M A; Malbec, L; Arrive, L; Vadrot, D

    1988-12-01

    Forty patients with bladder carcinoma were examined preoperatively by means of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In all patients, total cystectomy with enterocystoplasty and pelvic node dissection was performed. The surgical and pathologic findings were correlated with the MR findings. Extension through the deep muscle of the bladder wall was present in 20 of the 40 patients and was diagnosed with a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 95%. Extension to perivesical fat was present in 18 of 40 patients and was diagnosed with a sensitivity of 66% and a specificity of 100%. Invasion of the adjacent organs was present in nine of 40 patients and was diagnosed with a sensitivity of 44% and a specificity of 96%. On the basis of the MR findings, the tumor was correctly staged, according to the TNM classification, in 24 of 40 (60%) patients, tumor extension was overestimated in three of 40 (7.5%) patients, and tumor extension was underestimated in 13 of 40 (32.5%) patients. MR imaging has been shown to be accurate in identification of macroscopic lymph node involvement and deep muscle involvement. It appears to be at least as useful as computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of perivesical fat involvement and to be superior to CT in the detection of invasion of adjacent organs. One limitation of MR imaging is in the evaluation of tumor extension into the periurethral glands.

  18. Parenteral Nutrition for Patients Treated for Locally Advanced Inoperable Tumors of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx Stage III; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx Stage IV; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage III; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage IV; Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage III; Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stage IV; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity Stage III; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity Stage IV; Locally Advanced Malignant Neoplasm

  19. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms as Prognostic and Predictive Factors of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Colorectal Cancer of Stages I and II

    PubMed Central

    Horvat, Matej; Potočnik, Uroš; Repnik, Katja; Kavalar, Rajko; Štabuc, Borut

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a highly heterogeneous disease regarding the stage at time of diagnosis and there is special attention regarding adjuvant chemotherapy in unselected patients with stage I and stage II. The clinicohistologically based TNM staging system with emphasis on histological evaluation of primary tumor and resected regional lymph nodes remains the standard of staging, but it has restricted sensitivity resulting in false downward stage migration. Molecular characteristics might predispose tumors to a worse prognosis and identification of those enables identifying patients with high risk of disease recurrence. Suitable predictive markers also enable choosing the most appropriate therapy. The current challenge facing adjuvant chemotherapy in stages I and II CRC is choosing patients with the highest risk of disease recurrence who are going to derive most benefit without facing unnecessary adverse effects. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are one of the potential molecular markers that might help us identify patients with unfavorable prognostic factors regarding disease initiation and recurrence and could determine selection of an appropriate chemotherapy regimen in the adjuvant and metastatic setting. In this paper, we discuss SNPs of genes involved in the multistep processes of cancerogenesis, metastasis, and the metabolism of chemotherapy that might prove clinically significant. PMID:26884752

  20. Impact of FDG-PET/CT on Radiotherapy Volume Delineation in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Correlation of Imaging Stage With Pathologic Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, Sergio L. Menard, Sonia; Devic, Slobodan; Sirois, Christian; Souhami, Luis; Lisbona, Robert; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) is more accurate than CT in determining the extent of non-small-cell lung cancer. We performed a study to evaluate the impact of FDG-PET/CT on the radiotherapy volume delineation compared with CT without using any mathematical algorithm and to correlate the findings with the pathologic examination findings. Methods and Materials: A total of 32 patients with proven non-small-cell lung cancer, pathologic specimens from the mediastinum and lung primary, and pretreatment chest CT and FDG-PET/CT scans were studied. For each patient, two data sets of theoretical gross tumor volumes were contoured. One set was determined using the chest CT only, and the second, done separately, was based on the co-registered FDG-PET/CT data. The disease stage of each patient was determined using the TNM staging system for three data sets: the CT scan only, FDG-PET/CT scan, and pathologic findings. Results: Pathologic examination altered the CT-determined stage in 22 (69%) of 32 patients and the PET-determined stage in 16 (50%) of 32 patients. The most significant alterations were related to the N stage. PET altered the TNM stage in 15 (44%) of 32 patients compared with CT alone, but only 7 of these 15 alterations were confirmed by the pathologic findings. With respect to contouring the tumor volume for radiotherapy, PET altered the contour in 18 (56%) of 32 cases compared with CT alone. Conclusion: The contour of the tumor volume of non-small-cell lung cancer patients with co-registered FDG-PET/CT resulted in >50% alterations compared with CT targeting, findings similar to those of other publications. However, the significance of this change is unknown. Furthermore, pathologic examination showed that PET is not always accurate and histologic examination should be obtained to confirm the findings of PET whenever possible.

  1. Low Level of Microsatellite Instability Correlates with Poor Clinical Prognosis in Stage II Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mojarad, Ehsan Nazemalhosseini; Kashfi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Mirtalebi, Hanieh; Taleghani, Mohammad Yaghoob; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Savabkar, Sanaz; Pourhoseingholi, Mohammad Amin; Jalaeikhoo, Hasan; Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Hamid; Kuppen, Peter J. K.; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    The influence of microsatellite instability (MSI) on the prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) requires more investigation. We assessed the role of MSI status in survival of individuals diagnosed with primary colorectal cancer. In this retrospective cross-sectional study the MSI status was determined in 158 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumors and their matched normal tissues from patients who underwent curative surgery. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to assess the clinical prognostic significance. In this study we found that MSI-H tumors were predominantly located in the colon versus rectum (p = 0.03), associated with poorer differentiation (p = 0.003) and TNM stage II/III of tumors (p = 0.02). In CRC patients with stage II, MSI-L cases showed significantly poorer survival compared with patients who had MSI-H or MSS tumors (p = 0.04). This study indicates that MSI-L tumors correlate with poorer clinical outcome in patients with stage II tumors (p = 0.04) or in tumors located in the colon (p = 0.02). MSI-L characterizes a distinct subgroup of CRC patients who have a poorer outcome. This study suggests that MSI status in CRC, as a clinical prognostic marker, is dependent on other factors, such as tumor stage and location. PMID:27429617

  2. Ares I Stage Separation Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. In this HD video image, an Ares I x-test involves the upper stage separating from the first stage. This particular test was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center in July 2007. (Highest resolution available)

  3. Lunar Module Ascent Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Lunar Module 'Spider' ascent stage is photographed from the Command/Service Module on the fifth day of the Apollo 9 earth-orbital mission. The Lunar Module's descent stage had already been jettisoned.

  4. Stages of Adolescence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Stages of Adolescence Page Content Article Body Adolescence, these years from puberty to adulthood, may be roughly divided into three stages: early adolescence, generally ages eleven to fourteen; middle adolescence, ages ...

  5. Breast cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    Doctors use 7 main stages to describe breast cancer. Stage 0, also called carcinoma in situ. This is cancer that is confined to the lobules or ducts in the breast. It has not spread to surrounding tissue. ...

  6. Ovarian Cancer Stage IV

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1335 View Download Large: 2400x2670 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Description: Drawing of stage IV shows ...

  7. Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1530x1350 View Download Large: 3060x2700 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC Description: Drawing of stage IIIC shows ...

  8. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage II Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1650x675 View Download Large: 3300x1350 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage II Description: Three-panel drawing of stage ...

  9. Ovarian Cancer Stage I

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage I Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1650x675 View Download Large: 3300x1350 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage I Description: Three-panel drawing of stage ...

  10. Beyond Erikson's Eight Stages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Ruth

    1979-01-01

    Erik Erikson has described eight stages of the healthy personality. This essay offers a revised version of the eight stages. Although most individuals develop through the eight stages, each is personally unique because patterns of fluctuation between safety and growth differ from one individual to another. (Author)

  11. Molt-inhibiting hormone stimulates vitellogenesis at advanced ovarian developmental stages in the female blue crab, Callinectes sapidus 2: novel specific binding sites in hepatopancreas and cAMP as a second messenger

    PubMed Central

    Zmora, Nilli; Sagi, Amir; Zohar, Yonathan; Chung, J Sook

    2009-01-01

    The finding that molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) regulates vitellogenesis in the hepatopancreas of mature Callinectes sapidus females, raised the need for the characterization of its mode of action. Using classical radioligand binding assays, we located specific, saturable, and non-cooperative binding sites for MIH in the Y-organs of juveniles (J-YO) and in the hepatopancreas of vitellogenic adult females. MIH binding to the hepatopancreas membranes had an affinity 77 times lower than that of juvenile YO membranes (KD values: 3.22 × 10-8 and 4.19 × 10-10 M/mg protein, respectively). The number of maximum binding sites (BMAX) was approximately two times higher in the hepatopancreas than in the YO (BMAX values: 9.24 × 10-9 and 4.8 × 10-9 M/mg protein, respectively). Furthermore, MIH binding site number in the hepatopancreas was dependent on ovarian stage and was twice as high at stage 3 than at stages 2 and 1. SDS-PAGE separation of [125I] MIH or [125I] crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) crosslinked to the specific binding sites in the membranes of the J-YO and hepatopancreas suggests a molecular weight of ~51 kDa for a MIH receptor in both tissues and a molecular weight of ~61 kDa for a CHH receptor in the hepatopancreas. The use of an in vitro incubation of hepatopancreas fragments suggests that MIH probably utilizes cAMP as a second messenger in this tissue, as cAMP levels increased in response to MIH. Additionally, 8-Bromo-cAMP mimicked the effects of MIH on vitellogenin (VtG) mRNA and heterogeneous nuclear (hn) VtG RNA levels. The results imply that the functions of MIH in the regulation of molt and vitellogenesis are mediated through tissue specific receptors with different kinetics and signal transduction. MIH ability to regulate vitellogenesis is associated with the appearance of MIH specific membrane binding sites in the hepatopancreas upon pubertal/final molt. PMID:19583849

  12. Endoscopic options for early stage esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pari M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery has traditionally been the preferred treatment for early stage esophageal cancer. Recent advances in endoscopic treatments have been shown to be effective and safe. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) allow endoscopists to remove small, superficial lesions, providing tumor specimen that can be examined for accurate pathologic tumor staging and assessment of adequacy of resection. Endoscopic ablation procedures, including photodynamic therapy (PDT) and radio frequency ablation (RFA), have also been shown to safely and effectively treat esophageal dysplasia and early stage neoplasia, with excellent long-term disease control. Both approaches are becoming more widely available around the world, and provide an alternative, safe, low risk strategy for treating early stage disease, making combined endoscopic therapy the recommended treatment of choice for early stage esophageal cancers. PMID:25642334

  13. Sequential scintigraphic staging of small cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bitran, J.D.; Bekerman, C.; Pinsky, S.

    1981-04-15

    Thirty patients with small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung were sequentially staged following a history and physical exam with liver, bran, bone, and gallium-67 citrate scans. Scintigraphic evaluation disclosed 7 of 30 patients (23%) with advanced disease, stage IIIM1. When Gallium-67 scans were used as the sole criteria for staging, they proved to be accurate and identified six of the seven patients with occult metastatic disease. Gallium-67 scans proved to be accurate in detecting thoracic and extrathoracic metastases in the 30 patients with SCC, especially within the liver and lymph node-bearing area. The diagnostic accuracy of gallium-67 fell in regions such as bone or brain. Despite the limitations of gallium-67 scanning, the authors conclude that these scans are useful in staging patients with SCC and should be the initial scans used in staging such patients.

  14. Radiological response and survival in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with three-drug induction chemotherapy followed by radical local treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Laura; Zago, Giulia; Marulli, Giuseppe; Del Bianco, Paola; Schiavon, Marco; Pasello, Giulia; Polo, Valentina; Canova, Fabio; Tonetto, Fabrizio; Loreggian, Lucio; Rea, Federico; Conte, PierFranco; Favaretto, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives If concurrent chemoradiotherapy cannot be performed, induction chemotherapy followed by radical-intent surgical treatment is an acceptable option for non primarily resectable non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). No markers are available to predict which patients may benefit from local treatment after induction. This exploratory study aims to assess the feasibility and the activity of multimodality treatment, including triple-agent chemotherapy followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy in locally advanced NSCLCs. Methods We retrospectively collected data from locally advanced NSCLCs treated with induction chemotherapy with carboplatin (area under the curve 6, d [day]1), paclitaxel (200 mg/m2, d1), and gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2 d1, 8) for three to four courses, followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy. We analyzed radiological response and toxicity. Estimated progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were correlated to response, surgery, and clinical features. Results In all, 58 NSCLCs were included in the study: 40 staged as IIIA, 18 as IIIB (according to TNM Classification of Malignant Tumors–7th edition staging system). A total of 36 (62%) patients achieved partial response (PR), and six (10%) progressions were recorded. Grade 3–4 hematological toxicity was observed in 36 (62%) cases. After chemotherapy, 37 (64%) patients underwent surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy, and two patients received radical-intent radiotherapy. The median PFS and OS were 11 months and 23 months, respectively. Both PFS and OS were significantly correlated to objective response (P<0.0001) and surgery (P<0.0001 and P=0.002). Patients obtaining PR and receiving local treatment achieved a median PFS and OS of 35 and 48 months, respectively. Median PFS and OS of patients not achieving PR or not receiving local treatment were 5–7 and 11–15 months, respectively. The extension of surgery did not affect the outcome. Conclusion The

  15. Second stage of labor.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yvonne W; Caughey, Aaron B

    2015-06-01

    Current American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' definition of prolonged second stage diagnoses 10% to 14% of nulliparous and 3% to 3.5% of multiparous women as having a prolonged second stage. The progression of labor in modern obstetrics may have deviated from the current labor norms established in the 1950s, likely due to differences in obstetric population characteristics and variation in clinical practice. Optimal management of the second stage in women with and without epidural remains debatable. Although prolonged second stage is associated with increased risk of maternal morbidity, conflicting data exist regarding the duration of second stage and associated neonatal morbidity and mortality.

  16. Evolution in Stage-Structured Populations

    PubMed Central

    Barfield, Michael; Holt, Robert D.; Gomulkiewicz, Richard

    2016-01-01

    For many organisms, stage is a better predictor of demographic rates than age. Yet no general theoretical framework exists for understanding or predicting evolution in stage-structured populations. Here, we provide a general modeling approach that can be used to predict evolution and demography of stage-structured populations. This advances our ability to understand evolution in stage-structured populations to a level previously available only for populations structured by age. We use this framework to provide the first rigorous proof that Lande’s theorem, which relates adaptive evolution to population growth, applies to stage-classified populations, assuming only normality and that evolution is slow relative to population dynamics. We extend this theorem to allow for different means or variances among stages. Our next major result is the formulation of Price’s theorem, a fundamental law of evolution, for stage-structured populations. In addition, we use data from Trillium grandiflorum to demonstrate how our models can be applied to a real-world population and thereby show their practical potential to generate accurate projections of evolutionary and population dynamics. Finally, we use our framework to compare rates of evolution in age- versus stage-structured populations, which shows how our methods can yield biological insights about evolution in stage-structured populations. PMID:21460563

  17. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  18. A Contribution to Solve the Problem of the Need for Consolidative Radiotherapy after Intensive Chemotherapy in Advanced Stages of Hodgkin's Lymphoma-Analysis of a Quality Control Program Initiated by the Radiotherapy Reference Center of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG)

    SciTech Connect

    Eich, Hans Theodor Gossmann, Axel; Engert, Andreas; Kriz, Jan; Bredenfeld, Henning; Hansemann, Katja; Skripnitchenko, Roman; Brillant, Corinne; Pfistner, Beate; Staar, Susanne; Diehl, Volker; Mueller, Rolf-Peter

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The role of radiotherapy (RT) after intensive chemotherapy in patients with advanced stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is still unclear. The German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) randomized HD12 trial was designed to test whether consolidative RT in the region of initial bulky disease and of residual disease is necessary after effective chemotherapy. A quality control program based on a multidisciplinary panel of radiation oncologists, radiologists, and medical oncologists who reviewed all patients' staging and restaging imaging was initiated. Methods and Materials: A total of 1661 patients aged 16 to 65 years with HL in Stage IIB (large mediastinal mass and/or E-lesions) or Stage III to IV were randomized from January 1999 to January 2003 according to a factorial design between: 8 esc.BEACOPP + RT (arm A), 8 esc.BEACOPP non-RT (arm B), 4+4BEACOPP + RT (arm C), 4+4BEACOPP non-RT (arm D). Results: In the fifth interim analysis, 1449 patients were eligible for the arm comparison with regard to RT. After a median observation time of 48 months the FFTF rate was 86% and the OS 92%. The FFTF was 95% in the RT arms A+C and 88% in the non-RT arms B+D: no sequential significant difference. One thousand and eighty four patients were evaluated by the panel. The panel defined initial bulky disease in 800 patients and residual disease in 600 patients. The panel recommended continuation of therapy according to the randomization for 934 of 1084 patients and additive RT independently from the randomization arm for 145 of 1084 patients. Conclusions: The study showed that RT can be reduced substantially after effective chemotherapy. However, because of the irradiation of 10% of patients in the non-RT arms, equivalent effectiveness of a non-RT strategy cannot be proved. A substantial limitation of consolidative RT according to expert panel recommendations appears to be possible without reducing effectiveness.

  19. Early Stage Selection Repeatability: Can We Learn Anything from the Past?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sugarcane cultivar development program at Canal Point involves several stages of variety selection and advancement. Stage 2 of this program involves the evaluation of approximately 1500 clones and the advancement of approximately 135 clones to Stage 3 based on objective, quantitative yield data...

  20. Staged electrostatic precipitator

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Stanley J.; Almlie, Jay C.; Zhuang, Ye

    2016-03-01

    A device includes a chamber having an air inlet and an air outlet. The device includes a plurality of stages including at least a first stage adjacent a second stage. The plurality of stages are disposed in the chamber and each stage has a plurality of discharge electrodes disposed in an interior region and is bounded by an upstream baffle on an end proximate the air inlet and bounded by a downstream baffle on an end proximate the air outlet. Each stage has at least one sidewall between the upstream baffle and the downstream baffle. The sidewall is configured as a collection electrode and has a plurality of apertures disposed along a length between the upstream baffle and the downstream baffle. The upstream baffle of the first stage is positioned in staggered alignment relative to the upstream baffle of the second stage and the downstream baffle of the first stage are positioned in staggered alignment relative to the downstream baffle of the second stage.

  1. Two stage catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Inventor); Bachovchin, Dennis (Inventor); Smeltzer, Eugene E. (Inventor); Lippert, Thomas E. (Inventor); Bruck, Gerald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A catalytic combustor (14) includes a first catalytic stage (30), a second catalytic stage (40), and an oxidation completion stage (49). The first catalytic stage receives an oxidizer (e.g., 20) and a fuel (26) and discharges a partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture (36). The second catalytic stage receives the partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture and further oxidizes the mixture. The second catalytic stage may include a passageway (47) for conducting a bypass portion (46) of the mixture past a catalyst (e.g., 41) disposed therein. The second catalytic stage may have an outlet temperature elevated sufficiently to complete oxidation of the mixture without using a separate ignition source. The oxidation completion stage is disposed downstream of the second catalytic stage and may recombine the bypass portion with a catalyst exposed portion (48) of the mixture and complete oxidation of the mixture. The second catalytic stage may also include a reticulated foam support (50), a honeycomb support, a tube support or a plate support.

  2. Hyperuricaemia and gout: time for a new staging system?

    PubMed

    Dalbeth, Nicola; Stamp, Lisa

    2014-09-01

    The current widely used clinical staging system for hyperuricaemia and gout describes the symptomatology of gout, but does not capture key aspects of the pathological basis of the disease. We propose a new clinical staging system. Stage A: hyperuricaemia, but without evidence of monosodium urate (MSU) crystal deposition or symptoms of gout. Stage B: MSU crystal deposition by microscopy or advanced imaging, but without signs or symptoms of gout. Stage C: MSU crystal deposition with prior or current symptoms of acute gout flares. Stage D: advanced gout requiring specialist interventions. This proposed new staging system provides a clear focus on gout as a chronic disease of MSU crystal deposition, and provides a rational framework to test the role of screening and treatment of asymptomatic disease.

  3. The new seventh edition American Joint Committee on Cancer staging of cutaneous non-melanoma skin cancer: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Warner, Christina L; Cockerell, Clay J

    2011-06-01

    The seventh edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Cancer Staging Manual includes a major revision of the staging protocol for cutaneous carcinomas. There are several significant improvements to the Tumor, Nodes, and Metastases (TNM) staging system, including consideration of high-risk factors within the primary T grade, a decrease in the tumor size threshold from 5 cm to 2 cm, improved stratification of patient lymph node status, as well as exclusion of Merkel cell carcinomas from the staging system for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and other cutaneous carcinomas. However, some important variables in cutaneous SCC were excluded from consideration. In addition, the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual makes some recommendations that will likely prove difficult to apply in clinical practice, particularly that Clark level, depth of invasion, and presence or absence of perineural invasion should be recorded for each peripheral SCC. In this review, we examine the new recommendations with an emphasis on their utility and practicality. PMID:21469759

  4. Estimated aortic blood pressure based on radial artery tonometry underestimates directly measured aortic blood pressure in patients with advancing chronic kidney disease staging and increasing arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Rasmus K; Peters, Christian D; Khatir, Dinah S; Laugesen, Esben; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Winther, Simon; Buus, Niels H

    2016-10-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) can be assessed noninvasively based on radial tonometry and may potentially be a better predictor of clinical outcome than brachial BP. However, the validity of noninvasively obtained estimates has never been examined in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Here we compared invasive aortic systolic BP (SBP) with estimated central SBP obtained by radial artery tonometry and examined the influence of renal function and arterial stiffness on this relationship. We evaluated 83 patients with stage 3 to 5 CKD (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] 30 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) and 41 controls without renal disease undergoing scheduled coronary angiography. BP in the ascending aorta was measured through the angiography catheter and simultaneously estimated using radial tonometry. The mean difference between estimated central and aortic SBP was -13.2 (95% confidence interval -14.9 to -11.4) mm Hg. Arterial stiffness was evaluated by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) and was significantly increased in CKD patients compared with (versus) control patients (mean 10.7 vs. 9.3 m/s). The difference in BP significantly increased 1.0 mm Hg for every 10 ml/min decrease in eGFR and by 1.6 mm Hg per 1 m/s increase in cfPWV. Using multivariate regression analysis including both eGFR and cfPWV, the difference between estimated central and invasive aortic SBP was significantly increased by 0.7 mm Hg. For the entire cohort brachial SBP significantly better reflected invasive SBP than estimated SBP. Thus, tonometry-based estimates of central BP progressively underestimate invasive central SBP with decreasing renal function and increasing arterial stiffness in CKD patients.

  5. Adaptive two-stage designs in phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Anindita; Tsiatis, Anastasios A

    2006-10-15

    Two-stage designs have been widely used in phase II clinical trials. Such designs are desirable because they allow a decision to be made on whether a treatment is effective or not after the accumulation of the data at the end of each stage. Optimal fixed two-stage designs, where the sample size at each stage is fixed in advance, were proposed by Simon when the primary outcome is a binary response. This paper proposes an adaptive two-stage design which allows the sample size at the second stage to depend on the results at the first stage. Using a Bayesian decision-theoretic construct, we derive optimal adaptive two-stage designs; the optimality criterion being minimum expected sample size under the null hypothesis. Comparisons are made between Simon's two-stage fixed design and the new design with respect to this optimality criterion. PMID:16479547

  6. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, M. G.; Borowski, S. K.; George, J. A.; Kim, T.; Emrich, W. J.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.; Gerrish, H. P.; Adams, R. B.

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP).

  7. Staging for vulvar cancer.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Neville F; Barlow, Ellen L

    2015-08-01

    Vulvar cancer has been staged by the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) since 1969, and the original staging system was based on clinical findings only. This system provided a very good spread of prognostic groupings. Because vulvar cancer is virtually always treated surgically, the status of the lymph nodes is the most important prognostic factor and this can only be determined with certainty by histological examination of resected lymph nodes, FIGO introduced a surgical staging system in 1988. This was modified in 1994 to include a category of microinvasive vulvar cancer (stage IA), because such patients have virtually no risk of lymph node metastases. This system did not give a reasonably even spread of prognostic groupings. In addition, patients with stage III disease were shown to be a heterogeneous group prognostically, and the number of positive nodes and the morphology of those nodes were not taken into account. A new surgical staging system for vulvar cancer was introduced by FIGO in 2009. Initial retrospective analyses have suggested that this new staging system has overcome the major deficiencies in the 1994 system.

  8. [Contribution of MRI in the staging of cancer of the bladder. Apropos of 40 cases].

    PubMed

    Buy, J N; Ghossain, M; Guinet, C; Richard, F; Doucet, M; Bigot, J M; Vadrot, D; Laval-Jeantet, M; Ecoiffier, J

    1989-02-01

    56 patients with bladder carcinoma were examined by magnetic resonance in the pre-operative staging. In 40 patients where total cystectomy with enterocystoplasty and pelvic node dissection were performed, a good correlation with surgical and pathologic findings was obtained. MR examination using T1 (TR 400 ms, TE 28 ms) and T2 (TR 1,200-1,600 ms, TE 40 80 120 ms) weighted images in different planes where performed after biopsy of the bladder tumor through endoscopy and within 1 or 2 weeks before surgery. Neoplasms were characterized by site, size and growth pattern. Extension through the deep muscle of the bladder wall was correctly identified in 95% with a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 95%. Extension through perivesical fat was assessed accurately in 85% with a sensitivity of 66% and a specificity of 100%. Accuracy in evaluating invasion of adjacent organs was 85%, sensitivity 44%, specificity 96%. Lymphadenopathy has been accurately assessed in 97.5% with a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 100%. MR correctly staged the tumor according to TNM classification in 24/40 (60%) patients, overestimated the extension in 3/40 (7.5%) and underestimated the extension in 13/40 (32.5%).

  9. [Is there alternative to FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colorectal cancer patients?].

    PubMed

    Esch, Anouk; Coriat, Romain; Perkins, Géraldine; Brezault, Catherine; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2012-01-01

    Being the second cancer for men and the third cancer for women in France, colorectal cancer represents a serious public health issue. Its incidence has increased these last years and despite new therapeutics being developed, it still has a bad prognostic. Thanks in part to Hemoccult national mass screening program, its diagnosis is made possible at an earlier stage, which makes a surgical curative resection and the carrying out of adjuvant chemotherapy possible. For stage III colic cancer that has been surgically removed, adjuvant chemotherapy by FOLFOX 4 has to be offered. Nevertheless, because of its toxicities, the patient's high age, important comorbidities or post-surgical complications, this chemotherapy occasionally cannot be done. What are the colorectal cancer prognostic factors which would guide the chemotherapy? TNM classification, number of examined lymph nodes, MSI status, and presence or not of a perforation or a perinervous, lymphatic or venous invasion is recognized prognostic factors. Also, what are the alternatives of FOLFOX 4 regimen as colorectal cancer adjuvant treatment?

  10. Hidden Stages of Cognition Revealed in Patterns of Brain Activation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John R; Pyke, Aryn A; Fincham, Jon M

    2016-09-01

    To advance cognitive theory, researchers must be able to parse the performance of a task into its significant mental stages. In this article, we describe a new method that uses functional MRI brain activation to identify when participants are engaged in different cognitive stages on individual trials. The method combines multivoxel pattern analysis to identify cognitive stages and hidden semi-Markov models to identify their durations. This method, applied to a problem-solving task, identified four distinct stages: encoding, planning, solving, and responding. We examined whether these stages corresponded to their ascribed functions by testing whether they are affected by appropriate factors. Planning-stage duration increased as the method for solving the problem became less obvious, whereas solving-stage duration increased as the number of calculations to produce the answer increased. Responding-stage duration increased with the difficulty of the motor actions required to produce the answer. PMID:27440808

  11. Advance care directives

    MedlinePlus

    ... advance directive; Do-not-resuscitate - advance directive; Durable power of attorney - advance care directive; POA - advance care directive; Health care agent - advance care directive; Health care proxy - ...

  12. Staging Airliner Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Andrew S.

    2007-01-01

    There is a general consensus building that historically high fuel prices and greater public awareness of the emissions that result from burning fuel are going to be long-term concerns for those who design, build, and operate airliners. The possibility of saving both fuel and reducing emissions has rekindled interest in breaking very long-range airline flights into multiple stages or even adopting in-flight refueling. It is likely that staging will result in lower fuel burn, and recent published reports have suggested that the savings are substantial, particularly if the airliner is designed from the outset for this kind of operation. Given that staging runs against the design and operation historical trend, this result begs for further attention. This paper will examine the staging question, examining both analytic and numeric performance estimation methodologies to quantify the likely amount of fuel savings that can be expected and the resulting design impacts on the airliner.

  13. Understanding cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body. The spread of cancer is called metastasis . Cancer staging is used to help describe the ... cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes (N) Metastasis (M) , or if and how much the cancer ...

  14. Stages of Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... your baby in these three stages. First trimester (week 1-week 12) First trimester See how your baby is ... is each pregnancy. Return to top Second trimester (week 13-week 28) Second trimester See how your ...

  15. Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, David

    2011-01-01

    The CPS is an in-space cryogenic propulsive stage based largely on state of the practice design for launch vehicle upper stages. However, unlike conventional propulsive stages, it also contains power generation and thermal control systems to limit the loss of liquid hydrogen and oxygen due to boil-off during extended in-space storage. The CPS provides the necessary (Delta)V for rapid transfer of in-space elements to their destinations or staging points (i.e., E-M L1). The CPS is designed around a block upgrade strategy to provide maximum mission/architecture flexibility. Block 1 CPS: Short duration flight times (hours), passive cryo fluid management. Block 2 CPS: Long duration flight times (days/weeks/months), active and passive cryo fluid management.

  16. Stages of Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer) cells form in the tissues of the pancreas. The pancreas is a gland about 6 inches ... spleen , and bile ducts . Tests that examine the pancreas are used to detect (find), diagnose, and stage ...

  17. Radar stage uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; Davies, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is investigating the performance of radars used for stage (or water-level) measurement. This paper presents a comparison of estimated uncertainties and data for radar water-level measurements with float, bubbler, and wire weight water-level measurements. The radar sensor was also temperature-tested in a laboratory. The uncertainty estimates indicate that radar measurements are more accurate than uncorrected pressure sensors at higher water stages, but are less accurate than pressure sensors at low stages. Field data at two sites indicate that radar sensors may have a small negative bias. Comparison of field radar measurements with wire weight measurements found that the radar tends to measure slightly lower values as stage increases. Copyright ASCE 2005.

  18. Management of cervical cancer and surgical-pathological staging (SPS). Report of our clinical case series.

    PubMed

    Onnis, A; Marchetti, M; Maggino, T; Cascio, A; Cerri, G; Dipasquale, C; Meneghello, E; Romagnolo, C; Rozzo, M L

    1988-01-01

    FIGO staging is imprecise in a relevant number of cases of cervical cancer, especially in advanced stages, when the prognosis and the choice of the therapy are most delicate. The Authors examine their case series about the index of correction of FIGO staging after Surgical Pathological Staging (SPS). Surgical Pathological Staging was applied systematically in 788 cases and revealed errors in FIGO staging in 16% of cases at stage I; 77% at stage II; and 96% at stage III. SPS allows a more precise knowledge of neoplastic diffusion and consequently to the elimination of many false advanced stages and to adequate the treatment. Furthermore 5 year survival rate confirms the role of SPS and Surgical therapy alone or combined with Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy in every stages of diffusion of cervical cancer. PMID:3383889

  19. Precision adjustable stage

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.; Silva, Leonard L.

    1988-01-01

    An improved mounting stage of the type used for the detection of laser beams is disclosed. A stage center block is mounted on each of two opposite sides by a pair of spaced ball bearing tracks which provide stability as well as simplicity. The use of the spaced ball bearing pairs in conjunction with an adjustment screw which also provides support eliminates extraneous stabilization components and permits maximization of the area of the center block laser transmission hole.

  20. Multiple stage railgun

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.; Scudder, Jonathan K.; Aaland, Kristian

    1982-01-01

    A multiple stage magnetic railgun accelerator (10) for accelerating a projectile (15) by movement of a plasma arc (13) along the rails (11,12). The railgun (10) is divided into a plurality of successive rail stages (10a-n) which are sequentially energized by separate energy sources (14a-n) as the projectile (15) moves through the bore (17) of the railgun (10). Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end (29) of the railgun (10) can be prevented by connection of the energy sources (14a-n) to the rails (11,12) through isolation diodes (34a-n). Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end of the railgun can also be prevented by dividing the rails (11,12) into electrically isolated rail sections (11a-n, 12a-n). In such case means (55a-n) are used to extinguish the arc at the end of each energized stage and a fuse (31) or laser device (61) is used to initiate a new plasma arc in the next energized rail stage.

  1. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy in Detecting Lower-Extremity Lymphedema in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Vulvar Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Lymphadenectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Lymphedema; Perioperative/Postoperative Complications; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  2. Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Pleural Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pleural Mesothelioma

  3. Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts a manufactured aluminum panel, that will fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel, undergoing a confidence panel test. In this test, bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  4. Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image, depicts a manufactured aluminum panel, that will be used to fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel, undergoing a confidence panel test. In this test, the bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  5. Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts a manufactured aluminum panel that will be used to fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel, undergoing a confidence panel test. In this test, the bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California.

  6. Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. In this HD video image, processes for upper stage barrel fabrication are talking place. The aluminum panels are manufacturing process demonstration articles that will undergo testing until perfected. The panels are built by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  7. Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts a manufactured aluminum panel that will be used to fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel, undergoing a confidence panel test. In this test, the bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  8. Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. In this HD video image, processes for upper stage barrel fabrication are talking place. The aluminum panels are manufacturing process demonstration articles that will undergo testing until perfected. The panels are built by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution Available)

  9. Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts confidence testing of a manufactured aluminum panel that will fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel. In this test, bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  10. ARES I Upper Stage Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. In this HD video image, processes for upper stage barrel fabrication are talking place. Aluminum panels are manufacturing process demonstration articles that will undergo testing until perfected. The panels are built by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Largest resolution available)

  11. Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts a manufactured panel that will be used for the Ares I upper stage barrel fabrication. The aluminum panels are manufacturing process demonstration articles that will undergo testing until perfected. The panels are built by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  12. Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts a manufactured aluminum panel, that will fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel, undergoing a confidence panel test. In this test, the bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  13. Advanced Beamline Design for Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Prokop, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab is a new electron accelerator currently in the commissioning stage. In addition to testing superconducting accelerating cavities for future accelerators, it is foreseen to support a variety of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments. Producing the required electron bunches with the expected flexibility is challenging. The goal of this dissertation is to explore via numerical simulations new accelerator beamlines that can enable the advanced manipulation of electron bunches. The work especially includes the design of a low-energy bunch compressor and a study of transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchangers.

  14. Advanced beamline design for Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, Christopher R.

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab is a new electron accelerator currently in the commissioning stage. In addition to testing superconducting accelerating cavities for future accelerators, it is foreseen to support a variety of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments. Producing the required electron bunches with the expected flexibility is challenging. The goal of this dissertation is to explore via numerical simulations new accelerator beamlines that can enable the advanced manipulation of electron bunches. The work especially includes the design of a low-energy bunch compressor and a study of transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchangers.

  15. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  16. Advanced expander test bed engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Space Chemical Engine Technology Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine and advanced component technologies applicable to space engines as well as launch vehicle upper stage engines. The AETB will be used to validate the high pressure expander cycle concept, study system interactions, and conduct studies of advanced mission focused components and new health monitoring techniques in an engine system environment. The split expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust.

  17. Fewer Advanced Alzheimer's Patients on Feeding Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... at someone in the advanced stages of a terminal illness, a feeding tube doesn't make a ... of palliative care (keeping a person with a terminal illness as comfortable as possible), Mitchell said. As ...

  18. Complement Factor H Autoantibodies are Associated with Early Stage NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Amornsiripanitch, Nita; Hong, Shaolin; Campa, Michael J.; Frank, Michael M.; Gottlin, Elizabeth B.; Patz, Edward F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In order to discover diagnostic biomarkers associated with early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we searched for autoantibodies preferentially present in stage I patients compared to patients with advanced stage disease. Here we describe an autoantibody against complement factor H (CFH) and its association with early stage NSCLC. Experimental Design Immunoblots were used to detect autoantibodies in the sera of stage I NSCLC patients. An autoantibody recognizing a 150 kDa protein was discovered and the protein was identified by mass spectrometry. The association of the autoantibody with early stage disease was suggested by the results of immunoblot analysis with sera from 28 stage I patients and 28 stage III/IV patients. This association was confirmed by protein microarray of sera from 125 NSCLC patients of all stages as well as 125 age, gender, and smoking history matched controls. Results The immunoreactive protein was identified as CFH. By immunoblot analysis, anti-CFH autoantibody was found in 50% of stage I NSCLC patients and 11% of late stage NSCLC patients (P=0.003). By protein microarray analysis, patients with stage I NSCLC had a significantly higher incidence of anti-CFH antibody than those with late stage NSCLC (P=0.0051). The percentage of sera with a positive level of CFH autoantibody was 30.4% in stage I, 21.1% in stage II, 12.5% in stage III, 7.4% in stage IV and 8.0% in the control group. Conclusions These findings suggest that in patients with NSCLC, CFH autoantibody is a molecular marker associated with early stage disease. PMID:20515868

  19. 2-Stage Classification Modeling

    1994-11-01

    CIRCUIT2.4 is used to design optimum two-stage classification configurations and operating conditions for energy conservation. It permits simulation of five basic grinding-classification circuits, including one single-stage and four two-stage classification arrangements. Hydrocyclones, spiral classifiers, and sieve band screens can be simulated, and the user may choose the combination of devices for the flowsheet simulation. In addition, the user may select from four classification modeling methods to achieve the goals of a simulation project using themore » most familiar concepts. Circuit performance is modeled based on classification parameters or equipment operating conditions. A modular approach was taken in designing the program, which allows future addition of other models with relatively minor changes.« less

  20. 2-Stage Classification Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Baltich, L. K.

    1994-11-01

    CIRCUIT2.4 is used to design optimum two-stage classification configurations and operating conditions for energy conservation. It permits simulation of five basic grinding-classification circuits, including one single-stage and four two-stage classification arrangements. Hydrocyclones, spiral classifiers, and sieve band screens can be simulated, and the user may choose the combination of devices for the flowsheet simulation. In addition, the user may select from four classification modeling methods to achieve the goals of a simulation project using the most familiar concepts. Circuit performance is modeled based on classification parameters or equipment operating conditions. A modular approach was taken in designing the program, which allows future addition of other models with relatively minor changes.

  1. Nuclear electric propulsion stage requirements and description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondt, J. F.; Peelgren, M. L.; Nakashima, A. M.; Nsieh, T. M.; Phillips, W. M.; Kikin, G. M.

    1974-01-01

    The application of a nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) stage in the exploration of near-earth, cometary, and planetary space was discussed. The NEP stage is powered by a liquid-metal-cooled, fast spectrum thermionic reactor capable of providing 120 kWe for 20,000 hours. This power is used to drive a number of mercury ion bombardment thrusters with specific impulse in the range of 4000-5000 seconds. The NEP description, characteristics, and functional requirements are discussed. These requirements are based on a set of five coordinate missions, which are described in detail. These five missions are a representative part of a larger set of missions used as a basic for an advanced propulsion comparison study. Additionally, the NEP stage development plan and test program is outlined and a schedule presented.

  2. A toolbox to study liver stage malaria.

    PubMed

    Prudêncio, Miguel; Mota, Maria M; Mendes, António M

    2011-12-01

    The first obligatory phase of mammalian infection by Plasmodium parasites, the causative agents of malaria, occurs in the liver of the host. This stage of Plasmodium infection bears enormous potential for anti-malarial intervention. Recent technological progress has strongly contributed to overcoming some of the long-standing difficulties in experimentally assessing hepatic infection by Plasmodium. Here, we review appropriate infection models and infection assessment tools, and provide a comprehensive description of recent advances in experimental strategies to investigate the liver stage of malaria. These issues are discussed in the context of current challenges in the field to provide researchers with the technical tools that enable effective experimental approaches to study liver stage malaria.

  3. What affects pleasure in persons with advanced stage dementia?

    PubMed

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Marx, Marcia S; Freedman, Laurence S; Murad, Havi; Thein, Khin; Dakheel-Ali, Maha

    2012-03-01

    We examined the impact of environmental, person, and stimulus characteristics on pleasure in persons with dementia. Study participants were 193 residents of 7 Maryland nursing homes who were presented with 25 stimuli from these categories: live human social stimuli, live pet social stimuli, simulated social stimuli, inanimate social stimuli, a reading stimulus, manipulative stimuli, a music stimulus, task and work-related stimuli, and two different self-identity stimuli. Systematic observations of pleasure in the natural environment were conducted using Lawton's Modified Behavior Stream. Analysis showed that pleasure is related to stimulus category, personal attributes and environmental conditions. In the multivariate analyses, all types of social stimuli (live and simulated, human and nonhuman), self-identity stimuli, and music were related to significantly higher levels of pleasure than the control condition. Females and persons with higher ADL and communication functional status exhibited more pleasure. Pleasure was most likely to occur in environments with moderate noise levels. These results demonstrate that these nursing home residents are indeed capable of showing pleasure. Caregivers of nursing home residents with dementia should incorporate social, self-identity, and music stimuli into their residents' care plans so that eliciting pleasure from each resident becomes the norm rather than a random occurrence. PMID:22208995

  4. What affects pleasure in persons with advanced stage dementia?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Marx, Marcia S.; Freedman, Laurence S.; Murad, Havi; Thein, Khin; Dakheel-Ali, Maha

    2012-01-01

    We examined the impact of environmental, person, and stimulus characteristics on pleasure in persons with dementia. Study participants were 193 residents of 7 Maryland nursing homes who were presented with 25 stimuli from these categories: live human social stimuli, simulated social stimuli, inanimate social stimuli, a reading stimulus, manipulative stimuli, a music stimulus, task and work-related stimuli, and two different self-identity stimuli. Systematic observations of pleasure in the natural environment were conducted using Lawton's Modified Behavior Stream. Analysis showed that pleasure is related to stimulus category, personal attributes and environmental conditions. In the multivariate analyses, all types of social stimuli (live and simulated, human and nonhuman), self-identity stimuli, and music were related to significantly higher levels of pleasure than the control condition. Females and persons with higher ADL and communication functional status exhibited more pleasure. Pleasure was most likely to occur in environments with moderate noise levels. These results demonstrate that these nursing home residents are indeed capable of showing pleasure. Caregivers of nursing home residents with dementia should incorporate social, self-identity, and music stimuli into their residents' care plans so that eliciting pleasure from each resident becomes the norm rather than a random occurrence. PMID:22208995

  5. Improved anaerobic digestion by staged fermentation and advanced reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Bostian, H.E.; Henry, M.P.; Sajjad, A.; Farrell, J.B.; Salotto, B.V.

    1985-01-01

    The anaerobic digestion process has taken on new importance and emphasis in recent years because of its potential applications for energy and chemicals production from various types of renewable-carbon resources, and because it can be coupled with certain electrochemical, thermochemical, and biochemical processes to generate electric power, hydrocarbons, methanol, and other high-value products. A number of initiatives have been taken to improve the anaerobic digestion process in keeping with the increasing appreciation for its utility and versatility of application in municipal, industrial, and rural settings.

  6. Role of additional radiotherapy in advanced stages of Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, J H; Coleman, C N; Fischer, R I; Lister, T A; Diehl, V

    1992-09-01

    Although radiotherapy is widely used as additional treatment following chemotherapy, its precise role has never been clearly proven. Relapses tend to occur in previously involved bulky sites. Non-randomized studies may suggest a positive effect of the addition of radiotherapy. This effect however, might also be caused by selection. Randomized studies have not resulted in a survival advantage for the patients treated with additional radiotherapy compared to no further treatment or additional chemotherapy. The SWOG study 7808 suggest a 20% benefit in remission duration for the nodular sclerosis histology subgroup. Definitive conclusions have to wait for more mature results of randomized studies including the ongoing EORTC study and the possibility to perform an overview of all studies. PMID:1280464

  7. MARCKS in advanced stages of neural retina histogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zolessi, Flavio R; Arruti, Cristina

    2004-01-01

    Myristoylated alanine-rich kinase C substrate (MARCKS), an actin-binding protein, is involved in several signal transduction pathways. It is susceptible to be phosphorylated by protein kinases as protein kinase C and some proline-directed kinases. These phosphorylations differently modulate its functions. We previously showed that a phosphorylation at its Ser25 (S25p-MARCKS) in chickens is a signature of this ubiquitous protein in neuron differentiation. To gain insight into the possible involvement of MARCKS in late retinal histogenesis, we compared the developmental expression patterns of the total protein and its S25p variants. Here we show that the most outstanding modifications occur at the outer retina, where S25p disappears at the end of embryonic development and where MARCKS is missing in adults. These results suggest diverse functional specializations in the different retinal layers.

  8. MARCKS in advanced stages of neural retina histogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zolessi, Flavio R; Arruti, Cristina

    2004-01-01

    Myristoylated alanine-rich kinase C substrate (MARCKS), an actin-binding protein, is involved in several signal transduction pathways. It is susceptible to be phosphorylated by protein kinases as protein kinase C and some proline-directed kinases. These phosphorylations differently modulate its functions. We previously showed that a phosphorylation at its Ser25 (S25p-MARCKS) in chickens is a signature of this ubiquitous protein in neuron differentiation. To gain insight into the possible involvement of MARCKS in late retinal histogenesis, we compared the developmental expression patterns of the total protein and its S25p variants. Here we show that the most outstanding modifications occur at the outer retina, where S25p disappears at the end of embryonic development and where MARCKS is missing in adults. These results suggest diverse functional specializations in the different retinal layers. PMID:15855766

  9. Role of additional radiotherapy in advanced stages of Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, J H; Coleman, C N; Fischer, R I; Lister, T A; Diehl, V

    1992-09-01

    Although radiotherapy is widely used as additional treatment following chemotherapy, its precise role has never been clearly proven. Relapses tend to occur in previously involved bulky sites. Non-randomized studies may suggest a positive effect of the addition of radiotherapy. This effect however, might also be caused by selection. Randomized studies have not resulted in a survival advantage for the patients treated with additional radiotherapy compared to no further treatment or additional chemotherapy. The SWOG study 7808 suggest a 20% benefit in remission duration for the nodular sclerosis histology subgroup. Definitive conclusions have to wait for more mature results of randomized studies including the ongoing EORTC study and the possibility to perform an overview of all studies.

  10. Stage cementing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Blamford, D.M.; Easter, J.H.

    1988-06-21

    A stage cementing apparatus for selectively passing cement from the interior passage of a casing to the annulus between the exterior of the casing and borehole, the casing having an upper portion and a lower portion, is described comprising: a barrel secured to the upper portion of the casing; a mandrel secured to the lower portion of the casing, and a stage cementing tool having a generally cylindrical configuration adapted for attachment to the lower end of the barrel about a portion of the mandrel.

  11. Staged fluidized bed

    DOEpatents

    Mallon, R.G.

    1983-05-13

    The invention relates to oil shale retorting and more particularly to staged fluidized bed oil shale retorting. Method and apparatus are disclosed for narrowing the distribution of residence times of any size particle and equalizing the residence times of large and small particles in fluidized beds. Particles are moved up one fluidized column and down a second fluidized column with the relative heights selected to equalize residence times of large and small particles. Additional pairs of columns are staged to narrow the distribution of residence times and provide complete processing of the material.

  12. Applications of a novel tumor-grading-metastasis staging system for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: An analysis of surgical patients from a Chinese institution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Tan, Chun-Lu; Zhang, Yi; Ke, Neng-Wen; Zeng, Lin; Li, Ang; Zhang, Hao; Xiong, Jun-Jie; Guo, Zi-Heng; Tian, Bo-Le; Liu, Xu-Bao

    2016-07-01

    The ability to stratify patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) into prognostic groups has been hindered by the absence of a commonly accepted staging system. Both the 7th tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging guidelines by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the 2010 grading classifications by the World Health Organization (WHO) were validated to be unsatisfactory.We aim to evaluate the feasibility of combining the latest AJCC and WHO criteria to devise a novel tumor-grading-metastasis (TGM) staging system. We also sought to examine the stage-specific survival rates and the prognostic value of this new TGM system for p-NETs.Data of 120 patients with surgical resection and histopathological diagnosis of p-NETs from January 2004 to February 2014 in our institution were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Based on the AJCC and WHO criteria, we replaced the stage N0 and N1 with stage Ga (NET G1 and NET G2) and Gb (NET G3 and MANEC) respectively, without changes of the definition of T or M stage. The present novel TGM staging system was grouped as follows: stage I was defined as T1-2, Ga, M0; stage II as T3, Ga, M0 or as T1-3, Gb, M0; stage III as T4, Ga-b, M0 and stage IV as any T, M1.The new TGM staging system successfully distributed 55, 42, 12, and 11 eligible patients in stage I to IV, respectively. Differences of survival compared stage I with III and IV for patients with p-NETs were both statistically significant (P < 0.001), as well as those of stage II with III and IV (P < 0.001). Patients in stage I showed better a survival than those in stage II, whereas difference between stages III and IV was not notable (P = 0.001, P = 0.286, respectively). In multivariate models, when the TGM staging system was evaluated in place of the individual T, G, and M variables, this new criteria were proven to be an independent predictor of survival for surgically resected p-NETs (P < 0.05).Stratifying patients well, the current

  13. Applications of a novel tumor-grading-metastasis staging system for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: An analysis of surgical patients from a Chinese institution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Tan, Chun-Lu; Zhang, Yi; Ke, Neng-Wen; Zeng, Lin; Li, Ang; Zhang, Hao; Xiong, Jun-Jie; Guo, Zi-Heng; Tian, Bo-Le; Liu, Xu-Bao

    2016-07-01

    The ability to stratify patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) into prognostic groups has been hindered by the absence of a commonly accepted staging system. Both the 7th tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging guidelines by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the 2010 grading classifications by the World Health Organization (WHO) were validated to be unsatisfactory.We aim to evaluate the feasibility of combining the latest AJCC and WHO criteria to devise a novel tumor-grading-metastasis (TGM) staging system. We also sought to examine the stage-specific survival rates and the prognostic value of this new TGM system for p-NETs.Data of 120 patients with surgical resection and histopathological diagnosis of p-NETs from January 2004 to February 2014 in our institution were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Based on the AJCC and WHO criteria, we replaced the stage N0 and N1 with stage Ga (NET G1 and NET G2) and Gb (NET G3 and MANEC) respectively, without changes of the definition of T or M stage. The present novel TGM staging system was grouped as follows: stage I was defined as T1-2, Ga, M0; stage II as T3, Ga, M0 or as T1-3, Gb, M0; stage III as T4, Ga-b, M0 and stage IV as any T, M1.The new TGM staging system successfully distributed 55, 42, 12, and 11 eligible patients in stage I to IV, respectively. Differences of survival compared stage I with III and IV for patients with p-NETs were both statistically significant (P < 0.001), as well as those of stage II with III and IV (P < 0.001). Patients in stage I showed better a survival than those in stage II, whereas difference between stages III and IV was not notable (P = 0.001, P = 0.286, respectively). In multivariate models, when the TGM staging system was evaluated in place of the individual T, G, and M variables, this new criteria were proven to be an independent predictor of survival for surgically resected p-NETs (P < 0.05).Stratifying patients well, the current

  14. Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound Rapamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer With mTOR Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Advanced Malignant Neoplasm; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Carcinoma; Malignant Uterine Neoplasm; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IVA Bladder Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Bladder Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  15. Advanced Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This video looks at a spinoff application of the technology from advanced microsensors -- those that monitor and determine conditions of spacecraft like the Space Shuttle. The application featured is concerned with the monitoring of the health of premature babies.

  16. Advanced Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarantos, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    This is an excerpt from a course for advanced students, designed to teach proficiency in English composition by providing activities specifically geared to the elimination of native language interference. (LG)

  17. Crescentic ramp turbine stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ching-Pang (Inventor); Tam, Anna (Inventor); Kirtley, Kevin Richard (Inventor); Lamson, Scott Henry (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A turbine stage includes a row of airfoils joined to corresponding platforms to define flow passages therebetween. Each airfoil includes opposite pressure and suction sides and extends in chord between opposite leading and trailing edges. Each platform includes a crescentic ramp increasing in height from the leading and trailing edges toward the midchord of the airfoil along the pressure side thereof.

  18. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung, liver, and peritoneal cavity. An inset shows cancer cells spreading from the pancreas, through the blood and lymph system, to another ... abdomen that contains the intestines, stomach, and liver). Cancer may also have spread to ... pancreas or to lymph nodes. Stage IV pancreatic cancer. ...

  19. Stage a Water Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In the author's book titled "The Incredible Water Show," the characters from "Miss Alaineus: A Vocabulary Disaster" used an ocean of information to stage an inventive performance about the water cycle. In this article, the author relates how she turned the story into hands-on science teaching for real-life fifth-grade students. The author also…

  20. STS upper stage operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchens, M. D.; Schnyer, A. D.

    1977-01-01

    Several design/development and operational approaches for STS upper stages are being pursued to realize maximum operational and economic benefits upon the introduction of the STS in the 1980s. The paper focuses special attention on safety operations, launch site operations and on-orbit operations.

  1. End-Stage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moua, Mai Neng

    2001-01-01

    Through her reflections on dealing with dialysis for end-stage renal disease and awaiting a kidney transplant, the author presents insights into how her experience was shaped by the physical, emotional, and multicultural forces she faced. Among the issues discussed are her ambivalent feelings between pursuing a regular lifestyle and receiving…

  2. Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Army/NASA Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program is charged with developing and demonstrating a light, quiet, and durable drivetrain for next-generation rotorcraft in two classes: a 10,000-20,000 Future Attack Air Vehicle capable of both tactical ground support and air-to-air missions, and a 60,000-80,000 lb Advanced Cargo Aircraft, for heavy-lift field-support operations. Specific ART objectives encompass a 25-percent reduction in drivetrain weight, a 10-dB noise level reduction at the transmission source, and the achievement of a 5000-hr MTBF. Four candidate drivetrain systems have been carried to a conceptual design stage, together with projections of their mission performance and life-cycle costs.

  3. Thymidine phosphorylase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α expression in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer: association with response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuhan; Lai, Hao; Qin, Yuzhou; Chen, Jiansi; Lin, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pretreatment status of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-1α) could predict pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy with oxaliplatin and capecitabine (XELOXART) and outcomes for clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients. A total of 180 patients diagnosed with clinical stage II/III rectal cancer received XELOXART. The status of TP, and HIF-1α were determined in pretreatment biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Tumor response was assessed in resected regimens using the tumor regression grade system and TNM staging system. 5-year disease free survival (DFS) and 5-year overall survival (OS) were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by the log-rank test. Over expression of TP and low expression of HIF-1α were associated with pathologic response to XELOXART and better outcomes (DFS and OS) in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients (P < 0.05). Our result suggested that pretreatment status of TP and HIF-1α were found to predict pathologic response and outcomes in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer received XELOXART. Additional well-designed, large sample, multicenter, prospective studies are needed to confirm the result of this study.

  4. Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen; Niebuhr, Jason; Cruz, Santana; Lamoreaux, chris

    2007-01-01

    The advanced resistive exercise device (ARED), now at the prototype stage of development, is a versatile machine that can be used to perform different customized exercises for which, heretofore, it has been necessary to use different machines. Conceived as a means of helping astronauts and others to maintain muscle and bone strength and endurance in low-gravity environments, the ARED could also prove advantageous in terrestrial settings (e.g., health clubs and military training facilities) in which many users are exercising simultaneously and there is heavy demand for use of exercise machines.

  5. Affordable Development of a Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, M. G.; Borowski, S. K.; George, J. A.; Kim, T.; Emrich, W. J.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.; Gerrish, H. P.; Adams, R. B.

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. The foundation provided by development and utilization of a NCPS could enable development of extremely high performance systems. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP).

  6. Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts the manufacturing of aluminum panels that will be used to form the Ares I barrel. The panels are manufacturing process demonstration articles that will undergo testing until perfected. The panels are built by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  7. Cyclin D1 and Ki-67 expression correlates to tumor staging in tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    de Carli, Marina-Lara; Sperandio, Felipe-Fornias; Hanemann, João-Adolfo-Costa; Pereira, Alessandro-Antônio-Costa

    2015-01-01

    Background The immunohistochemical expression of Cyclin D1 and Ki-67 were analyzed in tongue squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), relating them to the clinical and morphological exhibition of these tumors. Material and Methods Twenty-nine patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria; clinical data included gender, age, ethnicity and use of licit drugs such as alcohol and tobacco. The TNM staging and histopathological differentiation grading was assessed for each case. In addition, T1 patients were gathered with T2 patients; and T3 patients were gathered with T4 patients to assemble two distinct groups: (T1/T2) and (T3/T4). Results The mean follow-up time was 24 months and 30% of the patients died as a consequence of the disease, while 23.3% lived with the disease and 46.7% lived lesion-free. T1 and T2 tumors showed statistically lesser Ki-67 and Cyclin D1 staining when compared to T3 and T4 tumors. Conclusions Ki-67 and Cyclin D1 pose as auxiliary tools when determining the progression of tongue SCC at the time of diagnosis. Key words:Carcinoma, squamous cell, cyclin D, immunohistochemistry, Ki-67 antigen, prognosis. PMID:26449430

  8. MICE Staging and Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick

    2010-03-01

    Ionization cooling will be a key technique for a high-intensity Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a high-precision, staged accelerator experiment being performed at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. Its goal is the first demonstration, with 0.1% resolution, of the feasibility of reducing the transverse emittance of a beam of muons by ionization cooling in low-Z absorbers. MICE is being staged in the following steps: I. Creating and characterizing a beam of muons; II. Measuring their emittance; III. Systematic comparison of successive measurements; IV. Inserting absorber; V. Reaccelerating longitudinally; and VI. Complete "10%-cooling" test. Step I is currently in progress with Step II to commence next year; completion of Step VI is anticipated in ˜2012.

  9. Saturn IB Second Stage (S-IVB Stage)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    This cutaway drawing shows the S-IVB stage in its Saturn IB configuration. As a part of the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) 'building block' approach to the Saturn development, the S-IVB stage was utilized in the Saturn IB launch vehicle as a second stage and, later, the Saturn V launch vehicle as a third stage. The stage was powered by a single J-2 engine, initially capable of 200,000 pounds of thrust.

  10. Staged Event Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Hoschek, Wolfgang; Berket, Karlo

    2005-05-30

    Sea is a framework for a Staged Event Architecture, designed around non-blocking asynchronous communication facilities that are decoupled from the threading model chosen by any given application, Components for P networking and in-memory communication are provided. The Sea Java library encapsulates these concepts. Sea is used to easily build efficient and flexible low-level network clients and servers, and in particular as a basic communication substrate for Peer-to-Peer applications.

  11. Staged depressurization system

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, T.L.

    1993-11-02

    A nuclear reactor having a reactor vessel disposed in a containment shell is depressurized in stages using depressurizer valves coupled in fluid communication with the coolant circuit. At least one sparger submerged in the in-containment refueling water storage tank which can be drained into the containment sump communicates between one or more of the valves and an inside of the containment shell. The depressurizer valves are opened in stages, preferably at progressively lower coolant levels and for opening progressively larger flowpaths to effect depressurization through a number of the valves in parallel. The valves can be associated with a pressurizer tank in the containment shell, coupled to a coolant outlet of the reactor. At least one depressurization valve stage openable at a lowest pressure is coupled directly between the coolant circuit and the containment shell. The reactor is disposed in the open sump in the containment shell, and a further valve couples the open sump to a conduit coupling the refueling water storage tank to the coolant circuit for adding water to the coolant circuit, whereby water in the containment shell can be added to the reactor from the open sump. 4 figures.

  12. Staged depressurization system

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Terry L.

    1993-01-01

    A nuclear reactor having a reactor vessel disposed in a containment shell is depressurized in stages using depressurizer valves coupled in fluid communication with the coolant circuit. At least one sparger submerged in the in-containment refueling water storage tank which can be drained into the containment sump communicates between one or more of the valves and an inside of the containment shell. The depressurizer valves are opened in stages, preferably at progressively lower coolant levels and for opening progressively larger flowpaths to effect depressurization through a number of the valves in parallel. The valves can be associated with a pressurizer tank in the containment shell, coupled to a coolant outlet of the reactor. At least one depressurization valve stage openable at a lowest pressure is coupled directly between the coolant circuit and the containment shell. The reactor is disposed in the open sump in the containment shell, and a further valve couples the open sump to a conduit coupling the refueling water storage tank to the coolant circuit for adding water to the coolant circuit, whereby water in the containment shell can be added to the reactor from the open sump.

  13. Staged cascade fluidized bed combustor

    DOEpatents

    Cannon, Joseph N.; De Lucia, David E.; Jackson, William M.; Porter, James H.

    1984-01-01

    A fluid bed combustor comprising a plurality of fluidized bed stages interconnected by downcomers providing controlled solids transfer from stage to stage. Each stage is formed from a number of heat transfer tubes carried by a multiapertured web which passes fluidizing air to upper stages. The combustor cross section is tapered inwardly from the middle towards the top and bottom ends. Sorbent materials, as well as non-volatile solid fuels, are added to the top stages of the combustor, and volatile solid fuels are added at an intermediate stage.

  14. Neutron interferometry with cold stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineeva, Taisiya; Arif, M.; Huber, M. G.; Shahi, C. B.; Clark, C. W.; Cory, D. G.; Nsofini, J.; Sarenac, D.; Pushin, D. A.

    Neutron interferometry (NI) is amongst the most precise methods for characterizing neutron interactions by measuring the relative difference between two neutron paths, one of which contains a sample-of-interest. Because neutrons carry magnetic moment and are deeply penetrating, they are excellent probes to investigate properties of magnetic materials. The advantage of NI is its unique sensitivity which allows to directly measure magnetic and structural transitions in materials. Up to now NI has been sparingly used in material research due to its sensitivity to environmental noise. However, recent successes in implementing Quantum Error Correction principles lead to an improved NI design making it robust against mechanical vibrations. Following these advances, a new user facility at the National Institute for Standards and Technology was built to study condensed matter applications, biology and quantum physics. Incorporating cold sample stage inside NI is the first of its kind experiment which can be carried out on large range of temperatures down to 4K. Upon successful realization, it will open new frontiers to characterize magnetic domains, phase transitions and spin properties in a variety of materials such as, for example, iron-based superconductors and spintronic materials. Supported in part by CERC, CIFAR, NSERC and CREATE.

  15. Technological Advancements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

  16. Research Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    Research advances, a new feature in Journal of Chemical Engineering that brings information about innovations in current areas of research to high school and college science faculty with an intent to provide educators with timely descriptions of latest progress in research that can be integrated into existing courses to update course content and…

  17. Challenges of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Colagrande, Stefano; Inghilesi, Andrea L; Aburas, Sami; Taliani, Gian G; Nardi, Cosimo; Marra, Fabio

    2016-09-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive malignancy, resulting as the third cause of death by cancer each year. The management of patients with HCC is complex, as both the tumour stage and any underlying liver disease must be considered conjointly. Although surveillance by imaging, clinical and biochemical parameters is routinely performed, a lot of patients suffering from cirrhosis have an advanced stage HCC at the first diagnosis. Advanced stage HCC includes heterogeneous groups of patients with different clinical condition and radiological features and sorafenib is the only approved treatment according to Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer. Since the introduction of sorafenib in clinical practice, several phase III clinical trials have failed to demonstrate any superiority over sorafenib in the frontline setting. Loco-regional therapies have also been tested as first line treatment, but their role in advanced HCC is still matter of debate. No single agent or combination therapies have been shown to impact outcomes after sorafenib failure. Therefore this review will focus on the range of experimental therapeutics for patients with advanced HCC and highlights the successes and failures of these treatments as well as areas for future development. Specifics such as dose limiting toxicity and safety profile in patients with liver dysfunction related to the underlying chronic liver disease should be considered when developing therapies in HCC. Finally, robust validated and reproducible surrogate end-points as well as predictive biomarkers should be defined in future randomized trials. PMID:27678348

  18. Challenges of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Colagrande, Stefano; Inghilesi, Andrea L; Aburas, Sami; Taliani, Gian G; Nardi, Cosimo; Marra, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive malignancy, resulting as the third cause of death by cancer each year. The management of patients with HCC is complex, as both the tumour stage and any underlying liver disease must be considered conjointly. Although surveillance by imaging, clinical and biochemical parameters is routinely performed, a lot of patients suffering from cirrhosis have an advanced stage HCC at the first diagnosis. Advanced stage HCC includes heterogeneous groups of patients with different clinical condition and radiological features and sorafenib is the only approved treatment according to Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer. Since the introduction of sorafenib in clinical practice, several phase III clinical trials have failed to demonstrate any superiority over sorafenib in the frontline setting. Loco-regional therapies have also been tested as first line treatment, but their role in advanced HCC is still matter of debate. No single agent or combination therapies have been shown to impact outcomes after sorafenib failure. Therefore this review will focus on the range of experimental therapeutics for patients with advanced HCC and highlights the successes and failures of these treatments as well as areas for future development. Specifics such as dose limiting toxicity and safety profile in patients with liver dysfunction related to the underlying chronic liver disease should be considered when developing therapies in HCC. Finally, robust validated and reproducible surrogate end-points as well as predictive biomarkers should be defined in future randomized trials.

  19. Challenges of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Colagrande, Stefano; Inghilesi, Andrea L; Aburas, Sami; Taliani, Gian G; Nardi, Cosimo; Marra, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive malignancy, resulting as the third cause of death by cancer each year. The management of patients with HCC is complex, as both the tumour stage and any underlying liver disease must be considered conjointly. Although surveillance by imaging, clinical and biochemical parameters is routinely performed, a lot of patients suffering from cirrhosis have an advanced stage HCC at the first diagnosis. Advanced stage HCC includes heterogeneous groups of patients with different clinical condition and radiological features and sorafenib is the only approved treatment according to Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer. Since the introduction of sorafenib in clinical practice, several phase III clinical trials have failed to demonstrate any superiority over sorafenib in the frontline setting. Loco-regional therapies have also been tested as first line treatment, but their role in advanced HCC is still matter of debate. No single agent or combination therapies have been shown to impact outcomes after sorafenib failure. Therefore this review will focus on the range of experimental therapeutics for patients with advanced HCC and highlights the successes and failures of these treatments as well as areas for future development. Specifics such as dose limiting toxicity and safety profile in patients with liver dysfunction related to the underlying chronic liver disease should be considered when developing therapies in HCC. Finally, robust validated and reproducible surrogate end-points as well as predictive biomarkers should be defined in future randomized trials. PMID:27678348

  20. TU-C-12A-09: Modeling Pathologic Response of Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer to Chemo-Radiotherapy Using Quantitative PET/CT Features, Clinical Parameters and Demographics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Chen, W; Kligerman, S; D’Souza, W; Suntharalingam, M; Lu, W; Tan, S; Kim, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop predictive models using quantitative PET/CT features for the evaluation of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. Methods: This study included 20 patients who underwent tri-modality therapy (CRT + surgery) and had {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans before initiation of CRT and 4-6 weeks after completion of CRT but prior to surgery. Four groups of tumor features were examined: (1) conventional PET/CT response measures (SUVmax, tumor diameter, etc.); (2) clinical parameters (TNM stage, histology, etc.) and demographics; (3) spatial-temporal PET features, which characterize tumor SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns, geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT; and (4) all features combined. An optimal feature set was identified with recursive feature selection and cross-validations. Support vector machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR) models were constructed for prediction of pathologic tumor response to CRT, using cross-validations to avoid model over-fitting. Prediction accuracy was assessed via area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and precision was evaluated via confidence intervals (CIs) of AUC. Results: When applied to the 4 groups of tumor features, the LR model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.57 (0.10), 0.73 (0.07), 0.90 (0.06), and 0.90 (0.06). The SVM model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.56 (0.07), 0.60 (0.06), 0.94 (0.02), and 1.00 (no misclassifications). Using spatial-temporal PET features combined with conventional PET/CT measures and clinical parameters, the SVM model achieved very high accuracy (AUC 1.00) and precision (no misclassifications), significantly better than using conventional PET/CT measures or clinical parameters and demographics alone. For groups with a large number of tumor features (groups 3 and 4), the SVM model achieved significantly higher accuracy than the LR model. Conclusion: The SVM model using all features

  1. Dual stage check valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, D. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A dual stage seat valve head arrangement is described which consists of a primary sealing point located between a fixed orifice seat and a valve poppet, and a secondary sealing point between an orifice poppet and a valve poppet. Upstream of the valve orifice is a flexible, convoluted metal diaphragm attached to the orifice poppet. Downstream of the valve orifice, a finger spring exerts a force against the valve poppet, tending to keep the valve in a closed position. The series arrangement of a double seat and poppet is able to tolerate small particle contamination while minimizing chatter by controlling throttling or metering across the secondary seat, thus preserving the primary sealing surface.

  2. Chimpanzee sleep stages.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freemon, F. R.; Mcnew, J. J.; Adey, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    The electroencephalogram and electro-oculogram of two unrestrained juvenile chimpanzees was monitored for 7 consecutive nights using telemetry methods. Of the sleeping time, 23% was spent in the rapid eye movement of REM type of sleep, whereas 8, 4, 15, and 10% were spent in non-REM stages 1 through 4, respectively. Seven to nine periods of REM sleep occurred per night. The average time from the beginning of one REM period to the beginning of the next was approximately 85 min.

  3. Two stages splicing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudaber, Mohammad Hassan; Yusof, Yuhani

    2015-05-01

    The study of the biological process of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) splicing system in a translucent approach was investigated in 2012 by Yusof under the framework of formal language theory. In this work, the concepts of splicing system in two stages as well as splicing languages are mathematically and biologically discussed. Additionally, some theorems based on recognition site factor of initial strings at the existence of two initial strings and two rules are provided via Yusof-Goode (Y-G) approach. Besides, an example is also given in showing the biological meaning of the introduced concept.

  4. Advanced Stage, Increased Lactate Dehydrogenase, and Primary Site, but Not Adolescent Age (≥ 15 Years), Are Associated With an Increased Risk of Treatment Failure in Children and Adolescents With Mature B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Results of the FAB LMB 96 Study

    PubMed Central

    Cairo, Mitchell S.; Sposto, Richard; Gerrard, Mary; Auperin, Anne; Goldman, Stanton C.; Harrison, Lauren; Pinkerton, Ross; Raphael, Martine; McCarthy, Keith; Perkins, Sherrie L.; Patte, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Adolescents (age 15 to 21 years) compared with younger children with mature B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) have been historically considered to have an inferior prognosis. We therefore analyzed the impact of age and other diagnostic factors on the risk of treatment failure in children and adolescents treated on the French-American-British Mature B-Cell Lymphoma 96 (FAB LMB 96) trial. Patients and Methods Patients were divided by risk: group A (limited), group B (intermediate), and group C (advanced), as previously described. Prognostic factors analyzed for event-free survival (EFS) included age (< 15 v ≥ 15 years), stage (I/II v III/IV), primary site, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), bone marrow/CNS (BM/CNS) involvement, and histology (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma v mediastinal B-cell lymphoma v Burkitt lymphoma or Burkitt-like lymphoma). Results The 3-year EFS for the whole cohort was 88% ± 1%. Age was not associated as a risk factor for increased treatment failure in either univariate analysis (P = .15) or multivariate analysis (P = .58). Increased LDH (≥ 2 × upper limit of normal [ULN] v < 2 × ULN), primary site, and BM-positive/CNS-positive disease were all independent risk factors associated with a significant increase in treatment failure rate (relative risk, 2.0; P < .001, P < .012, and P < .001, respectively). Conclusion LDH level at diagnosis, mediastinal disease, and combined BM-positive/CNS-positive involvement are independent risk factors in children with mature B-cell NHL. Future studies should be developed to identify specific therapeutic strategies (immunotherapy) to overcome these risk factors and to identify the biologic basis associated with these prognostic factors in children with mature B-cell NHL. PMID:22215753

  5. Automatic age-related macular degeneration detection and staging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Grinsven, Mark J. J. P.; Lechanteur, Yara T. E.; van de Ven, Johannes P. H.; van Ginneken, Bram; Theelen, Thomas; Sánchez, Clara I.

    2013-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative disorder of the central part of the retina, which mainly affects older people and leads to permanent loss of vision in advanced stages of the disease. AMD grading of non-advanced AMD patients allows risk assessment for the development of advanced AMD and enables timely treatment of patients, to prevent vision loss. AMD grading is currently performed manually on color fundus images, which is time consuming and expensive. In this paper, we propose a supervised classification method to distinguish patients at high risk to develop advanced AMD from low risk patients and provide an exact AMD stage determination. The method is based on the analysis of the number and size of drusen on color fundus images, as drusen are the early characteristics of AMD. An automatic drusen detection algorithm is used to detect all drusen. A weighted histogram of the detected drusen is constructed to summarize the drusen extension and size and fed into a random forest classifier in order to separate low risk from high risk patients and to allow exact AMD stage determination. Experiments showed that the proposed method achieved similar performance as human observers in distinguishing low risk from high risk AMD patients, obtaining areas under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve of 0.929 and 0.934. A weighted kappa agreement of 0.641 and 0.622 versus two observers were obtained for AMD stage evaluation. Our method allows for quick and reliable AMD staging at low costs.

  6. Advanced nuclear rocket engine mission analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsthaler, J.; Farbman, G.; Sulmeisters, T.; Buden, D.; Harris, P.

    1987-12-01

    The use of a derivative of the NERVA engine developed from 1955 to 1973 was evluated for potential application to Air Force orbital transfer and maneuvering missions in the time period 1995 to 2020. The NERVA stge was found to have lower life cycle costs (LCC) than an advanced chemical stage for performing low earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous orbit (GEO0 missions at any level of activity greater than three missions per year. It had lower life cycle costs than a high performance nuclear electric engine at any level of LEO to GEO mission activity. An examination of all unmanned orbital transfer and maneuvering missions from the Space Transportation Architecture study (STAS 111-3) indicated a LCC advantage for the NERVA stage over the advanced chemical stage of fifteen million dollars. The cost advanced accured from both the orbital transfer and maneuvering missions. Parametric analyses showed that the specific impulse of the NERVA stage and the cost of delivering material to low earth orbit were the most significant factors in the LCC advantage over the chemical stage. Lower development costs and a higher thrust gave the NERVA engine an LCC advantage over the nuclear electric stage. An examination of technical data from the Rover/NERVA program indicated that development of the NERVA stage has a low technical risk, and the potential for high reliability and safe operation. The data indicated the NERVA engine had a great flexibility which would permit a single stage to perform all Air Force missions.

  7. Two-gene signature improves the discriminatory power of IASLC/ATS/ERS classification to predict the survival of patients with early-stage lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yifeng; Hou, Likun; Yang, Yu; Xie, Huikang; Yang, Yang; Li, Zhigang; Zhao, Heng; Gao, Wen; Su, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigated the contribution of a gene expression–based signature (composed of BAG1, BRCA1, CDC6, CDK2AP1, ERBB3, FUT3, IL11, LCK, RND3, SH3BGR) to survival prediction for early-stage lung adenocarcinoma categorized by the new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/the American Thoracic Society (ATS)/the European Respiratory Society (ERS) classification. We also aimed to verify whether gene signature improves the risk discrimination of IASLC/ATS/ERS classification in early-stage lung adenocarcinoma. Patients and methods Total RNA was extracted from 93 patients with pathologically confirmed TNM stage Ia and Ib lung adenocarcinoma. The mRNA expression levels of ten genes in the signature (BAG1, BRCA1, CDC6, CDK2AP1, ERBB3, FUT3, IL11, LCK, RND3, and SH3BGR) were detected using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Each patient was categorized according to the new IASLC/ATS/ERS classification by accessing hematoxylin–eosin-stained slides. The corresponding Kaplan–Meier survival analysis by the log-rank statistic, multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling, and c-index calculation were conducted using the programming language R (Version 2.15.1) with the “risksetROC” package. Results The multivariate analysis demonstrated that the risk factor of the ten-gene expression signature can significantly improve the discriminatory value of TNM staging in survival prediction, but not the value of the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification. Further analysis suggested that only BRCA1 and ERBB3 in the signature were independent risk factors after adjusting for the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification by Cox regression. A new algorithm of the two-gene expression signature containing BRCA1 and ERBB3 was generated. Adding the two-gene signature into the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification model further improved the discriminatory c-statistic from 0.728 to 0.756. Conclusion The two-gene signature composed of BRCA1 and ERBB3 was an independent

  8. Changes in Brain Function in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Who Are Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Polyembryoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Teratoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  9. Methoxyamine, Cisplatin, and Pemetrexed Disodium in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Mesothelioma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Mesothelioma That Is Refractory to Cisplatin and Pemetrexed

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Advanced Peritoneal Malignant Mesothelioma; Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Peritoneal Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Pleural Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Pleural Mesothelioma; Thymoma

  10. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  11. Advanced computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Advanced concepts in hardware, software and algorithms are being pursued for application in next generation space computers and for ground based analysis of space data. The research program focuses on massively parallel computation and neural networks, as well as optical processing and optical networking which are discussed under photonics. Also included are theoretical programs in neural and nonlinear science, and device development for magnetic and ferroelectric memories.

  12. Advanced Nanoemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryd, Michael M.; Mason, Thomas G.

    2012-05-01

    Recent advances in the growing field of nanoemulsions are opening up new applications in many areas such as pharmaceuticals, foods, and cosmetics. Moreover, highly controlled nanoemulsions can also serve as excellent model systems for investigating basic scientific questions about soft matter. Here, we highlight some of the most recent developments in nanoemulsions, focusing on methods of formation, surface modification, material properties, and characterization. These developments provide insight into the substantial advantages that nanoemulsions can offer over their microscale emulsion counterparts.

  13. Whole organism blood stage vaccines against malaria.

    PubMed

    Stanisic, Danielle I; Good, Michael F

    2015-12-22

    Despite a century of research focused on the development and implementation of effective control strategies, infection with the malaria parasite continues to result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. An effective malaria vaccine is considered by many to be the definitive solution. Yet, after decades of research, we are still without a vaccine that is capable of inducing robust, long lasting protection in naturally exposed individuals. Extensive sub-unit vaccine development focused on the blood stage of the malaria parasite has thus far yielded disappointing results. There is now a renewed focus on whole parasite vaccine strategies, particularly as they may overcome some of the inherent weaknesses deemed to be associated with the sub-unit approach. This review discusses the whole parasite vaccine strategy focusing on the blood stage of the malaria parasite, with an emphasis on recent advances and challenges in the development of killed and live attenuated vaccines.

  14. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  15. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and duodenum. The bile duct and pancreatic duct are also shown. Stage IIA pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby tissue and organs ...

  16. Ares I First Stage Propulsion System Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priskos, Alex S.

    2010-01-01

    With the retirement of the Space Shuttle inevitable, the US is faced with the need to loft a reliable cost-effective, technologically viable solution to bring the nation s fleet of spacecraft back up to industry standard. It must not only support the International Space Station (ISS), it must also be capable of supporting human exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). NASA created the Constellation Program to develop a new fleet including the launch vehicles, the spacecraft, and the mission architecture to meet those objectives. The Ares First Stage Team is tasked with developing a propulsion system capable of safely, dependably and repeatedly lofting that new fleet. To minimize technical risks and development costs, the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) of Shuttle were used as a starting point in the design and production of a new first stage element. While the first stage will provide the foundation, the structural backbone, power, and control for launch, the new propulsive element will also provide a greater total impulse to loft a safer, more powerful, fleet of space flight vehicles. Substantial design and system upgrades were required to meet the mass and trajectory requisites of the new fleet. Noteworthy innovations and design features include new forward structures, new propellant grain geometry, a new internal insulation system, and a state-of-the art avionics system. Additional advances were in materials and composite structures development, case bond liners, and thermal protection systems. Significant progress has been made in the design, development and testing of the propulsion and avionics systems for the new first stage element. Challenges, such as those anticipated with thrust oscillation, have been better characterized, and are being effectively mitigated. The test firing of the first development motor (DM-1) was a success that validated much of the engineering development to date. Substantive data has been collected and analyzed, allowing the Ares

  17. Study of blade aspect ratio on a compressor front stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behlke, R. F.; Brooky, J. D.; Canal, E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A single stage, low aspect ratio, compressor with a 442.0 m/sec (1450 ft/sec) tip speed and a 0.597 hub/tip ratio typical of an advanced core compressor front stage was tested. The test stage incorporated an inlet duct which was representative of an engine transition duct between fan and high pressure compressors. At design speed, the rotor stator stage achieved a peak adiabatic efficiency of 86.6 percent at a flow of 44.35 kg/sec (97.8 lbm/sec) and a pressure ratio of 1.8. Surge margin was 12.5 percent from the peak stage efficiency point.

  18. The Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J.; Hickman, Robert R.; Broadway, Jeramie W.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Belvin, Anthony D.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Scott, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) development efforts in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability and performance potential of NTP systems. For example, Project Rover (1955 - 1973) completed 22 high power rocket reactor tests. Peak performances included operating at an average hydrogen exhaust temperature of 2550 K and a peak fuel power density of 5200 MW/m3 (Pewee test), operating at a thrust of 930 kN (Phoebus-2A test), and operating for 62.7 minutes in a single burn (NRX-A6 test). Results from Project Rover indicated that an NTP system with a high thrust-to-weight ratio and a specific impulse greater than 900 s would be feasible. Excellent results were also obtained by the former Soviet Union. Although historical programs had promising results, many factors would affect the development of a 21st century nuclear thermal rocket (NTR). Test facilities built in the US during Project Rover no longer exist. However, advances in analytical techniques, the ability to utilize or adapt existing facilities and infrastructure, and the ability to develop a limited number of new test facilities may enable affordable development, qualification, and utilization of a Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS). Bead-loaded graphite fuel was utilized throughout the Rover/NERVA program, and coated graphite composite fuel (tested in the Nuclear Furnace) and cermet fuel both show potential for even higher performance than that demonstrated in the Rover/NERVA engine tests.. NASA's NCPS project was initiated in October, 2011, with the goal of assessing the affordability and viability of an NCPS. FY 2014 activities are focused on fabrication and test (non-nuclear) of both coated graphite composite fuel elements and cermet fuel elements. Additional activities include developing a pre-conceptual design of the NCPS stage and evaluating affordable strategies for NCPS development, qualification, and utilization. NCPS stage designs are focused on supporting human Mars

  19. Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Biwer, C.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, Sukanta; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Buonanno, A.; Cadonati, L.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chen, Y.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Collette, C.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; D´ıaz, M.; Di Palma, I.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferreira, E. C.; Fisher, R. P.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gaonkar, S.; Gehrels, N.; Gergely, L. Á.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Hee, S.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lormand, M.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meadors, G. D.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, J. D.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second-generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA, USA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in Initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than Initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid and high frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

  20. Lung cancer staging now and in the future.

    PubMed

    Liam, Chong-Kin; Andarini, Sita; Lee, Pyng; Ho, James Chung-Man; Chau, Ngo Quy; Tscheikuna, Jamsak

    2015-05-01

    For a long time lung cancer was associated with a fatalistic approach by healthcare professionals. In recent years, advances in imaging, improved diagnostic techniques and more effective treatment modalities are reasons for optimism. Accurate lung cancer staging is vitally important because treatment options and prognosis differ significantly by stage. The staging algorithm should include a contrast computed tomography (CT) of the chest and the upper abdomen including adrenals, positron emission tomography/CT for staging the mediastinum and to rule out extrathoracic metastasis in patients considered for surgical resection, endosonography-guided needle sampling procedure replacing mediastinoscopy for near complete mediastinal staging, and brain imaging as clinically indicated. Applicability of evidence-based guidelines for staging of lung cancer depends on the available expertise and level of resources and is directly impacted by financial issues. Considering the diversity of healthcare infrastructure and economic performance of Asian countries, optimal and cost-effective use of staging methods appropriate to the available resources is prudent. The pulmonologist plays a central role in the multidisciplinary approach to lung cancer diagnosis, staging and management. Regional respiratory societies such as the Asian Pacific Society of Respirology should work with national respiratory societies to strive for uniform standards of care. For developing countries, a minimum set of care standards should be formulated. Cost-effective delivery of optimal care for lung cancer patients, including staging within the various healthcare systems, should be encouraged and most importantly, tobacco control implementation should receive an absolute priority status in all countries in Asia.

  1. A modified duodenal neuroendocrine tumor staging schema better defines the risk of lymph node metastasis and disease-free survival.

    PubMed

    Kachare, Swapnil D; Liner, Kendall R; Vohra, Nasreen A; Zervos, Emmanuel E; Fitzgerald, Timothy L

    2014-08-01

    Duodenal neuroendocrine tumors are rare but increasing in incidence and optimal management is hindered by lack of duodenum-specific staging. Duodenal carcinoids were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results tumor registry. Depth of invasion was defined as limited to lamina propria (LP), invading muscularis propria (MP), through muscularis propria (TMP), and through serosa (S). Nine hundred forty-nine patients were identified with majorities being male (57%), white (70%), and node-negative (87%). Tumor size (cm) was less than 1, 47 per cent; 1 to 2, 35 per cent; and greater than 2, 8 per cent with 76 per cent LP. Lymph node (LN) involvement was associated with age, depth of invasion (LP 4%, MP 28%, TMP 54%, and S 57%) and size (less than 1 cm, 3%; 1 to 2 cm, 13%; and greater than 2 cm, 40%). Using the current T staging, LN involvement was: T1 (LP) 2 per cent, T2 (MP or greater than 1 cm) 13 per cent, T3 (TMP) 54 per cent, and T4 (S) 57 per cent. We reclassified current T1 to T1a and current T2 stage to T1b (1 to 2 cm and LP) and T2 (MP or greater than 2 cm). LN metastasis for T1b tumors was 4.7 per cent compared with 20.8 per cent for T2. The resulting TNM classification better defines 5-year disease-specific survival. Our modified staging schema identifies a low-risk group (T1a and T1b) that may be considered for local therapy.

  2. Utility of peritoneal washing cytology in staging and prognosis of ovarian and fallopian tube neoplasms: a 10-year retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Whitney; Madan, Rashna; O'Neil, Maura; Tawfik, Ossama W; Fan, Fang

    2016-06-01

    The prognostic significance of peritoneal washing cytology in gynecologic neoplasms is controversial. The presence of neoplastic cells in peritoneal washings is currently part of the Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics and American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging systems in cases of ovarian and fallopian tube neoplasms without metastasis beyond the pelvis. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed all cases of ovarian and fallopian tube neoplasms in which cytologic studies were performed. The utility of cytology in tumor staging and the relationship between cytology results and patient outcome are studied. All cases of ovarian and fallopian tube neoplasms in our institution between July 2002 and July 2012 were reviewed. Primary tumor characteristics including type and pelvic extension were collected, categorized, and correlated with peritoneal washing cytology. Final tumor staging was reviewed and the impact of positive cytology was evaluated. A total of 120 cases of ovarian and fallopian tube neoplasms without extrapelvic metastasis were identified within the study period. Peritoneal washing cytology was positive in 24% (29/120) of neoplasms and upstaged the tumor 83% (24/29) of the time when positive. Overall, 20% (24/120) of reviewed cases were upstaged based on positive cytology results. Peritoneal washing cytology remains a useful staging tool for ovarian and fallopian tube neoplasms limited to the pelvic cavity. Positive cytology results in upstaging in a significant proportion of the cases regardless of the tumor type. A larger study is needed to analyze follow-up data to determine if upstaging based on positive cytology adversely affects outcome. PMID:27180061

  3. Ares I Upper Stage Parachute Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. In this HD video image, the first stage reentry parachute drop test is conducted at the Yuma, Arizona proving ground. The parachute tests demonstrated a three-stage deployment sequence that included the use of an Orbiter drag chute to properly stage the unfurling of the main chute. The parachute recovery system for Orion will be similar to the system used for Apollo command module landings and include two drogue, three pilot, and three main parachutes. (Highest resolution available)

  4. Ares I Upper Stage Parachute Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. In this HD video image, the first stage reentry parachute drop test is conducted at the Yuma, Arizona proving ground. The parachute tests demonstrated a three-stage deployment sequence that included the use of an Orbiter drag chute to properly stage the unfurling of the main chute. The parachute recovery system for Orion will be similar to the system used for Apollo command module landings and include two drogue, three pilot, and three main parachutes. (Highest resolution available)

  5. Bevacizumab, Cisplatin, Radiation Therapy, and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Stage IIB, Stage III, Stage IVA, or Stage IVB Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-21

    Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx

  6. Oblimersen Sodium and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-10-11

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  7. Chemotherapy with DMXAA (5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid) in combination with CI-1010 (1H-imidazole-1-ethanol,alpha-[[(2-bromoethyl)amino]methyl]-2-nitro-,mon o-hydrobromide (R isomer)) against advanced stage murine colon carcinoma 26.

    PubMed

    Vincent, P; Roberts, B; Elliott, W; Leopold, W

    1997-01-01

    Because an enhanced therapeutic gain might be expected with co-administration of a hypoxic cell selective cytotoxin and a compound that induces hemorrhagic necrosis in tumors, the combination of CI-1010 (a potent bioreductive hypoxia selective cyto toxin) and 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA) has been evaluated against advanced stage (>150 mg) murine colon carcinoma 26 (C26). CI-1010 and DMXAA were administered intraperitoneally over a range of toxic to ineffective doses as single agents and in combination to adult BALB/c x DBA/2 F1 hybrid mice bearing s.c. implants of C26. Both CI-1010 and DMXAA were ineffective as single agents, but regimens combining these two agents were highly active. The administration of DMXAA at 20 mg/kg/inj on days 9, 13, and 17 and CI-1010 at 65 mg/kg/inj on days 9-17 resulted in 60% of the animals tumor free on day 92 of the study. The remaining animals that were not tumor free survivors achieved a delay in tumor growth of 22.4 days. However, this treatment regimen was also considered toxic resulting in 2/10 treatment related deaths. Modification of the CI-1010 treatment schedule to intermittent delivery 24 h after each scheduled dose of DMXAA reduced treatment related toxicity while retaining efficacy. On this schedule the combination of CI-1010 (95 mg/kg/inj) given 24 h after DMXAA (20 mg/kg/inj) on days 9, 13, and 17 resulted in 60% of the treated animals tumor free on day 98 of the study. Treatment failures experienced a tumor growth delay of 11.6 days. Combination chemotherapy with CI-1010 and DMXAA was ineffective when DMXAA was administered 1 h prior to CI-1010, simultaneously with CI-1010, or 1 h after the administration of CI-1010. These results suggest that an enhanced therapeutic interaction between CI-1010 and DMXAA is achievable in vivo and that this interaction requires the development of substantial DMXAA induced tumor hypoxia prior to administration of CI-1010.

  8. Advanced small launch vehicle study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reins, G. E.; Alvis, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to determine the most economical (lowest cost/launch) approach for the development of an advanced small launch vehicle (ASLV) for use over the next decade. The ASLV design objective was to place a 340 kg (750 lb) payload into a 556 km (300 n.mi.) circular orbit when launched due east from Wallops Island, Virginia. The investigation encompassed improvements to the current Scout launch vehicle; use of existing military and NASA launch vehicle stages; and new, optionally staged vehicles. Staging analyses included use of liquid, solid, and hybrid propellants. Improvements in guidance, controls, interstages, telemetry, and payload shroud were also considered. It was concluded that the most economical approach is to progressively improve the Scout launch vehicle in three phased steps which are discussed.

  9. SEOM clinical guidelines in early-stage breast cancer 2015.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Saenz, J A; Bermejo, B; Estevez, L G; Palomo, A G; Gonzalez-Farre, X; Margeli, M; Pernas, S; Servitja, S; Rodriguez, C A; Ciruelos, E

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer is a major public health problem. Despite remarkable advances in early diagnosis and treatment, one in three women may have metastases since diagnosis. Better understanding of prognostic and predictive factors allows us to select the most appropriate adjuvant therapy in each patient. In these guidelines, we summarize current evidence for the medical management of early-stage breast cancer.

  10. [Advanced pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis].

    PubMed

    Triebel, H J; von Hülst, M; Schofer, M

    1987-09-01

    A severe course of microlithiasis alveolaris pulmonum in a 28-year old patient is described. The disease, which had progressed to a very advanced stage at the time of examination, produced in the plain radiograph of the thorax an extensive, homogeneous, ground-glass like shadow of practically all organs of the thorax. The typical miliary (spot-like) shadow ("sandstorm lung") is visible only in the lateral and apical parts of the lung. CT revealed massive calcareous deposits which increased in craniocaudal and ventrodorsal direction. Bullous metaplasia of the lung was particularly striking in the apical region. No effective therapy is known so far. A combined heart and lung transplantation might be the only therapy that could prolong the patient's life. PMID:3659783

  11. Advanced expander test bed program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccardi, D. P.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Space Chemical Engine Technology Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine and advanced component technologies applicable to space engines as well as launch vehicle upper stage engines. The AETB will be used to validate the high-pressure expander cycle concept, investigate system interactions, and conduct investigations of advanced mission focused components and new health monitoring techniques in an engine system environment. The split expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust. Contract work began 27 Apr. 1990. During 1992, a major milestone was achieved with the review of the final design of the oxidizer turbopump in Sep. 1992.

  12. Correlation of the Serum Level of Carcinoembryonic Antigen and Prolactin with Different Stages of Colorectal Carcinoma According to Dukes' Staging.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M R; Sheikh, S H; Lima, I J; Islam, M R; Faisal, M; Islam, M S; Faruk, M O; Jalal, M T

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is well established tumor marker for colorectal cancers worldwide. Recent studies show that serum prolactin level is also raised in colorectal cancers. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the correlation of serum CEA and Prolactin with Dukes' staging of colorectal carcinomas. Between January 2013 and June 2013, Serum CEA and Serum Prolactin were measured by radioimmunoassay from 103 patients who were histopathologically diagnosed as colorectal carcinomas. Evaluation of the stages of the colorectal cancers was done on the basis of preoperative investigations and postoperative histopathology and correlated with Preoperative Serum CEA and Serum Prolactin. Results were presented as median value, range and percentage. Male to female ratio was 1.4:1 with median age of 42.26 years (range 17-78 years). Most of the patients in this series presented with carcinoma rectum (42%). Most of the patients (52%) were found in Dukes' stage C and 27% and 15% cases were found as Dukes' stage B and Dukes' stage D respectively. Stage of the disease is directly proportionate to percentage of the patient with high serum prolactin except early stage (Dukes' A-50%, Dukes' B-28.6%, Dukes' C-33.3% & Dukes' D-46.7%). Similarly serum CEA level is directly proportionate to tumor stage (Dukes' A-0%, Dukes' B-32%, Dukes' C-40.7% & Dukes' D-74.7%). A preoperative high serum CEA value suggests advanced disease either locally or with distant metastasis. In contrast preoperative high serum prolactin (hyperprolactinaemia) did not suggest advanced disease as it can be elevated even in early stage of disease. Serum CEA and Serum Prolactin both are valuable tumor markers but serum CEA could not be replaced by serum Prolactin. Serum Prolactin may be a helpful marker in earlier stages of the colorectal cancer.

  13. Advanced Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Synchrony, developed by St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) is an advanced state-of-the-art implantable pacemaker that closely matches the natural rhythm of the heart. The companion element of the Synchrony Pacemaker System is the Programmer Analyzer APS-II which allows a doctor to reprogram and fine tune the pacemaker to each user's special requirements without surgery. The two-way communications capability that allows the physician to instruct and query the pacemaker is accomplished by bidirectional telemetry. APS-II features 28 pacing functions and thousands of programming combinations to accommodate diverse lifestyles. Microprocessor unit also records and stores pertinent patient data up to a year.

  14. Melanoma staging: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Forschner, Andrea; Eigentler, Thomas Kurt; Pflugfelder, Annette; Leiter, Ulrike; Weide, Benjamin; Held, Laura; Meier, Friedegund; Garbe, Claus

    2010-01-01

    The value of staging examinations remains controversial for the initial staging in melanoma patients at the time of the primary diagnosis and for surveillance. Issues concerning tumor recurrences and progression must be discussed separately for different risk groups. For low-risk patients (stage IA; tumor thickness less than 1 mm), staging examinations like sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB), blood tests, or imaging can generally be abandoned. Baseline staging with simple techniques is at the discretion of the physician. In intermediate-risk patients (stages IB and IIA), an initial staging examination involving SLNB and computed tomography (CT) scans is recommended. Further follow-up may be restricted to physical examinations, blood tests of tumor marker protein S100beta, and to lymph node ultrasonography. If findings are suspicious, further imaging procedures may be involved. In high-risk patients (stages IIB to III), an initial staging examination with CT is recommended, and regular follow-up every 6 months with whole body imaging by CT or magnetic resonance imaging seems useful. Physical examinations, blood tests of tumor marker protein S100beta, and lymph node ultrasound imaging should be routine. This intense follow-up may enable surgical treatments with complete removal of all recognizable metastases in about 15% to 25% of patients and improve their prognosis. The risk of recurrence or tumor progression is very high in stage IV patients, and their management is individualized. PMID:20541679

  15. Advanced hybrid gasification facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowski, R.S.; Skinner, W.H.; Johnson, S.A.; Dixit, V.B.

    1993-08-01

    The objective of this procurement is to provide a test facility to support early commercialization of advanced fixed-bed coal gasification technology for electric power generation applications. The proprietary CRS Sirrine Engineers, Inc. PyGas{trademark} staged gasifier has been selected as the initial gasifier to be developed under this program. The gasifier is expected to avoid agglomeration when used on caking coals. It is also being designed to crack tar vapors and ammonia, and to provide an environment in which volatilized alkali may react with aluminosilicates in the coal ash thereby minimizing their concentration in the hot raw coal gas passing through the system to the gas turbine. This paper describes a novel, staged, airblown, fixed-bed gasifier designed to solve both through the incorporation of pyrolysis (carbonization) with gasification. It employs a pyrolyzer (carbonizer) to avoid sticky coal agglomeration which occurs in a fixed-bed process when coal is gradually heated through the 400{degrees}F to 900{degrees}F range. In a pyrolyzer, the coal is rapidly heated such that coal tar is immediately vaporized. Gaseous tars are then thermally cracked prior to the completion of the gasification process. During the subsequent endothermic gasification reactions, volatilized alkali can be chemically bound to aluminosilicates in (or added to) the ash. To reduce NOx from fuel home nitrogen, moisture is minimized to control ammonia generation, and HCN in the upper gasifier region is partially oxidized to NO which reacts with NH3/HCN to form N2.

  16. Advanced centrifugal contactor development

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuth, S.F.; Jubin, R.T.; Ladd, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), compact centrifugal contactors were designed and prototypes were built for the Breeder Reprocessing Engineering Test (BRET) facility. These contactors were designed for a nominal throughput of 0.1 metric tons of heavy metal per day. While construction of BRET has been put on indefinite hold, development of the 5.5-cm-diam rotor centrifugal contactors has advanced due to their broad applicability in other areas of reprocessing. Development has been concentrated in three areas: (1) mass transfers, (2) hydraulics, and (3) fabrication. Mass transfer development has involved determining how the stage efficiency is affected by the rotor speed, phase ratio, and feed flow rate. Hydraulic efforts have focused on the cascade operation with individual stage failures. Fabrication development has resulted in reducing the number of rotor components from seven to four. This paper discusses the results of these development efforts. 20 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Status Report on Nuclear Stage Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Paul G.; Harris, Ronald J.

    1970-01-01

    This status report on nuclear stage definition should convey the message that a comprehensive analysis is underway, embracing many vehicle concepts and the full range of expected RNS operations. Flexible use in the future space program is one objective; economy and ease of operations are also major goals. Not until details unfold in the several mission areas and in definitions of interrelated systems can the RNS studies be narrowed down to fewer alternatives. Consequently, the current phase of the NSSD study is emphasizing (1) in-space operations, especially as they are affected by aftercooling and the radiation environment of the stage, and (2) RNS concepts in which the unique features of nuclear propulsion are utilized or designed around. Studies to date indicate that significant benefits can be realized through use of an RNS in the missions of the 1980's. Tn the broader context of technology advancement and foundation-building for later decades, the development of a reusable nuclear stage is highly desirable. The next year's efforts will, we trust, bring us much nearer to a full understanding of the RNS and its role in the future space program.

  18. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2013-04-16

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  19. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2014-05-20

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  20. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2012-09-11

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  1. Staged Repository Development Programmes

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, T

    2003-10-01

    Programs to manage and ultimately dispose of high-level radioactive wastes are unique from scientific and technological as well as socio-political aspects. From a scientific and technological perspective, high-level radioactive wastes remain potentially hazardous for geological time periods-many millennia-and scientific and technological programs must be put in place that result in a system that provides high confidence that the wastes will be isolated from the accessible environment for these many thousands of years. Of course, ''proof'' in the classical sense is not possible at the outset, since the performance of the system can only be known with assurance, if ever, after the waste has been emplaced for those geological time periods. Adding to this challenge, many uncertainties exist in both the natural and engineered systems that are intended to isolate the wastes, and some of the uncertainties will remain regardless of the time and expense in attempting to characterize the system and assess its performance. What was perhaps underappreciated in the early days of waste management and repository program development were the unique and intense reactions that the institutional, political, and public bodies would have to repository program development, particularly in programs attempting to identify and then select sites for characterization, design, licensing, and ultimate development. Reactions in most nations were strong, focused, unrelenting, and often successful in hindering, derailing, and even stopping national repository programs. The reasons for such reactions and the measures to successfully respond to them are still evolving and continue to be the focus of many national program and political leaders. Adaptive Staging suggests an approach to repository program development that reflects the unique challenges associated with the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The step-wise, incremental, learn-as-you-go approach is intended to maximize the

  2. Advanced rotorcraft transmission program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program is an Army-funded, joint Army/NASA program to develop and demonstrate lightweight, quiet, durable drivetrain systems for next generation rotorcraft. ART addresses the drivetrain requirements of two distinct next generation aircraft classes: Future Air Attack Vehicle, a 10,000 to 20,000 lb. aircraft capable of undertaking tactical support and air-to-air missions; and Advanced Cargo Aircraft, a 60,000 to 80,000 lb. aircraft capable of heavy life field support operations. Both tiltrotor and more conventional helicopter configurations are included in the ART program. Specific objectives of ART include reduction of drivetrain weight by 25 percent compared to baseline state-of-the-art drive systems configured and sized for the next generation aircraft, reduction of noise level at the transmission source by 10 dB relative to a suitably sized and configured baseline, and attainment of at least a 5000 hr mean-time-between-removal. The technical approach for achieving the ART goals includes application of the latest available component, material, and lubrication technology to advanced concept drivetrains that utilize new ideas in gear configuration, transmission layout, and airframe/drivetrain integration. To date, candidate drivetrain systems were carried to a conceptual design stage, and tradeoff studies were conducted resulting in selection of an ART transmission configuration for each of the four contractors. The final selection was based on comparative weight, noise, and reliability studies. A description of each of the selected ART designs is included. Preliminary design of each of the four selected ART transmission was completed, as have mission impact studies wherein comparisons of aircraft mission performance and life cycle costs are undertaken for the next generation aircraft with ART and with the baseline transmission.

  3. Four stages of a scientific discipline; four types of scientist.

    PubMed

    Shneider, Alexander M

    2009-05-01

    In this article I propose the classification of the evolutionary stages that a scientific discipline evolves through and the type of scientists that are the most productive at each stage. I believe that each scientific discipline evolves sequentially through four stages. Scientists at stage one introduce new objects and phenomena as subject matter for a new scientific discipline. To do this they have to introduce a new language adequately describing the subject matter. At stage two, scientists develop a toolbox of methods and techniques for the new discipline. Owing to this advancement in methodology, the spectrum of objects and phenomena that fall into the realm of the new science are further understood at this stage. Most of the specific knowledge is generated at the third stage, at which the highest number of original research publications is generated. The majority of third-stage investigation is based on the initial application of new research methods to objects and/or phenomena. The purpose of the fourth stage is to maintain and pass on scientific knowledge generated during the first three stages. Groundbreaking new discoveries are not made at this stage. However, new ways to present scientific information are generated, and crucial revisions are often made of the role of the discipline within the constantly evolving scientific environment. The very nature of each stage determines the optimal psychological type and modus operandi of the scientist operating within it. Thus, it is not only the talent and devotion of scientists that determines whether they are capable of contributing substantially but, rather, whether they have the 'right type' of talent for the chosen scientific discipline at that time. Understanding the four different evolutionary stages of a scientific discipline might be instrumental for many scientists in optimizing their career path, in addition to being useful in assembling scientific teams, precluding conflicts and maximizing

  4. Advanced manned earth-to-orbit vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Charles H.

    1986-10-01

    Advanced manned launch vehicle concepts which are designed to meet the space transportation architecture and mission needs for the early 21st century are described. Concepts are described which are based both on modest (evolutionary) and revolutionary advancements in performance technologies but with emphasis on defining operations cost. Design options feature fully reusable, vertical-takeoff, horizontal-landing, rocket-powered concepts and include a variety of possible staging arrangements depending on the desired mission emphasis and the available technologies.

  5. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer

  6. Second stage gasifier in staged gasification and integrated process

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guohai; Vimalchand, Pannalal; Peng, Wan Wang

    2015-10-06

    A second stage gasification unit in a staged gasification integrated process flow scheme and operating methods are disclosed to gasify a wide range of low reactivity fuels. The inclusion of second stage gasification unit operating at high temperatures closer to ash fusion temperatures in the bed provides sufficient flexibility in unit configurations, operating conditions and methods to achieve an overall carbon conversion of over 95% for low reactivity materials such as bituminous and anthracite coals, petroleum residues and coke. The second stage gasification unit includes a stationary fluidized bed gasifier operating with a sufficiently turbulent bed of predefined inert bed material with lean char carbon content. The second stage gasifier fluidized bed is operated at relatively high temperatures up to 1400.degree. C. Steam and oxidant mixture can be injected to further increase the freeboard region operating temperature in the range of approximately from 50 to 100.degree. C. above the bed temperature.

  7. Advanced stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Arnulf

    1983-03-01

    Toroidal confinement of a plasma by an external magnetic field is not compatible with axisymmetry, in contrast to confinement by the pinch effect of induced electric currents as in a tokomak or by the reversed field pinch configuration. The existence of magnetic surfaces throughout the region in which grad p ≠ 0 is therefore not guaranteed in such configurations, though it is necessary for MHD-equilibrium when the lines of force possess a finite twist (or "rotational transform"). These twisted equilibria are called stellarators. The other type of external confinement requires all lines of force to be closed upon themselves and p to be function of the well defined quantity Q = φ d l/ B only. The resulting "bumpy" tori are sometimes also referred to as being M + S like. By discussing specific examples it is shown that stellarator configurations exist which retain as much as possible the properties of M + S like configurations, combine these with the magnetic well, and with an approximation to the isodynamic requirement of D. Palumbo. These so-called Advanced Stellarators shown an improvement in predicted particle confinement and beta-limit compared to the classical stellarators. They can also be viewed as forming a system of linked stabilized mirrors of small mirror ratio. These fields can be produced by modular coils. A prototype of such a configuration is being designed by the stellarator division of IPP under the name of Wendelstein VII-AS. Expected physical data and technical details of W VII-AS are given.

  8. Advanced capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R. D.; Buritz, R. S.; Taylor, A. R.; Bullwinkel, E. P.

    1982-11-01

    An experimental development program was conducted to develop and test advanced dielectric materials for capacitors for airborne power systems. High rep rate and low rate capacitors for use in pulse-forming networks, high voltage filter capacitors, and high frequency ac capacitors for series resonant inverters were considered. The initial goal was to develop an improved polysulfone film. Initially, low breakdown strength was thought to be related to inclusions of conductive particles. The effect of filtration of the casting solution was investigated. These experiments showed that more filtration was not the entire solution to low breakdown. The film samples were found to contain dissolved ionic impurities that move through the dielectric when voltage is applied and cause enhancement of the electric field. These contaminants enter the film via the resin and solvent, and can be partially removed. However, these treatments did not significantly improve the breakdown characteristics. A new material, Ultem, was proposed for use in high energy density capacitors. This new polyetherimide resin has properties similar to polysulfone and polyimide, with improvement in breakdown characteristics and temperature capability. The technique of casting films on a roughened drum was demonstrated, and found useful in preparing textured films. this is the first step toward a replacement for kraft paper.

  9. Advanced capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennis, J. B.; Buritz, R. S.

    1984-10-01

    This report describes an experimental program to develop and test advanced dielectric materials for capacitors for airborne power systems. Five classes of capacitors were considered: high rep rate and low rep rate pulse capacitors for use in pulse-forming networks, high voltage filter capacitors, high frequency AC capacitors for series resonant inverters, and AC filter capacitors. To meet these requirements, existing dielectric materials were modified, and new materials were developed. The initial goal was to develop an improved polysulfone film with fewer imperfections that could operate at significantly higher electrical stresses. It was shown that contaminants enter the film via the resin and solvent, and that they can be partially removed. As far as developed, however, these treatments did not significantly improved the breakdown characteristics. The technique of casting films on a roughened drum was demonstrated, and found useful in preparing textured films -- the first step toward a replacement for Kraft paper. A new material, Ultem, was proposed for use in high energy density capacitors. This new polyetherimide resin has properties similar to polysulfone and polyimide, with improvement in breakdown characteristics and temperature capability. This material was selected for further study in model capacitor designs.

  10. Ares I Upper Stage Subscale Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. The launch vehicle's first stage is a single, five-segment reusable solid rocket booster derived from the Space Shuttle Program's reusable solid rocket motor that burns a specially formulated and shaped solid propellant called polybutadiene acrylonitrile (PBAN). The second or upper stage will be propelled by a J-2X main engine fueled with liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. This HD video image depicts a test firing of a 40k subscale J2X injector at MSFC's test stand 115. (Highest resolution available)

  11. Situational variation in moral judgment: In a stage or on a stage?

    PubMed

    Carpendale, J I; Krebs, D L

    1992-04-01

    Two issues were examined in this study-the consistency of moral judgment across different types of dilemma and different social contexts, and the relationship between the structure (stage) of moral judgment and the content of moral decisions. Forty subjects were given two hypothetical dilemmas about business decisions and two standard Kohlberg dilemmas. Half the subjects directed their responses to a business audience, half to a philosophical audience. Responses to the moral dilemmas were scored in accordance with the Colby and Kohlberg (1987) scoring manual. Stage of moral reasoning was found to be significantly higher on the Kohlberg dilemmas than on the business dilemmas. A significant interaction between type of dilemma and audience was attributed to the tendency of subjects directing their responses to a business audience to interpret one of the business dilemmas in terms of the moral order of business, but for subjects directing their responses to a philosophy audience to treat it as a philosophical dilemma. The other business dilemma evoked uniformly low-level moral judgments. The amount of selfishness intrinsic in subjects' moral choices on the business dilemmas was significantly negatively correlated with moral maturity on the business dilemmas, but not with their moral maturity on Kohlberg's test. These results are interpreted as more consistent with models of moral development such as those advanced by C. G. Levine ([1979] "Stage Acquisition and Stage Use: An Appraisal of Stage Displacement Explanations of Variation in Moral Reasoning, " Human Development, Vol. 22, pp. 145-164), J. Rest ([1983] "Morality," in: P. H. Mussen [ed.], J. H. Flavell and E. Markman [Vol. eds.], Handbook of Child Psychology [Vol. 3, 4th ed.], John Wiley & Sons, New York), and R. Harré ([1984]) Personal Being: A Theory for Individual Psychology, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts), which posit a relatively wide range of within-person stage use and emphasize the

  12. Design study for a staged Very Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Peter J. Limon et al.

    2001-06-26

    Advancing accelerator designs and technology to achieve the highest energies has enabled remarkable discoveries in particle physics. This report presents the results of a design study for a new collider at Fermilab that will create exceptional opportunities for particle physics--a two-stage very large hadron collider. In its first stage, the machine provides a facility for energy-frontier particle physics research, at an affordable cost and on a reasonable time scale. In a second-stage upgrade in the same tunnel, the VLHC offers the possibility of reaching 100 times the collision energy of the Tevatron. The existing Fermilab accelerator complex serves as the injector, and the collision halls are on the Fermilab site. The Stage-1 VLHC reaches a collision energy of 40 TeV and a luminosity comparable to that of the LHC, using robust superferric magnets of elegant simplicity housed in a large-circumference tunnel. The Stage-2 VLHC, constructed after the scientific potential of the first stage has been fully realized, reaches a collision energy of at least 175 TeV with the installation of high-field magnets in the same tunnel. It makes optimal use of the infrastructure developed for the Stage-1 machine, using the Stage-1 accelerator itself as the injector. The goals of this study, commissioned by the Fermilab Director in November 2000, are: to create reasonable designs for the Stage-1 and Stage-2 VLHC in the same tunnel; to discover the technical challenges and potential impediments to building such a facility at Fermilab; to determine the approximate costs of the major elements of the Stage-1 VLHC; and to identify areas requiring significant R and D to establish the basis for the design.

  13. Correlation between body mass index and clinicopathological features of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zeming; Maimaiti, Yusufu; Yu, Pan; Xiong, Yiquan; Zeng, Wen; Li, Xiaoyu; Song, Haiping; Lu, Chong; Xin, Yue; Zhou, Jing; Zhang, Ning; Ming, Jie; Liu, Chunping; Shi, Wei; Shi, Lan; Li, Xueqin; Nie, Xiu; Huang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To demonstrate the relationships between body mass index (BMI) and the clinicopathological features of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Methods: A total of 810 consecutive patients with PTC (501 patients with PTMC) who underwent total thyroidectomy in 2009-2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Height and weight were used to calculate BMI. Results: Increased BMI was strongly associated with i) extrathyroidal invasion (P < 0.001) and advanced TNM stage (P = 0.005) in patients with PTMC (n = 501), and ii) extrathyroidal invasion (P = 0.001), advanced TNM stage (P = 0.001), and multifocality (P = 0.002) in patients with PTC (n = 810). As compared with normal-weight patients with PTMC, obese patients with PTMC had greater risks of extrathyroidal invasion (OR = 5.214, P = 0.0270), and overweight patients with PTMC had greater risks of extrathyroidal invasion (OR = 2.165, P = 0.0013) and advanced TNM stage (OR = 2.019, P = 0.0137). As compared with normal-weight patients with PTC, obese patients with PTC had greater risks of extrathyroidal invasion (OR = 3.101, P = 0.0172), and overweight patients with PTC had greater risks of extrathyroidal invasion (OR = 1.486, P = 0.0279), advanced TNM stage (OR = 1.650, P = 0.0347), and multifocality (OR = 1.651, P = 0.0054). Conclusions: Increased BMI might elevate the risks of aggressive clinicopathological features, such as extrathyroidal invasion and advanced TNM stage. Obesity control may play an important role in preventing the development of aggressive PTMCs and all PTCs. PMID:26629173

  14. Multiple stage miniature stepping motor

    DOEpatents

    Niven, William A.; Shikany, S. David; Shira, Michael L.

    1981-01-01

    A stepping motor comprising a plurality of stages which may be selectively activated to effect stepping movement of the motor, and which are mounted along a common rotor shaft to achieve considerable reduction in motor size and minimum diameter, whereby sequential activation of the stages results in successive rotor steps with direction being determined by the particular activating sequence followed.

  15. A Model of Moral Stages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Don Collins

    2008-01-01

    The argument of this paper focuses on the relationship between cognitive structures and structures of interaction. It contends that there is still a place in moral development theory and research for a concept of moral stages. The thesis, in short, is that moral stages are not structures of thought. They are structures of action encoded in…

  16. The Theatre Student: Stage Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Albert M.

    Stage violence is a complex art which, when conceived inventively, approached with professional care and respect, and practiced with patience and energy, can be the highlight of a scene or of an entire play. This book is designed for amateurs who have not had the benefit of formal training in stage violence. Chapters discuss falling (the…

  17. Stage fluctuations of Wisconsin lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    House, Leo B.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes lake-stage fluctuations of 83 gaged lakes in Wisconsin and presents techniques for estimating stage fluctuation at ungaged lakes. Included are stage information at 83 lakes and stage-frequency data for 32 of these lakes that had sufficient record for analysis. Lakes are classified by a hydrologic-topographic lake classification scheme as ground-water flowthrough (GWF) lakes, surface-water drainage (SWD) lakes, and surface-water flow-through (SWF) lakes. Lakes within the same class were found to have similar water-level fluctuations. The lake-stage records indicate that most annual maximums occur during the months of May and June for all three classes. Annual minimum lake levels generally occur in September for surface-water drainage lakes, in March for surface-water flowthrough lakes, and in November for ground-water flow-through lakes. Data for each lake include location, period of water-level record, hydrologic classification, drainage area, surface area, lake volume, maximum depth, long-term mean stage and its standard deviation, maximum and minimum observed lake stage, and the average annual lake-stage fluctuation.

  18. Writing Stages: A Developmental Hierarchy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milner, Joseph O.

    The developmental stages of writing can be related to Jean Piaget's final three stages of development (preoperational, concrete operational, and formal operational) and to the narrative, descriptive, explanative, analytical, and artistic rhetorical modes. As the child enters kindergarten or the first grade, narrative blooms. By this age most young…

  19. Decision System Integrating Preferences to Support Sleep Staging.

    PubMed

    Ugon, Adrien; Sedki, Karima; Kotti, Amina; Seroussi, Brigitte; Philippe, Carole; Ganascia, Jean-Gabriel; Garda, Patrick; Bouaud, Jacques; Pinna, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Scoring sleep stages can be considered as a classification problem. Once the whole recording segmented into 30-seconds epochs, features, extracted from raw signals, are typically injected into machine learning algorithms in order to build a model able to assign a sleep stage, trying to mimic what experts have done on the training set. Such approaches ignore the advances in sleep medicine, in which guidelines have been published by the AASM, providing definitions and rules that should be followed to score sleep stages. In addition, these approaches are not able to solve conflict situations, in which criteria of different sleep stages are met. This work proposes a novel approach based on AASM guidelines. Rules are formalized integrating, for some of them, preferences allowing to support decision in conflict situations. Applied to a doubtful epoch, our approach has taken the appropriate decision. PMID:27577436

  20. Multi-stage wax hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, J.J.; Nye, J.R.; Soudek, M.

    1991-02-19

    This patent describes improvement in a process for the shape selective catalytic dewaxing of a wax containing feed. It consists of at least one of atmospheric gas oil and vacuum gas oil by passing the feed with about 1000 to 5000 standard cubic feet per barrel of hydrogen over a dewaxing catalyst comprising a shape selective zeolite to produce a dewaxed product and wherein the hydrogen is added to retard catalyst aging. The improvement comprises conducting the dewaxing reaction in at least two states, with a first stage containing at least 20 wt. % of the dewaxing catalyst and in at least one second stage containing at least 20 wt. % of the dewaxing catalyst and adding at least a portion of the hydrogen downstream of the first stage reactor wherein the total hydrogen to the second stage is greater than the total hydrogen to the first stage.

  1. Subminiature infrared detector translation stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Alan D.

    1989-11-01

    This paper describes a precision subminiature three-axis translation stage used in the GOES Sounder to provide positional adjustment of 12 cooled infrared detectors. Four separate translation stages and detectors are packaged into a detector mechanism which has an overall size of 0.850 x 1.230 x 0.600 inches. Each translation stage is capable of + or - 0.015 inch motion in the X and Y axes and +0.050/-0.025 inch motion in the Z axis with a sensitivity of 0.0002 inches. The function of the detector translation stage allows real time detector signal peaking during Sounder alignment. The translation stage operates in a cryogenic environment under a 10 to the -6th torr vacuum.

  2. Subminiature infrared detector translation stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Alan D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a precision subminiature three-axis translation stage used in the GOES Sounder to provide positional adjustment of 12 cooled infrared detectors. Four separate translation stages and detectors are packaged into a detector mechanism which has an overall size of 0.850 x 1.230 x 0.600 inches. Each translation stage is capable of + or - 0.015 inch motion in the X and Y axes and +0.050/-0.025 inch motion in the Z axis with a sensitivity of 0.0002 inches. The function of the detector translation stage allows real time detector signal peaking during Sounder alignment. The translation stage operates in a cryogenic environment under a 10 to the -6th torr vacuum.

  3. Stage measurement at gaging stations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauer, Vernon B.; Turnipseed, D. Phil

    2010-01-01

    Stream and reservoir stage are critical parameters in the computation of stream discharge and reservoir volume, respectively. In addition, a record of stream stage is useful in the design of structures that may be affected by stream elevation, as well as for the planning for various uses of flood plains. This report describes equipment and methodology for the observation, sensing, and recording of stage in streams and reservoirs. Although the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) still uses the traditional, basic stilling-well float system as a predominant gaging station, modern electronic stage sensors and water-level recorders are now commonly used. Bubble gages coupled with nonsubmersible pressure transducers eliminate the need for stilling wells. Submersible pressure transducers have become common in use for the measurement of stage in both rivers and lakes. Furthermore, noncontact methods, such as radar, acoustic, and laser methods of sensing water levels, are being developed and tested, and in the case of radar, are commonly used for the measurement of stage. This report describes commonly used gaging-station structures, as well as the design and operation of gaging stations. Almost all of the equipment and instruments described in this report will meet the accuracy standard set by the USGS Office of Surface Water (OSW) for the measurement of stage for most applications, which is ?0.01 foot (ft) or 0.2 percent of the effective stage. Several telemetry systems are used to transmit stage data from the gaging station to the office, although satellite telemetry has become the standard. These telemetry systems provide near real-time stage data, as well as other information that alerts the hydrographer to extreme or abnormal events, and instrument malfunctions.

  4. Research on advanced transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Ryouhei; Nosaka, Masataka; Koyari, Yukio; Yamada, Yoshio; Noda, Keiichirou; Shinohara, Suetsugu; Itou, Tetsuichi; Etou, Takao; Kaneko, Yutaka

    1992-08-01

    An overview of the researches on advanced space transportation systems is presented. Conceptual study is conducted on fly back boosters with expendable upper stage rocket systems assuming a launch capacity of 30 tons and returning to the launch site by the boosters, and prospect of their feasibility is obtained. Reviews are conducted on subjects as follows: (1) trial production of 10 tons sub scale engines for the purpose of acquiring hardware data and picking up technical problems for full scale 100 tons thrust engines using hydrocarbon fuels; (2) development techniques for advanced liquid propulsion systems from the aspects of development schedule, cost; (3) review of conventional technologies, and common use of component; (4) oxidant switching propulsion systems focusing on feasibility of Liquefied Air Cycle Engine (LACE) and Compressed Air Cycle Engine (CACE); (5) present status of slosh hydrogen manufacturing, storage, and handling; (6) construction of small high speed dynamometer for promoting research on mini pump development; (7) hybrid solid boosters under research all over the world as low-cost and clean propulsion systems; and (8) high performance solid propellant for upper stage and lower stage propulsion systems.

  5. 77 FR 24717 - Scientific Information Request on Local Therapies for the Treatment of Stage I Non-Small Cell...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... Therapies for the Treatment of Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Endobronchial Obstruction Due to... for the Treatment of Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Endobronchial Obstruction Due to Advanced... effectiveness review of the evidence for local therapies for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung...

  6. Advanced Energy Industries, Inc. SEGIS developments.

    SciTech Connect

    Scharf, Mesa P.; Bower, Ward Isaac; Mills-Price, Michael A.; Sena-Henderson, Lisa; David, Carolyn; Akhil, Abbas Ali; Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Gonzalez, Sigifredo

    2012-03-01

    The Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems (SEGIS) initiative is a three-year, three-stage project that includes conceptual design and market analysis (Stage 1), prototype development/testing (Stage 2), and commercialization (Stage 3). Projects focus on system development of solar technologies, expansion of intelligent renewable energy applications, and connecting large-scale photovoltaic (PV) installations into the electric grid. As documented in this report, Advanced Energy Industries, Inc. (AE), its partners, and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) successfully collaborated to complete the final stage of the SEGIS initiative, which has guided new technology development and development of methodologies for unification of PV and smart-grid technologies. The combined team met all deliverables throughout the three-year program and commercialized a broad set of the developed technologies.

  7. Staging neurodegenerative disorders: structural, regional, biomarker, and functional progressions.

    PubMed

    Archer, Trevor; Kostrzewa, Richard M; Beninger, Richard J; Palomo, Tomas

    2011-02-01

    The notion of staging in the neurodegenerative disorders is modulated by the constant and progressive loss of several aspects of brain structural integrity, circuitry, and neuronal processes. These destructive processes eventually remove individuals' abilities to perform at sufficient and necessary functional capacity at several levels of disease severity. The classification of (a) patients on the basis of diagnosis, risk prognosis, and intervention outcome, forms the basis of clinical staging, and (b) laboratory animals on the basis of animal model of brain disorder, extent of insult, and dysfunctional expression, provides the components for the clinical staging and preclinical staging, respectively, expressing associated epidemiological, biological, and genetic characteristics. The major focus of clinical staging in the present account stems from the fundamental notions of Braak staging as they describe the course and eventual prognosis for Alzheimer's disease, Lewy Body dementia, and Parkinson's disease. Mild cognitive impairment, which expresses the decline in episodic and semantic memory performance below the age-adjusted normal range without marked loss of global cognition or activities of daily living, and the applications of longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging, major instruments for the monitoring of either disease progression in dementia, present important challenges for staging concepts. Although Braak notions present the essential basis for further developments, current staging conceptualizations seem inadequate to comply with the massive influx of information dealing with neurodegenerative processes in brain, advanced both under clinical realities, and discoveries in the laboratory setting. The contributions of various biomarkers of disease progression, e.g., amyloid precursor protein, and neurotransmitter system imbalances, e.g., dopamine receptor supersensitivity and interactive propensities, await their incorporation into the existing staging

  8. Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) accommodations requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Results of an accommodations analysis for the Advanced Solar Observatory on Space Station Freedom are reported. Concepts for the High Resolution Telescope Cluster, Pinhole/Occulter Facility, and High Energy Cluster were developed which can be accommodated on Space Station Freedom. It is shown that workable accommodations concepts are possible. Areas of emphasis for the next stage of engineering development are identified.

  9. Second Language Vocabulary Growth at Advanced Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturk, Meral

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the receptive vocabulary growth of advanced EFL learners in an English-medium degree programme. The study used the Vocabulary Size Test in a cross-sectional design to measure the vocabulary size of learners at various stages of study. The effect of word frequency on vocabulary development and the presence of an…

  10. A Validated Prediction Model for Overall Survival From Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Toward Survival Prediction for Individual Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Oberije, Cary; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Houben, Ruud; Heuvel, Michel van de; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Deasy, Joseph O.; Belderbos, Jose; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Rimner, Andreas; Din, Shaun; Lambin, Philippe

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Although patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are homogeneous according to the TNM staging system, they form a heterogeneous group, which is reflected in the survival outcome. The increasing amount of information for an individual patient and the growing number of treatment options facilitate personalized treatment, but they also complicate treatment decision making. Decision support systems (DSS), which provide individualized prognostic information, can overcome this but are currently lacking. A DSS for stage III NSCLC requires the development and integration of multiple models. The current study takes the first step in this process by developing and validating a model that can provide physicians with a survival probability for an individual NSCLC patient. Methods and Materials: Data from 548 patients with stage III NSCLC were available to enable the development of a prediction model, using stratified Cox regression. Variables were selected by using a bootstrap procedure. Performance of the model was expressed as the c statistic, assessed internally and on 2 external data sets (n=174 and n=130). Results: The final multivariate model, stratified for treatment, consisted of age, gender, World Health Organization performance status, overall treatment time, equivalent radiation dose, number of positive lymph node stations, and gross tumor volume. The bootstrapped c statistic was 0.62. The model could identify risk groups in external data sets. Nomograms were constructed to predict an individual patient's survival probability ( (www.predictcancer.org)). The data set can be downloaded at (https://www.cancerdata.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.02.048). Conclusions: The prediction model for overall survival of patients with stage III NSCLC highlights the importance of combining patient, clinical, and treatment variables. Nomograms were developed and validated. This tool could be used as a first building block for a decision support system.

  11. Core compressor exit stage study. Volume 1: Blading design. [turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    A baseline compressor test stage was designed as well as a candidate rotor and two candidate stators that have the potential of reducing endwall losses relative to the baseline stage. These test stages are typical of those required in the rear stages of advanced, highly-loaded core compressors. The baseline Stage A is a low-speed model of Stage 7 of the 10 stage AMAC compressor. Candidate Rotor B uses a type of meanline in the tip region that unloads the leading edge and loads the trailing edge relative to the baseline Rotor A design. Candidate Stator B embodies twist gradients in the endwall region. Candidate Stator C embodies airfoil sections near the endwalls that have reduced trailing edge loading relative to Stator A. Tests will be conducted using four identical stages of blading so that the designs described will operate in a true multistage environment.

  12. Conceptual design of a two stage to orbit spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armiger, Scott C.; Kwarta, Jennifer S.; Horsley, Kevin B.; Snow, Glenn A.; Koe, Eric C.; Single, Thomas G.

    1993-01-01

    This project, undertaken through the Advanced Space Design Program, developed a 'Conceptual Design of a Two Stage To Orbit Spacecraft (TSTO).' The design developed utilizes a combination of air breathing and rocket propulsion systems and is fully reusable, with horizontal takeoff and landing capability. The orbiter is carried in an aerodynamically designed bay in the aft section of the booster vehicle to the staging altitude. This TSTO Spacecraft design meets the requirements of replacing the aging Space Shuttle system with a more easily maintained vehicle with more flexible mission capability.

  13. SCIENCE BRIEF: ADVANCED CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on advanced concepts will evaluate and demonstrate the application of innovative infrastructure designs, management procedures and operational approaches. Advanced concepts go beyond simple asset management. The infusion of these advanced concepts into established wastew...

  14. Cognitive Development and Group Stages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saidla, Debie D.

    1990-01-01

    Attempts to integrate Perry's (1970) scheme of the cognitive development of college students with a model of group development adapted by Waldo (1985) based on Tuckman's (1965) formulation of developmental group stages. (Author)

  15. Evaluating the Stage Learning Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Hoben

    1980-01-01

    A procedure for evaluating the Genevan stage learning hypothesis is illustrated by analyzing Inhelder, Sinclair, and Bovet's guided learning experiments (in "Learning and the Development of Cognition." Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1974). (Author/MP)

  16. Two stage to orbit design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary design of a two-stage to orbit vehicle was conducted with the requirements to carry a 10,000 pound payload into a 300 mile low-earth orbit using an airbreathing first stage, and to take off and land unassisted on a 15,000 foot runway. The goal of the design analysis was to produce the most efficient vehicle in size and weight which could accomplish the mission requirements. Initial parametric analysis indicated that the weight of the orbiter and the transonic performance of the system were the two parameters that had the largest impact on the design. The resulting system uses a turbofan ramjet powered first stage to propel a scramjet and rocket powered orbiter to the stage point of Mach 6 to 6.5 at an altitude of 90,000 ft.

  17. Two stage liquefaction of coal

    DOEpatents

    Neuworth, Martin B.

    1981-01-01

    A two stage coal liquefaction process and apparatus comprising hydrogen donor solvent extracting, solvent deashing, and catalytic hydrocracking. Preferrably, the catalytic hydrocracking is performed in an ebullating bed hydrocracker.

  18. The Advanced Launch System (ALS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Charles H.

    The Advanced Launch System (ALS) is an unmanned vehicle that will achieve low hardware cost by using a reusable booster stage which flies back to the launch site, and a core stage in which the rocket engines and redundant avionics are in a module that is returned to earth and recovered for reuse. The booster's utilization of liquid propellant instead of solid propellant will help lower the consumable costs. The ALS also includes launch processing and flight control facilities, necessary support equipment, and ground- and flight-operations infrastructure. The ALS program studies show that, through the ALS, the United States can launch a major Mars initiative economically and with confidence. It is estimated that the objective ALS can be operational in the late 1990s.

  19. Staged sacrectomy--an adaptive approach.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, Rajaraman; Bose, Jagadish Chandra; Muthusamy, Vimalakannan; Natarajan, Mayilvahanan; Kunjithapatham, Deiveegan

    2009-09-01

    Object Sacral tumors are commonly diagnosed late and therefore present at an advanced stage. The late presentation makes curative surgery technically demanding. Sacrectomy is fraught with a high local recurrence rate and potential complications: deep infection; substantial blood loss; large-bone and soft-tissue defects; bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunction; spinopelvic nonunion; and gait disturbance. The aim of this study was to analyze the complications and morbidity of sacrectomy and the modifications meant to reduce the morbidity. Methods This is a retrospective study of the patients who underwent sacrectomy between February 1997 and September 2008 in the Department of Surgical Oncology, Government Royapettah Hospital, Kilpauk Medical College, in Chennai, Tamilnadu, India. Sacrectomy was performed using 1 of the following approaches: posterior approach, abdominolateral approach, or abdominosacral approach, either as sequential or staged operations. The morbidity rate after the sequential and staged abdominosacral approaches was analyzed. Functional assessment was made based on the Enneking functional scoring system. The results were analyzed and survival analysis was done using the Kaplan-Meier method (with SPSS software). Results Nineteen patients underwent sacrectomy, of which 12 operations were partial, 3 were subtotal, and 4 were total sacrectomy. Histological diagnosis included giant cell tumor, chordoma, chondroblastoma, adenocarcinoma of rectum, and retroperitoneal sarcoma. The giant cell tumor was the most common tumor in this series, followed by chordoma. The patients' mean age at diagnosis was 32 years. There were 10 male and 9 female patients. Fortyseven percent of patients had bowel and bladder disturbances postoperatively, and 57.89% of patients had wound complications. The median follow-up duration was 24 months (range 2-140 months). The 5-year overall survival rate was 70.4%, and the 5-year disease-free survival rate was 65% (based on the Kaplan

  20. Staged regenerative sorption heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system for cooling and heating a space. A sorbent is confined in a plurality of compressors of which at least four are first stage and at least four are second stage. The first stage operates over a first pressure region and the second stage over a second pressure region which is higher than the first. Sorbate from the first stage enters the second stage. The sorbate loop includes a condenser, expansion valve, evaporator and the compressors. A single sorbate loop can be employed for single-temperature-control such as air conditioning and heating. Two sorbate loops can be used for two-temperature-control as in a refrigerator and freezer. The evaporator temperatures control the freezer and refrigerator temperatures. Alternatively the refrigerator temperature can be cooled by the freezer with one sorbate loop. A heat transfer fluid is circulated in a closed loop which includes a radiator and the compressors. Low temperature heat is exhausted by the radiator. High temperature heat is added to the heat transfer fluid entering the compressors which are desorbing vapor. Heat is transferred from compressors which are sorbing vapor to the heat transfer fluid, and from the heat transfer fluid to the compressors which are desorbing vapor. Each compressor is subjected to the following phases, heating to its highest temperature, cooling down from its highest temperature, cooling to its lowest temperature, and warming up from its lowest temperature. The phases are repeated to complete a cycle and regenerate heat.