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Sample records for advanced turbine engine

  1. Turbine pyrometry for advanced engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Strange, R. R.

    1987-06-01

    The turbine pyrometry requirements for advanced engine designs are examined. The practical use of current optical pyrometer systems is limited to situations where the reflected radiation comprises not more than 50 percent of the total signal. Alternative approaches, including techniques known as 'Advanced Dual Spectral Area Pyrometer', 'Active Pyrometry', passive synchronous detection pyrometry, and techniques that use thermographic phosphors, are discussed. It is suggested that the methods that use thermographic phosphors at low temperatures can be extended to high temperatures and gas turbine engine environment and can be adapted to the vane scanning pyrometer application.

  2. Advanced General Aviation Turbine Engine (GATE) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R.; Benstein, E. H.

    1979-01-01

    The small engine technology requirements suitable for general aviation service in the 1987 to 1988 time frame were defined. The market analysis showed potential United States engines sales of 31,500 per year providing that the turbine engine sales price approaches current reciprocating engine prices. An optimum engine design was prepared for four categories of fixed wing aircraft and for rotary wing applications. A common core approach was derived from the optimum engines that maximizes engine commonality over the power spectrum with a projected price competitive with reciprocating piston engines. The advanced technology features reduced engine cost, approximately 50 percent compared with current technology.

  3. TMF design considerations in turbine airfoils of advanced turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Date, C. G.; Zamrik, S. Y.; Adams, J. H.; Frani, N. E.

    A review of thermal-mechanicalfatigue (TMF) in advanced turbine engines is presented. The review includes examples of typical thermal-mechnical loadings encountered in the design of hot section blades and vanes. Specific issues related to TMF behavior are presented and the associated impact on component life analysis and design is discussed.

  4. Advanced bristle seals for gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabe, Jerry L.

    1993-01-01

    A seven month proof-of-concept program was conducted for an advanced bristle seal, called a bush seal, for use in gas turbine engines. This program was performed as a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 1 project. Bush seal specimen and a full ring bush seal were designed, evaluated, and manufactured for testing. An analytical study of the potential of the bush seal relative to a labyrinth seal was conducted. Static and dynamic testing of the bush seal was performed to determine the behavior of the bristles under pressurization and during contact with a rotating labyrinth tooth. Stable behavior of the bristle elements was observed during static pressurization of a full ring bush seal. The dynamic testing of various configurations of bush seal against a rotating labyrinth tooth showed minimal wear of the bristles relative to a conventional labyrinth seal. The development and application of the bush seal concept to gas turbine engines has the potential of improving the engine's performance while decreasing the degradation of the seal performance over time.

  5. Advanced General Aviation Turbine Engine (GATE) concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lays, E. J.; Murray, G. L.

    1979-01-01

    Concepts are discussed that project turbine engine cost savings through use of geometrically constrained components designed for low rotational speeds and low stress to permit manufacturing economies. Aerodynamic development of geometrically constrained components is recommended to maximize component efficiency. Conceptual engines, airplane applications, airplane performance, engine cost, and engine-related life cycle costs are presented. The powerplants proposed offer encouragement with respect to fuel efficiency and life cycle costs, and make possible remarkable airplane performance gains.

  6. Cost/benefit studies of advanced materials technologies for future aircraft turbine engines: Materials for advanced turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, M.; Wilbers, L.

    1982-01-01

    Cost benefit studies were conducted on six advanced materials and processes technologies applicable to commercial engines planned for production in the 1985 to 1990 time frame. These technologies consisted of thermal barrier coatings for combustor and high pressure turbine airfoils, directionally solidified eutectic high pressure turbine blades, (both cast and fabricated), and mixers, tail cones, and piping made of titanium-aluminum alloys. A fabricated titanium fan blisk, an advanced turbine disk alloy with improved low cycle fatigue life, and a long-life high pressure turbine blade abrasive tip and ceramic shroud system were also analyzed. Technologies showing considerable promise as to benefits, low development costs, and high probability of success were thermal barrier coating, directionally solidified eutectic turbine blades, and abrasive-tip blades/ceramic-shroud turbine systems.

  7. Study of an advanced General Aviation Turbine Engine (GATE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, J. C.; Short, F. R.; Staton, D. V.; Zolezzi, B. A.; Curry, C. E.; Orelup, M. J.; Vaught, J. M.; Humphrey, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The best technology program for a small, economically viable gas turbine engine applicable to the general aviation helicopter and aircraft market for 1985-1990 was studied. Turboshaft and turboprop engines in the 112 to 746 kW (150 to 1000 hp) range and turbofan engines up to 6672 N (1500 lbf) thrust were considered. A good market for new turbine engines was predicted for 1988 providing aircraft are designed to capitalize on the advantages of the turbine engine. Parametric engine families were defined in terms of design and off-design performance, mass, and cost. These were evaluated in aircraft design missions selected to represent important market segments for fixed and rotary-wing applications. Payoff parameters influenced by engine cycle and configuration changes were aircraft gross mass, acquisition cost, total cost of ownership, and cash flow. Significant advantage over a current technology, small gas turbine engines was found especially in cost of ownership and fuel economy for airframes incorporating an air-cooled high-pressure ratio engine. A power class of 373 kW (500 hp) was recommended as the next frontier for technology advance where large improvements in fuel economy and engine mass appear possible through component research and development.

  8. Advanced materials research for long-haul aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorelli, R. A.; Blankenship, C. P.

    1978-01-01

    The status of research efforts to apply low to intermediate temperature composite materials and advanced high temperature materials to engine components is reviewed. Emerging materials technologies and their potential benefits to aircraft gas turbines were emphasized. The problems were identified, and the general state of the technology for near term use was assessed.

  9. Advanced controls for airbreathing engines, volume 3: Allison gas turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bough, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    The application of advanced control concepts to airbreathing engines may yield significant improvements in aircraft/engine performance and operability. Screening studies of advanced control concepts for airbreathing engines were conducted by three major domestic aircraft engine manufacturers to determine the potential impact of concepts on turbine engine performance and operability. The purpose of the studies was to identify concepts which offered high potential yet may incur high research and development risk. A target suite of proposed advanced control concepts was formulated and evaluated in a two-phase study to quantify each concept's impact on desired engine characteristics. To aid in the evaluation specific aircraft/engine combinations were considered: a Military High Performance Fighter mission, a High Speed Civil Transport mission, and a Civil Tiltrotor mission. Each of the advanced control concepts considered in the study are defined and described. The concept potential impact on engine performance was determined. Relevant figures of merit on which to evaluate the concepts are determined. Finally, the concepts are ranked with respect to the target aircraft/engine missions. A final report describing the screening studies was prepared by each engine manufacturer. Volume 3 of these reports describes the studies performed by the Allison Gas Turbine Division.

  10. Advanced solidification processing of an industrial gas turbine engine component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, Mei Ling; Price, Allen; Bellows, Richard S.

    2003-03-01

    This paper will describe the efforts of the Advanced Turbine Airfoil Manufacturing Technology Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Howmet Research Corporation. The purpose of the program is to develop single-crystal and directionally solidified casting technologies to benefit Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) industrial and utility gas turbine engines. The focus is on defining and implementing advanced Vacuum Induction Melting (VIM) furnace enhancements that provide precise control of mold temperatures during solidification. Emphasis was placed on increasing the total magnitude of thermal gradients while minimizing the difference in maximum and minimum gradients produced during the solidification process. Advanced VIM casting techniques were applied to Solar Turbines Incorporated’s Titan 130 First Stage High Pressure Turbine Blade under the ATS program. A comparison of the advanced VIM casting process to the conventional Bridgeman casting process will be presented as it pertains to the thermal gradients achieved during solidification, microstructure, elemental partitioning characterization, and solution heat treat response.

  11. Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornstein, N. S.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of this task is to perform a technical assessment of turbine blading for advanced second generation PFBC conditions, identify specific problems/issues, and recommend an approach for solving any problems identified. A literature search was conducted, problems associated with hot corrosion defined and limited experiments performed. Sulfidation corrosion occurs in industrial, marine and aircraft gas turbine engines and is due to the presence of condensed alkali (sodium) sulfates. The principle source of the alkali in industrial, marine and aircraft gas turbine engines is sea salt crystals. The principle source of the sulfur is not the liquid fuels, but the same ocean born crystals. Moreover deposition of the corrosive salt occurs primarily by a non-equilibrium process. Sodium will be present in the cleaned combusted gases that enter the PFBC turbine. Although equilibrium condensation is not favored, deposition via impaction is probable. Marine gas turbines operate in sodium chloride rich environments without experiencing the accelerated attack noted in coal fired boilers where condensed chlorides contact metallic surfaces. The sulfates of calcium and magnesium are the products of the reactions used to control sulfur. Based upon industrial gas turbine experience and laboratory tests, calcium and magnesium sulfates are, at temperatures up to 1500 F (815 C), relatively innocuous salts. In this study it is found that at 1650 F (900 C) and above, calcium sulfate becomes an aggressive corrodent.

  12. Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures are investigated. Constructions of special elements which containing traction-free circular boundaries are investigated. New versions of mixed variational principle and version of hybrid stress elements are formulated. A method is established for suppression of kinematic deformation modes. semiLoof plate and shell elements are constructed by assumed stress hybrid method. An elastic-plastic analysis is conducted by viscoplasticity theory using the mechanical subelement model.

  13. Materials for advanced rocket engine turbopump turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    A study program was conducted to identify those materials that will provide the greatest benefits as turbine blades for advanced liquid propellant rocket engine turbines and to prepare technology plans for the development of those materials for use in the 1990 through 1995 period. The candidate materials were selected from six classes of materials: single-crystal (SC) superalloys, oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) superalloys, rapid solidification processed (RSP) superalloys, directionally solidified eutectic (DSE) superalloys, fiber-reinforced superalloy (FRS) composites, and ceramics. Properties of materials from the six classes were compiled and evaluated and property improvements were projected approximately 5 years into the future for advanced versions of materials in each of the six classes.

  14. Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings for Advanced Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (T/EBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engine systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures and reduce cooling requirements, thus help achieve engine low emission and high efficiency goals. Advanced T/EBCs are being developed for the low emission SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor applications by extending the CMC liner and vane temperature capability to 1650 C (3000 F) in oxidizing and water vapor containing combustion environments. Low conductivity thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are also being developed for metallic turbine airfoil and combustor applications, providing the component temperature capability up to 1650 C (3000 F). In this paper, ceramic coating development considerations and requirements for both the ceramic and metallic components will be described for engine high temperature and high-heat-flux applications. The underlying coating failure mechanisms and life prediction approaches will be discussed based on the simulated engine tests and fracture mechanics modeling results.

  15. Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbine and Diesel Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCS) have been developed for advanced gas turbine and diesel engine applications to improve engine reliability and fuel efficiency. However, durability issues of these thermal barrier coatings under high temperature cyclic conditions are still of major concern. The coating failure depends not only on the coating, but also on the ceramic sintering/creep and bond coat oxidation under the operating conditions. Novel test approaches have been established to obtain critical thermomechanical and thermophysical properties of the coating systems under near-realistic transient and steady state temperature and stress gradients encountered in advanced engine systems. This paper presents detailed experimental and modeling results describing processes occurring in the ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coating systems, thus providing a framework for developing strategies to manage ceramic coating architecture, microstructure and properties.

  16. Radial inflow gas turbine engine with advanced transition duct

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, David J

    2015-03-17

    A gas turbine engine (10), including: a turbine having radial inflow impellor blades (38); and an array of advanced transition combustor assemblies arranged circumferentially about the radial inflow impellor blades (38) and having inner surfaces (34) that are adjacent to combustion gases (40). The inner surfaces (34) of the array are configured to accelerate and orient, for delivery directly onto the radial inflow impellor blades (38), a plurality of discrete flows of the combustion gases (40). The array inner surfaces (34) define respective combustion gas flow axes (20). Each combustion gas flow axis (20) is straight from a point of ignition until no longer bound by the array inner surfaces (34), and each combustion gas flow axis (20) intersects a unique location on a circumference defined by a sweep of the radial inflow impellor blades (38).

  17. Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, Theodore H. H.

    1991-01-01

    The following tasks on the study of advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures are described: (1) constructions of special elements which contain traction-free circular boundaries; (2) formulation of new version of mixed variational principles and new version of hybrid stress elements; (3) establishment of methods for suppression of kinematic deformation modes; (4) construction of semiLoof plate and shell elements by assumed stress hybrid method; and (5) elastic-plastic analysis by viscoplasticity theory using the mechanical subelement model.

  18. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines. Volume 1; Power Metallurgy Rene 95 Rotating Turbine Engine Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfouts, W. R.; Shamblen, C. E.; Mosier, J. S.; Peebles, R. E.; Gorsler, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt was made to improve methods for producing powder metallurgy aircraft gas turbine engine parts from the nickel base superalloy known as Rene 95. The parts produced were the high pressure turbine aft shaft for the CF6-50 engine and the stages 5 through 9 compressor disk forgings for the CFM56/F101 engines. A 50% cost reduction was achieved as compared to conventional cast and wrought processing practices. An integrated effort involving several powder producers and a major forging source were included.

  19. CMC Technology Advancements for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    CMC research at NASA Glenn is focused on aircraft propulsion applications. The objective is to enable reduced engine emissions and fuel consumption for more environmentally friendly aircraft. Engine system studies show that incorporation of ceramic composites into turbine engines will enable significant reductions in emissions and fuel burn due to increased engine efficiency resulting from reduced cooling requirements for hot section components. This presentation will describe recent progress and challenges in developing fiber and matrix constituents for 2700 F CMC turbine applications. In addition, ongoing research in the development of durable environmental barrier coatings, ceramic joining integration technologies and life prediction methods for CMC engine components will be reviewed.

  20. Analytical design of an advanced radial turbine. [automobile engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Large, G. D.; Finger, D. G.; Linder, C. G.

    1981-01-01

    The aerodynamic and mechanical potential of a single stage ceramic radial inflow turbine was evaluated for a high temperature single stage automotive engine. The aerodynamic analysis utilizes a turbine system optimization technique to evaluate both radial and nonradial rotor blading. Selected turbine rotor configurations were evaluated mechanically with three dimensional finite element techniques. Results indicate that exceptionally high rotor tip speeds (2300 ft/sec) and performance potential are feasible with radial bladed rotors if the projected ceramic material properties are realized. Nonradial rotors reduced tip speed requirements (at constant turbine efficiency) but resulted in a lower cumulative probability of success due to higher blade and disk stresses.

  1. Catalyst durability evaluation for advanced gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, G. C.; Pessagno, S. L.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic combustion has demonstrated the ability to provide low NO(x) emissions while maintaining high combustion efficiency. Recently, under joint NASA Lewis, EPA, and Acurex sponsorship, a catalytic reactor was tested for 1000 hours to demonstrate durability in combustion environments representative of advanced automotive gas turbine engines. At a 740K air preheat temperature and a propane fuel/air ratio of 0.028 by mass, the adiabatic flame temperature was held at about 1700K. The graded cell monolithic reactor measured 5 cm in diameter by 10.2 cm in length and was operated at a reference velocity of 13.4 m/s at 1 atmosphere pressure. Measured NO(x) levels remained below 5 ppm while unburned hydrocarbon concentrations registered near zero and carbon monoxide levels were nominally below 20 ppm. The durability test included several parametric turndown studies and ended with a series of on/off cycling tests to further characterize reactor performance.

  2. Materials for advanced turbine engines. Volume 1: Advanced blade tip seal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelahy, J. W.; Fairbanks, N. P.

    1982-01-01

    Project 3, the subject of this technical report, was structured toward the successful engine demonstration of an improved-efficiency, long-life, tip-seal system for turbine blades. The advanced tip-seal system was designed to maintain close operating clearances between turbine blade tips and turbine shrouds and, at the same time, be resistant to environmental effects including high-temperature oxidation, hot corrosion, and thermal cycling. The turbine blade tip comprised an environmentally resistant, activated-diffussion-bonded, monocrystal superalloy combined with a thin layer of aluminium oxide abrasive particles entrapped in an electroplated NiCr matrix. The project established the tip design and joint location, characterized the single-crystal tip alloy and abrasive tip treatment, and established the manufacturing and quality-control plans required to fully process the blades. A total of 171 blades were fully manufactured, and 100 were endurance and performance engine-tested.

  3. Fuel economy screening study of advanced automotive gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Fuel economy potentials were calculated and compared among ten turbomachinery configurations. All gas turbine engines were evaluated with a continuously variable transmission in a 1978 compact car. A reference fuel economy was calculated for the car with its conventional spark ignition piston engine and three speed automatic transmission. Two promising engine/transmission combinations, using gasoline, had 55 to 60 percent gains over the reference fuel economy. Fuel economy sensitivities to engine design parameter changes were also calculated for these two combinations.

  4. Fabrication of ceramic components for advanced gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, F.; Solidum, E.

    1985-01-01

    The AGT101 ceramic gas turbine engine feasibility study has made use of the slip casting of silicon or silicon nitride powders to produce either reaction-bonded or sintered components such as turbine rotors, turbine shrouds, and inner and outer diffusers. Attention is given to the effects of processing parameters on the microstructure and properties of the finished components; the parameters encompass powder particle size distribution, casting slip viscosity, pH, and solid content fraction. The green slip cast components were consolidated by nitriding, sintering, or sinter/HIPping.

  5. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support project (HVTE-TS): Final summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This final technical report was prepared by Rolls-Royce Allison summarizing the multiyear activities of the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and the Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support (HVTE-TS) project. The ATTAP program was initiated in October 1987 and continued through 1993 under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Propulsion Systems, Advanced Propulsion Division. ATTAP was intended to advance the technological readiness of the automotive ceramic gas turbine engine. The target application was the prime power unit coupled to conventional transmissions and powertrains. During the early 1990s, hybrid electric powered automotive propulsion systems became the focus of development and demonstration efforts by the US auto industry and the Department of energy. Thus in 1994, the original ATTAP technology focus was redirected to meet the needs of advanced gas turbine electric generator sets. As a result, the program was restructured to provide the required hybrid vehicle turbine engine technology support and the project renamed HVTE-TS. The overall objective of the combined ATTAP and HVTE-TS projects was to develop and demonstrate structural ceramic components that have the potential for competitive automotive engine life cycle cost and for operating 3,500 hr in an advanced high temperature turbine engine environment. This report describes materials characterization and ceramic component development, ceramic components, hot gasifier rig testing, test-bed engine testing, combustion development, insulation development, and regenerator system development. 130 figs., 12 tabs.

  6. Integrated design and analysis of advanced airfoil shapes for gas turbine engines

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.A.; Rooney, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    An integral process in the mechanical design of gas turbine airfoils is the conversion of hot or running geometry into cold or as-manufactured geometry. New and advanced methods of design and analysis must be created that parallel new and technologically advanced turbine components. In particular, to achieve the high performance required of today's gas turbine engines, the industry is forced to design and manufacture increasingly complex airfoil shapes using advanced analysis and modeling techniques. This paper describes a method of integrating advanced, general purpose finite element analysis techniques in the mechanical design process.

  7. Advanced Seal Technology Role in Meeting Next Generation Turbine Engine Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Munson, John

    1999-01-01

    Cycle studies have shown the benefits of increasing engine pressure ratios and cycle temperatures to decrease engine weight and improve performance in next generation turbine engines. Advanced seals have been identified as critical in meeting engine goals for specific fuel consumption, thrust-to-weight, emissions, durability and operating costs. NASA and the industry are identifying and developing engine and sealing technologies that will result in dramatic improvements and address the goals for engines entering service in the 2005-2007 time frame. This paper provides an overview of advanced seal technology requirements and highlights the results of a preliminary design effort to implement advanced seals into a regional aircraft turbine engine. This study examines in great detail the benefits of applying advanced seals in the high pressure turbine region of the engine. Low leakage film-riding seals can cut in half the estimated 4% cycle air currently used to purge the high pressure turbine cavities. These savings can be applied in one of several ways. Holding rotor inlet temperature (RIT) constant the engine specific fuel consumption can be reduced 0.9%, or thrust could be increased 2.5%, or mission fuel burn could be reduced 1.3%. Alternatively, RIT could be lowered 20 'F resulting in a 50% increase in turbine blade life reducing overall regional aircraft maintenance and fuel bum direct operating costs by nearly 1%. Thermal, structural, secondary-air systems, safety (seal failure and effect), and emissions analyses have shown the proposed design is feasible.

  8. Compatibility of alternative fuels with advanced automotive gas turbine and stirling engines. A literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairelli, J.; Horvath, D.

    1981-01-01

    The application of alternative fuels in advanced automotive gas turbine and Stirling engines is discussed on the basis of a literature survey. These alternative engines are briefly described, and the aspects that will influence fuel selection are identified. Fuel properties and combustion properties are discussed, with consideration given to advanced materials and components. Alternative fuels from petroleum, coal, oil shale, alcohol, and hydrogen are discussed, and some background is given about the origin and production of these fuels. Fuel requirements for automotive gas turbine and Stirling engines are developed, and the need for certain reseach efforts is discussed. Future research efforts planned at Lewis are described.

  9. Ceramics for the advanced automotive gas turbine engine: A look at a single shaft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nosek, S. M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a preliminary analysis of a single shaft regenerative design with a single stage radial turbine are presented to show the fuel economy that can be achieved at high turbine inlet temperatures, with this particular advanced design, if the turbine tip speed and regenerator inlet temperature are not limited. The engine size was 100 hp for application to a 3500 lb auto. The fuel economy was analyzed by coupling the engine to the auto through a continuously variable speed-ratio transmission and operating the system at constant turbine inlet temperature over the Composite Driving Cycle. The fuel was gasoline and the analysis was for a 85 F day. With a turbine inlet temperature of 2500 F the fuel economy was 26.2 mpg, an improvement of 18 percent over that of 22.3 mpg with a turbine inlet temperature of 1900 F. The turbine tip speed needed for best economy with the 2500 F engine was 2530 ft/sec. The regenerator temperature was approximately 2200 F at idle. Disk stresses were estimated for one single stage radial turbine and two two-stage radial-axial turbines and compared with maximum allowable stress curves estimated for a current ceramic material. Results show a need for higher Weibull Modulus, higher strength ceramics.

  10. Materials for advanced turbine engines. Project 2: Rene 150 directionally solidified superalloy turbine blades, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboer, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The results of the engine testing of Rene 150 Stage 1 high pressure turbine blades in CF6-50 core and fan engines are presented. The core engine test was conducted for 233 hours with a variety of test cycles, and the fan engine test was conducted for 1000 C cycles. Post-test analysis of the core engine test data confirmed the suitability of the Rene 150 HPT blade for fan engine testing. Post-test evaluation and analysis of the fan engine test blades included visual and dimensional inspection as well as metallographic examination of selected blades. The Rene 150 HPT blade met the target goal of this project by demonstrating increased metal temperature capability; however, the post-test analysis revealed several areas that would have to be addressed in designing a long-life Rene 150 CF6-50 HPT blade.

  11. Materials and structural aspects of advanced gas-turbine helicopter engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Acurio, J.

    1979-01-01

    The key to improved helicopter gas turbine engine performance lies in the development of advanced materials and advanced structural and design concepts. The modification of the low temperature components of helicopter engines (such as the inlet particle separator), the introduction of composites for use in the engine front frame, the development of advanced materials with increased use-temperature capability for the engine hot section, can result in improved performance and/or decreased engine maintenance cost. A major emphasis in helicopter engine design is the ability to design to meet a required lifetime. This, in turn, requires that the interrelated aspects of higher operating temperatures and pressures, cooling concepts, and environmental protection schemes be integrated into component design. The major material advances, coatings, and design life-prediction techniques pertinent to helicopter engines are reviewed; the current state-of-the-art is identified; and when appropriate, progress, problems, and future directions are assessed.

  12. Development of lubricious coatings for advanced turbine engine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.R.; Munson, J.H.

    1996-02-01

    Development of durable and low-cost high-temperature lubricants for use in gas-turbine regenerator cores is critically important for achieving improved performance and fuel-efficiency in future automotive and hybrid-electric vehicles. Successful development and implementation of such coatings could have substantial technological and economic impacts on energy conservation and could reduce dependence on imported oil. Furthermore, this technology may also contribute to a cleaner environment by reducing emissions. Argonne National Laboratory is exploring new oxide-based lubricious coatings that can meet the stringent tribological conditions of advanced regenerator cores and seals. One of the key elements of this project involves the development of new ceramic and alloy coatings that will reduce friction and wear at temperatures up to 2,000 F. This paper will highlight the recent research in high-temperature lubrication and in the development of new and improved carbon-carbon and carbon-polyimide based composites that can be used at temperatures up to 1,100 F.

  13. Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.H.; Johnson, B.V.

    1993-04-01

    The investigators conclude that: (1) Turbine erosion resistance was shown to be improved by a factor of 5 by varying the turbine design. Increasing the number of stages and increasing the mean radius reduces the peak predicted erosion rates for 2-D flows on the blade airfoil from values which are 6 times those of the vane to values of erosion which are comparable to those of the vane airfoils. (2) Turbine erosion was a strong function of airfoil shape depending on particle diameter. Different airfoil shapes for the same turbine operating condition resulted in a factor of 7 change in airfoil erosion for the smallest particles studied (5 micron). (3) Predicted erosion for the various turbines analyzed was a strong function of particle diameter and weaker function of particle density. (4) Three dimensional secondary flows were shown to cause increases in peak and average erosion on the vane and blade airfoils. Additionally, the interblade secondary flows and stationary outer case caused unique erosion patterns which were not obtainable with 2-D analyses. (5) Analysis of the results indicate that hot gas cleanup systems are necessary to achieve acceptable turbine life in direct-fired, coal-fueled systems. In addition, serious consequences arise when hot gas filter systems fail for even short time periods. For a complete failure of the filter system, a 0.030 in. thick corrosion-resistant protective coating on a turbine blade would be eroded at some locations within eight minutes.

  14. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The development and progress of the Advanced Gas Turbine engine program is examined. An analysis of the role of ceramics in the design and major engine components is included. Projected fuel economy, emissions and performance standards, and versatility in fuel use are also discussed.

  15. Cost/benefit analysis of advanced material technologies for small aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comey, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Cost/benefit studies were conducted on ten advanced material technologies applicable to small aircraft gas turbine engines to be produced in the 1985 time frame. The cost/benefit studies were applied to a two engine, business-type jet aircraft in the 6800- to 9100-Kg (15,000- to 20,000-lb) gross weight class. The new material technologies are intended to provide improvements in the areas of high-pressure turbine rotor components, high-pressure turbine rotor components, high-pressure turbine stator airfoils, and static structural components. The cost/benefit of each technology is presented in terms of relative value, which is defined as a change in life cycle cost times probability of success divided by development cost. Technologies showing the most promising cost/benefits based on relative value are uncooled single crystal MAR-M 247 turbine blades, cooled DS MAR-M 247 turbine blades, and cooled ODS 'M'CrAl laminate turbine stator vanes.

  16. Cost/benefit analysis of advanced materials technologies for future aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisset, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The cost/benefits of advance commercial gas turbine materials are described. Development costs, estimated payoffs and probabilities of success are discussed. The materials technologies investigated are: (1) single crystal turbine blades, (2) high strength hot isostatic pressed turbine disk, (3) advanced oxide dispersion strengthened burner liner, (4) bore entry cooled hot isostatic pressed turbine disk, (5) turbine blade tip - outer airseal system, and (6) advance turbine blade alloys.

  17. Materials and structural aspects of advanced gas-turbine helicopter engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Acurio, J.

    1979-01-01

    Advances in materials, coatings, turbine cooling technology, structural and design concepts, and component-life prediction of helicopter gas-turbine-engine components are presented. Stationary parts including the inlet particle separator, the front frame, rotor tip seals, vanes and combustors and rotating components - compressor blades, disks, and turbine blades - are discussed. Advanced composite materials are considered for the front frame and compressor blades, prealloyed powder superalloys will increase strength and reduce costs of disks, the oxide dispersion strengthened alloys will have 100C higher use temperature in combustors and vanes than conventional superalloys, ceramics will provide the highest use temperature of 1400C for stator vanes and 1370C for turbine blades, and directionally solidified eutectics will afford up to 50C temperature advantage at turbine blade operating conditions. Coatings for surface protection at higher surface temperatures and design trends in turbine cooling technology are discussed. New analytical methods of life prediction such as strain gage partitioning for high temperature prediction, fatigue life, computerized prediction of oxidation resistance, and advanced techniques for estimating coating life are described.

  18. Computational thermo-fluid dynamics contributions to advanced gas turbine engine design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.; Adamczyk, J. J.; Rohlik, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    The design practices for the gas turbine are traced throughout history with particular emphasis on the calculational or analytical methods. Three principal components of the gas turbine engine will be considered: namely, the compressor, the combustor and the turbine.

  19. Optimization of engines for a commercial Mach 0.98 transport using advanced turbine cooling methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, G. A.; Whitlow, J. B., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of an advanced technology airplane using supercritical aerodynamics. Cruise Mach number was 0.98 at 40,000 feet altitude with a payload of 60,000 pounds and a range of 3000 nautical miles. Separate-flow turbofans were examined parametrically to determine the effect of sea-level-static design turbine-inlet-temperature and noise on takeoff gross weight (TOGW) assuming full-film turbine cooling. The optimum turbine inlet temperature was 2650 F. Two-stage-fan engines, with cruise fan pressure ratio of 2.25, achieved a noise goal of 103.5 EPNdB with todays noise technology while one-stage-fan engines, achieved a noise goal of 98 EPNdB. The take-off gross weight penalty to use the one-stage fan was 6.2 percent.

  20. High performance fibers for structurally reliable metal and ceramic composites. [advanced gas turbine engine materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Very few of the commercially available high performance fibers with low densities, high Young's moduli, and high tensile strengths possess all the necessary property requirements for providing either metal matrix composites (MMC) or ceramic matrix composites (CMC) with high structural reliability. These requirements are discussed in general and examples are presented of how these property guidelines are influencing fiber evaluation and improvement studies at NASA aimed at developing structurally reliable MMC and CMC for advanced gas turbine engines.

  1. Advanced High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites for Gas Turbine Engines Program Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, David; Carella, John

    1999-01-01

    This document, submitted by AlliedSignal Engines (AE), a division of AlliedSignal Aerospace Company, presents the program final report for the Advanced High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites for Gas Turbine Engines Program Expansion in compliance with data requirements in the statement of work, Contract No. NAS3-97003. This document includes: 1 -Technical Summary: a) Component Design, b) Manufacturing Process Selection, c) Vendor Selection, and d) Testing Validation: 2-Program Conclusion and Perspective. Also, see the Appendix at the back of this report. This report covers the program accomplishments from December 1, 1996, to August 24, 1998. The Advanced High Temperature PMC's for Gas Turbine Engines Program Expansion was a one year long, five task technical effort aimed at designing, fabricating and testing a turbine engine component using NASA's high temperature resin system AMB-21. The fiber material chosen was graphite T650-35, 3K, 8HS with UC-309 sizing. The first four tasks included component design and manufacturing, process selection, vendor selection, component fabrication and validation testing. The final task involved monthly financial and technical reports.

  2. Integration of magnetic bearings in the design of advanced gas turbine engines

    SciTech Connect

    Storace, A.F.; Sood, D.; Lyons, J.P.; Preston, M.A.

    1995-10-01

    Active magnetic bearings provide revolutionary advantages for gas turbine engine rotor support. These advantages include tremendously improved vibration and stability characteristics, reduced power loss, improved reliability, fault tolerance, and greatly extended bearing service life. The marriage of these advantages with innovative structural network design and advanced materials utilization will permit major increases in thrust-to-weight performance and structural efficiency for future gas turbine engines. However, obtaining the maximum payoff requires two key ingredients. The first is the use of modern magnetic bearing technologies such as innovative digital control techniques, high-density power electronics, high-density magnetic actuators, fault-tolerant system architecture, and electronic (sensorless) position estimation. This paper describes these technologies and the test hardware currently in place for verifying the performance of advanced magnetic actuators, power electronics, and digital controls. The second key ingredient is to go beyond the simple replacement of rolling element bearings with magnetic bearings by incorporating magnetic bearings as an integral part of the overall engine design. This is analogous to the proper approach to designing with composites, whereby the designer tailors the geometry and load-carrying function of the structural system or component for the composite instead of simply substituting composites in a design originally intended for metal material. This paper describes methodologies for the design integration of magnetic bearings in gas turbine engines.

  3. Ceramic component processing development for advanced gas-turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcentire, B. J.; Hengst, R. R.; Collins, W. T.; Taglialavore, A. P.; Yeckley, R. L.; Bright, E.; Bingham, M. G.

    1991-01-01

    A review of ceramic component advancements directed at developing manufacturing technologies for rotors, stators, vane-seat platforms and scrolls is presented. The first three components are being produced from HIPed Si3N4, while scrolls were prepared from a series of siliconized silicon-carbide materials. Developmental work has been conducted on all aspects of the fabrication process utilizing Taguchi experimental design methods. An assessment of material properties for various components from each process and material are made.

  4. NDE of advanced turbine engine components and materials by computed tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yancey, R. N.; Baaklini, George Y.; Klima, Stanley J.

    1991-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an X-ray technique that provides quantitative 3D density information of materials and components and can accurately detail spatial distributions of cracks, voids, and density variations. CT scans of ceramic materials, composites, and engine components were taken and the resulting images will be discussed. Scans were taken with two CT systems with different spatial resolution capabilities. The scans showed internal damage, density variations, and geometrical arrangement of various features in the materials and components. It was concluded that CT can play an important role in the characterization of advanced turbine engine materials and components. Future applications of this technology will be outlined.

  5. Review of status and potential of tungsten-wire: Superalloy composites for advanced gas turbine engine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorelli, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The current status of development of refractory-wire-superalloy composites and the potential for their application to turbine blades in land-based power generation and advanced aircraft engines are reviewed. The data indicate that refractory-wire-superalloy composites have application as turbine blades at temperatures of 2200 F and above.

  6. Cost benefit study of advanced materials technology for aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillery, R. V.; Johnston, R. P.

    1977-01-01

    The cost/benefits of eight advanced materials technologies were evaluated for two aircraft missions. The overall study was based on a time frame of commercial engine use of the advanced material technologies by 1985. The material technologies evaluated were eutectic turbine blades, titanium aluminide components, ceramic vanes, shrouds and combustor liners, tungsten composite FeCrAly blades, gamma prime oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy blades, and no coat ODS alloy combustor liners. They were evaluated in two conventional takeoff and landing missions, one transcontinental and one intercontinental.

  7. Integration of magnetic bearings in the design of advanced gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storace, Albert F.; Sood, Devendra K.; Lyons, James P.; Preston, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings provide revolutionary advantages for gas turbine engine rotor support. These advantages include tremendously improved vibration and stability characteristics, reduced power loss, improved reliability, fault-tolerance, and greatly extended bearing service life. The marriage of these advantages with innovative structural network design and advanced materials utilization will permit major increases in thrust to weight performance and structural efficiency for future gas turbine engines. However, obtaining the maximum payoff requires two key ingredients. The first key ingredient is the use of modern magnetic bearing technologies such as innovative digital control techniques, high-density power electronics, high-density magnetic actuators, fault-tolerant system architecture, and electronic (sensorless) position estimation. This paper describes these technologies. The second key ingredient is to go beyond the simple replacement of rolling element bearings with magnetic bearings by incorporating magnetic bearings as an integral part of the overall engine design. This is analogous to the proper approach to designing with composites, whereby the designer tailors the geometry and load carrying function of the structural system or component for the composite instead of simply substituting composites in a design originally intended for metal material. This paper describes methodologies for the design integration of magnetic bearings in gas turbine engines.

  8. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Gaul

    2004-04-21

    Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing

  9. Advanced bristle seals for gas turbine engines. Final report, May-November 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cabe, J.L.

    1993-01-28

    A seven month proof-of-concept program was conducted for an advanced bristle seal, called a bush seal, for use in gas turbine engines. This program was performed as a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project. Bush seal specimen and a full ring bush seal were designed, evaluated, and manufactured for testing. An analytical study of the potential of the bush seal relative to a labyrinth seal was conducted. Static and dynamic testing of the bush seal was performed to determine the behavior of the bristles under pressurization and during contact with a rotating labyrinth tooth. Stable behavior of the bristle elements was observed during static pressurization of a full ring bush seal. The dynamic testing of various configurations of bush seal against a rotating labyrinth tooth showed minimal wear of the bristles relative to a conventional labyrinth seal. the development and application of the bush seal concept to gas turbine engines has the potential of improving the engine's performance while decreasing the degradation of the seal performance over time.... Seal, Bush seal, Labyrinth seal, Gas turbine.

  10. Exploring Advanced Technology Gas Turbine Engine Design and Performance for the Large Civil Tiltrotor (LCTR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    A Large Civil Tiltrotor (LCTR) conceptual design was developed as part of the NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Systems Investigation in order to establish a consistent basis for evaluating the benefits of advanced technology for large tiltrotors. The concept has since evolved into the second-generation LCTR2, designed to carry 90 passengers for 1,000 nautical miles at 300 knots, with vertical takeoff and landing capability. This paper explores gas turbine component performance and cycle parameters to quantify performance gains possible for additional improvements in component and material performance beyond those identified in previous LCTR2 propulsion studies and to identify additional research areas. The vehicle-level characteristics from this advanced technology generation 2 propulsion architecture will help set performance levels as additional propulsion and power systems are conceived to meet ever-increasing requirements for mobility and comfort, while reducing energy use, cost, noise and emissions. The Large Civil Tiltrotor vehicle and mission will be discussed as a starting point for this effort. A few, relevant engine and component technology studies, including previous LCTR2 engine study results will be summarized to help orient the reader on gas turbine engine architecture, performance and limitations. Study assumptions and methodology used to explore engine design and performance, as well as assess vehicle sizing and mission performance will then be discussed. Individual performance for present and advanced engines, as well as engine performance effects on overall vehicle size and mission fuel usage, will be given. All results will be summarized to facilitate understanding the importance and interaction of various component and system performance on overall vehicle characteristics.

  11. Advanced turbine systems program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

  12. Advanced turbine systems program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

    1992-12-31

    In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

  13. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John

    2015-09-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratories, Siemens has completed the Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development Program to develop an advanced gas turbine for incorporation into future coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. All the scheduled DOE Milestones were completed and significant technical progress was made in the development of new technologies and concepts. Advanced computer simulations and modeling, as well as subscale, full scale laboratory, rig and engine testing were utilized to evaluate and select concepts for further development. Program Requirements of: A 3 to 5 percentage point improvement in overall plant combined cycle efficiency when compared to the reference baseline plant; 20 to 30 percent reduction in overall plant capital cost when compared to the reference baseline plant; and NOx emissions of 2 PPM out of the stack. were all met. The program was completed on schedule and within the allotted budget

  14. Advanced cooled-engine shell/spar turbine vanes and blades. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    The objectives of the Advanced Cooling Full-Scale Engine Demonstration Program, Phase II (EPRI Contract RP1319-5), were to develop and to demonstrate an advanced aircraft cooling technology for use in the vanes, blades, and associated hot-section components of a utility-sized combustion turbine. Use of such technology would provide reduced metal-surface temperatures for improved reliability or the potential for increasing turbine inlet temperatures for improved thermal efficiency. In the shell/spar cooling technology chosen for the vane and blade construction, cooling air flows through channels between a thin metal external sheet (shell) and a hollow-cast internal support member (spar). The shell and spar are joined by diffusion bonding. The results of first-stage shell/spar blade and vane design studies are reported, and heat transfer and stress analyses of the blade and vane designs are featured. The progress made on the development of the vane fabrication technology, up to the early termination at the end of 1984, is fully delineated. The successful development of an ultrasonic inspection technique to indicate unbonded areas between the shell and spar is reported. The results of heat transfer testing with shell/spar specimens and low-cycle fatigue testing of IN617 sheet are described. Problem areas in the determination of the low-cycle fatigue life expectancy of the designs are identified. Recommendations are given for continuing the blade and vane shell/spar advanced cooling technology development.

  15. Advanced Low-Emissions Catalytic-Combustor Program, phase 1. [aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturgess, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    Six catalytic combustor concepts were defined, analyzed, and evaluated. Major design considerations included low emissions, performance, safety, durability, installations, operations and development. On the basis of these considerations the two most promising concepts were selected. Refined analysis and preliminary design work was conducted on these two concepts. The selected concepts were required to fit within the combustor chamber dimensions of the reference engine. This is achieved by using a dump diffuser discharging into a plenum chamber between the compressor discharge and the turbine inlet, with the combustors overlaying the prediffuser and the rear of the compressor. To enhance maintainability, the outer combustor case for each concept is designed to translate forward for accessibility to the catalytic reactor, liners and high pressure turbine area. The catalytic reactor is self-contained with air-cooled canning on a resilient mounting. Both selected concepts employed integrated engine-starting approaches to raise the catalytic reactor up to operating conditions. Advanced liner schemes are used to minimize required cooling air. The two selected concepts respectively employ fuel-rich initial thermal reaction followed by rapid quench and subsequent fuel-lean catalytic reaction of carbon monoxide, and, fuel-lean thermal reaction of some fuel in a continuously operating pilot combustor with fuel-lean catalytic reaction of remaining fuel in a radially-staged main combustor.

  16. Optimization of engines for a commercial Mach 0.85 transport using advanced turbine cooling methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    A parametric study was made of a group of separate-flow-turbofan engines for use in advanced technology airplanes designed for a cruise Mach number of 0.85 at 40,000 feet. The three-engined airplanes were sized to carry 200 passengers 3000 nautical miles. Supercritical aerodynamics were assumed. Film-cooled turbines were used and sea-level-static turbine-rotor-inlet temperature was always 2600 F. The optimum cycle depends on the noise goal assumed. Without a noise goal the best fan pressure ratio (FPR) is about 1.90. At noise goals of FAR 36, -10 EPNdb, and -20 EPNdb, the best FPR's are 1.85, 1.76, and 1.70, respectively, at cruise. The take-off FPR's are progressively less than the cruise value as the noise goal approaches -20 EPNdb. The penalties in take-off gross weight incurred were 8.5, 19, and 64 percent at goals of FAR 36, -10 EPNdb, and -20 EPNdb, respectively.

  17. ADVANCED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS FOR STATIONARY GAS TURBINE ENGINES. VOLUME IV. COMBUSTOR VERIFICATION TESTING. ADDENDUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reports describe an exploratory development program to identify, evaluate, and demonstrate dry techniques for significantly reducing NOx from stationary gas turbine engines. Volume 4 describes an additional series of tests to evaluate the performance of the combustor on heavy...

  18. Study of advanced radial outflow turbine for solar steam Rankine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C.; Kolenc, T.

    1979-01-01

    The performance characteristics of various steam Rankine engine configurations for solar electric power generation were investigated. A radial outflow steam turbine was investigated to determine: (1) a method for predicting performance from experimental data; (2) the flexibility of a single design with regard to power output and pressure ratio; and (3) the effect of varying the number of turbine stages. All turbine designs were restricted to be compatible with commercially available gearboxes and generators. A study of several operating methods and control schemes for the steam Rankine engine shows that from an efficiency and control simplicity standpoint, the best approach is to hold turbine inlet temperature constant, vary turbine inlet pressure to match load, and allow condenser temperature to float maintaining constant heat rejection load.

  19. Cost/benefit analysis of advanced materials technologies for future aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    The materials technologies studied included thermal barrier coatings for turbine airfoils, turbine disks, cases, turbine vanes and engine and nacelle composite materials. The cost/benefit of each technology was determined in terms of Relative Value defined as change in return on investment times probability of success divided by development cost. A recommended final ranking of technologies was based primarily on consideration of Relative Values with secondary consideration given to changes in other economic parameters. Technologies showing the most promising cost/benefits were thermal barrier coated temperature nacelle/engine system composites.

  20. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    Joesph Fadok

    2008-01-01

    Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the

  1. Cascaded humidified advanced turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhamkin, M.; Swenson, E.C.; Cohn, A.; Bradshaw, D.; Taylor, R.; Wilson, J.M.; Gaul, G.; Jahnke, F.; Polsky, M.

    1995-05-01

    This article describes how, by combining the best features of simple- and combined-cycle gas turbine power plants, the CHAT cycle concept offers power producers a clean, more efficient and less expensive alternative to both. The patented cascaded advanced turbine and its cascaded humidified advanced turbine (CHAT) derivative offer utilities and other power producers a practical advanced gas turbine power plant by combining commercially-available gas turbine and industrial compressor technologies in a unique way. Compared to combined-cycle plants, a CHAT power plant has lower emissions and specific capital costs-approximately 20 percent lower than what is presently available. Further, CHAT`s operating characteristics are especially well-suited to load following quick start-up scenarios and they are less susceptible to power degradation from higher ambient air temperature conditions.

  2. ADVANCED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS FOR STATIONARY GAS TURBINE ENGINES: VOLUME I. REVIEW AND PRELIMINARY EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reports describe an exploratory development program to identify, evaluate, and demonstrate dry techniques for significantly reducing NOx from thermal and fuel-bound sources in stationary gas turbine engines. Volume 1 covers Phase I of the four-phase effort. In Phase I, duty c...

  3. ADVANCED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS FOR STATIONARY GAS TURBINE ENGINES: VOLUME III. COMBUSTOR VERIFICATION TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reports describe an exploratory development program to identify, evaluate, and demonstrate dry techniques for significantly reducing NOx from stationary gas turbine engines. Volume 3 describes the scaleup of the rich-burn/quick-quench (RB/QQ) model to a full-scale (25 MW) gas...

  4. Preliminary analysis of a downsized advanced gas-turbine engine in a subcompact car

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, J. L.; Johnsen, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Relative fuel economy advantages exist for a ceramic turbine engine when it is downsized for a small car were investigated. A 75 kW (100 hp) single shaft engine under development was analytically downsized to 37 kW (50 hp) and analyzed with a metal belt continuously variable transmission in a synthesized car. With gasoline, a 25% advantage was calculated over that of a current spark ignition engine, scaled to the same power, using the same transmission and car. With diesel fuel, a 21% advantage was calculated over that of a similar diesel engine vehicle.

  5. Single rotor turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Platts, David A.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented a turbine engine with a single rotor which cools the engine, functions as a radial compressor, pushes air through the engine to the ignition point, and acts as an axial turbine for powering the compressor. The invention engine is designed to use a simple scheme of conventional passage shapes to provide both a radial and axial flow pattern through the single rotor, thereby allowing the radial intake air flow to cool the turbine blades and turbine exhaust gases in an axial flow to be used for energy transfer. In an alternative embodiment, an electric generator is incorporated in the engine to specifically adapt the invention for power generation. Magnets are embedded in the exhaust face of the single rotor proximate to a ring of stationary magnetic cores with windings to provide for the generation of electricity. In this alternative embodiment, the turbine is a radial inflow turbine rather than an axial turbine as used in the first embodiment. Radial inflow passages of conventional design are interleaved with radial compressor passages to allow the intake air to cool the turbine blades.

  6. Turbine engine interstage seal

    SciTech Connect

    Clevenger, L.L.

    1993-08-10

    A seal structure is described for a turbine engine, the turbine engine including a housing surrounding a centrifugal compressor having a rotor, and a radial inflow turbine including a turbine rotor, the compressor rotor and the turbine rotor being disposed in back-to-back relation, the turbine rotor being drivingly connected with the compressor rotor and axially spaced therefrom to define an annular gap there between, the gap radially bounded at its outer periphery by the housing and at its inner periphery by an annular surface intermediate the compressor rotor and the turbine rotor an annular sealing member disposed in the gap to control air flow from the compressor toward the turbine; the annular sealing member the first axial direction, and a third annular wall portion joining with the second annular wall portion and extending inward therefrom towards the surface intermediate the compressor rotor and the turbine rotor, and biasing means cooperating with the housing for urging the seal structure toward the turbine rotor.

  7. Advanced SiC/SiC Ceramic Composites For Gas-Turbine Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; DiCarlo, J. A.; Easler, T. E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing a variety of advanced SiC/SiC ceramic composite (ASC) systems that allow these materials to operate for hundreds of hours under stress in air at temperatures approaching 2700 F. These SiC/SiC composite systems are lightweight (approximately 30% metal density) and, in comparison to monolithic ceramics and carbon fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, are able to reliably retain their structural properties for long times under aggressive gas-turbine engine environments. The key for the ASC systems is related first to the NASA development of the Sylramic-iBN Sic fiber, which displays higher thermal stability than any other SiC- based ceramic fibers and possesses an in-situ grown BN surface layer for higher environmental durability. This fiber is simply derived from Sylramic Sic fiber type that is currently produced at ATK COI Ceramics (COIC). Further capability is then derived by using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) and/or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) to form a Sic-based matrix with high creep and rupture resistance as well as high thermal conductivity. The objectives of this study were (1) to optimize the constituents and processing parameters for a Sylramic-iBN fiber reinforced ceramic composite system in which the Sic-based matrix is formed at COIC almost entirely by PIP (full PIP approach), (2) to evaluate the properties of this system in comparison to other 2700 F Sylramic-iBN systems in which the matrix is formed by full CVI and CVI + PIP, and (3) to examine the pros and cons of the full PIP approach for fabricating hot-section engine components. A key goal is the development of a composite system with low porosity, thereby providing high modulus, high matrix cracking strength, high interlaminar strength, and high thermal conductivity, a major property requirement for engine components that will experience high thermal gradients during service. Other key composite property goals are demonstration at

  8. Manufacture and engine test of advanced oxide dispersion strengthened alloy turbine vanes. [for space shuttle thermal protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    Oxide-Dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Ni-Cr-Al alloy systems were exploited for turbine engine vanes which would be used for the space shuttle thermal protection system. Available commercial and developmental advanced ODS alloys were evaluated, and three were selected based on established vane property goals and manufacturing criteria. The selected alloys were evaluated in an engine test. Candidate alloys were screened by strength, thermal fatigue resistance, oxidation and sulfidation resistance. The Ni-16Cr (3 to 5)Al-ThO2 system was identified as having attractive high temperature oxidation resistance. Subsequent work also indicated exceptional sulfidation resistance for these alloys.

  9. Development of a high-temperature durable catalyst for use in catalytic combustors for advanced automotive gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, H.; Snow, G. C.; Chu, E. K.; Chang, R. L. S.; Angwin, M. J.; Pessagno, S. L.

    1981-01-01

    Durable catalytic reactors for advanced gas turbine engines were developed. Objectives were: to evaluate furnace aging as a cost effective catalytic reactor screening test, measure reactor degradation as a function of furnace aging, demonstrate 1,000 hours of combustion durability, and define a catalytic reactor system with a high probability of successful integration into an automotive gas turbine engine. Fourteen different catalytic reactor concepts were evaluated, leading to the selection of one for a durability combustion test with diesel fuel for combustion conditions. Eight additional catalytic reactors were evaluated and one of these was successfully combustion tested on propane fuel. This durability reactor used graded cell honeycombs and a combination of noble metal and metal oxide catalysts. The reactor was catalytically active and structurally sound at the end of the durability test.

  10. Baseline automotive gas turbine engine development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. E. (Editor); Pampreen, R. C. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Tests results on a baseline engine are presented to document the automotive gas turbine state-of-the-art at the start of the program. The performance characteristics of the engine and of a vehicle powered by this engine are defined. Component improvement concepts in the baseline engine were evaluated on engine dynamometer tests in the complete vehicle on a chassis dynamometer and on road tests. The concepts included advanced combustors, ceramic regenerators, an integrated control system, low cost turbine material, a continuously variable transmission, power-turbine-driven accessories, power augmentation, and linerless insulation in the engine housing.

  11. Silicon-Based Ceramic-Matrix Composites for Advanced Turbine Engines: Some Degradation Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Ogbuji, Linus U. J.

    2000-01-01

    SiC/BN/SiC composites are designed to take advantage of the high specific strengths and moduli of non-oxide ceramics, and their excellent resistance to creep, chemical attack, and oxidation, while circumventing the brittleness inherent in ceramics. Hence, these composites have the potential to take turbine engines of the future to higher operating temperatures than is achievable with metal alloys. However, these composites remain developmental and more work needs to be done to optimize processing techniques. This paper highlights the lingering issue of pest degradation in these materials and shows that it results from vestiges of processing steps and can thus be minimized or eliminated.

  12. High-pressure hydrogen testing of single crystal superalloys for advanced rocket engine turbopump turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, W. S.; Parr, R. A.; Johnston, M. H.; Strizak, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    A screening program to determine the effects of high pressure hydrogen on selected candidate materials for advanced single crystal turbine blade applications is examined. The alloys chosen for the investigation are CM SX-2, CM SX-4C, Rene N-4, and PWA1480. Testing is carried out in hydrogen and helium at 34 MPa and room temperature, with both notched and unnotched single crystal specimens. Results show a significant variation in susceptibility to Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) among the four alloys and a marked difference in fracture topography between hydrogen and helium environment specimens.

  13. Gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Lawlor, Shawn P.; Roberts, II, William Byron

    2016-03-08

    A gas turbine engine with a compressor rotor having compressor impulse blades that delivers gas at supersonic conditions to a stator. The stator includes a one or more aerodynamic ducts that each have a converging portion and a diverging portion for deceleration of the selected gas to subsonic conditions and to deliver a high pressure oxidant containing gas to flameholders. The flameholders may be provided as trapped vortex combustors, for combustion of a fuel to produce hot pressurized combustion gases. The hot pressurized combustion gases are choked before passing out of an aerodynamic duct to a turbine. Work is recovered in a turbine by expanding the combustion gases through impulse blades. By balancing the axial loading on compressor impulse blades and turbine impulse blades, asymmetrical thrust is minimized or avoided.

  14. Advanced wind turbine design

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, P.M.; Jaffrey, A.

    1995-09-01

    Garrad Hassan have a project in progress funded by the UK Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) to assess the prospects and cost benefits of advanced wind turbine design. In the course of this work, a new concept, the coned rotor design, has been developed. This enables a wind turbine system to operate in effect with variable rotor diameter augmenting energy capture in light winds and shedding loads in storm conditions. Comparisons with conventional design suggest that a major benefit in reduced cost of wind generated electricity may be possible.

  15. Development of a high-temperature durable catalyst for use in catalytic combustors for advanced automotive gas turbine engines

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, H; Snow, G C; Chu, E K :; Chang, R L.S.; Angwin, M J; Pessagno, S L

    1981-09-01

    An experimental program was performed to develop durable catalytic reactors for advanced gas turbine engines. This program was performed as part of DOE's Gas Turbine Highway Vehicle Systems Project. Objectives of this program were to evaluate furnace aging as a cost-effective catalytic reactor screening test, measure reactor degradation as a function of furnace aging, demonstrate 1000 h of combustion durability, and define a catalytic reactor system with a high probability of successfful integration into an automotive gas turbine engine. In the first phase of this program, 14 different catalytic reactor concepts were evaluated, leading to the selection of one for a durability combustion test with diesel fuel at 1700 K combustion coditions. The durability reactor, a proprietary UOP noble metal catalyst, failed structurally after about 136 h and the catalyst was essentially inactive after about 226 h. In Phase II, eight additional catalytic reactors were evalated and one of these was sucessfully combustion-tested for 1000 h at 1700 K on propane fuel. This durability reactor used graded-cell honeycombs and a combination of noble metal and metal oxide catalysts. The reactor was catalytically active and structurally sound at the end of the durability test.

  16. Single-crystal superalloy drives turbine advances

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, K.

    1995-04-01

    In searching for ways to improve power-to-weight ratios and fuel efficiency, gas turbine engine manufacturers invest heavily in the development and testing of new alloys. Their goal is to find turbine airfoil materials that can handle the higher operating temperatures, increased component stresses, and faster rotational speeds that are needed to increase turbine performance. Major turbine engine manufacturers find they can achieve these objectives through ultra-high performance, single-crystal superalloys -- a group of nickel-base materials that exhibit outstanding strength and surface stability at temperatures up to 85{percent} of their melting points. One such superalloy is CMSX-4, co-engineered by ingot maker Cannon-Muskegon and turbine engine manufacturers Rolls-Royce and Allison Engine Company. It is currently being used in such applications as Allison`s advanced airfoil programs.

  17. Liquid rocket engine turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Criteria for the design and development of turbines for rocket engines to meet specific performance, and installation requirements are summarized. The total design problem, and design elements are identified, and the current technology pertaining to these elements is described. Recommended practices for achieving a successful design are included.

  18. Blade for turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Babu, Michael (Inventor); Murdock, James R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A blade for a turbine engine having a centerline. The blade comprises: a root section extending at an angle relative to the centerline; and an airfoil section extending from the root section. The root section is directly adjacent said airfoil section. In other words, the blade is neckless. The blade is part of a rotor assembly, and is preferably a fan blade.

  19. Small gas turbine engine technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedzwiecki, Richard W.; Meitner, Peter L.

    1988-01-01

    Performance of small gas turbine engines in the 250 to 1,000 horsepower size range is significantly lower than that of large engines. Engines of this size are typically used in rotorcraft, commutercraft, general aviation, and cruise missile applications. Principal reasons for the lower efficiencies of a smaller engine are well known: component efficients are lower by as much as 8 to 10 percentage points because of size effects. Small engines are designed for lower cycle pressures and temperatures because of smaller blading and cooling limitations. The highly developed analytical and manufacturing techniques evolved for large engines are not directly transferrable to small engines. Thus, it was recognized that a focused effort addressing technologies for small engies was needed and could significantly impact their performance. Recently, in-house and contract studies were undertaken at the NASA Lewis Research Center to identify advanced engine cycle and component requirements for substantial performance improvement of small gas turbines for projected year 2000 applications. The results of both in-house research and contract studies are presented. In summary, projected fuel savings of 22 to 42 percent could be obtained. Accompanying direct operating cost reductions of 11 to 17 percent, depending on fuel cost, were also estimated. High payoff technologies are identified for all engine applications, and recent results of experimental research to evolve the high payoff technologies are described.

  20. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Advanced Turbine Technology Application Project (ATTAP) activities during the past year were highlighted by test-bed engine design and development activities; ceramic component design; materials and component characterization; ceramic component process development and fabrication; component rig testing; and test-bed engine fabrication and testing. Although substantial technical challenges remain, all areas exhibited progress. Test-bed engine design and development activity included engine mechanical design, power turbine flow-path design and mechanical layout, and engine system integration aimed at upgrading the AGT-5 from a 1038 C metal engine to a durable 1371 C structural ceramic component test-bed engine. ATTAP-defined ceramic and associated ceramic/metal component design activities include: the ceramic combustor body, the ceramic gasifier turbine static structure, the ceramic gasifier turbine rotor, the ceramic/metal power turbine static structure, and the ceramic power turbine rotors. The materials and component characterization efforts included the testing and evaluation of several candidate ceramic materials and components being developed for use in the ATTAP. Ceramic component process development and fabrication activities are being conducted for the gasifier turbine rotor, gasifier turbine vanes, gasifier turbine scroll, extruded regenerator disks, and thermal insulation. Component rig testing activities include the development of the necessary test procedures and conduction of rig testing of the ceramic components and assemblies. Four-hundred hours of hot gasifier rig test time were accumulated with turbine inlet temperatures exceeding 1204 C at 100 percent design gasifier speed. A total of 348.6 test hours were achieved on a single ceramic rotor without failure and a second ceramic rotor was retired in engine-ready condition at 364.9 test hours. Test-bed engine fabrication, testing, and development supported improvements in ceramic component technology

  1. Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines. Phase 1, Erosion of turbine hot gas path blading: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.H.; Johnson, B.V.

    1993-04-01

    The investigators conclude that: (1) Turbine erosion resistance was shown to be improved by a factor of 5 by varying the turbine design. Increasing the number of stages and increasing the mean radius reduces the peak predicted erosion rates for 2-D flows on the blade airfoil from values which are 6 times those of the vane to values of erosion which are comparable to those of the vane airfoils. (2) Turbine erosion was a strong function of airfoil shape depending on particle diameter. Different airfoil shapes for the same turbine operating condition resulted in a factor of 7 change in airfoil erosion for the smallest particles studied (5 micron). (3) Predicted erosion for the various turbines analyzed was a strong function of particle diameter and weaker function of particle density. (4) Three dimensional secondary flows were shown to cause increases in peak and average erosion on the vane and blade airfoils. Additionally, the interblade secondary flows and stationary outer case caused unique erosion patterns which were not obtainable with 2-D analyses. (5) Analysis of the results indicate that hot gas cleanup systems are necessary to achieve acceptable turbine life in direct-fired, coal-fueled systems. In addition, serious consequences arise when hot gas filter systems fail for even short time periods. For a complete failure of the filter system, a 0.030 in. thick corrosion-resistant protective coating on a turbine blade would be eroded at some locations within eight minutes.

  2. Advanced Shock Position Control for Mode Transition in a Turbine Based Combined Cycle Engine Inlet Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Stueber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    A dual flow-path inlet system is being tested to evaluate methodologies for a Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) propulsion system to perform a controlled inlet mode transition. Prior to experimental testing, simulation models are used to test, debug, and validate potential control algorithms. One simulation package being used for testing is the High Mach Transient Engine Cycle Code simulation, known as HiTECC. This paper discusses the closed loop control system, which utilizes a shock location sensor to improve inlet performance and operability. Even though the shock location feedback has a coarse resolution, the feedback allows for a reduction in steady state error and, in some cases, better performance than with previous proposed pressure ratio based methods. This paper demonstrates the design and benefit with the implementation of a proportional-integral controller, an H-Infinity based controller, and a disturbance observer based controller.

  3. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines (MATE). Project 4: Erosion resistant compressor airfoil coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashid, J. M.; Freling, M.; Friedrich, L. A.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of coatings to provide at least a 2X improvement in particulate erosion resistance for steel, nickel and titanium compressor airfoils was identified and demonstrated. Coating materials evaluated included plasma sprayed cobalt tungsten carbide, nickel carbide and diffusion applied chromium plus boron. Several processing parameters for plasma spray processing and diffusion coating were evaluated to identify coating systems having the most potential for providing airfoil erosion resistance. Based on laboratory results and analytical evaluations, selected coating systems were applied to gas turbine blades and evaluated for surface finish, burner rig erosion resistance and effect on high cycle fatigue strength. Based on these tests, the following coatings were recommended for engine testing: Gator-Gard plasma spray 88WC-12Co on titanium alloy airfoils, plasma spray 83WC-17Co on steel and nickel alloy airfoils, and Cr+B on nickel alloy airfoils.

  4. Durability testing at 5 atmospheres of advanced catalysts and catalyst supports for gas turbine engine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, B. A.; Lee, H. C.; Osgerby, I. T.; Heck, R. M.; Hess, H.

    1980-01-01

    The durability of CATCOM catalysts and catalyst supports was experimentally demonstrated in a combustion environment under simulated gas turbine engine combustor operating conditions. A test of 1000 hours duration was completed with one catalyst using no. 2 diesel fuel and operating at catalytically-supported thermal combustion conditions. The performance of the catalyst was determined by monitoring emissions throughout the test, and by examining the physical condition of the catalyst core at the conclusion of the test. Tests were performed periodically to determine changes in catalytic activity of the catalyst core. Detailed parametric studies were also run at the beginning and end of the durability test, using no. 2 fuel oil. Initial and final emissions for the 1000 hours test respectively were: unburned hydrocarbons (C3 vppm):0, 146, carbon monoxide (vppm):30, 2420; nitrogen oxides (vppm):5.7, 5.6.

  5. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Sy Ali

    2002-03-01

    The market for power generation equipment is undergoing a tremendous transformation. The traditional electric utility industry is restructuring, promising new opportunities and challenges for all facilities to meet their demands for electric and thermal energy. Now more than ever, facilities have a host of options to choose from, including new distributed generation (DG) technologies that are entering the market as well as existing DG options that are improving in cost and performance. The market is beginning to recognize that some of these users have needs beyond traditional grid-based power. Together, these changes are motivating commercial and industrial facilities to re-evaluate their current mix of energy services. One of the emerging generating options is a new breed of advanced fuel cells. While there are a variety of fuel cell technologies being developed, the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) are especially promising, with their electric efficiency expected around 50-60 percent and their ability to generate either hot water or high quality steam. In addition, they both have the attractive characteristics of all fuel cells--relatively small siting footprint, rapid response to changing loads, very low emissions, quiet operation, and an inherently modular design lending itself to capacity expansion at predictable unit cost with reasonably short lead times. The objectives of this project are to:(1) Estimate the market potential for high efficiency fuel cell hybrids in the U.S.;(2) Segment market size by commercial, industrial, and other key markets;(3) Identify and evaluate potential early adopters; and(4) Develop results that will help prioritize and target future R&D investments. The study focuses on high efficiency MCFC- and SOFC-based hybrids and competing systems such as gas turbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells and traditional grid service. Specific regions in the country have been identified where these

  6. Gas fired Advanced Turbine System

    SciTech Connect

    LeCren, R.T.; White, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of the first phase of the Advanced Gas Turbine System (ATS) program was the concept definition of an advanced engine system that meets efficiency and emission goals far exceeding those that can be provided with today`s equipment. The thermal efficiency goal for such an advanced industrial engine was set at 50% some 15 percentage points higher than current equipment levels. Exhaust emissions goals for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), and unburned hydrocarbons (UH) were fixed at 8 parts per million by volume (ppmv), 20 ppmv, and 20 ppmv respectively, corrected to 15% oxygen (O{sub 2}) levels. Other goals had to be addressed; these involved reducing the cost of power produced by 10 percent and improving or maintaining the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) at current levels. This advanced gas turbine was to be fueled with natural gas, and it had to embody features that would allow it bum coal or coal derived fuels.

  7. Status of Technological Advancements for Reducing Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Pollutant Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Combustor test rig results indicate that substantial reductions from current emission levels of carbon monoxide (CO), total unburned hydrocarbons (THC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and smoke are achievable by employing varying degrees of technological advancements in combustion systems. Minor to moderate modifications to existing conventional combustors produced significant reductions in CO and THC emissions at engine low power (idle/taxi) operating conditions but did not effectively reduce NOx at engine full power (takeoff) operating conditions. Staged combusiton techniques were needed to simultaneously reduce the levels of all the emissions over the entire engine operating range (from idle to takeoff). Emission levels that approached or were below the requirements of the 1979 EPA standards were achieved with the staged combustion systems and in some cases with the minor to moderate modifications to existing conventional combustion systems. Results from research programs indicate that an entire new generation of combustor technology with extremely low emission levels may be possible in the future.

  8. Advanced turbine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of an advanced convective cooling concept applied to rocket turbine airfoils which operate in a high pressure hydrogen and methane environment was investigated. The concept consists of a central structural member in which grooves are machined. The grooves are temporarily filled with a removable filler and the entire airfoil is covered with a layer of electroformed nickel, or nickel base alloy. After removal of the filler, the low thermal resistance of the nickel closure causes the wall temperature to be reduced by heat transfer to the coolant. The program is divided in the following tasks: (1) turbine performance appraisal; (2) coolant geometry evaluation; (3) test hardware design and analysis; and (4) test airfoil fabrication.

  9. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    ATTAP activities during the past year were highlighted by an extensive materials assessment, execution of a reference powertrain design, test-bed engine design and development, ceramic component design, materials and component characterization, ceramic component process development and fabrication, component rig design and fabrication, test-bed engine fabrication, and hot gasifier rig and engine testing. Materials assessment activities entailed engine environment evaluation of domestically supplied radial gasifier turbine rotors that were available at the conclusion of the Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project as well as an extensive survey of both domestic and foreign ceramic suppliers and Government laboratories performing ceramic materials research applicable to advanced heat engines. A reference powertrain design was executed to reflect the selection of the AGT-5 as the ceramic component test-bed engine for the ATTAP. Test-bed engine development activity focused on upgrading the AGT-5 from a 1038 C (1900 F) metal engine to a durable 1371 C (2500 F) structural ceramic component test-bed engine. Ceramic component design activities included the combustor, gasifier turbine static structure, and gasifier turbine rotor. The materials and component characterization efforts have included the testing and evaluation of several candidate ceramic materials and components being developed for use in the ATTAP. Ceramic component process development and fabrication activities were initiated for the gasifier turbine rotor, gasifier turbine vanes, gasifier turbine scroll, extruded regenerator disks, and thermal insulation. Component rig development activities included combustor, hot gasifier, and regenerator rigs. Test-bed engine fabrication activities consisted of the fabrication of an all-new AGT-5 durability test-bed engine and support of all engine test activities through instrumentation/build/repair. Hot gasifier rig and test-bed engine testing

  10. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology (HOST) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Daniel E.; Ensign, C. Robert

    1986-01-01

    The Hot Section Technology (HOST) Project is a NASA-sponsored endeavor to improve the durability of advanced gas turbine engines for commercial and military aircraft. Through improvements in the analytical models and life prediction systems, designs for future hot section components, the combustor and turbine, will be more accurately analyzed and will incorporate features required for longer life in the more hostile operating environment of high performance engines.

  11. Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines. Phase 2, Corrosion of turbine hot gas path blading: Final report, December 1988--February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bornstein, N.

    1993-06-01

    The environment within the advanced industrial gas turbine is highly oxidizing and contains the compounds, salts and oxides that accelerate the rate of oxidation of structural materials. Protective coatings which differ from each other and the superalloys in composition and phase morphology, enhance the oxidation and corrosion resistance of the superalloys. As temperatures increase, the relativity stability and long term effectiveness of the coatings is of concern. The interdiffusion of coating and alloy constituents can affect chemical and mechanical properties. Long term studies are appropriate. Thermal barrier coatings, introduced at the inception of the current program will further improve the thermal efficiency of industrial gas turbine engines. The interaction between state-of-the-art thermal barrier coatings (TBC) and oxidation and corrosion in the coal fired environment is of concern and should be critically examined. The superior performance of the overlay coating is related to thickness rather than chemistry. With respect to sodium sulfate corrosion, the life of the overlay coating is 2.7 times longer than that of the platinum aluminide which in turn is 2.2 times longer than that of the simple aluminide. The ranking of the coatings is unchanged with respect to eutectic soft corrosion, however the salt is more aggressive. The life of the overlay coating is 1.4 times longer than that of the platinum aluminide which is 1.9 times longer than that of the simple aluminide.

  12. Evaluation of Erosion Resistance of Advanced Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Miller, Robert A.; Cuy, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to aircraft engine performance and durability. By demonstrating advanced turbine material testing capabilities, we will be able to facilitate the critical turbine coating and subcomponent development and help establish advanced erosion-resistant turbine airfoil thermal barrier coatings design tools. The objective of this work is to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments, validating advanced turbine airfoil thermal barrier coating systems based on nano-tetragonal phase toughening design approaches.

  13. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Work to develop and demonstrate the technology of structural ceramics for automotive engines and similar applications is described. Long-range technology is being sought to produce gas turbine engines for automobiles with reduced fuel consumption and reduced environmental impact. The Advanced Turbine Technology Application Project (ATTAP) test bed engine is designed such that, when installed in a 3,000 pound inertia weight automobile, it will provide low emissions, 42 miles per gallon fuel economy on diesel fuel, multifuel capability, costs competitive with current spark ignition engines, and noise and safety characteristics that meet Federal standards.

  14. Proceedings of the joint contractors meeting: FE/EE Advanced Turbine Systems conference FE fuel cells and coal-fired heat engines conference

    SciTech Connect

    Geiling, D.W.

    1993-08-01

    The joint contractors meeting: FE/EE Advanced Turbine Systems conference FEE fuel cells and coal-fired heat engines conference; was sponsored by the US Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy and held at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, West Virginia 26507-0880, August 3--5, 1993. Individual papers have been entered separately.

  15. Recent advances in catalytic combustion for ground power gas turbine engines

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.L.; Karim, H.; Castaldi, M.; Etemad, S.; Pfefferle, W.C.; Newburry, D.; Bachovchin, D.

    1999-07-01

    Catalytic combustion is one means of meeting increasingly strict emissions requirements for ground-based gas turbine engines for power generation. In conventional homogeneous combustion, high flame temperatures and incomplete combustion lead to emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and carbon monoxide (CO), and in lean premixed systems unburned hydrocarbons (UHC). However, catalytic reaction upstream of a lean premixed homogeneous combustion zone can increase the fuel/air mixture reactivity sufficiently to allow low CO/UHC emissions at adiabatic flame temperatures below 1,500 C, with concurrent low NO{sub x} emissions. As a result, catalytic combustion technologies have demonstrated single-digit emissions, and meet DOE-ATS goals (NO{sub x} {lt} 10 ppm, and CO/UHC {lt} 20 ppm) by a wide margin. Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) is currently developing catalytic combustion systems for Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. For natural gas fuel operation, PCI has demonstrated NO{sub x} {lt} 5 ppm, CO {lt} 1 ppm, and UHC {lt} 1 ppm (all corrected to 15% O2) in a sub-scale atmospheric rig, using a catalytic pre-reactor upstream of the combustion zone. For these tests, gas-phase combustion was stabilized in an 8-inch diameter convection-cooled metal liner at adiabatic flame temperatures from 1,250 C to 1,550 C. In parallel, extensive high pressure reactor component development and testing have been conducted at sub-scale, in preparation for high pressure testing of a full-scale catalytic combustor.

  16. ADVANCED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS FOR STATIONARY GAS TURBINE ENGINES: VOLUME II. BENCH SCALE EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reports describe an exploratory development program to identify, evaluate, and demonstrate dry techniques for significantly reducing NOx emissions from stationary gas turbine combustors. (Volume 1 documents the research activities leading to selection of 26 combustor design c...

  17. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Turbine Technologies Application Project (ATTAP) is in the fifth year of a multiyear development program to bring the automotive gas turbine engine to a state at which industry can make commercialization decisions. Activities during the past year included reference powertrain design updates, test-bed engine design and development, ceramic component design, materials and component characterization, ceramic component process development and fabrication, ceramic component rig testing, and test-bed engine fabrication and testing. Engine design and development included mechanical design, combustion system development, alternate aerodynamic flow testing, and controls development. Design activities included development of the ceramic gasifier turbine static structure, the ceramic gasifier rotor, and the ceramic power turbine rotor. Material characterization efforts included the testing and evaluation of five candidate high temperature ceramic materials. Ceramic component process development and fabrication, with the objective of approaching automotive volumes and costs, continued for the gasifier turbine rotor, gasifier turbine scroll, extruded regenerator disks, and thermal insulation. Engine and rig fabrication, testing, and development supported improvements in ceramic component technology. Total test time in 1992 amounted to 599 hours, of which 147 hours were engine testing and 452 were hot rig testing.

  18. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Macri

    2003-10-01

    Rolls-Royce Corporation has completed a cooperative agreement under Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-FC21-96MC33066 in support of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program to stimulate industrial power generation markets. This DOE contract was performed during the period of October 1995 to December 2002. This final technical report, which is a program deliverable, describes all associated results obtained during Phases 3A and 3B of the contract. Rolls-Royce Corporation (formerly Allison Engine Company) initially focused on the design and development of a 10-megawatt (MW) high-efficiency industrial gas turbine engine/package concept (termed the 701-K) to meet the specific goals of the ATS program, which included single digit NOx emissions, increased plant efficiency, fuel flexibility, and reduced cost of power (i.e., $/kW). While a detailed design effort and associated component development were successfully accomplished for the 701-K engine, capable of achieving the stated ATS program goals, in 1999 Rolls-Royce changed its focus to developing advanced component technologies for product insertion that would modernize the current fleet of 501-K and 601-K industrial gas turbines. This effort would also help to establish commercial venues for suppliers and designers and assist in involving future advanced technologies in the field of gas turbine engine development. This strategy change was partly driven by the market requirements that suggested a low demand for a 10-MW aeroderivative industrial gas turbine, a change in corporate strategy for aeroderivative gas turbine engine development initiatives, and a consensus that a better return on investment (ROI) could be achieved under the ATS contract by focusing on product improvements and technology insertion for the existing Rolls-Royce small engine industrial gas turbine fleet.

  19. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  20. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  1. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  2. The Cummins advanced turbocompound diesel engine evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehne, J. L.; Werner, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    An advanced turbocompound diesel engine program was initiated to improve the tank mileage of the turbocompound engine by 5% over the vehicle test engines. Engine improvements could be realized by increasing the available energy of the exhaust gas at the turbine inlet, incorporating gas turbine techniques into improving the turbomachinery efficiencies, and through refined engine system optimization. The individual and cumulative performance gains achieved with the advanced turbocompound engine improvements are presented.

  3. Economic aspects of advanced coal-fired gas turbine locomotives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liddle, S. G.; Bonzo, B. B.; Houser, B. C.

    1983-01-01

    Increases in the price of such conventional fuels as Diesel No. 2, as well as advancements in turbine technology, have prompted the present economic assessment of coal-fired gas turbine locomotive engines. A regenerative open cycle internal combustion gas turbine engine may be used, given the development of ceramic hot section components. Otherwise, an external combustion gas turbine engine appears attractive, since although its thermal efficiency is lower than that of a Diesel engine, its fuel is far less expensive. Attention is given to such a powerplant which will use a fluidized bed coal combustor. A life cycle cost analysis yields figures that are approximately half those typical of present locomotive engines.

  4. SERI advanced wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

    1992-02-01

    The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

  5. SERI advanced wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

    1992-02-01

    The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute`s (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

  6. SERI advanced wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

    1992-02-01

    The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10 percent to 30 percent more energy than conventional blades.

  7. AGT (Advanced Gas Turbine) technology project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    An overall summary documentation is provided for the Advanced Gas Turbine Technology Project conducted by the Allison Gas Turbine Division of General Motors. This advanced, high risk work was initiated in October 1979 under charter from the U.S. Congress to promote an engine for transportation that would provide an alternate to reciprocating spark ignition (SI) engines for the U.S. automotive industry and simultaneously establish the feasibility of advanced ceramic materials for hot section components to be used in an automotive gas turbine. As this program evolved, dictates of available funding, Government charter, and technical developments caused program emphases to focus on the development and demonstration of the ceramic turbine hot section and away from the development of engine and powertrain technologies and subsequent vehicular demonstrations. Program technical performance concluded in June 1987. The AGT 100 program successfully achieved project objectives with significant technology advances. Specific AGT 100 program achievements are: (1) Ceramic component feasibility for use in gas turbine engines has been demonstrated; (2) A new, 100 hp engine was designed, fabricated, and tested for 572 hour at operating temperatures to 2200 F, uncooled; (3) Statistical design methodology has been applied and correlated to experimental data acquired from over 5500 hour of rig and engine testing; (4) Ceramic component processing capability has progressed from a rudimentary level able to fabricate simple parts to a sophisticated level able to provide complex geometries such as rotors and scrolls; (5) Required improvements for monolithic and composite ceramic gas turbine components to meet automotive reliability, performance, and cost goals have been identified; (6) The combustor design demonstrated lower emissions than 1986 Federal Standards on methanol, JP-5, and diesel fuel. Thus, the potential for meeting emission standards and multifuel capability has been initiated

  8. Fretting in aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. L.; Bill, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of fretting in aircraft turbine engines is discussed. Critical fretting can occur on fan, compressor, and turbine blade mountings, as well as on splines, rolling element bearing races, and secondary sealing elements of face type seals. Structural fatigue failures have been shown to occur at fretted areas on component parts. Methods used by designers to reduce the effects of fretting are given.

  9. Durability Challenges for Next Generation of Gas Turbine Engine Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive fuel burn and carbon dioxide emission reduction goals for future gas turbine engines will require higher overall pressure ratio, and a significant increase in turbine inlet temperature. These goals can be achieved by increasing temperature capability of turbine engine hot section materials and decreasing weight of fan section of the engine. NASA is currently developing several advanced hot section materials for increasing temperature capability of future gas turbine engines. The materials of interest include ceramic matrix composites with 1482 - 1648 C temperature capability, advanced disk alloys with 815 C capability, and low conductivity thermal barrier coatings with erosion resistance. The presentation will provide an overview of durability challenges with emphasis on the environmental factors affecting durability for the next generation of gas turbine engine materials. The environmental factors include gaseous atmosphere in gas turbine engines, molten salt and glass deposits from airborne contaminants, impact from foreign object damage, and erosion from ingestion of small particles.

  10. Overview of Advanced Stirling and Gas Turbine Engine Development Programs and Implications for Solar Thermal Electrical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, D.

    1984-01-01

    The DOE automotive advanced engine development projects managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center were described. These included one Stirling cycle engine development and two air Brayton cycle development. Other engine research activities included: (1) an air Brayton engine development sponsored by the Gas Research Institute, and (2) plans for development of a Stirling cycle engine for space use. Current and potential use of these various engines with solar parabolic dishes were discussed.

  11. Overview of advanced Stirling and gas turbine engine development programs and implications for solar thermal electrical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, D.

    1984-03-01

    The DOE automotive advanced engine development projects managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center were described. These included one Stirling cycle engine development and two air Brayton cycle development. Other engine research activities included: (1) an air Brayton engine development sponsored by the Gas Research Institute, and (2) plans for development of a Stirling cycle engine for space use. Current and potential use of these various engines with solar parabolic dishes were discussed.

  12. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes work performed in support of the development and demonstration of a structural ceramic technology for automotive gas turbine engines. The AGT101 regenerated gas turbine engine developed under the previous DOE/NASA Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) program is being utilized for verification testing of the durability of next-generation ceramic components and their suitability for service at reference powertrain design conditions. Topics covered in this report include ceramic processing definition and refinement, design improvements to the test bed engine and test rigs, and design methodologies related to ceramic impact and fracture mechanisms. Appendices include reports by ATTAP subcontractors addressing the development of silicon nitride and silicon carbide families of materials and processes.

  13. Improved automobile gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofskey, M. G.; Katsanis, T.; Roelke, R. J.; Mclallin, K. L.; Wong, R. Y.; Schumann, L. F.; Galvas, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Upgraded engine delivers 100 hp in 3500 lb vehicle. Improved fuel economy is due to combined effects of reduced weight, reduced power-to-weight ratio, increased turbine inlet pressure, and improved component efficiencies at part power.

  14. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Technical work on the design and effort leading to the testing of a 74.5 kW (100 hp) automotive gas turbine engine is reviewed. Development of the engine compressor, gasifier turbine, power turbine, combustor, regenerator, and secondary system is discussed. Ceramic materials development and the application of such materials in the gas turbine engine components is described.

  15. Development of two rhenium- containing superalloys for single- crystal blade and directionally solidified vane applications in advanced turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, K.; Erickson, G. L.; Sikkenga, S. L.; Brentnall, W. D.; Aurrecoechea, J. M.; Kubarych, K. G.

    1993-08-01

    A team approach involving several turbine engine companies using the concepts of simultaneous engi-neering has been used to successfully develop CMSX-4 ® alloy for turbine blade applications. CMSX-4 al-loy is a second-generation, single-crystal cast nickel-base superalloy containing 3% Re and approximately 70% volume fraction of γ. The high level of balanced properties determined by labora-tory evaluation has been confirmed during field testing of the Solarγ Mars T-14000 industrial gas turbine with CMSX-4 single-crystal (SX) blades in both the coated and bare condition. A similar collaborative ap-proach has resulted in the successful development of CM 186 LCγ alloy for complex, directionally solidi-fied (DS) columnar grain vane segments. CM 186 LC alloy is a second-generation DS columnar grain cast nickel-base superalloy containing 3% Re and approximately 65% volume fraction of γ. Excellent com-ponent producibility and quality is demonstrated. Turbine engine testing is scheduled to commence by the end of 1993.

  16. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Reports technical effort by AlliedSignal Engines in sixth year of DOE/NASA funded project. Topics include: gas turbine engine design modifications of production APU to incorporate ceramic components; fabrication and processing of silicon nitride blades and nozzles; component and engine testing; and refinement and development of critical ceramics technologies, including: hot corrosion testing and environmental life predictive model; advanced NDE methods for internal flaws in ceramic components; and improved carbon pulverization modeling during impact. ATTAP project is oriented toward developing high-risk technology of ceramic structural component design and fabrication to carry forward to commercial production by 'bridging the gap' between structural ceramics in the laboratory and near-term commercial heat engine application. Current ATTAP project goal is to support accelerated commercialization of advanced, high-temperature engines for hybrid vehicles and other applications. Project objectives are to provide essential and substantial early field experience demonstrating ceramic component reliability and durability in modified, available, gas turbine engine applications; and to scale-up and improve manufacturing processes of ceramic turbine engine components and demonstrate application of these processes in the production environment.

  17. Ceramic applications in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, H. E.; Heitman, P. W.; Lindgren, L. C.; Thrasher, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    The application of ceramic components to demonstrate improved cycle efficiency by raising the operating temperature of the existing Allison IGI 404 vehicular gas turbine engine is discussed. This effort was called the Ceramic Applications in Turbine Engines (CATE) program and has successfully demonstrated ceramic components. Among these components are two design configurations featuring stationary and rotating caramic components in the IGT 404 engine. A complete discussion of all phases of the program, design, materials development, fabrication of ceramic components, and testing-including rig, engine, and vehicle demonstation test are presented. During the CATE program, a ceramic technology base was established that is now being applied to automotive and other gas turbine engine programs. This technology base is outlined and also provides a description of the CATE program accomplishments.

  18. Progress in advanced high temperature turbine materials, coatings, and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ault, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    Advanced materials, coatings, and cooling technology is assessed in terms of improved aircraft turbine engine performance. High cycle operating temperatures, lighter structural components, and adequate resistance to the various environmental factors associated with aircraft gas turbine engines are among the factors considered. Emphasis is placed on progress in development of high temperature materials for coating protection against oxidation, hot corrosion and erosion, and in turbine cooling technology. Specific topics discussed include metal matrix composites, superalloys, directionally solidified eutectics, and ceramics.

  19. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) powertrain system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, H. E.; Kaufeld, J.; Kordes, R.

    1981-01-01

    A 74.5 kW(100 hp) advanced automotive gas turbine engine is described. A design iteration to improve the weight and production cost associated with the original concept is discussed. Major rig tests included 15 hours of compressor testing to 80% design speed and the results are presented. Approximately 150 hours of cold flow testing showed duct loss to be less than the design goal. Combustor test results are presented for initial checkout tests. Turbine design and rig fabrication is discussed. From a materials study of six methods to fabricate rotors, two have been selected for further effort. A discussion of all six methods is given.

  20. Thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine and diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Brindley, William J.; Bailey, M. Murray

    1989-01-01

    The present state of development of thin thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines and thick thermal barrier coatings for truck diesel engines is assessed. Although current thermal barrier coatings are flying in certain gas turbine engines, additional advances will be needed for future engines. Thick thermal barrier coatings for truck diesel engines have advanced to the point where they are being seriously considered for the next generation of engine. Since coatings for truck engines is a young field of inquiry, continued research and development efforts will be required to help bring this technology to commercialization.

  1. Casing for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Wiebe, David J.; Little, David A.; Charron, Richard C.

    2016-07-12

    A casing for a can annular gas turbine engine, including: a compressed air section (40) spanning between a last row of compressor blades (26) and a first row of turbine blades (28), the compressed air section (40) having a plurality of openings (50) there through, wherein a single combustor/advanced duct assembly (64) extends through each opening (50); and one top hat (68) associated with each opening (50) configured to enclose the associated combustor/advanced duct assembly (64) and seal the opening (50). A volume enclosed by the compressed air section (40) is not greater than a volume of a frustum (54) defined at an upstream end (56) by an inner diameter of the casing at the last row of compressor blades (26) and at a downstream end (60) by an inner diameter of the casing at the first row of turbine blades (28).

  2. Energy efficient engine high-pressure turbine detailed design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thulin, R. D.; Howe, D. C.; Singer, I. D.

    1982-01-01

    The energy efficient engine high-pressure turbine is a single stage system based on technology advancements in the areas of aerodynamics, structures and materials to achieve high performance, low operating economics and durability commensurate with commercial service requirements. Low loss performance features combined with a low through-flow velocity approach results in a predicted efficiency of 88.8 for a flight propulsion system. Turbine airfoil durability goals are achieved through the use of advanced high-strength and high-temperature capability single crystal materials and effective cooling management. Overall, this design reflects a considerable extension in turbine technology that is applicable to future, energy efficient gas-turbine engines.

  3. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Turbine Engine Section Technology (HOST) Project Office of the Lewis Research Center sponsored a workshop to discuss current research pertinent to turbine engine hot section durability problems. Presentations were made concerning hot section environment and the behavior of combustion liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes.

  4. Combustion research for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, E. J.; Claus, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Research on combustion is being conducted at Lewis Research Center to provide improved analytical models of the complex flow and chemical reaction processes which occur in the combustor of gas turbine engines and other aeropropulsion systems. The objective of the research is to obtain a better understanding of the various physical processes that occur in the gas turbine combustor in order to develop models and numerical codes which can accurately describe these processes. Activities include in-house research projects, university grants, and industry contracts and are classified under the subject areas of advanced numerics, fuel sprays, fluid mixing, and radiation-chemistry. Results are high-lighted from several projects.

  5. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-04-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  6. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-02-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  7. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

  8. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  9. Gas turbine engine fuel control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H. S. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A variable orifice system is described that is responsive to compressor inlet pressure and temperature, compressor discharge pressure and rotational speed of a gas-turbine engine. It is incorporated into a hydraulic circuit that includes a zero gradient pump driven at a speed proportional to the speed of the engine. The resulting system provides control of fuel rate for starting, steady running, acceleration and deceleration under varying altitudes and flight speeds.

  10. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-01-01

    This report describes progress made in the advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. The topics of the report include selection of the Allison GFATS, castcool technology development for industrial engines test plan and schedule, code development and background gathering phase for the ultra low NOx combustion technology task, active turbine clearance task, and water vapor/air mixture cooling of turbine vanes task.

  11. A real-time simulation evaluation of an advanced detection, isolation and accommodation algorithm for sensor failures in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.; Delaat, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    An advanced sensor failure detection, isolation, and accommodation (ADIA) algorithm has been developed for use with an aircraft turbofan engine control system. In a previous paper the authors described the ADIA algorithm and its real-time implementation. Subsequent improvements made to the algorithm and implementation are discussed, and the results of an evaluation presented. The evaluation used a real-time, hybrid computer simulation of an F100 turbofan engine.

  12. A real-time simulation evaluation of an advanced detection. Isolation and accommodation algorithm for sensor failures in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.; Delaat, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    An advanced sensor failure detection, isolation, and accommodation (ADIA) algorithm has been developed for use with an aircraft turbofan engine control system. In a previous paper the authors described the ADIA algorithm and its real-time implementation. Subsequent improvements made to the algorithm and implementation are discussed, and the results of an evaluation presented. The evaluation used a real-time, hybrid computer simulation of an F100 turbofan engine.

  13. Advanced Seal Development for Large Industrial Gas Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Raymond E.

    2006-01-01

    Efforts are in progress to develop advanced sealing for large utility industrial gas turbine engines (combustion turbines). Such seals have been under developed for some time for aero gas turbines. It is desired to transition this technology to combustion turbines. Brush seals, film riding face and circumferential seals, and other dynamic and static sealing approaches are being incorporated into gas turbines for aero applications by several engine manufacturers. These seals replace labyrinth or other seals with significantly reduced leakage rates. For utility industrial gas turbines, leakage reduction with advanced sealing can be even greater with the enormous size of the components. Challenges to transitioning technology include: extremely long operating times between overhauls; infrequent but large radial and axial excursions; difficulty in coating larger components; and maintenance, installation, and durability requirements. Advanced sealing is part of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) engine development being done under a cooperative agreement between Westinghouse and the US Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. Seal development focuses on various types of seals in the 501ATS engine both at dynamic and static locations. Each development includes rig testing of candidate designs and subsequent engine validation testing of prototype seals. This presentation gives an update of the ongoing ATS sealing efforts with special emphasis on brush seals.

  14. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This report is the eleventh in the series of Technical Summary reports for the Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project, authorized under NASA Contract DEN3-167, and sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). This report was prepared by Garrett Turbine Engine Company, A Division of the Garrett Corporation, and includes information provided by Ford Motor Company, the Standard Oil Company, and AiResearch Casting Company. This report covers plans and progress for the period July 1, 1985 through June 30, 1986. Technical progress during the reported period was highlighted by the 85-hour endurance run of an all-ceramic engine operating in the 2000 to 2250 F temperature regime. Component development continued in the areas of the combustion/fuel injection system, regenerator and seals system, and ceramic turbine rotor attachment design. Component rig testing saw further refinements. Ceramic materials showed continued improvements in required properties for gas turbine applications; however, continued development is needed before performance and reliability goals can be set.

  15. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP). Annual report 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Garrett Auxiliary Power Division (GAPD), a unit of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company, during calendar year 1992, toward development and demonstration of structural ceramic technology for automotive gas turbine engines. This work was performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) under National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Contract DEN3-335, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP). GAPD utilized the AGT101 regenerated gas turbine engine developed under the previous DOE/NASA Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) program as the ATTAP test bed for ceramic engine technology demonstration. ATTAP focussed on improving AGT101 test bed reliability, development of ceramic design methodologies, and improvement of fabrication and materials processing technology by domestic US ceramics fabricators. A series of durability tests was conducted to verify technology advancements. This is the fifth in a series of technical summary reports published annually over the course of the five-year contract.

  16. Ceramic applications in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, J. A.; Janovicz, M. A.; Thrasher, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    Development testing activities on the 1900 F-configuration ceramic parts were completed, 2070 F-configuration ceramic component rig and engine testing was initiated, and the conceptual design for the 2265 F-configuration engine was identified. Fabrication of the 2070 F-configuration ceramic parts continued, along with burner rig development testing of the 2070 F-configuration metal combustor in preparation for 1132 C (2070 F) qualification test conditions. Shakedown testing of the hot engine simulator (HES) rig was also completed in preparation for testing of a spin rig-qualified ceramic-bladed rotor assembly at 1132 C (2070 F) test conditions. Concurrently, ceramics from new sources and alternate materials continued to be evaluated, and fabrication of 2070 F-configuration ceramic component from these new sources continued. Cold spin testing of the critical 2070 F-configuration blade continued in the spin test rig to qualify a set of ceramic blades at 117% engine speed for the gasifier turbine rotor. Rig testing of the ceramic-bladed gasifier turbine rotor assembly at 108% engine speed was also performed, which resulted in the failure of one blade. The new three-piece hot seal with the nickel oxide/calcium fluoride wearface composition was qualified in the regenerator rig and introduced to engine operation wiwth marginal success.

  17. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This report is the fourth in a series of Annual Technical Summary Reports for the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP). This report covers plans and progress on ceramics development for commercial automotive applications over the period 1 Jan. - 31 Dec. 1991. Project effort conducted under this contract is part of the DOE Gas Turbine Highway Vehicle System program. This program is directed to provide the U.S. automotive industry the high-risk, long-range technology necessary to produce gas turbine engines for automobiles with reduced fuel consumption, reduced environmental impact, and a decreased reliance on scarce materials and resources. The program is oriented toward developing the high-risk technology of ceramic structural component design and fabrication, such that industry can carry this technology forward to production in the 1990s. The ATTAP test bed engine, carried over from the previous AGT101 project, is being used for verification testing of the durability of next-generation ceramic components, and their suitability for service at Reference Powertrain Design conditions. This document reports the technical effort conducted by GAPD and the ATTAP subcontractors during the fourth year of the project. Topics covered include ceramic processing definition and refinement, design improvements to the ATTAP test bed engine and test rigs and the methodology development of ceramic impact and fracture mechanisms. Appendices include reports by ATTAP subcontractors in the development of silicon nitride and silicon carbide families of materials and processes.

  18. Advanced gas turbine systems program

    SciTech Connect

    Zeh, C.M.

    1995-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a program to develop fuel-efficient gas turbine-based power systems with low emissions. DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE/EE) have initiated an 8-year program to develop high-efficiency, natural gas-fired advanced gas turbine power systems. The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program will support full-scale prototype demonstration of both industrial- and utility-scale systems that will provide commercial marketplace entries by the year 2000. When the program targets are met, power system emissions will be lower than from the best technology in use today. Efficiency of the utility-scale units will be greater than 60 percent on a lower heating value basis, and emissions of carbon dioxide will be reduced inversely with this increase. Industrial systems will also see an improvement of at least 15 percent in efficiency. Nitrogen oxides will be reduced by at least 10 percent, and carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions will each be kept below 20 parts per million, for both utility and industrial systems.

  19. Advanced Control Design for Wind Turbines; Part I: Control Design, Implementation, and Initial Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to give wind turbine engineers information and examples of the design, testing through simulation, field implementation, and field testing of advanced wind turbine controls.

  20. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) 1993 annual report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes work performed by AlliedSignal Engines, a unit of AlliedSignal Aerospace Company, during calendar year 1993, toward development and demonstration of structural ceramic technology for automotive gas turbine engines. This work was performed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Contract DEN3-335, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATFAP). During 1993, the test bed used to demonstrate ceramic technology was changed from the AlliedSignal Engines/Garrett Model AGT101 regenerated gas turbine engine to the Model 331-200(CT) engine. The 331-200(CT) ceramic demonstrator is a fully-developed test platform based on the existing production AlliedSignal 331-200(ER) gas turbine auxiliary power unit (APU), and is well suited to evaluating ceramic turbine blades and nozzles. In addition, commonality of the 331-200(CT) engine with existing gas turbine APU's in commercial service provides the potential for field testing of ceramic components. The 1993 ATTAP activities emphasized design modifications of the 331-200 engine test bed to accommodate ceramic first-stage turbine nozzles and blades, fabrication of the ceramic components, ceramic component proof and rig tests, operational tests of the test bed equipped with the ceramic components, and refinement of critical ceramic design technologies.

  1. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) 1993 annual report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-07-01

    This report summarizes work performed by AlliedSignal Engines, a unit of AlliedSignal Aerospace Company, during calendar year 1993, toward development and demonstration of structural ceramic technology for automotive gas turbine engines. This work was performed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Contract DEN3-335, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATFAP). During 1993, the test bed used to demonstrate ceramic technology was changed from the AlliedSignal Engines/Garrett Model AGT101 regenerated gas turbine engine to the Model 331-200(CT) engine. The 331-200(CT) ceramic demonstrator is a fully-developed test platform based on the existing production AlliedSignal 331-200(ER) gas turbine auxiliary power unit (APU), and is well suited to evaluating ceramic turbine blades and nozzles. In addition, commonality of the 331-200(CT) engine with existing gas turbine APU's in commercial service provides the potential for field testing of ceramic components. The 1993 ATTAP activities emphasized design modifications of the 331-200 engine test bed to accommodate ceramic first-stage turbine nozzles and blades, fabrication of the ceramic components, ceramic component proof and rig tests, operational tests of the test bed equipped with the ceramic components, and refinement of critical ceramic design technologies.

  2. An overview of aerospace gas turbine technology of relevance to the development of the automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. G.; Miller, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Technology areas related to gas turbine propulsion systems with potential for application to the automotive gas turbine engine are discussed. Areas included are: system steady-state and transient performance prediction techniques, compressor and turbine design and performance prediction programs and effects of geometry, combustor technology and advanced concepts, and ceramic coatings and materials technology.

  3. Advancing gas turbine technology: Evolution and revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, S.E.

    1995-05-01

    This article describes advances made in gas turbine technology as manufacturers introduce aero-derived advances in the pursuit of more power. The rise in the application of gas turbines for electric power generation is attributable to many factors. The first is an abundance of cheap natural gas. The second reason is the very high (54 percent to 58 percent) combined-cycle efficiencies being achieved with commercially available technology right now. Reliability and availability are cited third. Low environmental impact was cited as the fourth reason why gas turbines are so popular. Fifth are gas turbine`s low capital costs.

  4. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) technology development project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This report is the final in a series of Technical Summary Reports for the Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project, authorizrd under NASA Contract DEN3-167 and sponsored by the DOE. The project was administered by NASA-Lewis Research Center of Cleveland, Ohio. Plans and progress are summarized for the period October 1979 through June 1987. This program aims to provide the US automotive industry the high risk, long range technology necessary to produce gas turbine engines for automobiles that will reduce fuel consumption and reduce environmental impact. The intent is that this technology will reach the marketplace by the 1990s. The Garrett/Ford automotive AGT was designated AGT101. The AGT101 is a 74.5 kW (100 shp) engine, capable of speeds to 100,000 rpm, and operates at turbine inlet temperatures to 1370 C (2500 F) with a specific fuel consumption level of 0.18 kg/kW-hr (0.3 lbs/hp-hr) over most of the operating range. This final report summarizes the powertrain design, power section development and component/ceramic technology development.

  5. Advanced turbine study. [airfoil coling in rocket turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Experiments to determine the available increase in turbine horsepower achieved by increasing turbine inlet temperature over a range of 1800 to 2600 R, while applying current gas turbine airfoil cling technology are discussed. Four cases of rocket turbine operating conditions were investigated. Two of the cases used O2/H2 propellant, one with a fuel flowrate of 160 pps, the other 80 pps. Two cases used O2/CH4 propellant, each having different fuel flowrates, pressure ratios, and inlet pressures. Film cooling was found to be the required scheme for these rocket turbine applications because of the high heat flux environments. Conventional convective or impingement cooling, used in jet engines, is inadequate in a rocket turbine environment because of the resulting high temperature gradients in the airfoil wall, causing high strains and low cyclic life. The hydrogen-rich turbine environment experienced a loss, or no gain, in delivered horsepower as turbine inlet temperature was increased at constant airfoil life. The effects of film cooling with regard to reduced flow available for turbine work, dilution of mainstream gas temperature and cooling reentry losses, offset the relatively low specific work capability of hydrogen when increasing turbine inlet temperature over the 1800 to 2600 R range. However, the methane-rich environment experienced an increase in delivered horsepower as turbine inlet temperature was increased at constant airfoil life. The results of a materials survey and heat transfer and durability analysis are discussed.

  6. Variable cycle gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. E.; Foster, T. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A technique, method, and apparatus were designed for varying the bypass ratio and modulating the flow of a gas turbine engine in order to achieve improved mixed mission performance. Embodiments include gas flow control system for management of core and bypass stream pressure comprising diverter valve means downstream of the core engine to selectively mix or separate the core and bypass exhaust streams. The flow control system may also include variable geometry means for maintaining the engine inlet airflow at a matched design level at all flight velocities. Earth preferred embodiment thus may be converted from a high specific thrust mixed flow cycle at supersonic velocities to a lower specific thrust separated flow turbofan system at subsonic velocities with a high degree of flow variability in each mode of operation.

  7. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of Annual Technical Summary Reports for the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report was prepared by Garrett Auxiliary Power Division (GAPD), a unit of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company, a unit of Allied Signal, Inc. The report includes information provided by Garrett Ceramic Components, and the Norton Advanced Ceramics Company, (formerly Norton/TRW Ceramics), subcontractors to GAPD on the ATTAP. This report covers plans and progress on ceramics development for commercial automotive applications over the period 1 Jan. through 31 Dec. 1992. Project effort conducted under this contract is part of the DOE Gas Turbine Highway Vehicle System program. This program is directed to provide the U.S. automotive industry the high-risk, long-range technology necessary to produce gas turbine engines for automobiles with reduced fuel consumption, reduced environmental impact, and a decreased reliance on scarce materials and resources. The program is oriented toward developing the high-risk technology of ceramic structural component design and fabrication, such that industry can carry this technology forward to production in the 1990's. The ATTAP test bed engine, carried over from the previous AGT101 project, is being used for verification testing of the durability of next generation ceramic components, and their suitability for service at Reference Powertrain Design conditions. This document reports the technical effort conducted by GAPD and the ATTAP subcontractors during the fifth year of the project. Topics covered include ceramic processing definition and refinement, design improvements to the ATTAP test bed engine and test rigs, and the methodology development of ceramic impact and fracture mechanisms. Appendices include reports by ATTAP subcontractors in the development of silicon nitride materials and processes.

  8. Gas turbine engine control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idelchik, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A control system and method of controlling a gas turbine engine. The control system receives an error signal and processes the error signal to form a primary fuel control signal. The control system also receives at least one anticipatory demand signal and processes the signal to form an anticipatory fuel control signal. The control system adjusts the value of the anticipatory fuel control signal based on the value of the error signal to form an adjusted anticipatory signal and then the adjusted anticipatory fuel control signal and the primary fuel control signal are combined to form a fuel command signal.

  9. Turbine engine variable geometry device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, Casimir (Inventor); Lenz, Herman N. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A variable geometry device for use with the turbine nozzle of a turbine engine of the type having a support housing and a combustion chamber contained within the support housing. A pair of spaced walls in the support housing define an annular and radially extending nozzle passageway. The outer end of the nozzle passageway is open to the combustion chamber while the inner end of the nozzle passageway is open to one or more turbine stages. A plurality of circumferentially spaced nozzle vanes are mounted to one of the spaced walls and protrude across the nozzle passageway. An annular opening is formed around the opposite spaced wall and an annular ring is axially slidably mounted within the opening. A motor is operatively connected to this ring and, upon actuation, axially displaces the ring within the nozzle passageway. In addition, the ring includes a plurality of circumferentially spaced slots which register with the nozzle vanes so that the vane geometry remains the same despite axial displacement of the ring.

  10. Staged combustion with piston engine and turbine engine supercharger

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Larry E.; Anderson, Brian L.; O'Brien, Kevin C.

    2011-11-01

    A combustion engine method and system provides increased fuel efficiency and reduces polluting exhaust emissions by burning fuel in a two-stage combustion system. Fuel is combusted in a piston engine in a first stage producing piston engine exhaust gases. Fuel contained in the piston engine exhaust gases is combusted in a second stage turbine engine. Turbine engine exhaust gases are used to supercharge the piston engine.

  11. Staged combustion with piston engine and turbine engine supercharger

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Larry E.; Anderson, Brian L.; O'Brien, Kevin C.

    2006-05-09

    A combustion engine method and system provides increased fuel efficiency and reduces polluting exhaust emissions by burning fuel in a two-stage combustion system. Fuel is combusted in a piston engine in a first stage producing piston engine exhaust gases. Fuel contained in the piston engine exhaust gases is combusted in a second stage turbine engine. Turbine engine exhaust gases are used to supercharge the piston engine.

  12. Heterogeneous reactions in aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. C.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Lukachko, S. P.; Waitz, I. A.

    2002-05-01

    One-dimensional flow models and unity probability heterogeneous rate parameters are used to estimate the maximum effect of heterogeneous reactions on trace species evolution in aircraft gas turbines. The analysis includes reactions on soot particulates and turbine/nozzle material surfaces. Results for a representative advanced subsonic engine indicate the net change in reactant mixing ratios due to heterogeneous reactions is <10-6 for O2, CO2, and H2O, and <10-10 for minor combustion products such as SO2 and NO2. The change in the mixing ratios relative to the initial values is <0.01%. Since these estimates are based on heterogeneous reaction probabilities of unity, the actual changes will be even lower. Thus, heterogeneous chemistry within the engine cannot explain the high conversion of SO2 to SO3 which some wake models require to explain the observed levels of volatile aerosols. Furthermore, turbine heterogeneous processes will not effect exhaust NOx or NOy levels.

  13. Advanced Wind Turbine Drivetrain Concepts. Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-12-01

    This report presents key findings from the Department of Energy’s Advanced Drivetrain Workshop, held on June 29-30, 2010, to assess different advanced drivetrain technologies, their relative potential to improve the state-of-the-art in wind turbine drivetrains, and the scope of research and development needed for their commercialization in wind turbine applications.

  14. Active Combustion Control for Aircraft Gas-Turbine Engines-Experimental Results for an Advanced, Low-Emissions Combustor Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Kopasakis, George; Saus, Joseph R.; Chang, Clarence T.; Wey, Changlie

    2012-01-01

    Lean combustion concepts for aircraft engine combustors are prone to combustion instabilities. Mitigation of instabilities is an enabling technology for these low-emissions combustors. NASA Glenn Research Center s prior activity has demonstrated active control to suppress a high-frequency combustion instability in a combustor rig designed to emulate an actual aircraft engine instability experience with a conventional, rich-front-end combustor. The current effort is developing further understanding of the problem specifically as applied to future lean-burning, very low-emissions combustors. A prototype advanced, low-emissions aircraft engine combustor with a combustion instability has been identified and previous work has characterized the dynamic behavior of that combustor prototype. The combustor exhibits thermoacoustic instabilities that are related to increasing fuel flow and that potentially prevent full-power operation. A simplified, non-linear oscillator model and a more physics-based sectored 1-D dynamic model have been developed to capture the combustor prototype s instability behavior. Utilizing these models, the NASA Adaptive Sliding Phasor Average Control (ASPAC) instability control method has been updated for the low-emissions combustor prototype. Active combustion instability suppression using the ASPAC control method has been demonstrated experimentally with this combustor prototype in a NASA combustion test cell operating at engine pressures, temperatures, and flows. A high-frequency fuel valve was utilized to perturb the combustor fuel flow. Successful instability suppression was shown using a dynamic pressure sensor in the combustor for controller feedback. Instability control was also shown with a pressure feedback sensor in the lower temperature region upstream of the combustor. It was also demonstrated that the controller can prevent the instability from occurring while combustor operation was transitioning from a stable, low-power condition to

  15. Advanced turbine blade tip seal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelahy, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    An advanced blade/shroud system designed to maintain close clearance between blade tips and turbine shrouds and at the same time, be resistant to environmental effects including high temperature oxidation, hot corrosion, and thermal cycling is described. Increased efficiency and increased blade life are attained by using the advanced blade tip seal system. Features of the system include improved clearance control when blade tips preferentially wear the shrouds and a superior single crystal superalloy tip. The tip design, joint location, characterization of the single crystal tip alloy, the abrasive tip treatment, and the component and engine test are among the factors addressed. Results of wear testing, quality control plans, and the total manufacturing cycle required to fully process the blades are also discussed.

  16. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) powertrain system development for automotive applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary layouts were made for the exhaust system, air induction system, and battery installation. Points of interference were identified and resolved by altering either the vehicle or engine designs. An engine general arrangement evolved to meet the vehicle engine compartment constraints while minimizing the duct pressure losses and the heat rejection. A power transfer system (between gasifier and power turbines) was developed to maintain nearly constant temperatures throughout the entire range of engine operation. An advanced four speed automatic transmission was selected to be used with the engine. Performance calculations show improvements in component efficiencies and an increase in fuel economy. A single stage centrifugal compressor design was completed and released for procurement. Gasifier turbine, power turbine, combustor, generator, secondary systems, materials, controls, and transmission development are reported.

  17. Power lever apparatus for a turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    McCombs Jr., H. L.

    1985-05-21

    In a turbine engine having a compressor with a bleed valve and a variable geometry apparatus is responsive to an operational control member for regulating the flow rate of fuel supplied the turbine engine as a function of atmospheric pressure and the temperature of air supplied to the compressor corresponding to movement of a power lever by an operator to a desired operation of the turbine engine. The power lever has an indicator member fluidically connected to a follower member linked to the operational control member. The fluidic connection is responsive to operational parameters of the turbine engine and limits the rotational input to the follower member when the rate of fuel flow could cause stalling and the development of an unacceptable operating temperature or overspeed condition in the turbine engine.

  18. Advanced materials for aircraft engine applications.

    PubMed

    Backman, D G; Williams, J C

    1992-02-28

    A review of advances for aircraft engine structural materials and processes is presented. Improved materials, such as superalloys, and the processes for making turbine disks and blades have had a major impact on the capability of modern gas turbine engines. New structural materials, notably composites and intermetallic materials, are emerging that will eventually further enhance engine performance, reduce engine weight, and thereby enable new aircraft systems. In the future, successful aerospace manufacturers will combine product design and materials excellence with improved manufacturing methods to increase production efficiency, enhance product quality, and decrease the engine development cycle time. PMID:17817782

  19. Industrial Advanced Turbine Systems Program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Esbeck, D.W.

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in partnership with industry, has set new performance standards for industrial gas turbines through the creation of the Industrial Advanced Turbine System Program. Their leadership will lead to the development of an optimized, energy efficient, and environmentally friendly gas turbine power systems in this size class (3-to-20 MW). The DOE has already created a positive effect by encouraging gas turbine system manufacturers to reassess their product and technology plans using the new higher standards as the benchmark. Solar Turbines has been a leader in the industrial gas turbine business, and is delighted to have joined with the DOE in developing the goals and vision for this program. We welcome the opportunity to help the national goals of energy conservation and environmental enhancement. The results of this program should lead to the U.S. based gas turbine industry maintaining its international leadership and the creation of highly paid domestic jobs.

  20. Mainshaft seals for small gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Lynwander, P.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of mainshaft seals for small gas turbine engines was conducted with shaft speeds to 213 m/s (700 ft/sec), air pressures to 148 Newtons per square centimeter abs. (215 psia), and air temperatures to 412k(282 F). A radial face seal incorporating self-acting geometry for lift augmentation was evaluated. In addition, three conventional carbon seal types (face, circumferential segmented, and rotating ring) were run for comparison. Test results indicated that the conventional seals used in this evaluation may not be satisfactory in future advanced engines because of excessive air leakage. On the other hand, the self-acting face seal was shown to have the potential capability of limiting leakages to one-half that of the conventional face seals and one-fifth that of conventional ring seals. A 150-hour endurance test of the self-acting face seal was conducted.

  1. 14 CFR 27.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics....939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a...

  2. 14 CFR 27.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics....939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a...

  3. 14 CFR 27.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics....939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a...

  4. 14 CFR 29.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics....939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a...

  5. 14 CFR 29.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics....939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a...

  6. 14 CFR 27.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics....939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a...

  7. 14 CFR 29.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics....939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a...

  8. 14 CFR 29.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics....939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a...

  9. Ceramic Composite Development for Gas Turbine Engine Hot Section Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.; VANrOODE, mARK

    2006-01-01

    The development of ceramic materials for incorporation into the hot section of gas turbine engines has been ongoing for about fifty years. Researchers have designed, developed, and tested ceramic gas turbine components in rigs and engines for automotive, aero-propulsion, industrial, and utility power applications. Today, primarily because of materials limitations and/or economic factors, major challenges still remain for the implementation of ceramic components in gas turbines. For example, because of low fracture toughness, monolithic ceramics continue to suffer from the risk of failure due to unknown extrinsic damage events during engine service. On the other hand, ceramic matrix composites (CMC) with their ability to display much higher damage tolerance appear to be the materials of choice for current and future engine components. The objective of this paper is to briefly review the design and property status of CMC materials for implementation within the combustor and turbine sections for gas turbine engine applications. It is shown that although CMC systems have advanced significantly in thermo-structural performance within recent years, certain challenges still exist in terms of producibility, design, and affordability for commercial CMC turbine components. Nevertheless, there exist some recent successful efforts for prototype CMC components within different engine types.

  10. Fish Passage Assessment of an Advanced Hydropower Turbine and Conventional Turbine Using Blade-strike Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2011-01-04

    In the Columbia and Snake River basins, several species of Pacific salmon were listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 due to significant declines of fish population. Dam operators and design engineers are thus faced with the task of making those hydroelectric facilities more ecologically friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, applied for re-licensing from the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that were designed to increase power generation and improve fish passage conditions. We applied both deterministic and stochastic blade-strike models to the newly installed turbine and an existing turbine. Modeled probabilities were compared to the results of a large-scale live fish survival study and a sensor fish study under the same operational parameters. Overall, injury rates predicted by the deterministic model were higher than experimental rates of injury while those predicted by the stochastic model were in close agreement with experiment results. Fish orientation at the time of entry into the plane of the leading edges of the turbine runner blades was an important factor contributing to uncertainty in modeled results. The advanced design turbine had slightly higher modeled injury rates than the existing turbine design; however, there was no statistical evidence that suggested significant differences in blade-strike injuries between the two turbines and the hypothesis that direct fish survival rate through the advanced hydropower turbine is equal or better than that through the conventional turbine could not be rejected.

  11. Combustion modeling in advanced gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, L.D.; Hedman, P.O.; Fletcher, T.H.

    1995-10-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program is to help develop and commercialize ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base-load applications in the utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. Combustion modeling, including emission characteristics, has been identified as a needed, high-priority technology by key professionals in the gas turbine industry.

  12. Static seal for turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, Santiago; Gisch, Andrew

    2014-04-01

    A seal structure for a gas turbine engine, the seal structure including first and second components located adjacent to each other and forming a barrier between high and low pressure zones. A seal cavity is defined in the first and second components, the seal cavity extending to either side of an elongated gap extending generally in a first direction between the first and second components. A seal member is positioned within the seal cavity and spans across the elongated gap. The seal member includes first and second side edges extending into each of the components in a second direction transverse to the first direction, and opposing longitudinal edges extending between the side edges generally parallel to the first direction. The side edges include a groove formed therein for effecting a reduction of gas flow around the seal member at the side edges.

  13. Regenerator for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Lewakowski, John J.

    1979-01-01

    A rotary disc-type counterflow regenerator for a gas turbine engine includes a disc-shaped ceramic core surrounded by a metal rim which carries a coaxial annular ring gear. Bonding of the metal rim to the ceramic core is accomplished by constructing the metal rim in three integral portions: a driving portion disposed adjacent the ceramic core which carries the ring gear, a bonding portion disposed further away from the ceramic core and which is bonded thereto by elastomeric pads, and a connecting portion connecting the bonding portion to the driving portion. The elastomeric pads are bonded to radially flexible mounts formed as part of the metal rim by circumferential slots in the transition portion and lateral slots extending from one end of the circumferential slots across the bonding portion of the rim.

  14. Materials for advanced ultrasupercritical steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Purgert, Robert; Shingledecker, John; Saha, Deepak; Thangirala, Mani; Booras, George; Powers, John; Riley, Colin; Hendrix, Howard

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have sponsored a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired power plants capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than the current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) steam conditions. A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction for boilers and for steam turbines. The overall project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760°C (1400°F)/35MPa (5000 psi). This final technical report covers the research completed by the General Electric Company (GE) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), with support from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) – Albany Research Center, to develop the A-USC steam turbine materials technology to meet the overall project goals. Specifically, this report summarizes the industrial scale-up and materials property database development for non-welded rotors (disc forgings), buckets (blades), bolting, castings (needed for casing and valve bodies), casting weld repair, and casting to pipe welding. Additionally, the report provides an engineering and economic assessment of an A-USC power plant without and with partial carbon capture and storage. This research project successfully demonstrated the materials technology at a sufficient scale and with corresponding materials property data to enable the design of an A-USC steam turbine. The key accomplishments included the development of a triple-melt and forged Haynes 282 disc for bolted rotor construction, long-term property development for Nimonic 105 for blading and bolting, successful scale-up of Haynes 282 and Nimonic 263 castings using

  15. Integrated gas turbine engine-nacelle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, A. P.; Sargisson, D. F.; Stotler, C. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A nacelle for use with a gas turbine engine is presented. An integral webbed structure resembling a spoked wheel for rigidly interconnecting the nacelle and engine, provides lightweight support. The inner surface of the nacelle defines the outer limits of the engine motive fluid flow annulus while the outer surface of the nacelle defines a streamlined envelope for the engine.

  16. General Aviation Turbine Engine (GATE) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baerst, C. F.; Furst, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of turbine engines for the smaller general aviation aircraft was investigated and a technology program for developing the necessary technology was identified. Major results included the definition of the 1988 general aviation market, the identification of turboprop and turboshaft engines that meet the requirements of the aircraft studies, a benefit analysis showing the superiority of gas turbine engines for portions of the market studied, and detailed plans for the development of the necessary technology.

  17. Gas turbine engines with particle traps

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.; Sumner, D. Warren; Sheoran, Yogendra; Judd, Z. Daniel

    1992-01-01

    A gas turbine engine (10) incorporates a particle trap (46) that forms an entrapment region (73) in a plenum (24) which extends from within the combustor (18) to the inlet (32) of a radial-inflow turbine (52, 54). The engine (10) is thereby adapted to entrap particles that originate downstream from the compressor (14) and are otherwise propelled by combustion gas (22) into the turbine (52, 54). Carbonaceous particles that are dislodged from the inner wall (50) of the combustor (18) are incinerated within the entrapment region (73) during operation of the engine (10).

  18. System definition and analysis gas-fired industrial advanced turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, G.M.

    1997-05-01

    The objective is to define and analyze an engine system based on the gas fuel Advanced Turbine from Task 3. Using the cycle results of Task 3, a technical effort was started for Task 6 which would establish the definition of the engine flowpath and the key engine component systems. The key engine systems are: gas turbine engine overall flowpath; booster (low pressure compressor); intercooler; high pressure compressor; combustor; high pressure turbine; low pressure turbine and materials; engine system packaging; and power plant configurations. The design objective is to use the GE90 engine as the platform for the GE Industrial Advanced Turbine System. This objective sets the bounds for the engine flowpath and component systems.

  19. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    ATTAP activities were highlighted by test bed engine design and development activities; ceramic component design; materials and engine component characterization; ceramic component process development and fabrication; component rig testing; and test bed engine fabrication and testing. Specifically, ATTAP aims to develop and demonstrate the technology of structural ceramics that have the potential for competitive automotive engine life cycle cost and for operating for 3500 hours in a turbine engine environment at temperatures up to 1371 C (2500 F).

  20. Development of environmentally advanced hydropower turbine system design concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, G.F.; Webb, D.R.; Fisher, R.K. Jr.

    1997-08-01

    A team worked together on the development of environmentally advanced hydro turbine design concepts to reduce hydropower`s impact on the environment, and to improve the understanding of the technical and environmental issues involved, in particular, with fish survival as a result of their passage through hydro power sites. This approach brought together a turbine design and manufacturing company, biologists, a utility, a consulting engineering firm and a university research facility, in order to benefit from the synergy of diverse disciplines. Through a combination of advanced technology and engineering analyses, innovative design concepts adaptable to both new and existing hydro facilities were developed and are presented. The project was divided into 4 tasks. Task 1 investigated a broad range of environmental issues and how the issues differed throughout the country. Task 2 addressed fish physiology and turbine physics. Task 3 investigated individual design elements needed for the refinement of the three concept families defined in Task 1. Advanced numerical tools for flow simulation in turbines are used to quantify characteristics of flow and pressure fields within turbine water passageways. The issues associated with dissolved oxygen enhancement using turbine aeration are presented. The state of the art and recent advancements of this technology are reviewed. Key elements for applying turbine aeration to improve aquatic habitat are discussed and a review of the procedures for testing of aerating turbines is presented. In Task 4, the results of the Tasks were assembled into three families of design concepts to address the most significant issues defined in Task 1. The results of the work conclude that significant improvements in fish passage survival are achievable.

  1. 21st century advanced hydropower turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    Brookshier, P.A.; Flynn, J.V.; Loose, R.R.

    1995-11-01

    While hydropower turbine manufacturers have incrementally improved turbine technology to increase efficiency, the basic design concepts haven`t changed for decades. These late 19th and early 20th century designs did not consider environmental effects, since little was known about environmental effects of hydropower at the time. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the hydropower industry recognize that hydropower plants have an effect on the environment and there is a great need to bring turbine designs into the 21st century. DOE has issued a request for proposals (RFP) that requested proposers to discard conventional thinking, search out innovative solutions, and to visualize innovative turbines designed from a new perspective. This perspective would look at the {open_quotes}turbine system{close_quotes} (intake to tailrace) which will balance environmental, technical, and economic considerations. This paper describes the DOE Advanced Hydropower Turbine System Program.

  2. Multi-heat addition turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franciscus, Leo C. (Inventor); Brabbs, Theodore A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A multi-heat addition turbine engine (MHATE) incorporates a plurality of heat addition devices to transfer energy to air and a plurality of turbines to extract energy from the air while converting it to work. The MHATE provides dry power and lower fuel consumption or lower combustor exit temperatures.

  3. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology (HOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Research and plans concerning aircraft gas turbine engine hot section durability problems were discussed. Under the topics of structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, surface protective coatings, combustion, turbine heat transfer, and instrumentation specific points addressed were the thermal and fluid environment around liners, blades, and vanes, material coatings, constitutive behavior, stress-strain response, and life prediction methods for the three components.

  4. Advanced IGCC/Hydrogen Gas Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    York, William; Hughes, Michael; Berry, Jonathan; Russell, Tamara; Lau, Y. C.; Liu, Shan; Arnett, Michael; Peck, Arthur; Tralshawala, Nilesh; Weber, Joseph; Benjamin, Marc; Iduate, Michelle; Kittleson, Jacob; Garcia-Crespo, Andres; Delvaux, John; Casanova, Fernando; Lacy, Ben; Brzek, Brian; Wolfe, Chris; Palafox, Pepe; Ding, Ben; Badding, Bruce; McDuffie, Dwayne; Zemsky, Christine

    2015-07-30

    The objective of this program was to develop the technologies required for a fuel flexible (coal derived hydrogen or syngas) gas turbine for IGCC that met DOE turbine performance goals. The overall DOE Advanced Power System goal was to conduct the research and development (R&D) necessary to produce coal-based IGCC power systems with high efficiency, near-zero emissions, and competitive capital cost. To meet this goal, the DOE Fossil Energy Turbine Program had as an interim objective of 2 to 3 percentage points improvement in combined cycle (CC) efficiency. The final goal is 3 to 5 percentage points improvement in CC efficiency above the state of the art for CC turbines in IGCC applications at the time the program started. The efficiency goals were for NOx emissions of less than 2 ppm NOx (@15 % O2). As a result of the technologies developed under this program, the DOE goals were exceeded with a projected 8 point efficiency improvement. In addition, a new combustion technology was conceived of and developed to overcome the challenges of burning hydrogen and achieving the DOE’s NOx goal. This report also covers the developments under the ARRA-funded portion of the program that include gas turbine technology advancements for improvement in the efficiency, emissions, and cost performance of gas turbines for industrial applications with carbon capture and sequestration. Example applications could be cement plants, chemical plants, refineries, steel and aluminum plants, manufacturing facilities, etc. The DOE’s goal for more than 5 percentage point improvement in efficiency was met with cycle analyses performed for representative IGCC Steel Mill and IGCC Refinery applications. Technologies were developed in this program under the following areas: combustion, larger latter stage buckets, CMC and EBC, advanced materials and coatings, advanced configurations to reduce cooling, sealing and rotor purge flows, turbine aerodynamics, advanced sensors, advancements in first

  5. Plan for an Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bajura, R.A.; Webb, H.A.; Parks, W.P.

    1993-03-01

    A draft version of this paper was presented at the Clemson Clean, affordable, and reliable natural gas utilization technologies will play a growing role in meeting future power generation needs in the United States. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) National Energy Strategy projected that total demand for natural gas will rise from 18.5 trillion cubic feet (tcf) in 1990 to 24.2 tcf by the year 2000. Much of this increase is attributed to the increased use of natural gas as a fuel for electric power generation. Candidate technologies for gas fired power generation include gas turbine and fuel cell systems. The first workshop on research needs for advanced gas turbine systems for power generation was held on April 8-10, 1991 in Greenville, South Carolina. The goals of the Clemson-I Workshop were to identify research needs which would accelerate the development of advanced gas turbines and to consider new approaches to implement this research. The Clemson-I Workshop focused on advanced gas turbine systems which would have a lower cost of electricity or better environmental performance than systems currently under development. The workshop was cosponsored by the DOE`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Clemson University, and the South Carolina Energy Research and Development Center. The proceedings from the workshop have been published. The 75 participants in the Clemson-I Workshop represented a broad spectrum of the gas turbine Research & Development (R&D) community as well as potential users of advanced gas turbines. Gas turbine manufacturers, the electric utility industry, the university community, as well as government and private sector R&D sponsors were represented. Participants in the Clemson-I Workshop concluded that it is technically feasible to develop advanced turbine systems and that Government participation would accelerate the developmental effort. Advanced turbine systems could be operated on natural gas or adapted to coal or biomass firing.

  6. Plan for an Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bajura, R.A.; Webb, H.A. ); Parks, W.P. )

    1993-01-01

    A draft version of this paper was presented at the Clemson Clean, affordable, and reliable natural gas utilization technologies will play a growing role in meeting future power generation needs in the United States. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Strategy projected that total demand for natural gas will rise from 18.5 trillion cubic feet (tcf) in 1990 to 24.2 tcf by the year 2000. Much of this increase is attributed to the increased use of natural gas as a fuel for electric power generation. Candidate technologies for gas fired power generation include gas turbine and fuel cell systems. The first workshop on research needs for advanced gas turbine systems for power generation was held on April 8-10, 1991 in Greenville, South Carolina. The goals of the Clemson-I Workshop were to identify research needs which would accelerate the development of advanced gas turbines and to consider new approaches to implement this research. The Clemson-I Workshop focused on advanced gas turbine systems which would have a lower cost of electricity or better environmental performance than systems currently under development. The workshop was cosponsored by the DOE's Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Clemson University, and the South Carolina Energy Research and Development Center. The proceedings from the workshop have been published. The 75 participants in the Clemson-I Workshop represented a broad spectrum of the gas turbine Research Development (R D) community as well as potential users of advanced gas turbines. Gas turbine manufacturers, the electric utility industry, the university community, as well as government and private sector R D sponsors were represented. Participants in the Clemson-I Workshop concluded that it is technically feasible to develop advanced turbine systems and that Government participation would accelerate the developmental effort. Advanced turbine systems could be operated on natural gas or adapted to coal or biomass firing.

  7. Advanced turbine systems study system scoping and feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    United Technologies Research Center, Pratt Whitney Commercial Engine Business, And Pratt Whitney Government Engine and Space Propulsion has performed a preliminary analysis of an Advanced Turbine System (ATS) under Contract DE-AC21-92MC29247 with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The natural gas-fired reference system identified by the UTC team is the Humid Air Turbine (HAT) Cycle in which the gas turbine exhaust heat and heat rejected from the intercooler is used in a saturator to humidify the high pressure compressor discharge air. This results in a significant increase in flow through the turbine at no increase in compressor power. Using technology based on the PW FT4000, the industrial engine derivative of the PW4000, currently under development by PW, the system would have an output of approximately 209 MW and an efficiency of 55.3%. Through use of advanced cooling and materials technologies similar to those currently in the newest generation military aircraft engines, a growth version of this engine could attain approximately 295 MW output at an efficiency of 61.5%. There is the potential for even higher performance in the future as technology from aerospace R D programs is adapted to aero-derivative industrial engines.

  8. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wenglarz, R.A.

    1994-08-01

    Several technology advances since the early coal-fueled turbine programs that address technical issues of coal as a turbine fuel have been developed in the early 1980s: Coal-water suspensions as fuel form, improved methods for removing ash and contaminants from coal, staged combustion for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from fuel-bound nitrogen, and greater understanding of deposition/erosion/corrosion and their control. Several Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems programs were awarded to gas turbine manufacturers for for components development and proof of concept tests; one of these was Allison. Tests were conducted in a subscale coal combustion facility and a full-scale facility operating a coal combustor sized to the Allison Model 501-K industrial turbine. A rich-quench-lean (RQL), low nitrogen oxide combustor design incorporating hot gas cleanup was developed for coal fuels; this should also be applicable to biomass, etc. The combustor tests showed NO{sub x} and CO emissions {le} levels for turbines operating with natural gas. Water washing of vanes from the turbine removed the deposits. Systems and economic evaluations identified two possible applications for RQL turbines: Cogeneration plants based on Allison 501-K turbine (output 3.7 MW(e), 23,000 lbs/hr steam) and combined cycle power plants based on 50 MW or larger gas turbines. Coal-fueled cogeneration plant configurations were defined and evaluated for site specific factors. A coal-fueled turbine combined cycle plant design was identified which is simple, compact, and results in lower capital cost, with comparable efficiency and low emissions relative to other coal technologies (gasification, advanced PFBC).

  9. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    ATTAP activities during the past year included test-bed engine design and development, ceramic component design, materials and component characterization, ceramic component process development and fabrication, ceramic component rig testing, and test-bed engine fabrication and testing. Significant technical challenges remain, but all areas exhibited progress. Test-bed engine design and development included engine mechanical design, combustion system design, alternate aerodynamic designs of gasifier scrolls, and engine system integration aimed at upgrading the AGT-5 from a 1038 C (1900 F) metal engine to a durable 1372 C (2500 F) structural ceramic component test-bed engine. ATTAP-defined ceramic and associated ceramic/metal component design activities completed include the ceramic gasifier turbine static structure, the ceramic gasifier turbine rotor, ceramic combustors, the ceramic regenerator disk, the ceramic power turbine rotors, and the ceramic/metal power turbine static structure. The material and component characterization efforts included the testing and evaluation of seven candidate materials and three development components. Ceramic component process development and fabrication proceeded for the gasifier turbine rotor, gasifier turbine scroll, gasifier turbine vanes and vane platform, extruded regenerator disks, and thermal insulation. Component rig activities included the development of both rigs and the necessary test procedures, and conduct of rig testing of the ceramic components and assemblies. Test-bed engine fabrication, testing, and development supported improvements in ceramic component technology that permit the achievement of both program performance and durability goals. Total test time in 1991 amounted to 847 hours, of which 128 hours were engine testing, and 719 were hot rig testing.

  10. Combustion modeling in advanced gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, L.D.; Hedman, P.O.; Fletcher, T.H.; Brewster, B.S.; Kramer, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    Goal of DOE`s Advanced Turbine Systems program is to develop and commercialize ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, cost competitive gas turbine systems for base-load applications in utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. Primary objective of the program here is to develop a comprehensive combustion model for advanced gas turbine combustion systems using natural gas (coal gasification or biomass fuels). The efforts included code evaluation (PCGC-3), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, laser Doppler anemometry, and laser-induced fluorescence.

  11. Gas Turbine Engine Having Fan Rotor Driven by Turbine Exhaust and with a Bypass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Chandler, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A gas turbine engine has a core engine incorporating a core engine turbine. A fan rotor is driven by a fan rotor turbine. The fan rotor turbine is in the path of gases downstream from the core engine turbine. A bypass door is moveable from a closed position at which the gases from the core engine turbine pass over the fan rotor turbine, and moveable to a bypass position at which the gases are directed away from the fan rotor turbine. An aircraft is also disclosed.

  12. Nickel base alloy. [for gas turbine engine stator vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Waters, W. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A nickel base superalloy for use at temperatures of 2000 F (1095 C) to 2200 F (1205 C) was developed for use as stator vane material in advanced gas turbine engines. The alloy has a nominal composition in weight percent of 16 tungsten, 7 aluminum, 1 molybdenum, 2 columbium, 0.3 zirconium, 0.2 carbon and the balance nickel.

  13. Wind Turbine Modeling Overview for Control Engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, P. J.; Butterfield, S. B.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate modeling of wind turbine systems is of paramount importance for controls engineers seeking to reduce loads and optimize energy capture of operating turbines in the field. When designing control systems, engineers often employ a series of models developed in the different disciplines of wind energy. The limitations and coupling of each of these models is explained to highlight how these models might influence control system design.

  14. Integrated gas turbine engine-nacelle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, A. P.; Sargisson, D. F.; Stotler, C. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A nacelle for use with a gas turbine engine is provided with an integral webbed structure resembling a spoked wheel for rigidly interconnecting the nacelle and engine. The nacelle is entirely supported in its spacial relationship with the engine by means of the webbed structure. The inner surface of the nacelle defines the outer limits of the engine motive fluid flow annulus, while the outer surface of the nacelle defines a streamlined envelope for the engine.

  15. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology (HOST) Project of the NASA Lewis Research Center sponsored a workshop to discuss current research pertinent to turbine engine durability problems. Presentations were made concerning the hot section environment and the behavior of combustion liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The presentations were divided into six sessions: Instrumentation, Combustion, Turbine Heat Transfer, Structural Analysis, Fatigue and Fracture, and Surface Protection. Topics discussed included modeling of thermal and fluid-flow phenomena, structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, surface protective coatings, constitutive behavior of materials, stress-strain response, and life-prediction methods. Researchers from industry, academia, and government presented results of their work sponsored by the HOST project.

  16. Advanced liner-cooling techniques for gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    Component research for advanced small gas turbine engines is currently underway at the NASA Lewis Research Center. As part of this program, a basic reverse-flow combustor geometry was being maintained while different advanced liner wall cooling techniques were investigated. Performance and liner cooling effectiveness of the experimental combustor configuration featuring counter-flow film-cooled panels is presented and compared with two previously reported combustors featuring: splash film-cooled liner walls; and transpiration cooled liner walls (Lamilloy).

  17. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings for commercial gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Susan Manning; Gupta, Dinesh K.; Sheffler, Keith D.

    1991-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the short history, current status, and future prospects of ceramic thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine engines. Particular attention is given to plasma-sprayed and electron beam-physical vapor deposited yttria-stabilized (7 wt pct Y2O3) zirconia systems. Recent advances include improvements in the spallation life of thermal barrier coatings, improved bond coat composition and spraying techniques, and improved component design. The discussion also covers field experience, life prediction modeling, and future directions in ceramic coatings in relation to gas turbine engine design.

  18. Gas turbine engine with recirculating bleed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, A. P. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emissions in a gas turbine engine are reduced by bleeding hot air from the engine cycle and introducing it back into the engine upstream of the bleed location and upstream of the combustor inlet. As this hot inlet air is recycled, the combustor inlet temperature rises rapidly at a constant engine thrust level. In most combustors, this will reduce carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emissions significantly. The preferred locations for hot air extraction are at the compressor discharge or from within the turbine, whereas the preferred reentry location is at the compressor inlet.

  19. The AGT 101 advanced automotive gas turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rackley, R. A.; Kidwell, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    A development program is described whose goal is the accumulation of the technology base needed by the U.S. automotive industry for the production of automotive gas turbine powertrains. Such gas turbine designs must exhibit reduced fuel consumption, a multi-fuel capability, and low exhaust emissions. The AGT101 powertrain described is a 74.6 kW, regenerated single-shaft gas turbine, operating at a maximum inlet temperature of 1644 K and coupled to a split differential gearbox and automatic overdrive transmission. The engine's single stage centrifugal compressor and single stage radial inflow turbine are mounted on a common shaft, and will operate at a maximum rotor speed of 100,000 rpm. All high temperature components, including the turbine rotor, are ceramic.

  20. Advanced Turbine Systems annual program review

    SciTech Connect

    Koop, W.E.

    1995-10-01

    Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) is a joint Air Force, Navy, Army, NASA, ARPA, and industry program focused on developing turbine engine technologies, with the goal of doubling propulsion capability by around the turn-of-the-century, and thus providing smaller, lighter, more durable, more affordable turbine engines in the future. IHPTET`s technology development plan for increasing propulsion capability with respect to time is divided into three phases. This phased approach reduces the technological risk of taking one giant leap, and also reduces the {open_quotes}political{close_quotes} risk of not delivering a product for an extended period of time, in that the phasing allows continuous transfer of IHPTET technologies to our warfighters and continuous transfer to the commercial sector (dual-use). The IHPTET program addresses the three major classes of engines: turbofan/turbojet, turboshaft/turboprop, and expendables.

  1. General Aviation Turbine Engine (GATE) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strack, W. C.

    1983-01-01

    When all the technology studies were done and the accompanying market analyses were complete, the conclusion was that it is indeed possible to reduce the cost of turbine engines by a factor of 3 using low-cost manufacturing techniques and increased production rates. In the interest of reducing engine cost, some performance was sacrificed. Yet we ended up with about a 20 percent predicted improvement in SFC over current technology turboprops. However, even this level of improvement does not match the low SFC of reciprocating powerplants--particularly those advanced concepts described earlier. The 20 percent better SFC and much lower weight of a turboprop does mean that if such a powerplant were installed in a resized small airplane, one could save between 10 and 30 percent fuel relative to existing recip engines, depending on different mission and airplane combinations. The price of the aircraft would go down about 15 percent in the case of a high powered single, or 25 percent in the case of a normal size twin. The operating costs would decrease about 10 percent in the case of the single, and as much as 35 percent in the case of the twin.

  2. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

    1991-07-01

    Advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past few years, together with recent DOE-METC sponsored studies, have served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine can ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. The five-year program consists of three phases, namely: (1) system description; (2) component development; (3) prototype system verification. A successful conclusion to the program will initiate a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs.

  3. Aerodynamic performance of conventional and advanced design labyrinth seals with solid-smooth abradable, and honeycomb lands. [gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, H. L.; Cox, D. M.; Holle, G. F.

    1977-01-01

    Labyrinth air seal static and dynamic performance was evaluated using solid, abradable, and honeycomb lands with standard and advanced seal designs. The effects on leakage of land surface roughness, abradable land porosity, rub grooves in abradable lands, and honeycomb land cell size and depth were studied using a standard labyrinth seal. The effects of rotation on the optimum seal knife pitch were also investigated. Selected geometric and aerodynamic parameters for an advanced seal design were evaluated to derive an optimized performance configuration. The rotational energy requirements were also measured to determine the inherent friction and pumping energy absorbed by the various seal knife and land configurations tested in order to properly assess the net seal system performance level. Results indicate that: (1) seal leakage can be significantly affected with honeycomb or abradable lands; (2) rotational energy absorption does not vary significantly with the use of a solid-smooth, an abradable, or a honeycomb land; and (3) optimization of an advanced lab seal design produced a configuration that had leakage 25% below a conventional stepped seal.

  4. Gas turbine engine active clearance control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deveau, Paul J. (Inventor); Greenberg, Paul B. (Inventor); Paolillo, Roger E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Method for controlling the clearance between rotating and stationary components of a gas turbine engine are disclosed. Techniques for achieving close correspondence between the radial position of rotor blade tips and the circumscribing outer air seals are disclosed. In one embodiment turbine case temperature modifying air is provided in flow rate, pressure and temperature varied as a function of engine operating condition. The modifying air is scheduled from a modulating and mixing valve supplied with dual source compressor air. One source supplies relatively low pressure, low temperature air and the other source supplies relatively high pressure, high temperature air. After the air has been used for the active clearance control (cooling the high pressure turbine case) it is then used for cooling the structure that supports the outer air seal and other high pressure turbine component parts.

  5. Toward improved durability in advanced aircraft engine hot sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Daniel E. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The conference on durability improvement methods for advanced aircraft gas turbine hot-section components discussed NASA's Hot Section Technology (HOST) project, advanced high-temperature instrumentation for hot-section research, the development and application of combustor aerothermal models, and the evaluation of a data base and numerical model for turbine heat transfer. Also discussed are structural analysis methods for gas turbine hot section components, fatigue life-prediction modeling for turbine hot section materials, and the service life modeling of thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines.

  6. Oxidation of advanced steam turbine alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  7. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project annual report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This report is the tenth in a series of Technical Summary reports for the Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project, authorized under NASA Contract DEN3-167, and sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). This report was prepared by Garrett Turbine Engine Company, A Division of the Garrett Corporation, and includes information provided by Ford Motor Company, the Carborundum Company, and AiResearch Casting Company. The Project is administered by Mr. Thomas N. Strom, Project Manager, NASA-Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio. This report covers plans and progress for the period July 1, 1984 through June 30, 1985.

  8. Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M A; Pettit, F; Meier, G H; Yanar, M; Helminiak, M; Chyu, M; Siw, S; Slaughter, W S; Karaivanov, V; Kang, B S; Feng, C; Tannebaum, J M; Chen, R; Zhang, B; Fu, T; Richards, G A; Sidwell, T G; Straub, D; Casleton, K H; Dogan, O M

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogen-fired and oxy-fueled land-based gas turbines currently target inlet operating temperatures of ~1425-1760°C (~2600-3200°F). In view of natural gas or syngas-fired engines, advancements in both materials, as well as aerothermal cooling configurations are anticipated prior to commercial operation. This paper reviews recent technical accomplishments resulting from NETL’s collaborative research efforts with the University of Pittsburgh and West Virginia University for future land-based gas turbine applications.

  9. Airfoil seal system for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-06-25

    A turbine airfoil seal system of a turbine engine having a seal base with a plurality of seal strips extending therefrom for sealing gaps between rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components. The seal strips may overlap each other and may be generally aligned with each other. The seal strips may flex during operation to further reduce the gap between the rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components.

  10. The GATE studies - Assessing the potential of future small general aviation turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strack, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Four studies have been completed that explore the opportunities for future General Aviation Turbine Engines (GATE) in the 150-1000 SHP class. These studies forecasted the potential impact of advanced technology turbine engines in the post-1988 market, identified important aircraft and missions, desirable engine sizes, engine performance and cost goals. Parametric evaluations of various engine cycles, configurations, design features, and advanced technology elements defined baseline conceptual engines for each of the important missions identified by the market analysis. Both fixed-wing and helicopter aircraft, and turboshaft, turboprop, and turbofan engines were considered. Key technology areas were recommended for NASA support in order to realize proposed improvements.

  11. Control for a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, T.J.

    1992-08-04

    This patent describes a gas turbine engine having fuel metering means for delivering fuel to the engine and including means for controlling the fuel metering means including speed control means and slave-datum control responsive to a speed request signal and limit signal for limiting the fuel metering means for producing a signal that is integrated with respect to time for controlling the speed control means, and slave-datum limit control means for further limiting the slave-datum control so that its output is indicative of the maximum or minimum constraints of the engine during the engine's acceleration and deceleration modes of operation whereby the windup effect on the speed control means is eliminated, the output produced by the slave datum limit control means is a function of the formula: ((maximum constraint) [minus] (KOP [times] 'slave-datum'))/KP + speed feedback, where: maximum constraint is the surge limit of the gas turbine engine. KOP [times] 'slave-datum' is the scheduled engine operating point required for steady state engine operation, KP is the proportional gain of an engine governor, KIP is the slope of an engine operating line and speed feedback is indicative of the rotational speed of the gas turbine engine.

  12. The Cascaded Humidified Advanced Turbine (CHAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhamkin, M.; Swensen, E.C.; Wilson, J.M.; Gaul, G.; Polsky, M.

    1996-07-01

    This paper introduces the Cascaded Humidified Advanced Turbine (CHAT) plant, a gas turbine based power generation plant utilizing intercooling, reheat, and humidification. It is based upon the integration of an existing heavy duty gas turbine with an additional shaft comprising industrial compressors and high pressure expander. CHAT capitalizes on the latest proven gas turbine technology, which, combined with a sophisticated thermal cycle configuration, results in substantial improvement in gas turbine efficiency, compared to a simple cycle, while still maintaining typical advantages and merits of a combustion turbine plant. Built with a commercial combustion turbine and available industrial compressors and expanders, the CHAT plant does not require extensive product development and testing. As a result, the CHAT power plant can be offered with specific capital costs up to 20 percent lower than the combined cycle plant, and with competing efficiency. Compared to a combined cycle plant, the CHAT plant offers lower emissions (due to air humidification) and other significant operating advantages with regard to start-up time and costs, better efficiency at part load, lower power degradation at higher ambient temperatures, and simpler operations and maintenance due to elimination of the complexities and costs associated with steam production. The CHAT plant also integrates very effectively with coal gasification and particularly well with the water quench design. This feature has been discussed in previous publications.

  13. Mainshaft seals for small gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Lynwander, P.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of mainshaft seals for small gas turbine engines was conducted with shaft speeds to 213 m/sec, air pressures to 215 psia, and air temperatures to 412 K. A radial face seal incorporating self-acting geometry for lift augmentation was evaluated. In addition, three conventional carbon seal types (face, circumferential segmented, and rotating ring) were run for comparison. Test results indicated that the conventional seals used in this evaluation may not be satisfactory in future advanced engines because of excessive air leakage. On the other hand, the self-acting face seal was shown to have the potential capability of limiting leakages to one-half that of the conventional face seals and one-fifth that of conventional ring seals. A 150 hour endurance test of the self-action face seal was conducted at speeds to 145 m/sec, air pressures to 180 psia, and air temperatures to 408 K. The seal wear was not measurable.

  14. Modal testing of advanced wind turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Osgood, R.M.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with the US wind industry, is supporting the development of technology for advanced, higher efficiency wind energy conversion systems. Under the Advanced Wind Turbine (AAWT) Program, the DOE, through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), will assist US industry in incorporating advanced wind turbine technology into utility-grade wind turbines. As part of the AWT Program, NREL is conducting a range of activities aimed at assisting the wind industry with system design analysis and testing. One major activity is NREL`s Full System Model Testing (FSMT) task. In 1993 and 1994, NREL`s FSMT team conducted model surveys on several wind turbine systems developed by industry, including Atlantic Orient Corporation`s AOC 15/50, R. Lynette and Associates` AWT-26 P1, and Carter Wind Turbines Incorporated`s CWT-300. This paper describes how these model surveys were carried out and how industry and NREL wind researchers used the experimental results to validate their analytical models.

  15. Overview of Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, H. A.; Bajura, R. A.

    The US Department of Energy initiated a program to develop advanced gas turbine systems to serve both central power and industrial power generation markets. The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program will lead to commercial offerings by the private sector by 2002. ATS will be developed to fire natural gas but will be adaptable to coal and biomass firing. The systems will be: highly efficient (15 percent improvement over today's best systems); environmentally superior (10 percent reduction in nitrogen oxides over today's best systems); and cost competitive (10 percent reduction in cost of electricity). The ATS Program has five elements. Innovative cycle development will lead to the demonstration of systems with advanced gas turbine cycles using current gas turbine technology. High temperature development will lead to the increased firing temperatures needed to achieve ATS Program efficiency goals. Ceramic component development/demonstration will expand the current DOE/CE program to demonstrate industrial-scale turbines with ceramic components. Technology base will support the overall program by conducting research and development (R&D) on generic technology issues. Coal application studies will adapt technology developed in the ATS program to coal-fired systems being developed in other DOE programs.

  16. Advanced Engineering Fibers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edie, Dan D.; Dunham, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Clemson University's Advanced Engineered Fibers Laboratory, which was established to provide national leadership and expertise in developing the processing equipment and advance fibers necessary for the chemical, fiber, and textile industries to enter the composite materials market. Discusses some of the laboratory's activities in…

  17. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Engine testing, ceramic component fabrication and evaluation, component performance rig testing, and analytical studies comprised AGT 100 activities during the 1985 year. Ten experimental assemblies (builds) were evaluated using two engines. Accrued operating time was 120 hr of burning and 170 hr total, bringing cumulative total operating time to 395 hr, all devoid of major failures. Tests identified the generator seals as the primary working fluid leakage sources. Power transfer clutch operation was demonstrated. An alpha SiC gasifier rotor engine test resulted in blade tip failures. Recurring case vibration and shaft whip have limited gasifier shaft speeds to 84%. Ceramic components successfully engine tested now include the SiC scroll assembly, Si3N3 turbine rotor, combustor assembly, regenerator disk bulkhead, turbine vanes, piston rings, and couplings. A compressor shroud design change to reduce heat recirculation back to the inlet was executed. Ceramic components activity continues to focus on the development of state-of-the-art material strength characteristics in full-scale engine hardware. Fiber reinforced glass-ceramic composite turbine (inner) backplates were fabricated by Corning Glass Works. The BMAS/III material performed well in engine testing. Backplates of MAS material have not been engine tested.

  18. Results from tests on a high work transonic turbine for an energy efficient engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, D. E.; Welna, H.; Singer, I. D.; Vanco, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental results of the evaluation of two high work, transonic, single-stage turbines investigated under the Energy Efficient Engine (E3) Program are presented. The objective of the E3 program is to provide an advanced technology base for a new generation of fuel-conservative turbofan engines. A single-stage turbine required fewer cooled airfoils, a reduced number of leakage paths and no interstage seals. These advanced energy efficient engines require high engine pressure ratios resulting in high expansion ratio, transonic, turbine designs which must have high aerodynamic efficiency. The goal of the turbine program is to develop a high pressure turbine that is compatible with the overall engine design and has an uncooled efficiency of 90.8 percent.

  19. Advanced engine study program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Galler, D. E.; Denman, T. F.; Shied, R. A.; Black, J. R.; Fierstein, A. R.; Clark, G. L.; Branstrom, B. R.

    1993-01-01

    A design and analysis study was conducted to provide advanced engine descriptions and parametric data for space transfer vehicles. The study was based on an advanced oxygen/hydrogen engine in the 7,500 to 50,000 lbf thrust range. Emphasis was placed on defining requirements for high-performance engines capable of achieving reliable and versatile operation in a space environment. Four variations on the expander cycle were compared, and the advantages and disadvantages of each were assessed. Parametric weight, envelope, and performance data were generated over a range of 7,500 to 50,000 lb thrust and a wide range of chamber pressure and nozzle expansion ratio.

  20. Gas turbine engine and composite parts

    SciTech Connect

    Prewo, K.M.; Brennan, J.J.

    1988-04-19

    A gas turbine engine core engine component blade, vane, disk, side plate, seal, combustor liner, flap, burner case structure, or turbine case structure, is described comprising a silicon carbide fiber reinforced glass composite consisting essentially of about 30% to about 70% by volume silicon carbide fibers in a glass matrix selected from the group consisting of borosilicate glass, high silica content glass, aluminosilicate glass and mixtures thereof, the composite having a fracture toughness exemplified by a critical stress intensity factor above about 15,000 psi (inch)/sup 1/2/, high temperature strength, high temperature oxidation stability and insulating properties.

  1. Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Pettit, F.; Meier, G.; Yanar, N.; Chyu, M.; Mazzotta, D.; Slaughter, W.; Karaivanov, V.; Kang, B.; Feng, C.; Chen, R.; Fu, T-C.

    2008-10-01

    In order to meet the 2010-2020 DOE Fossil Energy goals for Advanced Power Systems, future oxy-fuel and hydrogen-fired turbines will need to be operated at higher temperatures for extended periods of time, in environments that contain substantially higher moisture concentrations in comparison to current commercial natural gas-fired turbines. Development of modified or advanced material systems, combined with aerothermal concepts are currently being addressed in order to achieve successful operation of these land-based engines. To support the advanced turbine technology development, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has initiated a research program effort in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh (UPitt), and West Virginia University (WVU), working in conjunction with commercial material and coating suppliers as Howmet International and Coatings for Industry (CFI), and test facilities as Westinghouse Plasma Corporation (WPC) and Praxair, to develop advanced material and aerothermal technologies for use in future oxy-fuel and hydrogen-fired turbine applications. Our program efforts and recent results are presented.

  2. Advanced wind turbine design studies: Advanced conceptual study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, P; Sherwin, R

    1994-08-01

    In conjunction with the US Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s Advanced Wind Turbine Program, the Atlantic Orient Corporation developed preliminary designs for the next generation of wind turbines. These 50 kW and 350 kW turbines are based upon the concept of simplicity. By adhering to a design philosophy that emphasizes simplicity, we project that these turbines will produce energy at extremely competitive rates which will unlock the potential of wind energy domestically and internationally. The program consisted of three distinct phases. First, we evaluated the operational history of the Enertech 44 series wind turbines. As a result of this evaluation, we developed, in the second phase, a preliminary design for a new 50 kW turbine for the near-term market. In the third phase, we took a clean-sheet-of-paper approach to designing a 350 kW turbine focused on the mid-1990s utility market that incorporated past experience and advanced technology.

  3. Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine Program: Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbacher, R.; Kesser, K.; Beishon, D.

    1994-12-01

    The Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine (CAGT) Program is an advanced gas turbine research and development program whose goal is to accelerate the commercial availability, to within the turn of the century, of high efficiency aeroderivative gas turbines for electric power generating applications. In the first project phase, research was conducted to prove or disprove the research hypothesis that advanced aeroderivative gas turbine systems can provide a promising technology alternative, offering high efficiency and good environmental performance characteristics in modular sizes, for utility applications. This $5 million, Phase 1 research effort reflects the collaborative efforts of a broad and international coalition of industries and organizations, both public and private, that have pooled their resources to assist in this research. Included in this coalition are: electric and gas utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Gas Research Institute and the principal aircraft engine manufacturers. Additionally, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Energy Commission have interacted with the CAGT on both technical and executive levels as observers and sources of funding. The three aircraft engine manufacturer-led research teams participating in this research include: Rolls-Royce, Inc., and Bechtel; the Turbo Power and Marine Division of United Technologies and Fluor Daniel; and General Electric Power Generation, Stewart and Stevenson, and Bechtel. Each team has investigated advanced electric power generating systems based on their high-thrust (60,000 to 100,000 pounds) aircraft engines. The ultimate goal of the CAGT program is that the community of stakeholders in the growing market for natural-gas-fueled, electric power generation can collectively provide the right combination of market-pull and technology-push to substantially accelerate the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency aeroderivative technologies.

  4. Oxidation of alloys for advanced steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  5. Advanced turbine systems: Studies and conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    van der Linden, S.; Gnaedig, G.; Kreitmeier, F.

    1993-11-01

    The ABB selection for the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) includes advanced developments especially in the hot gas path of the combustion turbine and new state-of-the-art units such as the steam turbine and the HRSG. The increase in efficiency by more than 10% multiplicative compared to current designs will be based on: (1) Turbine Inlet Temperature Increase; (2) New Cooling Techniques for Stationary and Rotating Parts; and New Materials. Present, projected component improvements that will be introduced with the above mentioned issues will yield improved CCSC turbine performance, which will drive the ATS selected gas-fired reference CC power plant to 6 % LHV or better. The decrease in emission levels requires a careful optimization of the cycle design, where cooling air consumption has to be minimized. All interfaces of the individual systems in the complete CC Plant need careful checks, especially to avoid unnecessary margins in the individual designs. This study is an important step pointing out the feasibility of the ATS program with realistic goals set by DOE, which, however, will present challenges for Phase II time schedule of 18 months. With the approach outlined in this study and close cooperation with DOE, ATS program success can be achieved to deliver low emissions and low cost of electricity by the year 2002. The ABB conceptual design and step approach will lead to early component demonstration which will help accelerate the overall program objectives.

  6. The Role of Modern Control Theory in the Design of Controls for Aircraft Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, J.; Lehtinen, B.; Merrill, W.

    1982-01-01

    Accomplishments in applying Modern Control Theory to the design of controls for advanced aircraft turbine engines were reviewed. The results of successful research programs are discussed. Ongoing programs as well as planned or recommended future thrusts are also discussed.

  7. Fuel cell and advanced turbine power cycle

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.J.

    1995-10-19

    Solar Turbines, Incorporated (Solar) has a vested interest in the integration of gas turbines and high temperature fuel cells and in particular, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Solar has identified a parallel path approach to the technology developments needed for future products. The primary approach is to move away from the simple cycle industrial machines of the past and develop as a first step more efficient recuperated engines. This move was prompted by the recognition that the simple cycle machines were rapidly approaching their efficiency limits. Improving the efficiency of simple cycle machines is and will become increasingly more costly. Each efficiency increment will be progressively more costly than the previous step.

  8. 14 CFR 25.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be investigated...

  9. 14 CFR 25.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be investigated...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  11. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  12. 14 CFR 25.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be investigated...

  13. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  15. 14 CFR 25.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be investigated...

  16. 14 CFR 25.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be investigated...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  18. Mixer Assembly for a Gas Turbine Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Zhongtao (Inventor); Cohen, Jeffrey M. (Inventor); Fotache, Catalin G. (Inventor); Smith, Lance L. (Inventor); Hautman, Donald J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A mixer assembly for a gas turbine engine is provided, including a main mixer with fuel injection holes located between at least one radial swirler and at least one axial swirler, wherein the fuel injected into the main mixer is atomized and dispersed by the air flowing through the radial swirler and the axial swirler.

  19. Installation of electric generators on turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demel, H. F.

    1983-01-01

    The installation of generators on turbine aircraft is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the use of the samarium cobalt generator. Potential advantages of an electric secondary power system at the engine level are listed. The integrated generator and the externally mounted generator are discussed. It is concluded that the integrated generator is best used in turbojet and low bypass ratio engines where there is no easy way of placing generators externally without influencing frontal areas.

  20. Turbine Engine Clearance Control Systems: Current Practices and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2002-01-01

    Improved blade tip sealing in the high pressure compressor (HPC) and high pressure turbine (HPT) can provide dramatic reductions in specific fuel consumption (SFC), time-on-wing, compressor stall margin, and engine efficiency as well as increased payload and mission range capabilities. Maintenance costs to overhaul large commercial gas turbine engines can easily exceed $1M. Engine removal from service is primarily due to spent exhaust gas temperature (EGT) margin caused mainly by the deterioration of HPT components. Increased blade tip clearance is a major factor in hot section component degradation. As engine designs continue to push the performance envelope with fewer parts and the market drives manufacturers to increase service life, the need for advanced sealing continues to grow. A review of aero gas turbine engine HPT performance degradation and the mechanisms that promote these losses are discussed. Benefits to the HPT due to improved clearance management are identified. Past and present sealing technologies are presented along with specifications for next generation engine clearance control systems.

  1. Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Truskey, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering offers the promise of biologically based repair of injured and damaged blood vessels, valves, and cardiac tissue. Major advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering over the past few years involve improved methods to promote the establishment and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), scaffolds from decellularized tissue that may produce more highly differentiated tissues and advance clinical translation, improved methods to promote vascularization, and novel in vitro microphysiological systems to model normal and diseased tissue function. iPSC technology holds great promise, but robust methods are needed to further promote differentiation. Differentiation can be further enhanced with chemical, electrical, or mechanical stimuli. PMID:27303643

  2. Hydro-flow supra-turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Neale, A.B.

    1981-08-04

    A turbine engine operates at high pressure and at relatively low temperatures and revolutions per minute through the use of special carburetion, compressor, combustion unit, and turbine arrangements. The system is characterized by the use of water which is vaporized and concurrently reduces the temperature of the vaporized fuel and air mixture as compression occurs, and is not physically intermixed with the combustion gases until after initial combustion takes place. The compressor includes a pair of back-to-back, four stage composite compressors to which synchronized dual carburetion or meter-flow arrangements separately supply water and gasoline or other fuel, along with air. The water absorbs heat from the compression of both of the two compressors, and the resultant vaporous product gases are routed to the jacket of a combustion chamber in which the compressed fuel and air mixture is burned. Following initial ignition and some burning of the fuel, the superheated steam and combustion products are combined, and the combination is supplied to a multistage transverse flow turbine having in the order of 17 pressure stages. The turbine includes arrangements for directing the high pressure gases back and forth through the rotor blades at different radial distances from the axis of the turbine. Exhaust gases from the turbine are applied to a ''floating'' muffler, including a rotatable inner chamber to facilitate mixing exhaust gases with the ambient air, and to disperse the high moisture content of the exhaust gases.

  3. Airfoil for a turbine of a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Liang, George

    2010-12-21

    An airfoil for a turbine of a gas turbine engine is provided. The airfoil comprises a main body comprising a wall structure defining an inner cavity adapted to receive a cooling air. The wall structure includes a first diffusion region and at least one first metering opening extending from the inner cavity to the first diffusion region. The wall structure further comprises at least one cooling circuit comprising a second diffusion region and at least one second metering opening extending from the first diffusion region to the second diffusion region. The at least one cooling circuit may further comprise at least one third metering opening, at least one third diffusion region and a fourth diffusion region.

  4. Industrial Advanced Turbine Systems Program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Esbeck, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    DOE`s ATS Program will lead to the development of an optimized, energy efficient, and environmentally friendly gas turbine power systems in the 3 to 20 MW class. Market studies were conducted for application of ATS to the dispersed/distributed electric power generation market. The technology studies have led to the design of a gas-fired, recuperated, industrial size gas turbine. The Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine program continues. In the High Performance Steam Systems program, a 100 hour development test to prove the advanced 1500 F, 1500 psig system has been successfully completed. A market transformation will take place: the customer will be offered a choice of energy conversion technologies to meet heat and power generation needs into the next century.

  5. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A 74.5 kW (100 hp) automotive gas turbine was evaluated. The engine structure, bearings, oil system, and electronics were demonstrated and no shaft dynamics or other vibration problem were encountered. Areas identified during the five tests are the scroll retention features, and transient thermal deflection of turbine backplates. Modifications were designed. Seroll retention is addressed by modifying the seal arrangement in front of the gasifier turbine assembly, which will increase the pressure load on the scroll in the forward direction and thereby increase the retention forces. the backplate thermal deflection is addressed by geometric changes and thermal insulation to reduce heat input. Combustor rig proof testing of two ceramic combustor assemblies was completed. The combustor was modified to incorporate slots and reduce sharp edges, which should reduce thermal stresses. The development work focused on techniques to sinter these barrier materials onto the ceramic rotors with successes for both material systems. Silicon carbide structural parts, including engine configuration gasifier rotors (ECRs), preliminary gasifier scroll parts, and gasifier and power turbine vanes are fabricated.

  6. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Doris; Boucher, Cheryl

    2009-09-30

    Energy independence and fuel savings are hallmarks of the nation’s energy strategy. The advancement of natural gas reciprocating engine power generation technology is critical to the nation’s future. A new engine platform that meets the efficiency, emissions, fuel flexibility, cost and reliability/maintainability targets will enable American manufacturers to have highly competitive products that provide substantial environmental and economic benefits in the US and in international markets. Along with Cummins and Waukesha, Caterpillar participated in a multiyear cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy to create a 50% efficiency natural gas powered reciprocating engine system with a 95% reduction in NOx emissions by the year 2013. This platform developed under this agreement will be a significant contributor to the US energy strategy and will enable gas engine technology to remain a highly competitive choice, meeting customer cost of electricity targets, and regulatory environmental standard. Engine development under the Advanced Reciprocating Engine System (ARES) program was divided into phases, with the ultimate goal being approached in a series of incremental steps. This incremental approach would promote the commercialization of ARES technologies as soon as they emerged from development and would provide a technical and commercial foundation of later-developing technologies. Demonstrations of the Phase I and Phase II technology were completed in 2004 and 2008, respectively. Program tasks in Phase III included component and system development and testing from 2009-2012. Two advanced ignition technology evaluations were investigated under the ARES program: laser ignition and distributed ignition (DIGN). In collaboration with Colorado State University (CSU), a laser ignition system was developed to provide ignition at lean burn and high boost conditions. Much work has been performed in Caterpillar’s DIGN program under the ARES program. This work

  7. Optical systems for gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrigley, Mark

    1986-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a turbine-blade pyrometer transducer for in situ measurements of blade temperature in operating gas-turbine engines are described and illustrated with diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Consideration is given to the primary components (optical probe, fiber-optic cable, and electronics), the operating environment (extreme temperatures and pressures, vibration, EMI, and liquids), the design specifications, and specific fabrication techniques. It is pointed out that electrooptic transducers of this type reduce the measurement error to + or - 10 C, and that the same sensors can be used to measure blade-tip clearance and shaft speed or to detect flame-out.

  8. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) technology report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Engine testing, ceramic component fabrication and evaluation, component performance rig testing, and producibility experiments at Pontiac comprised AGT 100 activities of this period, January to December 1984. Two experimental engines were available and allowed the evaluation of eight experimental assemblies. Operating time accumulated was 115 hr of burning and 156 hr total. Total cumulative engine operating time is now 225 hr. Build number 11 and 12 of engine S/N 1 totaled 28 burning hours and constituted a single assembly of the engine core--the compressor, both turbines, and the gearbox. Build number 11 of engine S/N 1 included a 1:07 hr continuous test at 100% gasifier speed (86,000 rpm). Build number 8 of engine S/N 2 was the first engine test with a ceramic turbine rotor. A mechanical loss test of an engine assembly revealed the actual losses to be near the original design allowance. Component development activity included rig testing of the compressor, combustor, and regenerator. Compressor testing was initiated on a rig modified to control the transfer of heat between flow path, lubricating oil, and structure. Results show successful thermal decoupling of the rig and lubricating/cooling oil. Rig evaluation of a reduced-friction compressor was initiated. Combustor testing covered qualification of ceramic parts for engine use, mapping of operating range limits, and evaluation of a relocated igniter plug. Several seal refinements were tested on the hot regenerator rig. An alternate regenerator disk, extruded MAS, was examined and found to be currently inadequate for the AGT 100 application. Also, a new technique for measuring leakage was explored on the regenerator rig. Ceramic component activity has focused on the development of state-of-the-art material strength characteristics in full-scale hardware. Injection-molded sintered alpha-SiC rotors were produced at Carborundum in an extensive process and tool optimization study.

  9. More-Electric Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Albert F.

    1997-01-01

    A new NASA Lewis Research Center and U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) thrust, the more-electric commercial engine, is creating significant interest in industry. This engine would have an integral starter-generator on the gas generator shaft and would be fully supported by magnetic bearings. The NASA/Army emphasis is on a high-temperature magnetic bearing for future gas turbine engines. Magnetic bearings could increase the reliability and reduce the weight of such engines by eliminating the lubrication system. They could also increase the DN (diameter of the bearing times the rpm) limit on engine speed and allow active vibration cancellation systems to be used, resulting in a more efficient, more-electric engine.

  10. Development of Advanced Seals for Industrial Turbine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupp, Raymond E.; Aksit, Mahmut F.; Ghasripoor, Farshad; Turnquist, Norman A.; Dinc, Saim; Mortzheim, Jason; Demiroglu, Mehmet

    2002-10-01

    A critical area being addressed to improve industrial turbine performance is reducing the parasitic leakage flows through the various static and dynamic seals. Implementation of advanced seals into General Electric (GE) industrial turbines has progressed well over the last few years with significant operating performance gains achieved. Advanced static seals have been placed in gas turbine hot gas-path junctions and steam turbine packing ring segment end gaps. Brush seals have significantly decreased labyrinth seal leakages in gas turbine compressors and turbine interstages, steam turbine interstage and end packings, industrial compressor shaft seals, and generator seals. Abradable seals are being developed for blade-tip locations in various turbine locations. This presentation summarizes the status of advanced seal development for industrial turbines at GE.

  11. Oxidation of Alloys for Advanced Steam Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.E.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-09-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which requires steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steam oxidation of alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on applications in high- and intermediate-pressure turbines.

  12. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS(ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth A. Yackly

    2001-06-01

    optimized for the highest level of performance. The unique feature of an H-technology combined-cycle system is the integrated heat transfer system, which combines both the steam plant reheat process and gas turbine bucket and nozzle cooling. This feature allows the power generator to operate at a higher firing temperature than current technology units, thereby resulting in dramatic improvements in fuel-efficiency. The end result is the generation of electricity at the lowest, most competitive price possible. Also, despite the higher firing temperature of the H System{trademark}, the combustion temperature is kept at levels that minimize emission production. GE has more than 3.6 million fired hours of experience in operating advanced technology gas turbines, more than three times the fired hours of competitors' units combined. The H System{trademark} design incorporates lessons learned from this experience with knowledge gleaned from operating GE aircraft engines. In addition, the 9H gas turbine is the first ever designed using ''Design for Six Sigma'' methodology, which maximizes reliability and availability throughout the entire design process. Both the 7H and 9H gas turbines will achieve the reliability levels of our F-class technology machines. GE has tested its H System{trademark} gas turbine more thoroughly than any previously introduced into commercial service. The H System{trademark} gas turbine has undergone extensive design validation and component testing. Full-speed, no-load testing of the 9H was achieved in May 1998 and pre-shipment testing was completed in November 1999. The 9H will also undergo approximately a half-year of extensive demonstration and characterization testing at the launch site. Testing of the 7H began in December 1999, and full speed, no-load testing was completed in February 2000. The 7H gas turbine will also be subjected to extensive demonstration and characterization testing at the launch site.

  13. OUT Success Stories: Advanced Airfoils for Wind Turbines

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Jones, J.; Green, B.

    2000-08-01

    New airfoils have substantially increased the aerodynamic efficiency of wind turbines. It is clear that these new airfoils substantially increased energy output from wind turbines. Virtually all new blades built in this country today use these advanced airfoil designs.

  14. Active Combustion Control for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Breisacher, Kevin J.; Saus, Joseph R.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2000-01-01

    Lean-burning combustors are susceptible to combustion instabilities. Additionally, due to non-uniformities in the fuel-air mixing and in the combustion process, there typically exist hot areas in the combustor exit plane. These hot areas limit the operating temperature at the turbine inlet and thus constrain performance and efficiency. Finally, it is necessary to optimize the fuel-air ratio and flame temperature throughout the combustor to minimize the production of pollutants. In recent years, there has been considerable activity addressing Active Combustion Control. NASA Glenn Research Center's Active Combustion Control Technology effort aims to demonstrate active control in a realistic environment relevant to aircraft engines. Analysis and experiments are tied to aircraft gas turbine combustors. Considerable progress has been shown in demonstrating technologies for Combustion Instability Control, Pattern Factor Control, and Emissions Minimizing Control. Future plans are to advance the maturity of active combustion control technology to eventual demonstration in an engine environment.

  15. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP). 1944 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This report summarizes work performed in development and demonstration of structural ceramics technology for automotive gas turbine engines. At the end of this period, the project name was changed to ``Ceramic Turbine Engine Demonstration Project``, effective Jan. 1995. Objectives are to provide early field experience demonstrating the reliability and durability of ceramic components in a modified, available gas turbine engine application, and to scale up and improve the manufacturing processes for ceramic turbine engine components and demonstrate the application of these processes in the production environment. The 1994 ATTAP activities emphasized demonstration and refinement of the ceramic turbine nozzles in the AlliedSignal/Garrett Model 331-200[CT] engine test bed in preparation for field testing; improvements in understanding the vibration characteristics of the ceramic turbine blades; improvements in critical ceramics technologies; and scaleup of the process used to manufacture ceramic turbine components.

  16. Technology readiness for advanced ducted engines

    SciTech Connect

    Eckardt, D.; Brines, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Ducted Engines (ADEs) currently undergoing development for next-generation passenger aircraft typically possess bypass ratios of the order of 12-25 and specific fuel consumption figures 12-17 percent lower than current advanced turbofans. An extensive technology-readiness program has been mounted on behalf of ADE design definition over the last two years, encompassing among its concerns aircraft/engine-installation interference, low pressure-ratio fan aerodynamics, fan/nacelle interactions (including windmilling and thrust-reversal), acoustic characteristics, transonic-drive turbines, and slender nacelle aerodynamic and mechanical design. Both turbine-driven and geared ADE fans, which may be of single-rotating or contrarotating type, are discussed. 5 refs.

  17. Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

    1989-02-01

    The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

  18. Fiber sensor design for turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Kenneth W., Jr.; Beshears, David L.; Turley, W. Dale; Lewis, Wilfred, III; Noel, Bruce W.

    1991-12-01

    Determination of blade temperatures in the high-speed and turbulent environment of a turbine engine is difficult using standard pyrometry techniques because of the presence of high- temperature flame and the reflective nature of the inspection surfaces. A technique utilizing thermographic phosphor compounds bonded to engine vanes and turbine blades is presented that mitigates the negative effects of blackbody radiation while potentially allowing near real- time acquisition of blade temperature information. Specialized single and dual fiber-optic probes were designed to interrogate both fixed and rotating surfaces by delivering ultraviolet light from a quadrupled Nd:YAG (266 nm) laser to phosphor coatings consisting of Y2O3:Eu, YVO4, and YAG:Tb ceramic compounds. This technique utilizes the temperature- dependent fluorescent emission of a ceramic phosphor coating to discern the temperature of the interrogated surface. By using these methods, surface temperature measurements to 1200 degree(s)C are achievable in the combustion environment.

  19. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic hearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  20. Fatigue Reliability of Gas Turbine Engine Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, Thomas A.; Mahadevan, Sankaran; Tryon, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    The results of an investigation are described for fatigue reliability in engine structures. The description consists of two parts. Part 1 is for method development. Part 2 is a specific case study. In Part 1, the essential concepts and practical approaches to damage tolerance design in the gas turbine industry are summarized. These have evolved over the years in response to flight safety certification requirements. The effect of Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods on these methods is also reviewed. Assessment methods based on probabilistic fracture mechanics, with regard to both crack initiation and crack growth, are outlined. Limit state modeling techniques from structural reliability theory are shown to be appropriate for application to this problem, for both individual failure mode and system-level assessment. In Part 2, the results of a case study for the high pressure turbine of a turboprop engine are described. The response surface approach is used to construct a fatigue performance function. This performance function is used with the First Order Reliability Method (FORM) to determine the probability of failure and the sensitivity of the fatigue life to the engine parameters for the first stage disk rim of the two stage turbine. A hybrid combination of regression and Monte Carlo simulation is to use incorporate time dependent random variables. System reliability is used to determine the system probability of failure, and the sensitivity of the system fatigue life to the engine parameters of the high pressure turbine. 'ne variation in the primary hot gas and secondary cooling air, the uncertainty of the complex mission loading, and the scatter in the material data are considered.

  1. Flameholder for gas turbine engine afterburner

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, E.C.; Gulati, A.

    1992-07-14

    This patent describes a flameholder for reducing screech in gas turbine engines. It comprises: an elongated V-shaped member having a pair of opposing elongated walls joined at one end and diverging to respective trailing edges, the apex of the elongated V-shaped member facing upstream; and a plurality of vortex creating members extending from each of the trailing edges in a downstream direction.

  2. Optical monitoring system for a turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Lemieux, Dennis H; Smed, Jan P; Williams, James P; Jonnalagadda, Vinay

    2013-05-14

    The monitoring system for a gas turbine engine including a viewing tube assembly having an inner end and an outer end. The inner end is located adjacent to a hot gas flow path within the gas turbine engine and the outer end is located adjacent to an outer casing of the gas turbine engine. An aperture wall is located at the inner end of the viewing tube assembly and an optical element is located within the viewing tube assembly adjacent to the inner end and is spaced from the aperture wall to define a cooling and purge chamber therebetween. An aperture is defined in the aperture wall for passage of light from the hot gas flow path to the optical element. Swirl passages are defined in the viewing tube assembly between the aperture wall and the optical element for passage of cooling air from a location outside the viewing tube assembly into the chamber, wherein swirl passages effect a swirling movement of air in a circumferential direction within the chamber.

  3. Liquid lubricants for advanced aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, William R.; Fusaro, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of liquid lubricants for use in current and projected high performance turbojet engines is discussed. Chemical and physical properties are reviewed with special emphasis placed on the oxidation and thermal stability requirements imposed upon the lubrication system. A brief history is given of the development of turbine engine lubricants which led to the present day synthetic oils with their inherent modification advantages. The status and state of development of some eleven candidate classes of fluids for use in advanced turbine engines are discussed. Published examples of fundamental studies to obtain a better understanding of the chemistry involved in fluid degradation are reviewed. Alternatives to high temperature fluid development are described. The importance of continuing work on improving current high temperature lubricant candidates and encouraging development of new and improved fluid base stocks are discussed.

  4. Liquid lubricants for advanced aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, William R.; Fusaro, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of liquid lubricants for use in current and projected high performance turbojet engines is discussed. Chemical and physical properties are reviewed with special emphasis placed on the oxidation and thermal stability requirements imposed upon the lubrication system. A brief history is given of the development of turbine engine lubricants which led to the present day synthetic oils with their inherent modification advantages. The status and state of development of some eleven candidate classes of fluids for use in advanced turbine engines are discussed. Published examples of fundamental studies to obtain a better understanding of the chemistry involved in fluid degradation are reviewed. Alternatives to high temperature fluid development are described. The importance of continuing work on improving current high temperature lubricant candidates and encouraging development of new and improved fluid base stocks are discussed.

  5. Fish-Friendly Hydropower Turbine Development & Deployment: Alden Turbine Preliminary Engineering and Model Testing

    SciTech Connect

    2011-10-01

    The Alden turbine was developed through the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) former Advanced Hydro Turbine Systems Program (1994-2006) and, more recently, through the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the DOE's Wind & Water Power Program. The primary goal of the engineering study described here was to provide a commercially competitive turbine design that would yield fish passage survival rates comparable to or better than the survival rates of bypassing or spilling flow. Although the turbine design was performed for site conditions corresponding to 92 ft (28 m) net head and a discharge of 1500 cfs (42.5 cms), the design can be modified for additional sites with differing operating conditions. During the turbine development, design modifications were identified for the spiral case, distributor (stay vanes and wicket gates), runner, and draft tube to improve turbine performance while maintaining features for high fish passage survival. Computational results for pressure change rates and shear within the runner passage were similar in the original and final turbine geometries, while predicted minimum pressures were higher for the final turbine. The final turbine geometry and resulting flow environments are expected to further enhance the fish passage characteristics of the turbine. Computational results for the final design were shown to improve turbine efficiencies by over 6% at the selected operating condition when compared to the original concept. Prior to the release of the hydraulic components for model fabrication, finite element analysis calculations were conducted for the stay vanes, wicket gates, and runner to verify that structural design criteria for stress and deflections were met. A physical model of the turbine was manufactured and tested with data collected for power and efficiency, cavitation limits, runaway speed, axial and radial thrust, pressure pulsations, and wicket gate torque. All parameters were observed to fall within ranges

  6. MATE (Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines) Program, Project 3. Volume 2: Design, fabrication and evaluation of an oxide dispersion strengthened sheet alloy combustor liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, S.; Sheffler, K. D.

    1988-01-01

    The suitability of wrought oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) superalloy sheet for gas turbine engine combustor applications was evaluated. Two yttria (Y2O3) dispersion strengthened alloys were evaluated; Incoloy MA956 and Haynes Development Alloy (HDA) 8077 (NiCrAl base). Preliminary tests showed both alloys to be potentially viable combustor materials, with neither alloy exhibiting a significant advantage over the other. MA956 was selected as the final alloy based on manufacturing reproducibility for evaluation as a burner liner. A hybrid PW2037 inner burner liner containing MA956 and Hastelloy X components and using a louvered configuration was designed and constructed. The louvered configuration was chosen because of field experience and compatibility with the bill of material PW2037 design. The simulated flight cycle for the ground based engine tests consisted of 4.5 min idle, 1.5 min takeoff and intermediate conditions in a PW2037 engine with average uncorrected combustor exit temperature of 1527 C. Post test evaluation consisting of visual observations and fluorescent penetrant inspections was conducted after 500 cycles of testing. No loss of integrity in the burner liner was shown.

  7. An overview of aerospace gas turbine technology of relevance to the development of the automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. G.; Miller, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The NASA-Lewis Research Center (LeRC) has conducted, and has sponsored with industry and universities, extensive research into many of the technology areas related to gas turbine propulsion systems. This aerospace-related technology has been developed at both the component and systems level, and may have significant potential for application to the automotive gas turbine engine. This paper summarizes this technology and lists the associated references. The technology areas are system steady-state and transient performance prediction techniques, compressor and turbine design and performance prediction programs and effects of geometry, combustor technology and advanced concepts, and ceramic coatings and materials technology.

  8. Closed-loop air cooling system for a turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    North, William Edward

    2000-01-01

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for providing a closed-loop air cooling system for a turbine engine. The method and apparatus provide for bleeding pressurized air from a gas turbine engine compressor for use in cooling the turbine components. The compressed air is cascaded through the various stages of the turbine. At each stage a portion of the compressed air is returned to the compressor where useful work is recovered.

  9. Optimizing Dam Operations for Power and for Fish: an Overview of the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers ADvanced Turbine Development R&D. A Pre-Conference Workshop at HydroVision 2006, Oregon Convention Center, Portland, Oregon July 31, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, Dennis D.

    2006-08-01

    This booklet contains abstracts of presentations made at a preconference workshop on the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers hydroturbine programs. The workshop was held in conjunction with Hydrovision 2006 July 31, 2006 at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland Oregon. The workshop was organized by the Corps of Engineers, PNNL, and the DOE Wind and Hydropower Program. Presenters gave overviews of the Corps' Turbine Survival Program and the history of the DOE Advanced Turbine Development Program. They also spoke on physical hydraulic models, biocriteria for safe fish passage, pressure investigations using the Sensor Fish Device, blade strike models, optimization of power plant operations, bioindex testing of turbine performance, approaches to measuring fish survival, a systems view of turbine performance, and the Turbine Survival Program design approach.

  10. Gas Path Sealing in Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    A survey of gas path seals is presented with particular attention given to sealing clearance effects on engine component efficiency. The effects on compressor pressure ratio and stall margin are pointed out. Various case-rotor relative displacements, which affect gas path seal clearances, are identified. Forces produced by nonuniform sealing clearances and their effect on rotor stability are discussed qualitatively, and recent work on turbine-blade-tip sealing for high temperature is described. The need for active clearance control and for engine structural analysis is discussed. The functions of the internal-flow system and its seals are reviewed.

  11. 14 CFR 121.191 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.191 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that...

  12. 14 CFR 121.191 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.191 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that...

  13. 14 CFR 121.191 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.191 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that...

  14. 14 CFR 121.191 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.191 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that...

  15. Advanced Turbine Systems Program. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-03-01

    The Allison Gas Turbine Division (Allison) of General Motors Corporation conducted the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program feasibility study (Phase I) in accordance with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s (METC`s) contract DE-AC21-86MC23165 A028. This feasibility study was to define and describe a natural gas-fired reference system which would meet the objective of {ge}60% overall efficiency, produce nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions 10% less than the state-of-the-art without post combustion controls, and cost of electricity of the N{sup th} system to be approximately 10% below that of the current systems. In addition, the selected natural gas-fired reference system was expected to be adaptable to coal. The Allison proposed reference system feasibility study incorporated Allison`s long-term experience from advanced aerospace and military technology programs. This experience base is pertinent and crucial to the success of the ATS program. The existing aeroderivative technology base includes high temperature hot section design capability, single crystal technology, advanced cooling techniques, high temperature ceramics, ultrahigh turbomachinery components design, advanced cycles, and sophisticated computer codes.

  16. Advanced Combustion Systems for Next Generation Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Haynes; Jonathan Janssen; Craig Russell; Marcus Huffman

    2006-01-01

    Next generation turbine power plants will require high efficiency gas turbines with higher pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures than currently available. These increases in gas turbine cycle conditions will tend to increase NOx emissions. As the desire for higher efficiency drives pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures ever higher, gas turbines equipped with both lean premixed combustors and selective catalytic reduction after treatment eventually will be unable to meet the new emission goals of sub-3 ppm NOx. New gas turbine combustors are needed with lower emissions than the current state-of-the-art lean premixed combustors. In this program an advanced combustion system for the next generation of gas turbines is being developed with the goal of reducing combustor NOx emissions by 50% below the state-of-the-art. Dry Low NOx (DLN) technology is the current leader in NOx emission technology, guaranteeing 9 ppm NOx emissions for heavy duty F class gas turbines. This development program is directed at exploring advanced concepts which hold promise for meeting the low emissions targets. The trapped vortex combustor is an advanced concept in combustor design. It has been studied widely for aircraft engine applications because it has demonstrated the ability to maintain a stable flame over a wide range of fuel flow rates. Additionally, it has shown significantly lower NOx emission than a typical aircraft engine combustor and with low CO at the same time. The rapid CO burnout and low NOx production of this combustor made it a strong candidate for investigation. Incremental improvements to the DLN technology have not brought the dramatic improvements that are targeted in this program. A revolutionary combustor design is being explored because it captures many of the critical features needed to significantly reduce emissions. Experimental measurements of the combustor performance at atmospheric conditions were completed in the first phase of the program

  17. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) power-train system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, H. E.; Johnson, R. A.; Gibson, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    Technical work on the design and component testing of a 74.5 kW (100 hp) advanced automotive gas turbine is described. Selected component ceramic component design, and procurement were tested. Compressor tests of a modified rotor showed high speed performance improvement over previous rotor designs; efficiency improved by 2.5%, corrected flow by 4.6%, and pressure ratio by 11.6% at 100% speed. The aerodynamic design is completed for both the gasifier and power turbines. Ceramic (silicon carbide) gasifier rotors were spin tested to failure. Improving strengths is indicated by burst speeds and the group of five rotors failed at speeds between 104% and 116% of engine rated speed. The emission results from combustor testing showed NOx levels to be nearly one order of magnitude lower than with previous designs. A one piece ceramic exhaust duct/regenerator seal platform is designed with acceptable low stress levels.

  18. Proceedings of the Advanced Turbine Systems annual program review meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Goals of the 8-year program are to develop cleaner, more efficient, and less expensive gas turbine systems for utility and industrial electric power generation, cogeneration, and mechanical drive units. During this Nov. 9-11, 1994, meeting, presentations on energy policy issues were delivered by representatives of regulatory, industry, and research institutions; program overviews and technical reviews were given by contractors; and ongoing and proposed future projects sponsored by university and industry were presented and displayed at the poster session. Panel discussions on distributed power and Advanced Gas Systems Research education provided a forum for interactive dialog and exchange of ideas. Exhibitors included US DOE, Solar Turbines, Westinghouse, Allison Engine Co., and GE.

  19. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines (MATE): Project 3: Design, fabrication and evaluation of an oxide dispersion strengthened sheet alloy combustor liner, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henricks, R. J.; Sheffler, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    The suitability of wrought oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) superalloy sheet for gas turbine engine combustor applications was evaluated. Incoloy MA 956 (FeCrAl base) and Haynes Developmental Alloy (HDA) 8077 (NiCrAl base) were evaluated. Preliminary tests showed both alloys to be potentially viable combustor materials, with neither alloy exhibiting a significant advantage over the other. Both alloys demonstrated a +167C (300 F) advantage of creep and oxidation resistance with no improvement in thermal fatigue capability compared to a current generation combustor alloy (Hastelloy X). MA956 alloy was selected for further demonstration because it exhibited better manufacturing reproducibility than HDA8077. Additional property tests were conducted on MA956. To accommodate the limited thermal fatigue capability of ODS alloys, two segmented, mechanically attached, low strain ODS combustor design concepts having predicted fatigue lives or = 10,000 engine cycles were identified. One of these was a relatively conventional louvered geometry, while the other involved a transpiration cooled configuration. A series of 10,000 cycle combustor rig tests on subscale MA956 and Hastelloy X combustor components showed no cracking, thereby confirming the beneficial effect of the segmented design on thermal fatigue capability. These tests also confirmed the superior oxidation and thermal distortion resistance of the ODS alloy. A hybrid PW2037 inner burner liner containing MA956 and Hastelloy X components was designed and constructed.

  20. Advanced Materials for Mercury 50 Gas Turbine Combustion System

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Jeffrey

    2008-09-30

    Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-0CH11049, has conducted development activities to improve the durability of the Mercury 50 combustion system to 30,000 hours life and reduced life cycle costs. This project is part of Advanced Materials in the Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines program in DOE's Office of Distributed Energy. The targeted development engine was the Mercury{trademark} 50 gas turbine, which was developed by Solar under the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems program (DOE contract number DE-FC21-95MC31173). As a generator set, the Mercury 50 is used for distributed power and combined heat and power generation and is designed to achieve 38.5% electrical efficiency, reduced cost of electricity, and single digit emissions. The original program goal was 20,000 hours life, however, this goal was increased to be consistent with Solar's standard 30,000 hour time before overhaul for production engines. Through changes to the combustor design to incorporate effusion cooling in the Generation 3 Mercury 50 engine, which resulted in a drop in the combustor wall temperature, the current standard thermal barrier coated liner was predicted to have 18,000 hours life. With the addition of the advanced materials technology being evaluated under this program, the combustor life is predicted to be over 30,000 hours. The ultimate goal of the program was to demonstrate a fully integrated Mercury 50 combustion system, modified with advanced materials technologies, at a host site for a minimum of 4,000 hours. Solar was the Prime Contractor on the program team, which includes participation of other gas turbine manufacturers, various advanced material and coating suppliers, nationally recognized test laboratories, and multiple industrial end-user field demonstration sites. The program focused on a dual path development route to define an optimum mix of technologies for the Mercury 50 and future gas turbine products. For liner and injector

  1. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology (HOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A two-day workshop on the research and plans for turbine engine hot section durability problems was held on October 25 and 26, 1983, at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Presentations were made during six sessions, including structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, surface protective coatings, combustion, turbine heat transfer, and instrumentation, that dealt with the thermal and fluid environment around liners, blades, and vanes, and with material coatings, constitutive behavior, stress-strain response, and life prediction methods for the three components. The principal objective of each session was to disseminate the research results to date, along with future plans, in each of the six areas. Contract and government researchers presented results of their work.

  2. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence P. Golan

    2003-05-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for the reporting period October 1, 2002 to December 31, 2002 are described in this quarterly report. No new membership, workshops, research projects, internships, faculty fellowships or special studies were initiated during this reporting period. Contract completion is set for June 30, 2003. During the report period, six research progress reports were received (3 final reports and 3 semi-annual reports). The University of Central Florida contract SR080 was terminated during this period, as UCF was unable to secure research facilities. AGTSR now projects that it will under spend DOE obligated funds by approximately 340-350K$.

  3. The gate studies: Assessing the potential of future small general aviation turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strack, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Four studies were completed that explore the opportunities for future General Aviation turbine engines (GATE) in the 150-1000 SHP class. These studies forecasted the potential impact of advanced technology turbine engines in the post-1988 market, identified important aircraft and missions, desirable engine sizes, engine performance, and cost goals. Parametric evaluations of various engine cycles, configurations, design features, and advanced technology elements defined baseline conceptual engines for each of the important missions identified by the market analysis. Both fixed-wing and helicopter aircraft, and turboshaft, turboprop, and turbofan engines were considered. Sizable performance gains (e.g., 20% SFC decrease), and large engine cost reductions of sufficient magnitude to challenge the reciprocating engine in the 300-500 SHP class were predicted.

  4. TEDANN: Turbine engine diagnostic artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Kangas, L.J.; Greitzer, F.L.; Illi, O.J. Jr.

    1994-03-17

    The initial focus of TEDANN is on AGT-1500 fuel flow dynamics: that is, fuel flow faults detectable in the signals from the Electronic Control Unit`s (ECU) diagnostic connector. These voltage signals represent the status of the Electro-Mechanical Fuel System (EMFS) in response to ECU commands. The EMFS is a fuel metering device that delivers fuel to the turbine engine under the management of the ECU. The ECU is an analog computer whose fuel flow algorithm is dependent upon throttle position, ambient air and turbine inlet temperatures, and compressor and turbine speeds. Each of these variables has a representative voltage signal available at the ECU`s J1 diagnostic connector, which is accessed via the Automatic Breakout Box (ABOB). The ABOB is a firmware program capable of converting 128 separate analog data signals into digital format. The ECU`s J1 diagnostic connector provides 32 analog signals to the ABOB. The ABOB contains a 128 to 1 multiplexer and an analog-to-digital converter, CP both operated by an 8-bit embedded controller. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) developed and published the hardware specifications as well as the micro-code for the ABOB Intel EPROM processor and the internal code for the multiplexer driver subroutine. Once the ECU analog readings are converted into a digital format, the data stream will be input directly into TEDANN via the serial RS-232 port of the Contact Test Set (CTS) computer. The CTS computer is an IBM compatible personal computer designed and constructed for tactical use on the battlefield. The CTS has a 50MHz 32-bit Intel 80486DX processor. It has a 200MB hard drive and 8MB RAM. The CTS also has serial, parallel and SCSI interface ports. The CTS will also host a frame-based expert system for diagnosing turbine engine faults (referred to as TED; not shown in Figure 1).

  5. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) powertrain system development for automotive applications report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This report describes progress and work performed during January through June 1984 to develop technology for an Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) engine for automotive applications. Work performed during the first eight periods initiated design and analysis, ceramic development, component testing, and test bed evaluation. Project effort conducted under this contract is part of the DOE Gas Turbine Highway Vehicle System Program. This program is oriented at providing the United States automotive industry the high-risk long-range techology necessary to produce gas turbine engines for automobiles with reduced fuel consumption and reduced environmental impact. Technology resulting from this program is intended to reach the marketplace by the early 1990s.

  6. Asymmetric flameholder for gas turbine engine afterburner

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, A.; Bigelow, E.C.

    1992-03-17

    This patent describes an afterburner flameholder for a gas turbine engine, the engine having an afterburner region including a central diffuser cone, a generally cylindrical outer shell and fuel spray means in the region between the shell and the cone. It comprises an annular member having an asymmetric V-shape in cross section, the annular member including a first and a second circular sidewall member, each sidewall member being joined together at one end forming an apex, the annular member adapted to be secured to the engine in the afterburner region with the apex facing upstream in an axial direction towards the fuel spray means, the annular member in cross section forming a V with unequal length sidewall members, the distance between the distal ends of the first and second circular members measured in the direction of the included angle bisector being approximately equal to the distance between the distal ends measured in a direction perpendicular to the bisector.

  7. Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support (HVTE-TS) ceramic design manual

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    This ceramic component design manual was an element of the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP). The ATTAP was intended to advance the technological readiness of the ceramic automotive gas turbine engine as a primary power plant. Of the several technologies requiring development before such an engine could become a commercial reality, structural ceramic components represented the greatest technical challenge, and was the prime focus of the program. HVTE-TS, which was created to support the Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) program, continued the efforts begun in ATTAP to develop ceramic components for an automotive gas turbine engine. In HVTE-TS, the program focus was extended to make this technology applicable to the automotive gas turbine engines that form the basis of hybrid automotive propulsion systems consisting of combined batteries, electric drives, and on-board power generators as well as a primary power source. The purpose of the ceramic design manual is to document the process by which ceramic components are designed, analyzed, fabricated, assembled, and tested in a gas turbine engine. Interaction with ceramic component vendors is also emphasized. The main elements of the ceramic design manual are: an overview of design methodology; design process for the AGT-5 ceramic gasifier turbine rotor; and references. Some reference also is made to the design of turbine static structure components to show methods of attaching static hot section ceramic components to supporting metallic structures.

  8. Substitution of ceramics for high temperature alloys. [advantages of using silicon carbides and silicon nitrides in gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H. B.

    1978-01-01

    The high temperature capability of ceramics such as silicon nitride and silicon carbide can result in turbine engines of improved efficiency. Other advantages when compared to the nickel and cobalt alloys in current use are raw material availability, lower weight, erosion/corrosion resistance, and potentially lower cost. The use of ceramics in three different sizes of gas turbine is considered; these are the large utility turbines, advanced aircraft turbines, and small automotive turbines. Special consideration, unique to each of these applications, arise when one considers substituting ceramics for high temperature alloys. The effects of material substitutions are reviewed in terms of engine performance, operating economy, and secondary effects.

  9. 14 CFR 121.193 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.193 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two...). No person may operate a turbine engine powered airplane along an intended route unless he...

  10. 14 CFR 121.193 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.193 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two...). No person may operate a turbine engine powered airplane along an intended route unless he...

  11. 14 CFR 121.193 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.193 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two...). No person may operate a turbine engine powered airplane along an intended route unless he...

  12. 14 CFR 121.193 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.193 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two...). No person may operate a turbine engine powered airplane along an intended route unless he...

  13. Advanced aircraft engine materials trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Gray, H. R.; Levine, S. R.; Signorelli, R.

    1981-01-01

    Recent activities of the Lewis Research Center are reviewed which are directed toward developing materials for rotating hot section components for aircraft gas turbines. Turbine blade materials activities are directed at increasing metal temperatures approximately 100 C compared to current directionally solidified alloys by use of oxide dispersion strengthening or tungsten alloy wire reinforcement of nickel or iron base superalloys. The application of thermal barrier coatings offers a promise of increasing gas temperatures an additional 100 C with current cooling technology. For turbine disk alloys, activities are directed toward reducing the cost of turbine disks by 50 percent through near net shape fabrication of prealloyed powders as well as towards improved performance. In addition, advanced alloy concepts and fabrication methods for dual alloy disks are being studied as having potential for improving the life of future high performance disks and reducing the amount of strategic materials required in these components.

  14. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Turbine Engines: A Design and Performance Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Ghosn, Louis; Smialek, James L.; Miller, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBC) for SiC-based ceramics will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. However, the coating long-term durability remains a major concern with the ever-increasing temperature, strength and stability requirements in engine high heat-flux combustion environments, especially for highly-loaded rotating turbine components. Advanced TEBC systems, including nano-composite based HfO2-aluminosilicate and rare earth silicate coatings are being developed and tested for higher temperature capable SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine blade applications. This paper will emphasize coating composite and multilayer design approach and the resulting performance and durability in simulated engine high heat-flux, high stress and high pressure combustion environments. The advances in the environmental barrier coating development showed promise for future rotating CMC blade applications.

  15. The Federal Advanced Wind Turbine Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hock, S M; Thresher, R W; Goldman, P R

    1991-12-01

    The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines has been identified as a high priority activity by the US wind industry. The Department of Energy's Wind Energy Program has begun a multi-year development program aimed at assisting the wind industry with the design, development, and testing of advanced wind turbine systems that can compete with conventional electric generation for $0.05/kWh at 13 mph sites by the mid-1990s and with fossil-fuel-based generators for $0.04/kWh at 13 mph sites by the year 2000. The development plan consists of four phases: (1) Conceptual Design Studies; (2) Near-Term Product Development; (3) Next Generation Technology Integration and Design, and (4) Next- Generation Technology Development and Testing. The Conceptual Design Studies were begun in late 1990, and are scheduled for completion in the Spring of 1992. Preliminary results from these analyses are very promising and indicate that the goals stated above are technically feasible. This paper includes a brief summary of the Conceptual Design Studies and presents initial plans for the follow-on activities. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Gas Turbine Engine Inlet Wall Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florea, Razvan Virgil (Inventor); Matalanis, Claude G. (Inventor); Stucky, Mark B. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A gas turbine engine has an inlet duct formed to have a shape with a first ellipse in one half and a second ellipse in a second half. The second half has an upstream most end which is smaller than the first ellipse. The inlet duct has a surface defining the second ellipse which curves away from the first ellipse, such that the second ellipse is larger at an intermediate location. The second ellipse is even larger at a downstream end of the inlet duct leading into a fan.

  17. Brush seals for turbine engine fuel conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Mike

    1994-07-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate brush seals for replacing labyrinth seals in turboprop engines. The approach taken was to design and procure brush seals with assistance from Sealol, modify and instrument an existing T407 low pressure turbine test rig, replace inner balance piston and outer balance piston labyrinth seals with brush seals, conduct cyclic tests to evaluate seal leakage at operating pressures and temperatures, and evaluate effect of seal pack width and rotor eccentricity. Results are presented in viewgraph format and show that brush seals offer performance advantages over labyrinth seals.

  18. Brush seals for turbine engine fuel conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sousa, Mike

    1994-01-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate brush seals for replacing labyrinth seals in turboprop engines. The approach taken was to design and procure brush seals with assistance from Sealol, modify and instrument an existing T407 low pressure turbine test rig, replace inner balance piston and outer balance piston labyrinth seals with brush seals, conduct cyclic tests to evaluate seal leakage at operating pressures and temperatures, and evaluate effect of seal pack width and rotor eccentricity. Results are presented in viewgraph format and show that brush seals offer performance advantages over labyrinth seals.

  19. Turbine engine component with cooling passages

    DOEpatents

    Arrell, Douglas J.; James, Allister W.

    2012-01-17

    A component for use in a turbine engine including a first member and a second member associated with the first member. The second member includes a plurality of connecting elements extending therefrom. The connecting elements include securing portions at ends thereof that are received in corresponding cavities formed in the first member to attach the second member to the first member. The connecting elements are constructed to space apart a first surface of the second member from a first surface of the first member such that at least one cooling passage is formed between adjacent connecting elements and the first surface of the second member and the first surface of the first member.

  20. Efficient, Low Pressure Ratio Propulsor for Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Edward J. (Inventor); Monzon, Byron R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A gas turbine engine includes a spool, a turbine coupled to drive the spool, and a propulsor that is coupled to be driven by the turbine through the spool. A gear assembly is coupled between the propulsor and the spool such that rotation of the turbine drives the propulsor at a different speed than the spool. The propulsor includes a hub and a row of propulsor blades that extends from the hub. The row includes no more than 20 of the propulsor blades.

  1. INDUSTRIAL ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS: DEVELOPMENT & DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    George Escola

    2004-02-20

    Rochelle Municipal Utilities (RMU) was selected for the field evaluation site and placed an order for the first Mercury 50 generator set in November 1997. Field evaluation of the Mercury 50 package at Rochelle began in June 2000 and ran through December 2003. A total of 4,749 package hours were achieved on two generation 2-design engines. Engine Serial Number (ESN) 6 was installed in April 2000 and accumulated 2,324 hours and 267 starts until it was exchanged for ESN 7 in April 2001. ESN 7 ran until completion of the field evaluation period accumulating 2,426 hours and 292 starts. While the 4,749 hours of package operation falls short of the 8,000-hour goal, important lessons were learned at the Rochelle site that resulted in bringing a far superior generation 3 Mercury 50 package to commercialization. Among the issues raised and resolved were: (1) Engine shaft stability; (2) Engine power and efficiency degradation--Air inlet Restrictions, Compressor Efficiency, Turbine Efficiency, Exhaust System Cracks/Leaks; (3) Recuperator Core Durability; (4) Cold Weather Operations; (5) Valve Actuator Reliability; and (6) Remote Operation and Maintenance Support.

  2. Smart actuation of inlet guide vanes for small turbine engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusovici, Razvan; Kwok Choon, Stephen T.; Sepri, Paavo; Feys, Joshuo

    2011-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have gained popularity over the past few years to become an indispensable part of aerial missions that include reconnaissance, surveillance, and communication [1]. As a result, advancements in small jet-engine performance are needed to increase the performance (range, payload and efficiency) of the UAV. These jet engines designed especially for UAV's are characterized by thrust force on the order of 100N and due to their size and weight limitations, may lack advanced flow control devices such as IGV [2]. The goal of the current study was to present a conceptual design of an IGV smart-material based actuation mechanism that would be simple, compact and lightweight. The compressor section of an engine increases the pressure and conditions the flow before the air enters the combustion chamber [3]. The airflow entering the compressor is often turbulent due to the high angle of incidence between engine inlet and free-stream velocity, or existing atmospheric turbulence. Actuated IGV are used to help control the relative angle of incidence of the flow that enters the engine compressor, thereby preventing flow separation, compressor stall and thus extending the compressor's operating envelope [4]. Turbine jet- engines which employ variable IGV were developed by Rolls Royce (Trent DR-900) and General Electric (J79).

  3. Task 6 -- Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-10

    The Allison Engine Company has completed the Task 6 Conceptual Design and Analysis of Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) contract. At the heart of Allison`s system is an advanced simple cycle gas turbine engine. This engine will incorporate components that ensure the program goals are met. Allison plans to commercialize the ATS demonstrator and market a family of engines incorporating this technology. This family of engines, ranging from 4.9 MW to 12 MW, will be suitable for use in all industrial engine applications, including electric power generation, mechanical drive, and marine propulsion. In the field of electric power generation, the engines will be used for base load, standby, cogeneration, and distributed generation applications.

  4. Combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Wiebe, David J; Fox, Timothy A

    2013-02-19

    A combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine. The combustor assembly includes a combustor device coupled to a main engine casing, a first fuel injection system, a transition duct, and an intermediate duct. The combustor device includes a flow sleeve for receiving pressurized air and a liner disposed radially inwardly from the flow sleeve. The first fuel injection system provides fuel that is ignited with the pressurized air creating first working gases. The intermediate duct is disposed between the liner and the transition duct and defines a path for the first working gases to flow from the liner to the transition duct. An intermediate duct inlet portion is associated with a liner outlet and allows movement between the intermediate duct and the liner. An intermediate duct outlet portion is associated with a transition duct inlet section and allows movement between the intermediate duct and the transition duct.

  5. ADAPTIVE CLEARANCE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR TURBINE ENGINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, Keith M.

    2004-01-01

    The Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center primarily deals in developing controls, dynamic models, and health management technologies for air and space propulsion systems. During the summer of 2004 I was granted the privilege of working alongside professionals who were developing an active clearance control system for commercial jet engines. Clearance, the gap between the turbine blade tip and the encompassing shroud, increases as a result of wear mechanisms and rubbing of the turbine blades on shroud. Increases in clearance cause larger specific fuel consumption (SFC) and loss of efficient air flow. This occurs because, as clearances increase, the engine must run hotter and bum more fuel to achieve the same thrust. In order to maintain efficiency, reduce fuel bum, and reduce exhaust gas temperature (EGT), the clearance must be accurately controlled to gap sizes no greater than a few hundredths of an inch. To address this problem, NASA Glenn researchers have developed a basic control system with actuators and sensors on each section of the shroud. Instead of having a large uniform metal casing, there would be sections of the shroud with individual sensors attached internally that would move slightly to reform and maintain clearance. The proposed method would ultimately save the airline industry millions of dollars.

  6. Brayton cycle solarized advanced gas turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Described is the development of a Brayton Engine/Generator Set for solar thermal to electrical power conversion, authorized under DOE/NASA Contract DEN3-181. The objective was to design, fabricate, assemble, and test a small, hybrid, 20-kW Brayton-engine-powered generator set. The latter, called a power conversion assembly (PCA), is designed to operate with solar energy obtained from a parobolic dish concentrator, 11 meters in diameter, or with fossil energy supplied by burning fuels in a combustor, or by a combination of both (hybrid model). The CPA consists of the Brayton cycle engine, a solar collector, a belt-driven 20-kW generator, and the necessary control systems for automatic operation in solar-only, fuel-only, and hybrid modes to supply electrical power to a utility grid. The original configuration of the generator set used the GTEC Model GTP36-51 gas turbine engine for the PCA prime mover. However, subsequent development of the GTEC Model AGT101 led to its selection as the powersource for the PCA. Performance characteristics of the latter, thermally coupled to a solar collector for operation in the solar mode, are presented. The PCA was successfully demonstrated in the fuel-only mode at the GTEC Phoenix, Arizona, facilities prior to its shipment to Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico, for installation and testing on a test bed concentractor (parabolic dish). Considerations relative to Brayton-engine development using the all-ceramic AGT101 when it becomes available, which would satisfy the DOE heat engine efficiency goal of 35 to 41 percent, are also discussed in the report.

  7. General Aviation Propulsion (GAP) Program, Turbine Engine System Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the General Aviation Propulsion (GAP) Program Turbine Engine System Elements is to conduct a shared resource project to develop an affordable gas turbine engine for use on 4 to 6 place, light aircraft that will lead to revitalization of the general aviation industry in the United States, creating many new, high-quality jobs.

  8. Steam turbine development for advanced combined cycle power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oeynhausen, H.; Bergmann, D.; Balling, L.; Termuehlen, H.

    1996-12-31

    For advanced combined cycle power plants, the proper selection of steam turbine models is required to achieve optimal performance. The advancements in gas turbine technology must be followed by advances in the combined cycle steam turbine design. On the other hand, building low-cost gas turbines and steam turbines is desired which, however, can only be justified if no compromise is made in regard to their performance. The standard design concept of two-casing single-flow turbines seems to be the right choice for most of the present and future applications worldwide. Only for very specific applications it might be justified to select another design concept as a more suitable option.

  9. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Westinghouse's Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine System Program (DE-AC2l-86MC23167) was originally split into two major phases - a Basic Program and an Option. The Basic Program also contained two phases. The development of a 6 atm, 7 lb/s, 12 MMBtu/hr slagging combustor with an extended period of testing of the subscale combustor, was the first part of the Basic Program. In the second phase of the Basic Program, the combustor was to be operated over a 3-month period with a stationary cascade to study the effect of deposition, erosion and corrosion on combustion turbine components. The testing of the concept, in subscale, has demonstrated its ability to handle high- and low-sulfur bituminous coals, and low-sulfur subbituminous coal. Feeding the fuel in the form of PC has proven to be superior to CWM type feed. The program objectives relative to combustion efficiency, combustor exit temperature, NO[sub x] emissions, carbon burnout, and slag rejection have been met. Objectives for alkali, particulate, and SO[sub x] levels leaving the combustor were not met by the conclusion of testing at Textron. It is planned to continue this testing, to achieve all desired emission levels, as part of the W/NSP program to commercialize the slagging combustor technology.

  10. Advanced expander test bed engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Space Chemical Engine Technology Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine and advanced component technologies applicable to space engines as well as launch vehicle upper stage engines. The AETB will be used to validate the high pressure expander cycle concept, study system interactions, and conduct studies of advanced mission focused components and new health monitoring techniques in an engine system environment. The split expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust.

  11. Advanced combustion turbines and cycles: An EPRI perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Touchton, G.; Cohn, A.

    1995-10-01

    EPRI conducts a broad program of research in combustion turbine technology on behalf of its funders which is directed toward improving their competitive positions through lower cost of generation and risk mitigation. The major areas of EPRI interest are: (1) Combustion Turbine Technology Development, Assessment, and Procurement Information and Products. (2) Risk mitigation of emerging combustion turbines through durability surveillance. (3) Existing Fleet Management and Improvement Technology. In the context of the DOE ATS Review, the present paper will address new advanced turbines and cycles and durability surveillance, of emerging combustion turbines. It will touch on existing fleet management and improvement technology as appropriate.

  12. Evaluating thermographic phosphors in an operating turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M. ); Lewis, W.; Turley, W.D. ); Beshears, D.L.; Capps, G.J.; Cates, M.R.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W. )

    1989-01-01

    The results of a field test in a commercial turbine engine showed that we can remotely measure the temperature of engine components in operating engines using thermographic phosphors. The remote- measurement method exploits the temperature dependence of the characteristic decay time of the laser-induced fluorescence of thermographic phosphors. This paper summarizes recent work leading up to and including a successful test of the thermographic-phosphor method in an operating turbine engine. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  13. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence P. Golan

    2003-05-01

    The quarterly activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program are described in this quarterly report. As this program administers research, we have included all program activity herein within the past quarter as dated. More specific research progress reports are provided weekly at the request of the AGTSR COR and are being sent to NETL As for the administration of this program, items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading. No new memberships, workshops, research projects, internships, faculty fellowships or special studies were initiated during this reporting period. Contract completion is set for June 30, 2003. During the report period, nine subcontractor reports were received (5 final reports and 4 semi-annual reports). The report technology distribution is as follows: 3--aero-heat transfer, 2--combustion and 4--materials. AGTSR continues to project that it will under spend DOE obligated funds by approximately $329K.

  14. The development of advanced hydroelectric turbines to improve fish passage survival

    SciTech Connect

    Cada, Glenn F.

    2001-09-01

    Recent efforts to improve the survival of hydroelectric turbine-passed juvenile fish have explored modifications to both operation and design of the turbines. Much of this research is being carried out by power producers in the Columbia River basin (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the public utility districts), while the development of low impact turbines is being pursued on a national scale by the U.S. Department of Energy. Fisheries managers are involved in all aspects of these efforts. Advanced versions of conventional Kaplan turbines are being installed and tested in the Columbia River basin, and a pilot scale version of a novel turbine concept is undergoing laboratory testing. Field studies in the last few years have shown that improvements in the design of conventional turbines have increased the survival of juvenile fish. There is still much to be learned about the causes and extent of injuries in the turbine system (including the draft tube and tailrace), as well as the significance of indirect mortality and the effects of turbine passage on adult fish. However, improvements in turbine design and operation, as well as new field, laboratory, and modeling techniques to assess turbine-passage survival, are contributing toward resolution of the downstream fish passage issue at hydroelectric power plants.

  15. The impact of emission standards on the design of aircraft gas turbine engine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    The advent of environmental standards for controlling aircraft gas turbine engine emissions has led to a reevaluation of combustor design techniques. Effective emission control techniques have been identified and a wide spectrum of potential applications for these techniques to existing and advanced engines are being considered. Results from advanced combustor concept evaluations and from fundamental experiments are presented and discussed and comparisons are made with existing EPA emission standards and recommended levels for high altitude cruise. The impact that the advanced low emission concepts may impose on future aircraft engine combustor designs and related engine components is discussed.

  16. MATERIALS AND COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT FOR ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROJECT SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M A

    2010-06-18

    Future hydrogen-fired or oxy-fuel turbines will likely experience an enormous level of thermal and mechanical loading, as turbine inlet temperatures (TIT) approach 1425-1760C (2600-3200F) with pressures of 300-625 psig, respectively. Maintaining the structural integrity of future turbine components under these extreme conditions will require (1) durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), (2) high temperature creep resistant metal substrates, and (3) effective cooling techniques. While advances in substrate materials have been limited for the past decades, thermal protection of turbine airfoils in future hydrogen-fired and oxy-fuel turbines will rely primarily on collective advances in the TBCs and aerothermal cooling. To support the advanced turbine technology development, the Office of Research and Development (ORD) at National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has continued its collaborative research efforts with the University of Pittsburgh and West Virginia University, while working in conjunction with commercial material and coating suppliers. This paper presents the technical accomplishments that were made during FY09 in the initial areas of advanced materials, aerothermal heat transfer and non-destructive evaluation techniques for use in advanced land-based turbine applications in the Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems project, and introduces three new technology areas high temperature overlayer coating development, diffusion barrier coating development, and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy development that are being conducted in this effort.

  17. Advanced Turbine Technology (ATTAP) Applications Project. 1992 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-01

    ATTAP activities during the past year included reference powertrain design (RPD) updates, test-bed engine design and development, ceramic component design, materials and component characterization, ceramic component development and fabrication, ceramic component rig testing, and test-bed engine fabrication and testing. RPD revisions included updating the baseline vehicle as well as the turbine RPD. Comparison of major performance parameters shows that the turbine engine installation exceeds critical fuel economy, emissions, and performance goals, and meets overall ATTAP objectives.

  18. Intelligent Engine Systems: Thermal Management and Advanced Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergholz, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The objective is to provide turbine-cooling technologies to meet Propulsion 21 goals related to engine fuel burn, emissions, safety, and reliability. Specifically, the GE Aviation (GEA) Advanced Turbine Cooling and Thermal Management program seeks to develop advanced cooling and flow distribution methods for HP turbines, while achieving a substantial reduction in total cooling flow and assuring acceptable turbine component safety and reliability. Enhanced cooling techniques, such as fluidic devices, controlled-vortex cooling, and directed impingement jets, offer the opportunity to incorporate both active and passive schemes. Coolant heat transfer enhancement also can be achieved from advanced designs that incorporate multi-disciplinary optimization of external film and internal cooling passage geometry.

  19. A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2015-01-01

    In a NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI) sponsored program entitled "A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing," evaluation of emerging materials and additive manufacturing technologies was carried out. These technologies may enable fully non-metallic gas turbine engines in the future. This paper highlights the results of engine system trade studies which were carried out to estimate reduction in engine emissions and fuel burn enabled due to advanced materials and manufacturing processes. A number of key engine components were identified in which advanced materials and additive manufacturing processes would provide the most significant benefits to engine operation. In addition, feasibility of using additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate gas turbine engine components from polymer and ceramic matrix composite were demonstrated. A wide variety of prototype components (inlet guide vanes (IGV), acoustic liners, engine access door, were additively manufactured using high temperature polymer materials. Ceramic matrix composite components included first stage nozzle segments and high pressure turbine nozzle segments for a cooled doublet vane. In addition, IGVs and acoustic liners were tested in simulated engine conditions in test rigs. The test results are reported and discussed in detail.

  20. A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2015-01-01

    In a NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI) sponsored program entitled "A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing", evaluation of emerging materials and additive manufacturing technologies was carried out. These technologies may enable fully non-metallic gas turbine engines in the future. This paper highlights the results of engine system trade studies which were carried out to estimate reduction in engine emissions and fuel burn enabled due to advanced materials and manufacturing processes. A number of key engine components were identified in which advanced materials and additive manufacturing processes would provide the most significant benefits to engine operation. In addition, feasibility of using additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate gas turbine engine components from polymer and ceramic matrix composite were demonstrated. A wide variety of prototype components (inlet guide vanes (IGV), acoustic liners, engine access door) were additively manufactured using high temperature polymer materials. Ceramic matrix composite components included first stage nozzle segments and high pressure turbine nozzle segments for a cooled doublet vane. In addition, IGVs and acoustic liners were tested in simulated engine conditions in test rigs. The test results are reported and discussed in detail.

  1. Sensor and Actuator Needs for More Intelligent Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay; Schadow, Klaus; Horn, Wolfgang; Pfoertner, Hugo; Stiharu, Ion

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the controls and diagnostics technologies, that are seen as critical for more intelligent gas turbine engines (GTE), with an emphasis on the sensor and actuator technologies that need to be developed for the controls and diagnostics implementation. The objective of the paper is to help the "Customers" of advanced technologies, defense acquisition and aerospace research agencies, understand the state-of-the-art of intelligent GTE technologies, and help the "Researchers" and "Technology Developers" for GTE sensors and actuators identify what technologies need to be developed to enable the "Intelligent GTE" concepts and focus their research efforts on closing the technology gap. To keep the effort manageable, the focus of the paper is on "On-Board Intelligence" to enable safe and efficient operation of the engine over its life time, with an emphasis on gas path performance

  2. Airfoil for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Liang, George

    2011-05-24

    An airfoil is provided for a turbine of a gas turbine engine. The airfoil comprises: an outer structure comprising a first wall including a leading edge, a trailing edge, a pressure side, and a suction side; an inner structure comprising a second wall spaced from the first wall and at least one intermediate wall; and structure extending between the first and second walls so as to define first and second gaps between the first and second walls. The second wall and the at least one intermediate wall define at least one pressure side supply cavity and at least one suction side supply cavity. The second wall may include at least one first opening near the leading edge of the first wall. The first opening may extend from the at least one pressure side supply cavity to the first gap. The second wall may further comprise at least one second opening near the trailing edge of the outer structure. The second opening may extend from the at least one suction side supply cavity to the second gap. The first wall may comprise at least one first exit opening extending from the first gap through the pressure side of the first wall and at least one second exit opening extending from the second gap through the suction side of the second wall.

  3. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  4. Advanced radial inflow turbine rotor program: Design and dynamic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, C.

    1976-01-01

    The advancement of small, cooled, radial inflow turbine technology in the area of operation at higher turbine inlet temperature is discussed. The first step was accomplished by designing, fabricating, and subjecting to limited mechanical testing an advanced gas generator rotating assembly comprising a radial inflow turbine and two-stage centrifugal compressor. The radial inflow turbine and second-stage compressor were designed as an integrally machined monorotor with turbine cooling taking place basically by conduction to the compressor. Design turbine inlet rotor gas temperature, rotational speed, and overall gas generator compressor pressure ratio were 1422 K (2560 R), 71,222 rpm, and 10/1 respectively. Mechanical testing on a fabricated rotating assembly and bearing system covered 1,000 cold start/stop cycles and three spins to 120 percent design speed (85,466 rpm).

  5. Part A - Advanced turbine systems. Part B - Materials/manufacturing element of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Karnitz, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    The DOE Offices of Fossil Energy and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy have initiated a program to develop advanced turbine systems for power generation. The objective of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for utility and industrial applications. One of the supporting elements of the ATS Program is the Materials/Manufacturing Technologies Task. The objective of this element is to address the critical materials and manufacturing issues for both industrial and utility gas turbines.

  6. Modern Experimental Techniques in Turbine Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Bruckner, R. J.; Bencic, T. J.; Braunscheidel, E. P.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes application of two modern experimental techniques, thin-film thermocouples and pressure sensitive paint, to measurement in turbine engine components. A growing trend of using computational codes in turbomachinery design and development requires experimental techniques to refocus from overall performance testing to acquisition of detailed data on flow and heat transfer physics to validate these codes for design applications. The discussed experimental techniques satisfy this shift in focus. Both techniques are nonintrusive in practical terms. The thin-film thermocouple technique improves accuracy of surface temperature and heat transfer measurements. The pressure sensitive paint technique supplies areal surface pressure data rather than discrete point values only. The paper summarizes our experience with these techniques and suggests improvements to ease the application of these techniques for future turbomachinery research and code verifications.

  7. Gas turbine engine with supersonic compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, II, William Byron; Lawlor, Shawn P.

    2015-10-20

    A gas turbine engine having a compressor section using blades on a rotor to deliver a gas at supersonic conditions to a stator. The stator includes one or more of aerodynamic ducts that have converging and diverging portions for deceleration of the gas to subsonic conditions and to deliver a high pressure gas to combustors. The aerodynamic ducts include structures for changing the effective contraction ratio to enable starting even when designed for high pressure ratios, and structures for boundary layer control. In an embodiment, aerodynamic ducts are provided having an aspect ratio of two to one (2:1) or more, when viewed in cross-section orthogonal to flow direction at an entrance to the aerodynamic duct.

  8. Dynamic and Structural Gas Turbine Engine Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James A.

    2003-01-01

    Model the interactions between the structural dynamics and the performance dynamics of a gas turbine engine. Generally these two aspects are considered separate, unrelated phenomena and are studied independently. For diagnostic purposes, it is desirable to bring together as much information as possible, and that involves understanding how performance is affected by structural dynamics (if it is) and vice versa. This can involve the relationship between thrust response and the excitation of structural modes, for instance. The job will involve investigating and characterizing these dynamical relationships, generating a model that incorporates them, and suggesting and/or developing diagnostic and prognostic techniques that can be incorporated in a data fusion system. If no coupling is found, at the least a vibration model should be generated that can be used for diagnostics and prognostics related to blade loss, for instance.

  9. Combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Wiebe, David J; Fox, Timothy A

    2015-04-28

    A combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine includes a combustor device, a fuel injection system, a transition duct, and an intermediate duct. The combustor device includes a flow sleeve for receiving pressurized air and a liner surrounded by the flow sleeve. The fuel injection system provides fuel to be mixed with the pressurized air and ignited in the liner to create combustion products. The intermediate duct is disposed between the liner and the transition duct so as to define a path for the combustion products to flow from the liner to the transition duct. The intermediate duct is associated with the liner such that movement may occur therebetween, and the intermediate duct is associated with the transition duct such that movement may occur therebetween. The flow sleeve includes structure that defines an axial stop for limiting axial movement of the intermediate duct.

  10. Cooled airfoil in a turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Vitt, Paul H; Kemp, David A; Lee, Ching-Pang; Marra, John J

    2015-04-21

    An airfoil in a gas turbine engine includes an outer wall and an inner wall. The outer wall includes a leading edge, a trailing edge opposed from the leading edge in a chordal direction, a pressure side, and a suction side. The inner wall is coupled to the outer wall at a single chordal location and includes portions spaced from the pressure and suction sides of the outer wall so as to form first and second gaps between the inner wall and the respective pressure and suction sides. The inner wall defines a chamber therein and includes openings that provide fluid communication between the respective gaps and the chamber. The gaps receive cooling fluid that provides cooling to the outer wall as it flows through the gaps. The cooling fluid, after traversing at least substantial portions of the gaps, passes into the chamber through the openings in the inner wall.

  11. Advanced ceramic coating development for industrial/utility gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogan, J. W.; Stetson, A. R.

    1982-01-01

    A program was conducted with the objective of developing advanced thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems. Coating application was by plasma spray. Duplex, triplex and graded coatings were tested. Coating systems incorporated both NiCrAly and CoCrAly bond coats. Four ceramic overlays were tested: ZrO2.82O3; CaO.TiO2; 2CaO.SiO2; and MgO.Al2O3. The best overall results were obtained with a CaO.TiO2 coating applied to a NiCrAly bond coat. This coating was less sensitive than the ZrO2.8Y2O3 coating to process variables and part geometry. Testing with fuels contaminated with compounds containing sulfur, phosphorus and alkali metals showed the zirconia coatings were destabilized. The calcium titanate coatings were not affected by these contaminants. However, when fuels were used containing 50 ppm of vanadium and 150 ppm of magnesium, heavy deposits were formed on the test specimens and combustor components that required frequent cleaning of the test rig. During the program Mars engine first-stage turbine blades were coated and installed for an engine cyclic endurance run with the zirconia, calcium titanate, and calcium silicate coatings. Heavy spalling developed with the calcium silicate system. The zirconia and calcium titanate systems survived the full test duration. It was concluded that these two TBC's showed potential for application in gas turbines.

  12. Ceramic regenerator systems development program. [for automobile gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. A.; Fucinari, C. A.; Lingscheit, J. N.; Rahnke, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    Ceramic regenerator cores are considered that can be used in passenger car gas turbine engines, Stirling engines, and industrial/truck gas turbine engines. Improved materials and design concepts aimed at reducing or eliminating chemical attack were placed on durability test in Ford 707 industrial gas turbine engines. The results of 19,600 hours of turbine engine durability testing are described. Two materials, aluminum silicate and magnesium aluminum silicate, continue to show promise toward achieving the durability objectives of this program. A regenerator core made from aluminum silicate showed minimal evidence of chemical attack damage after 6935 hours of engine test at 800 C and another showed little distress after 3510 hours at 982 C. Results obtained in ceramic material screening tests, aerothermodynamic performance tests, stress analysis, cost studies, and material specifications are also included.

  13. Distributed control system for turbine engines

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, P.L.

    1999-01-01

    A distributed control system (DCS) for a turbine engine has been demonstrated and tested, consisting of prototype electronic interface units (EIUs) connected to data and power busses. In the DCS, a central control computer communicated with smart sensors and smart actuators via a 2.5 megabit/sec digital data bus, using the Fieldbus protocol. Power was distributed to the smart devices as 100 kHz 100V peak AC, allowing light, simple power converters at each smart device. All smart sensors, smart actuators, and cables were dual redundant. The smart actuators received position demand from the central control computer, exchanged data between channels to provide local redundancy management, closed the position loop locally, and reported actuator position to the central controller. Smart sensors converted sensed signals to digital values in engineering units, and performed local built-in tests. Testing of the DCS was done in a closed-loop simulation with an engine model. Frequency response of the DCS was almost identical with the conventional system.

  14. Advanced High-Temperature Engine Materials Technology Progresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced High Temperature Engine Materials Technology Program (HITEMP) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is to generate technology for advanced materials and structural analysis that will increase fuel economy, improve reliability, extend life, and reduce operating costs for 21st century civil propulsion systems. The primary focus is on fan and compressor materials (polymer-matrix composites - PMC's), compressor and turbine materials (superalloys, and metal-matrix and intermetallic-matrix composites - MMC's and IMC's), and turbine materials (ceramic-matrix composites - CMC's). These advanced materials are being developed in-house by Lewis researchers and on grants and contracts.

  15. Advanced Fluid--Structure Interaction Techniques in Application to Horizontal and Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenko, Artem

    During the last several decades engineers and scientists put significant effort into developing reliable and efficient wind turbines. As a wind power production demands grow, the wind energy research and development need to be enhanced with high-precision methods and tools. These include time-dependent, full-scale, complex-geometry advanced computational simulations at large-scale. Those, computational analysis of wind turbines, including fluid-structure interaction simulations (FSI) at full scale is important for accurate and reliable modeling, as well as blade failure prediction and design optimization. In current dissertation the FSI framework is applied to most challenging class of problems, such as large scale horizontal axis wind turbines and vertical axis wind turbines. The governing equations for aerodynamics and structural mechanics together with coupled formulation are explained in details. The simulations are performed for different wind turbine designs, operational conditions and validated against field-test and wind tunnel experimental data.

  16. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) powertrain system development for automotive applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Topics covered include the AGT 101 engine test; compressor design modification; cold air turbine testing; Mod 1 alloy turbine rotor fabrication; combustion aspects; regenerator development; and thermal screening tests for ceramic materials. The foil gas bearings, rotor dynamics, and AGT controls and accessories are also considered.

  17. Gas fired advanced turbine system. Phase 1, System scoping and feasibility studies

    SciTech Connect

    LeCren, R.T.; White, D.J.

    1993-11-01

    The basic concept thus derived from the Ericsson cycle is an intercooled, recuperated, and reheated gas turbine. Theoretical performance analyses, however, showed that reheat at high turbine rotor inlet temperatures (TRIT) did not provide significant efficiency gains and that the 50 percent efficiency goal could be met without reheat. Based upon these findings, the engine concept adopted as a starting point for the gas-fired advanced turbine system is an intercooled, recuperated (ICR) gas turbine. It was found that, at inlet temperatures greater than 2450{degrees}F, the thermal efficiency could be maintained above 50%, provided that the turbine cooling flows could be reduced to 7% of the main air flow or lower. This dual and conflicting requirement of increased temperatures and reduced cooling will probably force the abandonment of traditional air cooled turbine parts. Thus, the use of either ceramic materials or non-air cooling fluids has to be considered for the turbine nozzle guide vanes and turbine blades. The use of ceramic components for the proposed engine system is generally preferred because of the potential growth to higher temperatures that is available with such materials.

  18. Performance Evaluation and Modeling of Erosion Resistant Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to the rotorcraft engine performance and durability. The objective of this work was to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments, thus validating a new thermal barrier coating turbine blade technology for future rotorcraft applications. A high velocity burner rig based erosion test approach was established and a new series of rare earth oxide- and TiO2/Ta2O5- alloyed, ZrO2-based low conductivity thermal barrier coatings were designed and processed. The low conductivity thermal barrier coating systems demonstrated significant improvements in the erosion resistance. A comprehensive model based on accumulated strain damage low cycle fatigue is formulated for blade erosion life prediction. The work is currently aiming at the simulated engine erosion testing of advanced thermal barrier coated turbine blades to establish and validate the coating life prediction models.

  19. Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1991-07-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

  20. DOE/NREL Advanced Wind Turbine Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, C P; Smith, B; Laxson, A; Thresher, B; Goldman, P

    1993-05-01

    The development of technologically advanced, high-efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high-priority activity of the US wind industry. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute), sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated the Advanced Wind Turbine Program to assist the wind industry in the development of a new class of advanced wind turbines. The initial phase of the program focused on developing conceptual designs for near-term and advanced turbines. The goal of the second phase of this program is to use the experience gained over the last decade of turbine design and operation combined with the latest existing design tools to develop a turbine that will produce energy at $0.05 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) in a 5.8-m/s (13-mph) wind site. Three contracts have been awarded, and two more are under negotiation in the second phase. The third phase of the program will use new innovations and state-of-the-art wind turbine design technology to produce a turbine that will generate energy at $0.04/kWh in a 5.8-m/s wind site. Details of the third phase will be announced in early 1993.

  1. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, Edward

    2014-03-31

    The objective of the Cummins ARES program, in partnership with the US Department of Energy (DOE), is to develop advanced natural gas engine technologies that increase engine system efficiency at lower emissions levels while attaining lower cost of ownership. The goals of the project are to demonstrate engine system achieving 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency (BTE) in three phases, 44%, 47% and 50% (starting baseline efficiency at 36% BTE) and 0.1 g/bhp-hr NOx system out emissions (starting baseline NOx emissions at 2 – 4 g/bhp-hr NOx). Primary path towards above goals include high Brake Mean Effective Pressure (BMEP), improved closed cycle efficiency, increased air handling efficiency and optimized engine subsystems. Cummins has successfully demonstrated each of the phases of this program. All targets have been achieved through application of a combined set of advanced base engine technologies and Waste Heat Recovery from Charge Air and Exhaust streams, optimized and validated on the demonstration engine and other large engines. The following architectures were selected for each Phase: Phase 1: Lean Burn Spark Ignited (SI) Key Technologies: High Efficiency Turbocharging, Higher Efficiency Combustion System. In production on the 60/91L engines. Over 500MW of ARES Phase 1 technology has been sold. Phase 2: Lean Burn Technology with Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) System Key Technologies: Advanced Ignition System, Combustion Improvement, Integrated Waste Heat Recovery System. Base engine technologies intended for production within 2 to 3 years Phase 3: Lean Burn Technology with Exhaust and Charge Air Waste Heat Recovery System Key Technologies: Lower Friction, New Cylinder Head Designs, Improved Integrated Waste Heat Recovery System. Intended for production within 5 to 6 years Cummins is committed to the launch of next generation of large advanced NG engines based on ARES technology to be commercialized worldwide.

  2. Design and test of a small two stage counter-rotating turbine for rocket engine application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, F. W.; Branstrom, B. R.; Finke, A. K.; Johnson, P. D.; Rowey, R. J.; Veres, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and rig test evaluation of a small counter-rotating turbine system is described. The technology represented by this turbine is being developed for application in an advanced upper stage rocket engine turbopump. This engine will employ an oxygen/hydrogen expander cycle and achieve high performance through efficient combustion, high combustion pressure, and high area ratio exhaust nozzle expansion. Engine performance goals require that the turbopump drive turbines achieve high efficiency at low gas flow rates. The low flow rates result in very small airfoil diameter, height and chord. The high efficiency and small size requirements present a challenging turbine design problem. The unconventional approach employed to meet this challenge is described, along with the detailed design process and resulting airfoil configurations. The method and results of full scale aerodynamic performance evaluation testing of both one and two stage configurations, as well as operation without the secondary stage stator are presented. The overall results of this effort illustrate that advanced aerodynamic design tools and hardware fabrication techniques have provided improved capability to produce small high performance turbines for advanced rocket engines.

  3. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Presentations were made concerning the development of design analysis tools for combustor liners, turbine vanes, and turbine blades. Presentations were divided into six sections: instrumentation, combustion, turbine heat transfer, structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, surface protective coatings, constitutive behavior of materials, stress-strain response and life prediction methods.

  4. Development of next generation 1500C class advanced combustion turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, S.; Tskuda, Y.; Akita, E.; Tomita, Y.

    1998-07-01

    The full load test run of the 501G combustion turbine has just finished at Takasago combined cycle plant in MHI, Japan. The 501G has power output of 230MW at turbine inlet temperature of 1,500 C and can achieve combined net efficiency of 52%. The NO{sub x} level proved to be less than 25 ppm. The 501G and 701G1 combustion turbines are large heavy-duty single shaft combustion turbines which combine the proven reliability and efficiency of the F series with the latest low NO{sub x} combustion technology and the state-of-the-art cooling technique. As the full load test run has proved, it is a highly advanced designed turbine with documented high temperature, low NO{sub x} and high efficiency. This combined with time proven design concepts has created a new powerful combustion turbine, which will satisfy the large combustion turbine power generation needs for the next decades. The 501G turbine is the 60Hz, 3,600 rpm heavy duty combustion turbine rated at 230MW at a turbine inlet of 1,500 C fired on natural gas fuel. The combined cycle net efficiency is 58%. Verification tests for various components have been conducted through the last 3 years and since February '97 a full scale-full load test is being performed to verify the high performance, reliability and maintainability. The 701G1 is a 3,000 rpm combustion turbine designed for the 50 Hz power generation utilities and industrial service. The first 701G1 gas turbine is expected to begin commercial operation in 1999 in Tohoku Electric Power Co. Higashi Nilgata Power Plant No.4, in Japan. This paper describes the features of the next generation 1,500 C class advanced combustion turbines. Aerodynamic, cooling and mechanical design improvement is discussed along with the evolutionary changes based on time proven design concepts.

  5. Full hoop casing for midframe of industrial gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Myers, Gerald A.; Charron, Richard C.

    2015-12-01

    A can annular industrial gas turbine engine, including: a single-piece rotor shaft spanning a compressor section (82), a combustion section (84), a turbine section (86); and a combustion section casing (10) having a section (28) configured as a full hoop. When the combustion section casing is detached from the engine and moved to a maintenance position to allow access to an interior of the engine, a positioning jig (98) is used to support the compressor section casing (83) and turbine section casing (87).

  6. Single shaft automotive gas turbine engine characterization test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    An automotive gas turbine incorporating a single stage centrifugal compressor and a single stage radial inflow turbine is described. Among the engine's features is the use of wide range variable geometry at the inlet guide vanes, the compressor diffuser vanes, and the turbine inlet vanes to achieve improved part load fuel economy. The engine was tested to determine its performance in both the variable geometry and equivalent fixed geometry modes. Testing was conducted without the originally designed recuperator. Test results were compared with the predicted performance of the nonrecuperative engine based on existing component rig test maps. Agreement between test results and the computer model was achieved.

  7. New opportunities for future, small, General-Aviation Turbine Engines (GATE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strack, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    The results of four independent contracted studies to explore the opportunities for future small turbine engines are summarized in a composite overview. Candidate advanced technologies are screened, various cycles and staging arrangements are parametrically evaluated, and optimum conceptual engines are identified for a range of 300 to 600 horsepower applications. Engine improvements of 20 percent in specific fuel consumption and 40 percent in engine cost were forecast using high risk technologies that could be technically demonstrated by 1988. The ensuing economic benefits are in the neighborhood of 20 to 30 percent for twin-engine aircraft currently powered by piston engines.

  8. Aircraft Turbine Engine Control Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    This lecture will provide an overview of the aircraft turbine engine control research at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC). A brief introduction to the engine control problem is first provided with a description of the current state-of-the-art control law structure. A historical aspect of engine control development since the 1940s is then provided with a special emphasis on the contributions of GRC. The traditional engine control problem has been to provide a means to safely transition the engine from one steady-state operating point to another based on the pilot throttle inputs. With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at GRC is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, other government agencies, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA programs under the Aeronautics Research Mission. The second part of the lecture provides an overview of the various CDB technology development activities in aircraft engine control and diagnostics, both current and some accomplished in the recent past. The motivation for each of the research efforts, the research approach, technical challenges and the key progress to date are summarized. The technologies to be discussed include system level engine control concepts, gas path diagnostics, active component control, and distributed engine control architecture. The lecture will end with a futuristic perspective of how the various current technology developments will lead to an Intelligent and Autonomous Propulsion System requiring none to very minimum pilot interface

  9. Effects of Gas Turbine Component Performance on Engine and Rotary Wing Vehicle Size and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Christopher A.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program, Subsonic Rotary Wing Project, further gas turbine engine studies have been performed to quantify the effects of advanced gas turbine technologies on engine weight and fuel efficiency and the subsequent effects on a civilian rotary wing vehicle size and mission fuel. The Large Civil Tiltrotor (LCTR) vehicle and mission and a previous gas turbine engine study will be discussed as a starting point for this effort. Methodology used to assess effects of different compressor and turbine component performance on engine size, weight and fuel efficiency will be presented. A process to relate engine performance to overall LCTR vehicle size and fuel use will also be given. Technology assumptions and levels of performance used in this analysis for the compressor and turbine components performances will be discussed. Optimum cycles (in terms of power specific fuel consumption) will be determined with subsequent engine weight analysis. The combination of engine weight and specific fuel consumption will be used to estimate their effect on the overall LCTR vehicle size and mission fuel usage. All results will be summarized to help suggest which component performance areas have the most effect on the overall mission.

  10. Advanced Micro Turbine System (AMTS) -C200 Micro Turbine -Ultra-Low Emissions Micro Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Capstone Turbine Corporation

    2007-12-31

    In September 2000 Capstone Turbine Corporation commenced work on a US Department of Energy contract to develop and improve advanced microturbines for power generation with high electrical efficiency and reduced pollutants. The Advanced MicroTurbine System (AMTS) program focused on: (1) The development and implementation of technology for a 200 kWe scale high efficiency microturbine system (2) The development and implementation of a 65 kWe microturbine which meets California Air Resources Board (CARB) emissions standards effective in 2007. Both of these objectives were achieved in the course of the AMTS program. At its conclusion prototype C200 Microturbines had been designed, assembled and successfully completed field demonstration. C65 Microturbines operating on natural, digester and landfill gas were also developed and successfully tested to demonstrate compliance with CARB 2007 Fossil Fuel Emissions Standards for NOx, CO and VOC emissions. The C65 Microturbine subsequently received approval from CARB under Executive Order DG-018 and was approved for sale in California. The United Technologies Research Center worked in parallel to successfully execute a RD&D program to demonstrate the viability of a low emissions AMS which integrated a high-performing microturbine with Organic Rankine Cycle systems. These results are documented in AMS Final Report DOE/CH/11060-1 dated March 26, 2007.

  11. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-31

    Achieving the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) goals of 60% efficiency, single-digit NO{sub x}, and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NO{sub x} emission. Improved coatings and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal. GE`s view of the market, in conjunction with the industrial and utility objectives, requires the development of Advanced Gas Turbine Systems which encompass two potential products: a new aeroderivative combined-cycle system for the industrial market, and a combined-cycle system for the utility sector that is based on an advanced frame machine. The GE Advanced Gas Turbine Development program is focused on two specific products: (1) a 70 MW class industrial gas turbine based on the GE90 core technology utilizing an innovative air cooling methodology; (2) a 200 MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced Ge heavy-duty machine utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. Both of these activities required the identification and resolution of technical issues critical to achieving ATS goals. The emphasis for the industrial ATS was placed upon innovative cycle design and low emission combustion. The emphasis for the utility ATS was placed on developing a technology base for advanced turbine cooling, while utilizing demonstrated and planned improvements in low emission combustion. Significant overlap in the development programs will allow common technologies to be applied to both products. GE Power Systems is solely responsible for offering GE products for the industrial and utility markets.

  12. ATTAP: Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project. Annual report, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Purpose of ATTAP is to bring the automotive gas turbine engine to a technology state at which industry can make commercialization decisions. Activities during the past year included test-bed engine design and development, ceramic component design, materials and component characterization, ceramic component process development and fabrication, ceramic component rig testing, and test-bed engine fabrication and testing.

  13. Update on DOE Advanced IGCC/H2 Gas Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Ray

    2009-01-01

    Cooling Flow Reduction: a) Focus on improving turbine hot gas path part cooling efficiency. b) Applicable to current metallic turbine components and synergistic with advanced materials. c) Address challenges of IGCC/hydrogen fuel environment (for example, possible cooling hole plugging). Leakage Flow Reduction: a) Focus on decreasing turbine parasitic leakages, i.e. between static-to-static, static-to-rotating turbine parts. b) Develop improved seal designs in a variety of important areas. Purge Flow Reduction: a) Focus on decreasing required flows to keep rotor disk cavities within temperature limits. b) Develop improved sealing at the cavity rims and modified flow geometries to minimize hot gas ingestion and aerodynamic impact.

  14. Advanced Sensor Fish Device for ImprovedTurbine Design

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.

    2009-09-14

    Juvenile salmon (smolts) passing through hydroelectric turbines are subjected to environmental conditions that can potentially kill or injure them. Many turbines are reaching the end of their operational life expectancies and will be replaced with new turbines that incorporate advanced “fish friendly” designs devised to prevent injury and death to fish. To design a fish friendly turbine, it is first necessary to define the current conditions fish encounter. One such device used by biologists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was the sensor fish device to collect data that measures the forces fish experience during passage through hydroelectric projects.

  15. MATERIALS AND COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT FOR ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Alvin

    2009-06-12

    Future hydrogen-fired or oxy-fuel turbines will likely experience an enormous level of thermal and mechanical loading, as turbine inlet temperatures (TIT) approach 1425-1760ºC with pressures of 300-625 psig, respectively. Maintaining the structural integrity of future turbine components under these extreme conditions will require durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), high temperature creep resistant metal substrates, and effective cooling techniques. While advances in substrate materials have been limited for the past decades, thermal protection of turbine airfoils in future hydrogen-fired and oxy-fuel turbines will rely primarily on collective advances in TBCs and aerothermal cooling. To support the advanced turbine technology development, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) at the Office of Research and Development (ORD) has initiated a research project effort in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh (UPitt), and West Virginia University (WVU), working in conjunction with commercial material and coating suppliers, to develop advanced materials, aerothermal configurations, as well as non-destructive evaluation techniques for use in advanced land-based gas turbine applications. This paper reviews technical accomplishments recently achieved in each of these areas.

  16. A Plan for Revolutionary Change in Gas Turbine Engine Control System Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of Distributed Engine Control technology on the gas turbine engine has been a vexing challenge for the controls community. A successful implementation requires the resolution of multiple technical issues in areas such as network communications, power distribution, and system integration, but especially in the area of high temperature electronics. Impeding the achievement has been the lack of a clearly articulated message about the importance of the distributed control technology to future turbine engine system goals and objectives. To resolve these issues and bring the technology to fruition has, and will continue to require, a broad coalition of resources from government, industry, and academia. This presentation will describe the broad challenges facing the next generation of advanced control systems and the plan which is being put into action to successfully implement the technology on the next generation of gas turbine engine systems.

  17. "Fish Friendly" Hydropower Turbine Development and Deployment. Alden Turbine Preliminary Engineering and Model Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, D.

    2011-10-01

    This report presents the results of a collaborative research project funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and hydropower industry partners with the objective of completing the remaining developmental engineering required for a “fish-friendly” hydropower turbine called the Alden turbine.

  18. An Overview of Magnetic Bearing Technology for Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Daniel J.; Jansen, Mark J.; Montague, Gerald T.

    2004-01-01

    The idea of the magnetic bearing and its use in exotic applications has been conceptualized for many years, over a century, in fact. Patented, passive systems using permanent magnets date back over 150 years. More recently, scientists of the 1930s began investigating active systems using electromagnets for high-speed ultracentrifuges. However, passive magnetic bearings are physically unstable and active systems only provide proper stiffness and damping through sophisticated controllers and algorithms. This is precisely why, until the last decade, magnetic bearings did not become a practical alternative to rolling element bearings. Today, magnetic bearing technology has become viable because of advances in micro-processing controllers that allow for confident and robust active control. Further advances in the following areas: rotor and stator materials and designs which maximize flux, minimize energy losses, and minimize stress limitations; wire materials and coatings for high temperature operation; high-speed micro processing for advanced controller designs and extremely robust capabilities; back-up bearing technology for providing a viable touchdown surface; and precision sensor technology; have put magnetic bearings on the forefront of advanced, lubrication free support systems. This paper will discuss a specific joint program for the advancement of gas turbine engines and how it implies the vitality of magnetic bearings, a brief comparison between magnetic bearings and other bearing technologies in both their advantages and limitations, and an examination of foreseeable solutions to historically perceived limitations to magnetic bearing.

  19. Advanced rotary engine studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C.

    1980-01-01

    A review of rotary engine developments relevant to a stratified charge rotary aircraft engine is presented. Advantages in module size and weight, fuel efficiency, reliability, and multi-fuel capability are discussed along with developments in turbocharging, increased mean effective pressure, improved apex seal/trochoid wear surfacing materials, and high strength and temperature aluminum casting alloys. A carbureted prototype aircraft engine is also described.

  20. Advanced rotary engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C.

    1983-01-01

    The broad objectives of this paper are the following: (1) to summarize the Curtiss-Wright design, development and field testing background in the area of rotary aircraft engines; (2) to briefly summarize past activity and update development work in the area of stratified charge rotary combustion engines; and (3) to discuss the development of a high-performance direct injected unthrottled stratified charge rotary combustion aircraft engine. Efficiency improvements through turbocharging are also discussed.

  1. Advanced turbine systems sensors and controls needs assessment study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.L.; Fry, D.N.; McEvers, J.A.

    1997-02-01

    The Instrumentation and Controls Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory performed an assessment of the sensors and controls needs for land-based advanced gas turbines being designed as a part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program for both utility and industrial applications. The assessment included visits to five turbine manufacturers. During these visits, in-depth discussions were held with design and manufacturing staff to obtain their views regarding the need for new sensors and controls for their advanced turbine designs. The Unsteady Combustion Facilities at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center was visited to assess the need for new sensors for gas turbine combustion research. Finally, a workshop was conducted at the South Carolina Energy Research and Development Center which provided a forum for industry, laboratory, and university engineers to discuss and prioritize sensor and control needs. The assessment identified more than 50 different measurement, control, and monitoring needs for advanced turbines that cannot currently be met from commercial sources. While all the identified needs are important, some are absolutely critical to the success of the ATS Program.

  2. Advanced Turbine Systems Program industrial system concept development

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, S.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of Phase II of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program is to develop conceptual designs of gas fired advanced turbine systems that can be adapted for operation on coal and biomass fuels. The technical, economic, and environmental performance operating on natural gas and in a coal fueled mode is to be assessed. Detailed designs and test work relating to critical components are to be completed and a market study is to be conducted.

  3. Gas turbine engine and its associated air intake system

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, J.R.; Bennett, G.H.; Lee, L.A.

    1984-01-17

    A gas turbine engine and its associated air intake system are disclosed in which the air intake system comprises a generally horizontally extending duct through which an airflow is induced by an ejector pump powered by the engine. A portion of the air passing through the duct is directed through a second duct to the air inlet of the engine. The second duct is connected to the first duct in such a manner that the air directed to the engine air inlet is derived from a vertically upper region of the first duct. The arrangement is intended to reduce the amount of airborne particulate material ingested by the gas turbine engine.

  4. Advanced turbine systems study system scoping and feasibility study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    United Technologies Research Center, Pratt & Whitney Commercial Engine Business, And Pratt & Whitney Government Engine and Space Propulsion has performed a preliminary analysis of an Advanced Turbine System (ATS) under Contract DE-AC21-92MC29247 with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The natural gas-fired reference system identified by the UTC team is the Humid Air Turbine (HAT) Cycle in which the gas turbine exhaust heat and heat rejected from the intercooler is used in a saturator to humidify the high pressure compressor discharge air. This results in a significant increase in flow through the turbine at no increase in compressor power. Using technology based on the PW FT4000, the industrial engine derivative of the PW4000, currently under development by PW, the system would have an output of approximately 209 MW and an efficiency of 55.3%. Through use of advanced cooling and materials technologies similar to those currently in the newest generation military aircraft engines, a growth version of this engine could attain approximately 295 MW output at an efficiency of 61.5%. There is the potential for even higher performance in the future as technology from aerospace R&D programs is adapted to aero-derivative industrial engines.

  5. Advances in Thermal Spray Coatings for Gas Turbines and Energy Generation: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardwicke, Canan U.; Lau, Yuk-Chiu

    2013-06-01

    Functional coatings are widely used in energy generation equipment in industries such as renewables, oil and gas, propulsion engines, and gas turbines. Intelligent thermal spray processing is vital in many of these areas for efficient manufacturing. Advanced thermal spray coating applications include thermal management, wear, oxidation, corrosion resistance, sealing systems, vibration and sound absorbance, and component repair. This paper reviews the current status of materials, equipment, processing, and properties' aspects for key coatings in the energy industry, especially the developments in large-scale gas turbines. In addition to the most recent industrial advances in thermal spray technologies, future technical needs are also highlighted.

  6. Advanced Turbine System (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    GE has achieved a leadership position in the worldwide gas turbine industry in both industrial/utility markets and in aircraft engines. This design and manufacturing base plus their close contact with the users provides the technology for creation of the next generation advanced power generation systems for both the industrial and utility industries. GE has been active in the definition of advanced turbine systems for several years. These systems will leverage the technology from the latest developments in the entire GE gas turbine product line. These products will be USA based in engineering and manufacturing and are marketed through the GE Industrial and Power Systems. Achieving the advanced turbine system goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NO{sub x} and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NO{sub x} emission. Improved coating and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal. GE`s view of the market, in conjunction with the industrial and utility objectives requires the development of Advanced Gas Turbine Systems which encompasses two potential products: a new aeroderivative combined cycle system for the industrial market and a combined cycle system for the utility sector that is based on an advanced frame machine.

  7. Development and testing of CMC components for automotive gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials are currently being developed and evaluated for advanced gas turbine engine components because of their high specific strength and resistance to catastrophic failure. Components with 2D and 3D composite architectures have been successfully designed and fabricated. This is an overview of the test results for a backplate, combustor, and a rotor.

  8. An application of holographic interferometry for dynamic vibration analysis of a jet engine turbine compressor rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, Howard

    2003-09-01

    Holographic Interferometry has been successfully employed to characterize the materials and behavior of diverse types of structures under dynamic stress. Specialized variations of this technology have also been applied to define dynamic and vibration related structural behavior. Such applications of holographic technique offer some of the most effective methods of modal and dynamic analysis available. Real-time dynamic testing of the modal and mechanical behavior of jet engine turbine, rotor, vane, and compressor structures has always required advanced instrumentation for data collection in either simulated flight operation test or computer-based modeling and simulations. Advanced optical holography techniques are alternate methods which result in actual full-field behavioral data in a noninvasive, noncontact environment. These methods offer significant insight in both the development and subsequent operational test and modeling of advanced jet engine turbine and compressor rotor structures and their integration with total vehicle system dynamics. Structures and materials can be analyzed with very low amplitude excitation and the resultant data can be used to adjust the accuracy of mathematically derived structural and behavioral models. Holographic Interferometry offers a powerful tool to aid in the developmental engineering of turbine rotor and compressor structures for high stress applications. Aircraft engine applications in particular most consider operational environments where extremes in vibration and impulsive as well as continuous mechanical stress can affect both operation and structural stability. These considerations present ideal requisites for analysis using advanced holographic methods in the initial design and test of turbine rotor components. Holographic techniques are nondestructive, real-time, and definitive in allowing the identification of vibrational modes, displacements, and motion geometries. Such information can be crucial to the

  9. Application of holographic interferometry for dynamic vibration analysis of a jet engine turbine compressor rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, Howard

    2003-05-01

    Holographic Interferometry has been successfully employed to characterize the materials and behavior of diverse types of structures under dynamic stress 1,2,3,4. Specialized variations of this technology have also been applied to define dynamic and vibration related structural behavior 5. Such applications of holographic technique offer some of the most effective methods of modal and dynamic analysis available. Real-time dynamic testing of the modal and mechanical behavior of jet engine turbine, rotor, vane, and compressor structures has always required advanced instrumentation for data collection in either simulated flight operation test or computer-based modeling and simulations. Advanced optical holography techniques are alternate methods which result in actual full-field behavioral data in a noninvasive, noncontact environment 6. These methods offer significant insight in both the development and subsequent operational test and modeling of advanced jet engine turbine and compressor rotor structures and their integration with total vehicle system dynamics. Structures and materials can be analyzed with very low amplitude excitation and the resultant data can be used to adjust the accuracy of mathematically derived structural and behavioral models. Holographic Interferometry offers a powerful tool to aid in the developmental engineering of turbine rotor and compressor structures for high stress applications. Aircraft engine applications in particular must consider operational environments where extremes in vibration and impulsive as well as continuous mechanical stress can affect both operation and structural stability. These considerations present ideal requisites for analysis using advanced holographic methods in the initial design and test of turbine rotor components. Holographic techniques are nondestructive, real-time, and definitive in allowing the identification of vibrational modes, displacements, and motion geometries. Such information can be crucial to

  10. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF EXHAUST PARTICLES FROM GAS TURBINE ENGINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A program was conducted to chemically characterize particulate emissions from a current technology, high population, gas turbine engine. Attention was focused on polynuclear aromatic compounds, phenols, nitrosamines and total organics. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were...

  11. High density fuel qualification for a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Macleod, J.D.; Orbanski, B.; Hastings, P.R. Standard Aero, Ltd., Winnipeg, DND, Ottawa, )

    1992-01-01

    A program for the evaluation of gas turbine engine performance, carried out in the Engine Laboratory of the National Research Council of Canada, is described. Problems under consideration include performance alteration between JP-4 fuel and a high energy density fuel, called strategic military fuel (SMF); performance deterioration during the accelerated endurance test; and emission analysis. The T56 fuel control system is found to be capable of operation on the higher energy density fuel with no detrimental effects regarding control of the engine's normal operating regime. The deterioration of the engine performance during 150-hour endurance tests on SMF was very high, which was caused by an increase in turbine nozzle effective flow area and turbine blade untwist. The most significant performance losses during the endurance tests were on corrected output power, fuel flow, specific fuel consumption and compressor and turbine presure ratio. 9 refs.

  12. Composite hubs for low cost gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    A detailed stress analysis was performed using NASTRAN to demonstrate theoretically the adequacy of composite hubs for low cost turbine engine applications. Composite hubs are adequate for this application from the steady state stress view point.

  13. Aircraft Turbine Engine Control Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the aircraft turbine engine control research at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). A brief introduction to the engine control problem is first provided with a description of the state-of-the-art control law structure. A historical aspect of engine control development since the 1940s is then provided with a special emphasis on the contributions of GRC. With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance, and affordability, as well as the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at GRC is leading and participating in various projects to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA Aeronautics Research Mission programs. The rest of the paper provides an overview of the various CDB technology development activities in aircraft engine control and diagnostics, both current and some accomplished in the recent past. The motivation for each of the research efforts, the research approach, technical challenges, and the key progress to date are summarized.

  14. Abradable compressor and turbine seals, volume 1. [for turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, D. V.; Dennis, R. E.; Hurst, L. G.

    1979-01-01

    The application and advantages of abradable coatings as gas-path seals in a general aviation turbine engine were evaluated for use on the high-pressure compressor, the high-pressure turbine, and the low-pressure turbine shrouds. Topics covered include: (1) the initial selection of candidate materials for interim full-scale engine testing; (2) interim engine testing of the initially selected materials and additional candidate materials; (3) the design of the component required to adapt the hardware to permit full-scale engine testing of the most promising materials; (4) finalization of the fabrication methods used in the manufacture of engine test hardware; and (5) the manufacture of the hardware necessary to support the final full-scale engine tests.

  15. Ceramic applications in turbine engines. [for automotive application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, J. A.; Helms, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    In the past the potential of vehicular gas engines could not be realized because component materials served to limit the turbine operating temperature, thereby restricting fuel economy and initial cost. It was, therefore, not possible for the vehicular gas turbine to compete with more conventional engines. The emergence of low-cost, high-temperature ceramic components has the potential to reverse this situation. For example, the Allison GT404 engine, operating with ceramic components at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2350 F to 2500 F, has the potential of a fuel economy which is better than that of current Diesel engines. The Allison AGT100 engine operating with ceramic components offers the possibility of a 30% improvement in fuel economy over 1985 spark ignition engines. The materials considered for an employment in the ceramic components include silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum silicate, and lithium aluminum silicate.

  16. Leakage and Power Loss Test Results for Competing Turbine Engine Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced brush and finger seal technologies offer reduced leakage rates over conventional labyrinth seals used in gas turbine engines. To address engine manufacturers concerns about the heat generation and power loss from these contacting seals, brush, finger, and labyrinth seals were tested in the NASA High Speed, High Temperature Turbine Seal Test Rig. Leakage and power loss test results are compared for these competing seals for operating conditions up to 922 K (1200 F) inlet air temperature, 517 KPa (75 psid) across the seal, and surface velocities up to 366 m/s (1200 ft/s).

  17. External combustor for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Santanam, Chandran B.; Thomas, William H.; DeJulio, Emil R.

    1991-01-01

    An external combustor for a gas turbine engine has a cyclonic combustion chamber into which combustible gas with entrained solids is introduced through an inlet port in a primary spiral swirl. A metal draft sleeve for conducting a hot gas discharge stream from the cyclonic combustion chamber is mounted on a circular end wall of the latter adjacent the combustible gas inlet. The draft sleeve is mounted concentrically in a cylindrical passage and cooperates with the passage in defining an annulus around the draft sleeve which is open to the cyclonic combustion chamber and which is connected to a source of secondary air. Secondary air issues from the annulus into the cyclonic combustion chamber at a velocity of three to five times the velocity of the combustible gas at the inlet port. The secondary air defines a hollow cylindrical extension of the draft sleeve and persists in the cyclonic combustion chamber a distance of about three to five times the diameter of the draft sleeve. The hollow cylindrical extension shields the drive sleeve from the inlet port to prevent discharge of combustible gas through the draft sleeve.

  18. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project, ceramic component developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teneyck, M. O.; Macbeth, J. W.; Sweeting, T. B.

    1987-01-01

    The ceramic component technology development activity conducted by Standard Oil Engineered Materials Company while performing as a principal subcontractor to the Garrett Auxiliary Power Division for the Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project (NASA Contract DEN3-167) is summarized. The report covers the period October 1979 through July 1987, and includes information concerning ceramic technology work categorized as common and unique. The former pertains to ceramic development applicable to two parallel AGT projects established by NASA contracts DEN3-168 (AGT100) and DEN3-167 (AGT101), whereas the unique work solely pertains to Garrett directed activity under the latter contract. The AGT101 Technology Development Project is sponsored by DOE and administered by NASA-Lewis. Standard Oil directed its efforts toward the development of ceramic materials in the silicon-carbide family. Various shape forming and fabrication methods, and nondestructive evaluation techniques were explored to produce the static structural components for the ceramic engine. This permitted engine testing to proceed without program slippage.

  19. Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B.

    1995-10-01

    The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. This requires experiments in appropriate research facilities in which complete flow field data, not only point measurements, are obtained and analyzed. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows.

  20. Development of silicon nitride rotors for the ATTAP program at Garrett Ceramic Components. [Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busovne, B. J., Jr.; Pollinger, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    The development and fabrication of reliable high temperature-high strength silicon nitride rotors by Garrett Ceramic Components (GCC) for the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) is discussed. GCC's progress will be presented, including mechanical properties characterization, in-process monitoring development, and extensive NDE analysis. The current status of material, process, and part properties of the rotors being developed will be compared to properties required for implementation and successful operation of advanced gas turbine engines at 2500 F.

  1. FloWind`s advanced EHD series wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, B.

    1995-09-01

    The EHD series is a class of advanced, utility-grade vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) designed to maximize the profit derivable from any given wind site. The EHD (extended height-to-diameter) rotor geometry is varied to optimize energy capture depending on the characteristics of the wind site and the turbine`s location in the power plant array. By varying rotor height (42--63 meters (138--207 feet)) and diameter (17--21 meters (56--69 feet)) an optimal balance between swept area, aerodynamic efficiency, and wake loss is achieved with minimal modification to the turbine`s major components. In the fall of 19963, FloWind pultruded three blades for the first EHD wind turbine. These 48.8 meter (160 foot) long blades represented the largest structural protrusions ever fabricated. In January, 1994 the first EHD wind turbine was installed at FloWind`s wind power plant in Tehachapi, California and a full modal survey was carried out be researchers from the Sandia National Laboratories. Preliminary testing of the machine is underway and results from these tests have been compared directly to structural loads calculated by FloWind`s ANSYS dynamic model of the turbine. Results of the modal survey, predicted loads, and measured turbine operating data will be presented.

  2. Sealing technology for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Johnson, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental evaluation under simulated engine conditions revealed that conventional mainshaft seals have disadvantages of high gas leakage rates and wear. An advanced seal concept, the self-acting face seal, has a much lower gas leakage rate and greater pressure and speed capability. In endurance tests (150 hr) to 43,200 rpm the self-acting seal wear was not measurable, indicating that noncontact sealing operation was maintained even at this high rotative speed. A review of published data revealed that the leakage through gas path seals has a significant effect on thrust specific fuel consumption, stall margin, and engine maintenance. Reducing leakages by reducing seal clearances results in rubbing contact, and then the seal thermal response and wear determines the final seal clearances.

  3. Sealing technology for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Johnson, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental evaluation under simulated engine conditions revealed that conventional mainshaft seals have disadvantages of high gas leakage rates and wear. An advanced seal concept, the self-acting face seal, has a much lower gas leakage rate and greater pressure and speed capability. In endurance tests (150 hr) to 43 200 rpm the self-acting seal wear was not measurable, indicating noncontact sealing operation was maintained even at this high rotative speed. A review of published data revealed that the leakage through gas path seals has a significant effect on TSFC, stall margin and engine maintenance. Reducing leakages by reducing seal clearances results in rubbing contact, and then the seal thermal response and wear determines the final seal clearances. The control of clearances requires a material with the proper combination of rub tolerance (abradability) and erosion resistance. Increased rub tolerance is usually gained at the expense of reduced erosion resistance and vice versa.

  4. CFD in the context of IHPTET - The Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, Robert J.; Hudson, Dale A.

    1989-01-01

    The Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) Program is an integrated DOD/NASA technology program designed to double the performance capability of today's most advanced military turbine engines as we enter the twenty-first century. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is expected to play an important role in the design/analysis of specific configurations within this complex machine. In order to do this, a plan is being developed to ensure the timely impact of CFD on IHPTET. The developing philosophy of CFD in the context of IHPTET is discussed. The key elements in the developing plan and specific examples of state-of-the-art CFD efforts which are IHPTET turbine engine relevant are discussed.

  5. Inspection system for a turbine blade region of a turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Smed, Jan P.; Lemieux, Dennis H.; Williams, James P.

    2007-06-19

    An inspection system formed at least from a viewing tube for inspecting aspects of a turbine engine during operation of the turbine engine. An outer housing of the viewing tube may be positioned within a turbine engine using at least one bearing configured to fit into an indentation of a support housing to form a ball and socket joint enabling the viewing tube to move during operation as a result of vibrations and other movements. The viewing tube may also include one or more lenses positioned within the viewing tube for viewing the turbine components. The lenses may be kept free of contamination by maintaining a higher pressure in the viewing tube than a pressure outside of the viewing tube and enabling gases to pass through an aperture in a cap at a viewing end of the viewing tube.

  6. Method for detecting gas turbine engine flashback

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Kapil Kumar; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2012-09-04

    A method for monitoring and controlling a gas turbine, comprises predicting frequencies of combustion dynamics in a combustor using operating conditions of a gas turbine, receiving a signal from a sensor that is indicative of combustion dynamics in the combustor, and detecting a flashback if a frequency of the received signal does not correspond to the predicted frequencies.

  7. Hydropower R&D: Recent advances in turbine passage technology

    SciTech Connect

    Cada, Glenn F.; Rinehart, Ben N.

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the recent and planned R&D activities across the U.S. related to survival of fish entrained in hydroelectric turbines. In this report, we have considered studies that are intended to develop new information that can be used to mitigate turbine-passage mortality. This review focuses on the effects on fish of physical or operational modifications to turbines, comparisons to survival in other downstream passage routes (e.g., bypass systems and spillways), and applications of new modeling, experimental, and technological approaches to develop a greater understanding of the stresses associated with turbine passage. In addition, the emphasis is on biological studies, as opposed to the engineering studies (e.g., turbine index testing) that are often carried out in support of fish passage mitigation efforts.

  8. Hydropower R&D: Recent Advances in Turbine Passage Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, Bennie Nelson; Cada, G. F.

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the recent and planned R&D activities across the U.S. related to survival of fish entrained in hydroelectric turbines. In this report, we have considered studies that are intended to develop new information that can be used to mitigate turbine-passage mortality. This review focuses on the effects on fish of physical or operational modifications to turbines, comparisons to survival in other downstream passage routes (e.g., bypass systems and spillways), and applications of new modeling, experimental, and technological approaches to develop a greater understanding of the stresses associated with turbine passage. In addition, the emphasis is on biological studies, as opposed to the engineering studies (e.g., turbine index testing) that re often carried out in support of fish passage mitigation efforts.

  9. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine... existing at take- off. (b) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  10. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine... existing at take- off. (b) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  11. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine... existing at take- off. (b) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  12. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine... existing at take- off. (b) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  13. Advanced space engine preliminary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuffe, J. P. B.; Bradie, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary design was completed for an O2/H2, 89 kN (20,000 lb) thrust staged combustion rocket engine that has a single-bell nozzle with an overall expansion ratio of 400:1. The engine has a best estimate vacuum specific impulse of 4623.8 N-s/kg (471.5 sec) at full thrust and mixture ratio = 6.0. The engine employs gear-driven, low pressure pumps to provide low NPSH capability while individual turbine-driven, high-speed main pumps provide the system pressures required for high-chamber pressure operation. The engine design dry weight for the fixed-nozzle configuration is 206.9 kg (456.3 lb). Engine overall length is 234 cm (92.1 in.). The extendible nozzle version has a stowed length of 141.5 cm (55.7 in.). Critical technology items in the development of the engine were defined. Development program plans and their costs for development, production, operation, and flight support of the ASE were established for minimum cost and minimum time programs.

  14. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-04-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer conflation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. The objective of this task is to design 7H and 9H compressor rotor and stator structures with the goal of achieving high efficiency at lower cost and greater durability by applying proven GE Power Systems (GEPS) heavy-duty use design practices. The designs will be based on the GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) CF6-80C2 compressor. Transient and steady-state thermo-mechanical stress analyses will be run to ensure compliance with GEPS life standards. Drawings will be prepared for forgings, castings, machining, and instrumentation for full speed, no load (FSNL) tests of the first unit on both 9H and 7H applications.

  15. Orbit transfer vehicle advanced expander cycle engine point design study. Volume 2: Study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diem, H. G.

    1980-01-01

    The design characteristics of the baseline engine configuration of the advanced expander cycle engine are described. Several aspects of engine optimization are considered which directly impact the design of the baseline thrust chamber. Four major areas of the power cycle optimization are emphasized: main turbine arrangement; cycle engine source; high pressure pump design; and boost pump drive.

  16. A Fully Non-metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    The Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine project, funded by NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI), represents the first comprehensive evaluation of emerging materials and manufacturing technologies that will enable fully nonmetallic gas turbine engines. This will be achieved by assessing the feasibility of using additive manufacturing technologies for fabricating polymer matrix composite (PMC) and ceramic matrix composite (CMC) gas turbine engine components. The benefits of the proposed effort include: 50 weight reduction compared to metallic parts, reduced manufacturing costs due to less machining and no tooling requirements, reduced part count due to net shape single component fabrication, and rapid design change and production iterations. Two high payoff metallic components have been identified for replacement with PMCs and will be fabricated using fused deposition modeling (FDM) with high temperature capable polymer filaments. The first component is an acoustic panel treatment with a honeycomb structure with an integrated back sheet and perforated front sheet. The second component is a compressor inlet guide vane. The CMC effort, which is starting at a lower technology readiness level, will use a binder jet process to fabricate silicon carbide test coupons and demonstration articles. The polymer and ceramic additive manufacturing efforts will advance from monolithic materials toward silicon carbide and carbon fiber reinforced composites for improved properties. Microstructural analysis and mechanical testing will be conducted on the PMC and CMC materials. System studies will assess the benefits of fully nonmetallic gas turbine engine in terms of fuel burn, emissions, reduction of part count, and cost. The proposed effort will be focused on a small 7000 lbf gas turbine engine. However, the concepts are equally applicable to large gas turbine engines. The proposed effort includes a multidisciplinary, multiorganization NASA - industry team that includes experts in

  17. Intelligent Engine Systems: Thermal Management and Advanced Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergholz, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced Turbine Cooling and Thermal Management program is to develop intelligent control and distribution methods for turbine cooling, while achieving a reduction in total cooling flow and assuring acceptable turbine component safety and reliability. The program also will develop embedded sensor technologies and cooling system models for real-time engine diagnostics and health management. Both active and passive control strategies will be investigated that include the capability of intelligent modulation of flow quantities, pressures, and temperatures both within the supply system and at the turbine component level. Thermal management system concepts were studied, with a goal of reducing HPT blade cooling air supply temperature. An assessment will be made of the use of this air by the active clearance control system as well. Turbine component cooling designs incorporating advanced, high-effectiveness cooling features, will be evaluated. Turbine cooling flow control concepts will be studied at the cooling system level and the component level. Specific cooling features or sub-elements of an advanced HPT blade cooling design will be downselected for core fabrication and casting demonstrations.

  18. Rocket Engine Turbine Blade Surface Pressure Distributions Experiment and Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Susan T.; Zoladz, Thomas F.; Dorney, Daniel J.; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Understanding the unsteady aspects of turbine rotor flow fields is critical to successful future turbine designs. A technology program was conducted at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to increase the understanding of unsteady environments for rocket engine turbines. The experimental program involved instrumenting turbine rotor blades with miniature surface mounted high frequency response pressure transducers. The turbine model was then tested to measure the unsteady pressures on the rotor blades. The data obtained from the experimental program is unique in two respects. First, much more unsteady data was obtained (several minutes per set point) than has been possible in the past. Also, an extensive steady performance database existed for the turbine model. This allowed an evaluation of the effect of the on-blade instrumentation on the turbine's performance. A three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes analysis was also used to blindly predict the unsteady flow field in the turbine at the design operating conditions and at +15 degrees relative incidence to the first-stage rotor. The predicted time-averaged and unsteady pressure distributions show good agreement with the experimental data. This unique data set, the lessons learned for acquiring this type of data, and the improvements made to the data analysis and prediction tools are contributing significantly to current Space Launch Initiative turbine airflow test and blade surface pressure prediction efforts.

  19. The Combination of Internal-Combustion Engine and Gas Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinner, K.

    1947-01-01

    While the gas turbine by itself has been applied in particular cases for power generation and is in a state of promising development in this field, it has already met with considerable success in two cases when used as an exhaust turbine in connection with a centrifugal compressor, namely, in the supercharging of combustion engines and in the Velox process, which is of particular application for furnaces. In the present paper the most important possibilities of combining a combustion engine with a gas turbine are considered. These "combination engines " are compared with the simple gas turbine on whose state of development a brief review will first be given. The critical evaluation of the possibilities of development and fields of application of the various combustion engine systems, wherever it is not clearly expressed in the publications referred to, represents the opinion of the author. The state of development of the internal-combustion engine is in its main features generally known. It is used predominantly at the present time for the propulsion of aircraft and road vehicles and, except for certain restrictions due to war conditions, has been used to an increasing extent in ships and rail cars and in some fields applied as stationary power generators. In the Diesel engine a most economical heat engine with a useful efficiency of about 40 percent exists and in the Otto aircraft engine a heat engine of greatest power per unit weight of about 0.5 kilogram per horsepower.

  20. 14 CFR 121.193 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.193 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations:...

  1. High efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Morehead, H.

    1995-10-19

    An outline of the Westinghouse high-efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycle is presented. The following topics are discussed: The Westinghouse SOFC pilot manufacturing facility, cell scale-up plan, pressure effects on SOFC power and efficiency, sureCell versus conventional gas turbine plants, sureCell product line for distributed power applications, 20 MW pressurized-SOFC/gas turbine power plant, 10 MW SOFC/CT power plant, sureCell plant concept design requirements, and Westinghouse SOFC market entry.

  2. Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings for Advanced Propulsion Engine Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments, and extend component lifetimes. For future high performance engines, the development of advanced ceramic barrier coating systems will allow these coatings to be used to simultaneously increase engine operating temperature and reduce cooling requirements, thereby leading to significant improvements in engine power density and efficiency. In order to meet future engine performance and reliability requirements, the coating systems must be designed with increased high temperature stability, lower thermal conductivity, and improved thermal stress and erosion resistance. In this paper, ceramic coating design and testing considerations will be described for high temperature and high-heat-flux engine applications in hot corrosion and oxidation, erosion, and combustion water vapor environments. Further coating performance and life improvements will be expected by utilizing advanced coating architecture design, composition optimization, and improved processing techniques, in conjunction with modeling and design tools.

  3. Overview of Westinghouse`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bannister, R.L.; Bevc, F.P.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J.

    1995-10-01

    Westinghouse`s experience with land based gas turbines started in 1945 with the development of a 2000 hp gas turbine-generator set that consisted of a single reduction gear, compressor, 12 combustors and turbine. A thermal efficiency of 18% was obtained. By 1954, Westinghouse had developed a 15 MW unit (with a regenerator and intercooler) that was designed for a full-load simple cycle efficiency of 29%. As the initial step in the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program, Westinghouse has already developed a 230 MW gas turbine that has a simple cycle efficiency of 38.5% without the use of regeneration and intercooler concepts. In 1967, Westinghouse developed its first gas turbine combined cycle, a synergistic combination of the Brayton and the Rankine cycles. In a combined cycle the heat rejected by the higher temperature topping cycle is recovered in the lower temperature bottoming cycle to produce additional power from the energy initially released by the fuel. In this first Westinghouse combined cycle, a 1450{degrees}F burner outlet temperature gas turbine, rated at 25 MW, supplied exhaust heat which was used in a boiler to furnish steam to drive an 85 MW steam turbine. This plant achieved an annual average efficiency of 39.6%.

  4. Advanced Turbine Systems Program: Conceptual design and product development

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Objective is to provide the conceptual design and product development plant for an ultra high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000 (secondary objective is to begin early development of technologies critical to the success of ATS). This report addresses the remaining 7 of the 9 subtasks in Task 8, Design and Test of Critical Components: catalytic combustion, recuperator, high- temperature turbine disc, advanced control system, and ceramic materials.

  5. Analysis of regenerated single-shaft ceramic gas-turbine engines and resulting fuel economy in a compact car

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, J. L.; Tew, R. C., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Ranges in design and off-design operating conditions of an advanced gas turbine and their effects on fuel economy were analyzed. The assumed engine incorporated a single stage radial flow turbine and compressor with fixed geometry. Fuel economies were calculated over the composite driving cycle with gasoline as the fuel. At a constant turbine-inlet temperature, with a regenerator sized for a full power effectiveness the best fuel economies ranged from 11.1 to 10.2 km/liter (26.2 to 22.5 mpg) for full power turbine tip speeds of 770 to 488m/sec (2530 to 1600ft/sec), respectively.

  6. Advances in engineering plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, L.

    1997-12-01

    New polymers are being commercialized in record numbers, offering the product designer a new realm of possibilities, and promising tough competition to the traditional engineering resins. Most of the growth is in single-site catalyzed resins. Metallocene (and non-metallocene) single-site catalysts enhance polymer architecture to generate highly uniform molecules, and even permit tailoring new categories of polymers. These new materials include the truly unique aliphatic polyketone, syndiotactic polystyrene (SPS); polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) resins; and novel variations of established polymers. This article provides a closer look at these newcomers to the plastics marketplace, with an emphasis on their properties and potential applications.

  7. The influence of engine technology advancements on aircraft economics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherspoon, J. W.; Gaffin, W. O.

    1973-01-01

    A technology advancement in a new powerplant has both favorable and unfavorable effects. Increased bypass ratio and compression ratio, coupled with high turbine temperatures, improve performance but also increase engine price and maintenance cost. The factors that should be evaluated in choosing an engine for airline use are discussed. These factors are compared for two engines that might be considered for future 150 to 200 passenger airplanes: an all-new turbofan and a quiet derivative of an existing first generation turbofan. The results of the performance and cost evaluations of the example engines are reduced to common units so they can be combined.

  8. Multivariable quadratic synthesis of an advanced turbofan engine controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehoff, R. L.; Hall, W. E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A digital controller for an advanced turbofan engine utilizing multivariate feedback is described. The theoretical background of locally linearized control synthesis is reviewed briefly. The application of linear quadratic regulator techniques to the practical control problem is presented. The design procedure has been applied to the F100 turbofan engine, and details of the structure of this system are explained. Selected results from simulations of the engine and controller are utilized to illustrate the operation of the system. It is shown that the general multivariable design procedure will produce practical and implementable controllers for modern, high-performance turbine engines.

  9. Cf6 jet engine performance improvement: high pressure turbine roundness

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W.D.; Fasching, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    An improved high pressure turbine stator reducing fuel consumption in current CF6-50 turbofan engines was developed. The feasibility of the roundness and clearance response improvements was demonstrated. Application of these improvements will result in a cruise SFC reduction of 0.22 percent for new engines. For high time engines, the improved roundness and response characteristics results in an 0.5 percent reduction in cruise SFC. A basic life capability of the improved HP turbine stator in over 800 simulated flight cycles without any sign of significant distress is shown.

  10. Workshop on Aerosols and Particulates from Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Chown Chou (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    In response to the National Research Council (NRC) recommendations, the Workshop on Aerosols and Particulates from Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines was organized by the NASA Lewis Research Center and held on July 29-30, 1997 at the Ohio Aerospace Institute in Cleveland, Ohio. The objective is to develop consensus among experts in the field of aerosols from gas turbine combustors and engines as to important issues and venues to be considered. Workshop participants' expertise included engine and aircraft design, combustion processes and kinetics, atmospheric science, fuels, and flight operations and instrumentation.

  11. High Pressure Regenerative Turbine Engine: 21st Century Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. E.; Laganelli, A. L.; Senick, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A novel semi-closed cycle gas turbine engine was demonstrated and was found to meet the program goals. The proof-of-principle test of the High Pressure Regenerative Turbine Engine produced data that agreed well with models, enabling more confidence in designing future prototypes based on this concept. Emission levels were significantly reduced as predicted as a natural attribute of this power cycle. Engine testing over a portion of the operating range allowed verification of predicted power increases compared to the baseline.

  12. CF6 jet engine performance improvement: High pressure turbine roundness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. D.; Fasching, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    An improved high pressure turbine stator reducing fuel consumption in current CF6-50 turbofan engines was developed. The feasibility of the roundness and clearance response improvements was demonstrated. Application of these improvements will result in a cruise SFC reduction of 0.22 percent for new engines. For high time engines, the improved roundness and response characteristics results in an 0.5 percent reduction in cruise SFC. A basic life capability of the improved HP turbine stator in over 800 simulated flight cycles without any sign of significant distress is shown.

  13. Functionally gradient materials for thermal barrier coatings in advanced gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Banovic, S.W.; Barmak, K.; Chan, H.M.

    1995-10-01

    New designs for advanced gas turbine engines for power production are required to have higher operating temperatures in order to increase efficiency. However, elevated temperatures will increase the magnitude and severity of environmental degradation of critical turbine components (e.g. combustor parts, turbine blades, etc{hor_ellipsis}). To offset this problem, the usage of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has become popular by allowing an increase in maximum inlet temperatures for an operating engine. Although thermal barrier technology is over thirty years old, the principle failure mechanism is the spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the ceramic/bond coat interface. Therefore, it is desirable to develop a coating that combines the thermal barrier qualities of the ceramic layer and the corrosion protection by the metallic bond coat without the detrimental effects associated with the localization of the ceramic/metal interface to a single plane.

  14. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Annual report, June 1990--June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

    1991-07-01

    Advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past few years, together with recent DOE-METC sponsored studies, have served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine can ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. The five-year program consists of three phases, namely: (1) system description; (2) component development; (3) prototype system verification. A successful conclusion to the program will initiate a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs.

  15. Solid fuel combustion system for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Wilkes, Colin; Mongia, Hukam C.

    1993-01-01

    A solid fuel, pressurized fluidized bed combustion system for a gas turbine engine includes a carbonizer outside of the engine for gasifying coal to a low Btu fuel gas in a first fraction of compressor discharge, a pressurized fluidized bed outside of the engine for combusting the char residue from the carbonizer in a second fraction of compressor discharge to produce low temperature vitiated air, and a fuel-rich, fuel-lean staged topping combustor inside the engine in a compressed air plenum thereof. Diversion of less than 100% of compressor discharge outside the engine minimizes the expense of fabricating and maintaining conduits for transferring high pressure and high temperature gas and incorporation of the topping combustor in the compressed air plenum of the engine minimizes the expense of modifying otherwise conventional gas turbine engines for solid fuel, pressurized fluidized bed combustion.

  16. 14 CFR 29.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a result... drive system associated with critical combinations of power, rotational speed, and control...

  17. 14 CFR 27.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a result... drive system associated with critical combinations of power, rotational speed, and control...

  18. Serial cooling of a combustor for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Abreu, Mario E.; Kielczyk, Janusz J.

    2001-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine engine uses compressed air to cool a combustor liner and uses at least a portion of the same compressed air for combustion air. A flow diverting mechanism regulates compressed air flow entering a combustion air plenum feeding combustion air to a plurality of fuel nozzles. The flow diverting mechanism adjusts combustion air according to engine loading.

  19. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Presentations were made concerning the hot section environment and behavior of combustion liners, turbine blades, and waves. The presentations were divided into six sessions: instrumentation, combustion, turbine heat transfer, structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, and surface properties. The principal objective of each session was to disseminate research results to date, along with future plans. Topics discussed included modeling of thermal and fluid flow phenomena, structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, surface protective coatings, constitutive behavior, stress-strain response, and life prediction methods.

  20. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) powertrain system development for automotive applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Progress in the development of a gas turbine engine to improve fuel economy, reduce gaseous emissions and particulate levels, and compatible with a variety of alternate fuels is reported. The powertrain is designated AGT101 and consists of a regenerated single shaft gas turbine engine, a split differential gearbox and a Ford Automatic Overdrive production transmission. The powertrain is controlled by an electronic digital microprocessor and associated actuators, instrumentation, and sensors. Standard automotive accessories are driven by engine power provided by an accessory pad on the gearbox. Component/subsystem development progress is reported in the following areas: compressor, turbine, combustion system, regenerator, gearbox/transmission, structures, ceramic components, foil gas bearing, bearings and seals, rotor dynamics, and controls and accessories.

  1. NREL Advanced Research Turbine (ART) Aerodynamic Design of ART-2B Rotor Blades

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, D.A.

    2000-09-05

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) installed two Advanced Research Turbines (ART) at the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado, to use as full-scale test beds for ongoing research efforts, including three-dimensional blade aerodynamics and the effects of various control methods on turbine loads and performance. The Westinghouse WWG-0600 was selected as a baseline configuration for the ART turbines. The first turbine, ART-1, is currently operational and has been used to collect a baseline set of performance and loads data. A second turbine, ART-2A, incorporates several major modifications and may be upgraded further to a configuration designated aRT-2B. Possible features of the ART-2B turbine include a multi-degree of freedom hum and newly designed rotor blades. Global energy concepts, L.L.C. provided engineering support to NREL in designing the components for the ART-2B turbine. This document provides a summary of work performed by GEC on the aerodynamic design of ART-2B rotor blades.

  2. Using the CAE technologies of engineering analysis for designing steam turbines at ZAO Ural Turbine Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloshumova, V. N.; Kortenko, V. V.; Pokhoriler, V. L.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Ivanovskii, A. A.

    2008-08-01

    We describe the experience ZAO Ural Turbine Works specialists gained from mastering the series of CAD/CAE/CAM/PDM technologies, which are modern software tools of computer-aided engineering. We also present the results obtained from mathematical simulation of the process through which high-and intermediate-pressure rotors are heated for revealing the most thermally stressed zones, as well as the results from mathematical simulation of a new design of turbine cylinder shells for improving the maneuverability of these turbines.

  3. Turbine bucket for use in gas turbine engines and methods for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-06-03

    A turbine bucket for use with a turbine engine. The turbine bucket includes an airfoil that extends between a root end and a tip end. The airfoil includes an outer wall that defines a cavity that extends from the root end to the tip end. The outer wall includes a first ceramic matrix composite (CMC) substrate that extends a first distance from the root end to the tip end. An inner wall is positioned within the cavity. The inner wall includes a second CMC substrate that extends a second distance from the root end towards the tip end that is different than the first distance.

  4. Turbine Engine with Differential Gear Driven Fan and Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Pagluica, Gino J. (Inventor); Duong, Loc Quang (Inventor); Portlock, Lawrence E. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A gas turbine engine provides a differential gear system coupling the turbine to the bypass fan and the compressor. In this manner, the power/speed split between the bypass fan and the compressor can be optimized under all conditions. In the example shown, the turbine drives a sun gear, which drives a planet carrier and a ring gear in a differential manner. One of the planet carrier and the ring gear is coupled to the bypass fan, while the other is coupled to the compressor.

  5. Can advanced gas turbines meet all demands

    SciTech Connect

    Makansi, J.

    1993-07-01

    This article examines the wisdom of the power industry's reliance on the gas turbine for satisfying all demands placed on today's power plants, including lowering NO[sub x] emissions. The topics of the article include the price of environmentalism, durability and reliability problems, performance impacts of achieving low NO[sub x] emissions, balance of plant problems and fuel issues.

  6. Advanced diesel engineering and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    This state-of-the-art text/reference addresses advanced aspects of the design and operation of diesel engines. It is the only book to provide a comprehensive account of the adiabatic (or ceramic) diesel engine, aircraft and locomotive diesels (including both four-stroke and two-stroke configurations), an up-to-date analysis of torsional vibration shafts. Treats diesel engine vehicle noise, couplings and test instrumentation, and includes an excellent survey of fuel injection systems. All chapters are fully illustrated, most with supporting data. Contains an extensive, current bibliography.

  7. Proceedings of the Advanced Turbine Systems Annual Program Review meeting. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Goal of the 8-year program is to develop cleaner, more efficient, and less expensive gas turbine systems for utility and industrial electric power generation, cogeneration, and mechanical drive units. The conference is held annually for energy executives, engineers, scientists, and other interested parties industry, academia, and Government. Advanced turbine systems topics discussed during five technical sessions included policy and strategic issues, program element overviews and technical reviews, related activities, university/industry consortium interactions, and supportive projects. Twenty-one papers presented during the technical sessions are contained in this volume; they are processed separately for the data base.

  8. Use of magnetic compression to support turbine engine rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomfret, Chris J.

    1994-02-01

    Ever since the advent of gas turbine engines, their rotating disks have been designed with sufficient size and weight to withstand the centrifugal forces generated when the engine is operating. Unfortunately, this requirement has always been a life and performance limiting feature of gas turbine engines and, as manufacturers strive to meet operator demands for more performance without increasing weight, the need for innovative technology has become more important. This has prompted engineers to consider a fundamental and radical breakaway from the traditional design of turbine and compressor disks which have been in use since the first jet engine was flown 50 years ago. Magnetic compression aims to counteract, by direct opposition rather than restraint, the centrifugal forces generated within the engine. A magnetic coupling is created between a rotating disk and a stationary superconducting coil to create a massive inwardly-directed magnetic force. With the centrifugal forces opposed by an equal and opposite magnetic force, the large heavy disks could be dispensed with and replaced with a torque tube to hold the blades. The proof of this concept has been demonstrated and the thermal management of such a system studied in detail; this aspect, especially in the hot end of a gas turbine engine, remains a stiff but not impossible challenge. The potential payoffs in both military and commercial aviation and in the power generation industry are sufficient to warrant further serious studies for its application and optimization.

  9. Use of magnetic compression to support turbine engine rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomfret, Chris J.

    1994-01-01

    Ever since the advent of gas turbine engines, their rotating disks have been designed with sufficient size and weight to withstand the centrifugal forces generated when the engine is operating. Unfortunately, this requirement has always been a life and performance limiting feature of gas turbine engines and, as manufacturers strive to meet operator demands for more performance without increasing weight, the need for innovative technology has become more important. This has prompted engineers to consider a fundamental and radical breakaway from the traditional design of turbine and compressor disks which have been in use since the first jet engine was flown 50 years ago. Magnetic compression aims to counteract, by direct opposition rather than restraint, the centrifugal forces generated within the engine. A magnetic coupling is created between a rotating disk and a stationary superconducting coil to create a massive inwardly-directed magnetic force. With the centrifugal forces opposed by an equal and opposite magnetic force, the large heavy disks could be dispensed with and replaced with a torque tube to hold the blades. The proof of this concept has been demonstrated and the thermal management of such a system studied in detail; this aspect, especially in the hot end of a gas turbine engine, remains a stiff but not impossible challenge. The potential payoffs in both military and commercial aviation and in the power generation industry are sufficient to warrant further serious studies for its application and optimization.

  10. Hybrid vehicle turbine engine technology support (HVTE-TS) project. 1995--1996 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This report presents a summary of technical work accomplished on the Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine--Technology Support (HVTE-TS) Project during calendar years 1995 and 1996. Work was performed under an initial National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) contract DEN3-336. As of September 1996 the contract administration was transferred to the US Department of Energy (DoE) Chicago Operations Office, and renumbered as DE-AC02-96EE50553. The purpose of the HVTE-TS program is to develop gas turbine engine technology in support of DoE and automotive industry programs exploring the use of gas turbine generator sets in hybrid-electric automotive propulsion systems. The program focus is directed to the development of four key technologies to be applied to advanced turbogenerators for hybrid vehicles: Structural ceramic materials and processes; Low emissions combustion systems; Regenerators and seals systems; and Insulation systems and processes. 60 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercialization demonstration. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-09

    This report covers the period April--June, 1996 for the utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technical readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration program. The topics of the report include NEPA information, ATS engine design, integrated program plan, closed loop cooling, thin wall casting development, rotor air sealing development, compressor aerodynamic development, turbine aerodynamic development, phase 3 advanced air sealing development, active tip clearance control, combustion system development, ceramic ring segment, advanced thermal barrier coating development, steam cooling effects, directionally solidified blade development, single crystal blade development program, advanced vane alloy development, blade and vane life prediction, nickel based alloy rotor, and plans for the next reporting period.

  12. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht H. Mayer

    2000-07-15

    Asea Brown Boveri (ABB) has completed its technology based program. The results developed under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 8, concentrated on technology development and demonstration have been partially implemented in newer turbine designs. A significant improvement in heat rate and power output has been demonstrated. ABB will use the knowledge gained to further improve the efficiency of its Advanced Cycle System, which has been developed and introduced into the marked out side ABB's Advanced Turbine System (ATS) activities. The technology will lead to a power plant design that meets the ATS performance goals of over 60% plant efficiency, decreased electricity costs to consumers and lowest emissions.

  13. Advanced Technology for Engineering Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Advanced Technology for Engineering Education, held at the Peninsula Graduate Engineering Center, Hampton, Virginia, February 24-25, 1998. The workshop was jointly sponsored by the University of Virginia's Center for Advanced Computational Technology and NASA. Workshop attendees came from NASA, other government agencies, industry and universities. The objectives of the workshop were to assess the status of advanced technologies for engineering education and to explore the possibility of forming a consortium of interested individuals/universities for curriculum reform and development using advanced technologies. The presentations covered novel delivery systems and several implementations of new technologies for engineering education. Certain materials and products are identified in this publication in order to specify adequately the materials and products that were investigated in the research effort. In no case does such identification imply recommendation or endorsement of products by NASA, nor does it imply that the materials and products are the only ones or the best ones available for this purpose. In many cases equivalent materials and products are available and would probably produce equivalent results.

  14. Curved centerline air intake for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruehr, W. C.; Younghans, J. L.; Smith, E. B. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An inlet for a gas turbine engine was disposed about a curved centerline for the purpose of accepting intake air that is flowing at an angle to engine centerline and progressively turning that intake airflow along a curved path into alignment with the engine. This curved inlet is intended for use in under the wing locations and similar regions where airflow direction is altered by aerodynamic characteristics of the airplane. By curving the inlet, aerodynamic loss and acoustic generation and emission are decreased.

  15. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, December 1, 1994--February 28, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Achieving the advanced turbine system goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NOx and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NOx emission. Improved costing and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal. The GE Advanced Gas Turbine Development program is focused on two specific products: (1) a 70 MW class industrial gas turbine based on the GE90 core technology utilizing an innovative air cooling methodology; (2) a 200 MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced GE heavy duty machines utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. Both of these activities require the identification and resolution of technical issues critical to achieving Advanced Turbine System (ATS) goals. The emphasis for the industrial ATS will be placed upon innovative cycle design and low emission combustion. The emphasis for the utility ATS will be placed upon innovative cycle design and low emission combustion. The emphasis for the utility ATS will be placed on developing a technology base for advanced turbine cooling while utilizing demonstrated and planned improvements in low emissions combustion. Significant overlap in the development programs will allow common technologies to be applied to both products. GE`s Industrial and Power Systems is solely responsible for offering Ge products for the industrial and utility markets. The GE ATS program will be managed fully by this organization with core engine technology being supplied by GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) and fundamental studies supporting both product developments being conducted by GE Corporate Research and Development (CRD).

  16. Research instrumentation for hot section components of turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englund, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Programs to develop research instrumentation for use on hot section components of turbine engines are discussed. These programs can be separated into two categories: one category includes instruments which can measure the environment within the combustor and turbine components, the other includes instruments which measure the response of engine components to the imposed environment. Included in the first category are instruments to measure total heat flux and fluctuating gas temperature. High temperature strain measuring systems, thin film sensors (e.g., turbine blade thermocouples) and a system to view the interior of a combustor during engine operation are programs which comprise the second category. The paper will describe the state of development of these sensors and measuring systems and, in some cases, show examples of measurements made with this instrumentation. The discussion will cover work done at NASA Lewis and at various contractor facilities.

  17. Materials/manufacturing element of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Karnitz, M.A.; Holcomb, R.S.; Wright, I.G.

    1995-10-01

    The technology based portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) contains several subelements which address generic technology issues for land-based gas-turbine systems. One subelement is the Materials/Manufacturing Technology Program which is coordinated by DOE-Oak Ridge Operations and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from universities and the national laboratories. Projects in this subelement are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines. A materials/manufacturing plan was developed in FY 1994 with input from gas turbine manufacturers, materials suppliers, universities, and government laboratories. The plan outlines seven major subelements which focus on materials issues and manufacturing processes. Work is currently under way in four of the seven major subelements. There are now major projects on coatings and process development, scale-up of single crystal airfoil manufacturing technology, materials characterization, and technology information exchange.

  18. Advanced Turbine Systems Program industrial system concept development

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, S.

    1995-12-31

    Solar approached Phase II of ATS program with the goal of 50% thermal efficiency. An intercolled and recuperated gas turbine was identified as the ultimate system to meet this goal in a commercial gas turbine environment. With commercial input from detailed market studies and DOE`s ATS program, Solar redefined the company`s proposed ATS to fit both market and sponsor (DOE) requirements. Resulting optimized recuperated gas turbine will be developed in two sizes, 5 and 15 MWe. It will show a thermal efficiency of about 43%, a 23% improvement over current industrial gas turbines. Other ATS goals--emissions, RAMD (reliability, availability, maintainability, durability), cost of power--will be met or exceeded. During FY95, advanced development of key materials, combustion and component technologies proceeded to the point of acceptance for inclusion in ATS Phase III.

  19. Advanced Materials Development Program: Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines program plan, 1983--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Project is the development of an industrial technology base capable of providing reliable and cost-effective high temperature ceramic components for application in advanced heat engines. There is a deliberate emphasis on industrial'' in the purpose statement. The project is intended to support the US ceramic and engine industries by providing the needed ceramic materials technology. The heat engine programs have goals of component development and proof-of-concept. The CTAHE Project is aimed at developing generic basic ceramic technology and does not involve specific engine designs and components. The materials research and development efforts in the CTAHE Project are focused on the needs and general requirements of the advanced gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The CTAHE Project supports the DOE Office of Transportation Systems' heat engine programs, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications (ATTAP) and Heavy Duty Transport (HDT) by providing the basic technology required for development of reliable and cost-effective ceramic components. The heat engine programs provide the iterative component design, fabrication, and test development logic. 103 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. Micro-combustor for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Scott M.

    2010-11-30

    An improved gas turbine combustor (20) including a basket (26) and a multiplicity of micro openings (29) arrayed across an inlet wall (27) for passage of a fuel/air mixture for ignition within the combustor. The openings preferably have a diameter on the order of the quenching diameter; i.e. the port diameter for which the flame is self-extinguishing, which is a function of the fuel mixture, temperature and pressure. The basket may have a curved rectangular shape that approximates the shape of the curved rectangular shape of the intake manifolds of the turbine.

  1. New opportunities for future small civil turbine engines - Overviewing the GATE studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strack, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of four independent studies that explore the opportunities for future General Aviation Turbine Engines (GATE) in the 150-1000 SHP class. Detroit Diesel Allison, Garrett/AiResearch, Teledyne CAE, and Williams Research participated along with several airframers. These studies forecasted the potential impact of advanced technology turbine engines in the post-1988 market, identified important aircraft and missions, desirable engine sizes, engine performance and cost goals. Parametric evaluations of various engine cycles, configurations, design features, and advanced technology elements defined baseline conceptual engines for each of the important missions identified by the market analysis. Both fixed-wing and helicopter aircraft, and turboshaft, turboprop, and turbofan engines were considered. All four companies predicted sizable performance gains (e.g., 20% SFC decrease), and three predicted large engine cost reductions of sufficient magnitude to challenge the reciprocating engine in the 300-500 SHP class. Key technology areas were recommended for NASA support in order to realize these improvements.

  2. 14 CFR 135.381 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.381 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  3. 14 CFR 135.381 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.381 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  4. 14 CFR 135.381 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.381 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  5. 14 CFR 135.381 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.381 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  6. Lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The application of lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion to aircraft turbine engine systems can result in benefits in terms of superior combustion performance, improved combustor and turbine durability, and environmentally acceptable pollutant emissions. Lean, premixed prevaporized combustion is particularly attractive for reducing the oxides of nitrogen emissions during high altitude cruise. The NASA stratospheric cruise emission reduction program will evolve and demonstrate lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion technology for aircraft engines. This multiphased program is described. In addition, the various elements of the fundamental studies phase of the program are reviewed, and results to date of many of these studies are summarized.

  7. SMALL SCALE BIOMASS FUELED GAS TURBINE ENGINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new generation of small scale (less than 20 MWe) biomass fueled, power plants are being developed based on a gas turbine (Brayton cycle) prime mover. These power plants are expected to increase the efficiency and lower the cost of generating power from fuels such as wood. The n...

  8. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    This is the second annual technical report entitled, Improved Silicon Carbide for Advanced Heat Engines, and includes work performed during the period February 16, 1986 to February 15, 1987. The program is conducted for NASA under contract NAS3-24384. The objective is the development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines. The fabrication methods used are to be adaptable for mass production of such parts on an economically sound basis. Injection molding is the forming method selected. This objective is to be accomplished in a two-phase program: (1) to achieve a 20 percent improvement in strength and a 100 percent increase in Weibull modulus of the baseline material; and (2) to produce a complex shaped part, a gas turbine rotor, for example, with the improved mechanical properties attained in the first phase. Eight tasks are included in the first phase covering the characterization of the properties of a baseline material, the improvement of those properties and the fabrication of complex shaped parts. Activities during the first contract year concentrated on two of these areas: fabrication and characterization of the baseline material (Task 1) and improvement of material and processes (Task 7). Activities during the second contract year included an MOR bar matrix study to improve mechanical properties (Task 2), materials and process improvements (Task 7), and a Ford-funded task to mold a turbocharger rotor with an improved material (Task 8).

  9. Gas-turbine engine steady-state behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curnock, Barry

    A set of graphics with explanations illustrating gas turbine engine steady state behavior are presented. Typical combinations of compressors and nozzles which occur in a gas turbine engine are shown. The basic effect of a nozzle is explained by considering a compressor on a test rig: typical compressor, fan, and turbine characteristics are illustrated. The following are discussed: the degrees of freedom of an aeroengine (the flow and the power); the 'working lines' of components (the locus of the off design steady state operating points of a component plotted on a chart of that components characteristics); bleed and whirl; offtakes; P1 effects (performance changes which modify the basic nondimensional behavior an engine (caused by the effect on Reynolds number levels and on engine mechanical configuration of basic engine inlet pressure level)), and T1 effects (performance changes which modify the basic nondimensional behavior of an engine and are caused by the effects of engine inlet temperature level on Reynolds number level, on engine mechanical configuration and on specific heat level); variable nozzles; and turbojet matching.

  10. Advanced control for airbreathing engines, volume 1: Pratt and Whitney

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralph, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    The application of advanced control concepts to air breathing engines may yield significant improvements in aircraft/engine performance and operability. Screening studies of advanced control concepts for air breathing engines were conducted by three major domestic aircraft engine manufacturers to determine the potential impact of concepts on turbine engine performance and operability. The purpose of the studies was to identify concepts which offered high potential yet may incur high research and development risk. A target suite of proposed advanced control concepts was formulated and evaluated in a two phase study to quantify each concept's impact on desired engine characteristics. To aid in the evaluation specific aircraft/engine combinations were considered: a Military High Performance Fighter mission, a High Speed Civil Transport mission, and a Civil Tiltrotor mission. Each of the advanced control concepts considered in the study are defined and described. The concept potential impact on engine performance was determined. Relevant figures of merit on which to evaluate the concepts are determined. Finally, the concepts are ranked with respect to the target aircraft/engine missions. A final report describing the screening studies was prepared by each engine manufacturer. Volume 1 of these reports describes the studies performed by Pratt & Whitney.

  11. Engineering gas turbines for best value over time

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.

    1998-07-01

    Operation and Maintenance (O and M) and availability are increasingly important in power plant economics. The life-cycle cost of a combined cycle power plant is dominated by fuel cost, which exceeds capital and O and M costs combined. As economic and technological factors have reduced fuel and capital costs, O and M has become a larger fraction of total life-cycle cost. Furthermore, uncertainty on O and M cost impacts purchase decisions, being equivalent to 1% in levelized cost of electricity or a 1.5% improvement in heat rate. For a typical base-loaded, high-efficiency plant, a 1% change in availability is equivalent to 11--14 $/kW (depending on fuel cost) in equivalent capital value. Designing for multiple objectives. The design of gas turbines has always involved considering and balancing multiple requirements, a challenge that has grown increasingly complex as applications have become more varied, operating requirements more demanding, and technological options more numerous. Today, advanced analytic techniques, such as Quality Function Deployment (QFD) help assure that all customer requirements are weighed, and the most appropriate and effective technologies are applied to meet them. An example is presented in this paper. Remote monitoring and diagnostics of operating GE gas turbines are now being used to optimize output and efficiency, schedule maintenance, and warn of potential impending problems. Multiple sensors on operating machines continually measure key operating parameters and communicate data to the GE Power Answer Center in Schenectady, where actual operating conditions are compared with baseline standards derived from design conditions and field experience. Trends are tracked, and GE engineers immediately contact the customer regarding any potential anomalous conditions that may require attention.

  12. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

    1990-07-01

    The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. This quarter, work was centered on design, fabrication, and testing of the combustor, cleanup, fuel specifications, and hot end simulation rig. 2 refs., 59 figs., 29 tabs.

  13. Low pressure cooling seal system for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J

    2014-04-01

    A low pressure cooling system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids at low pressure, such as at ambient pressure, through at least one cooling fluid supply channel and into a cooling fluid mixing chamber positioned immediately downstream from a row of turbine blades extending radially outward from a rotor assembly to prevent ingestion of hot gases into internal aspects of the rotor assembly. The low pressure cooling system may also include at least one bleed channel that may extend through the rotor assembly and exhaust cooling fluids into the cooling fluid mixing chamber to seal a gap between rotational turbine blades and a downstream, stationary turbine component. Use of ambient pressure cooling fluids by the low pressure cooling system results in tremendous efficiencies by eliminating the need for pressurized cooling fluids for sealing this gap.

  14. Flow Integrating Section for a Gas Turbine Engine in Which Turbine Blades are Cooled by Full Compressor Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, W. Gene

    1999-11-14

    Routing of full compressor flow through hollow turbine blades achieves unusually effective blade cooling and allows a significant increase in turbine inlet gas temperature and, hence, engine efficiency. The invention, ''flow integrating section'' alleviates the turbine dissipation of kinetic energy of air jets leaving the hollow blades as they enter the compressor diffuser.

  15. Exergy as a useful tool for the performance assessment of aircraft gas turbine engines: A key review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şöhret, Yasin; Ekici, Selcuk; Altuntaş, Önder; Hepbasli, Arif; Karakoç, T. Hikmet

    2016-05-01

    It is known that aircraft gas turbine engines operate according to thermodynamic principles. Exergy is considered a very useful tool for assessing machines working on the basis of thermodynamics. In the current study, exergy-based assessment methodologies are initially explained in detail. A literature overview is then presented. According to the literature overview, turbofans may be described as the most investigated type of aircraft gas turbine engines. The combustion chamber is found to be the most irreversible component, and the gas turbine component needs less exergetic improvement compared to all other components of an aircraft gas turbine engine. Finally, the need for analyses of exergy, exergo-economic, exergo-environmental and exergo-sustainability for aircraft gas turbine engines is emphasized. A lack of agreement on exergy analysis paradigms and assumptions is noted by the authors. Exergy analyses of aircraft gas turbine engines, fed with conventional fuel as well as alternative fuel using advanced exergy analysis methodology to understand the interaction among components, are suggested to those interested in thermal engineering, aerospace engineering and environmental sciences.

  16. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    GE has achieved a leadership position in the worldwide gas turbine industry in both industrial/utility markets and in aircraft engines. This design and manufacturing base plus our close contact with the users provides the technology for creation of the next generation advanced power generation systems for both the industrial and utility industries. GE has been active in the definition of advanced turbine systems for several years. These systems will leverage the technology from the latest developments in the entire GE gas turbine product line. These products will be USA based in engineering and manufacturing and are marketed through the GE Industrial and Power Systems. Achieving the advanced turbine system goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NOx and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NOx emission. Improved coating and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal.

  17. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, August 25--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    GE has achieved a leadership position in the worldwide gas turbine industry in both industrial/utility markets and in aircraft engines. This design and manufacturing base plus our close contact with the users provides the technology for creation of the next generation advanced power generation systems for both the industrial and utility industries. GE has been active in the definition of advanced turbine systems for several years. These systems will leverage the technology from the latest developments in the entire GE gas turbine product line. These products will be USA based in engineering and manufacturing and are marketed through the GE Industrial and Power Systems. Achieving the advanced turbine system goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NOx and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NOx emission. Improved coating and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal.

  18. Technical review of Westinghouse`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Diakunchak, I.S.; Bannister, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is an ambitious program to develop the necessary technologies, which will result in a significant increase in natural gas-fired power generation plant efficiency, a decrease in cost of electricity and a decrease in harmful emissions. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigations on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant efficiency greater than 60% could be achieved. The more promising cycles were evaluated in more detail in Phase 2 in order to select the one that would achieve all of the program goals. The closed-loop cooled combined cycle was selected because it offered the best solution with the least risk for exceeding the ATS Program goals of net plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity, reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), and commercialization in the year 2000. The Westinghouse ATS plant is based on an advanced gas turbine design combined with an advanced steam. turbine and a high efficiency generator. To enhance achievement of the challenging performance, emissions, and RAM goals, current technologies are being extended and new technologies developed. The attainment of ATS performance goal necessitates advancements in aerodynamics, sealing, cooling, coatings, and materials technologies. To reduce emissions to the required levels, demands a development effort in the following combustion technology areas: premixed ultra low NOx combustion, catalytic combustion, combustion instabilities, and optical diagnostics. To achieve the RAM targets, requires the utilization of proven design features, with quantified risk analysis, and advanced materials, coatings, and cooling technologies. Phase 2 research and development projects currently in progress, as well as those planned for Phase 3, will result in advances in gas turbine technology and greatly contribute to ATS Program success.

  19. A remote augmentor lift system with a turbine bypass engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, L. H.; Franciscus, L. C.

    1982-01-01

    Two supersonic vertical takeoff or landing (VTOL) aircraft engine types, a conventional medium bypass ratio turbofan, and a turbine bypass turbojet were studied. The aircraft assumed was a clipped delta wing with canard configuration. A VTOL deck launched intercept, DLI, mission with Mach 1.6 dash and cruise segments was used as the design mission. Several alternate missions requiring extended subsonic capabilities were analyzed. Comparisons were made between the turbofan (TF) and the turbine bypass turbojet (TBE) engines in airplane types using a Remote Augmented Lift Systems, RALS and a Lift plus Lift Cruise system (L+LC). The figure of merit was takeoff gross weight for the VTOL DLI mission. The results of the study show that the turbine bypass turbojet and the conventional turbofan are competitive engines for both type of aircraft in terms of takeoff gross weight and range. However, the turbine bypass turbojet would be a simpler engine and may result in more attractive life cycle costs and reduced maintenance. The RALS and L+LC airplane types with either TBE or TF engines have approximately the same aircraft takeoff gross weight.

  20. Interactive-graphic flowpath plotting for turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corban, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    An engine cycle program capable of simulating the design and off-design performance of arbitrary turbine engines, and a computer code which, when used in conjunction with the cycle code, can predict the weight of the engines are described. A graphics subroutine was added to the code to enable the engineer to visualize the designed engine with more clarity by producing an overall view of the designed engine for output on a graphics device using IBM-370 graphics subroutines. In addition, with the engine drawn on a graphics screen, the program allows for the interactive user to make changes to the inputs to the code for the engine to be redrawn and reweighed. These improvements allow better use of the code in conjunction with the engine program.

  1. Tribological advancements for reliable wind turbine performance.

    PubMed

    Kotzalas, Michael N; Doll, Gary L

    2010-10-28

    Wind turbines have had various limitations to their mechanical system reliability owing to tribological problems over the past few decades. While several studies show that turbines are becoming more reliable, it is still not at an overall acceptable level to the operators based on their current business models. Data show that the electrical components are the most problematic; however, the parts are small, thus easy and inexpensive to replace in the nacelle, on top of the tower. It is the tribological issues that receive the most attention as they have higher costs associated with repair or replacement. These include the blade pitch systems, nacelle yaw systems, main shaft bearings, gearboxes and generator bearings, which are the focus of this review paper. The major tribological issues in wind turbines and the technological developments to understand and solve them are discussed within. The study starts with an overview of fretting corrosion, rolling contact fatigue, and frictional torque of the blade pitch and nacelle yaw bearings, and references to some of the recent design approaches applied to solve them. Also included is a brief overview into lubricant contamination issues in the gearbox and electric current discharge or arcing damage of the generator bearings. The primary focus of this review is the detailed examination of main shaft spherical roller bearing micropitting and gearbox bearing scuffing, micropitting and the newer phenomenon of white-etch area flaking. The main shaft and gearbox are integrally related and are the most commonly referred to items involving expensive repair costs and downtime. As such, the latest research and developments related to the cause of the wear and damage modes and the technologies used or proposed to solve them are presented. PMID:20855322

  2. Advanced engineering environment pilot project.

    SciTech Connect

    Schwegel, Jill; Pomplun, Alan R.; Abernathy, Rusty

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a concurrent engineering concept that enables real-time process tooling design and analysis, collaborative process flow development, automated document creation, and full process traceability throughout a product's life cycle. The AEE will enable NNSA's Design and Production Agencies to collaborate through a singular integrated process. Sandia National Laboratories and Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) are working together on a prototype AEE pilot project to evaluate PTC's product collaboration tools relative to the needs of the NWC. The primary deliverable for the project is a set of validated criteria for defining a complete commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) solution to deploy the AEE across the NWC.

  3. Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle Reliability, Availability & Maintainability

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Angello

    2005-09-30

    Power generators are concerned with the maintenance costs associated with the advanced turbines that they are purchasing. Since these machines do not have fully established Operation and Maintenance (O&M) track records, power generators face financial risk due to uncertain future maintenance costs. This risk is of particular concern, as the electricity industry transitions to a competitive business environment in which unexpected O&M costs cannot be passed through to consumers. These concerns have accelerated the need for intelligent software-based diagnostic systems that can monitor the health of a combustion turbine in real time and provide valuable information on the machine's performance to its owner/operators. EPRI, Impact Technologies, Boyce Engineering, and Progress Energy have teamed to develop a suite of intelligent software tools integrated with a diagnostic monitoring platform that, in real time, interpret data to assess the 'total health' of combustion turbines. The 'Combustion Turbine Health Management System' (CTHMS) will consist of a series of 'Dynamic Link Library' (DLL) programs residing on a diagnostic monitoring platform that accepts turbine health data from existing monitoring instrumentation. CTHMS interprets sensor and instrument outputs, correlates them to a machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, project servicing intervals, and estimate remaining component life. In addition, the CTHMS enables real-time anomaly detection and diagnostics of performance and mechanical faults, enabling power producers to more accurately predict critical component remaining useful life and turbine degradation.

  4. Steam Oxidation of Advanced Steam Turbine Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2008-01-01

    Power generation from coal using ultra supercritical steam results in improved fuel efficiency and decreased greenhouse gas emissions. Results of ongoing research into the oxidation of candidate nickel-base alloys for ultra supercritical steam turbines are presented. Exposure conditions range from moist air at atmospheric pressure (650°C to 800°C) to steam at 34.5 MPa (650°C to 760°C). Parabolic scale growth coupled with internal oxidation and reactive evaporation of chromia are the primary corrosion mechanisms.

  5. Analysis of Thermal Radiation Effects on Temperatures in Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert; Spuckler, Charles M.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are important, and in some instances a necessity, for high temperature applications such as combustor liners, and turbine vanes and rotating blades for current and advanced turbine engines. Some of the insulating materials used for coatings, such as zirconia that currently has widespread use, are partially transparent to thermal radiation. A translucent coating permits energy to be transported internally by radiation, thereby increasing the total energy transfer and acting like an increase in thermal conductivity. This degrades the insulating ability of the coating. Because of the strong dependence of radiant emission on temperature, internal radiative transfer effects are increased as temperatures are raised. Hence evaluating the significance of internal radiation is of importance as temperatures are increased to obtain higher efficiencies in advanced engines.

  6. Status review of NASA programs for reducing aircraft gas turbine engine emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Programs initiated by NASA to develop and demonstrate low emission advanced technology combustors for reducing aircraft gas turbine engine pollution are reviewed. Program goals are consistent with urban emission level requirements as specified by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency and with upper atmosphere cruise emission levels as recommended by the U. S. Climatic Impact Assessment Program and National Research Council. Preliminary tests of advanced technology combustors indicate that significant reductions in all major pollutant emissions should be attainable in present generation aircraft gas turbine engines without adverse effects on fuel consumption. Preliminary test results from fundamental studies indicate that extremely low emission combustion systems may be possible for future generation jet aircraft. The emission reduction techniques currently being evaluated in these programs are described along with the results and a qualitative assessment of development difficulty.

  7. Performance Benefits for Wave Rotor-Topped Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Scott M.; Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    The benefits of wave rotor-topping in turboshaft engines, subsonic high-bypass turbofan engines, auxiliary power units, and ground power units are evaluated. The thermodynamic cycle performance is modeled using a one-dimensional steady-state code; wave rotor performance is modeled using one-dimensional design/analysis codes. Design and off-design engine performance is calculated for baseline engines and wave rotor-topped engines, where the wave rotor acts as a high pressure spool. The wave rotor-enhanced engines are shown to have benefits in specific power and specific fuel flow over the baseline engines without increasing turbine inlet temperature. The off-design steady-state behavior of a wave rotor-topped engine is shown to be similar to a conventional engine. Mission studies are performed to quantify aircraft performance benefits for various wave rotor cycle and weight parameters. Gas turbine engine cycles most likely to benefit from wave rotor-topping are identified. Issues of practical integration and the corresponding technical challenges with various engine types are discussed.

  8. Energy efficient engine: High pressure turbine uncooled rig technology report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    Results obtained from testing five performance builds (three vane cascades and two rotating rigs of the Energy Efficient Engine uncooled rig have established the uncooled aerodynamic efficiency of the high-pressure turbine at 91.1 percent. This efficiency level was attained by increasing the rim speed and annulus area (AN(2)), and by increasing the turbine reaction level. The increase in AN(2) resulted in a performance improvement of 1.15 percent. At the design point pressure ratio, the increased reaction level rig demonstrated an efficiency of 91.1 percent. The results of this program have verified the aerodynamic design assumptions established for the Energy Efficient Engine high-pressure turbine component.

  9. Low transient thermal stress turbine engine components

    DOEpatents

    Shi, Jun; Schmidt, Wayde R.

    2011-06-28

    A turbine vane includes a platform; and at least one airfoil mounted to the platform and having a trailing edge and a leading edge, wherein the vane is composed of a functionally graded material having a first material and a second material, wherein the trailing edge includes a greater amount of the first material than the second material, and the leading edge includes a greater amount of the second material than the first material.

  10. 14 CFR 121.189 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff... Limitations § 121.189 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight greater than that listed in...

  11. 14 CFR 121.189 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff... Limitations § 121.189 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight greater than that listed in...

  12. 14 CFR 121.195 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.195 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane...

  13. 14 CFR 121.195 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.195 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane...

  14. 14 CFR 121.195 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.195 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane...

  15. 14 CFR 121.189 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff... Limitations § 121.189 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight greater than that listed in...

  16. 14 CFR 121.189 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff... Limitations § 121.189 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight greater than that listed in...

  17. 14 CFR 121.195 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.195 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane...

  18. 14 CFR 121.197 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.197 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate... turbine engine powered airplane unless (based on the assumptions in § 121.195 (b)) that airplane at...

  19. 14 CFR 121.197 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.197 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate... turbine engine powered airplane unless (based on the assumptions in § 121.195 (b)) that airplane at...

  20. 14 CFR 121.197 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.197 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate... turbine engine powered airplane unless (based on the assumptions in § 121.195 (b)) that airplane at...

  1. 14 CFR 121.197 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.197 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate... turbine engine powered airplane unless (based on the assumptions in § 121.195 (b)) that airplane at...

  2. Preliminary study of advanced turboprop and turboshaft engines for light aircraft. [cost effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knip, G.; Plencner, R. M.; Eisenberg, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of engine configuration, advanced component technology, compressor pressure ratio and turbine rotor-inlet temperature on such figures of merit as vehicle gross weight, mission fuel, aircraft acquisition cost, operating, cost and life cycle cost are determined for three fixed- and two rotary-wing aircraft. Compared with a current production turboprop, an advanced technology (1988) engine results in a 23 percent decrease in specific fuel consumption. Depending on the figure of merit and the mission, turbine engine cost reductions required to achieve aircraft cost parity with a current spark ignition reciprocating (SIR) engine vary from 0 to 60 percent and from 6 to 74 percent with a hypothetical advanced SIR engine. Compared with a hypothetical turboshaft using currently available technology (1978), an advanced technology (1988) engine installed in a light twin-engine helicopter results in a 16 percent reduction in mission fuel and about 11 percent in most of the other figures of merit.

  3. Methods of Si based ceramic components volatilization control in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John; Dion Ouellet, Noemie

    2016-09-06

    A method of controlling volatilization of silicon based components in a gas turbine engine includes measuring, estimating and/or predicting a variable related to operation of the gas turbine engine; correlating the variable to determine an amount of silicon to control volatilization of the silicon based components in the gas turbine engine; and injecting silicon into the gas turbine engine to control volatilization of the silicon based components. A gas turbine with a compressor, combustion system, turbine section and silicon injection system may be controlled by a controller that implements the control method.

  4. Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas-Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padture, Nitin P.; Gell, Maurice; Jordan, Eric H.

    2002-04-01

    Hundreds of different types of coatings are used to protect a variety of structural engineering materials from corrosion, wear, and erosion, and to provide lubrication and thermal insulation. Of all these, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have the most complex structure and must operate in the most demanding high-temperature environment of aircraft and industrial gas-turbine engines. TBCs, which comprise metal and ceramic multilayers, insulate turbine and combustor engine components from the hot gas stream, and improve the durability and energy efficiency of these engines. Improvements in TBCs will require a better understanding of the complex changes in their structure and properties that occur under operating conditions that lead to their failure. The structure, properties, and failure mechanisms of TBCs are herein reviewed, together with a discussion of current limitations and future opportunities.

  5. Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

    2009-09-01

    Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

  6. Advanced System for Process Engineering

    1992-02-01

    ASPEN (Advanced System for Process Engineering) is a state of the art process simulator and economic evaluation package which was designed for use in engineering fossil energy conversion processes. ASPEN can represent multiphase streams including solids, and handle complex substances such as coal. The system can perform steady state material and energy balances, determine equipment size and cost, and carry out preliminary economic evaluations. It is supported by a comprehensive physical property system for computationmore » of major properties such as enthalpy, entropy, free energy, molar volume, equilibrium ratio, fugacity coefficient, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and diffusion coefficient for specified phase conditions; vapor, liquid, or solid. The properties may be computed for pure components, mixtures, or components in a mixture, as appropriate. The ASPEN Input Language is oriented towards process engineers.« less

  7. Light weight gas turbine engine fuel pumping technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kassel, J.M.; Birdsall, J.

    1989-01-01

    The paper discusses the use of a single high speed centrifugal fuel pump as the only pump in a gas turbine engine fuel system. The characteristics and requirements of the high speed centrifugal fuel pump system are compared with a more traditional fuel pump system. The application of composite technology to the high speed centrifugal pump concept is also reviewed.

  8. A-10/TF34 Turbine Engine Monitoring System (TEMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    The hardware and software development of the A-10/TF34 turbine engine monitoring system (TEMS) is described. The operation and interfaces of the A-10/TF34 TEMS hardware are discussed with particular emphasis on function, capabilities, and limitations. The TEMS data types are defined and the various data acquisition modes are explained. Potential data products are also discussed.

  9. Application of laser anemometry in turbine engine research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    The application of laser anemometry to the study of flow fields in turbine engine components is reviewed. Included are discussions of optical configurations, seeding requirements, electronic signal processing, and data processing. Some typical results are presented along with a discussion of ongoing work.

  10. Application of laser anemometry in turbine engine research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The application of laser anemometry to the study of flow fields in turbine engine components is reviewed. Included are discussions of optical configurations, seeding requirements, electronic signal processing, and data processing. Some typical results are presented along with a discussion of ongoing work.

  11. Compressive stress system for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Hogberg, Nicholas Alvin

    2015-03-24

    The present application provides a compressive stress system for a gas turbine engine. The compressive stress system may include a first bucket attached to a rotor, a second bucket attached to the rotor, the first and the second buckets defining a shank pocket therebetween, and a compressive stress spring positioned within the shank pocket.

  12. Ceramic component development for the AGT101 gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, W. D.; Smith, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Under DOE/NASA sponsorship, a team is developing the AGT101, a highly efficient gas turbine engine for automotive application. The regenerated engine will operate at a maximum of 1370 C (2500 F) and 100,000 rpm, and will utilize a variety of Si3N4, SiC, lithium aluminum silicate and ceramic fiber insulation components. Engine design has been performed to consider the fabrication and material characteristics of these ceramic materials for both the static and rotating hot section components. Component fabrication has been performed, components have been screened in thermal and mechanical tests, and initial engine testing has been performed.

  13. Optimal Discrete Event Supervisory Control of Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan (Technical Monitor); Ray, Asok

    2004-01-01

    This report presents an application of the recently developed theory of optimal Discrete Event Supervisory (DES) control that is based on a signed real measure of regular languages. The DES control techniques are validated on an aircraft gas turbine engine simulation test bed. The test bed is implemented on a networked computer system in which two computers operate in the client-server mode. Several DES controllers have been tested for engine performance and reliability.

  14. Turbine engine hot-part temperature measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, A.G.; Prufert, M.B. )

    1992-07-01

    The paper identifies altitude test facility techniques for nonintrusive acquisition of hot-part temperatures using IR radiance measurements. The techniques discussed are applicable for turbojet and low-bypass turbofan engines. Constraints limiting IR measurements in the altitude ground test facility are discussed. Methods for evaluating altitude ground test data are outlined including review of predictive capabilities which enable the determination of the influence of turbine engine hot-part temperatures on IR emissions. 7 refs.

  15. Fundamental heat transfer research for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, D. E. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-seven experts from industry and the universities joined 24 NASA Lewis staff members in an exchange of ideas on trends in aeropropulsion research and technology, basic analyses, computational analyses, basic experiments, near-engine environment experiments, fundamental fluid mechanics and heat transfer, and hot technology as related to gas turbine engines. The workshop proceedings described include pre-workshop input from participants, presentations of current activity by the Lewis staff, reports of the four working groups, and a workshop summary.

  16. Impact of new instrumentation on advanced turbine research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A description is presented of an orderly test program that progresses from the simplest stationary geometry to the more complex, three dimensional, rotating turbine stage. The instrumentation requirements for this evolution of testing are described. The heat transfer instrumentation is emphasized. Recent progress made in devising new measurement techniques has greatly improved the development and confirmation of more accurate analytical methods for the prediction of turbine performance and heat transfer. However, there remain challenging requirements for novel measurement techniques that could advance the future research to be done in rotating blade rows of turbomachines.

  17. Materials/manufacturing element of the Advanced Turbine System Program

    SciTech Connect

    Karnitz, M.A.; Devan, J.H.; Holcomb, R.S.; Ferber, M.K.; Harrison, R.W.

    1994-08-01

    One of the supporting elements of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is the materials/manufacturing technologies task. The objective of this element is to address critical materials issues for both industrial and utility gas turbines. DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) will manage this element of the program, and a team from DOE-ORO and Oak Ridge National Laboratory is coordinating the planning for the materials/manufacturing effort. This paper describes that planning activity which is in the early stages.

  18. Overview of Westinghouse`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bannister, R.L.; Bevc, F.P.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    The proposed approach is to build on Westinghouse`s successful 501 series of gas turbines. The 501F offered a combined cycle efficiency of 54%; 501G increased this efficiency to 58%; the proposed single-shaft 400 MW class ATS combined cycle will have a plant cycle efficiency greater than 60%. Westinghous`s strategy is to build upon the next evolution of advances in combustion, aerodynamics, cooling, leakage control, materials, and mechanical design. Westinhouse will base its future gas turbine product line, both 50 and 60 Hz, on ATS technology; the 501G shows early influences of ATS.

  19. Thermal barrier coatings issues in advanced land-based gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, W. P.; Lee, W. Y.; Wright, I. G.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Advanced Turbine System (ATS) program is aimed at forecasting the development of a new generation of land-based gas turbine systems with overall efficiencies significantly beyond those of current state-of-the-art machines, as well as greatly increased times between inspection and refurbishment, improved environmental impact, and decreased cost. The proposed duty cycle of ATS turbines will require the use of different criteria in the design of the materials for the critical hot gas path components. In particular, thermal barrier coatings will be an essential feature of the hot gas path components in these machines. While such coatings are routinely used in high-performance aircraft engines and are becoming established in land-based turbines, the requirements of the ATS turbine application are sufficiently different that significant improvements in thermal barrier coating technology will be necessary. In particular, it appears that thermal barrier coatings will have to function on all airfoil sections of the first stage vanes and blades to provide the significant temperature reduction required. In contrast, such coatings applied to the blades and vances of advanced aircraft engines are intended primarily to reduce air cooling requirements and extend component lifetime; failure of those coatings can be tolerated without jeopardizing mechanical or corrosion performance. A major difference is that in ATS turbines these components will be totally reliant on thermal barrier coatings which will, therefore, need to be highly reliable even over the leading edges of first stage blades. Obviously, the ATS program provides a very challenging opportunity for TBC's, and involves some significant opportunities to extend this technology.

  20. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Annual report, August 1993--July 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    This Yearly Technical Progress Report covers the period August 3, 1993 through July 31, 1994 for Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program by Solar Turbines Incorporated under DOE Contract No. DE-AC421-93MC30246. As allowed by the Contract (Part 3, Section J, Attachment B) this report is also intended to fulfill the requirements for a fourth quarterly report. The objective of Phase 2 of the ATS Program is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost-competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized in the year 2000. During the period covered by this report, Solar has completed three of eight program tasks and has submitted topical reports. These three tasks included a Project Plan submission of information required by NEPA, and the selection of a Gas-Fueled Advanced Turbine System (GFATS). In the latest of the three tasks, Solar`s Engineering team identified an intercooled and recuperated (ICR) gas turbine as the eventual outcome of DOE`s ATS program coupled with Solar`s internal New Product Introduction (NPI) program. This machine, designated ``ATS50`` will operate at a thermal efficiency (turbine shaft power/fuel LHV) of 50 percent, will emit less than 10 parts per million of NOx and will reduce the cost of electricity by 10 percent. It will also demonstrate levels of reliability, availability, maintainability, and durability (RAMD) equal to or better than those of today`s gas turbine systems. Current activity is concentrated in three of the remaining five tasks a Market Study, GFATS System Definition and Analysis, and the Design and Test of Critical Components.