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Sample records for advanced ultra supercritical

  1. Cast Alloys for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb, P. Wang, P. D. Jablonski, and J. A. Hawk,

    2010-05-01

    The proposed steam inlet temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A-USC) steam turbine is high enough (760 °C) that traditional turbine casing and valve body materials such as ferritic/martensitic steels will not suffice due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Cast versions of several traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys were evaluated for use as casing or valve components for the next generation of industrial steam turbines. The full size castings are substantial: 2-5,000 kg each half and on the order of 100 cm thick. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled to produce equivalent microstructures. A multi-step homogenization heat treatment was developed to better deploy the alloy constituents. The most successful of these cast alloys in terms of creep strength (Haynes 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105) were subsequently evaluated by characterizing their microstructure as well as their steam oxidation resistance (at 760 and 800 °C).

  2. Ultra Supercritical Steamside Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Malgorzata

    2005-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which require steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

  3. Modeling Creep-Fatigue-Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultra-supercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chen

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this project is to model creep-fatigue-environment interactions in steam turbine rotor materials for advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) coal power Alloy 282 plants, to develop and demonstrate computational algorithms for alloy property predictions, and to determine and model key mechanisms that contribute to the damages caused by creep-fatigue-environment interactions.

  4. Microstructural evolution in advanced boiler materials for ultra-supercritical coal power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Quanyan

    The goal of improving the efficiency of pulverized coal powerplants has been pursued for decades. The need for greater efficiency and reduced environmental impact is pushing utilities to ultra supercritical conditions (USC), i.e. steam temperatures approaching 760°C under a stress of 35 MPa. The long-term creep strength and environmental resistance requirements imposed by these conditions are clearly beyond the capacity of the currently used ferritic steels and other conventional alloys. As part of a large DOE-funded consortium, new and existing materials based on advanced austenitic stainless steels and nickel base superalloys are being evaluated for these very demanding applications. In the present work, the nickel base superalloys of Inconel 617, CCA617, Haynes 230 and Inconel 740, and austenitic alloys Super 304H and HR6W, were evaluated on their microstructural properties over elevated temperature ageing and creep rupture conditions. The materials were aged for different lengths of time at temperatures relevant to USC applications, i.e., in the range from 700 to 800°C. The precipitation behaviors, namely of the gamma', carbides and eta phase in some conditions in nickel base superalloys, carbides in Haynes 230, Cu-rich precipitates in Super 304H and Laves phase particles in HR6W, were studied in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and related analytical techniques. Particular attention has been given on the structure, morphology and compositional distinctiveness of various phases (including gamma, gamma', carbides, secondary phase precipitates, and other types of particles) and their nature, dislocation structures and other types of defects. The results were presented and discussed in light of associated changes in microhardness in the cases of aged samples, and in close reference to mechanical testing (including tensile and creep rupture tests) wherever available. Several mechanical strengthening

  5. Ultra supercritical turbines--steam oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Alman, David E.

    2004-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy?s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538?C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620?C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760?C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

  6. Materials for Advanced Ultra-supercritical (A-USC) Steam Turbines – A-USC Component Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Purgert, Robert; Phillips, Jeffrey; Hendrix, Howard; Shingledecker, John; Tanzosh, James

    2016-10-01

    The work by the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE)/Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) Steam Boiler and Turbine Materials Consortia from 2001 through September 2015 was primarily focused on lab scale and pilot scale materials testing. This testing included air- or steam-cooled “loops” that were inserted into existing utility boilers to gain exposure of these materials to realistic conditions of high temperature and corrosion due to the constituents in the coal. Successful research and development resulted in metallic alloy materials and fabrication processes suited for power generation applications with metal temperatures up to approximately 1472°F (800°C). These materials or alloys have shown, in extensive laboratory tests and shop fabrication studies, to have excellent applicability for high-efficiency low CO2 transformational power generation technologies previously mentioned. However, as valuable as these material loops have been for obtaining information, their scale is significantly below that required to minimize the risk associated with a power company building a multi-billion dollar A-USC power plant. To decrease the identified risk barriers to full-scale implementation of these advanced materials, the U.S. DOE/OCDO A-USC Steam Boiler and Turbine Materials Consortia identified the key areas of the technology that need to be tested at a larger scale. Based upon the recommendations and outcome of a Consortia-sponsored workshop with the U.S.’s leading utilities, a Component Test (ComTest) Program for A-USC was proposed. The A-USC ComTest program would define materials performance requirements, plan for overall advanced system integration, design critical component tests, fabricate components for testing from advanced materials, and carry out the tests. The AUSC Component Test was premised on the program occurring at multiple facilities, with the operating temperatures, pressure and/or size of

  7. Ultra-Supercritical Pressure CFB Boiler Conceptual Design Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen Fan; Steve Goidich; Archie Robertson; Song Wu

    2006-06-30

    Electric utility interest in supercritical pressure steam cycles has revived in the United States after waning in the 1980s. Since supercritical cycles yield higher plant efficiencies than subcritical plants along with a proportional reduction in traditional stack gas pollutants and CO{sub 2} release rates, the interest is to pursue even more advanced steam conditions. The advantages of supercritical (SC) and ultra supercritical (USC) pressure steam conditions have been demonstrated in the high gas temperature, high heat flux environment of large pulverized coal-fired (PC) boilers. Interest in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion, as an alternative to PC combustion, has been steadily increasing. Although CFB boilers as large as 300 MWe are now in operation, they are drum type, subcritical pressure units. With their sizes being much smaller than and their combustion temperatures much lower than those of PC boilers (300 MWe versus 1,000 MWe and 1600 F versus 3500 F), a conceptual design study was conducted herein to investigate the technical feasibility and economics of USC CFB boilers. The conceptual study was conducted at 400 MWe and 800 MWe nominal plant sizes with high sulfur Illinois No. 6 coal used as the fuel. The USC CFB plants had higher heating value efficiencies of 40.6 and 41.3 percent respectively and their CFB boilers, which reflect conventional design practices, can be built without the need for an R&D effort. Assuming construction at a generic Ohio River Valley site with union labor, total plant costs in January 2006 dollars were estimated to be $1,551/kW and $1,244/kW with costs of electricity of $52.21/MWhr and $44.08/MWhr, respectively. Based on the above, this study has shown that large USC CFB boilers are feasible and that they can operate with performance and costs that are competitive with comparable USC PC boilers.

  8. Computational Modeling and Assessment Of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Gandy; John P. Shingledecker

    2011-04-11

    Forced outages and boiler unavailability in conventional coal-fired fossil power plants is most often caused by fireside corrosion of boiler waterwalls. Industry-wide, the rate of wall thickness corrosion wastage of fireside waterwalls in fossil-fired boilers has been of concern for many years. It is significant that the introduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission controls with staged burners systems has increased reported waterwall wastage rates to as much as 120 mils (3 mm) per year. Moreover, the reducing environment produced by the low-NOx combustion process is the primary cause of accelerated corrosion rates of waterwall tubes made of carbon and low alloy steels. Improved coatings, such as the MCrAl nanocoatings evaluated here (where M is Fe, Ni, and Co), are needed to reduce/eliminate waterwall damage in subcritical, supercritical, and ultra-supercritical (USC) boilers. The first two tasks of this six-task project-jointly sponsored by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FC26-07NT43096)-have focused on computational modeling of an advanced MCrAl nanocoating system and evaluation of two nanocrystalline (iron and nickel base) coatings, which will significantly improve the corrosion and erosion performance of tubing used in USC boilers. The computational model results showed that about 40 wt.% is required in Fe based nanocrystalline coatings for long-term durability, leading to a coating composition of Fe-25Cr-40Ni-10 wt.% Al. In addition, the long term thermal exposure test results further showed accelerated inward diffusion of Al from the nanocrystalline coatings into the substrate. In order to enhance the durability of these coatings, it is necessary to develop a diffusion barrier interlayer coating such TiN and/or AlN. The third task 'Process Advanced MCrAl Nanocoating Systems' of the six-task project jointly sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute, EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FC26-07NT43096)- has focused on processing of

  9. Supercritical fluid extraction: Recent advances and applications.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Miguel; Mendiola, Jose A; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Ibáñez, Elena

    2010-04-16

    Among the different extraction techniques used at analytical and preparative scale, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is one of the most used. This review covers the most recent developments of SFE in different fields, such as food science, natural products, by-product recovery, pharmaceutical and environmental sciences, during the period 2007-2009. The revision is focused on the most recent advances and applications in the different areas; among them, it is remarkable the strong impact of SFE to extract high value compounds from food and natural products but also its increasing importance in areas such as heavy metals recovery, enantiomeric resolution or drug delivery systems.

  10. Review of the coal-fired, over-supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumanovskii, A. G.; Shvarts, A. L.; Somova, E. V.; Verbovetskii, E. Kh.; Avrutskii, G. D.; Ermakova, S. V.; Kalugin, R. N.; Lazarev, M. V.

    2017-02-01

    The article presents a review of developments of modern high-capacity coal-fired over-supercritical (OSC) and ultra-supercritical (USC) steam power plants and their implementation. The basic engineering solutions are reported that ensure the reliability, economic performance, and low atmospheric pollution levels. The net efficiency of the power plants is increased by optimizing the heat balance, improving the primary and auxiliary equipment, and, which is the main thing, by increasing the throttle conditions. As a result of the enhanced efficiency, emissions of hazardous substances into the atmosphere, including carbon dioxide, the "greenhouse" gas, are reduced. To date, the exhaust steam conditions in the world power industry are p 0 ≈ 30 MPa and t 0 = 610/620°C. The efficiency of such power plants reaches 47%. The OSC plants are being operated in Germany, Denmark, Japan, China, and Korea; pilot plants are being developed in Russia. Currently, a project of a power plant for the ultra-supercritical steam conditions p 0 ≈ 35 MPa and t 0 = 700/720°C with efficiency of approximately 50% is being studied in the EU within the framework of the Thermie AD700 program, project AD 700PF. Investigations in this field have also been launched in the United States, Japan, and China. Engineering solutions are also being sought in Russia by the All-Russia Thermal Engineering Research Institute (VTI) and the Moscow Power Engineering Institute. The stated steam parameter level necessitates application of new materials, namely, nickel-base alloys. Taking into consideration high costs of nickel-base alloys and the absence in Russia of technologies for their production and manufacture of products from these materials for steam-turbine power plants, the development of power plants for steam parameters of 32 MPa and 650/650°C should be considered to be the first stage in creating the USC plants as, to achieve the above parameters, no expensive alloys are require. To develop and

  11. Computation Modeling and Assessment of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    J. Shingledecker; D. Gandy; N. Cheruvu; R. Wei; K. Chan

    2011-06-21

    Forced outages and boiler unavailability of coal-fired fossil plants is most often caused by fire-side corrosion of boiler waterwalls and tubing. Reliable coatings are required for Ultrasupercritical (USC) application to mitigate corrosion since these boilers will operate at a much higher temperatures and pressures than in supercritical (565 C {at} 24 MPa) boilers. Computational modeling efforts have been undertaken to design and assess potential Fe-Cr-Ni-Al systems to produce stable nanocrystalline coatings that form a protective, continuous scale of either Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The computational modeling results identified a new series of Fe-25Cr-40Ni with or without 10 wt.% Al nanocrystalline coatings that maintain long-term stability by forming a diffusion barrier layer at the coating/substrate interface. The computational modeling predictions of microstructure, formation of continuous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, inward Al diffusion, grain growth, and sintering behavior were validated with experimental results. Advanced coatings, such as MCrAl (where M is Fe, Ni, or Co) nanocrystalline coatings, have been processed using different magnetron sputtering deposition techniques. Several coating trials were performed and among the processing methods evaluated, the DC pulsed magnetron sputtering technique produced the best quality coating with a minimum number of shallow defects and the results of multiple deposition trials showed that the process is repeatable. scale, inward Al diffusion, grain growth, and sintering behavior were validated with experimental results. The cyclic oxidation test results revealed that the nanocrystalline coatings offer better oxidation resistance, in terms of weight loss, localized oxidation, and formation of mixed oxides in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, than widely used MCrAlY coatings. However, the ultra-fine grain structure in these coatings, consistent with the computational model predictions, resulted in accelerated Al

  12. Advanced Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Development

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Mark; Sienicki, James; Moisseytsev, Anton; Nellis, Gregory; Klein, Sanford

    2015-10-21

    Fluids operating in the supercritical state have promising characteristics for future high efficiency power cycles. In order to develop power cycles using supercritical fluids, it is necessary to understand the flow characteristics of fluids under both supercritical and two-phase conditions. In this study, a Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) methodology was developed for supercritical fluids flowing through complex geometries. A real fluid property module was implemented to provide properties for different supercritical fluids. However, in each simulation case, there is only one species of fluid. As a result, the fluid property module provides properties for either supercritical CO2 (S-CO2) or supercritical water (SCW). The Homogeneous Equilibrium Model (HEM) was employed to model the two-phase flow. HEM assumes two phases have same velocity, pressure, and temperature, making it only applicable for the dilute dispersed two-phase flow situation. Three example geometries, including orifices, labyrinth seals, and valves, were used to validate this methodology with experimental data. For the first geometry, S-CO2 and SCW flowing through orifices were simulated and compared with experimental data. The maximum difference between the mass flow rate predictions and experimental measurements is less than 5%. This is a significant improvement as previous works can only guarantee 10% error. In this research, several efforts were made to help this improvement. First, an accurate real fluid module was used to provide properties. Second, the upstream condition was determined by pressure and density, which determines supercritical states more precise than using pressure and temperature. For the second geometry, the flow through labyrinth seals was studied. After a successful validation, parametric studies were performed to study geometric effects on the leakage rate. Based on these parametric studies, an optimum design strategy for the see

  13. Boiler materials for ultra supercritical coal power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Purgert, Robert; Shingledecker, John; Pschirer, James; Ganta, Reddy; Weitzel, Paul; Sarver, Jeff; Vitalis, Brian; Gagliano, Michael; Stanko, Greg; Tortorelli, Peter

    2015-12-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have undertaken a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) steam conditions up to 760°C (1400°F) and 35 MPa (5000 psi). A limiting factor to achieving these higher temperatures and pressures for future A-USC plants are the materials of construction. The goal of this project is to assess/develop materials technology to build and operate an A-USC boiler capable of delivering steam with conditions up to 760°C (1400°F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). The project has successfully met this goal through a focused long-term public-private consortium partnership. The project was based on an R&D plan developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and an industry consortium that supplemented the recommendations of several DOE workshops on the subject of advanced materials. In view of the variety of skills and expertise required for the successful completion of the proposed work, a consortium led by the Energy Industries of Ohio (EIO) with cost-sharing participation of all the major domestic boiler manufacturers, ALSTOM Power (Alstom), Babcock and Wilcox Power Generation Group, Inc. (B&W), Foster Wheeler (FW), and Riley Power, Inc. (Riley), technical management by EPRI and research conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developed. The project has clearly identified and tested materials that can withstand 760°C (1400°F) steam conditions and can also make a 700°C (1300°F) plant more economically attractive. In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys have been assessed to provide a basis for

  14. Computational Modeling and Assessment Of Nanocoatings for Ultra Supercritical Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Gandy, David W.; Shingledecker, John P.

    2011-05-11

    Coal-fired power plants are a significant part of the nation's power generating capacity, currently accounting for more than 55% of the country's total electricity production. Extending the reliable lifetimes of fossil fired boiler components and reducing the maintenance costs are essential for economic operation of power plants. Corrosion and erosion are leading causes of superheater and reheater boiler tube failures leading to unscheduled costly outages. Several types of coatings and weld overlays have been used to extend the service life of boiler tubes; however, the protection afforded by such materials was limited approximately one to eight years. Power companies are more recently focused in achieving greater plant efficiency by increasing steam temperature and pressure into the advanced-ultrasupercritical (A-USC) condition with steam temperatures approaching 760°C (1400°F) and operating pressures in excess of 35MPa (5075 psig). Unfortunately, laboratory and field testing suggests that the resultant fireside environment when operating under A-USC conditions can potentially cause significant corrosion to conventional and advanced boiler materials1-2. In order to improve reliability and availability of fossil fired A-USC boilers, it is essential to develop advanced nanostructured coatings that provide excellent corrosion and erosion resistance without adversely affecting the other properties such as toughness and thermal fatigue strength of the component material.

  15. Liquefaction of coals using ultra-fine particle, unsupported catalysts: In situ generation by rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The purpose of this program is to design and fabricate an experimental ultra-fine particle generation system; use this system to generate ultra-fine, iron compound, catalyst particles; and to access the ability of these ultra-fine catalyst particles to improve the performance of the solubilization stage of two-stage, catalytic-catalytic liquefaction processes. The effort applied to this program during this reporting period focused on assembling the supercritical particle generation/collection system. Effort was applied to constructing a shakedown testing plan also.

  16. Steam Oxidation and Chromia Evaporation in Ultra-Supercritical Steam Boilers and Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon H. Holcomb

    2009-01-01

    U.S. Department of Energy’s goals include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which requires steam conditions of up to 760 °C and 340 atm, so-called ultra-supercritical (USC) conditions. Evaporation of protective chromia scales is expected to be a primary corrosion mechanism. A methodology to calculate Cr evaporation rates from chromia scales was developed and combined with Cr diffusion calculations within the alloy (with a constant flux of Cr leaving the alloy from evaporation) to predict Cr concentration profiles and to predict the time until breakaway oxidation. At the highest temperatures and pressures, the time until breakaway oxidation was predicted to be quite short for the turbine blade, and of concern within the steam pipe and the higher temperature portions of the superheater tube. Alloy additions such as Ti may allow for a reduction in evaporation rate with time, mitigating the deleterious effects of chromia evaporation.

  17. Advanced Thermal Storage for Central Receivers with Supercritical Coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Bruce D.

    2010-06-15

    The principal objective of the study is to determine if supercritical heat transport fluids in a central receiver power plant, in combination with ceramic thermocline storage systems, offer a reduction in levelized energy cost over a baseline nitrate salt concept. The baseline concept uses a nitrate salt receiver, two-tank (hot and cold) nitrate salt thermal storage, and a subcritical Rankine cycle. A total of 6 plant designs were analyzed, as follows: Plant Designation Receiver Fluid Thermal Storage Rankine Cycle Subcritical nitrate salt Nitrate salt Two tank nitrate salt Subcritical Supercritical nitrate salt Nitrate salt Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical Low temperature H2O Supercritical H2O Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical High temperature H2O Supercritical H2O Packed bed thermocline Supercritical Low temperature CO2 Supercritical CO2 Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical High temperature CO2 Supercritical CO2 Packed bed thermocline Supercritical Several conclusions have been drawn from the results of the study, as follows: 1) The use of supercritical H2O as the heat transport fluid in a packed bed thermocline is likely not a practical approach. The specific heat of the fluid is a strong function of the temperatures at values near 400 °C, and the temperature profile in the bed during a charging cycle is markedly different than the profile during a discharging cycle. 2) The use of supercritical CO2 as the heat transport fluid in a packed bed thermocline is judged to be technically feasible. Nonetheless, the high operating pressures for the supercritical fluid require the use of pressure vessels to contain the storage inventory. The unit cost of the two-tank nitrate salt system is approximately $24/kWht, while the unit cost of the high pressure thermocline system is nominally 10 times as high. 3) For the supercritical fluids, the outer crown temperatures of the receiver tubes are in the range of 700 to 800 °C. At temperatures of 700 °C and above

  18. Advanced reactor vessel steels for reactors with supercritical coolant parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, S. I.; Dub, V. S.; Lebedev, A. G.; Kuleshova, E. A.; Balikoev, A. G.; Makarycheva, E. V.; Tolstykh, D. S.; Frolov, A. S.; Krikun, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    A set of studies, tests, and technological works is performed to design promising high-strength vessel steels for reactors with supercritical coolant parameters. Compositions and technological parameters are proposed for the production of reference steel (within the limits of the grade composition of 15Kh2NMFA-A steel) and high-nickel steel. These steels are characterized by high properties, including metallurgical quality and service and technological parameters. Steel of the reference composition has high (higher by 15%) strength properties, improved viscoplastic properties, and ductile-brittle transition temperature t c of at most-125°C. The strength properties of the high-nickel steel are higher than those of the existing steels by 40-50% and higher than those of advanced foreign steels by 15-20% at ductile-brittle transition temperature t c of at most-165°C. Moreover, the designed steels are characterized by a low content of harmful impurity elements and nonmetallic inclusions, a fine-grained structure, and a low susceptibility to thermal embrittlement.

  19. Ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography of lignin-derived phenols from alkaline cupric oxide oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingzhe; Lidén, Gunnar; Sandahl, Margareta; Turner, Charlotta

    2016-08-01

    Traditional chromatographic methods for the analysis of lignin-derived phenolic compounds in environmental samples are generally time consuming. In this work, an ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography method with a diode array detector for the analysis of major lignin-derived phenolic compounds produced by alkaline cupric oxide oxidation was developed. In an analysis of a collection of 11 representative monomeric lignin phenolic compounds, all compounds were clearly separated within 6 min with excellent peak shapes, with a limit of detection of 0.5-2.5 μM, a limit of quantification of 2.5-5.0 μM, and a dynamic range of 5.0-2.0 mM (R(2) > 0.997). The new ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography method was also applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of lignin-derived phenolic compounds obtained upon alkaline cupric oxide oxidation of a commercial humic acid. Ten out of the previous eleven model compounds could be quantified in the oxidized humic acid sample. The high separation power and short analysis time obtained demonstrate for the first time that supercritical fluid chromatography is a fast and reliable technique for the analysis of lignin-derived phenols in complex environmental samples.

  20. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  1. ULTRA-LOW NOX ADVANCED VORTEX COMBUSTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan G. Edmonds; Robert C. Steele; Joseph T. Williams; Douglas L. Straub; Kent H. Casleton; Avtar Bining

    2006-05-01

    An ultra lean-premixed Advanced Vortex Combustor (AVC) has been developed and tested. The natural gas fueled AVC was tested at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE NETL) test facility in Morgantown (WV). All testing was performed at elevated pressures and inlet temperatures and at lean fuel-air ratios representative of industrial gas turbines. The improved AVC design exhibited simultaneous NOx/CO/UHC emissions of 4/4/0 ppmv (all emissions are at 15% O2 dry). The design also achieved less than 3 ppmv NOx with combustion efficiencies in excess of 99.5%. The design demonstrated tremendous acoustic dynamic stability over a wide range of operating conditions which potentially makes this approach significantly more attractive than other lean premixed combustion approaches. In addition, a pressure drop of 1.75% was measured which is significantly lower than conventional gas turbine combustors. Potentially, this lower pressure drop characteristic of the AVC concept translates into overall gas turbine cycle efficiency improvements of up to one full percentage point. The relatively high velocities and low pressure drops achievable with this technology make the AVC approach an attractive alternative for syngas fuel applications.

  2. Ultra-Low NOx Advanced Vortex Combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, R.G.; Steele, R.C.; Williams, J.T.; Straub, D.L.; Casleton, K.H.; Bining, Avtar

    2006-05-01

    An ultra lean-premixed Advanced Vortex Combustor (AVC) has been developed and tested. The natural gas fueled AVC was tested at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE NETL) test facility in Morgantown (WV). All testing was performed at elevated pressures and inlet temperatures and at lean fuel-air ratios representative of industrial gas turbines. The improved AVC design exhibited simultaneous NOx/CO/UHC emissions of 4/4/0 ppmv (all emissions are at 15% O2 dry). The design also achieved less than 3 ppmv NOx with combustion efficiencies in excess of 99.5%. The design demonstrated tremendous acoustic dynamic stability over a wide range of operating conditions which potentially makes this approach significantly more attractive than other lean premixed combustion approaches. In addition, a pressure drop of 1.75% was measured which is significantly lower than conventional gas turbine combustors. Potentially, this lower pressure drop characteristic of the AVC concept translates into overall gas turbine cycle efficiency improvements of up to one full percentage point. The relatively high velocities and low pressure drops achievable with this technology make the AVC approach an attractive alternative for syngas fuel applications.

  3. Advanced Computational Thermal Studies and their Assessment for Supercritical-Pressure Reactors (SCRs)

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. McEligot; J. Y. Yoo; J. S. Lee; S. T. Ro; E. Lurien; S. O. Park; R. H. Pletcher; B. L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J. M. Wallace

    2009-04-01

    The goal of this laboratory / university collaboration of coupled computational and experimental studies is the improvement of predictive methods for supercritical-pressure reactors. The general objective is to develop supporting knowledge needed of advanced computational techniques for the technology development of the concepts and their safety systems.

  4. Comparison of ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography for the analysis of pharmaceutical compounds.

    PubMed

    Grand-Guillaume Perrenoud, Alexandre; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy

    2012-11-30

    Currently, columns packed with sub-2 μm particles are widely employed in liquid chromatography but are scarcely used in supercritical fluid chromatography. The goal of the present study was to compare the performance, possibilities and limitations of both ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) and ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography (UHPSFC) using columns packed with sub-2 μm particles. For this purpose, a kinetic evaluation was first performed, and van Deemter curves and pressure plots were constructed and compared for columns packed with hybrid silica stationary phases composed of 1.7 and 3.5 μm particles. As expected, the kinetic performance of the UHPSFC method was significantly better than that of the UHPLC. Indeed, the h(min) values were in the same range with both strategies and were between 2.2 and 2.8, but u(opt) was increased by a factor of >4 in UHPSFC conditions. Another obvious advantage of UHPSFC over UHPLC is related to the generated backpressure, which is significantly lower in the presence of a supercritical or subcritical fluid. However, the upper pressure limit of the UHPSFC system was only ∼400 bar vs. ∼1000 bar in the UHPLC system, which prevents the use of highly organic mobile phases at high flow rates in UHPSFC. Second, the impact of reducing the particle size (from 3.5 to 1.7 μm) was evaluated in both UHPLC and UHPSFC conditions. The effect of frictional heating on the selectivity was demonstrated in UHPLC and that of fluid density or decompression cooling was highlighted in UHPSFC. However, in both cases, a change in selectivity was observed for only a limited number of compounds. Third, various types of column chemistries packed with 1.7 μm particles were evaluated in both UHPLC and UHPSFC conditions using a model mixture of acidic, neutral and basic compounds. It has been shown that more drastic changes in selectivity were obtained using UHPSFC columns compared to those obtained by changing

  5. Supercritical fluid extraction and ultra performance liquid chromatography of respiratory quinones for microbial community analysis in environmental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Atsuta, Yoichi; Fujie, Koichi; Daimon, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-05

    Microbial community structure plays a significant role in environmental assessment and animal health management. The development of a superior analytical strategy for the characterization of microbial community structure is an ongoing challenge. In this study, we developed an effective supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method for the analysis of bacterial respiratory quinones (RQ) in environmental and biological samples. RQ profile analysis is one of the most widely used culture-independent tools for characterizing microbial community structure. A UPLC equipped with a photo diode array (PDA) detector was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of ubiquinones (UQ) and menaquinones (MK) without tedious pretreatment. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) extraction with the solid-phase cartridge trap proved to be a more effective and rapid method for extracting respiratory quinones, compared to a conventional organic solvent extraction method. This methodology leads to a successful analytical procedure that involves a significant reduction in the complexity and sample preparation time. Application of the optimized methodology to characterize microbial communities based on the RQ profile was demonstrated for a variety of environmental samples (activated sludge, digested sludge, and compost) and biological samples (swine and Japanese quail feces).

  6. Comparison of ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography for the separation of spirostanol saponins.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling-Ling; Zhao, Yang; Xu, Yong-Wei; Sun, Qing-Long; Sun, Xin-Guang; Kang, Li-Ping; Yan, Ren-Yi; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Chao; Ma, Bai-Ping

    2016-02-20

    Spirostanol saponins are important active components of some herb medicines, and their isolation and purification are crucial for the research and development of traditional Chinese medicines. We aimed to compare the separation of spirostanol saponins by ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography (UHPSFC) and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC). Four groups of spirostanol saponins were separated respectively by UHPSFC and UHPLC. After optimization, UHPSFC was performed with a HSS C18 SB column or a Diol column and with methanol as the co-solvent. A BEH C18 column and mobile phase containing water (with 0.1% formic acid) and acetonitrile were used in UHPLC. We found that UHPSFC could be performed automatically and quickly. It is effective in separating the spirostanol saponins which share the same aglycone and vary in sugar chains, and is very sensitive to the number and the position of hydroxyl groups in aglycones. However, the resolution of spirostanol saponins with different aglycones and the same sugar moiety by UHPSFC was not ideal and could be resolved by UHPLC instead. UHPLC is good at differentiating the variation in aglycones, and is influenced by double bonds in aglycones. Therefore, UHPLC and UHPSFC are complementary in separating spirostanol saponins. Considering the naturally produced spirostanol saponins in herb medicines are different both in aglycones and in sugar chains, a better separation can be achieved by combination of UHPLC and UHPSFC. UHPSFC is a powerful technique for improving the resolution when UHPLC cannot resolve a mixture of spirostanol saponins and vice versa.

  7. Application of ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography for the determination of carotenoids in dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Zhao, Haiyan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wei; Fan, Sai; Wu, Guohua; Zhao, Rong

    2015-12-18

    A quick and simple ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography-photodiode array detector method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of 9 carotenoids in dietary supplements. The influences of stationary phase, co-solvent, pressure, temperature and flow rate on the separation of carotenoids were evaluated. The separation of the carotenoids was carried out using an Acquity UPC(2) HSS C18 SB column (150mm×3.0mm, 1.8μm) by gradient elution with carbon dioxide and a 1:2 (v:v) methanol/ethanol mixture. The column temperature was set to 35°C and the backpressure was 15.2MPa. Under these conditions, 9 carotenoids and the internal standard, β-apo-8'-carotenal, were successfully separated within 10min. The correlation coefficients (R(2)) of the calibration curves were all above 0.997, the limits of detection for the 9 carotenoids were in the range of 0.33-1.08μg/mL, and the limits of quantification were in the range of 1.09-3.58μg/mL. The mean recoveries were from 93.4% to 109.5% at different spiking levels, and the relative standard deviations were between 0.8% and 6.0%. This method was successfully applied to the determination of 9 carotenoids in commercial dietary supplements.

  8. Development and validation of ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography method for determination of illegal dyes and comparison to ultra-high performance liquid chromatography method.

    PubMed

    Khalikova, Maria A; Šatínský, Dalibor; Solich, Petr; Nováková, Lucie

    2015-05-18

    A novel simple, fast and efficient ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography (UHPSFC) method was developed and validated for the separation and quantitative determination of eleven illegal dyes in chili-containing spices. The method involved a simple ultrasound-assisted liquid extraction of illegal compounds with tetrahydrofuran. The separation was performed using a supercritical fluid chromatography system and CSH Fluoro-Phenyl stationary phase at 70°C. The mobile phase was carbon dioxide and the mixture of methanol:acetonitrile (1:1, v/v) with 2.5% formic acid as an additive at the flow rate 2.0 mL min(-1). The UV-vis detection was accomplished at 500 nm for seven compounds and at 420 nm for Sudan Orange G, Butter Yellow, Fast Garnet GBC and Methyl Red due to their maximum of absorbance. All eleven compounds were separated in less than 5 min. The method was successfully validated and applied using three commercial samples of chili-containing spices - Chili sauce (Indonesia), Feferony sauce (Slovakia) and Mojo sauce (Spain). The linearity range of proposed method was 0.50-9.09 mg kg(-1) (r ≥ 0.995). The detection limits were determined as signal to noise ratio of 3 and were ranged from 0.15 mg kg(-1) to 0.60 mg kg(-1) (1.80 mg kg(-1) for Fast Garnet) for standard solution and from 0.25 mg kg(-1) to 1.00 mg kg(-1) (2.50 mg kg(-1) for Fast Garnet, 1.50 mg kg(-1) for Sudan Red 7B) for chili-containing samples. The recovery values were in the range of 73.5-107.2% and relative standard deviation ranging from 0.1% to 8.2% for within-day precision and from 0.5% to 8.8% for between-day precision. The method showed potential for being used to monitor forbidden dyes in food constituents. The developed UHPSFC method was compared to the UHPLC-UV method. The orthogonality of Sudan dyes separation by these two methods was demonstrated. Benefits and drawbacks were discussed showing the reliability of both methods for monitoring of studied illegal dyes in real

  9. Comparison of ultra-high performance methods in liquid and supercritical fluid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization - mass spectrometry for impurity profiling of drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Lemasson, Elise; Bertin, Sophie; Hennig, Philippe; Lesellier, Eric; West, Caroline

    2016-11-11

    Impurity profiling of organic products synthesized as possible drug candidates represents a major analytical challenge. Complementary analytical methods are required to ensure that all impurities are detected. Both high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) can be used for this purpose. In this study, we compared ultra-high performance HPLC (UHPLC) and ultra-high performance SFC (UHPSFC) using a large dataset of 140 pharmaceutical compounds. Four previously optimized methods (two on each technique) were selected to ensure fast high-resolution separations. The four methods were evaluated based on response rate, peak capacity, peak shape and capability to detect impurities (UV). The orthogonality between all methods was also assessed. The best UHPLC method and UHPSFC methods provided comparable quality for the 140 compounds included in this study. Moreover, they were found to be highly orthogonal. At last, the potential of the combined use of UHPLC and UHPSFC for impurity profiling is illustrated with practical examples.

  10. A fast and sensitive method for the separation of carotenoids using ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jumaah, Firas; Plaza, Merichel; Abrahamsson, Victor; Turner, Charlotta; Sandahl, Margareta

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a rapid and sensitive ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPSFC-MS) method has been developed and partially validated for the separation of carotenoids within less than 6 min. Six columns of orthogonal selectivity were examined, and the best separation was obtained by using a 1-aminoanthracene (1-AA) column. The length of polyene chain as well as the number of hydroxyl groups in the structure of the studied carotenoids determines their differences in the physiochemical properties and thus the separation that is achieved on this column. All of the investigated carotenoids were baseline separated with resolution values greater than 1.5. The effects of gradient program, back pressure, and column temperature were studied with respect to chromatographic properties such as retention and selectivity. Electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) were compared in both positive and negative mode, using both direct infusion and hyphenated with UHPSFC. The ESI in positive mode provided the highest response. The coefficient of determination (R (2)) for all calibration curves were greater than 0.998. Limit of detection (LOD) was in the range of 2.6 and 25.2 ng/mL for α-carotene and astaxanthin, respectively, whereas limit of quantification (LOQ) was in the range of 7.8 and 58.0 ng/mL for α-carotene and astaxanthin, respectively. Repeatability and intermediate precision of the developed UHPSFC-MS method were determined and found to be RSD < 3 % and RSD < 6 %, respectively. The method was applied in order to determine carotenoids in supercritical fluid extracts of microalgae and rosehip. Graphical Abstract Ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography-a rapid separation method for the analysis of carotenoids in rosehip and microalgae samples.

  11. Wind tunnel tests of high-lift systems for advanced transports using high-aspect-ratio supercritical wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. B.; Oliver, W. R.; Spacht, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    The wind tunnel testing of an advanced technology high lift system for a wide body and a narrow body transport incorporating high aspect ratio supercritical wings is described. This testing has added to the very limited low speed high Reynolds number data base for this class or aircraft. The experimental results include the effects on low speed aerodynamic characteristics of various leading and trailing edge devices, nacelles and pylons, ailerons, and spoilers, and the effects of Mach and Reynolds numbers.

  12. Liquefaction of coals using ultra-fine particle, unsupported catalysts: In situ generation by rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The purpose of this program is to design and fabricate an experimental ultra-fine particle generation system; use this system to generate ultra-fine, iron compound, catalyst particles; and to access the ability of these ultra-fine catalyst particles to improve the performance of the solubilization stage of two-stage, catalytic-catalytic liquefaction processes. The effort applied to this program during this reporting period focused on assembling the supercritical particle generation/collection system. Effort was applied to constructing a shakedown testing plan also.

  13. Ultra Wideband Indoor Positioning Technologies: Analysis and Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Alarifi, Abdulrahman; Al-Salman, AbdulMalik; Alsaleh, Mansour; Alnafessah, Ahmad; Al-Hadhrami, Suheer; Al-Ammar, Mai A.; Al-Khalifa, Hend S.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, indoor positioning has emerged as a critical function in many end-user applications; including military, civilian, disaster relief and peacekeeping missions. In comparison with outdoor environments, sensing location information in indoor environments requires a higher precision and is a more challenging task in part because various objects reflect and disperse signals. Ultra WideBand (UWB) is an emerging technology in the field of indoor positioning that has shown better performance compared to others. In order to set the stage for this work, we provide a survey of the state-of-the-art technologies in indoor positioning, followed by a detailed comparative analysis of UWB positioning technologies. We also provide an analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) to analyze the present state of UWB positioning technologies. While SWOT is not a quantitative approach, it helps in assessing the real status and in revealing the potential of UWB positioning to effectively address the indoor positioning problem. Unlike previous studies, this paper presents new taxonomies, reviews some major recent advances, and argues for further exploration by the research community of this challenging problem space. PMID:27196906

  14. Ultra Wideband Indoor Positioning Technologies: Analysis and Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Alarifi, Abdulrahman; Al-Salman, AbdulMalik; Alsaleh, Mansour; Alnafessah, Ahmad; Al-Hadhrami, Suheer; Al-Ammar, Mai A; Al-Khalifa, Hend S

    2016-05-16

    In recent years, indoor positioning has emerged as a critical function in many end-user applications; including military, civilian, disaster relief and peacekeeping missions. In comparison with outdoor environments, sensing location information in indoor environments requires a higher precision and is a more challenging task in part because various objects reflect and disperse signals. Ultra WideBand (UWB) is an emerging technology in the field of indoor positioning that has shown better performance compared to others. In order to set the stage for this work, we provide a survey of the state-of-the-art technologies in indoor positioning, followed by a detailed comparative analysis of UWB positioning technologies. We also provide an analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) to analyze the present state of UWB positioning technologies. While SWOT is not a quantitative approach, it helps in assessing the real status and in revealing the potential of UWB positioning to effectively address the indoor positioning problem. Unlike previous studies, this paper presents new taxonomies, reviews some major recent advances, and argues for further exploration by the research community of this challenging problem space.

  15. Advanced Ultra-High Speed Motor for Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Impact Technologies LLC; University of Texas at Arlington

    2007-03-31

    Three (3) designs have been made for two sizes, 6.91 cm (2.72 inch) and 4.29 cm (1.69 inch) outer diameters, of a patented inverted configured Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines (PMSM) electric motor specifically for drilling at ultra-high rotational speeds (10,000 rpm) and that can utilize advanced drilling methods. Benefits of these motors are stackable power sections, full control (speed and direction) of downhole motors, flow hydraulics independent of motor operation, application of advanced drilling methods (water jetting and abrasive slurry jetting), and the ability of signal/power electric wires through motor(s). Key features of the final designed motors are: fixed non-rotating shaft with stator coils attached; rotating housing with permanent magnet (PM) rotor attached; bit attached to rotating housing; internal channel(s) in a nonrotating shaft; electric components that are hydrostatically isolated from high internal pressure circulating fluids ('muds') by static metal to metal seals; liquid filled motor with smoothed features for minimized turbulence in the motor during operation; and new inverted coated metal-metal hydrodynamic bearings and seals. PMSM, Induction and Switched Reluctance Machines (SRM), all pulse modulated, were considered, but PMSM were determined to provide the highest power density for the shortest motors. Both radial and axial electric PMSM driven motors were designed with axial designs deemed more rugged for ultra-high speed, drilling applications. The 6.91 cm (2.72 inch) OD axial inverted motor can generate 4.18KW (5.61 Hp) power at 10,000 rpm with a 4 Nm (2.95 ft-lbs) of torque for every 30.48 cm (12 inches) of power section. The 6.91 cm (2.72 inch) OD radial inverted motor can generate 5.03 KW (6.74 Hp) with 4.8 Nm (3.54 ft-lb) torque at 10,000 rpm for every 30.48 cm (12 inches) of power section. The 4.29 cm (1.69 inch) OD radial inverted motor can generate 2.56 KW (3.43 Hp) power with 2.44 Nm (1.8 ft-lb) torque at full speed 10

  16. Analysis of glucuronide and sulfate steroids in urine by ultra-high-performance supercritical-fluid chromatography hyphenated tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Doué, Mickael; Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Pouponneau, Karinne; Monteau, Fabrice; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2015-06-01

    Profiling conjugated urinary steroids to detect anabolic-steroid misuse is recognized as an efficient analytical strategy in both chemical-food-safety and anti-doping fields. The relevance and robustness of such profiling rely on the analysis of glucuronide and sulfate steroids, which is expected to have properties including accuracy, specificity, sensitivity, and, if possible, rapidity. In this context, the ability of ultra-high-performance supercritical-fluid chromatography (UHPSFC) hyphenated tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) to provide reliable and accurate phase II analysis of steroids was assessed. Four stationary phases with sub-2 μm particles (BEH, BEH 2-ethyl-pyridine, HSS C18 SB, and CSH fluorophenyl) were screened for their capacity to separate several conjugated steroid isomers. Analytical conditions including stationary phase, modifier composition and percentage, back pressure, column temperature, and composition and flow rate of make-up solvent were investigated to improve the separation and/or the sensitivity. Thus, an analytical procedure enabling the analysis of eight glucuronide and 12 sulfate steroids by two different methods in 12 and 15 min, respectively, was optimized. The two procedures were evaluated, and UHPSFC-MS-MS analysis revealed its ability to provide sensitive (limits of quantification: 0.1 ng mL(-1) and 0.5 ng mL(-1) for sulfate and glucuronide steroids, respectively) and reliable quantitative performance (R(2) > 0.995, RSD < 20%, and bias < 30%) through the use of suitable labeled internal standards. Comparison with UHPLC-MS-MS was performed, and UHPSFC-MS-MS obtained better performance in terms of sensitivity. Finally, as a proof of concept, this so-called green technology was used in a chemical-food-safety context to profile steroid conjugates in urine samples from bovines treated with estradiol. Graphical Abstract Glucuronide and sulfate steroids analysis in urine by ultra-high performance supercritical fluid

  17. Liquefaction of coals using ultra-fine particle, unsupported catalysts: In situ generation by rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this program is to design and fabricate an experimental ultra-fine particle generation system; use this system to generate ultra-fine, iron compound, catalyst particles; and to access the ability of these ultra-fine catalyst particles to improve the performance of the solubilization stage of two-stage, catalytic-catalytic liquefaction processes. The effort applied to this program during this reporting period was devoted to experimental design and fabrication tasks.

  18. Supercritical fluid-mediated methods to encapsulate drugs: recent advances and new opportunities.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Andrew; Lewis, Andrew L; Ilium, Lisbeth

    2011-12-01

    With the advent of the development of novel pharmaceutical products and therapies, there is a need for effective delivery of these products to patients. Dependent on whether they are small-molecular weight drugs or biologics, many new compounds may suffer from poor solubility, poor stability or require frequent administration and therefore require optimized delivery. For example, the utilization of polymorphism and the enhanced solubility in the amorphous state is being exploited to improve the dissolution of small-molecular weight poorly soluble drugs. This can be achieved by the formation of solid dispersions in water-soluble matrices. In addition, encapsulation in biodegradable polymeric materials is one potential route to reduce the frequency of administration through the formation of sustained-release formulations. This is desirable for biologics, for example, which generally require administration once or twice daily. Supercritical fluid processing can achieve both of these outcomes, and this review focuses on the use of supercritical CO2 to encapsulate active pharmaceutical ingredients to enhance solubility or achieve sustained release. Using supercritical CO2-mediated processes provides a clean and potentially solvent-free route to prepare novel drug products and is therefore an attractive alternative to conventional manufacturing technologies.

  19. Quantitative Determination of Cannabinoids in Cannabis and Cannabis Products Using Ultra-High-Performance Supercritical Fluid Chromatography and Diode Array/Mass Spectrometric Detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Wang, Yan-Hong; Avula, Bharathi; Radwan, Mohamed M; Wanas, Amira S; Mehmedic, Zlatko; van Antwerp, John; ElSohly, Mahmoud A; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2016-12-13

    Ultra-high-performance supercritical fluid chromatography (UHPSFC) is an efficient analytical technique and has not been fully employed for the analysis of cannabis. Here, a novel method was developed for the analysis of 30 cannabis plant extracts and preparations using UHPSFC/PDA-MS. Nine of the most abundant cannabinoids, viz. CBD, ∆(8) -THC, THCV, ∆(9) -THC, CBN, CBG, THCA-A, CBDA, and CBGA, were quantitatively determined (RSDs < 6.9%). Unlike GC methods, no derivatization or decarboxylation was required prior to UHPSFC analysis. The UHPSFC chromatographic separation of cannabinoids displayed an inverse elution order compared to UHPLC. Combining with PDA-MS, this orthogonality is valuable for discrimination of cannabinoids in complex matrices. The developed method was validated, and the quantification results were compared with a standard UHPLC method. The RSDs of these two methods were within ±13.0%. Finally, chemometric analysis including principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to differentiate between cannabis samples.

  20. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-10-01

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

  1. Advances in supercritical fluid spray application of low-pollution coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, K.A.; Dickson, D.J.; Derderian, E.J.; Glancy, C.W.; Goad, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) content of coating formulations, which causes ozone formation in the environment, has now been reduced up to 80% by using supercritical carbon dioxide to replace volatile organic solvents in conventional coating formulations. Toxic solvents classified as hazardous air pollutants by the Clean Air Act can be totally eliminated. The concept can also be applied to high-solids coatings (1) to further reduce VOC emissions and (2) to improve coating performance by using higher molecular weight polymers. Commercial fluid delivery equipment and spray guns are now available. The technology is being demonstrated on industrial spray lines.

  2. Electrochemistry in supercritical fluids

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Jack A.; Bartlett, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    A wide range of supercritical fluids (SCFs) have been studied as solvents for electrochemistry with carbon dioxide and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) being the most extensively studied. Recent advances have shown that it is possible to get well-resolved voltammetry in SCFs by suitable choice of the conditions and the electrolyte. In this review, we discuss the voltammetry obtained in these systems, studies of the double-layer capacitance, work on the electrodeposition of metals into high aspect ratio nanopores and the use of metallocenes as redox probes and standards in both supercritical carbon dioxide–acetonitrile and supercritical HFCs. PMID:26574527

  3. Electrochemistry in supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Branch, Jack A; Bartlett, Philip N

    2015-12-28

    A wide range of supercritical fluids (SCFs) have been studied as solvents for electrochemistry with carbon dioxide and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) being the most extensively studied. Recent advances have shown that it is possible to get well-resolved voltammetry in SCFs by suitable choice of the conditions and the electrolyte. In this review, we discuss the voltammetry obtained in these systems, studies of the double-layer capacitance, work on the electrodeposition of metals into high aspect ratio nanopores and the use of metallocenes as redox probes and standards in both supercritical carbon dioxide-acetonitrile and supercritical HFCs.

  4. Design philosophy of long range LFC transports with advanced supercritical LFC airfoils. [laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfenninger, Werner; Vemuru, Chandra S.

    1988-01-01

    The achievement of 70 percent laminar flow using modest boundary layer suction on the wings, empennage, nacelles, and struts of long-range LFC transports, combined with larger wing spans and lower span loadings, could make possible an unrefuelled range halfway around the world up to near sonic cruise speeds with large payloads. It is shown that supercritical LFC airfoils with undercut front and rear lower surfaces, an upper surface static pressure coefficient distribution with an extensive low supersonic flat rooftop, a far upstream supersonic pressure minimum, and a steep subsonic rear pressure rise with suction or a slotted cruise flap could alleviate sweep-induced crossflow and attachment-line boundary-layer instability. Wing-mounted superfans can reduce fuel consumption and engine tone noise.

  5. Ultra-high field MRI: Advancing systems neuroscience towards mesoscopic human brain function.

    PubMed

    Dumoulin, Serge O; Fracasso, Alessio; van der Zwaag, Wietske; Siero, Jeroen C W; Petridou, Natalia

    2017-01-16

    Human MRI scanners at ultra-high magnetic field strengths of 7 T and higher are increasingly available to the neuroscience community. A key advantage brought by ultra-high field MRI is the possibility to increase the spatial resolution at which data is acquired, with little reduction in image quality. This opens a new set of opportunities for neuroscience, allowing investigators to map the human cortex at an unprecedented level of detail. In this review, we present recent work that capitalizes on the increased signal-to-noise ratio available at ultra-high field and discuss the theoretical advances with a focus on sensory and motor systems neuroscience. Further, we review research performed at sub-millimeter spatial resolution and discuss the limits and the potential of ultra-high field imaging for structural and functional imaging in human cortex. The increased spatial resolution achievable at ultra-high field has the potential to unveil the fundamental computations performed within a given cortical area, ultimately allowing the visualization of the mesoscopic organization of human cortex at the functional and structural level.

  6. Development of advanced off-design models for supercritical carbon dioxide power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Dyreby, J. J.; Klein, S. A.; Nellis, G. F.; Reindl, D. T.

    2012-07-01

    In the search for increased efficiency of utility-scale electricity generation, Brayton cycles operating with supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) have found considerable interest. There are two main advantages of a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle compared to a Rankine cycle: 1) equal or greater thermal efficiencies can be realized using significantly smaller turbomachinery, and 2) heat rejection is not limited by the saturation temperature of the working fluid, which has the potential to reduce or completely eliminate the need for cooling water and instead allow dry cooling. While dry cooling is especially advantageous for power generation in arid climates, a reduction of water consumption in any location will be increasingly beneficial as tighter environmental regulations are enacted in the future. Because daily and seasonal weather variations may result in a plant operating away from its design point, models that are capable of predicting the off-design performance of S-CO{sub 2} power cycles are necessary for characterizing and evaluating cycle configurations and turbomachinery designs on an annual basis. To this end, an off-design model of a recuperated Brayton cycle was developed based on the radial turbomachinery currently being investigated by Sandia National Laboratory. (authors)

  7. Advanced Turbomachinery Components for Supercritical CO2 Power Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Michael

    2016-03-31

    Six indirectly heated supercritical CO2 (SCO2 ) Brayton cycles with turbine inlet conditions of 1300°F and 4000 psia with varying plant capacities from 10MWe to 550MWe were analyzed. 550 MWe plant capacity directly heated SCO2 Brayton cycles with turbine inlet conditions of 2500°F and 4000 psia were also analyzed. Turbomachinery configurations and conceptual designs for both indirectly and directly heated cycles were developed. Optimum turbomachinery and generator configurations were selected and the resulting analysis provides validation that the turbomachinery conceptual designs meet efficiency performance targets. Previously identified technology gaps were updated based on these conceptual designs. Material compatibility testing was conducted for materials typically used in turbomachinery housings, turbine disks and blades. Testing was completed for samples in unstressed and stressed conditions. All samples exposed to SCO2 showed some oxidation, the extent of which varied considerably between the alloys tested. Examination of cross sections of the stressed samples found no evidence of cracking due to SCO2 exposure.

  8. Oxidation of advanced steam turbine alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  9. Advanced Use of Therma-Probe for Ultra-Shallow Junction Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanowicz, Janusz; Clarysse, Trudo; Smets, Gerrit; Rosseel, Erik; Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2011-11-01

    Therma-Probe® (TP) is widely used in the semiconductor industry for the Statistical Process Control (SPC) monitoring of the various ion implantation steps included in the Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor process. This fully optical, hence non-destructive and fast, pump-probe technique measures the probe laser reflectance (DC reflectance) as well as the pump-laser-induced changes in probe reflectance (AC reflectance, also called TW signal). In this paper, we report on the latest advances in the use of TP for the monitoring of ultra-shallow junctions both before and after annealing of the implanted layers.

  10. Systems and methods for advanced ultra-high-performance InP solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark

    2017-03-07

    Systems and Methods for Advanced Ultra-High-Performance InP Solar Cells are provided. In one embodiment, an InP photovoltaic device comprises: a p-n junction absorber layer comprising at least one InP layer; a front surface confinement layer; and a back surface confinement layer; wherein either the front surface confinement layer or the back surface confinement layer forms part of a High-Low (HL) doping architecture; and wherein either the front surface confinement layer or the back surface confinement layer forms part of a heterointerface system architecture.

  11. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research Phase II: N+4 Advanced Concept Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Droney, Christopher K.

    2012-01-01

    This final report documents the work of the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team on Task 1 of the Phase II effort. The team consisted of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, General Electric, and Georgia Tech. Using a quantitative workshop process, the following technologies, appropriate to aircraft operational in the N+4 2040 timeframe, were identified: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), Hydrogen, fuel cell hybrids, battery electric hybrids, Low Energy Nuclear (LENR), boundary layer ingestion propulsion (BLI), unducted fans and advanced propellers, and combinations. Technology development plans were developed.

  12. Supercritical synthesis of biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Juana M; Lozano, Pedro; García-Verdugo, Eduardo; Burguete, M Isabel; Sánchez-Gómez, Gregorio; López-López, Gregorio; Pucheault, Mathieu; Vaultier, Michel; Luis, Santiago V

    2012-07-23

    The synthesis of biodiesel fuel from lipids (vegetable oils and animal fats) has gained in importance as a possible source of renewable non-fossil energy in an attempt to reduce our dependence on petroleum-based fuels. The catalytic processes commonly used for the production of biodiesel fuel present a series of limitations and drawbacks, among them the high energy consumption required for complex purification operations and undesirable side reactions. Supercritical fluid (SCF) technologies offer an interesting alternative to conventional processes for preparing biodiesel. This review highlights the advances, advantages, drawbacks and new tendencies involved in the use of supercritical fluids (SCFs) for biodiesel synthesis.

  13. Application of numerical optimization to the design of advanced supercritical airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. R.; Hicks, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    An application of numerical optimization to the design of advanced airfoils for transonic aircraft showed that low-drag sections can be developed for a given design Mach number without an accompanying drag increase at lower Mach numbers. This is achieved by imposing a constraint on the drag coefficient at an off-design Mach number while minimizing the drag coefficient at the design Mach number. This multiple design-point numerical optimization has been implemented with the use of airfoil shape functions which permit a wide range of attainable profiles during the optimization process. Analytical data for the starting airfoil shape, a single design-point optimized shape, and a double design-point optimized shape are presented. Experimental data obtained in the NASA Ames two-by two-foot wind tunnel are also presented and discussed.

  14. "Ultra"-Fast Fracture Strength of Advanced Structural Ceramic Materials Studied at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1999-01-01

    The accurate determination of inert strength is important in reliable life prediction of structural ceramic components. At ambient temperature, the inert strength of a brittle material is typically regarded as free of the effects of slow crack growth due to stress corrosion. Therefore, the inert strength can be determined either by eliminating active species, especially moisture, with an appropriate inert medium, or by using a very high test rate. However, at elevated temperatures, the concept or definition of the inert strength of brittle ceramic materials is not clear, since temperature itself is a degrading environment, resulting in strength degradation through slow crack growth and/or creep. Since the mechanism to control strength is rate-dependent viscous flow, the only conceivable way to determine the inert strength at elevated temperatures is to utilize a very fast test rate that either minimizes the time for or eliminates slow crack growth. Few experimental studies have measured the elevated-temperature, inert (or "ultra"-fast fracture) strength of advanced ceramics. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, an experimental study was initiated to better understand the "ultra"-fast fracture strength behavior of advanced ceramics at elevated temperatures. Fourteen advanced ceramics - one alumina, eleven silicon nitrides, and two silicon carbides - have been tested using constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing in flexure with a series of stress rates including the "ultra"-fast stress rate of 33 000 MPa/sec with digitally controlled test frames. The results for these 14 advanced ceramics indicate that, notwithstanding possible changes in flaw populations as well as flaw configurations because of elevated temperatures, the strength at 33 000 MPa/sec approached the room-temperature strength or reached a higher value than that determined at the conventional test rate of 30 MPa/sec. On the basis of the experimental data, it can be stated that the elevated

  15. BESTIA - the next generation ultra-fast CO2 laser for advanced accelerator research

    DOE PAGES

    Pogorelsky, Igor V.; Babzien, Markus; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; ...

    2015-12-02

    Over the last two decades, BNL’s ATF has pioneered the use of high-peak power CO2 lasers for research in advanced accelerators and radiation sources. In addition, our recent developments in ion acceleration, Compton scattering, and IFELs have further underscored the benefits from expanding the landscape of strong-field laser interactions deeper into the mid-infrared (MIR) range of wavelengths. This extension validates our ongoing efforts in advancing CO2 laser technology, which we report here. Our next-generation, multi-terawatt, femtosecond CO2 laser will open new opportunities for studying ultra-relativistic laser interactions with plasma in the MIR spectral domain, including new regimes in the particlemore » acceleration of ions and electrons.« less

  16. BESTIA - The next generation ultra-fast CO2 laser for advanced accelerator research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, Igor V.; Babzien, Markus; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Skaritka, John; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.

    2016-09-01

    Over the last two decades, BNL's ATF has pioneered the use of high-peak power CO2 lasers for research in advanced accelerators and radiation sources. Our recent developments in ion acceleration, Compton scattering, and IFELs have further underscored the benefits from expanding the landscape of strong-field laser interactions deeper into the mid-infrared (MIR) range of wavelengths. This extension validates our ongoing efforts in advancing CO2 laser technology, which we report here. Our next-generation, multi-terawatt, femtosecond CO2 laser will open new opportunities for studying ultra-relativistic laser interactions with plasma in the MIR spectral domain, including new regimes in the particle acceleration of ions and electrons.

  17. Supercritical Fluid Facilitated Growth of Copper and Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Geoffrey L.; Vohs, Jason K.; Brege, Jonathan J.; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2005-01-01

    Supercritical fluids (SCFs) possess properties that are intermediate between liquids and gases. The combination of supercritical fluid technology with advanced characterization techniques such as electron microscopy provided a practical and rewarding undergraduate laboratory experiment.

  18. Oxidation of alloys for advanced steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  19. Elevated-Temperature "Ultra" Fast Fracture Strength of Advanced Ceramics: An Approach to Elevated-Temperature "Inert" Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    The determination of "ultra" fast fracture strengths of five silicon nitride ceramics at elevated temperatures has been made by using constant stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") testing with a series of "ultra" fast test rates. The test material included four monolithic and one SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitrides. Of the five test materials, four silicon nitrides exhibited the elevated -temperature strengths that approaches their respective room-temperature strengths at an "ultra" fast test rate of 3.3 x 10(exp 4) MPa/s. This implies that slow cracks growth responsible for elevated-temperature failure can be eliminated or minimized by using the "ultra" fast test rate. These ongoing experimental results have shed light on laying a theoretical and practical foundation on the concept and definition of elevated-temperature "inert" strength behavior of advanced ceramics.

  20. Advance ultra sensitive multi-layered nano plasmonic devices for label free biosensing targeting immunodiagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Divya; Dwivedi, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    The rapid advancement in technology has envisaged and drafted the use of optical bio-sensing units into label free and multiplexed bio-sensing, exploring the surface plasmon polaritons, which has turned into a gold standard on the commercial basis, but they are bulky and find difficulty in scaling up for the throughput detection. The integration of plasmonic crystals with microfluidics on the bio-sensing frontier offers a multi-level validation of results with the ease of real-time detection and imaging and holds a great promise to develop ultra-sensitive, fast, portable device for the point-of-care diagnostics. The paper describes the fast, low cost approach of designing and simulating label free biosensor using open source MEEP and other software tools targeting Immunodiagnostics.

  1. Enrichment desired quality chitosan fraction and advance yield by sequential static and static-dynamic supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Yin; Chin, Hui Yen; Tsai, Min-Lang

    2015-11-20

    This study aimed to establish the sequential static and static-dynamic supercritical carbon dioxide (SDCO2) fractionation conditions to obtain a higher yield and desired chitosan with lower polydispersity index (PDI) and higher degree of deacetylation (DD). The yield increased with increasing DD of used chitosan and amount of cosolvent. The yield of acetic acid cosolvent was higher than those of malic and citric acid cosolvents. SDCO2, compared to static supercritical carbon dioxide, has higher yield. The yield of extracted chitosan was 5.82-14.70% by SDCO2/acetic acid, which increases with increasing pressure. The DD of fractionated chitosan increased from 66.1% to 70.81-85.33%, while the PDI decreased from 3.97 to 1.69-3.16. The molecular weight changed from 622kDa to 412-649kDa, which increased as density of supercritical carbon dioxide increases. Hence, higher DD and lower PDI extracted chitosan can be obtained through controlling the temperature and pressure of SDCO2.

  2. Advanced Technology Lunar Telescopes I. Overview and Progress Report On Ultra-Lightweight Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. C.; Pitts, R. E.; Oliversen, R. J.; Stolarik, J. D.; Segal, K.; Wilson, T. L.; Lin, E. I.; Hull, J. R.; Romeo, R.; Hojaji, H.; Ma, K. B.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chu, W. K.; Chu, C. W.

    1993-12-01

    The materials and technology already exist to build fully functional steerable telescopes for use on the moon, telescopes that are cost effective, that can be deployed using existing launchers, and that can function for extended periods without human maintenance. We describe our concept of advanced technology telescopes (ATT) which combines the elements of i) ultra-lightweight precision optics and structures, ii) non-contact, electronically controlled superconductor bearings and drive mechanisms, and iii) high dynamic range radiation resistant sensors. Unlike previous transit telescope designs, the ATTs can point and track objects anywhere in the sky over the entire lunar night (or day), can be deployed in multiple unit arrays, and can be equipped with standard astronomical instruments including spectrographs, imagers, or even interferometers. We first describe the optics. Lightweight optics are crucial because they minimize the mass of the telescope assembly and its support structure and ultimately the entire payload. By using materials and fabrication technology similar to that already refined by ESA and proven for space applications, we show that it is possible to produce precision optical elements of very low areal density (< 2 kg per sq. m). The process also has much lower per unit cost compared to traditional mirror fabrication techniques. By supporting the optical elements with a class of very lightweight but stiff material already developed by NASA, a telescope assembly can be made that has essentially the minimum possible mass. Such ultra-lightweight construction makes possible astronomical payloads that can be sent to the moon using existing small and medium size rockets. The very low per unit cost permits the production and deployment of multiple units, thereby increasing the versatility and productivity of a lunar observatory while providing good redundancy. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept optical telescope assembly that has a 31 cm diameter primary

  3. Advanced Fuels Reactor using Aneutronic Rodless Ultra Low Aspect Ratio Tokamak Hydrogenic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Celso

    2015-11-01

    The use of advanced fuels for fusion reactor is conventionally envisaged for field reversed configuration (FRC) devices. It is proposed here a preliminary study about the use of these fuels but on an aneutronic Rodless Ultra Low Aspect Ratio (RULART) hydrogenic plasmas. The idea is to inject micro-size boron pellets vertically at the inboard side (HFS, where TF is very high and the tokamak electron temperature is relatively low because of profile), synchronised with a proton NBI pointed to this region. Therefore, p-B reactions should occur and alpha particles produced. These pellets will act as an edge-like disturbance only (cp. killer pellet, although the vertical HFS should make this less critical, since the unablated part should appear in the bottom of the device). The boron cloud will appear at midplance, possibly as a MARFE-look like. Scaling of the p-B reactions by varying the NBI energy should be compared with the predictions of nuclear physics. This could be an alternative to the FRC approach, without the difficulties of the optimization of the FRC low confinement time. Instead, a robust good tokamak confinement with high local HFS TF (enhanced due to the ultra low aspect ratio and low pitch angle) is used. The plasma central post makes the RULART concept attractive because of the proximity of NBI path and also because a fraction of born alphas will cross the plasma post and dragged into it in the direction of the central plasma post current, escaping vertically into a hole in the bias plate and reaching the direct electricity converter, such as in the FRC concept.

  4. A hybrid approach for generating ultra-short bunches for advanced accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-09-01

    Generation of electron beams with high phase-space density, short bunch length and high peak current is an essential requirement for future linear colliders and bright electron beam sources. Unfortunately, such bunches cannot be produced directly from the source since forces from the mutual repulsion of electrons would destroy the brilliance of the beam within a short distance. Here, we detail a beam dynamics study of an innovative two-stage compression scheme that can generate ultra-short bunches without degrading the beam quality. In the first stage, the beam is compressed with an advanced velocity bunching technique in which the longitudinal phase space is rotated so that electrons on the bunch tail become faster than electrons in the bunch head. In the second stage, the beam is further compressed with a conventional magnetic chicane. With the aid of numerical simulations we show that our two-staged scheme is capable to increase the current of a 50 pC bunch to a notable factor of 100 while the emittance growth can be suppressed to 1% with appropriate tailoring of the initial beam distribution.

  5. Recent Advances and New Techniques in Visualization of Ultra-short Relativistic Electron Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-06-05

    Ultrashort electron bunches with rms length of {approx} 1 femtosecond (fs) can be used to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses in FELs that may open up many new regimes in ultrafast sciences. It is also envisioned that ultrashort electron bunches may excite {approx}TeV/m wake fields for plasma wake field acceleration and high field physics studies. Recent success of using 20 pC electron beam to drive an x-ray FEL at LCLS has stimulated world-wide interests in using low charge beam (1 {approx} 20 pC) to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses (0.1 fs {approx} 10 fs) in FELs. Accurate measurement of the length (preferably the temporal profile) of the ultrashort electron bunch is essential for understanding the physics associated with the bunch compression and transportation. However, the shorter and shorter electron bunch greatly challenges the present beam diagnostic methods. In this paper we review the recent advances in the measurement of ultra-short electron bunches. We will focus on several techniques and their variants that provide the state-of-the-art temporal resolution. Methods to further improve the resolution of these techniques and the promise to break the 1 fs time barrier is discussed. We review recent advances in the measurement of ultrashort relativistic electron bunches. We will focus on several techniques and their variants that are capable of breaking the femtosecond time barrier in measurements of ultrashort bunches. Techniques for measuring beam longitudinal phase space as well as the x-ray pulse shape in an x-ray FEL are also discussed.

  6. Dynamic transition in supercritical iron

    PubMed Central

    Fomin, Yu. D.; Ryzhov, V. N.; Tsiok, E. N.; Brazhkin, V. V.; Trachenko, K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advance in understanding the supercritical state posits the existence of a new line above the critical point separating two physically distinct states of matter: rigid liquid and non-rigid gas-like fluid. The location of this line, the Frenkel line, remains unknown for important real systems. Here, we map the Frenkel line on the phase diagram of supercritical iron using molecular dynamics simulations. On the basis of our data, we propose a general recipe to locate the Frenkel line for any system, the recipe that importantly does not involve system-specific detailed calculations and relies on the knowledge of the melting line only. We further discuss the relationship between the Frenkel line and the metal-insulator transition in supercritical liquid metals. Our results enable predicting the state of supercritical iron in several conditions of interest. In particular, we predict that liquid iron in the Jupiter core is in the “rigid liquid” state and is highly conducting. We finally analyse the evolution of iron conductivity in the core of smaller planets such as Earth and Venus as well as exoplanets: as planets cool off, the supercritical core undergoes the transition to the rigid-liquid conducting state at the Frenkel line. PMID:25424664

  7. Dynamic transition in supercritical iron.

    PubMed

    Fomin, Yu D; Ryzhov, V N; Tsiok, E N; Brazhkin, V V; Trachenko, K

    2014-11-26

    Recent advance in understanding the supercritical state posits the existence of a new line above the critical point separating two physically distinct states of matter: rigid liquid and non-rigid gas-like fluid. The location of this line, the Frenkel line, remains unknown for important real systems. Here, we map the Frenkel line on the phase diagram of supercritical iron using molecular dynamics simulations. On the basis of our data, we propose a general recipe to locate the Frenkel line for any system, the recipe that importantly does not involve system-specific detailed calculations and relies on the knowledge of the melting line only. We further discuss the relationship between the Frenkel line and the metal-insulator transition in supercritical liquid metals. Our results enable predicting the state of supercritical iron in several conditions of interest. In particular, we predict that liquid iron in the Jupiter core is in the "rigid liquid" state and is highly conducting. We finally analyse the evolution of iron conductivity in the core of smaller planets such as Earth and Venus as well as exoplanets: as planets cool off, the supercritical core undergoes the transition to the rigid-liquid conducting state at the Frenkel line.

  8. Dynamic transition in supercritical iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Yu. D.; Ryzhov, V. N.; Tsiok, E. N.; Brazhkin, V. V.; Trachenko, K.

    2014-11-01

    Recent advance in understanding the supercritical state posits the existence of a new line above the critical point separating two physically distinct states of matter: rigid liquid and non-rigid gas-like fluid. The location of this line, the Frenkel line, remains unknown for important real systems. Here, we map the Frenkel line on the phase diagram of supercritical iron using molecular dynamics simulations. On the basis of our data, we propose a general recipe to locate the Frenkel line for any system, the recipe that importantly does not involve system-specific detailed calculations and relies on the knowledge of the melting line only. We further discuss the relationship between the Frenkel line and the metal-insulator transition in supercritical liquid metals. Our results enable predicting the state of supercritical iron in several conditions of interest. In particular, we predict that liquid iron in the Jupiter core is in the ``rigid liquid'' state and is highly conducting. We finally analyse the evolution of iron conductivity in the core of smaller planets such as Earth and Venus as well as exoplanets: as planets cool off, the supercritical core undergoes the transition to the rigid-liquid conducting state at the Frenkel line.

  9. Advanced Production Surface Preparation Technology Development for Ultra-High Pressure Diesel Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, Marion B.

    2012-04-30

    In 2007, An Ultra High Injection Pressure (UHIP) fueling method has been demonstrated by Caterpillar Fuel Systems - Product Development, demonstrating ability to deliver U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) Tier 4 Final diesel engine emission performance with greatly reduced emissions handling components on the engine, such as without NOx reduction after-treatment and with only a through-flow 50% effective diesel particulate trap (DPT). They have shown this capability using multiple multi-cylinder engine tests of an Ultra High Pressure Common Rail (UHPCR) fuel system with higher than traditional levels of CEGR and an advanced injector nozzle design. The system delivered better atomization of the fuel, for more complete burn, to greatly reduce diesel particulates, while CEGR or high efficiency NOx reduction after-treatment handles the NOx. With the reduced back pressure of a traditional DPT, and with the more complete fuel burn, the system reduced levels of fuel consumption by 2.4% for similar delivery of torque and horsepower over the best Tier 4 Interim levels of fuel consumption in the diesel power industry. The challenge is to manufacture the components in high-volume production that can withstand the required higher pressure injection. Production processes must be developed to increase the toughness of the injector steel to withstand the UHIP pulsations and generate near perfect form and finish in the sub-millimeter size geometries within the injector. This project resulted in two developments in 2011. The first development was a process and a machine specification by which a high target of compressive residual stress (CRS) can be consistently imparted to key surfaces of the fuel system to increase the toughness of the steel, and a demonstration of the feasibility of further refinement of the process for use in volume production. The second development was the demonstration of the feasibility of a process for imparting near perfect, durable geometry to

  10. A rapid method for the separation of vitamin D and its metabolites by ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jumaah, Firas; Larsson, Sara; Essén, Sofia; Cunico, Larissa P; Holm, Cecilia; Turner, Charlotta; Sandahl, Margareta

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a new supercritical fluid chromatography-mass spectrometry (SFC-MS) method has been developed for the separation of nine vitamin D metabolites within less than eight minutes. This is the first study of analysis of vitamin D and its metabolites carried out by SFC-MS. Six columns of orthogonal selectivity were examined, and the best separation was obtained by using a 1-aminoanthracene (1-AA) column. The number and the position of hydroxyl groups in the structure of the studied compounds as well as the number of unsaturated bonds determine the physiochemical properties and, thus the separation of vitamin D metabolites that is achieved on this column. All D2 and the D3 forms were baseline separated with resolution values>1.5. The effects of pressure, temperature, flow rate and different gradient modes were studied. Electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) were compared in positive mode, both by direct infusion and after SFC separation. The results showed that the sensitivity in APCI(+) was higher than in ESI(+) using direct infusion. In contrast, the sensitivity in APCI(+) was 6-fold lower than in ESI(+) after SFC separation. The SFC-MS method was validated between 10 and 500ng/mL for all analytes with coefficient of determination (R(2))≥0.999 for all calibration curves. The limits of detection (LOD) were found to range between 0.39 and 5.98ng/mL for 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (24,25(OH)2D3) and 1-hydroxyvitamin D2 (1OHD2), respectively. To show its potential, the method was applied to human plasma samples from healthy individuals. Vitamin D3 (D3), 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25OHD3) and 24,25(OH)2D3 were determined in plasma samples and the concentrations were 6.6±3.0ng/mL, 23.8±9.2ng/mL and 5.4±2.7ng/mL, respectively.

  11. Characterizing pressure issues due to turbulent flow in tubing, in ultra-fast chiral supercritical fluid chromatography at up to 580bar.

    PubMed

    Berger, Terry A

    2016-12-02

    It has been widely suggested that the outlet pressure be changed to maintain constant density ("isopycnic" conditions) when comparing the kinetic performance of different columns in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). However, at high flow rates, flow in the tubing is turbulent, causing large extra-column pressure drops that limit options for changing outlet pressure. Some of these pressure drops occur before and some after the column, obscuring the actual column inlet and outlet pressures. In this work, a 4.6×100mm, 1.8μm R,R-Whelk-O1 column was used with low dispersion LD (120μm) plumbing to generate sub-1min chiral separations. However, the optimum, or near optimum, flow rate was 5mL-min(-1), producing a system pressure of 580bar (with 40% methanol, outlet pressure 120bar). Both the flow rate and pump pressure required were near the limits of the instrument, and significantly exceeded the capability of many other SFC's. Extra-column pressure drops (ΔPec) were as high as 200bar, caused mostly by turbulent flow in the tubing. The ΔPec increased by more than the square of the flow rate. Reynolds Numbers (Re) were calculated for tubing as a function of flow rate between 100 and 400bar and 5-20% methanol in CO2, and 40°-60°C. This represents the most extensive analysis of turbulence in tubing in the SFC literature. Flow in 120μm ID tubing was calculated to be laminar below 1.0mL-min(-1), mostly transitional up to 2.5mL-min(-1) and virtually always turbulent at 3mL-min(-1) and higher. Flow in 170μm tubing is turbulent at lower flows but generates half the ΔPec due to the lower mobile phase linear velocity. The results suggest that, while sub-minute chromatograms are easily generated, 4.6mm columns are not very user friendly for use with sub-2μm packings. The high flow rates required just to reach optimum result in high ΔPec generated by the tubing, causing uncertainty in the true column inlet, outlet, and average column pressure/density. When

  12. Recent advances in ultra-high performance liquid chromatography for the analysis of traditional chinese medicine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) have been widely used for the prevention and treatment of various diseases for thousands of years in China. Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UHPLC) is a relatively new technique offering new possibilities in liquid chromatography. This paper reviews recen...

  13. Advanced Power Ultra-Uprates of Existing Plants (APPU) Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rubiolo, Pablo R.; Conway, Lawarence E.; Oriani, Luca; Lahoda, Edward J.; DeSilva, Greg; Hu, Min H.; Hartz, Josh; Bachrach, Uriel; Smith, Larry; Dudek, Daniel F.; Gary J. Toman; Feng, Dandong; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2006-03-31

    This project assessed the feasibility of a Power Ultra-Uprate on an existing nuclear plant. The study determined the technical and design limitations of the current components, both inside and outside the containment. Based on the identified plant bottlenecks, the design changes for major pieces of equipment required to meet the Power Ultra-Uprate throughput were determined. Costs for modified pieces of equipment and for change-out and disposal of the replaced equipment were evaluated. These costs were then used to develop capital, fuel and operating and maintenance cost estimates for the Power Ultra-Uprate plant. The cost evaluation indicates that the largest cost components are the replacement of power (during the outage required for the uprate) and the new fuel loading. Based on these results, the study concluded that, for a standard 4-loop plant, the proposed Power Ultra-Uprate is technically feasible. However, the power uprate is likely to be more expensive than the cost (per Kw electric installed) of a new plant when large capacity uprates are considered (>25%). Nevertheless, the concept of the Power Ultra-Uprate may be an attractive option for specific nuclear power plants where a large margin exists in the steam and power conversion system or where medium power increases (~600 MWe) are needed. The results of the study suggest that development efforts on fuel technologies for current nuclear power plants should be oriented towards improving the fuel performance (fretting-wear, corrosion, uranium load, manufacturing, safety) required to achieve higher burnup rather focusing on potential increases in the fuel thermal output.

  14. BESTIA - the next generation ultra-fast CO2 laser for advanced accelerator research

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, Igor V.; Babzien, Markus; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Skaritka, John; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.

    2015-12-02

    Over the last two decades, BNL’s ATF has pioneered the use of high-peak power CO2 lasers for research in advanced accelerators and radiation sources. In addition, our recent developments in ion acceleration, Compton scattering, and IFELs have further underscored the benefits from expanding the landscape of strong-field laser interactions deeper into the mid-infrared (MIR) range of wavelengths. This extension validates our ongoing efforts in advancing CO2 laser technology, which we report here. Our next-generation, multi-terawatt, femtosecond CO2 laser will open new opportunities for studying ultra-relativistic laser interactions with plasma in the MIR spectral domain, including new regimes in the particle acceleration of ions and electrons.

  15. Ultra-Fast Fracture Strength of Advanced Ceramics at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1998-01-01

    An attempt was made to determine elevated-temperature, 'ultra'-fast fracture strengths of one alumina, two silicon nitrides and one silicon carbide by using constant stress-rate ('dynamic fatigue') testing with a series of 'ultra'-fast test rates. Of the materials tested, the alumina exhibited a convergence of strength at stress rates below 3.3 x 10(exp 4) MPa/s. The strength approached approximately the room-temperature inert strength. By contrast, the silicon nitrides and silicon carbide did not reveal a strength approach, but exhibited elevated-temperature strengths 10 and 20% lower than their respective room-temperature strengths. Although the analytical results imply that the elevated-temperature 'inert' strength of a ceramic material can be obtained by using sufficiently high stress rates, the experimental testing rates were only sufficient to demonstrate convergence for the alumina.

  16. Advances in molecular dynamics simulation of ultra-precision machining of hard and brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoguang; Li, Qiang; Liu, Tao; Kang, Renke; Jin, Zhuji; Guo, Dongming

    2016-12-01

    Hard and brittle materials, such as silicon, SiC, and optical glasses, are widely used in aerospace, military, integrated circuit, and other fields because of their excellent physical and chemical properties. However, these materials display poor machinability because of their hard and brittle properties. Damages such as surface micro-crack and subsurface damage often occur during machining of hard and brittle materials. Ultra-precision machining is widely used in processing hard and brittle materials to obtain nanoscale machining quality. However, the theoretical mechanism underlying this method remains unclear. This paper provides a review of present research on the molecular dynamics simulation of ultra-precision machining of hard and brittle materials. The future trends in this field are also discussed.

  17. RECENT ADVANCES IN ULTRA-HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY FOR THE ANALYSIS OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huilian; Liu, Min; Chen, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine has been widely used for the prevention and treatment of various diseases for thousands of years in China. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) is a relatively new technique offering new possibilities. This paper reviews recent developments in UHPLC in the separation and identification, fingerprinting, quantification, and metabolism of traditional Chinese medicine. Recently, the combination of UHPLC with MS has improved the efficiency of the analysis of these materials. PMID:25045170

  18. Applications of supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Gerd

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses supercritical fluids in industrial and near-to-industry applications. Supercritical fluids are flexible tools for processing materials. Supercritical fluids have been applied to mass-transfer processes, phase-transition processes, reactive systems, materials-related processes, and nanostructured materials. Some applications are already at industrial capacity, whereas others remain under development. In addition to extraction, application areas include impregnation and cleaning, multistage countercurrent separation, particle formation, coating, and reactive systems such as hydrogenation, biomass gasification, and supercritical water oxidation. Polymers are modified with supercritical fluids, and colloids and emulsions as well as nanostructured materials exhibit interesting phenomena when in contact with supercritical fluids that can be industrially exploited. For these applications to succeed, the properties of supercritical fluids in combination with the materials processed must be clearly determined and fundamental knowledge of the complex behavior must be made readily available.

  19. Supercritical fluid extraction

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Laintz, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated or lipophilic crown ether or fluorinated dithiocarbamate. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  20. A hybrid approach for generating ultra-short bunches for advanced accelerator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2016-06-01

    Generation of electron beams with high phase-space density, short bunch length and high peak current is an essential requirement for future linear colliders and bright electron beam sources. Unfortunately, such bunches cannot be produced directly from the source since forces from the mutual repulsion of electrons would destroy the brilliance of the beam within a short distance. Here, we detail a beam dynamics study of a two-stage compression scheme that can generate ultra-short bunches without degrading the beam quality. In the first stage, a magnetized beam is compressed with a velocity bunching technique in which the longitudinal phase space is rotated so that electrons on the bunch tail become faster than electrons in the bunch head. In the second stage, the beam is further compressed with a magnetic chicane. With the aid of numerical simulations we show that our two-staged scheme is capable to increase the current of a 50 pC bunch by a notable factor of 100 (from 15 A to 1.5 kA) while the emittance growth can be suppressed to 1% with appropriate tailoring of the initial beam distribution.

  1. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium-nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Chang, Hee -Jung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2016-02-11

    Here we demonstrate for the first time that planar Na-NiCl2 batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190°C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh/kg, which is 3 times higher than that of conventional tubular Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at 280°C, was obtained for planar Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at 190°C over a long-term cell test (1000 cycles). The high energy density and superior cycle stability are attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials (NaCl and Ni) at 190°C. The results reported in this work demonstrate that planar Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at an intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs.

  2. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium-nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; ...

    2016-02-11

    Here we demonstrate for the first time that planar Na-NiCl2 batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190°C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh/kg, which is 3 times higher than that of conventional tubular Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at 280°C, was obtained for planar Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at 190°C over a long-term cell test (1000 cycles). The high energy density and superior cycle stability are attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials (NaCl and Ni) at 190°C. The results reported in this work demonstrate that planar Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at anmore » intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs.« less

  3. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium-nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density.

    PubMed

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Y; Meinhardt, Kerry D; Chang, Hee Jung; Canfield, Nathan L; Sprenkle, Vincent L

    2016-02-11

    Sodium-metal halide batteries have been considered as one of the more attractive technologies for stationary electrical energy storage, however, they are not used for broader applications despite their relatively well-known redox system. One of the roadblocks hindering market penetration is the high-operating temperature. Here we demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190 °C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh kg(-1), higher than that of conventional tubular sodium-nickel chloride batteries (280 °C), is obtained for planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at 190 °C over a long-term cell test (1,000 cycles), and it attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials at the lower operating temperature. Results reported here demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at an intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs.

  4. Ultra-High-Performance Concrete And Advanced Manufacturing Methods For Modular Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Sawab, Jamshaid; Lim, Ing; Mo, Yi-Lung; Li, Mo; Wang, Hong; Guimaraes, Maria

    2016-04-13

    Small modular reactors (SMR) allow for less onsite construction, increase nuclear material security, and provide a flexible and cost-effective energy alternative. SMR can be factory-built as modular components, and shipped to desired locations for fast assembly. This project successfully developed a new class of ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC), which features a compressive strength greater than 22 ksi (150 MPa) without special treatment and self-consolidating characteristics desired for SMR modular construction. With an ultra-high strength and dense microstructure, it will facilitate rapid construction of steel plate-concrete (SC) beams and walls with thinner and lighter modules, and can withstand harsh environments and mechanical loads anticipated during the service life of nuclear power plants. In addition, the self-consolidating characteristics are crucial for the fast construction and assembly of SC modules with reduced labor costs and improved quality. Following the UHPC material development, the capacity of producing self-consolidating UHPC in mass quantities was investigated and compared to accepted self-consolidating concrete standards. With slightly adjusted mixing procedure using large-scale gravity-based mixers (compared with small-scale force-based mixer), the self-consolidating UHPC has been successfully processed at six cubic yards; the product met both minimum compressive strength requirements and self-consolidating concrete standards. Steel plate-UHPC beams (15 ft. long, 12 in. wide and 16 in. deep) and wall panels (40 in. X 40 in. X 3 in.) were then constructed using the self-consolidating UHPC without any external vibration. Quality control guidelines for producing UHPC in large scale were developed. When the concrete is replaced by UHPC in a steel plate concrete (SC) beam, it is critical to evaluate its structural behavior with both flexure and shear-governed failure modes. In recent years, SC has been widely used for buildings and nuclear

  5. Ultra sensitive magnetic sensors integrating the giant magnetoelectric effect with advanced microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhao

    This dissertation investigates approaches to enhance the performance, especially the sensitivity and signal to noise ratio of magnetoelectric sensors, which exploits the magnetoelectric coupling in magnetostrictive and piezoelectric laminate composites. A magnetic sensor is a system or device that can measure the magnitude of a magnetic field or each of its vector components. Usually the techniques encompass many aspects of physics and electronics. The common technologies used for magnetic field sensing include induction coil sensors, fluxgate, SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device), Hall effect, giant magnetoresistance, magnetostrictive/piezoelectric composites, and MEMS (microelectromechanical systems)-based magnetic sensors. Magnetic sensors have found a broad range of applications for many decades. For example, ultra sensitive magnetic sensors are able to detect tiny magnetic fields produced outside the brain by the neuronal currents which can be used for diagnostic application. Measuring the brain's magnetic field is extremely challenging because they are so weak, have strengths of 0.1--1 pT and thus requiring magnetic sensors with sub-picotesla sensitivity. In fact, to date, these measurements can only performed with the most sensitive magnetic sensors, i.e., SQUID. However, such detectors need expensive and cumbersome cryogenics to operate. Additionally, the thermal insulation of the sensors prevents them from being placed very closed to the tissues under study, thereby preventing high-resolution measurement capability. All of these severely limit their broad usage and proliferation for biomedical imaging, diagnosis, and research. A novel ultra-sensitive magnetic sensor capable of operating at room temperature is investigated in this thesis. Magnetoelectric effect is a material phenomenon featuring the interchange between the magnetic and electric energies or signals. The large ME effect observed in ME composites, especially the ME laminates

  6. Liquefaction of coals using ultra-fine particle, unsupported catalysts: In situ generation by rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1991--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this program is to design and fabricate an experimental ultra-fine particle generation system; use this system to generate ultra-fine, iron compound, catalyst particles; and to access the ability of these ultra-fine catalyst particles to improve the performance of the solubilization stage of two-stage, catalytic-catalytic liquefaction processes. The effort applied to this program during this reporting period was devoted to experimental design and fabrication tasks.

  7. Advanced Characterization of Soil Organic Matter Using Ultra High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tfaily, M. M.; Chu, R.; Tolic, N.; Roscioli, K.; Robinson, E. R.; Paša-Tolić, L.; Hess, N. J.

    2014-12-01

    The focus on ecosystem stress and climate change is currently relevant as researchers and policymakers strive to understand the feedbacks between soil C dynamics and climate change. Successful development of molecular profiles that link soil microbiology with soil carbon (C) to ascertain soil vulnerability and resilience to climate change would have great impact on assessments of soil ecosystems in response to climate change. Additionally, better understanding of the dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM) plays a central role to climate modeling, and fate and transport of carbon. The use of ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry (UHR MS) has enabled the examination of molecules, directly from mixtures, with ultrahigh mass resolution and sub-ppm mass accuracy. In this study, EMSL's extensive expertise and capabilities in UHR MS proteomics were leveraged to develop extraction protocols for the characterization of carbon compounds in SOM, thereby providing the chemical and structural detail needed to develop mechanistic descriptions of soil carbon flow processes. Our experiments have allowed us to identify thousands of individual compounds in complex soil mixtures with a wide range of C content representing diverse ecosystems within the USA. The yield of the chemical extraction was dependent on (1) the type of solvent used and its polarity, (2) sample-to-solvent ratios and (3) the chemical and physical nature of the samples including their origins. Hexane, a non-polar organic solvent, was efficient in extracting lipid-like compounds regardless of soil origin or organic carbon %. For samples with high organic carbon %, acetonitrile extracted a wide range of compounds characterized with high O/C ratios, identified as polyphenolic compounds that were not observed with methanol extraction. Soils extracted with pyridine showed a similar molecular distribution to those extracted by methanol. Solvent extraction followed by UHR MS is a promising tool to understand the

  8. Advances in high repetition rate, ultra-short, gigawatt laser systems for time-resolved spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this article is to emphasize the current advances in the development of high-repetition rate amplifier pumps. Although this review highlights amplifier pump development, any recent data from achieved outputs via the tunable amplifier section is also discussed. The first section describes desirable parameters attributable to the pump amplifier while the rest of the article deals with specific examples for various options. The pump amplifiers can be characterized into two distinct classes; those achieving operation in the hundred hertz regime and those performing at repetition rates {ge}1kHz. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Advances in high repetition rate, ultra-short, gigawatt laser systems for time-resolved spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this article is to emphasize the current advances in the development of high-repetition rate amplifier pumps. Although this review highlights amplifier pump development, any recent data from achieved outputs via the tunable amplifier section is also discussed. The first section describes desirable parameters attributable to the pump amplifier while the rest of the article deals with specific examples for various options. The pump amplifiers can be characterized into two distinct classes; those achieving operation in the hundred hertz regime and those performing at repetition rates {ge}1kHz. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Programmable Ultra Lightweight System Adaptable Radio (PULSAR) Low Cost Telemetry - Access from Space Advanced Technologies or Down the Middle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims. Herb; Varnavas, Kosta; Eberly, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Software Defined Radio (SDR) technology has been proven in the commercial sector since the early 1990's. Today's rapid advancement in mobile telephone reliability and power management capabilities exemplifies the effectiveness of the SDR technology for the modern communications market. In contrast, presently qualified satellite transponder applications were developed during the early 1960's space program. Programmable Ultra Lightweight System Adaptable Radio (PULSAR, NASA-MSFC SDR) technology revolutionizes satellite transponder technology by increasing data through-put capability by, at least, an order of magnitude. PULSAR leverages existing Marshall Space Flight Center SDR designs and commercially enhanced capabilities to provide a path to a radiation tolerant SDR transponder. These innovations will (1) reduce the cost of NASA Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Deep Space transponders, (2) decrease power requirements, and (3) a commensurate volume reduction. Also, PULSAR increases flexibility to implement multiple transponder types by utilizing the same hardware with altered logic - no analog hardware change is required - all of which can be accomplished in orbit. This provides high capability, low cost, transponders to programs of all sizes. The final project outcome would be the introduction of a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 7 low-cost CubeSat to SmallSat telemetry system into the NASA Portfolio.

  11. Optical contamination control in the Advanced LIGO ultra-high vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, Margot H.; Gushwa, Kaitlin E.; Torrie, Calum I.

    2013-11-01

    Fused silica optics in the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors are extremely sensitive to optical scattering and absorption losses induced by both particulate and hydrocarbon contamination. At full power, the optical surfaces are illuminated with up to 200 kW/cm2. Additionally, the round-trip test mass cavity loss budget is limited to 70 ppm total from all sources. Even low-level contaminants can result in laser damage to optics during the operation the interferometers, and/or the unacceptable reduction of overall detector sensitivity. These risks are mitigated by a two-pronged approach: quantifying contamination sources and the extent of contamination, then reducing sources and cleaning optics in-situ. As a result of these ongoing efforts, we now have a better understanding of what the contamination levels and sources are, and have made significant improvements to methods of controlling contamination, thus protecting the optics from losses and laser damage in the Advanced LIGO Interferometers.

  12. Advanced Micro Turbine System (AMTS) -C200 Micro Turbine -Ultra-Low Emissions Micro Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Capstone Turbine Corporation

    2007-12-31

    In September 2000 Capstone Turbine Corporation commenced work on a US Department of Energy contract to develop and improve advanced microturbines for power generation with high electrical efficiency and reduced pollutants. The Advanced MicroTurbine System (AMTS) program focused on: (1) The development and implementation of technology for a 200 kWe scale high efficiency microturbine system (2) The development and implementation of a 65 kWe microturbine which meets California Air Resources Board (CARB) emissions standards effective in 2007. Both of these objectives were achieved in the course of the AMTS program. At its conclusion prototype C200 Microturbines had been designed, assembled and successfully completed field demonstration. C65 Microturbines operating on natural, digester and landfill gas were also developed and successfully tested to demonstrate compliance with CARB 2007 Fossil Fuel Emissions Standards for NOx, CO and VOC emissions. The C65 Microturbine subsequently received approval from CARB under Executive Order DG-018 and was approved for sale in California. The United Technologies Research Center worked in parallel to successfully execute a RD&D program to demonstrate the viability of a low emissions AMS which integrated a high-performing microturbine with Organic Rankine Cycle systems. These results are documented in AMS Final Report DOE/CH/11060-1 dated March 26, 2007.

  13. SIEMENS ADVANCED QUANTRA FTICR MASS SPECTROMETER FOR ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION AT LOW MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, W; Laura Tovo, L

    2008-07-08

    The Siemens Advanced Quantra Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer was evaluated as an alternative instrument to large double focusing mass spectrometers for gas analysis. High resolution mass spectrometers capable of resolving the common mass isomers of the hydrogen isotopes are used to provide data for accurate loading of reservoirs and to monitor separation of tritium, deuterium, and helium. Conventional double focusing magnetic sector instruments have a resolution that is limited to about 5000. The Siemens FTICR instrument achieves resolution beyond 400,000 and could possibly resolve the tritium ion from the helium-3 ion, which differ by the weight of an electron, 0.00549 amu. Working with Y-12 and LANL, SRNL requested Siemens to modify their commercial Quantra system for low mass analysis. To achieve the required performance, Siemens had to increase the available waveform operating frequency from 5 MHz to 40 MHz and completely redesign the control electronics and software. However, they were able to use the previous ion trap, magnet, passive pump, and piezo-electric pulsed inlet valve design. NNSA invested $1M in this project and acquired four systems, two for Y-12 and one each for SRNL and LANL. Siemens claimed a $10M investment in the Quantra systems. The new Siemens Advanced Quantra demonstrated phenomenal resolution in the low mass range. Resolution greater than 400,000 was achieved for mass 2. The new spectrometer had a useful working mass range to 500 Daltons. However, experiments found that a continuous single scan from low mass to high was not possible. Two useful working ranges were established covering masses 1 to 6 and masses 12 to 500 for our studies. A compromise performance condition enabled masses 1 to 45 to be surveyed. The instrument was found to have a dynamic range of about three orders of magnitude and quantitative analysis is expected to be limited to around 5 percent without using complex fitting algorithms

  14. Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Deformation of an Ultra-Fine Precipitate Strengthened Advanced Austenitic Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    M.C. Carroll; L.J. Carroll

    2012-10-01

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine-precipitation-strengthened), has been identified as an ideal candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS alloys demonstrate improved creep resistance relative to 316 stainless steel (SS) through additions of Ti and Nb, which precipitate to form a widespread dispersion of stable nanoscale metallic carbide (MC) particles in the austenitic matrix. The low-cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of an HT-UPS alloy have been investigated at 650 °C and a 1.0% total strain, with an R-ratio of -1 and hold times at peak tensile strain as long as 150 min. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is directly compared to that of standard 316 SS. The measured values for total cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and in qualitative observations of the deformed microstructures. Crack propagation is primarily transgranular in fatigue and creep-fatigue of both alloys at the investigated conditions. Internal grain boundary damage in the form of fine cracks resulting from the tensile hold is present for hold times of 60 min and longer, and substantially more internal cracks are quantifiable in 316 SS than in HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material differ significantly; an equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas in HT-UPS the microstructure takes the form of widespread and relatively homogenous tangles of dislocations pinned by the nanoscale MC precipitates. The significant effect of the fine distribution of precipitates on observed fatigue and creep-fatigue response is described in three distinct behavioral regions as it evolves with continued cycling.

  15. On the characterization of ultra-precise X-ray optical components: advances and challenges in ex situ metrology.

    PubMed

    Siewert, F; Buchheim, J; Zeschke, T; Störmer, M; Falkenberg, G; Sankari, R

    2014-09-01

    To fully exploit the ultimate source properties of the next-generation light sources, such as free-electron lasers (FELs) and diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs), the quality requirements for gratings and reflective synchrotron optics, especially mirrors, have significantly increased. These coherence-preserving optical components for high-brightness sources will feature nanoscopic shape accuracies over macroscopic length scales up to 1000 mm. To enable high efficiency in terms of photon flux, such optics will be coated with application-tailored single or multilayer coatings. Advanced thin-film fabrication of today enables the synthesis of layers on the sub-nanometre precision level over a deposition length of up to 1500 mm. Specifically dedicated metrology instrumentation of comparable accuracy has been developed to characterize such optical elements. Second-generation slope-measuring profilers like the nanometre optical component measuring machine (NOM) at the BESSY-II Optics laboratory allow the inspection of up to 1500 mm-long reflective optical components with an accuracy better than 50 nrad r.m.s. Besides measuring the shape on top of the coated mirror, it is of particular interest to characterize the internal material properties of the mirror coating, which is the domain of X-rays. Layer thickness, density and interface roughness of single and multilayer coatings are investigated by means of X-ray reflectometry. In this publication recent achievements in the field of slope measuring metrology are shown and the characterization of different types of mirror coating demonstrated. Furthermore, upcoming challenges to the inspection of ultra-precise optical components designed to be used in future FEL and DLSR beamlines are discussed.

  16. Effect of Two Advanced Noise Reduction Technologies on the Aerodynamic Performance of an Ultra High Bypass Ratio Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christoper E.; Gazzaniga, John A.

    2013-01-01

    A wind tunnel experiment was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center anechoic 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel to investigate two new advanced noise reduction technologies in support of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing Project. The goal of the experiment was to demonstrate the noise reduction potential and effect on fan model performance of the two noise reduction technologies in a scale model Ultra-High Bypass turbofan at simulated takeoff and approach aircraft flight speeds. The two novel noise reduction technologies are called Over-the-Rotor acoustic treatment and Soft Vanes. Both technologies were aimed at modifying the local noise source mechanisms of the fan tip vortex/fan case interaction and the rotor wake-stator interaction. For the Over-the-Rotor acoustic treatment, two noise reduction configurations were investigated. The results showed that the two noise reduction technologies, Over-the-Rotor and Soft Vanes, were able to reduce the noise level of the fan model, but the Over-the-Rotor configurations had a significant negative impact on the fan aerodynamic performance; the loss in fan aerodynamic efficiency was between 2.75 to 8.75 percent, depending on configuration, compared to the conventional solid baseline fan case rubstrip also tested. Performance results with the Soft Vanes showed that there was no measurable change in the corrected fan thrust and a 1.8 percent loss in corrected stator vane thrust, which resulted in a total net thrust loss of approximately 0.5 percent compared with the baseline reference stator vane set.

  17. Engineering and Economic Analysis of an Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plant with and without Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Task 7. Design and Economic Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Booras, George; Powers, J.; Riley, C.; Hendrix, H.

    2015-09-01

    This report evaluates the economics and performance of two A-USC PC power plants; Case 1 is a conventionally configured A-USC PC power plant with superior emission controls, but without CO2 removal; and Case 2 adds a post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) system to the plant from Case 1, using the design and heat integration strategies from EPRI’s 2015 report, “Best Integrated Coal Plant.” The capture design basis for this case is “partial,” to meet EPA’s proposed New Source Performance Standard, which was initially proposed as 500 kg-CO2/MWh (gross) or 1100 lb-CO2/MWh (gross), but modified in August 2015 to 635 kg-CO2/MWh (gross) or 1400 lb-CO2/MWh (gross). This report draws upon the collective experience of consortium members, with EPRI and General Electric leading the study. General Electric provided the steam cycle analysis as well as v the steam turbine design and cost estimating. EPRI performed integrated plant performance analysis using EPRI’s PC Cost model.

  18. Advanced degradation of brominated epoxy resin and simultaneous transformation of glass fiber from waste printed circuit boards by improved supercritical water oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Fu-Shen

    2016-10-01

    This work investigated various supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) systems, i.e. SCWO1 (only water), SCWO2 (water+H2O2) and SCWO3 (water+H2O2/NaOH), for waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) detoxification and recycling. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to optimize the operating conditions of the optimal SCWO3 systems. The optimal reaction conditions for debromination were found to be the NaOH of 0.21g, the H2O2 volume of 9.04mL, the time of 39.7min, maximum debromination efficiency of 95.14%. Variance analysis indicated that the factors influencing debromination efficiency was in the sequence of NaOH>H2O2>time. Mechanism studies indicated that the dissociated ions from NaOH in supercritical water promoted the debromination of brominated epoxy resins (BERs) through an elimination reaction and nucleophilic substitution. HO2, produced by H2O2 could induce the oxidation of phenol ring to open (intermediates of BERs), which were thoroughly degraded to form hydrocarbons, CO2, H2O and NaBr. In addition, the alkali-silica reaction between OH(-) and SiO2 induced the phase transformation of glass fibers, which were simultaneously converted into anorthite and albite. Waste PCBs in H2O2/NaOH improved SCWO system were fully degraded into useful products and simultaneously transformed into functional materials. These findings are helpful for efficient recycling of waste PCBs.

  19. Prospects of Supercritical Fluids in Realizing Graphene-Based Functional Materials.

    PubMed

    Padmajan Sasikala, Suchithra; Poulin, Philippe; Aymonier, Cyril

    2016-04-13

    Supercritical-fluids science and technology predate all the approaches that are currently established for graphene production by several decades in advanced materials design. However, it has only recently been proposed as a plausible approach for graphene processing. Since then, supercritical fluids have emerged into contention as an alternative to existing technologies because of their scalability and versatility in processing graphene materials, which include composites, aerogels, and foams. Here, an overview is presented of such materials prepared through supercritical fluids from an advanced materials science standpoint, with a discussion on their fundamental properties and technological applications. The benefits of supercritical-fluid processing over conventional liquid-phase processing are presented. The benefits include not only better performances for advanced applications but also environmental issues associated with the synthesis process. Nevertheless, the limitations of supercritical-fluid processing are also stressed, along with challenges that are still faced toward the achievement of the great expectations from graphene materials.

  20. Effects of Gravity on Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegde, Uday; Hicks, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the fluid mechanics of supercritical water jets are being studied at NASA to develop a better understanding of flow behaviors for purposes of advancing supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) technologies for applications in reduced gravity environments. These studies provide guidance for the development of future SCWO experiments in new experimental platforms that will extend the current operational range of the DECLIC (Device for the Study of Critical Liquids and Crystallization) Facility on board the International Space Station (ISS). The hydrodynamics of supercritical fluid jets is one of the basic unit processes of a SCWO reactor. These hydrodynamics are often complicated by significant changes in the thermo-physical properties that govern flow behavior (e.g., viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat, compressibility, etc), particularly when fluids transition from sub-critical to supercritical conditions. Experiments were conducted in a 150 ml reactor cell under constant pressure with water injections at various flow rates. Flow configurations included supercritical jets injected into either sub-critical or supercritical water. Profound gravitational influences were observed, particularly in the transition to turbulence, for the flow conditions under study. These results will be presented and the parameters of the flow that control jet behavior will be examined and discussed.

  1. Development of New Cladding Materials Applied for Advanced LWR Aiming at Ultra-high Burn-up and Fast Neutron Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kiuchi, K.; Ogawa, H.; Ioka, I.; Kuroda, Y.; Anegawa, T.

    2002-07-01

    The ultra-high burnup more than 100 GWd/t and fast neutron spectrum tailoring are considered to be the most promising technologies applied to the advanced MOX LWRs for minimizing the electrical cost and waste management. The development of new cladding materials with the excellent irradiation properties has been conducted to realize these needs. Comparing with UO{sub 2}, to increase the internal pressure by FP gas release is accelerated with the co-production of Xe and He in MOX fuels. New stainless steels with the excellent irradiation properties, creep strength and compatibilities to high temperature water were selected to attain the reliability. The irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking through the past experience in LWR plants is possible to inhibit by new steel making process. The problems of tritium release and PCMI is possible to inhibit by ductile niobium alloy lining. (authors)

  2. Ultra-high voltage capillary electrophoresis >300 kV: recent advances in instrumentation and analyte detection.

    PubMed

    Henley, W Hampton; Jorgenson, James W

    2012-10-26

    Instrumentation has been developed for the implementation of ultra-high voltage capillary electrophoresis (UHVCE) with potentials up to and exceeding 300 kV. Several separations have been used to demonstrate the utility of higher applied voltages for improving the resolution of peptide, protein, and nucleic acid separations. Previously reported instrumentation was limited to 120 kV and required submersion in a bath of transformer oil to prevent corona and high voltage arcing between the components of the instrument [Hutterer, 1999, 2000, 2005] [1-3]. A modular design that uses plastic dielectric materials to overcome these obstacles enabling simplified operation of the instrument in air is described here in detail. A forced air system developed to control the temperature of the instrument to within a few degrees over a range of 25-60 °C for use with ultra-high voltage capillary gel electrophoresis is also described. UHVCE instrumentation and its applications with UV absorption and laser induced fluorescence detection are further developed, and the first demonstration of UHVCE coupled to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry is shown.

  3. Supercritical Fuel Pyrolysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-30

    experiments are conducted in the isothermal , isobaric reactor designed expressly for such purposes by Davis [22] and used by Stewart [11,12] in the AFOSR... isothermal , isobaric reactor specially designed for such purposes, we have conducted supercritical pyrolysis experiments with three model fuels: 1...prevalent understanding of how these different component groups behave under pyrolysis conditions. Clearly we need to know more about the pyrolysis

  4. Supercritical solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Yields of soluble organic extract are increased up to about 50% by the supercritical extraction of particulate coal at a temperature below the polymerization temperature for coal extract fragments (450 C.) and a pressure from 500 psig to 5,000 psig by the conjoint use of a solvent mixture containing a low volatility, high critical temperature coal dissolution catalyst such as phenanthrene and a high volatility, low critical temperature solvent such as toluene.

  5. Supercritical fluids cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, S.; Hjeresen, D.; Silva, L.; Spall, D.; Stephenson, R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses a proposed multi-party research and development program which seeks to develop supercritical fluid cleaning technology as an alternative to existing solvent cleaning applications. While SCF extraction technology has been in commercial use for several years, the use of these fluids as cleaning agents poses several new technical challenges. Problems inherent in the commercialization of SCF technology include: the cleaning efficacy and compatibility of supercritical working fluids with the parts to be cleaned must be assessed for a variety of materials and components; process parameters and equipment design Have been optimized for extractive applications and must be reconsidered for application to cleaning; and co-solvents and entrainers must be identified to facilitate the removal of polar inorganic and organic contaminants, which are often not well solvated in supercritical systems. The proposed research and development program would address these issues and lead to the development and commercialization of viable SCF-based technology for precision cleaning applications. This paper provides the technical background, program scope, and delineates the responsibilities of each principal participant in the program.

  6. Microemulsions in supercritical hydrochlorofluorocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, K.; Fulton, J.L.

    1996-10-30

    We report the properties of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) microemulsions formed in supercritical hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), hydrofluorocarbons, and flourocarbons. The fluids used in this study include compounds that are of low toxicity and flammability and that are expected to remain environmentally acceptable well into the next century (e.g., 1,1,1, 2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) and chlorodifluoromethane (R22)). We show that it is possible to form a water-in-oil type of microemulsion in a low molecular weight HCFC (R22). In addition to these HCFCs, We also review the ability to form microemulsions in 14 other fluids (ethane, propene, propane, n-butane, n-pentane, n-haxane, isobutane, isooctane, difluoromethane, trifluoromethane, hexafluoroethane, sulfur haxafluoride, xenon, and carbon dioxide) at conditions just above or below the critical point (0.75 < T/T{sub c} <1.1) of the solvent. We report extensively the phase behavior of AOT and didodecyldimethylammonium bromide microemulsions formed in a supercritical HCFC, R22. We show that microemulsions in HCFCs are practical alternatives to other fluids, such as supercritical carbon dioxide. 56 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Sample MMM manuscript for submission to AIP advances transient line starting analysis of the ultra-high speed PMSM.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wenjie; Li, Wei; Xiao, Ling; Li, Ming; Tian, Yongsheng; Sun, Yanhua; Yu, Lie

    2017-05-01

    Aiming at the ultra high speed permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) supported by gas foil bearings (GFBs), this paper calculates the transient line starting of the motor. Firstly, the start effect of the rotor composed of cylindrical PM and stainless steel sleeve is studied. Then, in order to enhance the start torque, copper ring, nickel ring and copper squirrel-cage are introduced in the rotor and their start effect are analysed, respectively. It can be found that the rotor including nickel ring can be accelerated to set speed, but all the other rotors are failed due to the higher PM and braking torques. It can be concluded that some material owning slight large relative permeability can be applied in the rotor to reduce the PM field and contribute to start by using the line-start method.

  8. Sample MMM manuscript for submission to AIP advances transient line starting analysis of the ultra-high speed PMSM

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wenjie; Li, Wei; Xiao, ling; Li, Ming; Tian, Yongsheng; Sun, Yanhua; Yu, Lie

    2017-01-01

    Aiming at the ultra high speed permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) supported by gas foil bearings (GFBs), this paper calculates the transient line starting of the motor. Firstly, the start effect of the rotor composed of cylindrical PM and stainless steel sleeve is studied. Then, in order to enhance the start torque, copper ring, nickel ring and copper squirrel-cage are introduced in the rotor and their start effect are analysed, respectively. It can be found that the rotor including nickel ring can be accelerated to set speed, but all the other rotors are failed due to the higher PM and braking torques. It can be concluded that some material owning slight large relative permeability can be applied in the rotor to reduce the PM field and contribute to start by using the line-start method. PMID:28105384

  9. Alloys for advanced steam turbines--Oxidation behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.

    2007-10-01

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. Current research on the oxidation of candidate materials for advanced steam turbines is presented with a focus on a methodology for estimating chromium evaporation rates from protective chromia scales. The high velocities and pressures of advanced steam turbines lead to evaporation predictions as high as 5 × 10-8 kg m-2s-1 of CrO2(OH)2(g) at 760°C and 34.5 MPa. This is equivalent to 0.077 mm per year of solid Cr loss.

  10. Supercritical fluid processing: opportunities for new resist materials and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher-Wetmore, Paula M.; Ober, Christopher K.; Gabor, Allen H.; Allen, Robert D.

    1996-05-01

    Over the past two decades supercritical fluids have been utilized as solvents for carrying out separations of materials as diverse as foods, polymers, pharmaceuticals, petrochemicals, natural products, and explosives. More recently they have been used for non-extractive applications such as recrystallization, deposition, impregnation, surface modification, and as a solvent alternative for precision parts cleaning. Today, supercritical fluid extraction is being practiced in the foods and beverage industries; there are commercial plants for decaffeinating coffee and tea, extracting beer flavoring agents from hops, and separating oils and oleoresins from spices. Interest in supercritical fluid processing of polymers has grown over the last ten years, and many new purification, fractionation, and even polymerization techniques have emerged. One of the most significant motivations for applying this technology to polymers has been increased performance demands. More recently, with increasing scrutiny of traditional solvents, supercritical fluids, and in particular carbon dioxide, are receiving widespread attention as 'environmentally conscious' solvents. This paper describes several examples of polymers applications, including a few involving photoresists, which demonstrate that as next- generation advanced polymer systems emerge, supercritical fluids are certain to offer advantages as cutting edge processing tools.

  11. A comparison of trim drag for conventional and supercritical wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, P. F.

    1983-01-01

    The magnitude of the trim drag incurred by advanced supercritical wings and conventional wide-body wings at cruise conditions are investigated. Experiments were performed in a transonic pressure tunnel at a Mach number of 0.82 with a conventional wide-body wing and supercritical wing with high aspect ratio (9.80) using one of three low-tail configurations or two T-tail configurations in order to determine the effects of horizontal tail size, location, camber and static margin. Drag measurements indicate trim drag for the supercritical wing not to be significantly higher than for the conventional wing, although the minimum drag values for the supercritical wing occurred at lower static margins than for conventional wings. Both wings exhibited a reduction in trim drag with reduced cambered tail size, and greater minimum drag increments for cambered tails than for symmetrical tails. Lower trim-drag increments were also observed for the T-tail configuration than the low tails. The increase in lift-drag ratio for the supercritical wing over the conventional wing amounted to 11% for the best tail configurations.

  12. On-line coupling of supercritical fluid extraction and chromatographic techniques.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Camargo, Andrea Del Pilar; Parada-Alfonso, Fabián; Ibáñez, Elena; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    This review summarizes and discusses recent advances and applications of on-line supercritical fluid extraction coupled to liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and supercritical fluid chromatographic techniques. Supercritical fluids, due to their exceptional physical properties, provide unique opportunities not only during the extraction step but also in the separation process. Although supercritical fluid extraction is especially suitable for recovery of non-polar organic compounds, this technique can also be successfully applied to the extraction of polar analytes by the aid of modifiers. Supercritical fluid extraction process can be performed following "off-line" or "on-line" approaches and their main features are contrasted herein. Besides, the parameters affecting the supercritical fluid extraction process are explained and a "decision tree" is for the first time presented in this review work as a guide tool for method development. The general principles (instrumental and methodological) of the different on-line couplings of supercritical fluid extraction with chromatographic techniques are described. Advantages and shortcomings of supercritical fluid extraction as hyphenated technique are discussed. Besides, an update of the most recent applications (from 2005 up to now) of the mentioned couplings is also presented in this review.

  13. Supercritical Fuel Pyrolysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-28

    aircraft will have to operate under very high pressures and will have to sustain very high heat loads (e.g., > 30,000 BTU/min) in order to meet aircraft...inability to predict solids formation tendencies of fuels under supercritical conditions has been brought to our attention by Dr. Tim Edwards (of the Air...introduce auto-oxidative effects [21]. The sparged fuel is then loaded into a high-pressure pump, which delivers the fuel to the reactor, as shown in Figure

  14. Supercritical Brayton Cycle Nuclear Power System Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    Both the NASA and DOE have programs that are investigating advanced power conversion cycles for planetary surface power on the moon or Mars, and for next generation nuclear power plants on earth. The gas Brayton cycle offers many practical solutions for space nuclear power systems and was selected as the nuclear power system of choice for the NASA Prometheus project. An alternative Brayton cycle that offers high efficiency at a lower reactor coolant outlet temperature is the supercritical Brayton cycle (SCBC). The supercritical cycle is a true Brayton cycle because it uses a single phase fluid with a compressor inlet temperature that is just above the critical point of the fluid. This paper describes the use of a supercritical Brayton cycle that achieves a cycle efficiency of 26.6% with a peak coolant temperature of 750 K and for a compressor inlet temperature of 390 K. The working fluid uses a clear odorless, nontoxic refrigerant C318 perflurocarbon (C4F8) that always operates in the gas phase. This coolant was selected because it has a critical temperature and pressure of 388.38 K and 2.777 MPa. The relatively high critical temperature allows for efficient thermal radiation that keeps the radiator mass small. The SCBC achieves high efficiency because the loop design takes advantage of the non-ideal nature of the coolant equation of state just above the critical point. The lower coolant temperature means that metal fuels, uranium oxide fuels, and uranium zirconium hydride fuels with stainless steel, ferretic steel, or superalloy cladding can be used with little mass penalty or reduction in cycle efficiency. The reactor can use liquid-metal coolants and no high temperature heat exchangers need to be developed. Indirect gas cooling or perhaps even direct gas cooling can be used if the C4F8 coolant is found to be sufficiently radiation tolerant. Other fluids can also be used in the supercritical Brayton cycle including Propane (C3H8, Tcritical = 369 K) and Hexane (C6

  15. Supercritical Brayton Cycle Nuclear Power System Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Steven A.

    2007-01-30

    Both the NASA and DOE have programs that are investigating advanced power conversion cycles for planetary surface power on the moon or Mars, and for next generation nuclear power plants on earth. The gas Brayton cycle offers many practical solutions for space nuclear power systems and was selected as the nuclear power system of choice for the NASA Prometheus project. An alternative Brayton cycle that offers high efficiency at a lower reactor coolant outlet temperature is the supercritical Brayton cycle (SCBC). The supercritical cycle is a true Brayton cycle because it uses a single phase fluid with a compressor inlet temperature that is just above the critical point of the fluid. This paper describes the use of a supercritical Brayton cycle that achieves a cycle efficiency of 26.6% with a peak coolant temperature of 750 K and for a compressor inlet temperature of 390 K. The working fluid uses a clear odorless, nontoxic refrigerant C318 perflurocarbon (C4F8) that always operates in the gas phase. This coolant was selected because it has a critical temperature and pressure of 388.38 K and 2.777 MPa. The relatively high critical temperature allows for efficient thermal radiation that keeps the radiator mass small. The SCBC achieves high efficiency because the loop design takes advantage of the non-ideal nature of the coolant equation of state just above the critical point. The lower coolant temperature means that metal fuels, uranium oxide fuels, and uranium zirconium hydride fuels with stainless steel, ferretic steel, or superalloy cladding can be used with little mass penalty or reduction in cycle efficiency. The reactor can use liquid-metal coolants and no high temperature heat exchangers need to be developed. Indirect gas cooling or perhaps even direct gas cooling can be used if the C4F8 coolant is found to be sufficiently radiation tolerant. Other fluids can also be used in the supercritical Brayton cycle including Propane (C3H8, Tcritical = 369 K) and Hexane (C6

  16. An advanced phantom study assessing the feasibility of neuronal current imaging by ultra-low-field NMR.

    PubMed

    Körber, Rainer; Nieminen, Jaakko O; Höfner, Nora; Jazbinšek, Vojko; Scheer, Hans-Jürgen; Kim, Kiwoong; Burghoff, Martin

    2013-12-01

    In ultra-low-field (ULF) NMR/MRI, a common scheme is to magnetize the sample by a polarizing field of up to hundreds of mT, after which the NMR signal, precessing in a field on the order of several μT, is detected with superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). In our ULF-NMR system, we polarize with up to 50mT and deploy a single-stage DC-SQUID current sensor with an integrated input coil which is connected to a wire-wound Nb gradiometer. We developed this system (white noise 0.50fT/√Hz) for assessing the feasibility of imaging neuronal currents by detecting their effect on the ULF-NMR signal. Magnetoencephalography investigations of evoked brain activity showed neuronal dipole moments below 50nAm. With our instrumentation, we have studied two different approaches for neuronal current imaging. In the so-called DC effect, long-lived neuronal activity shifts the Larmor frequency of the surrounding protons. An alternative strategy is to exploit fast neuronal activity as a tipping pulse. This so-called AC effect requires the proton Larmor frequency to match the frequency of the neuronal activity, which ranges from near-DC to ∼kHz. We emulated neuronal activity by means of a single dipolar source in a physical phantom, consisting of a hollow sphere filled with an aqueous solution of CuSO4 and NaCl. In these phantom studies, with physiologically relevant dipole depths, we determined resolution limits for our set-up for the AC and the DC effect of ∼10μAm and ∼50nAm, respectively. Hence, the DC effect appears to be detectable in vivo by current ULF-NMR technology.

  17. Corrosion in supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Propp, W.A.; Carleson, T.E.; Wai, Chen M.; Taylor, P.R.; Daehling, K.W.; Huang, Shaoping; Abdel-Latif, M.

    1996-05-01

    Integrated studies were carried out in the areas of corrosion, thermodynamic modeling, and electrochemistry under pressure and temperature conditions appropriate for potential applications of supercritical fluid (SCF) extractive metallurgy. Carbon dioxide and water were the primary fluids studied. Modifiers were used in some tests; these consisted of 1 wt% water and 10 wt% methanol for carbon dioxide and of sulfuric acid, sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium nitrate at concentrations ranging from 0.00517 to 0.010 M for the aqueous fluids. The materials studied were Types 304 and 316 (UNS S30400 and S31600) stainless steel, iron, and AISI-SAE 1080 (UNS G10800) carbon steel. The thermodynamic modeling consisted of development of a personal computer-based program for generating Pourbaix diagrams at supercritical conditions in aqueous systems. As part of the model, a general method for extrapolating entropies and related thermodynamic properties from ambient to SCF conditions was developed. The experimental work was used as a tool to evaluate the predictions of the model for these systems. The model predicted a general loss of passivation in iron-based alloys at SCF conditions that was consistent with experimentally measured corrosion rates and open circuit potentials. For carbon-dioxide-based SCFs, measured corrosion rates were low, indicating that carbon steel would be suitable for use with unmodified carbon dioxide, while Type 304 stainless steel would be suitable for use with water or methanol as modifiers.

  18. Thermochromic shifts in supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Yonker, C.R.; Smith, R.D. )

    1989-02-23

    Thermochromic shifts of organic solute molecules in supercritical CO{sub 2} under conditions of both constant pressure and density are compared to previous studies of solvatochromic shifts at isothermal conditions. Similar solvatochromic and thermochromic shifts are seen as a function of density for supercritical CO{sub 2}. At constant density a small thermochromic shift ({approx}400 cm{sup {minus}1}) for supercritical CO{sub 2} was seen for both 2-nitroanisole and 4-ethylnitrobenzene. The excited-state dipole moments for 2-nitroanisole, as calculated from the thermochromic and solvatochromic data, were in agreement.

  19. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This engineering bulletin presents a description and status of supercritical water oxidation technology, a summary of recent performance tests, and the current applicability of this emerging technology. This information is provided to assist remedial project managers, contractors...

  20. Final LDRD report : design and fabrication of advanced device structures for ultra high efficiency solid state lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    Koleske, Daniel David; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Shul, Randy John; Wendt, Joel Robert; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this one year LDRD was to improve the overall efficiency of InGaN LEDs by improving the extraction of light from the semiconductor chip. InGaN LEDs are currently the most promising technology for producing high efficiency blue and green semiconductor light emitters. Improving the efficiency of InGaN LEDs will enable a more rapid adoption of semiconductor based lighting. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop photonic structures to improve light extraction from nitride-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). While many advanced device geometries were considered for this work, we focused on the use of a photonic crystal for improved light extraction. Although resonant cavity LEDs and other advanced structures certainly have the potential to improve light extraction, the photonic crystal approach showed the most promise in the early stages of this short program. The photonic crystal (PX)-LED developed here incorporates a two dimensional photonic crystal, or photonic lattice, into a nitride-based LED. The dimensions of the photonic crystal are selected such that there are very few or no optical modes in the plane of the LED ('lateral' modes). This will reduce or eliminate any radiation in the lateral direction so that the majority of the LED radiation will be in vertical modes that escape the semiconductor, which will improve the light-extraction efficiency. PX-LEDs were fabricated using a range of hole diameters and lattice constants and compared to control LEDs without a photonic crystal. The far field patterns from the PX-LEDs were dramatically modified by the presence of the photonic crystal. An increase in LED brightness of 1.75X was observed for light measured into a 40 degree emission cone with a total increase in power of 1.5X for an unencapsulated LED.

  1. Supercritical fluids: Reactions, materials and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tumas, W.; Jacobson, G.B.; Josephsohn, N.S.; Brown, G.H.

    1999-04-09

    A number of important processes utilizing supercritical fluids have been either implemented or are emerging for extractions, separations and a wide range of cleaning applications. Supercritical fluids can be reasonable solvents yet share many of the advantages of gases including miscibility with other gases (i.e. hydrogen and oxygen), low viscosities and high diffusivities. Carbon dioxide has the further advantages of being nontoxic, nonflammable, inexpensive and currently unregulated. The use of compressed gases, either as liquids or supercritical fluids, as reaction media offers the opportunity to replace conventional hazardous solvents and also to optimize and potentially control the effect of solvent on chemical and material processing. The last several years has seen a significant growth in advances in chemical synthesis, catalytic transformations and materials synthesis and processing. The authors report on results from an exploratory program at Los Alamos National Laboratory aimed at investigating the use of dense phase fluids, particularly carbon dioxide, as reaction media for homogeneous, heterogeneous and phase-separable catalytic reactions in an effort to develop new, environmentally-friendly methods for chemical synthesis and processing. This approach offers the possibility of opening up substantially different chemical pathways, increasing selectivity at higher reaction rates, facilitating downstream separations and mitigating the need for hazardous solvents. Developing and understanding chemical and catalytic transformations in carbon dioxide could lead to greener chemistry at three levels: (1) Solvent replacement; (2) Better chemistry (e.g. higher reactivity, selectivity, less energy consumption); and (3) New chemistry (e.g. novel separations, use of COP{sub 2} as a C-1 source).

  2. Operation and analysis of a supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Steven Alan; Radel, Ross F.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2010-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is investigating advanced Brayton cycles using supercritical working fluids for use with solar, nuclear or fossil heat sources. The focus of this work has been on the supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle (S-CO2) which has the potential for high efficiency in the temperature range of interest for these heat sources, and is also very compact, with the potential for lower capital costs. The first step in the development of these advanced cycles was the construction of a small scale Brayton cycle loop, funded by the Laboratory Directed Research & Development program, to study the key issue of compression near the critical point of CO{sub 2}. This document outlines the design of the small scale loop, describes the major components, presents models of system performance, including losses, leakage, windage, compressor performance, and flow map predictions, and finally describes the experimental results that have been generated.

  3. Supercritical microgravity droplet vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, J.; Curtis, E.; Farrell, P.

    1990-01-01

    Supercritical droplet vaporization is an important issue in many combustion systems, such as liquid fueled rockets and compression-ignition (diesel) engines. In order to study the details of droplet behavior at these conditions, an experiment was designed to provide a gas phase environment which is above the critical pressure and critical temperature of a single liquid droplet. In general, the droplet begins as a cold droplet in the hot, high pressure environment. In order to eliminate disruptions to the droplet by convective motion in the gas, forced and natural convection gas motion are required to be small. Implementation of this requirement for forced convection is straightforward, while reduction of natural convection is achieved by reduction in the g-level for the experiment. The resulting experiment consists of a rig which can stably position a droplet without restraint in a high-pressure, high temperature gas field in microgravity. The microgravity field is currently achieved by dropping the device in the NASA Lewis 2.2 second drop tower. The performance of the experimental device and results to date are presented.

  4. A supercritical airfoil experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mateer, G. G.; Seegmiller, H. L.; Hand, L. A.; Szodruck, J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to provide a comprehensive data base for the validation of numerical simulations. The objective of the present paper is to provide a tabulation of the experimental data. The data were obtained in the two-dimensional, transonic flowfield surrounding a supercritical airfoil. A variety of flows were studied in which the boundary layer at the trailing edge of the model was either attached or separated. Unsteady flows were avoided by controlling the Mach number and angle of attack. Surface pressures were measured on both the model and wind tunnel walls, and the flowfield surrounding the model was documented using a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). Although wall interference could not be completely eliminated, its effect was minimized by employing the following techniques. Sidewall boundary layers were reduced by aspiration, and upper and lower walls were contoured to accommodate the flow around the model and the boundary-layer growth on the tunnel walls. A data base with minimal interference from a tunnel with solid walls provides an ideal basis for evaluating the development of codes for the transonic speed range because the codes can include the wall boundary conditions more precisely than interference connections can be made to the data sets.

  5. Steam Oxidation of Advanced Steam Turbine Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2008-01-01

    Power generation from coal using ultra supercritical steam results in improved fuel efficiency and decreased greenhouse gas emissions. Results of ongoing research into the oxidation of candidate nickel-base alloys for ultra supercritical steam turbines are presented. Exposure conditions range from moist air at atmospheric pressure (650°C to 800°C) to steam at 34.5 MPa (650°C to 760°C). Parabolic scale growth coupled with internal oxidation and reactive evaporation of chromia are the primary corrosion mechanisms.

  6. Supercritical Fluid Reactions for Coal Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Charles A. Eckert

    1997-11-01

    Exciting opportunities exist for the application of supercritical fluid (SCF) reactions for the pre-treatment of coal. Utilizing reactants which resemble the organic nitrogen containing components of coal, we developed a method to tailor chemical reactions in supercritical fluid solvents for the specific application of coal denitrogenation. The tautomeric equilibrium of a Schiff base was chosen as one model system and was investigated in supercritical ethane and cosolvent modified supercritical ethane. The Diels-Alder reaction of anthracene and 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) was selected as a second model system, and it was investigated in supercritical carbon dioxide.

  7. Supercritical droplet combustion and related transport phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Vigor; Hsieh, K. C.; Shuen, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of recent advances in theoretical analyses of supercritical droplet vaporization and combustion is conducted. Both hydrocarbon and cryogenic liquid droplets over a wide range of thermodynamic states are considered. Various important high-pressure effects on droplet behavior, such as thermodynamic non-ideality, transport anomaly, and property variation, are reviewed. Results indicate that the ambient gas pressure exerts significant control of droplet gasification and burning processes through its influence on fluid transport, gas-liquid interfacial thermodynamics, and chemical reactions. The droplet gasification rate increases progressively with pressure. However, the data for the overall burnout time exhibit a considerable change in the combustion mechanism at the criticl pressure, mainly as a result of reduced mass diffusivity and latent heat of vaporization with increased pressure. The influence of droplet size on the burning characteristics is also noted.

  8. Next Generation Engineered Materials for Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas Arrell

    2006-05-31

    To reduce the effect of global warming on our climate, the levels of CO{sub 2} emissions should be reduced. One way to do this is to increase the efficiency of electricity production from fossil fuels. This will in turn reduce the amount of CO{sub 2} emissions for a given power output. Using US practice for efficiency calculations, then a move from a typical US plant running at 37% efficiency to a 760 C /38.5 MPa (1400 F/5580 psi) plant running at 48% efficiency would reduce CO2 emissions by 170kg/MW.hr or 25%. This report presents a literature review and roadmap for the materials development required to produce a 760 C (1400 F) / 38.5MPa (5580 psi) steam turbine without use of cooling steam to reduce the material temperature. The report reviews the materials solutions available for operation in components exposed to temperatures in the range of 600 to 760 C, i.e. above the current range of operating conditions for today's turbines. A roadmap of the timescale and approximate cost for carrying out the required development is also included. The nano-structured austenitic alloy CF8C+ was investigated during the program, and the mechanical behavior of this alloy is presented and discussed as an illustration of the potential benefits available from nano-control of the material structure.

  9. Removing Solids From Supercritical Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Glenn T.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus removes precipitated inorganic salts and other solids in water-recycling process. Designed for use with oxidation in supercritical water which treats wastes and yields nearly pure water. Heating coils and insulation around vessel keep it hot. Locking bracket seals vessel but allows it to be easily opened for replacement of filled canisters.

  10. Supercritical multicomponent solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W. H.; Fong, W. S.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P. C. F.; Lawson, D. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The yield of organic extract from the supercritical extraction of coal with larger diameter organic solvents such as toluene is increased by use of a minor amount of from 0.1 to 10% by weight of a second solvent such as methanol having a molecular diameter significantly smaller than the average pore diameter of the coal.

  11. Mass spectrometry with direct supercritical fluid injection

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.

    1983-12-01

    Direct fluid injection mass spectrometry utilizes supercritical fluids for solvation and transfer of materials to a mass spectrometer chemical ionization (CI) source. Available data suggest that any material soluble in a supercritical fluid is transferred efficiently to the ionization region. Mass spectra are presented for mycotoxins of the trichothecene group obtained by use of supercritical carbon dioxide with isobutane as the CI reagent gas. Direct fluid injection MS/MS is also illustrated for major ions in the isobutane chemical ionization of T-2 toxin. The effect of pressure and temperature upon solubility in supercritical fluids is described and illustrated for diacetoxycirpenol. A potential method is also demonstrated for on-line fraction during MS analysis using pressure to control supercritical fluid solubility. Mass spectra are also presented for polar compounds, using supercritical ammonia, and the extension to complex mixtures is described. The fundamental basis and experimental requirements of the direct fluid injection process are discussed. 34 references, 11 figures, 1 table.

  12. Mass spectrometry with direct supercritical fluid injection

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.

    1983-12-01

    Direct fluid injection mass spectrometry utilizes supercritical fluids for solvation and transfer of materials to a mass spectrometer chemical ionization (CI) source. Available data suggest that any material soluble in a supercritical fluid is transferred efficiently to the ionization region. Mass spectra are presented for mycotoxins of the trichothecene group obtained by use of supercritical carbon dioxide with isobutane as the CI reagent gas. Direct fluid injection MS/MS is also illustrated for major ions in the isobutane chemical ionization of T-2 toxin. The effect of pressure and temperature upon solubility in supercritical fluids is described and illustrated for diacetoxyscirpenol. A potential method is also demonstrated for ''on-line fractionation'' during MS analysis using pressure to control supercritical fluid solubility. Mass spectra are also presented for polar compounds, using supercritical ammonia, and the extension to complex mixtures is described. The fundamental basis and experimental requirements of the direct fluid injection process are discussed. 1 figure, 11 tables.

  13. Performance and risks of advanced pulverized-coal plants

    SciTech Connect

    Nalbandian, H.

    2009-07-01

    This article is based on an in-depth report of the same title published by the IEA Clean Coal Centre, CCC/135 (see Coal Abstracts entry Sep 2008 00535). It discusses the commercial, developmental and future status of pulverized fuel power plants including subcritical supercritical and ultra supercritical systems of pulverized coal combustion, the most widely used technology in coal-fired power generation. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Lipidomics by Supercritical Fluid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Laboureur, Laurent; Ollero, Mario; Touboul, David

    2015-01-01

    This review enlightens the role of supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) in the field of lipid analysis. SFC has been popular in the late 1980s and 1990s before almost disappearing due to the commercial success of liquid chromatography (LC). It is only 20 years later that a regain of interest appeared when new commercial instruments were introduced. As SFC is fully compatible with the injection of extracts in pure organic solvent, this technique is perfectly suitable for lipid analysis and can be coupled with either highly universal (UV or evaporative light scattering) or highly specific (mass spectrometry) detection methods. A short history of the use of supercritical fluids as mobile phase for the separation oflipids will be introduced first. Then, the advantages and drawbacks of SFC are discussed for each class of lipids (fatty acyls, glycerolipids, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, sterols, prenols, polyketides) defined by the LIPID MAPS consortium. PMID:26090714

  15. Recuperative supercritical carbon dioxide cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Sprouse, Kenneth M; Subbaraman, Ganesan; O'Connor, George M; Johnson, Gregory A

    2014-11-18

    A power plant includes a closed loop, supercritical carbon dioxide system (CLS-CO.sub.2 system). The CLS-CO.sub.2 system includes a turbine-generator and a high temperature recuperator (HTR) that is arranged to receive expanded carbon dioxide from the turbine-generator. The HTR includes a plurality of heat exchangers that define respective heat exchange areas. At least two of the heat exchangers have different heat exchange areas.

  16. Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    INL's patented, continuous-flow Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC) produces the highest ASTM-quality B-100 biodiesel from waste fats, oils, and greases at the site of waste generation. SSC delivers low-cost transportation fuel, avoids significant landfill costs for municipalities, and reduces potent methane and other emissions produced in landfills from these wastes. You can learn more about INL's energy research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  17. Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    INL's patented, continuous-flow Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC) produces the highest ASTM-quality B-100 biodiesel from waste fats, oils, and greases at the site of waste generation. SSC delivers low-cost transportation fuel, avoids significant landfill costs for municipalities, and reduces potent methane and other emissions produced in landfills from these wastes. You can learn more about INL's energy research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  18. Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject presentation, entitled, Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment, was presented at the International Space Station (ISS) Increment 33/34 Science Symposium. This presentation provides an overview of an international collaboration between NASA and CNES to study the behavior of a dilute aqueous solution of Na2SO4 (5% w) at near-critical conditions. The Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) investigation, serves as important precursor work for subsequent Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) experiments. The SCWM investigation will be performed in DECLICs High Temperature Insert (HTI) for the purpose of studying critical fluid phenomena at high temperatures and pressures. The HTI includes a completely sealed and integrated test cell (i.e., Sample Cell Unit SCU) that will contain approximately 0.3 ml of the aqueous test solution. During the sequence of tests, scheduled to be performed in FY13, temperatures and pressures will be elevated to critical conditions (i.e., Tc = 374C and Pc = 22 MPa) in order to observe salt precipitation, precipitate agglomeration and precipitate transport in the presence of a temperature gradient without the influences of gravitational forces. This presentation provides an overview of the motivation for this work, a description of the DECLIC HTI hardware, the proposed test sequences, and a brief discussion of the scientific research objectives.

  19. Degludec, a new ultra-long-acting basal insulin for the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 1 and 2: advances in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Torres, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Degludec is the most recent molecule of the ultra-long-acting basal insulin analogues approved for human use. It forms soluble multihexamers which after subcutaneous injection are converted into monomers, and are thus slowly and continuously absorbed into the bloodstream. This absorption mechanism confers degludec an ultra-long and stable action profile, with no concentration peaks. This paper discusses the most recent studies in patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus, which showed degludec to be non inferior in decreasing HbA1c, ensuring optimum glycemic control similar to that achieved with insulin glargine or detemir. Degludec also had an improved safety profile, as it was associated to a significantly lower rate of nocturnal hypoglycemia in both types of diabetes and to a potentially lower overall hypoglycemia rate in type 2 DM. Degludec also opens the possibility to use more flexible regimens.

  20. Biocatalytic Processing Polymers in Supercritical Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    Russell, A.J and Beckman, E.J. (1991) Appl. Bioch . Biotech., 31, 197-211. Enzyme activity in supercritical fluids. 22. *Russell, A.J and Beckman, E.J...S., Jacob , J., Beckman, E.J. and Russell, A.J. (1991) Enz. Microb. Technol., 13, 519. Biocatalytic synthesis of acrylates in supercritical fluids. 24

  1. Design and application of a test rig for super-critical power transmission shafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlow, M.; Smalley, A.

    1979-01-01

    The design, assembly, operational check-out and application of a test facility for testing supercritical power transmission shafts under realistic conditions of size, speed and torque are described. Alternative balancing methods and alternative damping mechanisms are demonstrated and compared. The influence of torque upon the unbalance distribution is studied, and its effect on synchronous vibrations is investigated. The feasibility of operating supercritical power transmission shafting is demonstrated, but the need for careful control, by balancing and damping, of synchronous and nonsynchronous vibrations is made clear. The facility was demonstrated to be valuable for shaft system development programs and studies for both advanced and current-production hardware.

  2. Incorporating supercritical steam turbines into molten-salt power tower plants :

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, James Edward; Wolf, Thorsten; Muley, Nishant

    2013-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Siemens Energy, Inc., examined 14 different subcritical and supercritical steam cycles to determine if it is feasible to configure a molten-salt supercritical steam plant that has a capacity in the range of 150 to 200 MWe. The effects of main steam pressure and temperature, final feedwater temperature, and hot salt and cold salt return temperatures were determined on gross and half-net efficiencies. The main steam pressures ranged from 120 bar-a (subcritical) to 260 bar-a (supercritical). Hot salt temperatures of 566 and 600ÀC were evaluated, which resulted in main steam temperatures of 553 and 580ÀC, respectively. Also, the effects of final feedwater temperature (between 260 and 320ÀC) were evaluated, which impacted the cold salt return temperature. The annual energy production and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) were calculated using the System Advisory Model on 165 MWe subcritical plants (baseline and advanced) and the most promising supercritical plants. It was concluded that the supercritical steam plants produced more annual energy than the baseline subcritical steam plant for the same-size heliostat field, receiver, and thermal storage system. Two supercritical steam plants had the highest annual performance and had nearly the same LCOE. Both operated at 230 bar-a main steam pressure. One was designed for a hot salt temperature of 600ÀC and the other 565ÀC. The LCOEs for these plants were about 10% lower than the baseline subcritical plant operating at 120 bar-a main steam pressure and a hot salt temperature of 565ÀC. Based on the results of this study, it appears economically and technically feasible to incorporate supercritical steam turbines in molten-salt power tower plants.

  3. Supercritical water oxidation - Microgravity solids separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killilea, William R.; Hong, Glenn T.; Swallow, Kathleen C.; Thomason, Terry B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) waste treatment and water recycling technology to the problem of waste disposal in-long term manned space missions. As inorganic constituents present in the waste are not soluble in supercritical water, they must be removed from the organic-free supercritical fluid reactor effluent. Supercritical water reactor/solids separator designs capable of removing precipitated solids from the process' supercritical fluid in zero- and low- gravity environments are developed and evaluated. Preliminary experiments are then conducted to test the concepts. Feed materials for the experiments are urine, feces, and wipes with the addition of reverse osmosis brine, the rejected portion of processed hygiene water. The solid properties and their influence on the design of several oxidation-reactor/solids-separator configurations under study are presented.

  4. Electrodeposition of metals from supercritical fluids

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jie; Su, Wenta; Howdle, Steven M.; George, Michael W.; Cook, David; Perdjon-Abel, Magda; Bartlett, Philip N.; Zhang, Wenjian; Cheng, Fei; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; Hyde, Jason; Wilson, James; Smith, David C.; Mallik, Kanad; Sazio, Pier

    2009-01-01

    Electrodeposition is a widely used materials-deposition technology with a number of unique features, in particular, the efficient use of starting materials, conformal, and directed coating. The properties of the solvent medium for electrodeposition are critical to the technique's applicability. Supercritical fluids are unique solvents which give a wide range of advantages for chemistry in general, and materials processing in particular. However, a widely applicable approach to electrodeposition from supercritical fluids has not yet been developed. We present here a method that allows electrodeposition of a range of metals from supercritical carbon dioxide, using acetonitrile as a co-solvent and supercritical difluoromethane. This method is based on a careful selection of reagent and supporting electrolyte. There are no obvious barriers preventing this method being applied to deposit a range of materials from many different supercritical fluids. We present the deposition of 3-nm diameter nanowires in mesoporous silica templates using this methodology. PMID:19706479

  5. Efficient separation of curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin from turmeric using supercritical fluid chromatography: From analytical to preparative scale.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Qiao, Xue; Liang, Wen-fei; Ji, Shuai; Yang, Lu; Wang, Yuan; Xu, Yong-wei; Yang, Ying; Guo, De-an; Ye, Min

    2015-10-01

    Curcumin is the major constituent of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.). It has attracted widespread attention for its anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. The separation of curcumin and its two close analogs, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin, has been challenging by conventional techniques. In this study, an environmentally friendly method based on supercritical fluid chromatography was established for the rapid and facile separation of the three curcuminoids directly from the methanol extract of turmeric. The method was first developed and optimized by ultra performance convergence chromatography, and was then scaled up to preparative supercritical fluid chromatography. Eluted with supercritical fluid CO2 containing 8-15% methanol (containing 10 mM oxalic acid) at a flow rate of 80 mL/min, curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin could be well separated on a Viridis BEH OBD column (Waters, 250 mm × 19 mm, 5 μm) within 6.5 min. As a result, 20.8 mg of curcumin (97.9% purity), 7.0 mg of demethoxycurcumin (91.1%), and 4.6 mg of bisdemethoxycurcumin (94.8%) were obtained after a single step of supercritical fluid chromatography separation with a mean recovery of 76.6%. Showing obvious advantages in low solvent consumption, large sample loading, and easy solvent removal, supercritical fluid chromatography was proved to be a superior technique for the efficient separation of natural products.

  6. Recovery of Alkylation Activity in Deactivated USY Catalyst Using Supercritical Fluids: A Comparison of Light Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar; David N. Thompson; Kyle C. Burch

    2004-05-01

    Off-line, in-situ alkylation activity recovery from a completely deactivated solid acid catalyst was examined in a continuous-flow reaction system employing supercritical fluids (SCF). A USY zeolite catalyst was initially deactivated during the liquid phase alkylation of butene with isobutane in a single-pass reactor and then varying amounts of alkylation activity were recovered by passing supercritical fluids over the catalyst bed. A comparison of reactivation fluids on catalyst activity recovery is reported. Fluids examined included helium, propane, n-butane, isobutane, n-pentane, and isopentane. Phases studied included gas, liquid, and supercritical. As much as 82% of the fresh catalyst activity was recovered when employing supercritical isobutane. The ability of the fluid to facilitate a hydride reaction with the adsorbed deactivating high-molecular weight carbocations was indicated as an important property necessary to attain high levels of catalyst activity recovery. Activity recovery utilizing supercritical fluids that enhance reactivation by both reacting with and desorbing fouling compounds appears to be a promising technique to advance solid catalyst alkylation.

  7. Plasmas in High-Density Medium - Supercritical fluid plasma and Cryogenic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Kazuo

    2011-10-01

    Recently, there has been a lot of attention to plasmas in high-density medium as novel plasmas from the views points of not only pure sciences but also various technologies. In this talk, two topics, supercritical fluid plasma and cryogenic plasma, will be discussed. First, plasmas generated in supercritical fluids (supercritical fluid plasma) provide a new reaction field that combines the high reactivity of plasmas with the unique characteristics of supercritical fluids, i.e. molecular clustering and density fluctuations near the critical point. An overview of the earliest studies on plasmas generated in supercritical fluids to recent advances in the field, including synthesis of novel nanomaterials such as highly-order diamondoid (diamond molecules), will be given. Second, continuing to thermal plasma (gas temperature Tg higher than a few thousands to millions of K) and low temperature plasma (Tg ranging from a few hundreds to thousands of K), plasma in a third range of gas temperatures (Tg lower than 300 K) is called cryogenic plasma (or cryoplasma) to distinguish it from thermal and low-temperature plasmas. In our group, the gas temperature of the plasma can be continuously controlled below room temperature (RT) down to a cryogenic temperature such as the boiling point of helium (4 K). In addition to the diagnostics, the application of cryogenic plasma to nanoporous material processing (low damage ashing of low-k materials) will be discussed. This work was supported financially in part by Grants-in-Aid.

  8. Mini-review: green sustainable processes using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Edward; Sun, Qiubai; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Chongmin; Gou, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Environmentally benign carbon dioxide offers significant potential in its supercritical fluid phase to replace current reliance on a range of hazardous, relatively expensive and environmentally damaging organic solvents that are used on an extensive global basis. The unique combination of the physical properties of supercritical fluids are being exploited and further researched to continue the development and establishment of high efficiency, compact plant to provide energy and water efficient manufacturing processes. This mini-review is focused on the use and potential applications of supercritical fluid carbon dioxide for a selected range of key and emerging industrial processes as a sustainable alternative to totally eliminate or greatly reduce the requirement of numerous conventional organic solvents. Examples of the industries include: chemical extraction and purification, synthetic chemical reactions including polymerization and inorganic catalytic processes. Biochemical reactions involving enzymes, particle size engineering, textile dyeing and advanced material manufacture provide further illustrations of vital industrial activities where supercritical fluid technology processes are being implemented or developed. Some aspects relating to the economics of sustainable supercritical fluid carbon dioxide processes are also considered.

  9. Kinetics of Supercritical Water Oxidation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Donald R. Hardesty April 1 - June 30,1995 Project description: This project consists of experiments and theoretical modeling designed to improv...Washington. D.C., 4/95. D.R. Hardesty , "Kinetic Mechanisms of Supercritical Water Oxidation" presented at the FY95 In Progress Review. 5/95 Ft...McLean, 8300 MS9051 L. Rahn, 8351 MS9055 F. Tully, 8353 MS9056 G. Fisk, 8355 MS9052 D.R. Hardesty , 8361 Attn: Allendorf, S Allendorf, M

  10. The supercritical pomeron in QCD.

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. R.

    1998-06-29

    Deep-inelastic diffractive scaling violations have provided fundamental insight into the QCD pomeron, suggesting a single gluon inner structure rather than that of a perturbative two-gluon bound state. This talk outlines a derivation of a high-energy, transverse momentum cut-off, confining solution of QCD. The pomeron, in first approximation, is a single reggeized gluon plus a ''wee parton'' component that compensates for the color and particle properties of the gluon. This solution corresponds to a super-critical phase of Reggeon Field Theory.

  11. Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Utilizing Pressured Oxy-combustion in Conjunction with Cryogenic Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, Klaus; McClung, Aaron; Davis, John

    2014-03-31

    The team of Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI) and Thar Energy LLC (Thar) applied technology engineering and economic analysis to evaluate two advanced oxy-combustion power cycles, the Cryogenic Pressurized Oxy-combustion Cycle (CPOC), and the Supercritical Oxy-combustion Cycle. This assessment evaluated the performance and economic cost of the two proposed cycles with carbon capture, and included a technology gap analysis of the proposed technologies to determine the technology readiness level of the cycle and the cycle components. The results of the engineering and economic analysis and the technology gap analysis were used to identify the next steps along the technology development roadmap for the selected cycle. The project objectives, as outlined in the FOA, were 90% CO{sub 2} removal at no more than a 35% increase in cost of electricity (COE) as compared to a Supercritical Pulverized Coal Plant without CO{sub 2} capture. The supercritical oxy-combustion power cycle with 99% carbon capture achieves a COE of $121/MWe. This revised COE represents a 21% reduction in cost as compared to supercritical steam with 90% carbon capture ($137/MWe). However, this represents a 49% increase in the COE over supercritical steam without carbon capture ($80.95/MWe), exceeding the 35% target. The supercritical oxy-combustion cycle with 99% carbon capture achieved a 37.9% HHV plant efficiency (39.3% LHV plant efficiency), when coupling a supercritical oxy-combustion thermal loop to an indirect supercritical CO{sub 2} (sCO{sub 2}) power block. In this configuration, the power block achieved 48% thermal efficiency for turbine inlet conditions of 650°C and 290 atm. Power block efficiencies near 60% are feasible with higher turbine inlet temperatures, however a design tradeoff to limit firing temperature to 650°C was made in order to use austenitic stainless steels for the high temperature pressure vessels and piping and to minimize the need for advanced turbomachinery features

  12. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2015-06-09

    A system and method for reactively refining hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20 degrees and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure, using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. A reaction portion of the system and method delivers lightweight, volatile hydrocarbons to an associated contacting unit which operates in mixed subcritical/supercritical or supercritical modes. Using thermal diffusion, multiphase contact, or a momentum generating pressure gradient, the contacting unit separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques.

  13. Geothermal energy production with supercritical fluids

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald W.

    2003-12-30

    There has been invented a method for producing geothermal energy using supercritical fluids for creation of the underground reservoir, production of the geothermal energy, and for heat transport. Underground reservoirs are created by pumping a supercritical fluid such as carbon dioxide into a formation to fracture the rock. Once the reservoir is formed, the same supercritical fluid is allowed to heat up and expand, then is pumped out of the reservoir to transfer the heat to a surface power generating plant or other application.

  14. Oxy-Combustion Environment Characterization: Fire- and Steam-Side Corrosion in Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak; G. H. Meier; B. S. Lutz; N. M. Yanar; F. S. Pettit; J. Zhu; A. Wise; D. E. Laughlin; S. Sridhar

    2012-09-25

    Oxy-fuel combustion is burning a fuel in oxygen rather than air. The low nitrogen flue gas that results is relatively easy to capture CO{sub 2} from for reuse or sequestration. Corrosion issues associated with the environment change (replacement of much of the N{sub 2} with CO{sub 2} and higher sulfur levels) from air- to oxy-firing were examined. Alloys studied included model Fe-Cr alloys and commercial ferritic steels, austenitic steels, and nickel base superalloys. The corrosion behavior is described in terms of corrosion rates, scale morphologies, and scale/ash interactions for the different environmental conditions. Additionally, the progress towards laboratory oxidation tests in advanced ultra-supercritical steam is updated.

  15. Nanostructured Materials: Symthesis in Supercritical Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe; Ye, Xiangrong; Wai, Chien M.

    2009-03-24

    This chapter summarizes the recent developent of synthesis and characterization of nanostructured materials synthesized in supercritical fluids. Nanocomposite catalysts such as Pt and Pd on carbon nanotube support have been synthesized and used for fuel cell applications.

  16. Oxy-combustor operable with supercritical fluid

    DOEpatents

    Brun, Klaus; McClung, Aaron M.; Owston, Rebecca A.

    2017-04-04

    An oxy-combustor is provided which comprises a combustion vessel including at least one solid fuel slurry inlet port, at least one oxygen inlet port and at least one supercritical fluid inlet port, wherein the combustion vessel is operable at an operating pressure of at least 1,100 psi; an interior of the combustion vessel comprises a combustion chamber and a supercritical fluid infusion chamber surrounding at least a part of the combustion chamber, the supercritical fluid infusion chamber and the combustion chamber are separated by a porous liner surrounding the combustion chamber, and the supercritical infusion chamber is located between the porous liner and an outer casing of the combustion vessel.

  17. Supercritical fluid reactions for coal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.A.

    1997-04-01

    Exciting opportunities exist for the application of supercritical fluid (SCF) reactions for the pre-treatment of coal. Utilizing reactants which resemble the organic nitrogen containing components of coal, we propose to develop a method to tailor chemical reactions in supercritical fluid solvents for the specific application of coal denitrogenation. The Diels-Alder reaction of anthracene and 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) was chosen as the model system and was investigated in supercritical carbon dioxide. Kinetic data has been previously collected for pure CO{sub 2} at pressures between the critical pressure of CO{sub 2} (73.8 bar) and 216 bar. This data is now being used to construct mathematical forms which can model these pressure induced kinetic changes. One promising avenue of investigation involves treating the supercritical medium as a dense gas, which allows a kinetic model based on high reference pressure fugacity coefficients to be derived.

  18. Helicity in supercritical temporal mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Okong'o, N.

    2003-01-01

    Databases of transitional states obtained from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of temporal, supercritical mixing layers for two species systems, 02/H2 and C7Hle/N2, are analyzed to elucidate species-specific turbulence aspects.

  19. Charting the landscape of supercritical string theory.

    PubMed

    Hellerman, Simeon; Swanson, Ian

    2007-10-26

    Special solutions of string theory in supercritical dimensions can interpolate in time between theories with different numbers of spacetime dimensions and different amounts of world sheet supersymmetry. These solutions connect supercritical string theories to the more familiar string duality web in ten dimensions and provide a precise link between supersymmetric and purely bosonic string theories. Dimension quenching and c duality appear to be natural concepts in string theory, giving rise to large networks of interconnected theories.

  20. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1993-11-30

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

  1. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

  2. Advances in ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for sensitive detection of several food allergens in complex and processed foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Planque, M; Arnould, T; Dieu, M; Delahaut, P; Renard, P; Gillard, N

    2016-09-16

    Sensitive detection of food allergens is affected by food processing and foodstuff complexity. It is therefore a challenge to detect cross-contamination in food production that could endanger an allergic customer's life. Here we used ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for simultaneous detection of traces of milk (casein, whey protein), egg (yolk, white), soybean, and peanut allergens in different complex and/or heat-processed foodstuffs. The method is based on a single protocol (extraction, trypsin digestion, and purification) applicable to the different tested foodstuffs: chocolate, ice cream, tomato sauce, and processed cookies. The determined limits of quantitation, expressed in total milk, egg, peanut, or soy proteins (and not soluble proteins) per kilogram of food, are: 0.5mg/kg for milk (detection of caseins), 5mg/kg for milk (detection of whey), 2.5mg/kg for peanut, 5mg/kg for soy, 3.4mg/kg for egg (detection of egg white), and 30.8mg/kg for egg (detection of egg yolk). The main advantage is the ability of the method to detect four major food allergens simultaneously in processed and complex matrices with very high sensitivity and specificity.

  3. Organic syntheses employing supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction solvent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barstow, Leon E. (Inventor); Ward, Glen D. (Inventor); Bier, Milan (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Chemical reactions are readily carried out using supercritical carbon dioxide as the reaction medium. Supercritical carbon dioxide is of special value as a reaction medium in reactions for synthesizing polypeptides, for sequencing polypeptides, or for amino acid analysis.

  4. Organic syntheses employing supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction solvent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barstow, Leon E. (Inventor); Ward, Glen D. (Inventor); Bier, Milan (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reactions are readily carried out using supercritical carbon dioxide as the reaction medium. Supercritical carbon dioxide is of special value as a reaction medium in reactions for synthesizing polypeptides, for sequencing polypeptides, or for amino acid analysis.

  5. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra- lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  6. Super Boiler: First Generation, Ultra-High Efficiency Firetube Boiler

    SciTech Connect

    2006-06-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop and demonstrate a first-generation ultra-high-efficiency, ultra-low emissions, compact gas-fired package boiler (Super Boiler), and formulate a long-range RD&D plan for advanced boiler technology out to the year 2020.

  7. An Ultra-Deep Targeted Sequencing Gene Panel Improves the Prognostic Stratification of Patients With Advanced Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Chen, Shu-Jen; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Yang, Lan-Yan; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsao, Chung-Kan; Chen, I-How; Chang, Kai-Ping; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Kang, Chung-Jan; Chen, Hua-Chien; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-02-01

    An improved prognostic stratification of patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and pathologically positive (pN+) nodes is urgently needed. Here, we sought to examine whether an ultra-deep targeted sequencing (UDT-Seq) gene panel may improve the prognostic stratification in this patient group.A mutation-based signature affecting 10 genes (including genetic mutations in 6 oncogenes and 4 tumor suppressor genes) was devised to predict disease-free survival (DFS) in 345 primary tumor specimens obtained from pN+ OSCC patients. Of the 345 patients, 144 were extracapsular spread (ECS)-negative and 201 were ECS-positive. The 5-year locoregional control, distant metastases, disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival (OS) rates served as outcome measures.The UDT-Seq panel was an independent risk factor (RF) for 5-year locoregional control (P = 0.0067), distant metastases (P = 0.0001), DFS (P < 0.0001), disease-specific survival (DSS, P < 0.0001), and OS (P = 0.0003) in pN+ OSCC patients. The presence of ECS and pT3-4 disease were also independent RFs for DFS, DSS, and OS. A prognostic scoring system was formulated by summing up the significant covariates (UDT-Seq, ECS, pT3-4) separately for each survival endpoint. The presence of a positive UDT-Seq panel (n = 77) significantly improved risk stratification for all the survival endpoints as compared with traditional AJCC staging (P < 0.0001). Among ECS-negative patients, those with a UDT-Seq-positive panel (n = 31) had significantly worse DFS (P = 0.0005) and DSS (P = 0.0002). Among ECS-positive patients, those with a UDT-Seq-positive panel (n = 46) also had significantly worse DFS (P = 0.0032) and DSS (P = 0.0098).Our UDT-Seq gene panel consisting of clinically actionable genes was significantly associated with patient outcomes and provided better prognostic stratification than traditional AJCC staging. It was also able to predict prognosis in

  8. iTOUGH2-EOS1SC. Multiphase Reservoir Simulator for Water under Sub- and Supercritical Conditions. User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Magnusdottir, Lilja; Finsterle, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    Supercritical fluids exist near magmatic heat sources in geothermal reservoirs, and the high enthalpy fluid is becoming more desirable for energy production with advancing technology. In geothermal modeling, the roots of the geothermal systems are normally avoided but in order to accurately predict the thermal behavior when wells are drilled close to magmatic intrusions, it is necessary to incorporate the heat sources into the modeling scheme. Modeling supercritical conditions poses a variety of challenges due to the large gradients in fluid properties near the critical zone. This work focused on using the iTOUGH2 simulator to model the extreme temperature and pressure conditions in magmatic geothermal systems.

  9. UltraScale Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, , Jr.

    1997-08-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Information Technology Office (DARPA/ITO) supports research in technology for defense-critical applications. Defense Applications are always insatiable consumers of computing. Futuristic applications such as automated image interpretation/whole vehicle radar-cross-section/real-time prototyping/faster-than-real-time simulation will require computing capabilities orders-of-magnitude beyond the best performance that can be projected from contemporary scalable parallel processors. To reach beyond the silicon digital paradigm, DARPA has initiated a program in UltraScale Computing to explore the domain of innovative computational models, methods, and mechanisms. The objective is to encourage a complete re-thinking of computing. Novel architectures, program synthesis, and execution environments are needed as well as alternative underlying physical mechanisms including molecular, biological, optical and quantum mechanical processes. Development of these advanced computing technologies will offer spectacular performance and cost improvements beyond the threshold of traditional materials and processes. The talk will focus on novel approaches for employing vastly more computational units than shrinking transistors will enable and exploration of the biological options for solving computationally difficult problems.

  10. Supercritical waste oxidation pump investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, G.; Garcia, K.

    1993-02-01

    This report investigates the pumping techniques and pumping equipment that would be appropriate for a 5,000 gallon per day supercritical water oxidation waste disposal facility. The pumps must boost water, waste, and additives from atmospheric pressure to approximately 27.6 MPa (4,000 psia). The required flow ranges from 10 gpm to less than 0.1 gpm. For the higher flows, many commercial piston pumps are available. These pumps have packing and check-valves that will require periodic maintenance; probably at 2 to 6 month intervals. Several commercial diaphragm pumps were also discovered that could pump the higher flow rates. Diaphragm pumps have the advantage of not requiring dynamic seals. For the lower flows associated with the waste and additive materials, commercial diaphragm pumps. are available. Difficult to pump materials that are sticky, radioactive, or contain solids, could be injected with an accumulator using an inert gas as the driving mechanism. The information presented in this report serves as a spring board for trade studies and the development of equipment specifications.

  11. Supercritical fluid thermodynamics for coal processing

    SciTech Connect

    van Swol, F. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Eckert, C.A. . School of Chemical Engineering)

    1988-09-15

    The main objective of this research is to develop an equation of state that can be used to predict solubilities and tailor supercritical fluid solvents for the extraction and processing of coal. To meet this objective we have implemented a two-sided. approach. First, we expanded the database of model coal compound solubilities in higher temperature fluids, polar fluids, and fluid mixtures systems. Second, the unique solute/solute, solute/cosolvent and solute/solvent intermolecular interactions in supercritical fluid solutions were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. These results increased our understanding of the molecular phenomena that affect solubility in supercritical fluids and were significant in the development of an equation of state that accurately reflects the true molecular makeup of the solution. (VC)

  12. Supercritical fluid mixing in Diesel Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Luis; Ma, Peter; Kurman, Matthew; Tess, Michael; Ihme, Matthias; Kweon, Chol-Bum

    2014-11-01

    A numerical framework for simulating supercritical fluids mixing with large density ratios is presented in the context of diesel sprays. Accurate modeling of real fluid effects on the fuel air mixture formation process is critical in characterizing engine combustion. Recent work (Dahms, 2013) has suggested that liquid fuel enters the chamber in a transcritical state and rapidly evolves to supercritical regime where the interface transitions from a distinct liquid/gas interface into a continuous turbulent mixing layer. In this work, the Peng Robinson EoS is invoked as the real fluid model due to an acceptable compromise between accuracy and computational tractability. Measurements at supercritical conditions are reported from the Constant Pressure Flow (CPF) chamber facility at the Army Research Laboratory. Mie and Schlieren optical spray diagnostics are utilized to provide time resolved liquid and vapor penetration length measurement. The quantitative comparison presented is discussed. Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU).

  13. DNS of High Pressure Supercritical Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Shao Teng; Raman, Venkatramanan

    2016-11-01

    Supercritical flows have always been important to rocket motors, and more recently to aircraft engines and stationary gas turbines. The purpose of the present study is to understand effects of differential diffusion on reacting scalars using supercritical isotropic turbulence. Focus is on fuel and oxidant reacting in the transcritical region where density, heat capacity and transport properties are highly sensitive to variations in temperature and pressure. Reynolds and Damkohler number vary as a result and although it is common to neglect differential diffusion effects if Re is sufficiently large, this large variation in temperature with heat release can accentuate molecular transport differences. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) for one step chemistry reaction between fuel and oxidizer are used to examine the differential diffusion effects. A key issue investigated in this paper is if the flamelet progress variable approach, where the Lewis number is usually assumed to be unity and constant for all species, can be accurately applied to simulate supercritical combustion.

  14. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-07-18

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job.

  15. Corrosion in Supercritical carbon Dioxide: Materials, Environmental Purity, Surface Treatments, and Flow Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark

    2013-12-10

    The supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle is gaining importance for power conversion in the Generation IV fast reactor system because of its high conversion efficiencies. When used in conjunction with a sodium fast reactor, the supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle offers additional safety advantages by eliminating potential sodium-water interactions that may occur in a steam cycle. In power conversion systems for Generation IV fast reactors, supercritical CO{sub 2} temperatures could be in the range of 30°C to 650°C, depending on the specific component in the system. Materials corrosion primarily at high temperatures will be an important issue. Therefore, the corrosion performance limits for materials at various temperatures must be established. The proposed research will have four objectives centered on addressing corrosion issues in a high-temperature supercritical CO{sub 2} environment: Task 1: Evaluation of corrosion performance of candidate alloys in high-purity supercritical CO{sub 2}: The following alloys will be tested: Ferritic-martensitic Steels NF616 and HCM12A, austenitic alloys Incoloy 800H and 347 stainless steel, and two advanced concept alloys, AFA (alumina forming austenitic) steel and MA754. Supercritical CO{sub 2} testing will be performed at 450°C, 550°C, and 650°C at a pressure of 20 MPa, in a test facility that is already in place at the proposing university. High purity CO{sub 2} (99.9998%) will be used for these tests. Task 2: Investigation of the effects of CO, H{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2} impurities in supercritical CO{sub 2} on corrosion: Impurities that will inevitably present in the CO{sub 2} will play a critical role in dictating the extent of corrosion and corrosion mechanisms. These effects must be understood to identify the level of CO{sub 2} chemistry control needed to maintain sufficient levels of purity to manage corrosion. The individual effects of important impurities CO, H{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2} will be investigated by adding them

  16. Direct growth of highly dispersed MnCl2 · 4H2O nanostructures with different morphologies on graphene in supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qin-Qin; Zhao, Xiao-Chen; Yin, Jian-Zhong; Xu, Gang

    2016-06-01

    Willow leaf-like Mn3O4 nanoplates@graphene nanocomposites were synthesized using graphene instead of graphene oxide as initial materials with the assistance of supercritical CO2. The near-zero surface tension and the gas-like viscosity of supercritical CO2 favored the intercalation and dispersion of precursors among the graphene nanosheets. In addition, MnCl2 · 4H2O ultra-small nanoparticles with diameter of 1-3 nm were supported on graphene using MnCl2 · 4H2O as precursor, supercritical CO2 as solvent and methanol as co-solvent under very moderate conditions. It was also found that the specific capacitance of the MnCl2 · 4H2O ultra-small nanoparticles@graphene with a metal loading of only 12.4% was twice that of pure graphene. In addition, the capacitance retention ratio of the MnCl2 · 4H2O ultra-small nanoparticles@graphene composite decreased by only 5.4% when the cycle number increased from 200 to 1000.

  17. Solid catalyzed isoparaffin alkylation at supercritical fluid and near-supercritical fluid conditions

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.; Kong, Peter C.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved method for the alkylation reaction of isoparaffins with olefins over solid catalysts including contacting a mixture of an isoparaffin, an olefin and a phase-modifying material with a solid acid catalyst member under alkylation conversion conditions at either supercritical fluid, or near-supercritical fluid conditions, at a temperature and a pressure relative to the critical temperature(T.sub.c) and the critical pressure(P.sub.c) of the reaction mixture. The phase-modifying phase-modifying material is employed to promote the reaction's achievement of either a supercritical fluid state or a near-supercritical state while simultaneously allowing for decreased reaction temperature and longer catalyst life.

  18. Ultra-precision processes for optics manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, William R.

    1991-01-01

    The Optics MODIL (Manufacturing Operations Development and Integration Laboratory) is developing advanced manufacturing technologies for fabrication of ultra precision optical components, aiming for a ten-fold improvement in precision and a shortening of the scheduled lead time. Current work focuses on diamond single point turning, ductile grinding, ion milling, and in/on process metrology.

  19. Ultra-precision processes for optics manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, William R.

    1991-12-01

    The Optics MODIL (Manufacturing Operations Development and Integration Laboratory) is developing advanced manufacturing technologies for fabrication of ultra precision optical components, aiming for a ten-fold improvement in precision and a shortening of the scheduled lead time. Current work focuses on diamond single point turning, ductile grinding, ion milling, and in/on process metrology.

  20. Supercritical Fluid Reactions for Coal Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, Charles A

    1997-07-01

    Exciting opportunities exist for the application of supercritical fluid (SCF) reactions for the pre-treatment of coal. Utilizing reactants which resemble the organic nitrogen containing components of coal, we propose to develop a method to tailor chemical reactions in supercritical fluid solvents for the specific application of coal denitrogenation. The Diels-Alder reaction of anthracene and 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) was chosen as the model system and was investigated in supercritical carbon dioxide. Kinetic data have been previously collected for pure CO2 at 40C and pressures between the critical pressure of CO2 (73.8 bar) and 216 bar. These data support the theory of local density enhancements suggested in the literature. Data taken at 50C and pressures ranging from 70 bar to 195 bar are currently reported; they do not exhibit the molecular clustering evident closer to the critical temperature. The data taken at 40C are now being used to construct mathematical forms which can model these pressure-induced kinetic changes. One promising avenue of investigation involves treating the supercritical medium as a dense gas, which allows a kinetic model based on high reference pressure fugacity coefficients to be derived.

  1. Destruction of Energetic Materials in Supercritical Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-25

    THERMOCHEMISTRY OF ENERGETIC MATERIALS IN SUPERCRITICAL WATER...fringe spacing is 13.5 µm and the acoustic signal period is 28.3 ns. 138 SECTION VI THERMOCHEMISTRY OF ENERGETIC MATERIALS IN...validation calculation studied the solvation free energies of alkali–chloride ion pairs in liquid water. Such information can teach us about the

  2. Chemical deposition methods using supercritical fluid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Sievers, Robert E.; Hansen, Brian N.

    1990-01-01

    A method for depositing a film of a desired material on a substrate comprises dissolving at least one reagent in a supercritical fluid comprising at least one solvent. Either the reagent is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the solvent to form the desired product, or at least one additional reagent is included in the supercritical solution and is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the first reagent or with a compound derived from the first reagent to form the desired material. The supercritical solution is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol and a chemical reaction is induced in the vapor or aerosol so that a film of the desired material resulting from the chemical reaction is deposited on the substrate surface. In an alternate embodiment, the supercritical solution containing at least one reagent is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol which is then mixed with a gas containing at least one additional reagent. A chemical reaction is induced in the resulting mixture so that a film of the desired material is deposited.

  3. Petrophysical core characterization at supercritical geothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummerow, Juliane; Raab, Siegfried

    2015-04-01

    There is a growing scientific interest in the exploitation of supercritical geothermal reservoirs to increase the efficiency of geothermal power plants. The utilisation of geothermal energy requires in any case the detailed knowledge of the reservoir. In reservoir engineering, the characterisation of the geothermal system by electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a common geophysical exploration and monitoring strategy. For a realistic interpretation of the field measurements it is necessary to know both, the physical properties of the rock and those of the interacting fluid at defined temperature and pressure conditions. While there have been made great effort in determine the physical and chemical properties of water above its critical point (Tcritical = 374.21° C and pcritical = 221.2 bar), the influence of fluid-rock interactions on petrophysical properties in supercritical aqueous systems is nearly unknown. At supercritical conditions the viscosity of the fluid is low, which enhances the mass transfer and diffusion-controlled chemical reactions. This may have considerable effects on the porosity and hydraulic properties of a rock. To investigate high-enthalpy fluid-rock systems, in the framework of the EU-funded project IMAGE we have built a new percolation set-up, which allows for the measurement of electrical resistivity and permeability of rock samples at controlled supercritical conditions of aqueous fluids (pore pressure = 400 bar and a temperature = 400° C). First results will be presented.

  4. Improved Supercritical-Solvent Extraction of Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L.

    1982-01-01

    Raw coal upgraded by supercritical-solvent extraction system that uses two materials instead of one. System achieved extraction yields of 20 to 49 weight percent. Single-solvent yields are about 25 weight percent. Experimental results show extraction yields may be timedependent. Observed decreases in weight of coal agreed well with increases in ash content of residue.

  5. Supercritical-Multiple-Solvent Extraction From Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W.; Fong, W.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P.; Lawson, D.

    1983-01-01

    Large and small molecules dissolve different constituents. Experimental apparatus used to test supercritical extraction of hydrogen rich compounds from coal in various organic solvents. In decreasing order of importance, relevant process parameters were found to be temperature, solvent type, pressure, and residence time.

  6. Supercritical fluid extraction and processing of foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumers are aware of the processing techniques used to manufacture food and health supplements and are concerned about the impact of those processes on their health and the environment. Processes that use supercritical fluids as an alternative to solvents that are used to extract nutrients and bio...

  7. Model-free adaptive control of supercritical circulating fluidized-bed boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, George Shu-Xing; Mulkey, Steven L

    2014-12-16

    A novel 3-Input-3-Output (3.times.3) Fuel-Air Ratio Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) controller is introduced, which can effectively control key process variables including Bed Temperature, Excess O2, and Furnace Negative Pressure of combustion processes of advanced boilers. A novel 7-input-7-output (7.times.7) MFA control system is also described for controlling a combined 3-Input-3-Output (3.times.3) process of Boiler-Turbine-Generator (BTG) units and a 5.times.5 CFB combustion process of advanced boilers. Those boilers include Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Boilers and Once-Through Supercritical Circulating Fluidized-Bed (OTSC CFB) Boilers.

  8. Supercritical carbon dioxide approach to nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xiang-Rong

    Supercritical fluid technology is a novel and emerging strategy to generate nanomaterials in small areas, within high-aspect-ratio structures, on complicated surfaces and poor wettable substrates with high uniformity, high homogeneity and minimum environmental problems. In this dissertation, several strategies were developed for thin film deposition and nanocomposite fabrication. In developing supercritical fluid immersion deposition (SFID), supercritical or near supercritical CO2 was used as a new solvent for immersion deposition, a galvanic displacement process traditionally carried out in aqueous HF solutions containing metal ions, to selectively develop Pd, Cu, Ag and other metal films on featured and non-featured Si substrates. Annealing of thin palladium films deposited by SFID can lead to the formation of palladium silicide in small features on Si substrates. Deposition of metal films on germanium substrates was also achieved through SFID. Through hydrogen reduction of metal-beta-diketone complexes in supercritical CO2, a rapid, convenient and environmentally benign approach has been developed to synthesize a variety of nanostructured materials: (1) Metal (Pd, Ni and Cu) nanowires and nanorods sheathed within multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) templates; (2) nanoparticles of palladium, rhodium and ruthenium decorated onto functionalized MWCNTs. These highly dispersed nanoparticles are expected to exhibit promising catalytic properties for a variety of chemical or electrochemical reactions; (3) Cu, Pd or Cu-Pd alloy nanocrystals deposited onto SiO2 nanowires (NWs), SiO2 microfibers, or SiC NWs. Different types of nanostructures were achieved, including nanocrystal-NW, spherical aggregation-NW, shell-NW composites and "mesoporous" metals supported by the framework of NWs.

  9. Evolution of the core physics concept for the Canadian supercritical water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pencer, J.; Colton, A.; Wang, X.; Gaudet, M.; Hamilton, H.; Yetisir, M.

    2013-07-01

    The supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the advanced reactor concepts chosen by the GEN-IV International Forum (GIF) for research and development efforts. Canada's contribution is the Canadian SCWR, a heavy water moderated, pressure tube supercritical light water cooled reactor. Recent developments in the SCWR lattice and core concepts, primarily the introduction of a large central flow tube filled with coolant combined with a two-ring fuel assembly, have enabled significant improvements compared to earlier concepts. These improvements include a reduction in coolant void reactivity (CVR) by more than 10 mk, and an almost 40% increase in fuel exit burnup, which is achieved via balanced power distribution between the fuel pins in the fuel assembly. In this paper the evolution of the physics concept is reviewed, and the present lattice and core physics concepts are presented.

  10. Recovery of Minerals in Martian Soils Via Supercritical Fluid Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debelak, Kenneth A.; Roth, John A.

    2001-03-01

    We are investigating the use of supercritical fluids to extract mineral and/or carbonaceous material from Martian surface soils and its igneous crust. Two candidate supercritical fluids are carbon dioxide and water. The Martian atmosphere is composed mostly of carbon dioxide (approx. 95.3%) and could therefore provide an in-situ source of carbon dioxide. Water, although present in the Martian atmosphere at only approx. 0.03%, is also a candidate supercritical solvent. Previous work done with supercritical fluids has focused primarily on their solvating properties with organic compounds. Interestingly, the first work reported by Hannay and Hogarth at a meeting of the Royal Society of London in 1879 observed that increasing or decreasing the pressure caused several inorganic salts e.g., cobalt chloride, potassium iodide, and potassium bromide, to dissolve or precipitate in supercritical ethanol. In high-pressure boilers, silica, present in most boiler feed waters, is dissolved in supercritical steam and transported as dissolved silica to the turbine blades. As the pressure is reduced the silica precipitates onto the turbine blades eventually requiring the shutdown of the generator. In supercritical water oxidation processes for waste treatment, dissolved salts present a similar problem. The solubility of silicon dioxide (SiO2) in supercritical water is shown. The solubility curve has a shape characteristic of supercritical systems. At a high pressure (greater than 1750 atmospheres) increasing the temperature results in an increase in solubility of silica, while at low pressures, less than 400 atm., the solubility decreases as temperature increases. There are only a few studies in the literature where supercritical fluids are used in extractive metallurgy. Bolt modified the Mond process in which supercritical carbon monoxide was used to produce nickel carbonyl (Ni(CO)4). Tolley and Tester studied the solubility of titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) in supercritical CO2

  11. Bio-oil production from biomass via supercritical fluid extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durak, Halil

    2016-04-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction is used for producing bio-fuel from biomass. Supercritical fluid extraction process under supercritical conditions is the thermally disruption process of the lignocellulose or other organic materials at 250-400 °C temperature range under high pressure (4-5 MPa). Supercritical fluid extraction trials were performed in a cylindrical reactor (75 mL) in organic solvents (acetone, ethanol) under supercritical conditions with (calcium hydroxide, sodium carbonate) and without catalyst at the temperatures of 250, 275 and 300 °C. The produced liquids at 300 °C in supercritical liquefaction were analyzed and characterized by elemental, GC-MS and FT-IR. 36 and 37 different types of compounds were identified by GC-MS obtained in acetone and ethanol respectively.

  12. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2004-01-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  13. Investigation of Supercritical Water Phenomena for Space and Extraterrestrial Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.; Fisher, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The cost of carrying or resupplying life support resources for long duration manned space exploration missions such as a mission to Mars is prohibitive and requires the development of suitable recycling technologies. Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) has been identified as an attractive candidate for these extended missions because (i) pre-drying of wet waste streams is not required, (ii) product streams are relatively benign, microbially inert, and easily reclaimed, (iii) waste conversion is complete and relatively fast, and (iv) with proper design and operation, reactions can be self-sustaining. Initial work in this area at NASA was carried out at the Ames Research Center in the 1990 s with a focus on understanding the linkages between feed stock preparation (i.e., particle size and distribution) of cellulosic based waste streams and destruction rates under a range of operating temperatures and pressures. More recently, work in SCWO research for space and extra-terrestrial application has been performed at NASA s Glenn Research Center where various investigations, with a particular focus in the gravitational effects on the thermo-physical processes occurring in the bulk medium, have been pursued. In 2010 a collaborative NASA/CNES (the French Space Agency) experiment on the critical transition of pure water was conducted in the long duration microgravity environment on the International Space Station (ISS). A follow-on experiment, to study the precipitation of salt in sub-critical, trans-critical and supercritical water is scheduled to be conducted on the ISS in 2013. This paper provides a brief history of NASA s earlier work in SCWO, discusses the potential for application of SCWO technology in extended space and extraterrestrial missions, describes related research conducted on the ISS, and provides a list of future research activities to advance this technology in both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial applications.

  14. Supercritical Fluid Infusion of Iron Additives in Polymeric Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazem, Negin; Taylor, Larry T.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project was the experimentation to measure preparation of iron nanophases within polymeric matrices via supercritical fluid infusion of iron precursors followed by thermal reduction. Another objective was to determine if supercritical CO2 could infuse into the polymer. The experiment is described along with the materials, and the supercritical fluid infusion and cure procedures. X-ray photoelectron spectra and transmission electron micrographs were obtained. The results are summarized in charts, and tables.

  15. Supercritical water oxidation of products of human metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tester, Jefferson W.; Orge A. achelling, Richard K. ADTHOMASSON; Orge A. achelling, Richard K. ADTHOMASSON

    1986-01-01

    Although the efficient destruction of organic material was demonstrated in the supercritical water oxidation process, the reaction kinetics and mechanisms are unknown. The kinetics and mechanisms of carbon monoxide and ammonia oxidation in and reaction with supercritical water were studied experimentally. Experimental oxidation of urine and feces in a microprocessor controlled system was performed. A minaturized supercritical water oxidation process for space applications was design, including preliminary mass and energy balances, power, space and weight requirements.

  16. Correlated Particle Motion and THz Spectral Response of Supercritical Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śmiechowski, Maciej; Schran, Christoph; Forbert, Harald; Marx, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of supercritical water reveal distinctly different distance-dependent modulations of dipolar response and correlations in particle motion compared to ambient conditions. The strongly perturbed H-bond network of water at supercritical conditions allows for considerable translational and rotational freedom of individual molecules. These changes give rise to substantially different infrared spectra and vibrational density of states at THz frequencies for densities above and below the Widom line that separates percolating liquidlike and clustered gaslike supercritical water.

  17. Supercritical convection, critical heat flux, and coking characteristics of propane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Gross, R. S.; Boyd, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of propane at subcritical and supercritical pressure were experimentally evaluated using electrically heated Monel K-500 tubes. A design correlation for supercritical heat transfer coefficient was established using the approach previously applied to supercritical oxygen. Flow oscillations were observed and the onset of these oscillations at supercritical pressures was correlated with wall-to-bulk temperature ratio and velocity. The critical heat flux measured at subcritical pressure was correlated with the product of velocity and subcooling. Long duration tests at fixed heat flux conditions were conducted to evaluate coking on the coolant side tube wall and coking rates comparable to RP-1 were observed.

  18. Supercritical methanol for polyethylene terephthalate depolymerization: Observation using simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Genta, Minoru; Iwaya, Tomoko; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2007-07-01

    To apply PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol to commercial recycling, the benefits of supercritical methanol usage in PET depolymerization was investigated from the viewpoint of the reaction rate and energy demands. PET was depolymerized in a batch reactor at 573 K in supercritical methanol under 14.7 MPa and in vapor methanol under 0.98 MPa in our previous work. The main products of both reactions were the PET monomers of dimethyl terephthalate (DMT) and ethylene glycol (EG). The rate of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol was faster than that of PET depolymerization in vapor methanol. This indicates supercritical fluid is beneficial in reducing reaction time without the use of a catalyst. We depicted the simple process flow of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol and in vapor methanol, and by simulation evaluated the total heat demand of each process. In this simulation, bis-hydroxyethyl terephthalate (BHET) was used as a model component of PET. The total heat demand of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol was 2.35 x 10{sup 6} kJ/kmol Produced-DMT. That of PET depolymerization in vapor methanol was 2.84 x 10{sup 6} kJ/kmol Produced-DMT. The smaller total heat demand of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol clearly reveals the advantage of using supercritical fluid in terms of energy savings.

  19. Supercritical Water Process for the Chemical Recycling of Waste Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Motonobu

    2010-11-01

    The development of chemical recycling of waste plastics by decomposition reactions in sub- and supercritical water is reviewed. Decomposition reactions proceed rapidly and selectively using supercritical fluids compared to conventional processes. Condensation polymerization plastics such as PET, nylon, and polyurethane, are relatively easily depolymerized to their monomers in supercritical water. The monomer components are recovered in high yield. Addition polymerization plastics such as phenol resin, epoxy resin, and polyethylene, are also decomposed to monomer components with or without catalysts. Recycling process of fiber reinforced plastics has been studied. Pilot scale or commercial scale plants have been developed and are operating with sub- and supercritical fluids.

  20. Supercritical waste oxidation of aqueous wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modell, M.

    1986-01-01

    For aqueous wastes containing 1 to 20 wt% organics, supercritical water oxidation is less costly than controlled incineration or activated carbon treatment and far more efficient than wet oxidation. Above the critical temperature (374 C) and pressure (218 atm) of water, organic materials and gases are completely miscible with water. In supercritical water oxidation, organics, air and water are brought together in a mixture at 250 atm and temperatures above 400 C. Organic oxidation is initiated spontaneously at these conditions. The heat of combustion is released within the fluid and results in a rise in temperature 600 to 650 C. Under these conditions, organics are destroyed rapidly with efficiencies in excess of 99.999%. Heteroatoms are oxidized to acids, which can be precipitated out as salts by adding a base to the feed. Examples are given for process configurations to treat aqueous wastes with 10 and 2 wt% organics.

  1. Analytical supercritical fluid extraction of adsorbent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.W.; Wright, C.W.; Gale, R.W.; Smith, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The use of supercritical fluids for the analytical extraction of semivolatile and higher molecular weight materials from various adsorbent and particulate matrices was investigated. Instrumentation was designed to allow gram quantities of the matrix to be extracted at pressures up to 400 bar and temperatures to 235 /sup 0/C with collection of the effluent in a sealed liquid-nitrogen-cooled flask. Carbon dioxide, isobutane, and methanol modified (20 mol %) carbon dioxide fluid systems were evaluated and compared to liquid Soxhlet extraction. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) provided very rapid (approx. =30 min) extraction with comparable efficiency to the Soxhlet methods, and both more rapid and more efficient extractions appear feasible. The more polar carbon dioxide-methanol fluid system gave higher extraction efficiencies for the more polar adsorbates and the isobutane system was more efficient for the higher molecular weight and less polar compounds.

  2. Supercritical fluid thermodynamics for coal processing

    SciTech Connect

    van Swol, F. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Eckert, C.A. . School of Chemical Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    Because of their unusual solvating and mass transfer properties, supercritical fluids show potential for a variety of coal processing applications. We have established a database of coal model compound equilibria; to add to this database, we have developed and are testing methods of rapidly measuring cosolvent effects on solubility. In addition, we have used fluorescence spectroscopy to study the nature of cosolvent effects on molecular level. The solubility and spectroscopic measurements are being used to guide the development of an equation of state that includes both physical and chemical interactions. The equation of state will be used to predict solubility behavior to systems can be designed for the processing of coal with supercritical fluids. 8 figs.

  3. Depolymerization of polyethylene terephthalate in supercritical methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Motonobu; Koyamoto, Hiroshi; Kodama, Akio; Hirose, Tsutomu; Nagaoka, Shoji

    2002-11-01

    The degradation of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) in supercritical methanol was investigated with the aim of developing a process for chemical recycling of waste plastics. A batch reactor was used at temperatures of 573-623 K under an estimated pressure of 20 MPa for a reaction time of 2-120 min. PET was decomposed to its monomers, dimethyl terephthalate and ethylene glycol, by methanolysis in supercritical methanol. The reaction products were analysed using size-exclusion chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and reversed-phase liquid chromatography. The molecular weight distribution of the products was obtained as a function of reaction time. The yields of monomer components of the decomposition products including by-products were measured. Continuous kinetics analysis was performed on the experimental data.

  4. Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Chum, H.L.; Filardo, G.

    1990-10-23

    A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70 C and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution. 1 fig.

  5. Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Chum, Helena L.; Filardo, Giuseppe

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70.degree. C. and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution.

  6. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2014-11-25

    This is a method to reactively refine hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20.degree. and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. The reaction portion of the method delivers lighter weight, more volatile hydrocarbons to an attached contacting device that operates in mixed subcritical or supercritical modes. This separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques. This method produces valuable products with fewer processing steps, lower costs, increased worker safety due to less processing and handling, allow greater opportunity for new oil field development and subsequent positive economic impact, reduce related carbon dioxide, and wastes typical with conventional refineries.

  7. Thermal lensing in a supercritical water medium.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Rene G; Mezyk, Stephen P; Stewart, Charlynn; Rollins, Harry W; Mincher, Bruce J; Fox, Robert V; Phillips, BarJean; Brey, Richard

    2007-01-25

    A pulsed, two-beam, thermal lensing experiment was performed to determine the concentration of aqueous solutes above the critical point of water. Despite a very significant mirage effect due to thermal gradients in the cell and absorption by water itself, the thermal lensing signal strength for aqueous benzoic acid in supercritical water was found to be linear with concentration in the sub-millimolar range. Although thermal lensing experiments in aqueous media are notoriously insensitive, the sharp density gradient near the critical point considerably improves the signal intensity. In this study a short-pulse pump 266 nm YAG laser and continuous low-power probe Ar ion beam were both focused into a supercritical water cell, giving a lensing signal whose strength could be maximized by changing the overlap of the two beams.

  8. Methods for producing films using supercritical fluid

    DOEpatents

    Yonker, Clement R.; Fulton, John L.

    2004-06-15

    A method for forming a continuous film on a substrate surface that involves depositing particles onto a substrate surface and contacting the particle-deposited substrate surface with a supercritical fluid under conditions sufficient for forming a continuous film from the deposited particles. The particles may have a mean particle size of less 1 micron. The method may be performed by providing a pressure vessel that can contain a compressible fluid. A particle-deposited substrate is provided in the pressure vessel and the compressible fluid is maintained at a supercritical or sub-critical state sufficient for forming a film from the deposited particles. The T.sub.g of particles may be reduced by subjecting the particles to the methods detailed in the present disclosure.

  9. Advanced Materials Deposition for Semiconductor Nanostructures Using Supercritical Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    fine tuning of nanoparticle size synthesized by the microemulsion method. To make water-in-CO2 microemulsion, a fluorinated AOT surfactant, sodium bis...2,2,3,3,4,4,5,5- octafluoro- 1 -pentyl)-2-sulfosuccinate, was used in our experiments. Fluorine containing compounds are known to have high...metal sulfide nanoparticles were stabilized by the same fluorinated decanethiol compound used in the silver nanoparticle study for spectroscopic

  10. Effect of supercritical fluid density on nanoencapsulated drug particle size using the supercritical antisolvent method.

    PubMed

    Kalani, Mahshid; Yunus, Robiah

    2012-01-01

    The reported work demonstrates and discusses the effect of supercritical fluid density (pressure and temperature of supercritical fluid carbon dioxide) on particle size and distribution using the supercritical antisolvent (SAS) method in the purpose of drug encapsulation. In this study, paracetamol was encapsulated inside L-polylactic acid, a semicrystalline polymer, with different process parameters, including pressure and temperature, using the SAS process. The morphology and particle size of the prepared nanoparticles were determined by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results revealed that increasing temperature enhanced mean particle size due to the plasticizing effect. Furthermore, increasing pressure enhanced molecular interaction and solubility; thus, particle size was reduced. Transmission electron microscopy images defined the internal structure of nanoparticles. Thermal characteristics of nanoparticles were also investigated via differential scanning calorimetry. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction pattern revealed the changes in crystallinity structure during the SAS process. In vitro drug release analysis determined the sustained release of paracetamol in over 4 weeks.

  11. Supercritical water oxidation of landfill leachate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shuzhong; Guo Yang; Chen Chongming; Zhang Jie; Gong Yanmeng; Wang Yuzhen

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Thermal analysis of NH{sub 3} in supercritical water oxidation reaction. > Research on the catalytic reaction of landfill leachate by using response surface method. > Kinetic research of supercritical water oxidation of NH{sub 3} with and without MnO{sub 2} catalyst. - Abstract: In this paper, ammonia as an important ingredient in landfill leachate was mainly studied. Based on Peng-Robinson formulations and Gibbs free energy minimization method, the estimation of equilibrium composition and thermodynamic analysis for supercritical water oxidation of ammonia (SCWO) was made. As equilibrium is reached, ammonia could be totally oxidized in SCW. N{sub 2} is the main product, and the formation of NO{sub 2} and NO could be neglected. The investigation on SCWO of landfill leachate was conducted in a batch reactor at temperature of 380-500 deg. C, reaction time of 50-300 s and pressure of 25 MPa. The effect of reaction parameters such as oxidant equivalent ratio, reaction time and temperature were investigated. The results showed that COD and NH{sub 3} conversion improved as temperature, reaction time and oxygen excess increased. Compared to organics, NH{sub 3} is a refractory compound in supercritical water. The conversion of COD and NH{sub 3} were higher in the presence of MnO{sub 2} than that without catalyst. The interaction between reaction temperature and time was analyzed by using response surface method (RSM) and the results showed that its influence on the NH{sub 3} conversion was relatively insignificant in the case without catalyst. A global power-law rate expression was regressed from experimental data to estimate the reaction rate of NH{sub 3}. The activation energy with and without catalyst for NH{sub 3} oxidation were 107.07 {+-} 8.57 kJ/mol and 83.22 {+-} 15.62 kJ/mol, respectively.

  12. Simulations of Flowing Supercritical N-Decane

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-03-01

    Thermal Diagnostic Studies ( STDS ), located in the Air Force Research Laboratory’S Fuels Branch, is used to analyze fuels under supercritical temperatures...and pressures. Computational simulations of the STDS reactor are performed to better understand the heat transfer, fluid dynamics, and chemistry...associated with fuel flow through the STDS reactor. A simplified global chemistry model is incorporated into the computational simulation. Predictions of

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Supercritical Spray Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-26

    Dynamics of the Rheological and Structural Properties of Linear and Branched Molecules. Simple Shear and Poiseuille Flows ; Instabilities and Slip...Michael Barrucco Publications: "Comparison of Wall Models for the Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Micro flows ," R. D. Branam and M. M...Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Dec. 2003 - 31 May 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Supercritical

  14. Coiled tubing drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Kolle , Jack J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for increasing the efficiency of drilling operations by using a drilling fluid material that exists as supercritical fluid or a dense gas at temperature and pressure conditions existing at a drill site. The material can be used to reduce mechanical drilling forces, to remove cuttings, or to jet erode a substrate. In one embodiment, carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) is used as the material for drilling within wells in the earth, where the normal temperature and pressure conditions cause CO.sub.2 to exist as a supercritical fluid. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) is preferably used with coiled tube (CT) drilling equipment. The very low viscosity SC--CO.sub.2 provides efficient cooling of the drill head, and efficient cuttings removal. Further, the diffusivity of SC--CO.sub.2 within the pores of petroleum formations is significantly higher than that of water, making jet erosion using SC--CO.sub.2 much more effective than water jet erosion. SC--CO.sub.2 jets can be used to assist mechanical drilling, for erosion drilling, or for scale removal. A choke manifold at the well head or mud cap drilling equipment can be used to control the pressure within the borehole, to ensure that the temperature and pressure conditions necessary for CO.sub.2 to exist as either a supercritical fluid or a dense gas occur at the drill site. Spent CO.sub.2 can be vented to the atmosphere, collected for reuse, or directed into the formation to aid in the recovery of petroleum.

  15. Supercritical CO2 Extraction of Porogen Phase: An Alternative Route to Nanoporous Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Lubguban, J.

    2004-11-04

    We present a supercritical CO{sub 2} (SCCO{sub 2}) process for the preparation of nanoporous organosilicate thin films for ultra low dielectric constant materials. The porous structure was generated by SCCO{sub 2} extraction of a sacrificial poly(propylene glycol) (PPG) from a nanohybrid film, where the nanoscopic domains of PPG porogen are entrapped within the crosslinked poly(methylsilsesquioxane) (PMSSQ) matrix. As a comparison, porous structures generated by both the usual thermal decomposition (at ca. 450 C) and by a SCCO{sub 2} process for 25 wt% and 55 wt% porogen loadings were evaluated. It is found that the SCCO{sub 2} process is effective in removing the porogen phase at relatively low temperatures (< 200 C) through diffusion of the supercritical fluid into the phase-separated nanohybrids and selective extraction of the porogen phase. Pore morphologies generated from the two methods are compared from representative three-dimensional (3D) images built from small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) data.

  16. Supercritical thermodynamcis of sulfur and nitrogen species

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.A.

    1991-10-01

    Significant opportunity exists for the application of supercritical fluid (SCF) technology to coal processing, both for pretreatment of high sulfur coals, as well as liquefaction and treatment of coal liquids. Supercritical fluids are attractive solvents for a variety of coal processing applications because of their unusual solvating and mass transfer properties. Solubility studies have been carried out for a number of model coal and coal liquid compounds, primarily in pure supercritical fluids. We are extending this database of model coal compound equilibria using modern techniques that have the advantage of being much more rapid than traditional techniques. Cosolvent effects on solubility are being investigated over a variety of solvent properties. In addition, specific molecular interactions are being investigated through spectroscopic techniques. The resulting data are being used to develop a chemical-physical equation of state (EOS) model of SCF solution with meaningful parameters. The equation of state will be used to predict solubility behavior, which will permit the design and tailoring of SCF cosolvent systems for specific coal processing applications.

  17. Rapid and sensitive determination of the intermediates of advanced glycation end products in the human nail by ultra-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Min, Jun Zhe; Yamamoto, Makoto; Yu, Hai-fu; Higashi, Tatsuya; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2012-05-15

    The resolution of the intermediate advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the human nail was carried out by the combination of 4,5-dimethyl-1,2-phenylenediamine (DMPD) derivatives and ultra-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-TOF-MS). The reaction of the reagent with 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG), methylglyoxal (MG), and glyoxal (GO) effectively proceeds at 60°C for 2h. The resulting derivatives were efficiently separated by a gradient program (a mixture of water and acetonitrile containing 0.1% formic acid) using a reversed-phase ACQUITY UPLC BEH C(18) column (1.7 μm, 50×2.1 mm i.d.) and sensitively detected by TOF-MS. The detection limits (signal-to-noise ratio=5) of the TOF-MS were 10 to 50 fmol. A good linearity was achieved from the calibration curve, which was obtained by plotting the peak area ratios of the analytes relative to the internal standard (IS) (i.e., 2,3-hexanedione) versus the injected amounts of 3-DG, MG, and GO (r(2)>0.999), and the intra- and interday assay precisions were less than 6.89%. The derivatives of the compounds in the human nail were successfully identified by the proposed procedure. As we know, these three kinds of dicarbonyl intermediates in the formation of AGEs-3-DG, MG, and GO-were first found in human nail samples. Using these methods, the amounts of compound in the nails of healthy volunteers and diabetic patients were determined. When comparing the index from the diabetic patients with that from healthy volunteers, there is no significant difference in the content of the MG and GO in the nails. However, a statistically significant (P<0.001) correlation was observed between the 3-DG concentrations. Because the proposed method provides a good mass accuracy and the trace detection of the dicarbonyl intermediates of AGEs in the human nail, this analytical technique could be a noninvasive technique to assist in the diagnosis and assessment of disease activity

  18. Advanced Thermal Storage System with Novel Molten Salt: December 8, 2011 - April 30, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Jonemann, M.

    2013-05-01

    Final technical progress report of Halotechnics Subcontract No. NEU-2-11979-01. Halotechnics has demonstrated an advanced thermal energy storage system with a novel molten salt operating at 700 degrees C. The molten salt and storage system will enable the use of advanced power cycles such as supercritical steam and supercritical carbon dioxide in next generation CSP plants. The salt consists of low cost, earth abundant materials.

  19. Comparison of experimental and theoretical drag characteristics for a 10-percent-thick supercritical airfoil using a new version of an analysis code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. D.; Allison, D. O.

    1977-01-01

    Comparisons of experimental and theoretical drag characteristics for a 10-percent-thick supercritical airfoil using a new version of an advanced analysis code. Comparisons are made at near-design normal-force coefficients for Reynolds numbers from 2 to 11 million. Comments are made concerning various input parameters to the code.

  20. Supercritical carbon dioxide cleaning market assessment and commercialization/deployment plan

    SciTech Connect

    Snowden-Swan, L.J.

    1994-08-01

    Through the US Department of Energy`s Industrial Waste Program (IWP), work is being conducted to research, develop, and commercialize supercritical fluid cleaning for its potential as a safer technology in a wide range of industrial cleaning operations. Commercialization, which has not proceeded as quickly as expected, is being aided by the Joint Association for the Advancement of Supercritical Technology (JAAST), a research consortium made up of industry, university, and National Laboratory partners. Under the IWP, JAAST is facilitating interaction and communication among those involved in the technology and addressing specific issues slowing its growth and acceptance. As part of the IWP/JAAST effort, Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a study to (1) identify and evaluate potential markets for supercritical fluids cleaning, (2) identify and address current perceptions that inhibit the acceptance of the technology into industrial cleaning operations, and (3) develop a plan that will lead to successful deployment and implementation in potential market areas. The approach to gathering the information needed for formulating the plan was to interview several individuals involved in developing, using, or commercializing the technology, specifically, supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}), the most commonly used fluid. Several potential markets were identified, including cleaning gyroscope and filling hardware; optical components; instrument bearings; computer disk drive components; medical devices; and fabrics, cloths, and rags. In cases where there are parts with intricate geometries, where water-based cleaning may corrode parts and materials, or where significant time and energy for drying is required, SCCO{sub 2} may be an especially attractive alternative. While pursuing these applications, certain barriers still need to be overcome.

  1. Ultra-Lightweight Mirror Manufacturing and Radiation Response Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    1 1.2.1-1 Classical Lightweight Mirrors vs Ultra Lightweight Frit-Bonded Mirrors ..... ................... 21.2.2-1 Corning Glass Works Mirror...95 APPENDIX D D-1 - D-4 Irradiatton Response Tests . . . . ............ 103 vi RC-00348 LIST OF TABLES Table Title Page 1.2.3-1 Classical ...comparing classical lightweight mirror 4000 Current Thnolog designr * to the advanced ultra light- ’ 3000-a. weight designs The upper curve repre- i 200

  2. NASA supercritical airfoils: A matrix of family-related airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA supercritical airfoil development program is summarized in a chronological fashion. Some of the airfoil design guidelines are discussed, and coordinates of a matrix of family related supercritical airfoils ranging from thicknesses of 2 to 18 percent and over a design lift coefficient range from 0 to 1.0 are presented.

  3. Supercritical-Fluid Extraction of Oil From Tar Sands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E.

    1982-01-01

    New supercritical solvent mixtures have been laboratory-tested for extraction of oil from tar sands. Mixture is circulated through sand at high pressure and at a temperature above critical point, dissolving organic matter into the compressed gas. Extract is recovered from sand residues. Low-temperature super-critical solvents reduce energy consumption and waste-disposal problems.

  4. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-01-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.

  5. Ultra-Deepwater Production Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ken L. Smith; Marc E. Leveque

    2005-05-31

    The report herein is a summary of the work performed on three projects to demonstrate hydrocarbon drilling and production methods applicable to deep and ultra deepwater field developments in the Gulf of Mexico and other like applications around the world. This work advances technology that could lead to more economic development and exploitation of reserves in ultra-deep water or remote areas. The first project is Subsea Processing. Its scope includes a review of the ''state of the art'' in subsea components to enable primary production process functions such as first stage liquids and gas separation, flow boosting, chemical treatment, flow metering, etc. These components are then combined to allow for the elimination of costly surface production facilities at the well site. A number of studies were then performed on proposed field development projects to validate the economic potential of this technology. The second project involved the design and testing of a light weight production riser made of composite material. The proposed design was to meet an actual Gulf of Mexico deepwater development project. The various engineering and testing work is reviewed, including test results. The third project described in this report encompasses the development and testing of a close tolerance liner drilling system, a new technology aimed at reducing deepwater drilling costs. The design and prototype testing in a test well are described in detail.

  6. Metal Nanoparticles Preparation In Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Harry W. Rollins

    2004-04-01

    The novel optical, electronic, and/or magnetic properties of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles have resulted in extensive research on new methods for their preparation. An ideal preparation method would allow the particle size, size distribution, crystallinity, and particle shape to be easily controlled, and would be applicable to a wide variety of material systems. Numerous preparation methods have been reported, each with its inherent advantages and disadvantages; however, an ideal method has yet to emerge. The most widely applied methods for nanoparticle preparation include the sonochemical reduction of organometallic reagents,(1&2) the solvothermal method of Alivisatos,(3) reactions in microemulsions,(4-6) the polyol method (reduction by alcohols),(7-9) and the use of polymer and solgel materials as hosts.(10-13) In addition to these methods, there are a variety of methods that take advantage of the unique properties of a supercritical fluid.(14&15) Through simple variations of temperature and pressure, the properties of a supercritical fluid can be continuously tuned from gas-like to liquid-like without undergoing a phase change. Nanoparticle preparation methods that utilize supercritical fluids are briefly reviewed below using the following categories: Rapid Expansion of Supercritical Solutions (RESS), Reactive Supercritical Fluid Processing, and Supercritical Fluid Microemulsions. Because of its easily accessible critical temperature and pressure and environmentally benign nature, carbon dioxide is the most widely used supercritical solvent. Supercritical CO2 is unfortunately a poor solvent for many polar or ionic species, which has impeded its use in the preparation of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles. We have developed a reactive supercritical fluid processing method using supercritical carbon dioxide for the preparation of metal and metal sulfide particles and used it to prepare narrowly distributed nanoparticles of silver (Ag) and silver sulfide

  7. Hemispheric ultra-wideband antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-04-01

    This report begins with a review of reduced size ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas and the peculiar problems that arise when building a UWB antenna. It then gives a description of a new type of UWB antenna that resolves these problems. This antenna, dubbed the hemispheric conical antenna, is similar to a conventional conical antenna in that it uses the same inverted conical conductor over a ground plane, but it also uses a hemispheric dielectric fill in between the conductive cone and the ground plane. The dielectric material creates a fundamentally new antenna which is reduced in size and much more rugged than a standard UWB conical antenna. The creation of finite-difference time domain (FDTD) software tools in spherical coordinates, as described in SAND2004-6577, enabled this technological advance.

  8. Supercritical fluid extraction of N-nitrosamines

    SciTech Connect

    Tewani, S.

    1993-01-01

    The detailed chemistry of N-nitrosamines including the mechanism of carcinogenicity, modes of formation, inhibition and destruction are discussed in detail. The occurrence and risk assessment of human exposure of these suspect cancer agents is described. The methods of isolation and analysis of N-nitrosamines are critically discussed with emphasis on Gas Chromatography (GC)-Electrochemical Detectors, GC-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (GC-HRMS), GC-Thermal Energy Analyser (GC-TEA). The theoretical concepts of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) are discussed. A comparison of physical and chemical properties of supercritical fluids (SF) with other phases is given. A comparison of static, dynamic, recirculating SFEs shows the versatility of this technique. The advantages over conventional methods such as Soxhlet extraction are discussed. The instrumentation and operational technique of a laboratory built supercritical fluid extractor is explained. A brief review of applications (industrial and analytical) of SFE is given. The evaluation of SFE for analytical sample preparation and analyses of volatile N-nitrosamines (VNAs), tobacco specific N-nitrosamines (TSNAs), and N-nitrosodiethanolamine (NDELA) from spiked matrices, tobacco and cutting fluids is presented. Experimental parameters such as pressure, temperature, equilibration time, collector materials, modifier are evaluated to optimize the recoveries. The extracts are analysed by GC-TEA which is already proven to be highly selective and sensitive to quantitation of N-nitrosamines. The extraction of VNAs in pure SF-CO[sub 2] is quantitative at moderate pressures and low temperatures. For the extraction of TSNAs and NDELA, it is imperative to have high pressures and presence of an additive ([approximately]10% methanol) to achieve satisfactory results. This study offers a simple, rapid, accurate and environmentally advantageous sample preparation technique for the estimation of N-nitrosamines at nanogram levels.

  9. Supercritical Water Oxidation Data Acquisition Testing

    SciTech Connect

    K. M. Garcia

    1996-08-01

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) is a high pressure oxidation process that blends air, water, and organic waste material in an oxidizer in which where the temperature and pressure in the oxidizer are maintained above the critical point of water. Supercritical water mixed with hydrocarbons, which would be insoluble at subcritical conditions, forms a homogeneous phase which possesses properties associated with both a gas and a liquid. Hydrocarbons in contact with oxygen and SCW are readily oxidized. These properties of SCW make it an attractive means for the destruction of waste streams containing organic materials. SCWO technology holds great promise for treating mixed wastes in an environmentally safe and efficient manner. In the spring of 1994 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a Supercritical Water Oxidation Data Acquisition Testing (SCWODAT) program. The SCWODAT program provided further information and operational data on the effectiveness of treating both simulated mixed waste and typical Navy hazardous waste using the SCWO technology. The program concentrated on the acquisition of data through pilot plant testing. The Phase I DOE testing used a simulated waste stream that contained a complex machine cutting oil and metals, that acted as surrogates for radionuclides. The Phase II Navy testing included pilot testing using hazardous waste materials to demonstrate the effectiveness of the SCWO technology. The SCWODAT program demonstrated that the SCWO process oxidized the simulated waste stream containing complex machine cutting oil, selected by DOE as representative of one of the most difficult of the organic waste streams for which SCWO had been applied. The simulated waste stream with surrogate metals in solution was oxidized, with a high destruction efficiency, on the order of 99.97%, in both the neutralized and unneutralized modes of operation.

  10. Experiences on Cryogenic Injection under Supercritical Condition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Pressure S’ub- and Supercritical Jets," AIAA Paper 2000-3392,.• Environment Using Raman Imaging," AIAA Paper 95-0140. S6th and SS et Iot Pap er 2 , 10...Technical Paper ,, 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUHOR5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER I5W...34intuitive/ smart " equation is proposed 0for the growth rate that agrees well with the presented experimental data for a wide range of density ratios

  11. Supercritical fluid thermodynamics from equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovangigli, Vincent; Matuszewski, Lionel

    2012-03-01

    Supercritical multicomponent fluid thermodynamics are often built from equations of state. We investigate mathematically such a construction of a Gibbsian thermodynamics compatible at low density with that of ideal gas mixtures starting from a pressure law. We further study the structure of chemical production rates obtained from nonequilibrium statistical thermodynamics. As a typical application, we consider the Soave-Redlich-Kwong cubic equation of state and investigate mathematically the corresponding thermodynamics. This thermodynamics is then used to study the stability of H2-O2-N2 mixtures at high pressure and low temperature as well as to illustrate the role of nonidealities in a transcritical H2-O2-N2 flame.

  12. Supercritical water oxidation technology for DWPF

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.T.; Gentilucci, J.A.

    1992-02-07

    At the request of Mr. H.L. Brandt and others in the Savannah River Field Office High Level Waste Division office, DWPF, and SRL personnel have reviewed two potential applications for supercritical water oxidation technology in DWPF. The first application would replace the current hydrolysis process by destroying the organic fractions of the precipitated cesium / potassium tetraphenylborate slurry. The second application pertains to liquid benzene destruction. After a thorough evaluation the first application is not recommended. The second is ready to be tested if needed.

  13. Processing of Advanced Cast Alloys for A-USC Steam Turbine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffery A.; Cowen, Christopher J.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2012-02-01

    The high-temperature components within conventional supercritical coal-fired power plants are manufactured from ferritic/martensitic steels. To reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, the efficiency of pulverized coal steam power plants must be increased to as high a temperature and pressure as feasible. The proposed steam temperature in the DOE/NETL Advanced Ultra Supercritical power plant is high enough (760°C) that ferritic/martensitic steels will not work for the majority of high-temperature components in the turbine or for pipes and tubes in the boiler due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Thus, Ni-based superalloys are being considered for many of these components. Off-the-shelf forged nickel alloys have shown good promise at these temperatures, but further improvements can be made through experimentation within the nominal chemistry range as well as through thermomechanical processing and subsequent heat treatment. However, cast nickel-based superalloys, which possess high strength, creep resistance, and weldability, are typically not available, particularly those with good ductility and toughness that are weldable in thick sections. To address those issues related to thick casting for turbine casings, for example, cast analogs of selected wrought nickel-based superalloys such as alloy 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105 have been produced. Alloy design criteria, melt processing experiences, and heat treatment are discussed with respect to the as-processed and heat-treated microstructures and selected mechanical properties. The discussion concludes with the prospects for full-scale development of a thick section casting for a steam turbine valve chest or rotor casing.

  14. On the Possibility of Condensation during Supercritical Fuel Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Lu; Reitz, Rolf

    2014-11-01

    Supercritical fuel injection into a nitrogen environment was simulated using Peng-Robinson equation of state. The real gas simulation was found to match the experimental injectant density much better than the ideal gas simulation, emphasizing the importance of applying realistic equation of state model. Possible fuel condensation processes were also investigated by considering the stability of the single phase by utilizing fundamental thermodynamics principles. Several conclusions from the experiments are also seen from the simulations. First, though both the injection and chamber pressures are above the critical pressure of the injectant, condensation can become possible as long as their temperature difference is large enough, and when this occurs, the fluid is able to enter the two-phase region. Condensation is found to be enhanced when the chamber temperature is further reduced, indicating that the fluid is in a state further away from the phase border. In addition, the newly formed condensed phase is found to exist only in the jet boundary where there are strong interactions between the ``hot'' injectant and the ``cold'' nitrogen. Finally, it was concluded that the local strong heat and mass exchange sent the mixture into the two-phase region by crossing the dew point line with the commencement of condensation. The research work was sponsored by Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratories through the Advanced Engine Combustion Program (MOU 04-S-383).

  15. Effects of supercritical environment on hydrocarbon-fuel injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Bongchul; Kim, Dohun; Son, Min; Koo, Jaye

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the effects of environment conditions on decane were investigated. Decane was injected in subcritical and supercritical ambient conditions. The visualization chamber was pressurized to 1.68 MPa by using nitrogen gas at a temperature of 653 K for subcritical ambient conditions. For supercritical ambient conditions, the visualization chamber was pressurized to 2.52 MPa by using helium at a temperature of 653 K. The decane injection in the pressurized chamber was visualized via a shadowgraph technique and gradient images were obtained by a post processing method. A large variation in density gradient was observed at jet interface in the case of subcritical injection in subcritical ambient conditions. Conversely, for supercritical injection in supercritical ambient conditions, a small density gradient was observed at the jet interface. In a manner similar to that observed in other cases, supercritical injection in subcritical ambient conditions differed from supercritical ambient conditions such as sphere shape liquid. Additionally, there were changes in the interface, and the supercritical injection core width was thicker than that in the subcritical injection. Furthermore, in cases with the same injection conditions, the change in the supercritical ambient normalized core width was smaller than the change in the subcritical ambient normalized core width owing to high specific heat at the supercritical injection and small phase change at the interface. Therefore, the interface was affected by the changing ambient condition. Given that the effect of changing the thermodynamic properties of propellants could be essential for a variable thrust rocket engine, the effects of the ambient conditions were investigated experimentally.

  16. UltraForm finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fess, E.; Schoen, J.; Bechtold, M.; Mohring, D.

    2005-05-01

    A new compliant sub-aperture optical finishing technique is being investigated for the removal of mid-spatial frequency artifacts and smoothing of hard polycrystalline infrared ceramics for aspheric applications and conformal shaped optics. The UltraForm concept was developed by OptiPro Systems, Ontario, NY, and is a joint process development effort with the Center for Optics manufacturing (COM). The UltraForm tool is a pressurized, elastomeric bladder in the shape of a toroid. Finishing pads are attached to the periphery, allowing the use of a wide variety of pad materials and abrasive selections. Experimentation has been conducted using both slurry mixes and fixed abrasive pads. The toroidal tool is rotated while the compliant tool is compressed into contact with the surface. Currently this process has specific interest for the finishing of conformal ALON Domes. Also to be discussed will be new versions of the UltraForm Tools which are currently be developed and tested.

  17. Oxidation of oily sludge in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Cui, Baochen; Cui, Fuyi; Jing, Guolin; Xu, Shengli; Huo, Weijing; Liu, Shuzhi

    2009-06-15

    The oxidation of oily sludge in supercritical water is performed in a batch reactor at reaction temperatures between 663 and 723 K, the reaction times between 1 and 10 min and pressure between 23 and 27 MPa. Effect of reaction parameters such as reaction time, temperature, pressure, O(2) excess and initial COD on oxidation of oily sludge is investigated. The results indicate that chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate of 92% can be reached in 10 min. COD removal rate increases as the reaction time, temperature and initial COD increase. Pressure and O(2) excess have no remarkable affect on reaction. By taking into account the dependence of reaction rate on COD concentration, a global power-law rate expression was regressed from experimental data. The resulting pre-exponential factor was 8.99 x 10(14)(mol L(-1))(-0.405)s(-1); the activation energy was 213.13+/-1.33 kJ/mol; and the reaction order for oily sludge (based on COD) is 1.405. It was concluded that supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a rapidly emerging oily sludge processing technology.

  18. Modern supercritical fluid technology for food applications.

    PubMed

    King, Jerry W

    2014-01-01

    This review provides an update on the use of supercritical fluid (SCF) technology as applied to food-based materials. It advocates the use of the solubility parameter theory (SPT) for rationalizing the results obtained when employing sub- and supercritical media to food and nutrient-bearing materials and for optimizing processing conditions. Total extraction and fractionation of foodstuffs employing SCFs are compared and are illustrated by using multiple fluids and unit processes to obtain the desired food product. Some of the additional prophylactic benefits of using carbon dioxide as the processing fluid are explained and illustrated with multiple examples of commercial products produced using SCF media. I emphasize the role of SCF technology in the context of environmentally benign and sustainable processing, as well as its integration into an overall biorefinery concept. Conclusions are drawn in terms of current trends in the field and future research that is needed to secure new applications of the SCF platform as applied in food science and technology.

  19. Modeling new coal projects: supercritical or subcritical?

    SciTech Connect

    Carrino, A.J.; Jones, R.B.

    2006-11-15

    Decisions made on new build coal-fired plants are driven by several factors - emissions, fuel logistics and electric transmission access all provide constraints. The crucial economic decision whether to build supercritical or subcritical units often depends on assumptions concerning the reliability/availability of each technology, the cost of on-fuel operations including maintenance, the generation efficiencies and the potential for emissions credits at some future value. Modeling the influence of these key factors requires analysis and documentation to assure the assets actually meet the projected financial performance. This article addresses some of the issue related to the trade-offs that have the potential to be driven by the supercritical/subcritical decision. Solomon Associates has been collecting cost, generation and reliability data on coal-fired power generation assets for approximately 10 years using a strict methodology and taxonomy to categorize and compare actual plant operations data. This database provides validated information not only on performance, but also on alternative performance scenarios, which can provide useful insights in the pro forma financial analysis and models of new plants. 1 ref., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. Toward Better Modeling of Supercritical Turbulent Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selle, Laurent; Okongo'o, Nora; Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    study was done as part of an effort to develop computational models representing turbulent mixing under thermodynamic supercritical (here, high pressure) conditions. The question was whether the large-eddy simulation (LES) approach, developed previously for atmospheric-pressure compressible-perfect-gas and incompressible flows, can be extended to real-gas non-ideal (including supercritical) fluid mixtures. [In LES, the governing equations are approximated such that the flow field is spatially filtered and subgrid-scale (SGS) phenomena are represented by models.] The study included analyses of results from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of several such mixing layers based on the Navier-Stokes, total-energy, and conservation- of-chemical-species governing equations. Comparison of LES and DNS results revealed the need to augment the atmospheric- pressure LES equations with additional SGS momentum and energy terms. These new terms are the direct result of high-density-gradient-magnitude regions found in the DNS and observed experimentally under fully turbulent flow conditions. A model has been derived for the new term in the momentum equation and was found to perform well at small filter size but to deteriorate with increasing filter size. Several alternative models were derived for the new SGS term in the energy equation that would need further investigations to determine if they are too computationally intensive in LES.

  1. Supercritical water oxidation treatment of textile sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Shuzhong; Li, Yanhui; Lu, Jinling; Chen, Senlin; Luo, XingQi

    2016-10-17

    In this work, we studied the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of the textile sludge, the hydrothermal conversion of typical textile compounds and the corrosion properties of stainless steel 316. Moreover, the influence mechanisms of NaOH during these related processes were explored. The results show that decomposition efficiency for organic matter in liquid phase of the textile sludge was improved with the increment of reaction temperature or oxidation coefficient. However, the organic substance in solid phase can be oxidized completely in supercritical water. Serious coking occurred during the high pressure water at 250-450°C for the Reactive Orange 7, while at 300 and 350°C for the polyvinyl alcohol. The addition of NaOH not only accelerated the destruction of organic contaminants in the SCWO reactor, but effectively inhibited the dehydration conversion of textile compounds during the preheating process, which was favorable for the treatment system of textile sludge. The corrosion experiment results indicate that the stainless steel 316 could be competent for the body materials of the reactor and the heat exchangers. Furthermore, there was prominent enhancement of sodium hydroxide for the corrosion resistance of 316 in subcritical water. On the contrary the effect was almost none during SCWO.

  2. High Density Thermal Energy Storage with Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapathi, Gani B.; Wirz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach to storing thermal energy with supercritical fluids is being investigated, which if successful, promises to transform the way thermal energy is captured and utilized. The use of supercritical fluids allows cost-affordable high-density storage with a combination of latent heat and sensible heat in the two-phase as well as the supercritical state. This technology will enhance penetration of several thermal power generation applications and high temperature water for commercial use if the overall cost of the technology can be demonstrated to be lower than the current state-of-the-art molten salt using sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate eutectic mixtures.

  3. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-07-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  4. Model-free adaptive control of advanced power plants

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, George Shu-Xing; Mulkey, Steven L.; Wang, Qiang

    2015-08-18

    A novel 3-Input-3-Output (3.times.3) Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) controller with a set of artificial neural networks as part of the controller is introduced. A 3.times.3 MFA control system using the inventive 3.times.3 MFA controller is described to control key process variables including Power, Steam Throttle Pressure, and Steam Temperature of boiler-turbine-generator (BTG) units in conventional and advanced power plants. Those advanced power plants may comprise Once-Through Supercritical (OTSC) Boilers, Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Boilers, and Once-Through Supercritical Circulating Fluidized-Bed (OTSC CFB) Boilers.

  5. Fatty and resin acid analysis in tall oil products via supercritical fluid extraction-supercritical fluid reaction using enzymatic catalysis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S L; King, J W

    2001-07-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is combined with supercritical fluid reaction (SFR) in an analytical mode to assess tall oil products for their fatty or resin acid content or both. The SFR consists of an inline enzymatically catalyzed reaction in which a lipase transesterifies specific lipids with methanol. The SFE-SFR sequence is conducted employing commercially available extractors using supported lipases in the extraction cell to form methyl esters. In this study, six different commercially available lipases are screened for activity. The SFE-SFR extracts are analyzed by capillary gas chromatography and supercritical fluid chromatography and then compared with tall oil products derivatized by conventional chemical derivatization techniques.

  6. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  7. Stability Analysis of a Uniformly Heated Channel with Supercritical Water

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega Gomez, T.; Class, A.; Schulenberg, T.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    2006-07-01

    The thermal-hydraulic stability of a uniformly heated channel at supercritical water pressure has been investigated to help understand the system instability phenomena which may occur in Supercritical Water Nuclear Reactors (SCWR). We have extended the modeling approach often used for Boiling Water Nuclear Reactor (BWR) stability analysis to supercritical pressure operation conditions. We have shown that Ledinegg excursive instabilities and pressure-drop oscillations (PDO) will not occur in supercritical water systems. The linear stability characteristics of a typical uniformly heated channel were computed by evaluating the eigenvalues of the model. An analysis of non-linear instability phenomena was also performed in the time domain and the dynamic bifurcations were evaluated. (authors)

  8. LOX droplet vaporization in a supercritical forced convective environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Chia-Chun; Yang, Vigor

    1993-11-01

    Modern liquid rocket engines often use liquid oxygen (LOX) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) as propellants to achieve high performance, with the engine operational conditions in the supercritical regimes of the propellants. Once the propellant exceeds its critical state, it essentially becomes a puff of dense fluid. The entire field becomes a continuous medium, and no distinct interfacial boundary between the liquid and gas exists. Although several studies have been undertaken to investigate the supercritical droplet behavior at quiescent conditions, very little effort has been made to address the fundamental mechanisms associated with LOX droplet vaporization in a supercritical, forced convective environment. The purpose is to establish a theoretical framework within which supercritical droplet dynamics and vaporization can be studied systematically by means of an efficient and robust numerical algorithm.

  9. Thermodynamic properties of supercritical carbon dioxide: Widom and Frenkel lines.

    PubMed

    Fomin, Yu D; Ryzhov, V N; Tsiok, E N; Brazhkin, V V

    2015-02-01

    Supercritical fluids are widely used in a number of important technological applications, yet the theoretical progress in the field has been rather moderate. Fairly recently, a new understanding of the liquidlike and gaslike properties of supercritical fluids has come to the fore, particularly with the advent of the Widom and Frenkel lines that aim to demarcate different physical properties on the phase diagram. Here, we report the results of a computational study of supercritical carbon dioxide, one of the most important fluids in the chemical industry. We study the response functions of CO_{2} in the supercritical state and calculate the locations of their maxima (Widom lines). We also report the preliminary calculations of the Frenkel line, the line of crossover of microscopic dynamics of particles. Our insights are relevant to physical processes in the atmosphere of Venus and its evolution.

  10. Physical properties of the benchmark models program supercritical wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dansberry, Bryan E.; Durham, Michael H.; Bennett, Robert M.; Turnock, David L.; Silva, Walter A.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of the Benchmark Models Program is to provide data useful in the development and evaluation of aeroelastic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. To that end, a series of three similar wing models are being flutter tested in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. These models are designed to simultaneously acquire model response data and unsteady surface pressure data during wing flutter conditions. The supercritical wing is the second model of this series. It is a rigid semispan model with a rectangular planform and a NASA SC(2)-0414 supercritical airfoil shape. The supercritical wing model was flutter tested on a flexible mount, called the Pitch and Plunge Apparatus, that provides a well-defined, two-degree-of-freedom dynamic system. The supercritical wing model and associated flutter test apparatus is described and experimentally determined wind-off structural dynamic characteristics of the combined rigid model and flexible mount system are included.

  11. LOX droplet vaporization in a supercritical forced convective environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsiao, Chia-Chun; Yang, Vigor

    1993-01-01

    Modern liquid rocket engines often use liquid oxygen (LOX) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) as propellants to achieve high performance, with the engine operational conditions in the supercritical regimes of the propellants. Once the propellant exceeds its critical state, it essentially becomes a puff of dense fluid. The entire field becomes a continuous medium, and no distinct interfacial boundary between the liquid and gas exists. Although several studies have been undertaken to investigate the supercritical droplet behavior at quiescent conditions, very little effort has been made to address the fundamental mechanisms associated with LOX droplet vaporization in a supercritical, forced convective environment. The purpose is to establish a theoretical framework within which supercritical droplet dynamics and vaporization can be studied systematically by means of an efficient and robust numerical algorithm.

  12. Particle Formation by Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Expansion Process

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junbo; Li, Haiting; Quan, Can

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction and expansion (SFEE) patented technology combines the advantages of both supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and rapid expansion of supercritical solution (RESS) with on-line coupling, which makes the nanoparticle formation feasible directly from matrix such as Chinese herbal medicine. Supercritical fluid extraction is a green separation technology, which has been developed for decades and widely applied in traditional Chinese medicines or natural active components. In this paper, a SFEE patented instrument was firstly built up and controlled by LABVIEW work stations. Stearic acid was used to verify the SFEE process at optimized condition; via adjusting the preexpansion pressure and temperature one can get different sizes of particles. Furthermore, stearic acid was purified during the SFEE process with HPLC-ELSD detecting device; purity of stearic acid increased by 19%, and the device can purify stearic acid. PMID:24223031

  13. Thermodynamic properties of supercritical carbon dioxide: Widom and Frenkel lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Yu. D.; Ryzhov, V. N.; Tsiok, E. N.; Brazhkin, V. V.

    2015-02-01

    Supercritical fluids are widely used in a number of important technological applications, yet the theoretical progress in the field has been rather moderate. Fairly recently, a new understanding of the liquidlike and gaslike properties of supercritical fluids has come to the fore, particularly with the advent of the Widom and Frenkel lines that aim to demarcate different physical properties on the phase diagram. Here, we report the results of a computational study of supercritical carbon dioxide, one of the most important fluids in the chemical industry. We study the response functions of CO2 in the supercritical state and calculate the locations of their maxima (Widom lines). We also report the preliminary calculations of the Frenkel line, the line of crossover of microscopic dynamics of particles. Our insights are relevant to physical processes in the atmosphere of Venus and its evolution.

  14. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Aflatoxin B 1 from Soil

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research describes the development of a Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) method to recover aflatoxin B1 from fortified soil. The effects of temperature, pressure, modifier (identity and percentage), and extraction type were assessed. Using the optimized SFE conditions, ...

  15. Simultaneous Graphite Exfoliation and N Doping in Supercritical Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Sasikala, Suchithra Padmajan; Huang, Kai; Giroire, Baptiste; Prabhakaran, Prem; Henry, Lucile; Penicaud, Alain; Poulin, Philippe; Aymonier, Cyril

    2016-11-16

    We report the exfoliation of graphite and simultaneous N doping of graphene by two methods: supercritical ammonia treatment and liquid-phase exfoliation with NH4OH. While the supercritical ammonia allowed N doping at a level of 6.4 atom % in 2 h, the liquid-phase exfoliation with NH4OH allowed N doping at a level of 2.7 atom % in 6 h. The N doped graphene obtained via the supercritical ammonia route had few layers (<5) and showed large lateral flake size (∼8 μm) and low defect density (ID/IG < 0.6) in spite of their high level of N doping. This work is the first demonstration of supercritical ammonia as an exfoliation agent and N doping precursor for graphene. Notably, the N doped graphene showed electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction with high durability and good methanol tolerance compared to those of commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  16. Supercritical Wing Technology: A Progress Report on Flight Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The papers in this compilation were presented at the NASA Symposium on "Supercritical Wing Technology: A Progress Report on Flight Evaluation" held at the NASA Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., on February 29, 1972. The purpose of the symposium was to present timely information on flight results obtained with the F-8 and T-2C supercritical wing configurations, discuss comparisons with wind-tunnel predictions, and project [ ] flight programs planned for the F-8 and F-III (TACT) airplanes.

  17. Process for treating effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, C.M.; Shapiro, C.

    1997-11-25

    A method for treating a gaseous effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor containing entrained solids is provided comprising the steps of expanding the gas/solids effluent from a first to a second lower pressure at a temperature at which no liquid condenses; separating the solids from the gas effluent; neutralizing the effluent to remove any acid gases; condensing the effluent; and retaining the purified effluent to the supercritical water oxidation reactor. 6 figs.

  18. Process for treating effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, Charles M.; Shapiro, Carolyn

    1997-01-01

    A method for treating a gaseous effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor containing entrained solids is provided comprising the steps of expanding the gas/solids effluent from a first to a second lower pressure at a temperature at which no liquid condenses; separating the solids from the gas effluent; neutralizing the effluent to remove any acid gases; condensing the effluent; and retaining the purified effluent to the supercritical water oxidation reactor.

  19. Supercritical carbon dioxide: putting the fizz into biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Barry, John J.A.; Silva, Marta M.C.G.; Popov, Vladimir K.; Shakesheff, Kevin M.; Howdle, Steven M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes recent progress made in the use of high pressure or supercritical fluids to process polymers into three-dimensional tissue engineering scaffolds. Three current examples are highlighted: foaming of acrylates for use in cartilage tissue engineering; plasticization and encapsulation of bioactive species into biodegradable polyesters for bone tissue engineering; and a novel laser sintering process used to fabricate three-dimensional biodegradable polyester structures from particles prepared via a supercritical route. PMID:17464360

  20. Supercritical hydrogenation and acid-catalysed reactions "without gases".

    PubMed

    Hyde, Jason R; Poliakoff, Martyn

    2004-07-07

    The high temperature catalytic decomposition of HCO2H and HCO2Et are used to generate the high pressure H2 and the supercritical fluids needed for micro-scale hydrogenation of organic compounds; our approach overcomes the problems and limitations of handling high pressure gases on a small-scale and opens the way to the widespread use of continuous supercritical reactions in the laboratory.

  1. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in supercritical fluids. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Akgerman, A.; Bukur, D.B.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this study was to investigate Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) in the supercritical phase employing a commercial precipitated iron catalysts. As the supercritical fluid the authors used propane and n-hexane. The catalyst had a nominal composition of 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 SiO{sub 2} on mass basis and was used in a fixed bed reactor under both normal (conventional) and supercritical conditions. Experimental data were obtained at different temperatures (235 C, 250 C, and 260 C) and synthesis gas feed compositions (H{sub 2}/CO molar feed ratio of 0.67, 1.0 and 2.0) in both modes of operation under steady state conditions. The authors compared the performance of the precipitated iron catalyst in the supercritical phase, with the data obtained in gas phase (fixed bed reactor) and slurry phase (STS reactor). Comparisons were made in terms of bulk catalyst activity and various aspects of product selectivity (e.g. lumped hydrocarbon distribution and olefin content as a function of carbon number). In order to gain better understanding of the role of intraparticle mass transfer during FTS under conventional or supercritical conditions, the authors have measured diffusivities of representative hydrocarbon products in supercritical fluids, as well as their effective diffusion rates into the pores of catalyst at the reaction conditions. They constructed a Taylor dispersion apparatus to measure diffusion coefficients of hydrocarbon products of FTS in sub and supercritical ethane, propane, and hexane. In addition, they developed a tracer response technique to measure the effective diffusivities in the catalyst pores at the same conditions. Based on these results they have developed an equation for prediction of diffusion in supercritical fluids, which is based on the rough hard sphere theory.

  2. Supercritical extraction of lycopene from tomato industrial wastes with ethane.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Beatriz P; Gouveia, Luisa; Matos, Patricia G S; Cristino, Ana F; Palavra, António F; Mendes, Rui L

    2012-07-11

    Supercritical fluid extraction of all-E-lycopene from tomato industrial wastes (mixture of skins and seeds) was carried out in a semi-continuous flow apparatus using ethane as supercritical solvent. The effect of pressure, temperature, feed particle size, solvent superficial velocity and matrix initial composition was evaluated. Moreover, the yield of the extraction was compared with that obtained with other supercritical solvents (supercritical CO₂ and a near critical mixture of ethane and propane). The recovery of all-E-lycopene increased with pressure, decreased with the increase of the particle size in the initial stages of the extraction and was not practically affected by the solvent superficial velocity. The effect of the temperature was more complex. When the temperature increased from 40 to 60 °C the recovery of all-E-lycopene increased from 80 to 90%. However, for a further increase to 80 °C, the recovery remained almost the same, indicating that some E-Z isomerization could have occurred, as well as some degradation of lycopene. The recovery of all-E-lycopene was almost the same for feed samples with different all-E-lycopene content. Furthermore, when a batch with a higher all-E-lycopene content was used, supercritical ethane and a near critical mixture of ethane and propane showed to be better solvents than supercritical CO₂ leading to a faster extraction with a higher recovery of the carotenoid.

  3. Containment system for supercritical water oxidation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, Philippe

    1994-01-01

    A system for containment of a supercritical water oxidation reactor in the event of a rupture of the reactor. The system includes a containment for housing the reaction vessel and a communicating chamber for holding a volume of coolant, such as water. The coolant is recirculated and sprayed to entrain and cool any reactants that might have escaped from the reaction vessel. Baffles at the entrance to the chamber prevent the sprayed coolant from contacting the reaction vessel. An impact-absorbing layer is positioned between the vessel and the containment to at least partially absorb momentum of any fragments propelled by the rupturing vessel. Remote, quick-disconnecting fittings exterior to the containment, in cooperation with shut-off valves, enable the vessel to be isolated and the system safely taken off-line. Normally-closed orifices throughout the containment and chamber enable decontamination of interior surfaces when necessary.

  4. Containment system for supercritical water oxidation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, P.

    1994-07-05

    A system is described for containment of a supercritical water oxidation reactor in the event of a rupture of the reactor. The system includes a containment for housing the reaction vessel and a communicating chamber for holding a volume of coolant, such as water. The coolant is recirculated and sprayed to entrain and cool any reactants that might have escaped from the reaction vessel. Baffles at the entrance to the chamber prevent the sprayed coolant from contacting the reaction vessel. An impact-absorbing layer is positioned between the vessel and the containment to at least partially absorb momentum of any fragments propelled by the rupturing vessel. Remote, quick-disconnecting fittings exterior to the containment, in cooperation with shut-off valves, enable the vessel to be isolated and the system safely taken off-line. Normally-closed orifices throughout the containment and chamber enable decontamination of interior surfaces when necessary. 2 figures.

  5. Electromagnetic Whistler Precursors at Supercritical Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of electromagnetic precursor waves, identified as whistler mode waves, at supercritical interplanetary shocks using the Wind search coil magnetometer. The precursors propagate obliquely with respect to the local magnetic field, shock normal vector, solar wind velocity, and they are not phase standing structures. All are right-hand polarized with respect to the magnetic field (spacecraft frame), and all but one are right-hand polarized with respect to the shock normal vector in the normal incidence frame. Particle distributions show signatures of specularly reflected gyrating ions, which may be a source of free energy for the observed modes. In one event, we simultaneously observe perpendicular ion heating and parallel electron acceleration, consistent with wave heating/acceleration due to these waves.

  6. Etching of glass microchips with supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Karásek, Pavel; Grym, Jakub; Roth, Michal; Planeta, Josef; Foret, František

    2015-01-07

    A novel method of etching channels in glass microchips with the most tunable solvent, water, was tested as an alternative to common hydrogen fluoride-containing etchants. The etching properties of water strongly depend on temperature and pressure, especially in the vicinity of the water critical point. The chips were etched at the subcritical, supercritical and critical temperature of water, and the resulting channel shape, width, depth and surface morphology were studied by scanning electron microscopy and 3D laser profilometry. Channels etched with the hot water were compared with the chips etched with standard hydrogen fluoride-containing solution. Depending on the water pressure and temperature, the silicate dissolved from the glass could be re-deposited on the channel surface. This interesting phenomenon is described together with the conditions necessary for its utilization. The results illustrate the versatility of pure water as a glass etching and surface morphing agent.

  7. Supercritical antisolvent precipitation of PHBV microparticles.

    PubMed

    Costa, Mariana Sousa; Duarte, Ana Rita C; Cardoso, M Margarida; Duarte, Catarina M M

    2007-01-02

    The micronization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) from organic solutions using supercritical antisolvent (SAS) technique has been successfully achieved. SAS experiments were carried out at different operational conditions and microspheres with mean diameters ranging from 3 to 9 microm were obtained. The effect of CO(2) and liquid flow, temperature and pressure on particle size and particle size distribution was evaluated. The microspheres were precipitated from a dichloromethane (DCM) solution. The best process conditions for this mixture were, according to our study, 40 degrees C, 100 bar, 1 mL min(-1) liquid flow and 10 L min(-1) carbon dioxide flow. Experiments with polymers containing different HV percentages were carried out. The powders obtained became more spherical as the HV content decreased.

  8. Gasification of cyanobacterial in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiwen; Zhu, Wei; Xu, Zhirong; Gong, Miao

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacterial collected from eutrophic freshwater lakes constituted intractable waste with a rich algae biomass content. Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) was proposed to treat the cyanobacterial and to produce hydrogen for energy. The H 2 yield reached 2.92 mol/kg at reaction conditions of 500 °C, 30 min and 22 MPa; this yield accounted for 26% of the total gaseous products. Abundant ammonia and dissolved reactive phosphorous were concentrated in the liquid product, which could be recovered and used as a liquid fertilizer. Solid residue, which accounted only for about 1% of the wet weight, was mainly composed of coke and ash. The efficiency of H 2 production was better than that from other biomass, because of the abundant organic matter in cyanobacterial. Thus, cyanobacterial are an ideal biomass feedstock for H 2 production from SCWG.

  9. Supercritical oxygen heat transfer. [regenerative cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R. G.; Rousar, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Heat transfer to supercritical oxygen was experimentally measured in electrical heated tubes. Experimental data were obtained for pressures ranging from 17 to 34.5 MPa (2460 to 5000 psia), and heat fluxes from 2 to 90 million w/sq cm (1.2 to 55 Btu/(sq in. sec)). Bulk temperatures ranged from 96 to 217 K (173 to 391 R). Experimental data obtained by other investigators were added to this to increase the range of pressure down to 2 MPa (290 psia) and increase the range of bulk temperature up to 566 K (1019 R). From this compilation of experimental data a correlating equation was developed which predicts over 95% of the experimental data within + or - 30%.

  10. Supercritical water oxidation of landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuzhong; Guo, Yang; Chen, Chongming; Zhang, Jie; Gong, Yanmeng; Wang, Yuzhen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, ammonia as an important ingredient in landfill leachate was mainly studied. Based on Peng-Robinson formulations and Gibbs free energy minimization method, the estimation of equilibrium composition and thermodynamic analysis for supercritical water oxidation of ammonia (SCWO) was made. As equilibrium is reached, ammonia could be totally oxidized in SCW. N(2) is the main product, and the formation of NO(2) and NO could be neglected. The investigation on SCWO of landfill leachate was conducted in a batch reactor at temperature of 380-500 °C, reaction time of 50-300s and pressure of 25 MPa. The effect of reaction parameters such as oxidant equivalent ratio, reaction time and temperature were investigated. The results showed that COD and NH(3) conversion improved as temperature, reaction time and oxygen excess increased. Compared to organics, NH(3) is a refractory compound in supercritical water. The conversion of COD and NH(3) were higher in the presence of MnO(2) than that without catalyst. The interaction between reaction temperature and time was analyzed by using response surface method (RSM) and the results showed that its influence on the NH(3) conversion was relatively insignificant in the case without catalyst. A global power-law rate expression was regressed from experimental data to estimate the reaction rate of NH(3). The activation energy with and without catalyst for NH(3) oxidation were 107.07 ± 8.57 kJ/mol and 83.22 ± 15.62 kJ/mol, respectively.

  11. Design Construction and Operation of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (sCO2) Loop for Investigation of Dry Cooling and Natural Circulation Potential for Use in Advanced Small Modular Reactors Utilizing sCO2 Power Conversion Cycles.

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, Bobby D.; Rodriguez, Salvador B.; Carlson, Matthew David

    2015-11-01

    This report outlines the work completed for a Laboratory Directed Research and Development project at Sandia National Laboratories from October 2012 through September 2015. An experimental supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO 2 ) loop was designed, built, and o perated. The experimental work demonstrated that sCO 2 can be uti lized as the working fluid in an air - cooled, natural circulation configuration to transfer heat from a source to the ultimate heat sink, which is the surrounding ambient environment in most ca ses. The loop was also operated in an induction - heated, water - cooled configuration that allows for measurements of physical parameters that are difficult to isolate in the air - cooled configuration. Analysis included the development of two computational flu id dynamics models. Future work is anticipated to answer questions that were not covered in this project.

  12. Innovative instrument design and applications in supercritical fluid chromatography and extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Oudsema, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    A novel sample introduction system was developed for supercritical fluid chromatography. The solventless injector utilizes a gas purge for solvent elimination and is capable of handling large sample volumes. Successful operation depends on the difference in volatility between the solvent and the analyte along with effective refocusing mechanisms at the head of the column. Reduced analysis times are achieved by in-line derivatization to permit the separation of polar analytes and elimination of volatile reagents and by products. The construction of a SFC restrictor from a 2 mm metal disc was described. The design is compact, robust and will readily interface with existing detectors. Preliminary results indicate that variable flow control can be achieved by temperature programming. The Knox equation was useful in illustrating the limitations of the solventless injector during isochloric conditions and proved that small particle (<10[mu]m) columns packed by the supercritical fluid displacement method are identical to those packed by the high pressure slurry packing method developed for HPLC. Supercritical CO[sub 2] and microbore columns are compatible with GC style detectors (FID). The use of formamide as a modifier improves the chromatographic properties for compounds containing nitrogen atoms and is compatible with the FID. SFE/SFC with formic acid modified CO[sub 2], polymer encapsulated stationary phases and the FID represent a considerable advance in the analysis of organotin compounds. The method is capable of extracting and separating a diverse group of industrially important organotin compounds. Triorganotins were determined in marine paint, potatoes, almonds and cation exchange resin. Diorganotin compounds were determined in PVC and cation exchange resin. The solventless injector allowed on line collection from the SFE cell and direct introduction to the analytical column.

  13. Subcritical and supercritical technology for the production of second generation bioethanol.

    PubMed

    Rostagno, Mauricio A; Prado, Juliana M; Mudhoo, Ackmez; Santos, Diego T; Forster-Carneiro, Tânia; Meireles, M Angela A

    2015-01-01

    There is increased interest in reducing our reliance on fossil fuels and increasing the share of renewable raw materials in our energy supply chain due to environmental and economic concerns. Ethanol is emerging as a potential alternative to liquid fuels due to its eco-friendly characteristics and relatively low production costs. As ethanol is currently produced from commodities also used for human and animal consumption, there is an urgent need of identifying renewable raw materials that do not pose a competitive problem. Lignocellulosic agricultural residues are an ideal choice since they can be effectively hydrolyzed to fermentable sugars and integrated in the context of a biorefinery without competing with the food supply chain. However, the conventional hydrolysis methods still have major issues that need to be addressed. These issues are related to the processing rate and generation of fermentation inhibitors, which can compromise the quality of the product and the cost of the process. As the knowledge of the processes taking place during hydrolysis of agricultural residues is increasing, new techniques are being exploited to overcome these drawbacks. This review gives an overview of the state-of-the-art of hydrolysis with subcritical and supercritical water in the context of reusing agricultural residues for the production of suitable substrates to be processed during the fermentative production of bioethanol. Presently, subcritical and/or supercritical water hydrolysis has been found to yield low sugar contents mainly due to concurrent competing degradation of sugars during the hydrothermal processes. In this line of thinking, the present review also revisits the recent applications and advances to provide an insight of future research trends to optimize on the subcritical and supercritical process kinetics.

  14. US program on materials technology for ultra-supercritical coal power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, R.; Henry, J.F.; Tanzosh, J.; Stanko, G.; Shingledecker, J.; Vitalis, B.; Purgert, R.

    2005-06-01

    The study reported on here is aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers that are capable of operating with steam at temperatures of 760{sup o}C (1400{sup o}F) and pressures of 35 MPa (5000 psi). The economic viability of such a plant has been explored. Candidate alloys applicable to various ranges of temperatures have been identified. Stress rupture tests have been completed on the base metal and on welds to a number of alloys. Steamside oxidation tests in an autoclave at 650{sup o}C (1200{sup o}F) and 800{sup o}C (1475 {sup o}F) have been completed. Fireside corrosion tests have been conducted under conditions simulating those of waterwalls and superheater/reheater tubes. The weldability and fabricability of the alloys have been investigated. The capabilities of various overlay coatings and diffusion coatings have been examined. This article provides a status report on the progress achieved to date on this project.

  15. Boiler materials for ultra-supercritical coal power plants - steamside oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, R.; Sarver, J.; Tanzosh, J.M.

    2006-06-15

    The corrosion behavior of tubing materials carrying steam at high temperature is of great concern to fossil power plant operators. This is due to the fact that the oxide films formed on the steam side can lead to major failures and consequently to reduced plant availability. The wall loss of the pressure boundary caused by oxidation can increase the hoop stresses and cause premature creep failures; second, the increased insulation of the tubes due to the low thermal conductivity of the oxide film can lead to increased metal temperature, thereby exacerbating the fireside corrosion as well as creep problems. The third concern is that thicker oxides may spall more easily when the plant is cooled down. On restart, the spalled material may lodge somewhere in the system with the potential for causing tube blockages, or it may be swept out with the working fluid and enter the steam turbine causing erosion damage to the turbine nozzles and blades. Failures of tubing and turbine components by these mechanisms have been widely reported in the United States. In view of the importance of the steamside oxidation, a major study of the phenomenon is being carried out as part of a major national program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Ohio Coal Development Office. As a prelude to the experimental work, a literature survey was performed to document the state of the art. Results of the review are reported here.

  16. Ultra Low Temperature Instrumentation for Measurements in Astrophysics : ULTIMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunkov, Yu. M.; Elbs, J.; Godfrin, H.; Winkelmann, C. B.

    2006-09-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in particle detection using superfluid 3He at ultra-low temperature about 100 μK, for application in large detector project ULTIMA for the search of non-baryonic Dark Matter. The unique advantages of 3He, and in particular of its superfluid state, for Dark Matter search are highlighted.

  17. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-04-29

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, and shear bond. Testing to determine the effect of temperature cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. In addition, the stress-strain behavior of the cement types was studied. This report discusses a software program that is being developed to help design ULHS cements and foamed cements.

  18. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-01-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

  19. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that will be performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries, as well as the results of Field Tests 1 and 2.

  20. Ultra-Precision Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Under a Joint Sponsored Research Agreement with Goddard Space Flight Center, SEMATECH, Inc., the Silicon Valley Group, Inc. and Tinsley Laboratories, known as SVG-Tinsley, developed an Ultra-Precision Optics Manufacturing System for space and microlithographic applications. Continuing improvements in optics manufacture will be able to meet unique NASA requirements and the production needs of the lithography industry for many years to come.

  1. Ultra high resolution tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  2. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-04-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter.

  3. Ultra-high resolution DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, A H; Robinson, H; Gao, Y G

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the progress in our efforts at producing ultra-high resolution (< 0.8 A) DNA structures using advanced cryo-crystallography and synchrotron. Our work is aimed at providing reliable geometric (bond length and bond angle), electronic and motional information of DNA molecules in different conformational contexts. These highly-reliable, new structures will be the basis for constructing better DNA force-field parameters, which will benefit the structural refinement of DNA, protein-DNA complexes, and ligand-DNA complexes.

  4. Characterization of Polyimide Foams for Ultra-Lightweight Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael (Technical Monitor); Hillman, Keithan; Veazie, David R.

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-lightweight materials have played a significant role in nearly every area of human activity ranging from magnetic tapes and artificial organs to atmospheric balloons and space inflatables. The application range of ultra-lightweight materials in past decades has expanded dramatically due to their unsurpassed efficiency in terms of low weight and high compliance properties. A new generation of ultra-lightweight materials involving advanced polymeric materials, such as TEEK (TM) polyimide foams, is beginning to emerge to produce novel performance from ultra-lightweight systems for space applications. As a result, they require that special conditions be fulfilled to ensure adequate structural performance, shape retention, and thermal stability. It is therefore important and essential to develop methodologies for predicting the complex properties of ultra-lightweight foams. To support NASA programs such as the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), Clark Atlanta University, along with SORDAL, Inc., has initiated projects for commercial process development of polyimide foams for the proposed cryogenic tank integrated structure (see figure 1). Fabrication and characterization of high temperature, advanced aerospace-grade polyimide foams and filled foam sandwich composites for specified lifetimes in NASA space applications, as well as quantifying the lifetime of components, are immensely attractive goals. In order to improve the development, durability, safety, and life cycle performance of ultra-lightweight polymeric foams, test methods for the properties are constant concerns in terms of timeliness, reliability, and cost. A major challenge is to identify the mechanisms of failures (i.e., core failure, interfacial debonding, and crack development) that are reflected in the measured properties. The long-term goal of the this research is to develop the tools and capabilities necessary to successfully engineer ultra-lightweight polymeric foams. The desire is to reduce density

  5. Supercritical fluid reactions for coal processing. Quarterly report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.A.

    1996-10-01

    Exciting opportunities exist for the application of supercritical fluid (SCF) reactions for the pre-treatment of coal. Utilizing reactants which resemble the organic nitrogen containing components of coal, we propose to develop a method to tailor chemical reactions in supercritical fluid solvents for the specific application of coal denitrogenation. The tautomeric equilibrium of a Schiff base was chosen as the model system and was investigated in supercritical ethane and cosolvent modified supercritical ethane.

  6. Supercritical fluid reactions for coal processing. Quarterly progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.A.

    1996-11-01

    Exciting opportunities exist for the application of supercritical fluid (SCF) reactions for the pre-treatment of coal. Utilizing reactants which resemble the organic nitrogen containing components of coal, we propose to develop a method to tailor chemical reactions in supercritical fluid solvents for the specific application of coal denitrogenation. The tautomeric equilibrium of a Schiff base was chosen as the model system and was investigated in supercritical ethane and cosolvent modified supercritical ethane.

  7. Multiplexed Optical Fiber Sensors for Coal Fired Advanced Fossil Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary

    2012-03-31

    This report summarizes technical progress on the program Multiplexed Optical Fiber Sensors for Coal Fired Advanced Fossil Energy Systems funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed jointly by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Virginia Tech. This three-year project started on October 1, 2008. In the project, a fiber optical sensing system based on intrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (IFPI) was developed for strain and temperature measurements for Ultra Supercritical boiler condition assessment. Investigations were focused on sensor design, fabrication, attachment techniques and novel materials for high temperature and strain measurements. At the start of the project, the technical requirements for the sensing technology were determined together with our industrial partner Alstom Power. As is demonstrated in Chapter 4, all the technical requirements are successfully met. The success of the technology extended beyond laboratory test; its capability was further validated through the field test at DOE NETL, in which the sensors yielded distributed temperature mapping of a testing coupon installed in the turbine test rig. The measurement results agreed well with prior results generated with thermocouples. In this project, significant improvements were made to the IFPI sensor technology by splicing condition optimization, transmission loss reduction, sensor signal demodulation and sensor system design.

  8. Silver nanoparticles generated by pulsed laser ablation in supercritical CO2 medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machmudah, Siti; Sato, Takayuki; Wahyudiono; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) has been widely employed in industrial and biological applications and in other fields. The environmental conditions in which PLA is conducted are important parameters that affect both the solid particle cloud and the deposition produced by the plume. In this work, the generation of nanoparticles (NPs) has been developed by performing PLA of silver (Ag) plates in a supercritical CO2 medium. Ag NPs were successfully generated by allowing the selective generation of clusters. Laser ablation was performed with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm under various pressures and temperatures of CO2 medium. On the basis of the experimental result, both surface of the irradiated Ag plate and structure of Ag NPs were significantly affected by the changes in supercritical CO2 pressure and temperature. With increasing irradiation pressure, plume deposited in the surrounding crater created by the ablation was clearly observed. In Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) the image of the generated Ag NPs on the silicon wafer and the morphology of Ag particles were basically a sphere-like structure. Ag particles contain NPs with large-varied diameter ranging from 5 nm to 1.2 μm. The bigger Ag NPs melted during the ablation process and then ejected smaller spherical Ag NPs, which formed nanoclusters attached on the molten Ag NPs. The smaller Ag NPs were also formed around the bigger Ag NPs. Based on the results, this new method can also be used to obtain advanced nano-structured materials.

  9. Log-law and compressibility effects in transcritical turbulent boundary layers at supercritical pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Soshi

    2015-11-01

    In this talk, we discuss the log-law and effects of compressibility in transcritical heated turbulent boundary layers on a zero-pressure-gradient flat plate at supercritical pressure conditions by solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations using direct numerical simulation. In the supercritical fluids (especially at transcritical conditions), due to the strong real fluid effects thermodynamic properties vary abruptly within a narrow temperature range through the pseudo-critical temperature and significantly deviate from the ideal fluid. Peculiar interactions between the strongly non-linear real fluid effects and wall turbulence, and its resultant log-law and turbulence statistics are discussed, which have never been seen in the ideal-fluid turbulent boundary layers. We also show non-negligible compressibility effects in the flow even in the low-Mach number regime considered in this study. This work was supported by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science KAKENHI Grant Number 26709066. Computer time was provided by the K computer at the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science through the HPCI System Research project hp150035.

  10. Topics in Chemical Instrumentation--An Introduction to Supercritical Fluid Chromatography: Part 1: Principles and Instrumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmieri, Margo D.

    1988-01-01

    Identifies the properties and characteristics of supercritical fluids. Discusses the methodology for supercritical fluid chromatography including flow rate, plate height, column efficiency, viscosity, and other factors. Reviews instruments, column types, and elution conditions. Lists supercritical fluid data for 22 compounds, mostly organic. (MVL)

  11. 10 MW Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, Craig

    2014-01-29

    The Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test project was to demonstrate the inherent efficiencies of a supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) power turbine and associated turbomachinery under conditions and at a scale relevant to commercial concentrating solar power (CSP) projects, thereby accelerating the commercial deployment of this new power generation technology. The project involved eight partnering organizations: NREL, Sandia National Laboratories, Echogen Power Systems, Abengoa Solar, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Electric Power Research Institute, Barber-Nichols, and the CSP Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The multi-year project planned to design, fabricate, and validate an s-CO2 power turbine of nominally 10 MWe that is capable of operation at up to 700°C and operates in a dry-cooled test loop. The project plan consisted of three phases: (1) system design and modeling, (2) fabrication, and (3) testing. The major accomplishments of Phase 1 included: Design of a multistage, axial-flow, s-CO2 power turbine; Design modifications to an existing turbocompressor to provide s-CO2 flow for the test system; Updated equipment and installation costs for the turbomachinery and associated support infrastructure; Development of simulation tools for the test loop itself and for more efficient cycle designs that are of greater commercial interest; Simulation of s-CO2 power cycle integration into molten-nitrate-salt CSP systems indicating a cost benefit of up to 8% in levelized cost of energy; Identification of recuperator cost as a key economic parameter; Corrosion data for multiple alloys at temperatures up to 650ºC in high-pressure CO2 and recommendations for materials-of-construction; and Revised test plan and preliminary operating conditions based on the ongoing tests of related equipment. Phase 1 established that the cost of the facility needed to test the power turbine at its full power and temperature would exceed the planned funding for Phases 2 and 3. Late

  12. Reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olanrewaju, Kazeem Bode

    The uncertainties in the continuous supply of fossil fuels from the crisis-ridden oil-rich region of the world is fast shifting focus on the need to utilize cellulosic biomass and develop more efficient technologies for its conversion to fuels and chemicals. One such technology is the rapid degradation of cellulose in supercritical water without the need for an enzyme or inorganic catalyst such as acid. This project focused on the study of reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water. Cellulose reactions at hydrothermal conditions can proceed via the homogeneous route involving dissolution and hydrolysis or the heterogeneous path of surface hydrolysis. The work is divided into three main parts. First, the detailed kinetic analysis of cellulose reactions in micro- and tubular reactors was conducted. Reaction kinetics models were applied, and kinetics parameters at both subcritical and supercritical conditions were evaluated. The second major task was the evaluation of yields of water soluble hydrolysates obtained from the hydrolysis of cellulose and starch in hydrothermal reactors. Lastly, changes in molecular weight distribution due to hydrothermolytic degradation of cellulose were investigated. These changes were also simulated based on different modes of scission, and the pattern generated from simulation was compared with the distribution pattern from experiments. For a better understanding of the reaction kinetics of cellulose in subcritical and supercritical water, a series of reactions was conducted in the microreactor. Hydrolysis of cellulose was performed at subcritical temperatures ranging from 270 to 340 °C (tau = 0.40--0.88 s). For the dissolution of cellulose, the reaction was conducted at supercritical temperatures ranging from 375 to 395 °C (tau = 0.27--0.44 s). The operating pressure for the reactions at both subcritical and supercritical conditions was 5000 psig. The results show that the rate-limiting step in

  13. Experimental trim drag values and flow-field measurements for a wide-body transport model with conventional and supercritical wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, P. F.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if advanced supercritical wings incur higher trim drag values at cruise conditions than current wide body technology wings. Relative trim drag increments were measured in an experimental wind tunnel investigation conducted in the Langley 8 Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. The tests utilized a high aspect ratio supercritical wing and a wide body aircraft wing, in conjunction with five different horizontal tail configurations, mounted on a representative wide body fuselage. The three low tail and two T-tail configurations were designed to measure the effects of horizontal tail size, location, and camber on the trim drag increments for the two wings. Longitudinal force and moment data were taken at a Mach number of 0.82 and design cruise lift coefficients for the wide body and supercritical wings of 0.45 and 0.55, respectively. The data indicate that the supercritical wing does not have significantly higher trim drag than the wide body wing. A reduction in tail size, combined with relaxed static stability, produced trim drag reductions for both wings. The cambered tails had higher trim drag increments than the symmetrical tails for both wings, and the T-tail configurations had lower trim drag increments than the low tail configurations.

  14. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Droney, Christopher K.

    2011-01-01

    This Final Report summarizes the work accomplished by the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team in Phase 1, which includes the time period of October 2008 through March 2010. The team consisted of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, General Electric, and Georgia Tech. The team completed the development of a comprehensive future scenario for world-wide commercial aviation, selected baseline and advanced configurations for detailed study, generated technology suites for each configuration, conducted detailed performance analysis, calculated noise and emissions, assessed technology risks, and developed technology roadmaps. Five concepts were evaluated in detail: 2008 baseline, N+3 reference, N+3 high span strut braced wing, N+3 gas turbine battery electric concept, and N+3 hybrid wing body. A wide portfolio of technologies was identified to address the NASA N+3 goals. Significant improvements in air traffic management, aerodynamics, materials and structures, aircraft systems, propulsion, and acoustics are needed. Recommendations for Phase 2 concept and technology projects have been identified.

  15. High Resolution X-ray CMT Imaging of Supercritical CO2 in Porous Media: Experimental Challenges, Solutions, and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herring, A. L.; Andersson, L.; Newell, D. L.; Carey, J. W.; Wildenschild, D.

    2013-12-01

    Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration has been proposed as a climate change mitigation strategy to limit emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere from large fossil-fuel burning CO2 point sources; however, there are concerns associated with the long-term stability of a mobile subsurface CO2 plume. Capillary trapping of supercritical CO2 (scCO2), wherein the CO2 is held within the pore structure of the geologic matrix by capillary forces, is a more secure form of subsurface storage than structural trapping, which relies on an impermeable caprock to contain the buoyant CO2 plume. To understand the multiphase physics of CO2 transport, and to subsequently produce quantitative estimates of potential CO2 capillary trapping, it is necessary to study field, core, and pore-scale processes. X-ray computed microtomography (x-ray CMT) allows for three-dimensional (3D) in-situ visualization of fluid phases within and the physical structure of a porous medium at the pore-scale. We have designed and built a mobile experimental set-up capable of running at pressures up to 2000 PSI and temperatures up to 50°C, made with materials that are compatible with corrosive fluids. Our experimental procedure includes pressurizing, mixing, and separating fluids; and subsequently running immiscible drainage and imbibition flow experiments with brine and supercritical CO2. With this set-up and procedure, we successfully conducted a brine-scCO2 drainage experiment in Bentheimer sandstone at 1200 PSI and 36°C, and confirmed and quantified CO2 flow in the sandstone core via synchrotron-based x-ray CMT with a resolution of 4.65 μm at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. We have proven that we can observe, on a pore-scale basis, the movement of supercritical CO2 within a porous media. The properties of supercritical CO2 (e.g. viscosity, density, interfacial tension and solubility in brine) vary significantly with changes in pressure and temperature; consequently, precise

  16. Corrosive effects of supercritical carbon dioxide and cosolvents on metals

    SciTech Connect

    Russick, E.M.; Poulter, G.A.; Adkins, C.L.J.; Sorensen, N.R.

    1994-06-01

    With the eventual phase-out of chlorofluorocarbons, and restrictive regulations concerning the use of cleaning solvents such as hydrochlorofluorocarbons, and other volatile organic compounds, it is essential to seek new, environmentally acceptable cleaning processes. In the DOE Complex and in industry, an environmentally sound process for precision cleaning of machined metal parts is one of the issues that needs to be addressed. At Sandia, we are investigating the use of supercritical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as an alternative cleaning solvent for this application. Carbon dioxide is nontoxic, recyclable, and relatively inexpensive. Supercritical CO{sub 2} has been demonstrated as a solvent for many nonpolar organic compounds, including hydrocarbon-based machining and lubricating oils. The focus of this work is to investigate any corrosive effects of supercritical CO{sub 2} cleaning on metals. Sample coupons of several common metals were statically exposed to pure supercritical CO{sub 2}, water saturated supercritical CO{sub 2}, and 10 wt % methanol/CO{sub 2} cosolvent at 24,138 kPa (3500 psi) and 323K (50C) for 24 hours. Gravimetric analysis and magnified visual inspection of the coupons were performed before and after the exposure tests. Electron microprobe, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Auger electron surface analyses were done as needed where visual and gravimetric changes in the samples were evident. Results are reported.

  17. Extraction of metals using supercritical fluid and chelate forming ligand

    DOEpatents

    Wai, C.M.; Laintz, K.E.

    1998-03-24

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated {beta}-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated {beta}-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated {beta}-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated {beta}-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 7 figs.

  18. Extraction of metals using supercritical fluid and chelate forming legand

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Laintz, Kenneth E.

    1998-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  19. Experimental study of elliptical jet from sub to supercritical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2014-04-15

    The jet mixing at supercritical conditions involves fluid dynamics as well as thermodynamic phenomena. All the jet mixing studies at critical conditions to the present date have focused only on axisymmetric jets. When the liquid jet is injected into supercritical environment, the thermodynamic transition could be well understood by considering one of the important fluid properties such as surface tension since it decides the existence of distinct boundary between the liquid and gaseous phase. It is well known that an elliptical liquid jet undergoes axis-switching phenomena under atmospheric conditions due to the presence of surface tension. The experimental investigations were carried out with low speed elliptical jet under supercritical condition. Investigation of the binary component system with fluoroketone jet and N{sub 2} gas as environment shows that the surface tension force dominates for a large downstream distance, indicating delayed thermodynamic transition. The increase in pressure to critical state at supercritical temperature is found to expedite the thermodynamic transition. The ligament like structures has been observed rather than droplets for supercritical pressures. However, for the single component system with fluoroketone jet and fluoroketone environment shows that the jet disintegrates into droplets as it is subjected to the chamber conditions even for the subcritical pressures and no axis switching phenomenon is observed. For a single component system, as the pressure is increased to critical state, the liquid jet exhibits gas-gas like mixing behavior and that too without exhibiting axis-switching behavior.

  20. New topic of supercritical fluids: Local activity coefficients of supercritical solvent and cosolvent around solute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Minqiang; Zhang, Xiaogang; Han, Buxing; Song, Jiyuan; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Zhaofu; Zhang, Jianling

    2008-03-01

    The study of inhomogeneity in supercritical fluids (SCFs) is of great importance. In this work, we propose the concept of local activity coefficients in supercritical (SC) solutions, which link thermodynamics and inhomogeneity in SC systems. The local activity coefficients of CO2+acetonitrile+phenol blue and CO2+aceticacid+phenol blue systems are investigated at 308.15K in critical region and outside critical region. To do this, the local compositions of CO2+acetonitrile and CO2+acetic acid mixed solvents around phenol blue are first estimated using UV-visible spectroscopy. Then it is considered that there exist bulk phase and local phase around phenol blue in the systems. The activity coefficients of CO2 and the cosolvents (acetonitrile or acetic acid) in bulk phase are calculated using Peng-Robinson equation of state. The local activity coefficients of CO2 and the cosolvents are then calculated on the basis of thermodynamic principles. It is demonstrated that in the critical region the local activity coefficients differ from bulk activity coefficients significantly and are sensitive to pressure. This can explain many unusual phenomena in SC systems in critical region thermodynamically.

  1. New topic of supercritical fluids: local activity coefficients of supercritical solvent and cosolvent around solute.

    PubMed

    Hou, Minqiang; Zhang, Xiaogang; Han, Buxing; Song, Jiyuan; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Zhaofu; Zhang, Jianling

    2008-03-14

    The study of inhomogeneity in supercritical fluids (SCFs) is of great importance. In this work, we propose the concept of local activity coefficients in supercritical (SC) solutions, which link thermodynamics and inhomogeneity in SC systems. The local activity coefficients of CO(2)+acetonitrile+phenol blue and CO(2)+acetic acid+phenol blue systems are investigated at 308.15 K in critical region and outside critical region. To do this, the local compositions of CO(2)+acetonitrile and CO(2)+acetic acid mixed solvents around phenol blue are first estimated using UV-visible spectroscopy. Then it is considered that there exist bulk phase and local phase around phenol blue in the systems. The activity coefficients of CO(2) and the cosolvents (acetonitrile or acetic acid) in bulk phase are calculated using Peng-Robinson equation of state. The local activity coefficients of CO(2) and the cosolvents are then calculated on the basis of thermodynamic principles. It is demonstrated that in the critical region the local activity coefficients differ from bulk activity coefficients significantly and are sensitive to pressure. This can explain many unusual phenomena in SC systems in critical region thermodynamically.

  2. Microbial Growth under Supercritical CO2

    PubMed Central

    Peet, Kyle C.; Freedman, Adam J. E.; Hernandez, Hector H.; Britto, Vanya; Boreham, Chris; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.

    2015-01-01

    Growth of microorganisms in environments containing CO2 above its critical point is unexpected due to a combination of deleterious effects, including cytoplasmic acidification and membrane destabilization. Thus, supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is generally regarded as a sterilizing agent. We report isolation of bacteria from three sites targeted for geologic carbon dioxide sequestration (GCS) that are capable of growth in pressurized bioreactors containing scCO2. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes from scCO2 enrichment cultures revealed microbial assemblages of varied complexity, including representatives of the genus Bacillus. Propagation of enrichment cultures under scCO2 headspace led to isolation of six strains corresponding to Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subterraneus, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus safensis, and Bacillus megaterium. Isolates are spore-forming, facultative anaerobes and capable of germination and growth under an scCO2 headspace. In addition to these isolates, several Bacillus type strains grew under scCO2, suggesting that this may be a shared feature of spore-forming Bacillus spp. Our results provide direct evidence of microbial activity at the interface between scCO2 and an aqueous phase. Since microbial activity can influence the key mechanisms for permanent storage of sequestered CO2 (i.e., structural, residual, solubility, and mineral trapping), our work suggests that during GCS microorganisms may grow and catalyze biological reactions that influence the fate and transport of CO2 in the deep subsurface. PMID:25681188

  3. Near Term Application of Supercritical Water Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Bastian; Starflinger, Joerg; Schulenberg, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    A pressurized water reactor with a supercritical water primary loop is analyzed (PWR-SC) within this paper. It will be shown that the PWR-SC offers considerable advantages in the fields of safety, economy and efficiency compared with a conventional PWR design. A cycle analysis shows that the net plant efficiency increases by 2% compared to currently operated or built systems. In addition, the mass flow rate of the primary side is strongly decreased, which enables a reduction of the primary pump power by a factor of 4. In the secondary loop, the mass flow rate can be decreased by about 15%, which allows down-scaling of all secondary side components such as turbines, condensers and feed-water preheat systems as a consequence of the high core exit temperature. A coupled core analysis and a hot channel factor analysis are performed to demonstrate the promising safety features of the PWR-SC and to show the technical feasibility of such a system. (authors)

  4. Droplet vaporization in supercritical pressure environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Patrick V.; Peters, Bruce D.

    For most liquid-fueled combustion systems the behavior of the fuel as it is introduced to the combustion zone, often by spray injection, will have a significant impact on combustion. The subsequent combustion may be affected to a considerable degree by the initial spread of the liquid, break-up of larger fuel sheets and droplets into droplets of various sizes, droplet vaporization, and diffusion of gaseous fuel. Among the many factors which affect spray break-up and droplet vaporization are the environmental conditions into which the spray is introduced. For both diesel engines and rockets the environment pressure and temperature may be above the critical pressure and temperature of the injected fuel. In a compression-ignition internal combustion engine, the environment consists primarily of air, at pressures from 20 to 100 atmospheres and temperatures ranging from 900 to 1500 K. Even higher pressures are encountered in turbocharged diesels. A typical diesel reference fuel, dodecane, has a thermodynamic critical pressure of about 17 atmospheres, and a critical temperature of 600 K. Fuel is injected into a diesel engine environment in which ambient pressures exceed the critical pressure. While droplet temperatures are subcritical at first, they may rise to the critical temperature or higher. This paper will survey current understanding of supercritical pressure droplet vaporization. Specifically, the topics covered will include: liquid phase behavior; vapor phase behavior; thermodynamic and transport properties; droplet distribution and break-up; micro-explosions; and effects of microgravity.

  5. Supercritical wing sections 2, volume 108

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Garabedian, P.; Korn, D.; Jameson, A.; Beckmann, M. (Editor); Kuenzi, H. P. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical theory for the design and analysis of supercritical wing sections was previously presented. Examples and computer programs showing how this method works were included. The work on transonics is presented in a more definitive form. For design, a better model of the trailing edge is introduced which should eliminate a loss of fifteen or twenty percent in lift experienced with previous heavily aft loaded models, which is attributed to boundary layer separation. How drag creep can be reduced at off-design conditions is indicated. A rotated finite difference scheme is presented that enables the application of Murman's method of analysis in more or less arbitrary curvilinear coordinate systems. This allows the use of supersonic as well as subsonic free stream Mach numbers and to capture shock waves as far back on an airfoil as desired. Moreover, it leads to an effective three dimensional program for the computation of transonic flow past an oblique wing. In the case of two dimensional flow, the method is extended to take into account the displacement thickness computed by a semi-empirical turbulent boundary layer correction.

  6. Droplet vaporization in a supercritical microgravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, E. W.; Farrell, P. V.

    A model has been developed for non-convective vaporization of liquid fuel droplets in an environment above the liquid critical pressure and near or above the liquid critical temperature. The model employs conservation of mass, energy and chemical species, along with transport properties which vary with temperature and species concentration. The liquid interface is assumed to be in thermodynamic equilibrium. The interface problem is solved using the Gibbs-Duhem relationship, and evaluating mixture fugacities using a modified Redlich-Kwong equation of state for the mixture. Due to the limited range of this equation, a curve-fit equation of state suitable for conditions far from the liquid critical point was applied. Results are presented for an n-octane liquid drop in nitrogen gas. For two gas conditions, several droplet sizes are modeled. Results include droplet size histories, surface temperature histories, and liquid and gas phase temperature profiles. The liquid vaporization rate is increased significantly for supercritical conditions compared to subcritical conditions. Using the specified equation of state for the ambient conditions tested, the droplet is completely vaporized before the liquid surface is heated to the liquid critical temperature.

  7. A man-portable supercritical fluid extractor

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.W.; Zemanian, T.S.; Lee, R.N.; Wright, C.W.

    1995-02-01

    A new prototype supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) apparatus has been developed for the on-site preparation of solid matrix samples for subsequent organic analysis. The apparatus consists of two parts, each of which satisfy weight and size requirements for portability. They are a generator module that supplies high-pressure carbon dioxide (the source of which is dry ice) and a briefcase containing a pressure regulator, extraction cells, valves for flow control, flow restriction hardware, equipment for sample collection, temperature control devices, and ancillary supplies. The generator module provides carbon dioxide at pressures to 1 kbar ({approximately}14,500 psi), incorporates no moving parts, and allows rapid loading without tools due to novel fingertight closures. Samples are contained in sintered inserts that fit inside three extraction cells that also have rapid, fingertight closures. Analyte collection can be accomplished using liquid solvent or restrictorless rapid depressurization techniques. Control schemes allow operation at a wide variety of pressures and temperatures and the use of static, dynamic, or hybrid static/dynamic extraction strategies. The technical performance of the prototype apparatus was evaluated by comparison of results from the SFE of a soil sample spiked with six to nine organic compounds of environmental interest to Soxhlet extraction.

  8. A man-portable supercritical fluid extractor

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.W.; Zemanian, T.S.; Lee, R.N.; Wright, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    A new prototype supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) apparatus has been developed for the on-site preparation of solid matrix samples for subsequent organic analysis. The apparatus consists of two parts, each of which satisfy weight and size requirements for portability. They are a generator module that supplies high-pressure carbon dioxide (the source of which is dry ice) and a briefcase containing a pressure regulator, extraction cells, valves for flow control, flow restriction hardware, equipment for sample collection, temperature control devices, and ancillary supplies. The generator module provides carbon dioxide at pressures to 1 kbar ({approximately}14,500 psi), incorporates no moving parts, and allows rapid loading without tools due to novel fingertight closures. Samples are contained in sintered inserts that fit inside three extraction cells that also have rapid, fingertight closures. Analyte collection may be accomplished using liquid solvent or restrictorless rapid depressurization techniques. Control schemes allow operation at a wide variety of pressures and temperatures and the use of static, dynamic, or hybrid static/dynamic extraction strategies. The technical performance of the prototype apparatus was evaluated by comparison of results from the SFE of a soil sample spiked with six to nine organic compounds of environmental interest to Soxhlet extraction.

  9. Towards Overhauser DNP in supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Meerten, S. G. J.; Tayler, M. C. D.; Kentgens, A. P. M.; van Bentum, P. J. M.

    2016-06-01

    Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) is a well known technique to improve NMR sensitivity in the liquid state, where the large polarization of an electron spin is transferred to a nucleus of interest by cross-relaxation. The efficiency of the Overhauser mechanism for dipolar interactions depends critically on fast local translational dynamics at the timescale of the inverse electron Larmor frequency. The maximum polarization enhancement that can be achieved for 1H at high magnetic fields benefits from a low viscosity solvent. In this paper we investigate the option to use supercritical CO2 as a solvent for Overhauser DNP. We have investigated the diffusion constants and longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates of toluene in high pressure CO2. The change in 1H T1 by addition of TEMPO radical was analyzed to determine the Overhauser cross-relaxation in such a mixture, and is compared with calculations based on the Force Free Hard Sphere (FFHS) model. By analyzing the relaxation data within this model we find translational correlation times in the range of 2-4 ps, depending on temperature, pressure and toluene concentration. Such short correlation times may be instrumental for future Overhauser DNP applications at high magnetic fields, as are commonly used in NMR. Preliminary DNP experiments have been performed at 3.4 T on high pressure superheated water and model systems such as toluene in high pressure CO2.

  10. Welding immiscible polymers with a supercritical fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaochu; Sanchez, Isaac C

    2007-11-20

    Polymer adhesion between two immiscible polymers is usually poor because there is little interpenetration of one polymer into the other at the interface. Increasing the width of the interfacial zone can enhance adhesion and mechanical properties. In principle, this can be accomplished by exposing heterogeneous polymer materials to a high-pressure fluid. The fluid can act as a common solvent and promote interpenetration. It also increases chain mobility at the interface, which helps to promote "welding" of the two polymers. A combination of the gradient theory of inhomogeneous systems and the Sanchez-Lacombe equation of state was used to investigate this phenomenon, especially the effect of the high compressibility of supercritical (SC) fluid on the compatibilization of two incompatible polymers. We calculate the interfacial density profile, interfacial thickness, and interfacial tension between the two polymers with and without the SC fluid. We find that the interfacial tension is decreased and the interfacial thickness is increased with high-pressure SC fluid for the ternary systems we have investigated. As the critical point is approached and the SC compressibility becomes large, no enhancement or deleterious effects on compatibilization were observed.

  11. Nodal Solutions for Supercritical Laplace Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbono, Francesca; Franca, Matteo

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we study radial solutions for the following equation Δ u(x)+f (u(x), |x|) = 0, where {x in {Rn}}, n > 2, f is subcritical for r small and u large and supercritical for r large and u small, with respect to the Sobolev critical exponent {2^{*} = 2n/n-2}. The solutions are classified and characterized by their asymptotic behaviour and nodal properties. In an appropriate super-linear setting, we give an asymptotic condition sufficient to guarantee the existence of at least one ground state with fast decay with exactly j zeroes for any j ≥ 0. Under the same assumptions, we also find uncountably many ground states with slow decay, singular ground states with fast decay and singular ground states with slow decay, all of them with exactly j zeroes. Our approach, based on Fowler transformation and invariant manifold theory, enables us to deal with a wide family of potentials allowing spatial inhomogeneity and a quite general dependence on u. In particular, for the Matukuma-type potential, we show a kind of structural stability.

  12. Nonlinear dielectric effect in supercritical diethyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd-Rzoska, Aleksandra; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Martinez-Garcia, Julio Cesar

    2014-09-01

    Nonlinear dielectric effect (NDE) describes changes of dielectric permittivity induced by a strong electric field in a liquid dielectric. The most classical finding related to this magnitude is the negative sign of NDE in liquid diethyl ether (DEE), recalled by Peter Debye in his Nobel Prize lecture. This article shows that the positive sign of NDE in DEE is also possible, in the supercritical domain. Moreover, NDE on approaching the gas-liquid critical point exhibits a unique critical effect described by the critical exponent ψ ≈ 0.4 close to critical temperature (TC) and ψ ≈ 0.6 remote from TC. This can be linked to the emergence of the mean-field behavior in the immediate vicinity of TC, contrary to the typical pattern observed for critical phenomena. The multi-frequency mode of NDE measurements made it possible to estimate the evolution of lifetime of critical fluctuations. The new way of data analysis made it possible to describe the critical effect without a knowledge of the non-critical background contribution in prior.

  13. Chemistry and catalysis in supercritical media

    SciTech Connect

    Tumas, W.; Morgenstern, D.; Feng, S.

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The aim of this research is to explore the potential of supercritical fluids as reaction media for stoichiometric and catalytic chemical transformations in an effort to develop new, environmentally-friendly methods for chemical synthesis or processing. This approach offers the possibility of opening up substantially different chemical pathways, increasing selectivity while enhancing reaction rates, facilitating downstream separations and mitigating the need for hazardous solvents. The authors describe investigations into a number of catalytic processes for which carbon dioxide represents a viable solvent replacement. In several cases they have observed significant enhancements in selectivity and/or reactivity relative to conventional organic solvents. They have investigated the following catalytic processes: (a) selective oxidation including dihydroxylation and epoxidation, (b) asymmetric hydrogenation and hydrogen transfer reduction, (c) Lewis acid catalyzed acylation and alkylation, and (c) coupling of amines with carbon dioxide to make isocyanates.

  14. Towards Overhauser DNP in supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    van Meerten, S G J; Tayler, M C D; Kentgens, A P M; van Bentum, P J M

    2016-06-01

    Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) is a well known technique to improve NMR sensitivity in the liquid state, where the large polarization of an electron spin is transferred to a nucleus of interest by cross-relaxation. The efficiency of the Overhauser mechanism for dipolar interactions depends critically on fast local translational dynamics at the timescale of the inverse electron Larmor frequency. The maximum polarization enhancement that can be achieved for (1)H at high magnetic fields benefits from a low viscosity solvent. In this paper we investigate the option to use supercritical CO2 as a solvent for Overhauser DNP. We have investigated the diffusion constants and longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates of toluene in high pressure CO2. The change in (1)H T1 by addition of TEMPO radical was analyzed to determine the Overhauser cross-relaxation in such a mixture, and is compared with calculations based on the Force Free Hard Sphere (FFHS) model. By analyzing the relaxation data within this model we find translational correlation times in the range of 2-4ps, depending on temperature, pressure and toluene concentration. Such short correlation times may be instrumental for future Overhauser DNP applications at high magnetic fields, as are commonly used in NMR. Preliminary DNP experiments have been performed at 3.4T on high pressure superheated water and model systems such as toluene in high pressure CO2.

  15. The Supercritical Pile Model for GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.

    2005-01-01

    We present the spectral and temporal radiative signatures expected within the "Supercritical Pile" model of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB). This model is motivated by the need for a process that provides the dissipation necessary in GRB and presents a well defined scheme for converting the energy stored in the relativistic protons of the Relativistic Blast Waves (RBW) associated with GRB into radiation; at the same time it leads to spectra which exhibit a peak in the burst nuF(sub nu) distribution at an energy E(sub p) approx. equal to 1 MeV in the observer s frame, in agreement with observation and largely independent of the Lorentz factor r of the associated relativistic outflow. Futhermore, this scheme does not require (but does not preclude) acceleration of particles at the shock other than that provided by the isotropization of the flow bulk kinetic energy on the RBW frame. In the present paper we model in detail the evolution of protons, electrons and photons from a RBW to produce detailed spectra of the prompt GRB phase as a function of time from across a very broad range spanning roughly 4 log10Gamma decades in frequency. The model spectra are in general agreement with observations and provide a means for the delineating of the model parameters through direct comparison with trends observed in GRB properties.

  16. Microbial growth under supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Peet, Kyle C; Freedman, Adam J E; Hernandez, Hector H; Britto, Vanya; Boreham, Chris; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B; Thompson, Janelle R

    2015-04-01

    Growth of microorganisms in environments containing CO2 above its critical point is unexpected due to a combination of deleterious effects, including cytoplasmic acidification and membrane destabilization. Thus, supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is generally regarded as a sterilizing agent. We report isolation of bacteria from three sites targeted for geologic carbon dioxide sequestration (GCS) that are capable of growth in pressurized bioreactors containing scCO2. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes from scCO2 enrichment cultures revealed microbial assemblages of varied complexity, including representatives of the genus Bacillus. Propagation of enrichment cultures under scCO2 headspace led to isolation of six strains corresponding to Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subterraneus, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus safensis, and Bacillus megaterium. Isolates are spore-forming, facultative anaerobes and capable of germination and growth under an scCO2 headspace. In addition to these isolates, several Bacillus type strains grew under scCO2, suggesting that this may be a shared feature of spore-forming Bacillus spp. Our results provide direct evidence of microbial activity at the interface between scCO2 and an aqueous phase. Since microbial activity can influence the key mechanisms for permanent storage of sequestered CO2 (i.e., structural, residual, solubility, and mineral trapping), our work suggests that during GCS microorganisms may grow and catalyze biological reactions that influence the fate and transport of CO2 in the deep subsurface.

  17. On the supercritically diffusive magnetogeostrophic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedlander, Susan; Rusin, Walter; Vicol, Vlad

    2012-11-01

    We address the well-posedness theory for the magneto-geostrophic equation, namely an active scalar equation in which the divergence-free drift velocity is one derivative more singular than the active scalar. In the presence of supercritical fractional diffusion given by (-Δ)γ with 0 < γ < 1, we discover that for γ > 1/2 the equations are locally well-posed, while for γ < 1/2 they are ill-posed, in the sense that there is no Lipschitz solution map. The main reason for the striking loss of regularity when γ goes below 1/2 is that the constitutive law used to obtain the velocity from the active scalar is given by an unbounded Fourier multiplier which is both even and anisotropic. Lastly, we note that the anisotropy of the constitutive law for the velocity may be explored in order to obtain an improvement in the regularity of the solutions when the initial data and the force have thin Fourier support, i.e. they are supported on a plane in frequency space. In particular, for such well-prepared data one may prove the local existence and uniqueness of solutions for all values of γ ∈ (0, 1). In fact, these solutions are global in time when γ ∈ [1/2, 1).

  18. The Supercritical Pile Model for GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos

    2005-01-01

    We present the spectral and tempora1 radiative signatures expected within the "Supercritical Pile" model of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB). This model is motivated by the need for a process that provides the dissipation necessary in GRB and presents a well defined theme for converting the energy stored in the relativistic protons of the Relativistic Blast Waves (RBW) associated with GRB into radiation; at the same it leads to spectra which exhibit a peak in the burst vFv, distribution at an energy Ep l. MeV in the observer's frame, in agreement with observation and largely independent of the Lorentz factor P of the associated relativistic outflow. Furthermore, this scheme does not require (but does not preclude) acceleration of particles at the shock other than that provided by the isotropization of the flow kinetic energy on the RBW frame. In the present paper we model in detail the evolution of protons, electrons and photons from a RBW within the framework of this model to produce detailed spectra of the prompt GRB phase as a function of time from across a very broad range spanning roughly 4log10P decades in frequency. The model spectra are in general agreement with observations and provide a means for the delineating of the model parameters through direct comparison with trends observed in GRB properties.

  19. The Supercritical Pile Model for GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos

    2006-01-01

    We present the spectral and temporal radiative signatures expected within the Supercritical Pile model of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB). This model is motivated by the need for a process that provides the dissipation necessary in GRB and presents a well defined scheme for converting the energy stored in the relativistic protons of the Relativistic Blast Waves (RBW) associated with GRB into radiation; at the same time it leads to spectra which exhibit a peak in the burst nuF(sub nu) distribution at an energy E(sub p) approximately equal to 1 MeV in the observer s frame, in agreement with observation and largely independent of the Lorentz factor GAMMA of the associated relativistic outflow. Furthermore, this scheme does not require (but does not preclude) acceleration of particles at the shock other than that provided by the isotropization of the flow bulk kinetic energy on the RBW frame. In the present paper we model in detail the evolution of protons, electrons and photons from a RBW to produce detailed spectra of the prompt GRB phase as a function of time from across a very broad range spanning roughly 4 log10 GAMMA decades in frequency. The model spectra are in general agreement with observations and provide a means for the delineating of the model parameters through direct comparison with trends observed in GRB properties.

  20. Supercritical water pyrolysis of sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenchao; Du, Guiyue; Li, Jian; Fang, Yuanhao; Hou, Li'an; Chen, Guanyi; Ma, Degang

    2017-01-01

    Municipal sewage sludge (SS) from wastewater treatment plant containing high water content (>85wt.%), lead to the difficulty of co-combustion with MSW or coal due to the high cost of drying. This study explores an alternative method by supercritical water (SCW) pyrolysis of sewage sludge (SS) in a high pressure reaction vessel. The effects of temperature and moisture content of SS on yield and composition of the products (bio-oil, bio char and non-condensable gas) were studied. A temperature of 385°C and moisture content of 85wt.% were found to be the optimum conditions for the maximum bio-oil production of 37.23wt.%, with a higher heating value of 31.08MJ/kg. In the optimum condition, the yields of aliphatic hydrocarbon and phenols were about 29.23wt.% and 12.51wt.%, respectively. The physical and chemical properties of bio-char were analyzed by using XRF and BET. Results of GC analyses of NCG showed that it has the maximum HHV of 13.39MJ/m(3) at 445°C and moisture content of 85wt.%. The reaction path from SS to bio-oil through SCW pyrolysis was given. Moreover, carbon balance was calculated for the optimal condition, and finding out that 64.27wt.% of the carbon content was transferred from SS to bio-oil. Finally, this work demonstrates that the SCW pyrolysis is a promising disposal method for SS.

  1. Ultra-wideband receiver

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) receiver utilizes a strobed input line with a sampler connected to an amplifier. In a differential configuration, .+-.UWB inputs are connected to separate antennas or to two halves of a dipole antenna. The two input lines include samplers which are commonly strobed by a gating pulse with a very low duty cycle. In a single ended configuration, only a single strobed input line and sampler is utilized. The samplers integrate, or average, up to 10,000 pulses to achieve high sensitivity and good rejection of uncorrelated signals.

  2. Ultra-wideband receiver

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1994-09-06

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) receiver utilizes a strobed input line with a sampler connected to an amplifier. In a differential configuration, [+-] UWB inputs are connected to separate antennas or to two halves of a dipole antenna. The two input lines include samplers which are commonly strobed by a gating pulse with a very low duty cycle. In a single ended configuration, only a single strobed input line and sampler is utilized. The samplers integrate, or average, up to 10,000 pulses to achieve high sensitivity and good rejection of uncorrelated signals. 16 figs.

  3. Ultra-wideband receiver

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) receiver utilizes a strobed input line with a sampler connected to an amplifier. In a differential configuration, .+-.UWB inputs are connected to separate antennas or to two halves of a dipole antenna. The two input lines include samplers which are commonly strobed by a gating pulse with a very low duty cycle. In a single ended configuration, only a single strobed input line and sampler is utilized. The samplers integrate, or average, up to 10,000 pulses to achieve high sensitivity and good rejection of uncorrelated signals.

  4. Ultra-wideband receiver

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-06-04

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) receiver utilizes a strobed input line with a sampler connected to an amplifier. In a differential configuration, {+-}UWB inputs are connected to separate antennas or to two halves of a dipole antenna. The two input lines include samplers which are commonly strobed by a gating pulse with a very low duty cycle. In a single ended configuration, only a single strobed input line and sampler is utilized. The samplers integrate, or average, up to 10,000 pulses to achieve high sensitivity and good rejection of uncorrelated signals. 21 figs.

  5. Mobility of electrons in supercritical krypton: Role of density fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, Masaru; Holroyd, Richard A.; Preses, Jack M.

    2007-07-07

    Excess electrons were generated in supercritical krypton by means of pulsed x-ray irradiation, and the electron transport phenomena were studied. Electron signals immediately after a 30 ps pulse showed a distinctive feature characteristic of the presence of the Ramsauer-Townsend minimum in the momentum transfer cross section. The dependence of the drift velocity v{sub D} on field strength was found to be concave upward in the low field region and then to go through a maximum with increasing field strength, which is also typical of the presence of a minimum in the scattering cross section at an intermediate field strength. A minimum in the electron mobility was observed at about one-half the critical density. The acoustical phonon scattering model, which successfully explained the mobility change in this density region in supercritical xenon, was again found to account for the mobility in supercritical krypton.

  6. Research and development opportunities in supercritical fluid technology: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    On December 2, 1988, the US Department of Energy (DOE) held a workshop on supercritical fluid technology. The purpose of this workshop was to elicit research ideas from participants representing government, industry, and academia. A special concern was to determine the appropriate level of involvement for DOE and other organizations in order to develop commercial supercritical fluid technology. Group presentations and a general discussion were held to summarize the results. Comments on the general roles of DOE and industry in supercritical fluid R D included: some industries (e.g., food processing) are already researching this technology; DOE should cooperate with industry in attempting to demonstrate this technology; and direct support of private-sector projects by DOE should be encouraged. It was also noted that productivity benefits may outweigh energy conservation benefits in some application areas. 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  7. Preparation of drug delivery systems using supercritical fluid technology.

    PubMed

    Kompella, U B; Koushik, K

    2001-01-01

    Small changes in temperature and pressure near the critical region induce dramatic changes in the density and solubility of supercritical fluids, thereby facilitating the use of environmentally benign agents such as CO2 for their solvent and antisolvent properties in processing a wide variety of materials. While supercritical fluid technologies have been in commercial use in the food and chromatography industries for several years, only recently has this technology made inroads in the formulation of drug delivery systems. This review summarizes some of the recent applications of supercritical fluid technology in the preparation of drug delivery systems. Drugs containing polymeric particles, plain drug particles, solute-containing liposomes, and inclusion complexes of drug and carrier have been formulated using this technology. Also, polymer separation using this technology is enabling the selection of a pure fraction of a polymer, thereby allowing a more precise control of drug release from polymeric delivery systems.

  8. Steric effects and preferential interactions in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Saquing, C.D.; Lucien, F.P.; Foster, N.R

    1998-10-01

    Solubility data are presented for a mixture of o-hydroxybenzoic acid (o-HBA) and m-HBA in supercritical CO{sub 2} doped with 3.5 mol% methanol. The data were measured at 318 and 328 K and for pressures in the range of 101--201 bar. Some new data for the solubility of pure m-HBA in methanol-doped supercritical CO{sub 2} are also presented. The solubilities of the HBA isomers are enhanced considerably with the addition of methanol to supercritical CO{sub 2}. However, the solubility enhancement is strongly affected by the spatial arrangement of their functional groups (steric effect). There appears to be preferential interaction between the solutes and the cosolvent in the quaternary system, and this phenomenon is consistent with thermodynamic modeling of the system.

  9. Heat transfer research on supercritical water flow upward in tube

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H. B.; Yang, J.; Gu, H. Y.; Zhao, M.; Lu, D. H.; Zhang, J. M.; Wang, F.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-07-01

    The experimental research of heat transfer on supercritical water has been carried out on the supercritical water multipurpose test loop with a 7.6 mm upright tube. The experimental data of heat transfer is obtained. The experimental results of thermal-hydraulic parameters on flow and heat transfer of supercritical water show that: Heat transfer enhancement occurs when the fluid temperature reaches pseudo-critical point with low mass flow velocity, and peters out when the mass flow velocity increases. The heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number decrease with the heat flux or system pressure increases, and increase with the increasing of mass flow velocity. The wall temperature increases when the mass flow velocity decreases or the system pressure increases. (authors)

  10. The Effect of Supercritical Fluids on Solid Acid Catalyst Alkylation

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel Michael; Thompson, David Neil; Burch, Kyle Coates; Zalewski, D. J.

    2002-05-01

    The alkylation of isobutane with trans-2-butene was explored over six solid acid catalysts in the liquid, near-critical liquid, and supercritical regions through the addition of an inert cosolvent to the reaction feed mixture. The addition of supercritical cosolvents did not result in sustained catalytic alkylation activity. A modest improvement in product yield was obtained with the addition of methane in the modified-liquid region; however, catalyst longevity and product selectivity were decreased compared to cosolvent-free liquid conditions. This paper describes the catalyst screening and selection process, an exploration of catalyst performance with varying concentrations of methane, and an examination of the effects of seven supercritical fluids on catalyst performance. The catalysts included two zeolites, two sulfated metal oxides, and two Nafion catalysts. Three hydrocarbons, two fluorocarbons, carbon dioxide, and sulfur hexafluoride were explored as inert cosolvents added to the reaction mixture.

  11. Regeneration of a deactivated USY alkylation catalyst using supercritical isobutane

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar; David N. Ghompson; Kyle C. Burch

    2005-01-01

    Off-line, in-situ alkylation activity recovery from a completely deactivated solid acid catalyst was examined in a continuous-flow reaction system employing supercritical isobutane. A USY zeolite catalyst was initially deactivated during the liquid phase alkylation of butene with isobutane in a single-pass reactor and then varying amounts of alkylation activity were recovered by passing supercritical isobutane over the catalyst bed at different reactivation conditions. Temperature, pressure and regeneration time were found to play important roles in the supercritical isobutane regeneration process when applied to a completely deactivated USY zeolite alkylation catalyst. Manipulation of the variables that influence solvent strength, diffusivity, surface desorption, hydride transfer rates, and coke aging, strongly influence regeneration effectiveness.

  12. Supercritical extraction of phenols from organically modified smectite

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.J.; Yeo, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    Supercritical extraction has been performed in a fixed column to desorb phenol and 4-nitrophenol from organically modified smectite. The experiments were carried out in the sequence of adsorption of hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) to montmorillonite, adsorption of phenols to organoclay in aqueous solutions, desorption of phenols from loaded organoclay using supercritical carbon dioxide, and adsorption of phenols to regenerated organoclay. The desorption characteristics of phenols were investigated at various pressures up to 420 bar; at temperatures of 40, 60, and 70 C, and at low concentrations of a cosolvent. The extraction percentages of phenols reached up to 90% in 3 hours of extraction. The results showed that under the experimental conditions investigated, the activity of HDTMA was intact during the supercritical extraction of phenols, and hence HDTMA-modified montmorillonite exhibited undiminished adsorption power toward phenols after several regeneration cycles.

  13. Buffet characteristics of the F-8 supercritical wing airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deangelis, V. M.; Monaghan, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The buffet characteristics of the F-8 supercritical wing airplane were investigated. Wing structural response was used to determine the buffet characteristics of the wing and these characteristics are compared with wind tunnel model data and the wing flow characteristics at transonic speeds. The wingtip accelerometer was used to determine the buffet onset boundary and to measure the buffet intensity characteristics of the airplane. The effects of moderate trailing edge flap deflections on the buffet onset boundary are presented. The supercritical wing flow characteristics were determined from wind tunnel and flight static pressure measurements and from a dynamic pressure sensor mounted on the flight test airplane in the vicinity of the shock wave that formed on the upper surface of the wing at transonic speeds. The comparison of the airplane's structural response data to the supercritical flow characteristics includes the effects of a leading edge vortex generator.

  14. Amination of n-hexanol in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Kiyohiko; Uchida, Munehiro; Minami, Kimitaka; Osada, Mitsumasa; Sue, Kiwamu; Nonaka, Toshiyuki; Hattori, Hideo; Arai, Kunio

    2005-12-15

    The amination of 1-n-hexanol followed by amidation was carried out in supercritical water at 380, 400, and 420 degrees C and water densities of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 g/cm3. The replacement of the hydroxyl group with the amino group was found to occur in 1-n-hexanol using ammonium acetate in supercritical water without the addition of a metal or an acid catalyst. The yield of the final product, N-n-hexylacetamide, increased by increasing the reaction temperature, water density, and the amount of ammonium acetate. The yield and the selectivity of N-n-hexylacetamide were 78.5% and 87.5%, respectively, in supercritical water at 400 degrees C, 0.5 g/cm3, for 10 min.

  15. Ultra-Sensitive Photoreceiver Boosts Data Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA depends on advanced, ultra-sensitive photoreceivers and photodetectors to provide high-data communications and pinpoint image-detection and -recognition capabilities from great distances. In 2003, Epitaxial Technologies LLC was awarded a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Goddard Space Flight Center to address needs for advanced sensor components. Epitaxial developed a photoreciever capable of single proton sensitivity that is also smaller, lighter, and requires less power than its predecessor. This receiver operates in several wavelength ranges; will allow data rate transmissions in the terabit range; and will enhance Earth-based missions for remote sensing of crops and other natural resources, including applications for fluorescence and phosphorescence detection. Widespread military and civilian applications are anticipated, especially through enhancing fiber optic communications, laser imaging, and laser communications.

  16. Geological controls on supercritical fluid resources in volcanic geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S. W.; Driesner, T.; Weis, P.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale fluid convection in conventional volcanic geothermal systems is driven by the hydrothermal cooling of shallow intrusions. Recently, there has been increased interest in tapping supercritical fluid resources in volcanic geothermal systems, since such fluid reservoirs could provide a roughly order-of-magnitude greater potential for electricity production than conventional geothermal wells drilled to temperatures of 250-300 °C. The potential of supercritical geothermal reservoirs was demonstrated in 2010, when the Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) drilled into liquid magma at 2 km depth and encountered an overlying permeable, high-temperature (~450 °C) fluid reservoir capable of more than ~30 MWe of electricity production. However, a conceptual model describing the main factors governing the extent and structure of target reservoirs has remained elusive. Here, we present the first systematic investigation of the role of rock permeability, the brittle-ductile transition temperature, and the depth of magma chamber emplacement on the development of supercritical fluid reservoirs. We use the numerical modeling code CSMP++ to model two-phase flow of compressible water around an initially elliptical, 900 °C intrusion. Our models indicate that potentially exploitable supercritical fluid resources are an integral part of many magma-driven geothermal systems. Hotter and more extensive reservoirs are promoted by a brittle-ductile transition temperature higher than ~400 °C, an intrusion depth less than 3 km, and a host rock permeability of 10-14 to 10-15 m2. The systematic dependence of the size, location and hydrologic behavior of supercritical reservoirs on these factors aids the development of exploration models for different volcanic settings. In addition, by serving as the main agents of heat transfer at the interface of an intrusion and the overlying hydrothermal system, supercritical fluid reservoirs play a decisive role in determining the overall

  17. Destruction of energetic materials by supercritical water oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Beulow, S.J.; Dyer, R.B.; Harradine, D.M.; Robinson, J.M.; Oldenborg, R.C.; Funk, K.A.; McInroy, R.E.; Sanchez, J.A.; Spontarelli, T.

    1993-10-01

    Supercritical water oxidation is a relatively low-temperature process that can give high destruction efficiencies for a variety of hazardous chemical wastes. Results are presented examining the destruction of high explosives and propellants in supercritical water and the use of low temperature, low pressure hydrolysis as a pretreatment process. Reactions of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), nitroguanidine (NQ), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) are examined in a flow reactor operated at temperatures between 400{degrees}C and 650{degrees}C. Explosives are introduced into the reactor at concentrations below the solubility limits. For each of the compounds, over 99.9% is destroyed in less than 30 seconds at temperatures above 600{degrees}C. The reactions produce primarily N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O,CO{sub 2}, and some nitrate and nitrite ions. The distribution of reaction products depends on reactor pressure, temperature, and oxidizer concentration. Kinetics studies of the reactions of nitrate and nitrite ions with various reducing reagents in supercritical water show that they can be rapidly and completely destroyed at temperatures above 525{degrees}C. The use of slurries and hydrolysis to introduce high concentrations of explosives into a supercritical water reactor is examined. For some compounds the rate of reaction depends on particle size. The hydrolysis of explosives at low temperatures (<100{degrees}C) and low pressures (<1 atm) under basic conditions produces water soluble, non-explosive products which are easily destroyed by supercritical water oxidation. Large pieces of explosives (13 cm diameter) have been successfully hydrolyzed. The rate, extent, and products of the hydrolysis depend on the type and concentration of base. Results from the base hydrolysis of triple base propellant M31A1E1 and the subsequent supercritical water oxidation of the hydrolysis products are presented.

  18. Surfactant/Supercritical Fluid Cleaning of Contaminated Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    CFC's and halogenated hydrocarbon solvents have been the solvents of choice to degrease and otherwise clean precision metal parts to allow proper function. Recent regulations have, however, rendered most of these solvents unacceptable for these purposes. New processes which are being used or which have been proposed to replace these solvents usually either fail to remove water soluble contaminants or produce significant aqueous wastes which must then be disposed of. In this work, a new method for cleaning surfaces will be investigated. Solubility of typical contaminants such as lubricating greases and phosphatizing bath residues will be studied in several surfactant/supercritical fluid solutions. The effect of temperature, pressure, and the composition of the cleaning mixture on the solubility of oily, polar, and ionic contaminants will be investigated. A reverse micellar solution in a supercritical light hydrocarbon solvent will be used to clean samples of industrial wastes. A reverse micellar solution is one where water is dissolved into a non-polar solvent with the aid of a surfactant. The solution will be capable of dissolving both water-soluble contaminants and oil soluble contaminants. Once the contaminants have been dissolved into the solution they will be separated from the light hydrocarbon and precipitated by a relatively small pressure drop and the supercritical solvent will be available for recycle for reuse. The process will be compared to the efficacy of supercritical CO2 cleaning by attempting to clean the same types of substrates and machining wastes with the same contaminants using supercritical CO2. It is anticipated that the supercritical CO2 process will not be capable of removing ionic residues.

  19. Is there a third order phase transition for supercritical fluids?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jinglong; Zhang, Pingwen; Wang, Han Site, Luigi Delle

    2014-01-07

    We prove that according to Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid mixtures of Lennard-Jones (L-J) particles, there is no third order phase transition in the supercritical regime beyond Andrew's critical point. This result is in open contrast with recent theoretical studies and experiments which instead suggest not only its existence but also its universality regarding the chemical nature of the fluid. We argue that our results are solid enough to go beyond the limitations of MD and the generic character of L-J models, thus suggesting a rather smooth liquid-vapor thermodynamic behavior of fluids in supercritical regime.

  20. Extraction of oil from wheat germ by supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Piras, Alessandra; Rosa, Antonella; Falconieri, Danilo; Porcedda, Silvia; Dessì, Maria A; Marongiu, Bruno

    2009-07-15

    This study examined the supercritical fluid extraction of wheat germ oil. The effects of pressure (200-300 bar at 40 degrees C) and extraction time on the oil quality/quantity were studied. A comparison was also made between the relative qualities of material obtained by SFE and by organic solvent extraction. The extracts were analyzed for alpha-tocopherol and polyunsaturated fatty acid content. The maximum wheat germ oil yield at about 9% was obtained with supercritical carbon dioxide extraction at 300 bar, while fatty acid and alpha-tocopherol composition of the extracts was not remarkable affected by either pressure or the extraction method.

  1. Critical and supercritical current measurements by a magnetic induction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, E. A.; Bishop, J. E. L.; Havill, R. L.; Ward, P. J.

    1988-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the critical current and current-voltage characteristics at supercritical currents have been measured in the low field limit on toroidal samples of the ceramic high Tc superconductor YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ by a contactless magnetic induction technique that is sensitive to the transport supercurrent but not to any intragrain current loops. The sample constitutes a tertiary winding on a small ferrite transformer core. The secondary voltage provides a very sensitive indication of when the critical current is exceeded, and when it is integrated it yields the supercritical current-voltage characteristic.

  2. Step-wise supercritical extraction of carbonaceous residua

    DOEpatents

    Warzinski, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    A method of fractionating a mixture containing high boiling carbonaceous material and normally solid mineral matter includes processing with a plurality of different supercritical solvents. The mixture is treated with a first solvent of high critical temperature and solvent capacity to extract a large fraction as solute. The solute is released as liquid from solvent and successively treated with other supercritical solvents of different critical values to extract fractions of differing properties. Fractionation can be supplemented by solute reflux over a temperature gradient, pressure let down in steps and extractions at varying temperature and pressure values.

  3. Comparison of supercritical and conventional wing flutter characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, M. G.; Hanson, P. W.; Wynne, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    A wind-tunnel study was undertaken to directly compare the measured flutter boundaries of two dynamically similar aeroelastic models which had the same planform, maximum thickness-to-chord ratio, and as nearly identical stiffness and mass distributions as possible, with one wing having a supercritical airfoil and the other a conventional airfoil. The considerations and problems associated with flutter testing supercritical wing models at or near design lift coefficients are discussed, and the measured transonic boundaries of the two wings are compared with boundaries calculated with a subsonic lifting surface theory.

  4. Processing of polyolefin blends in supercritical propane solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Suh Joon

    New polymer blending methods are developed and studied by processing polyolefins in supercritical propane in this research. Polypropylene and ethylene copolymers were dissolved in supercritical propane, and processed via various paths and reactions, i.e., RESS (rapid expansion of supercritical solution), ICSS (isobaric crystallization from supercritical solution), and thermoplastic vulcanizate (TPV) formation. Each process resulted in a unique morphology of polyolefin blends. The effect of polyolefin microstructure on the solution behavior in supercritical propane was investigated, and the relationship between the morphology of the polyolefin blends and processing paths in supercritical propane solutions was established. To understand the thermodynamic properties of polyolefins in bulk and solutions, the solubility parameter was estimated by measurement of the internal pressure from the experimental P-V-T data for polyolefins in the melt state. As the short chain branch content in the ethylene copolymers increased, the internal pressure decreased. The cloud-point pressures of binary polymer solutions in propane decreased as the extent of short chain branching increased in the ethylene copolymers. At the same degree of branching, the cloud-point pressure decreased slightly with increasing branch length. The cloud-point pressures of a ternary polymer solution in the pressure-temperature phase diagrams were higher than those of binary polymer solutions at the same composition (indicating poorer solubility). Microfibers and microparticles (10 ˜ 50 mum diameter) were precipitated from the RESS process while microcellular foams were obtained from the ICSS process. The phase domains of the ethylene-butene (EB) copolymer in the polypropylene from the RESS process were smaller for highly branched EB copolymer. The surface morphology of ethylene copolymers in the microcelluar foams was also changed by increasing the branch content from microparticles to a viscous layer. New

  5. Supercritical water oxidation - Concept analysis for evolutionary Space Station application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, John B., Jr.; Brewer, Dana A.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of a supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) concept to reduce the number of processes needed in an evolutionary Space Station design's Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS), while reducing resupply requirements and enhancing the integration of separate ECLSS functions into a single Supercritical Water Oxidation process, is evaluated. While not feasible for an initial operational capability Space Station, the SCWO's application to the evolutionary Space Station configuration would aid the integration of eight ECLSS functions into a single one, thereby significantly reducing program costs.

  6. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-07-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the eleventh quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in unacceptable erosion of the test specimens. In subsequent tests, a different expansion procedure was implemented and an alternate curing method for cements formulated with TXI Lightweight cement was employed to prevent sample failure caused by thermal shock. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but data for some compositions were still questionable. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement were implemented and testing is ongoing.

  7. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-06-16

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the tenth quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in test specimen erosion that was unacceptable. A different expansion procedure is being evaluated. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The testing program initiated in November produced questionable initial results so the procedure was modified slightly and the testing was reinitiated. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but questionable data were obtained from several of the compositions. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement are being implemented and testing is ongoing.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of the key characteristics of the supercritical CO2-pentaerythritol tetraacetate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Peiyu; Jin, Zunlong; Liu, Hong; Wang, Dingbiao; Liu, Donglai

    2016-12-01

    Supercritical CO2 is widely used in many fields of industry. Investigation of statistical mechanics of CO2 fluid under quasi critical and supercritical state has great significance. Equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations are carried out to investigate the statistical mechanics and macroscopic performance of CO2 fluid under the quasi critical and supercritical state. The results show that the bond length and bond angle distributions for supercritical CO2 are Gaussian distribution basically. The dimers' proportion of supercritical CO2 system changes with pressure increasing. T-type dimer has high share within the system when pressure is higher than 9MPa. It can be inferred that T-type dimer leads to CO2 physical properties changing tempestuously under supercritical state. The effect that lubricating oil has on microstructure and heat transfer of supercritical CO2 is also investigated in the present work. The results show the lubricating oil produces significant effect on the dimers' structure under low pressure.

  9. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Bacterial and Archaeal Lipid Biomarkers from Anaerobically Digested Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Hanif, Muhammad; Atsuta, Yoichi; Fujie, Koichi; Daimon, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) was used in the analysis of bacterial respiratory quinone (RQ), bacterial phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and archaeal phospholipid ether lipid (PLEL) from anaerobically digested sludge. Bacterial RQ were determined using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). Determination of bacterial PLFA and archaeal PLEL was simultaneously performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effects of pressure, temperature, and modifier concentration on the total amounts of RQ, PLFA, and PLEL were investigated by 23 experiments with five settings chosen for each variable. The optimal extraction conditions that were obtained through a multiple-response optimization included a pressure of 23.6 MPa, temperature of 77.6 °C, and 10.6% (v/v) of methanol as the modifier. Thirty nine components of microbial lipid biomarkers were identified in the anaerobically digested sludge. Overall, the SFE method proved to be more effective, rapid, and quantitative for simultaneously extracting bacterial and archaeal lipid biomarkers, compared to conventional organic solvent extraction. This work shows the potential application of SFE as a routine method for the comprehensive analysis of microbial community structures in environmental assessments using the lipid biomarkers profile. PMID:22489140

  10. Treatment of sewage sludge in supercritical water and evaluation of the combined process of supercritical water gasification and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lili; Wang, Shuzhong; Xu, Donghai; Guo, Yang; Tang, Xingying; Wang, Longfei

    2015-01-01

    Influences of temperature and oxidation coefficient (n) on sewage sludge treatment in supercritical water and its corresponding reaction mechanism were studied. Moreover, the combined process of supercritical water gasification (SCWG) and supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) was also investigated. The results show that ammonia nitrogen, phenols and pyridines are main refractory intermediates. The weight of solid products at 873K and n=4 is only 3.5wt.% of the initial weight, which is lower than that after combustion. Volatile organics in solid phase have almost released at 723K and n=0. Highest yield of combustible gases was obtained at n=0, and H2 yield can reach 11.81mol/kg at 873K. Furthermore, the combination of SCWG at 723K and SCWO at 873K with a total n=1 is feasible for its good effluent quality and low operation costs.

  11. Supercritical CO2 direct cycle Gas Fast Reactor (SC-GFR) concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Steven Alan; Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Al Rashdan, Ahmad; Tsvetkov, Pavel Valeryevich; Vernon, Milton E.; Fleming, Darryn D.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2011-05-01

    This report describes the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) direct cycle gas fast reactor (SC-GFR) concept. The SC-GFR reactor concept was developed to determine the feasibility of a right size reactor (RSR) type concept using S-CO{sub 2} as the working fluid in a direct cycle fast reactor. Scoping analyses were performed for a 200 to 400 MWth reactor and an S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. Although a significant amount of work is still required, this type of reactor concept maintains some potentially significant advantages over ideal gas-cooled systems and liquid metal-cooled systems. The analyses presented in this report show that a relatively small long-life reactor core could be developed that maintains decay heat removal by natural circulation. The concept is based largely on the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) commercial power plants operated in the United Kingdom and other GFR concepts.

  12. Asphaltene reaction via supercritical fluid extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.

    1993-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of bitumen was carried out in a continuous extractor using propane as the solvent at several temperatures and pressures. The asphaltene contents of the residual fractions in the extractor were compared to the asphaltene content of the original bitumen. Asphaltenes were defined as pentane insolubles in this study. It was found that the absolute asphaltene content of the residual fractions exceeded the asphaltene content of the original bitumen. Even when the asphaltene content was prorated by the weight percent of the residual material, it was found to be higher than the original asphaltene content. The data established that the types of compounds separating as asphaltenes changed as the nature of the mixture was altered by SFE. The data also indicated that it may be inappropriate to perform asphaltene material balances to assess the amount of precipitate. The original asphaltene content of a bitumen that is undergoing compositional changes in a sequence of operations may not be an accurate measure of the precipitating tendency of the bitumen in production and processing operations. The asphaltene content of the residual material varied depending on the extraction conditions and was as much as 3--5 times the original asphaltene content. The asphaltene content of the residual material was a maximum at the most efficient extraction condition which was in the vicinity of the critical temperature of propane. The H/C atomic ratio of the residual fractions was lower compared to the original bitumen, indicating that the ratio of polar to nonpolar compounds may also be important from precipitation considerations. Saturate and aromatic compounds were preferentially extracted and the ratio of asphaltenes to resins increased in the residual fractions relative to the original bitumen.

  13. Asphaltene reaction via supercritical fluid extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.

    1993-03-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of bitumen was carried out in a continuous extractor using propane as the solvent at several temperatures and pressures. The asphaltene contents of the residual fractions in the extractor were compared to the asphaltene content of the original bitumen. Asphaltenes were defined as pentane insolubles in this study. It was found that the absolute asphaltene content of the residual fractions exceeded the asphaltene content of the original bitumen. Even when the asphaltene content was prorated by the weight percent of the residual material, it was found to be higher than the original asphaltene content. The data established that the types of compounds separating as asphaltenes changed as the nature of the mixture was altered by SFE. The data also indicated that it may be inappropriate to perform asphaltene material balances to assess the amount of precipitate. The original asphaltene content of a bitumen that is undergoing compositional changes in a sequence of operations may not be an accurate measure of the precipitating tendency of the bitumen in production and processing operations. The asphaltene content of the residual material varied depending on the extraction conditions and was as much as 3--5 times the original asphaltene content. The asphaltene content of the residual material was a maximum at the most efficient extraction condition which was in the vicinity of the critical temperature of propane. The H/C atomic ratio of the residual fractions was lower compared to the original bitumen, indicating that the ratio of polar to nonpolar compounds may also be important from precipitation considerations. Saturate and aromatic compounds were preferentially extracted and the ratio of asphaltenes to resins increased in the residual fractions relative to the original bitumen.

  14. Microbial Inactivation by Ultrasound Assisted Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedito, Jose; Ortuño, Carmen; Castillo-Zamudio, Rosa Isela; Mulet, Antonio

    A method combining supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and high power ultrasound (HPU) has been developed and tested for microbial/enzyme inactivation purposes, at different process conditions for both liquid and solid matrices. In culture media, using only SC-CO2, the inactivation rate of E. coli and S. cerevisiae increased with pressure and temperature; and the total inactivation (7-8 log-cycles) was attained after 25 and 140 min of SC-CO2 (350 bar, 36 °C) treatment, respectively. Using SC-CO2+HPU, the time for the total inactivation of both microorganisms was reduced to only 1-2 min, at any condition selected. The SC-CO2+HPU inactivation of both microorganisms was slower in juices (avg. 4.9 min) than in culture media (avg. 1.5 min). In solid samples (chicken, turkey ham and dry-cured pork cured ham) treated with SC-CO2 and SC-CO2+HPU, the inactivation rate of E. coli increased with temperature. The application of HPU to the SC-CO2 treatments accelerated the inactivation rate of E. coli and that effect was more pronounced in treatments with isotonic solution surrounding the solid food samples. The application of HPU enhanced the SC-CO2 inactivation mechanisms of microorganisms, generating a vigorous agitation that facilitated the CO2 solubilization and the mass transfer process. The cavitation generated by HPU could damage the cell walls accelerating the extraction of vital constituents and the microbial death. Thus, using the combined technique, reasonable industrial processing times and mild process conditions could be used which could result into a cost reduction and lead to the minimization in the food nutritional and organoleptic changes.

  15. Shock front nonstationarity of supercritical perpendicular shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Tohru; Oonishi, Makiko; LembèGe, Bertrand; Savoini, Philippe

    2003-06-01

    The shock front nonstationarity of perpendicular shocks in super-critical regime is analyzed by examining the coupling between "incoming" and "reflected" ion populations. For a given set of parameters including the upstream Mach number (MA) and the fraction α of reflected to incoming ions, a self-consistent, time-stationary solution of the coupling between ion streams and the electromagnetic field is sought for. If such a solution is found, the shock is stationary; otherwise, the shock is nonstationary, leading to a self-reforming shock front often observed in full particle simulations of quasi-perpendicular shocks. A parametric study of this numerical model allows us to define a critical αcrit between stationary and nonstationary regimes. The shock can be nonstationary even for relatively low MA(2-5). For a moderate MA(5-10), the critical value αcrit is about 15 to 20%. For very high MA (>10), αcrit saturates around 20%. Moreover, present full simulations show that self-reformation of the shock front occurs for relatively low βi and disappears for high βi, where βi is the ratio of upstream ion plasma to magnetic field pressures. Results issued from the present theoretical model are found to be in good agreement with full particle simulations for low βi case; this agreement holds as long as the motion of reflected ions is coherent enough (narrow ion ring) to be described by a single population in the model. The present model reveals to be "at variance" with full particle simulations results for the high βi case. Present results are also compared with previous hybrid simulations.

  16. Calculation of the planar supercritical flow over a NASA supercritical profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshihara, H.; Magnus, R.

    1970-01-01

    An unsteady finite difference procedure was used to calculate the steady inviscid flow over an 11% thickness ratio NASA supercritical profile of LWP 505 at M sub infinity = 0.80 and alpha = 0. An attempt is made to include the viscous effects using a modified form of Head's entrainment method to calculate the turbulent boundary layer. The attempt to predict the viscous effects using the compressible form of Head's integral method with a modified auxiliary equation for the form factors was unsatisfactory. Though a reasonably separation bubble was established on the lower surface, a grossly exaggerated displacement effect resulted downstream of the shock on the upper surface. There clearly is substantial further effort required to evolve a satisfactory boundary layer procedure, which must then be coupled in a still unproven manner with the inviscid procedure.

  17. Development and Testing of an UltraBattery-Equipped Honda Civic

    SciTech Connect

    Donald Karner

    2012-04-01

    The UltraBattery retrofit project DP1.8 and Carbon Enriched project C3, performed by ECOtality North America (ECOtality) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Advanced Lead Acid Battery Consortium (ALABC), are to demonstrate the suitability of advanced lead battery technology in Hybrid Electrical Vehicles (HEVs).

  18. Field-portable supercritical CO{sub 2} extractor

    DOEpatents

    Wright, B.W.; Zemanian, T.S.; Robins, W.H.; Woodcock, L.J.

    1997-06-10

    The present invention is an apparatus for extracting organic compounds from solid materials. A generator vessel has a removable closure for receiving a solid or liquid solvent which is heated with a resistive heating element to a gaseous or supercritical phase. The removable closure is unencumbered because the side wall is penetrated with an outlet for the gaseous or supercritical solvent. The generator vessel further has a pressure transducer that provides an electronic signal related to pressure of the gaseous or supercritical solvent. The apparatus of the present invention further includes at least one extraction cell having a top and a bottom and a wall extending there between, wherein the bottom is sealably penetrated by an inlet for gaseous or supercritical solvent received through a manifold connected to the outlet, the top having an easy-open removable closure cap, and the wall having an outlet port. Finally, a permeable sample cartridge is included for holding the solid materials and to provide radial-flow of the extraction fluid, which is placed within the extraction cell. 10 figs.

  19. Promising flame retardant textile in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since carbon dioxide is non-toxic, non-flammable and cost-effective, supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) is widely used in textile dyeing applications. Due to its environmentally benign character, scCO2 is considered in green chemistry as a substitute for organic solvents in chemical reactions. O...

  20. Method for nucleic acid isolation using supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Nivens, David E.; Applegate, Bruce M.

    1999-01-01

    A method for detecting the presence of a microorganism in an environmental sample involves contacting the sample with a supercritical fluid to isolate nucleic acid from the microorganism, then detecting the presence of a particular sequence within the isolated nucleic acid. The nucleic acid may optionally be subjected to further purification.

  1. Method for nucleic acid isolation using supercritical fluids

    DOEpatents

    Nivens, D.E.; Applegate, B.M.

    1999-07-13

    A method is disclosed for detecting the presence of a microorganism in an environmental sample involves contacting the sample with a supercritical fluid to isolate nucleic acid from the microorganism, then detecting the presence of a particular sequence within the isolated nucleic acid. The nucleic acid may optionally be subjected to further purification. 4 figs.

  2. Geologic controls on supercritical geothermal resources above magmatic intrusions.

    PubMed

    Scott, Samuel; Driesner, Thomas; Weis, Philipp

    2015-07-27

    A new and economically attractive type of geothermal resource was recently discovered in the Krafla volcanic system, Iceland, consisting of supercritical water at 450 °C immediately above a 2-km deep magma body. Although utilizing such supercritical resources could multiply power production from geothermal wells, the abundance, location and size of similar resources are undefined. Here we present the first numerical simulations of supercritical geothermal resource formation, showing that they are an integral part of magma-driven geothermal systems. Potentially exploitable resources form in rocks with a brittle-ductile transition temperature higher than 450 °C, such as basalt. Water temperatures and enthalpies can exceed 400 °C and 3 MJ kg(-1), depending on host rock permeability. Conventional high-enthalpy resources result from mixing of ascending supercritical and cooler surrounding water. Our models reproduce the measured thermal conditions of the resource discovered at Krafla. Similar resources may be widespread below conventional high-enthalpy geothermal systems.

  3. Supercritical carbon dioxide process for pasteurization of fruit juices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) nonthermal processing inactivates microorganisms in juices using non-toxic and non-reactive CO2. However, data is lacking on the inactivation of E. coli K12 and L. plantarum in apple cider using pilot plant scale SCCO2 equipment. For this study, pasteurized pres...

  4. Cobalt carbonyl catalyzed olefin hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    A method of olefin hydroformylation is provided wherein an olefin reacts with a carbonyl catalyst and with reaction gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a supercritical reaction solvent, such as carbon dioxide. The invention provides higher yields of n-isomer product without the gas-liquid mixing rate limitation seen in conventional Oxo processes using liquid media.

  5. Extraction of pesticides from contaminated soil using supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, G.B.

    1991-12-31

    The demand for processes to clean up contaminated soils without generating additional contaminants, such as hazardous solvents, is increasing. One approach to minimizing this problem is to use supercritical fluids like light hydrocarbons and CO{sub 2} to extract contaminants from soils. Gases exhibit unique properties under supercritical conditions. They retain the ability to diffuse through the interstitial spaces of solid materials, plus they have the solvating power of liquids. Some examples of extractions using SCFs are caffeine from coffee, cholesterol from eggs, drugs from plants, and nicotine from tobacco. Supercritical CO{sub 2} is an attractive, alternative extraction medium for removal of pesticides from soils. Carbon dioxide is readily available, relatively inexpensive, and if recycled, nonpolluting. Contaminants may be easily recovered by evaporating the CO{sub 2} into an expansion vessel. Supercritical fluid extraction technology is discussed and results are given for the extraction of atrazine, bentazon, alachlor, and permethrin from contaminated soil prepared in the laboratory. Initial studies show >95% removal for these pesticides.

  6. Extraction of pesticides from contaminated soil using supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, G.B.

    1991-01-01

    The demand for processes to clean up contaminated soils without generating additional contaminants, such as hazardous solvents, is increasing. One approach to minimizing this problem is to use supercritical fluids like light hydrocarbons and CO[sub 2] to extract contaminants from soils. Gases exhibit unique properties under supercritical conditions. They retain the ability to diffuse through the interstitial spaces of solid materials, plus they have the solvating power of liquids. Some examples of extractions using SCFs are caffeine from coffee, cholesterol from eggs, drugs from plants, and nicotine from tobacco. Supercritical CO[sub 2] is an attractive, alternative extraction medium for removal of pesticides from soils. Carbon dioxide is readily available, relatively inexpensive, and if recycled, nonpolluting. Contaminants may be easily recovered by evaporating the CO[sub 2] into an expansion vessel. Supercritical fluid extraction technology is discussed and results are given for the extraction of atrazine, bentazon, alachlor, and permethrin from contaminated soil prepared in the laboratory. Initial studies show >95% removal for these pesticides.

  7. SELECTIVE OXIDATION IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE USING CLEAN OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have systematically investigated heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of different substrates in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2). Three types of catagysts: a metal complex, 0.5% platinum g-alumina and 0.5% palladium g-alumina were used at a pressure of 200 bar, temperatures...

  8. SOLUBILITY OF METAL OXIDES IN SUPERCRITICAL AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    supercritical water and basic media in the temperature range 375 to 525 C under solution pressures of 5000 to 33,000 psi. The laboratory equipment and a method...for measuring the equilibrium densities of the solutions are discussed. A fundamental equation is derived which, with the use of the Van’t Hoff equation

  9. Statistical mechanical description of supercritical fluid extraction and retrograde condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. J.; Kwak, T. Y.; Mansoori, G. A.

    1987-07-01

    The phenomena of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and its reverse effect, which is known as retrograde condensation (RC), have found new and important applications in industrial separation of chemical compounds and recovery and processing of natural products and fossil fuels. Full-scale industrial utilization of SFE/RC processes requires knowledge about thermodynamic and transport characteristics of the asymmetric mixtures involved and the development of predictive modeling and correlation techniques for performance of the SFE/RC system under consideration. In this report, through the application of statistical mechanical techniques, the reasons for the lack of accuracy of existing predictive approaches are described and they are improved. It is demonstrated that these techniques also allow us to study the effect of mixed supercritical solvents on the solubility of heavy solutes (solids) at different compositions of the solvents, pressures, and temperatures. Fluid phase equilibrium algorithms based on the conformal solution van der Waals mixing rules and different equations of state are presented for the prediction of solubilities of heavy liquid in supercritical gases. It is shown that the Peng-Robinson equation of state based on conformal solution theory can predict solubilites of heavy liquid in supercritical gases more accurately than the van der Waals and Redlich-Kwong equations of state.

  10. SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION MODEL DEVELOPMENT FOR SELECTED EPA PRIORITY POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) evaluated for five compounds: acetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenol, pentachlorophenol, pyridine, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (methyl ester). inetic models were developed for acetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and pyridine. he test compounds were e...

  11. Stationary phases for packed-column supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F

    2012-08-10

    The properties of silica-based, chemically bonded, packed column stationary phases used in supercritical fluid chromatography are described with a focus on column design and retention mechanisms. Supercritical fluid chromatography has benefited substantially from innovations in column design for liquid chromatography even if the separation conditions employed are generally quite different. The mobile phase composition and column operating conditions play an interactive role in modifying selectivity in supercritical fluid chromatography by altering analyte solubility in the mobile phase and through selective solvation of the stationary phase resulting in a wider range and intensity of intermolecular interactions with the analyte. The solvation parameter model is used to identify the main parameters that affect retention in supercritical fluid chromatography using carbon dioxide-methanol as a mobile phase and as a basis for column characterization to facilitate the identification of stationary phases with different separation characteristics for method development. As a caution it is pointed out that these column characterization methods are possibly a product of both the stationary phase chemistry and the column operating conditions and are suitable for use only when columns of similar design and with similar operating conditions are used.

  12. Geologic controls on supercritical geothermal resources above magmatic intrusions

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Samuel; Driesner, Thomas; Weis, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    A new and economically attractive type of geothermal resource was recently discovered in the Krafla volcanic system, Iceland, consisting of supercritical water at 450 °C immediately above a 2-km deep magma body. Although utilizing such supercritical resources could multiply power production from geothermal wells, the abundance, location and size of similar resources are undefined. Here we present the first numerical simulations of supercritical geothermal resource formation, showing that they are an integral part of magma-driven geothermal systems. Potentially exploitable resources form in rocks with a brittle–ductile transition temperature higher than 450 °C, such as basalt. Water temperatures and enthalpies can exceed 400 °C and 3 MJ kg−1, depending on host rock permeability. Conventional high-enthalpy resources result from mixing of ascending supercritical and cooler surrounding water. Our models reproduce the measured thermal conditions of the resource discovered at Krafla. Similar resources may be widespread below conventional high-enthalpy geothermal systems. PMID:26211617

  13. Determination of thermodynamic properties by supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Roth, Michal

    2004-05-28

    This survey attempts to summarise thermodynamic applications of supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) with an emphasis on the results published during the last 10 years. In addition to a review of thermodynamic measurements by SFC, it contains brief sections on instrumental considerations and on the sources of auxiliary information needed when processing the retention data.

  14. The radial defocusing energy-supercritical NLS in dimension four

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chao; Zheng, Jiqiang

    2017-04-01

    We consider the radial defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger equations iut + Δu = | u|p u with supercritical exponent p > 4 in four space dimensions, and prove that any radial solution that remains bounded in the critical Sobolev space must be global and scatter.

  15. Cationic Polymerization of Vegetable Oils in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymers derived from vegetable oils have been prepared in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) medium by cationic polymerization. Boron trifluoride diethyl etherate BF3.O(C2H2)2 are used as initiator. Influences of polymerization temperature, initiator amount, and carbon dioxide pressure on the m...

  16. Preparation of Aromatic Polycarbonate Nanoparticles using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun-Young; Song, Cheong-Hun; Kim, Joong-In; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2002-04-01

    A novel synthetic process for producing aromatic polycarbonate (PC) nanoparticles using supercritical CO2 was developed. The objective of the present research work was to synthesize high molecular weight PC nanoparticles using transesterification between bisphenol-A (BPA) and diphenyl carbonate (DPC) in supercritical CO2 which is an excellent plasticizing agent and a good solvent for phenol, a by-product of the reaction. Poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) tri-block copolymer with CO2-phobic anchor and CO2-philic tail group was used as a stabilizer for the preparation of stable dispersions of BPA-DPC mixture in a CO2 continuous phase. As the reaction was proceeding, phenol formed from the reaction was dissolved and diffused into supercritical CO2 phase. The PC nanoparticles were isolated by simple venting of the supercritical CO2 from the reactor. Spherical morphology of PC particles was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Particle size and morphology of PC particles were modified upon variation of the process conditions. The resulting PC particles with a nano-size of 30-140 nm have a high molecular weight ( M w) of 3.1×105 (g/mol).

  17. Cobalt carbonyl catalyzed olefin hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

    1993-03-30

    A method of olefin hydroformylation is provided wherein an olefin reacts with a carbonyl catalyst and with reaction gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a supercritical reaction solvent, such as carbon dioxide. The invention provides higher yields of n-isomer product without the gas-liquid mixing rate limitation seen in conventional Oxo processes using liquid media.

  18. Cobalt carbonyl catalyzed olefin hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Rathke, Jerome W.; Klingler, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A method of olefin hydroformylation is provided wherein an olefin reacts with a carbonyl catalyst and with reaction gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a supercritical reaction solvent, such as carbon dioxide. The invention provides higher yields of n-isomer product without the gas-liquid mixing rate limitation seen in conventional Oxo processes using liquid media.

  19. Oil shale extraction using super-critical extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Significant improvement in oil shale extraction under supercritical conditions is provided by extracting the shale at a temperature below 400 C, such as from about 250 C to about 350 C, with a solvent having a Hildebrand solubility parameter within 1 to 2 Hb of the solubility parameter for oil shale bitumen.

  20. Supercritical fluid extraction and bioactivity of cedarwood oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (70°C, 4,000 psi) was used to extract cedarwood oil from Eastern redcedar, Juniperus virginiana L. The CO2-derived oil was tested for biological activity against several species of arthropods, including mosquitoes, ticks, houseflies, and ants. The cedarwood oil was found...

  1. Preparing Silica Aerogel Monoliths via a Rapid Supercritical Extraction Method

    PubMed Central

    Gorka, Caroline A.

    2014-01-01

    A procedure for the fabrication of monolithic silica aerogels in eight hours or less via a rapid supercritical extraction process is described. The procedure requires 15-20 min of preparation time, during which a liquid precursor mixture is prepared and poured into wells of a metal mold that is placed between the platens of a hydraulic hot press, followed by several hours of processing within the hot press. The precursor solution consists of a 1.0:12.0:3.6:3.5 x 10-3 molar ratio of tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS):methanol:water:ammonia. In each well of the mold, a porous silica sol-gel matrix forms. As the temperature of the mold and its contents is increased, the pressure within the mold rises. After the temperature/pressure conditions surpass the supercritical point for the solvent within the pores of the matrix (in this case, a methanol/water mixture), the supercritical fluid is released, and monolithic aerogel remains within the wells of the mold. With the mold used in this procedure, cylindrical monoliths of 2.2 cm diameter and 1.9 cm height are produced. Aerogels formed by this rapid method have comparable properties (low bulk and skeletal density, high surface area, mesoporous morphology) to those prepared by other methods that involve either additional reaction steps or solvent extractions (lengthier processes that generate more chemical waste).The rapid supercritical extraction method can also be applied to the fabrication of aerogels based on other precursor recipes. PMID:24637334

  2. Supercritical water oxidation data acquisition testing. Final report, Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    This report discusses the phase one testing of a data acquisition system for a supercritical water waste oxidation system. The system is designed to destroy a wide range of organic materials in mixed wastes. The design and testing of the MODAR Oxidizer is discussed. An analysis of the optimized runs is included.

  3. Preparing silica aerogel monoliths via a rapid supercritical extraction method.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Mary K; Anderson, Ann M; Gorka, Caroline A

    2014-02-28

    A procedure for the fabrication of monolithic silica aerogels in eight hours or less via a rapid supercritical extraction process is described. The procedure requires 15-20 min of preparation time, during which a liquid precursor mixture is prepared and poured into wells of a metal mold that is placed between the platens of a hydraulic hot press, followed by several hours of processing within the hot press. The precursor solution consists of a 1.0:12.0:3.6:3.5 x 10(-3) molar ratio of tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS):methanol:water:ammonia. In each well of the mold, a porous silica sol-gel matrix forms. As the temperature of the mold and its contents is increased, the pressure within the mold rises. After the temperature/pressure conditions surpass the supercritical point for the solvent within the pores of the matrix (in this case, a methanol/water mixture), the supercritical fluid is released, and monolithic aerogel remains within the wells of the mold. With the mold used in this procedure, cylindrical monoliths of 2.2 cm diameter and 1.9 cm height are produced. Aerogels formed by this rapid method have comparable properties (low bulk and skeletal density, high surface area, mesoporous morphology) to those prepared by other methods that involve either additional reaction steps or solvent extractions (lengthier processes that generate more chemical waste).The rapid supercritical extraction method can also be applied to the fabrication of aerogels based on other precursor recipes.

  4. Supercritical fluid chromatography for lipid analysis in foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Donato, Paola; Inferrera, Veronica; Sciarrone, Danilo; Mondello, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    The task of lipid analysis has always challenged separation scientists, and new techniques in chromatography were often developed for the separation of lipids; however, no single technique or methodology is yet capable of affording a comprehensive screening of all lipid species and classes. This review acquaints the role of supercritical fluid chromatography within the field of lipid analysis, from the early developed capillary separations based on pure CO2 , to the most recent techniques employing packed columns under subcritical conditions, including the niche multidimensional techniques using supercritical fluids in at least one of the separation dimensions. A short history of supercritical fluid chromatography will be introduced first, from its early popularity in the late 1980s, to the sudden fall and oblivion until the last decade, experiencing a regain of interest within the chromatographic community. Afterwards, the subject of lipid nomenclature and classification will be briefly dealt with, before discussing the main applications of supercritical fluid chromatography for food analysis, according to the specific class of lipids.

  5. Field-portable supercritical CO.sub.2 extractor

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Bob W.; Zemanian, Thomas S.; Robins, William H.; Woodcock, Leslie J.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus for extracting organic compounds from solid materials. A generator vessel has a removable closure for receiving a solid or liquid solvent which is heated with a resistive heating element to a gaseous or supercritical phase. The removable closure is unencumbered because the side wall is penetrated with an outlet for the gaseous or supercritical solvent. The generator vessel further has a pressure transducer that provides an electronic signal related to pressure of the gaseous or supercritical solvent. The apparatus of the present invention further includes at least one extraction cell having a top and a bottom and a wall extending therebetween, wherein the bottom is sealably penetrated by an inlet for gaseous or supercritical solvent received through a manifold connected to the outlet, the top having an easy-open removable closure cap, and the wall having an outlet port. Finally, a permeable sample cartridge is included for holding the solid materials and to provide radial-flow of the extraction fluid, which is placed within the extraction cell.

  6. Treatment of municipal sewage sludge in supercritical water: A review.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lili; Wang, Shuzhong; Xu, Donghai; Guo, Yang; Tang, Xingying; Wang, Laisheng

    2016-02-01

    With increasing construction of wastewater treatment plants and stricter policies, municipal sewage sludge (MSS) disposal has become a serious problem. Treatment of MSS in supercritical water (SCW) can avoid the pre-drying procedure and secondary pollution of conventional methods. SCW treatment methods can be divided into supercritical water gasification (SCWG), supercritical water partial oxidation (SCWPO) and supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) technologies with increasing amounts of oxidants. Hydrogen-rich gases can be generated from MSS by SCWG or SCWPO technology using oxidants less than stoichiometric ratio while organic compounds can be completely degraded by SCWO technology with using an oxidant excess. For SCWG and SCWPO technologies, this paper reviews the influences of different process variables (MSS properties, moisture content, temperature, oxidant amount and catalysts) on the production of gases. For SCWO technology, this paper reviews research regarding the removal of organics with or without hydrothermal flames and the changes in heavy metal speciation and risk. Finally, typical systems for handling MSS are summarized and research needs and challenges are proposed.

  7. Disintegration of fluids under supercritical conditions from mixing layer studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okong'o, N.; Bellan, J.

    2003-01-01

    Databases of transitional states obtained from Direct Numerical simulations (DNS) of temporal, supercritical mixing layers for two species systems, O2/H2 and C7H16/N2, are analyzed to elucidate species-specific turbulence aspects and features of fluid disintegration.

  8. Impregnation of Fenofibrate on mesoporous silica using supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Bouledjouidja, Abir; Masmoudi, Yasmine; Van Speybroeck, Michiel; Schueller, Laurent; Badens, Elisabeth

    2016-02-29

    Low oral bioavailability can be circumvented by the formulation of the poorly water soluble drug in ordered mesoporous silica (OMS-L-7). Fenofibrate is an orally administered, poorly water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), used clinically to lower lipid levels. Fenofibrate was loaded into silica using two methods: incipient wetness and supercritical impregnation. This study investigates the impact of loading and the impact of varying supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) processing conditions. The objective is to enhance Fenofibrate loading into silica while reducing degree of the drug crystallinity, so as to increase the drug's dissolution rate and its bioavailability. The comparison of both impregnation processes was made in terms of impregnation yields and duration as well as physical characterization of the drug. While incipient wetness method led to a Fenofibrate loading up to 300 mgdrug/gsilica in 48 h of impregnation, the supercritical impregnation method yielded loading up to 485 mgdrug/gsilica in 120 min of impregnation duration, at 16 MPa and 308 K, with a low degree of crystallinity (about 1%) comparable to the crystallinity observed via the solvent method. In addition to the enhancement of impregnation efficiency, the supercritical route provides a solvent-free alternative for impregnation.

  9. Thermal analysis of turbulent flow of a supercritical fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamane, E.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of the large variation of thermodynamics and transport properties near the pseudocritical temperature on the heat transfer coefficient of supercritical fluid in turbulent flow was studied. The formation of the characteristics peak in the heat transfer coefficient vs. bulk temperature curve is described, and the necessity of the fluid element at pseudocritical temperature located in the buffer layer is discussed.

  10. Supercritical fluid processing of drug nanoparticles in stable suspension.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Pankaj; Meziani, Mohammed J; Desai, Tarang; Foster, Charles; Diaz, Julian A; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2007-07-01

    Significant effort has been directed toward the development of drug formulation and delivery techniques, especially for the drug of no or poor aqueous solubility. Among various strategies to address the solubility issue, the reduction of drug particle sizes to the nanoscale has been identified as a potentially effective and broadly applicable approach. Complementary to traditional methods, supercritical fluid techniques have found unique applications in the production and processing of drug particles. Here we report the application of a newly developed supercritical fluid processing technique, Rapid Expansion of a Supercritical Solution into a Liquid Solvent, to the nanosizing of potent antiparasitic drug Amphotericin B particles. A supercritical carbon dioxide-cosolvent system was used for the solubilization and processing of the drug. The process produced well-dispersed nanoscale Amphotericin B particles suspended in an aqueous solution, and the suspension was intrinsically stable or could be further stabilized in the presence of water-soluble polymers. The properties of the drug nanoparticles were found to be dependent on the type of cosolvent used. The results on the use of dimethyl sulfoxide and methanol as cosolvents and their effects on the properties of nanosized Amphotericin B particles are presented and discussed.

  11. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2003, 2nd Annual/8th Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2003-09-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation-IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% vs. about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors, LWRs) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus the need for recirculation and jet pumps, a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies, LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which is also in use around the world.

  12. The Ultra Deep Field - WFPC2 Parallels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, Steven

    2003-07-01

    The ACS Ultra Deep Field {UDF} is a survey carried out by using Director's Discretionary time. The main science drivers are galaxy evolution and cosmology. The primary instrument is the Advanced Camera for Surveys but WFPC2, NICMOS, and STIS will also be used in pure parallel mode. The data will be made public. The UDF consists of a single ultra-deep field {410 orbits in total} within the CDF-S GOODS area. We request a modification of the default pure parallel programs. Rather than duplicate the redder bands which will be done much better with ACS, we propose to observe in the near-ultraviolet F300W filter. These data will enable study of the rest-frame ultraviolet morphology of galaxies at 0

  13. Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) - Survey of Materials Research and Development Needs to Assess Viability

    SciTech Connect

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2003-09-01

    Supercritical water-cooled reactors (SCWRs) are among the most promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency [i.e., about 45% vs. 33% of current light water reactors (LWRs)] and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs achieve this with superior thermodynamic conditions (i.e., high operating pressure and temperature), and by reducing the containment volume and eliminating the need for recirculation and jet pumps, pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers. The reference SCWR design in the U.S. is a direct cycle, thermal spectrum, light-water-cooled and moderated reactor with an operating pressure of 25 MPa and inlet/outlet coolant temperature of 280/500 °C. The inlet flow splits, partly to a down-comer and partly to a plenum at the top of the reactor pressure vessel to flow downward through the core in special water rods to the inlet plenum. This strategy is employed to provide good moderation at the top of the core, where the coolant density is only about 15-20% that of liquid water. The SCWR uses a power conversion cycle similar to that used in supercritical fossil-fired plants: high- intermediate- and low-pressure turbines are employed with one moisture-separator re-heater and up to eight feedwater heaters. The reference power is 3575 MWt, the net electric power is 1600 MWe and the thermal efficiency is 44.8%. The fuel is low-enriched uranium oxide fuel and the plant is designed primarily for base load operation. The purpose of this report is to survey existing materials for fossil, fission and fusion applications and identify the materials research and development needed to establish the SCWR viabilitya with regard to possible materials of construction. The two most significant materials related factors in going from the current LWR designs to the SCWR are the increase in outlet coolant temperature from 300 to 500 °C and the possible compatibility issues associated with the supercritical water environment.

  14. Supercritical Water Reactor Cycle for Medium Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    BD Middleton; J Buongiorno

    2007-04-25

    Scoping studies for a power conversion system based on a direct-cycle supercritical water reactor have been conducted. The electric power range of interest is 5-30 MWe with a design point of 20 MWe. The overall design objective is to develop a system that has minimized physical size and performs satisfactorily over a broad range of operating conditions. The design constraints are as follows: Net cycle thermal efficiency {ge}20%; Steam turbine outlet quality {ge}90%; and Pumping power {le}2500 kW (at nominal conditions). Three basic cycle configurations were analyzed. Listed in order of increased plant complexity, they are: (1) Simple supercritical Rankine cycle; (2) All-supercritical Brayton cycle; and (3) Supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating. The sensitivity of these three configurations to various parameters, such as reactor exit temperature, reactor pressure, condenser pressure, etc., was assessed. The Thermoflex software package was used for this task. The results are as follows: (a) The simple supercritical Rankine cycle offers the greatest hardware simplification, but its high reactor temperature rise and reactor outlet temperature may pose serious problems from the viewpoint of thermal stresses, stability and materials in the core. (b) The all-supercritical Brayton cycle is not a contender, due to its poor thermal efficiency. (c) The supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating affords acceptable thermal efficiency with lower reactor temperature rise and outlet temperature. (d) The use of a moisture separator improves the performance of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and allows for a further reduction of the reactor outlet temperature, thus it was selected for the next step. Preliminary engineering design of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and moisture separation was performed. All major components including the turbine, feedwater heater, feedwater pump, condenser, condenser pump

  15. Remediation of Contaminated Soils By Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, A.; Zanetti, M. C.; Banchero, M.; Fiore, S.; Manna, L.

    The contaminants that can be found in soils are many, inorganic, like heavy metals, as well as organic. Among the organic contaminants, oil and coal refineries are responsi- ble for several cases of soil contamination with PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocar- bons). Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have toxic, carcinogenic and mu- tagenic effects. Limits have been set on the concentration of most contaminants, and growing concern is focusing on soil contamination issues. USA regulations set the maximum acceptable level of contamination by PAHs equal to 40 ppm at residential sites and 270 ppm at industrial sites. Stricter values are usually adopted in European Countries. Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction is a possible alternative technology to remove volatile organic compounds from contaminated soils. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) offers many advantages over conventional solvent extraction. Super- critical fluids combine gaseous properties as a high diffusion coefficient, and liquid properties as a high solvent power. The solvent power is strongly pressure-dependent near supercritical conditions: selective extractions are possible without changing the solvent. Solute can be separate from the solvent depressurising the system; therefore, it is possible to recycle the solvent and recover the contaminant. Carbon dioxide is frequently used as supercritical fluid, because it has moderate critical conditions, it is inert and available in pure form. In this work, supercritical fluid extraction technology has been used to remove a polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon from contaminated soils. The contaminant choice for the experiment has been naphthalene since several data are available in literature. G. A. Montero et al. [1] studied soil remediation with supercrit- ical carbon dioxide extraction technology; these Authors have found that there was a mass-transfer limitation. In the extraction vessel, the mass transfer coefficient in- creases with the

  16. Selective chelation and extraction of lanthanides and actinides with supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, R.D.; Carleson, T.E.; Harrington, J.D.; Jean, F.; Jiang, H.; Lin, Y.; Wai, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report is made up of three independent papers: (1) Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Thorium and Uranium with Fluorinated Beta-Diketones and Tributyl Phosphate, (2) Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Lanthanides with Beta-Diketones and Mixed Ligands, and (3) A Group Contribution Method for Predicting the Solubility of Solid Organic Compounds in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide. Experimental data are presented demonstrating the successful extraction of thorium and uranium using fluorinated beta-diketones to form stable complexes that are extracted with supercritical carbon dioxide. The conditions for extracting the lanthanide ions from liquid and solid materials using supercritical carbon dioxide are presented. In addition, the Peng-Robison equation of state and thermodynamic equilibrium are used to predict the solubilities of organic solids in supercritical carbon dioxide from the sublimation pressure, critical properties, and a centric factor of the solid of interest.

  17. Catalytic upgrading of bio-oil by HZSM-5 in sub- and super-critical ethanol.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun; Chen, Ping; Lou, Hui; Zheng, Xiaoming

    2009-07-01

    The pyrolysis bio-oil from rice husk was upgraded in sub- and super-critical ethanol using HZSM-5 as catalyst. The results showed that super-critical upgrading process performed more effectively than sub-critical upgrading process. Acidic HZSM-5 facilitates esterification in super-critical ethanol to convert acids contained in crude bio-oil into various kinds of esters. Stronger acidic HZSM-5 (low Si/Al ratio) can facilitate cracking of heavy components of crude bio-oil more effectively in super-critical upgrading process. The residue of distillated upgraded bio-oil from super-critical upgrading process decreased evidently, compared with that of distillated crude bio-oil. This work proved that crude bio-oil can be effectively upgraded in super-critical upgrading process with the aid of acidic catalyst.

  18. Application of supercritical fluid carbon dioxide to the extraction and analysis of lipids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Won; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2012-10-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO(2)) is an ecofriendly supercritical fluid that is chemically inert, nontoxic, noninflammable and nonpolluting. As a green material, SCCO(2) has desirable properties such as high density, low viscosity and high diffusivity that make it suitable for use as a solvent in supercritical fluid extraction, an effective and environment-friendly analytical method, and as a mobile phase for supercritical fluid chromatography, which facilitates high-throughput, high-resolution analysis. Furthermore, the low polarity of SCCO(2) is suitable for the extraction and analysis of hydrophobic compounds. The growing concern surrounding environmental pollution has triggered the development of green analysis methods based on the use of SCCO(2) in various laboratories and industries. SCCO(2) is becoming an effective alternative to conventional organic solvents. In this review, the usefulness of SCCO(2) in supercritical fluid extraction and supercritical fluid chromatography for the extraction and analysis of lipids is described.

  19. Inactivation behavior of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by supercritical N₂O compared to supercritical CO₂.

    PubMed

    Mun, Sungmin; Hahn, Ji-Sook; Lee, Youn-Woo; Yoon, Jeyong

    2011-01-05

    Interest is growing for a non-thermal sterilization technique in the food and pharmaceutical industries in order to ensure microbiological safety without the deterioration of product quality. In this study, supercritical nitrous oxide (SC N₂O) treatment was carried out in a multi-batch system to examine its bactericidal effect and characteristics, which largely remains unclear. The effect of operating pressure, temperature, mixing intensity, and working volume ratio (defined as the ratio of sample volume to the reactor volume to be filled with SC fluids) on the inactivation efficiency of SC N₂O were investigated in comparison with supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO₂) treatment. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was chosen as a model microorganism. A 8-log reduction of P. aeruginosa cell concentration (10% working volume) in neutral phosphate-buffered saline was achieved by the SC N₂O treatment accompanying no pH change in the presence of vigorous mixing (600 rpm) within 6 min, in a condition of 37°C and 10 MPa and its overall efficiency is comparable to the SC CO₂ treatment. Among the reaction parameters investigated in this study, mixing intensity appeared to be the most important operating parameter affecting the bactericidal efficiency. The release of intracellular substances in cells as a result of the SC N₂O treatment was explained as one of major bactericidal actions by the SC N₂O treatment. At the same time, relatively negligible change of proteins or enzyme activities in the cells in case of the SC N₂O treatment was observed compared to the SC CO₂ treatment. Also, the observation by scanning and transmission electron microscopy shows the milder morphological change of SC N₂O-treated cells in comparison with the SC CO₂-treated cells. This study suggests that the SC N₂O bactericidal application on food products would be a viable option over SC CO₂ application, when mild change of enzyme activity and the proteins, or no pH change are desired.

  20. Supercritical fluid reactions for coal processing. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.A.

    1996-12-31

    Exciting opportunities exist for the application of supercritical fluid (SCF) reactions for the pre-treatment of coal. Utilizing reactants which resemble the organic nitrogen containing components of coal, we propose to develop a method to tailor chemical reactions in supercritical fluid solvents for the specific application of coal denitrogenation. The Diels-Alder reaction of anthracene and 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) was chosen as the model system and was investigated in supercritical carbon dioxide.

  1. Supercritical fluid technology. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning applications of supercritical fluid technology. Topics include supercritical fluid technology use in chromatographic analysis, removal of cholesterol and caffeine from food products, extraction of essential oils, extraction of pesticide and other toxic contaminants from soil and food, and food analysis. Supercritical fluid technology patents and uses in the pharmaceutical industry are also described.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  2. Hydraulic studies of drilling microbores with supercritical steam, nitrogen and carbon dioxide

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ken Oglesby

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic studies of drilling microbores at various depths and with various hole sizes, tubing, fluids and rates showed theoretical feasibility. WELLFLO SIMULATIONS REPORT STEP 4: DRILLING 10,000 FT WELLS WITH SUPERCRITICAL STEAM, NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE STEP 5: DRILLING 20,000 FT WELLS WITH SUPERCRITICAL STEAM, NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE STEP 6: DRILLING 30,000 FT WELLS WITH SUPERCRITICAL STEAM, NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE Mehmet Karaaslan, MSI

  3. Configuration design studies and wind tunnel tests of an energy efficient transport with a high-aspect-ratio supercritical wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henne, P. A.; Dahlin, J. A.; Peavey, C. C.; Gerren, D. S.

    1982-01-01

    The results of design studies and wind tunnel tests of high aspect ratio supercritical wings suitable for a medium range, narrow body transport aircraft flying near M=0.80 were presented. The basic characteristics of the wing design were derived from system studies of advanced transport aircraft where detailed structural and aerodynamic tradeoffs were used to determine the most optimum design from the standpoint of fuel usage and direct operating cost. These basic characteristics included wing area, aspect ratio, average thickness, and sweep. The detailed wing design was accomplished through application of previous test results and advanced computational transonic flow procedures. In addition to the basic wing/body development, considerable attention was directed to nacelle/plyon location effects, horizontal tail effects, and boundary layer transition effects. Results of these tests showed that the basic cruise performance objectives were met or exceeded.

  4. Computational analysis of microstructure of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene for total joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Kelly M; Atwood, Sara A

    2013-02-01

    properties could advance our understanding of how microstructure affects bulk mechanical properties. This advanced understanding could allow for the engineering of next-generation ultra high microstructures to optimize mechanical behavior and increase device longevity.

  5. Rutile Solubility in Supercritical Albite-H2O fluids: Implications for Element Mobility in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antignano, A.; Manning, C. E.

    2006-12-01

    Supercritical fluids with compositions intermediate between H2O and silicate are widely invoked as important transport agents in subduction zones. This proposal is in part motivated by the expectation that such fluids might have greater ability to dissolve and transport key trace elements at high P and T. As a test of this hypothesis, we measured the solubility of rutile (TiO2) in supercritical albite (ab, NaAlSi3O8)-H2O at 900°C, 1.5 GPa, from Xab = 0 to 0.3. At this P and T, rutile has very low solubility in H2O and there is full miscibility between H2O and ab melt. Experiments were conducted in a piston-cylinder apparatus with NaCl-graphite furnaces. In each, a 1.6 mm OD Pt inner capsule with a synthetic rutile crystal was lightly crimped and placed in a 3.5 OD Pt capsule with ultra pure H2O and powdered Amelia albite. Equilibrium was achieved after 4 hrs. Solubility was determined by the weight loss of the rutile grain. Quench textures consistent with supercritical behavior were observed in all runs. Residual corundum is present in the H2O-rich runs, but it decreases with increasing ab concentration. Results show that rutile solubility initially rises sharply with increasing ab concentration from 38 ppm in pure H2O to 739 ppm at Xab =0.05 (44 wt%). With further increase in ab, rutile solubility increases only slightly, to 922 ppm at Xab =0.25 (83 wt%). No significant solubility increase was noted near the critical compositon (~50 wt% ab). Our results show that intermediate fluids do not significantly enhance Ti solubility above dilute silicate-bearing solutions. The presence of residual Al2O3 and the sharp initial rise in rutile solubility at low Xab imply that, by analogy with silicate melts, Ti is present in solution as Na-Ti-O complexes (e.g., Dickenson and Hess, 1985, GCA, 49, 2289). However, the lack of residual corundum at high Xab suggests a transiton to different Ti species, perhaps aqueous NaAlSi3O8-like complexes. Our results give insight into rutile

  6. Use and practice of achiral and chiral supercritical fluid chromatography in pharmaceutical analysis and purification.

    PubMed

    Lemasson, Elise; Bertin, Sophie; West, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The interest of pharmaceutical companies for complementary high-performance chromatographic tools to assess a product's purity or enhance this purity is on the rise. The high-throughput capability and economic benefits of supercritical fluid chromatography, but also the "green" aspect of CO2 as the principal solvent, render supercritical fluid chromatography very attractive for a wide range of pharmaceutical applications. The recent reintroduction of new robust instruments dedicated to supercritical fluid chromatography and the progress in stationary phase technology have also greatly benefited supercritical fluid chromatography. Additionally, it was shown several times that supercritical fluid chromatography could be orthogonal to reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and could efficiently compete with it. Supercritical fluid chromatography is an adequate tool for small molecules of pharmaceutical interest: synthetic intermediates, active pharmaceutical ingredients, impurities, or degradation products. In this review, we first discuss about general chromatographic conditions for supercritical fluid chromatography analysis to better suit compounds of pharmaceutical interest. We also discuss about the use of achiral and chiral supercritical fluid chromatography for analytical purposes and the recent applications in these areas. The use of preparative supercritical fluid chromatography by pharmaceutical companies is also covered.

  7. Oxygen monitoring in supercritical carbon dioxide using a fibre optic sensor.

    PubMed

    Tservistas, M; Köneke, R; Comte, A; Scheper, T

    2001-05-07

    Investigations of enzymatic reactions in supercritical CO(2) are often hindered by the high pressure involved in these processes, making reaction monitoring extremely difficult. This paper describes the implementation of a fiber optic based oxygen sensor into a high pressure reactor for supercritical carbon dioxide. The sensor is pressure resistant, working in supercritical carbon dioxide and reusable after depressurisation. The sensor signal is found to be affected by pressure changes, but stable at constant pressure. Oxygen concentration in supercritical CO(2) is monitored using the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide as a simple oxygen producing reaction.

  8. Fundamental kinetics and mechanistic pathways for oxidation reactions in supercritical water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webley, Paul A.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidation of the products of human metabolism in supercritical water has been shown to be an efficient way to accomplish the on-board water/waste recycling in future long-term space flights. Studies of the oxidation kinetics of methane to carbon dioxide in supercritical water are presented in this paper in order to enhance the fundamental understanding of the oxidation of human waste compounds in supercritical water. It is concluded that, although the elementary reaction models remain the best hope for simulating oxidation in supercritical water, several modifications to existing mechanisms need to be made to account for the role of water in the reaction mechanism.

  9. Experimental study of choking flow of water at supercritical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muftuoglu, Altan

    Future nuclear reactors will operate at a coolant pressure close to 25 MPa and at outlet temperatures ranging from 500°C to 625°C. As a result, the outlet flow enthalpy in future Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors (SCWR) will be much higher than those of actual ones which can increase overall nuclear plant efficiencies up to 48%. However, under such flow conditions, the thermal-hydraulic behavior of supercritical water is not fully known, e.g., pressure drop, forced convection and heat transfer deterioration, critical and blowdown flow rate, etc. Up to now, only a very limited number of studies have been performed under supercritical conditions. Moreover, these studies are conducted at conditions that are not representative of future SCWRs. In addition, existing choked flow data have been collected from experiments at atmospheric discharge pressure conditions and in most cases by using working fluids different than water which constrain researchers to analyze the data correctly. In particular, the knowledge of critical (choked) discharge of supercritical fluids is mandatory to perform nuclear reactor safety analyses and to design key mechanical components (e.g., control and safety relief valves, etc.). Hence, an experimental supercritical water facility has been built at Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal which allows researchers to perform choking flow experiments under supercritical conditions. The facility can also be used to carry out heat transfer and pressure drop experiments under supercritical conditions. In this thesis, we present the results obtained at this facility using a test section that contains a 1 mm inside diameter, 3.17 mm long orifice plate with sharp edges. Thus, 545 choking flow of water data points are obtained under supercritical conditions for flow pressures ranging from 22.1 MPa to 32.1 MPa, flow temperatures ranging from 50°C to 502°C and for discharge pressures from 0.1 MPa to 3.6 MPa. Obtained data are compared with the data given in

  10. Wettability of supercritical carbon dioxide/water/quartz systems: simultaneous measurement of contact angle and interfacial tension at reservoir conditions.

    PubMed

    Saraji, Soheil; Goual, Lamia; Piri, Mohammad; Plancher, Henry

    2013-06-11

    Injection of carbon dioxide in deep saline aquifers is considered as a method of carbon sequestration. The efficiency of this process is dependent on the fluid-fluid and rock-fluid interactions inside the porous media. For instance, the final storage capacity and total amount of capillary-trapped CO2 inside an aquifer are affected by the interfacial tension between the fluids and the contact angle between the fluids and the rock mineral surface. A thorough study of these parameters and their variations with temperature and pressure will provide a better understanding of the carbon sequestration process and thus improve predictions of the sequestration efficiency. In this study, the controversial concept of wettability alteration of quartz surfaces in the presence of supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) was investigated. A novel apparatus for measuring interfacial tension and contact angle at high temperatures and pressures based on Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis with no-Apex (ADSA-NA) method was developed and validated with a simple system. Densities, interfacial tensions, and dynamic contact angles of CO2/water/quartz systems were determined for a wide range of pressures and temperatures relevant to geological sequestration of CO2 in the subcritical and supercritical states. Image analysis was performed with ADSA-NA method that allows the determination of both interfacial tensions and contact angles with high accuracy. The results show that supercritical CO2 alters the wettability of quartz surface toward less water-wet conditions compared to subcritical CO2. Also we observed an increase in the water advancing contact angles with increasing temperature indicating less water-wet quartz surfaces at higher temperatures.

  11. Mass transfer in supercritical fluids instancing selected fluids in supercritical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Miao; Benning, Rainer; Delgado, Antonio; Ertunc, Oezguer

    The research interests lie in a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of diffusion and nucle-ation of organic solutes in near-and supercritical state of a solvent, which count as important means of mass transfer in the process engineering industry. The use of supercritical fluids in industrial processes, such as extraction and particle handling, has become a more and more popular method. Take a closer look at the two processes one would find that there are obviously two sub-processes involved in each of the process, namely the diffusion/nucleation as well as a phase transition procedure. Because of the operational limitations in the practice, this phase transition can-not be neglected. So it is also included in the theoretical approach. Classically to deduce conclusions from experiment results, mathematical/physical models outlining property changes and summarizing characteristics of the two processes are expected. In order to become an insight of these phenomena from the origin, and also to serve as a fundamental attribute for the numerical simulation later, the theories of statistical thermodynamics are adopted here as a proper means to describe the behaviors of the two processes. As the diffusion coefficients of the samples in our case are only of an order of approx. 10-8m2s-1, it can be assumed that the processes are in equilibrium (local changes are neglectably small), a model can be built on a general macroscopic approach for equilibrium systems, namely the Boltzmann-Gibbs distri-bution. And some rather general methods e.g. linear response theory can be applied. But as the transfer phenomena are genuinely not equilibrium systems, from this aspect a model can also be built based on the microscopic description -the kinetic theory of the behaviors of the particles of this non-equilibrium system. The characteristics under compensated gravity are also to be considered in the models. The differences and constraints between the models are to be compared and

  12. Experimental Study on Fluid Distribution at Ultra-High Metamorphic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mönicke, K.; Burchard, M.; Duyster, J.; Maresch, W. V.; Röller, K.; Stöckhert, B.

    2001-12-01

    Ultra-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks record deep subduction of continental crust. Insight into their rheological behavior at UHP metamorphic conditions is important for the understanding of the mechanical state and the kinematics within subduction zones. Amazingly, many exhumed UHP metamorphic rocks do not show evidence of significant deformation. Thus, it has been proposed that deformation is localized in low-strength zones controlled by partially wetting interstitial fluids [1]. Experimental results [2] show that at UHP metamorphic conditions only one homogenous fluid phase with variable composition exists, whose density and viscosity should be intermediate between those of conventional aqueous solutions and hydrous melts. Inclusions of such supercritical fluid have been recently described from a natural UHP metamorphic rock [3]. Motivated by these findings, experiments using a piston-cylinder apparatus were performed to study the fluid distribution in various rock types at pressures of 3.5 GPa and temperatures between 900 ° C and 600 ° C. Starting materials were natural UHP metamorphic specimens of (1) S-type granitic biotite-phengite-gneiss and (2) pyrope-quartzite, both from the Dora Maira Massif (Western Alps, Italy) and (3) a diamond-bearing garnet-mica-gneiss with granodioritic bulk composition from the Saxonian Erzgebirge (Germany), all with 2 wt.% water added. The supercritical fluids formed in these experiments can be quenched to form a silicic glass with demixing of an aqueous solution without changing the UHP fluid topology significantly. The shape of the fluid-filled interstices is irregular and complex, resulting in a low volume/interface area ratio and a potential of high stress concentration at the edges of wedge-shaped offshoots. We propose that the distribution of supercritical fluids has a pronounced effect on the strength of cool subducted crust, allowing deformation by grain boundary sliding and dissolution precipitation creep, or

  13. Solute Nucleation and Growth in Supercritical Fluid Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smedley, Gregory T.; Wilemski, Gerald; Rawlins, W. Terry; Joshi, Prakash; Oakes, David B.; Durgin, William W.

    1996-01-01

    This research effort is directed toward two primary scientific objectives: (1) to determine the gravitational effect on the measurement of nucleation and growth rates near a critical point and (2) to investigate the nucleation process in supercritical fluids to aid in the evaluation and development of existing theoretical models and practical applications. A nucleation pulse method will be employed for this investigation using a rapid expansion to a supersaturated state that is maintained for approximately 1 ms followed by a rapid recompression to a less supersaturated state that effectively terminates nucleation while permitting growth to continue. Nucleation, which occurs during the initial supersaturated state, is decoupled from growth by producing rapid pressure changes. Thermodynamic analysis, condensation modeling, apparatus design, and optical diagnostic design necessary for the initiation of a theoretical and experimental investigation of naphthalene nucleation from supercritical CO2 have been completed.

  14. Application of supercritical antisolvent method in drug encapsulation: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kalani, Mahshid; Yunus, Robiah

    2011-01-01

    The review focuses on the application of supercritical fluids as antisolvents in the pharmaceutical field and demonstrates the supercritical antisolvent method in the use of drug encapsulation. The main factors for choosing the solvent and biodegradable polymer to produce fine particles to ensure effective drug delivery are emphasized and the effect of polymer structure on drug encapsulation is illustrated. The review also demonstrates the drug release mechanism and polymeric controlled release system, and discusses the effects of the various conditions in the process, such as pressure, temperature, concentration, chemical compositions (organic solvents, drug, and biodegradable polymer), nozzle geometry, CO2 flow rate, and the liquid phase flow rate on particle size and its distribution. PMID:21796245

  15. Modeling of supercritical fluid extraction from herbaceous matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Reverchon, E.; Donsi, G.; Osseo, L.S. . Dipt. di Ingegneria Chimica e Alimentare)

    1993-11-01

    Experimental results of supercritical fluid extraction from various herbaceous matrices are presented. In optimal extraction conditions, the use of a fractional separation technique allows a nearly complete separation of the extract in cuticular waxes and essential oil. The modeling of these results is proposed starting from the description of the mass transfer from a single spherical particle. The simultaneous extraction of two pseudocompounds is assumed to simulate the two compound families obtained by fractionation. The model is then extended to simulate the whole extractor. The yields of essential oil and cuticular waxes obtained from rosemary, basil, and marjoram leaves are fairly simulated by the model. Intraparticle mass transfer resulted as the controlling stage in supercritical extraction of essential oils.

  16. Upgrading of crude algal bio-oil in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Duan, Peigao; Savage, Phillip E

    2011-01-01

    We determined the influence of a Pt/C catalyst, high-pressure H2, and pH on the upgrading of a crude algal bio-oil in supercritical water (SCW). The SCW treatment led to a product oil with a higher heating value (∼42 MJ/kg) and lower acid number than the crude bio-oil. The product oil was also lower in O and N and essentially free of sulfur. Including the Pt/C catalyst in the reactor led to a freely flowing liquid product oil with a high abundance of hydrocarbons. Overall, many of the properties of the upgraded oil obtained from catalytic treatment in SCW are similar to those of hydrocarbon fuels derived from fossil fuel resources. Thus, this work shows that the crude bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction of a microalga can be effectively upgraded in supercritical water in the presence of a Pt/C catalyst.

  17. Supercritical water oxidation data acquisition testing. Final report, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) technology holds great promise for treating mixed wastes, in an environmentally safe and efficient manner. In the spring of 1994 the US Department of Energy (DOE), Idaho Operations Office awarded Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation, of Boston Massachusetts and its sub-contractor MODAR, Inc. of Natick Massachusetts a Supercritical Water Oxidation Data Acquisition Testing (SCWODAT) program. The SCWODAT program was contracted through a Cooperative Agreement that was co-funded by the US Department of Energy and the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program. The SCWODAT testing scope outlined by the DOE in the original Cooperative Agreement and amendments thereto was initiated in June 1994 and successfully completed in December 1995. The SCWODAT program provided further information and operational data on the effectiveness of treating both simulated mixed waste and typical Navy hazardous waste using the MODAR SCWO technology.

  18. Solubility of the sesquiterpene alcohol patchoulol in supercritical carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Hybertson, Brooks M.

    2009-01-01

    The solubility of the sesquiterpene alcohol patchoulol in supercritical carbon dioxide was measured at P ranging from 10.0 MPa to 25.0 MPa and T of 40.0 and 50.0 °C using a simple microsampling type apparatus with a 100.5 µL sample loop to remove aliquots for off-line analysis. The system was first validated using vanillin with off-line spectrophotometric analysis, then utilized for patchoulol measurements with off-line GC-MS analysis. The measured solubility of patchoulol in supercritical CO2 ranged from mole fractions of 0.43 × 10−3 at 10.0 MPa and 50.0 °C to 9.45 × 10−3 at 25.0 MPa and 40.0 °C. PMID:19424449

  19. Exploration of the gasification of Spirulina algae in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew; Hendry, Doug; Wilkinson, Nikolas; Venkitasamy, Chandrasekar; Jacoby, William

    2012-09-01

    This study presents non-catalytic gasification of Spirulina algae in supercritical water using a plug flow reactor and a mechanism for feeding solid carbon streams into high pressure (>25 MPa) environments. A 2(III)(3-1) factorial experimental design explored the effect of concentration, temperature, and residence time on gasification reactions. A positive displacement pump fed algae slurries into the reactor at a temperature range of 550-600°C, and residence times between 4 and 9s. The results indicate that algae gasify efficiently in supercritical water, highlighting the potential for a high throughput process. Additional experiments determined Arrhenius parameters of Spirulina algae. This study also presents a model of the gasification reaction using the estimated activation energy (108 kJ/mol) and other Arrhenius parameters at plug flow conditions. The maximum rate of gasification under the conditions studied of 53 g/Ls is much higher than previously reported.

  20. Supercritical Saltwater Spray for Marine Cloud Brightening (MCB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukermans, A.; Cooper, G. F.; Foster, J.; Galbraith, L. K.; Johnston, D.; Ormond, B.; Wang, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Solar Radiation Management (SRM), including both stratospheric sulfur aerosol delivery and MCB, has emerged as the leading contender for geoengineering. Field research in MCB would require a technique capable of producing 1017 salt nuclei/sec from a single source on a seagoing vessel. Spraying supercritical saltwater has emerged as a viable technology, at least for research purposes. Under optimum conditions a single 50-μm nozzle produces 1014 suitable nuclei/sec. Power consumption is high (1-2 MW), but 95% of the required energy is in the form of heat that can probably be obtained from wasted ship-engine heat. While its implementation is conceptually simple, the corrosive nature of supercritical saltwater makes the material requirements very demanding. Progress on this work is detailed.

  1. Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide cleaning of plutonium parts

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, S.J.; Haschke, J.M.; Cox, L.E.

    1993-09-01

    Supercritical fluid (SCF) carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is being evaluated for use as a cleaning solvent to replace 1,1,1-trichloroethane for the final cleaning of plutonium (Pu) parts. These parts must be free of organic residue to avoid corrosion in the stockpile. Thermodynamic and kinetic data for selected reactions of Pu metal are evaluated as a basis for assessing the risk of a violent exothermic reaction during the use of SCF CO{sub 2} on Pu. The need for considering kinetic behavior of a reaction in assessing its thermal risk is demonstrated. Weight difference data and results of xray photoelectron spectroscopy to evaluate the surface after exposure to the supercritical fluid show that SCF CO{sub 2} is an effective and compatible cleaning solvent.

  2. The wave numbers of supercritical surface tension driven Benard convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koschmieder, E. L.; Switzer, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    The cell size or the wave numbers of supercritical hexagonal convection cells in primarily surface tension driven convection on a uniformly heated plate was studied experimentally in thermal equilibrium in thin layers of silicone oil of large aspect ratio. It was found that the cell size decreases with increased temperature difference in the slightly supercritical range, and that the cell size is unique within the experimental error. It was also observed that the cell size reaches a minimum and begins to increase at larger temperature differences. This reversal of the rate of change of the wave number with temperature difference is attributed to influences of buoyancy on the fluid motion. The consequences of buoyancy were tested with three fluid layers of different depth.

  3. Application of supercritical antisolvent method in drug encapsulation: a review.

    PubMed

    Kalani, Mahshid; Yunus, Robiah

    2011-01-01

    The review focuses on the application of supercritical fluids as antisolvents in the pharmaceutical field and demonstrates the supercritical antisolvent method in the use of drug encapsulation. The main factors for choosing the solvent and biodegradable polymer to produce fine particles to ensure effective drug delivery are emphasized and the effect of polymer structure on drug encapsulation is illustrated. The review also demonstrates the drug release mechanism and polymeric controlled release system, and discusses the effects of the various conditions in the process, such as pressure, temperature, concentration, chemical compositions (organic solvents, drug, and biodegradable polymer), nozzle geometry, CO(2) flow rate, and the liquid phase flow rate on particle size and its distribution.

  4. Method and apparatus for waste destruction using supercritical water oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Haroldsen, Brent Lowell; Wu, Benjamin Chiau-pin

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to an improved apparatus and method for initiating and sustaining an oxidation reaction. A hazardous waste, is introduced into a reaction zone within a pressurized containment vessel. An oxidizer, preferably hydrogen peroxide, is mixed with a carrier fluid, preferably water, and the mixture is heated until the fluid achieves supercritical conditions of temperature and pressure. The heating means comprise cartridge heaters placed in closed-end tubes extending into the center region of the pressure vessel along the reactor longitudinal axis. A cooling jacket surrounds the pressure vessel to remove excess heat at the walls. Heating and cooling the fluid mixture in this manner creates a limited reaction zone near the center of the pressure vessel by establishing a steady state density gradient in the fluid mixture which gradually forces the fluid to circulate internally. This circulation allows the fluid mixture to oscillate between supercritical and subcritical states as it is heated and cooled.

  5. Solubilities in supercritical fluids: the application of chromatographic measurement methods

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.; Wright, B.W.; Yonker, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    New methods are described for the measurement of the solubilities of solids in supercritical fluids. These methods utilize instrumentation developed for capillary supercritical fluid chromatography consisting of deactivated, small diameter, fused silica tubing, coupled with detection methods based upon on flame ionization and mass spectrometric detectors. The methods involve (a) direct solubility determination where the fused silica capillary is used as an equilibrium cell, and (b) a pressure of threshold solubility technique which resembles chromatography and uses a programmed pressure increase and sensitive detection to determine the onset of solute migration. Results are also presented which suggest that solubilities can be determined, within certain limitations, from actual chromatographic experiments. The methods are illustrated using aromatic hydrocarbons and complex mycotoxins of the trichothecene group.

  6. Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation test reactor design report

    SciTech Connect

    Haroldsen, B.L.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Mills, B.E.; Brown, B.G.; Rousar, D.C.

    1996-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is working with GenCorp, Aerojet and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation to develop a transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor. The transpiring wall reactor promises to mitigate problems of salt deposition and corrosion by forming a protective boundary layer of pure supercritical water. A laboratory scale test reactor has been assembled to demonstrate the concept. A 1/4 scale transpiring wall reactor was designed and fabricated by Aerojet using their platelet technology. Sandia`s Engineering Evaluation Reactor serves as a test bed to supply, pressurize and heat the waste; collect, measure and analyze the effluent; and control operation of the system. This report describes the design, test capabilities, and operation of this versatile and unique test system with the transpiring wall reactor.

  7. Salt deposition studies in a supercritical water oxidation reactor

    SciTech Connect

    LaJeunesse, C.A.; Rice, S.F.; Hanush, R.G.; Aiken, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO), a method for destroying aqueous organic waste, is a relatively new technology discovered about fifteen years ago. SCWO occurs at moderate temperatures and pressures where the ability of water to dissolve hydrocarbons and other organic chemicals is greatly enhanced. Depending on the feed stream and residence time, the dissolved organic waste reacts with an oxidizer to produce innocuous combustion products. However, oxidation of organic material containing heteroatoms, such as sulfur or phosphorous, forms sulfuric or phosphoric acid in the absence of metal ions. In situ neutralization with sodium hydroxide then forms salts that are insoluble at supercritical conditions. These salts deposit in the reactor affecting the processing of the organic material. To design a system that can accommodate the formation of these salts, it is important to understand the deposition process quantitatively. This paper is an interim report on an experimental program designed to understand the salt deposition phenomena.

  8. Supercritical fluid fractionation of petroleum- and coal-derived mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    A supercritical fluid chromatography system was constructed to provide separations and fraction collection on a semi-preparative scale. A variety of complex mixtures were fractionated according to the number of aromatic rings using columns packed with NH/sub 2/-modified silica particles. Effluents were monitored with an ultraviolet spectrophotometer and a flame ionization detector while fractions were collected in pressurized vessels for subsequent analysis by capillary gas chromatography. A supercritical fluid chromatographic method to determine the percentage of saturates, olefins and aromatics in gasolines and middle distillate fuels was developed. A microbore silica column was used to isolate the aromatics, while a silver-loaded strong cation exchange microbore column was used to isolate the saturates Olefins were determined by difference. A flame ionization detector provided uniform, linear response for quantitation without calibration. The method was found to be accurate, rapid and reproducible.

  9. Micronization processes with supercritical fluids: fundamentals and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Martín, A; Cocero, M J

    2008-02-14

    Supercritical fluid techniques for materials precipitation have been proposed as an alternative to conventional precipitation processes as they allow to improve the performance of these processes in terms of reduction of particle size and control of morphology and particle size distribution, without degradation or contamination of the product. These techniques have received much attention during the last years, and their feasibility and performance have been experimentally demonstrated for many substances. One of the main pending tasks is the development of a systematic procedure for the design and scale-up of these processes. This requires not only empirical knowledge, but also information about the fundamentals of the process. This work aims to review the published literature dealing with a fundamental investigation or modeling of supercritical fluid precipitation processes.

  10. The Supercritical Pile Model: Prompt Emission Across the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos; Mastichiadis, A.

    2008-01-01

    The "Supercritical Pile" GRB model is an economical model that provides the dissipation necessary to convert explosively the energy stored in relativistic protons in the blast wave of a GRB into radiation; at the same time it produces spectra whose luminosity peaks at 1 MeV in the lab frame, the result of the kinematics of the proton-photon - pair production reaction that effects the conversion of proton energy to radiation. We outline the fundamental notions behind the "Supercritical Pile" model and discuss the resulting spectra of the prompt emission from optical to gamma-ray energies of order Gamma^2 m_ec^2, (Gamma is the Lorentz factor of the blast wave) present even in the absence of an accelerated particle distribution and compare our results to bursts that cover this entire energy range. Particular emphasis is given on the emission at the GLAST energy range both in the prompt and the afterglow stages of the burst.

  11. Supercritical fluid extraction of all-trans-lycopene from tomato.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Prieto, M Salud; Caja, M Mar; Herraiz, Marta; Santa-María, Guillermo

    2003-01-01

    A procedure is proposed for the supercritical fluid extraction of all-trans-lycopene from tomato using carbon dioxide at 40 degrees C without modifier. The present method minimizes the risk of degradation via isomerization and oxidation of health-promoting ingredients, such as lycopene. The effect of different experimental variables on the solvating power of the supercritical fluid was evaluated in terms of both the selectivity achievable in the process and the yield of the extraction of all-trans-lycopene. Satisfactory separations of the all-trans-lycopene isomers from the cis counterparts were achieved using a C(30) column. The obtained extract contained 88% all-trans-lycopene and 12% cis-lycopene.

  12. Supercritical Fluids: Nanotechnology and Select Emerging Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    to the lower size of the metallic nanoparticles , see Figure 13. Catalysis: Surface chemistry has greatly advanced our understanding of catalytic...incorporating them into the interior walls. Figure 15 shows the activity of the Au nanoparticles as a function of their size . Their activity is very sensitive...potential interest for hydrazine-fueled thrusters used for space vehicles, see De Jong and Ceus (2000). Figure 15. Effects of nanoparticle size on the

  13. Carbon dioxide-based supercritical fluids as IC manufacturing solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, J.B.; Davenhall, L.B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Pierce, T.; Tiefert, K.

    1999-05-11

    The production of integrated circuits (IC's) involves a number of discrete steps which utilize hazardous or regulated solvents and generate large waste streams. ES&H considerations associated with these chemicals have prompted a search for alternative, more environmentally benign solvent systems. An emerging technology for conventional solvent replacement is the use of supercritical fluids based on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Research work, conducted at Los Alamos in conjunction with the Hewlett-Packard Company, has lead to the development of a CO{sub 2}-based supercritical fluid treatment system for the stripping of hard-baked photoresists. This treatment system, known as Supercritical CO{sub 2} Resist Remover, or CORR, uses a two-component solvent composed of a nonhazardous, non-regulated compound, dissolved in supercritical CO{sub 2}. The solvent/treatment system has been successfully tested on metallized Si wafers coated with negative and positive photoresist, the latter both before and after ion-implantation. A description of the experimental data will be presented. Based on the initial laboratory results, the project has progressed to the design and construction of prototype, single-wafer photoresist-stripping equipment. The integrated system involves a closed-loop, recirculating cycle which continuously cleans and regenerates the CO{sub 2}, recycles the dissolved solvent, and separates and concentrates the spent resist. The status of the current design and implementation strategy of a treatment system to existing IC fabrication facilities will be discussed. Additional remarks will be made on the use of a SCORR-type system for the cleaning of wafers prior to processing.

  14. Valorization of horse manure through catalytic supercritical water gasification.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Sonil; Dalai, Ajay K; Gökalp, Iskender; Kozinski, Janusz A

    2016-06-01

    The organic wastes such as lignocellulosic biomass, municipal solid waste, sewage sludge and livestock manure have attracted attention as alternative sources of energy. Cattle manure, a waste generated in surplus amounts from the feedlot, has always been a chief environmental concern. This study is focused on identifying the candidacy of horse manure as a next generation feedstock for biofuel production through supercritical water gasification. The horse manure was gasified in supercritical water to examine the effects of temperature (400-600°C), biomass-to-water ratio (1:5 and 1:10) and reaction time (15-45min) at a pressure range of 23-25MPa. The horse manure and resulting biochar were characterized through carbon-hydrogen-nitrogen-sulfur (CHNS), inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of alkali catalysts such as NaOH, Na2CO3 and K2CO3 at variable concentrations (1-2wt%) were investigated to maximize the hydrogen yields. Supercritical water gasification of horse manure with 2wt% Na2CO3 at 600°C and 1:10 biomass-to-water ratio for 45min revealed maximum hydrogen yields (5.31mmol/g), total gas yields (20.8mmol/g) with greater carbon conversion efficiency (43.1%) and enhanced lower heating value of gas products (2920kJ/Nm(3)). The manure-derived biochars generated at temperatures higher than 500°C also demonstrated higher thermal stability (weight loss <34%) and larger carbon content (>70wt%) suggesting their application in enhancing soil fertility and carbon sequestration. The results propose that supercritical water gasification could be a proficient remediation technology for horse manure to generate hydrogen-rich gas products.

  15. Conversion of hazardous materials using supercritical water oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Rofer, Cheryl K.; Buelow, Steven J.; Dyer, Richard B.; Wander, Joseph D.

    1992-01-01

    A process for destruction of hazardous materials in a medium of supercritical water without the addition of an oxidant material. The harzardous material is converted to simple compounds which are relatively benign or easily treatable to yield materials which can be discharged into the environment. Treatment agents may be added to the reactants in order to bind certain materials, such as chlorine, in the form of salts or to otherwise facilitate the destruction reactions.

  16. Droplet turbulence interactions under subcritical and supercritical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, E. B.; Greenfield, S. C.; Ondas, M. S.; Song, Y.-H.; Spegar, T. D.; Santavicca, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this research is to experimentally characterize the behavior of droplets in vaporizing liquid sprays under conditions typical of those encountered in high pressure combustion systems such as liquid fueled rocket engines. Of particular interest are measurements of droplet drag, droplet heating, droplet vaporization, droplet distortion, and secondary droplet breakup, under both subcritical and supercritical conditions. The paper presents a brief description of the specific accomplishments which have been made over the past year.

  17. Heat Transfer Phenomena in Supercritical Water Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mark H. Anderson; MichaelL. Corradini; Riccardo Bonazza; Jeremy R. Licht

    2007-10-03

    A supercritical water heat transfer facility has been built at the University of Wisconsin to study heat transfer in ancircular and square annular flow channel. A series of integral heat transfer measurements has been carried out over a wide range of heat flux, mas velocity and bulk water temperatures at a pressure of 25 MPa. The circular annular test section geometry is a 1.07 cm diameter heater rod within a 4.29 diameter flow channel.

  18. Ultrasound enhanced process for extracting metal species in supercritical fluids

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Enokida, Youichi

    2006-10-31

    Improved methods for the extraction or dissolution of metals, metalloids or their oxides, especially lanthanides, actinides, uranium or their oxides, into supercritical solvents containing an extractant are disclosed. The disclosed embodiments specifically include enhancing the extraction or dissolution efficiency with ultrasound. The present methods allow the direct, efficient dissolution of UO2 or other uranium oxides without generating any waste stream or by-products.

  19. An artificial viscosity method for the design of supercritical airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, G. B.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical technique is presented for the design of two-dimensional supercritical wing sections with low wave drag. The method is a design mode of the analysis code H which gives excellent agreement with experimental results and is widely used in the aircraft industry. Topics covered include the partial differential equations of transonic flow, the computational procedure and results; the design procedure; a convergence theorem; and description of the code.

  20. Supercritical carbon dioxide: a solvent like no other

    PubMed Central

    Peach, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    Summary Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) could be one aspect of a significant and necessary movement towards green chemistry, being a potential replacement for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Unfortunately, carbon dioxide has a notoriously poor solubilising power and is famously difficult to handle. This review examines attempts and breakthroughs in enhancing the physicochemical properties of carbon dioxide, focusing primarily on factors that impact solubility of polar and ionic species and attempts to enhance scCO2 viscosity. PMID:25246947

  1. Towards Ultra-High Resolution Models of Climate and Weather

    SciTech Connect

    Wehner, Michael; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John

    2007-01-01

    We present a speculative extrapolation of the performance aspects of an atmospheric general circulation model to ultra-high resolution and describe alternative technological paths to realize integration of such a model in the relatively near future. Due to a superlinear scaling of the computational burden dictated by stability criterion, the solution of the equations of motion dominate the calculation at ultra-high resolutions. From this extrapolation, it is estimated that a credible kilometer scale atmospheric model would require at least a sustained ten petaflop computer to provide scientifically useful climate simulations. Our design study portends an alternate strategy for practical power-efficient implementations of petaflop scale systems. Embedded processor technology could be exploited to tailor a custom machine designed to ultra-high climate model specifications at relatively affordable cost and power considerations. The major conceptual changes required by a kilometer scale climate model are certain to be difficult to implement. Although the hardware, software, and algorithms are all equally critical in conducting ultra-high climate resolution studies, it is likely that the necessary petaflop computing technology will be available in advance of a credible kilometer scale climate model.

  2. The latent heat of vaporization of supercritical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banuti, Daniel; Raju, Muralikrishna; Hickey, Jean-Pierre; Ihme, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    The enthalpy of vaporization is the energy required to overcome intermolecular attractive forces and to expand the fluid volume against the ambient pressure when transforming a liquid into a gas. It diminishes for rising pressure until it vanishes at the critical point. Counterintuitively, we show that a latent heat is in fact also required to heat a supercritical fluid from a liquid to a gaseous state. Unlike its subcritical counterpart, the supercritical pseudoboiling transition is spread over a finite temperature range. Thus, in addition to overcoming intermolecular attractive forces, added energy simultaneously heats the fluid. Then, considering a transition from a liquid to an ideal gas state, we demonstrate that the required enthalpy is invariant to changes in pressure for 0 < p < 3pcr . This means that the classical pressure-dependent latent heat is merely the equilibrium part of the phase transition. The reduction at higher pressures is compensated by an increase in a nonequilibrium latent heat required to overcome residual intermolecular forces in the real fluid vapor during heating. At supercritical pressures, all of the transition occurs at non-equilibrium; for p -> 0 , all of the transition occurs at equilibrium.

  3. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Supercritical Pressure Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Schulenberg, T.; Koshizuka, S.; Oka, Y.; Souyri, A.

    2002-07-01

    In the frame of the European project HPLWR, joined by European research institutions, industrial partners and the University of Tokyo, thermal-hydraulic analysis of supercritical pressure light water reactors has been carried out. A thorough literature survey on heat transfer of supercritical fluids indicates a large deficiency in the prediction of the heat transfer coefficient and the onset of heat transfer deterioration under the reactor condition. A CFD code for analysing the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of supercritical fluids was developed. Numerical results show that the heat transfer coefficient, including the heat transfer deterioration region, can be well predicted using this CFD code, at least for circular tube geometries. Such a CFD code is well suitable for understanding the heat transfer mechanism. Based on the numerical results, a new heat transfer correlation has been proposed. For the thermal-hydraulic design of an HPLWR fuel assembly, the subchannel analysis code STAR-SC has been developed with a high numerical efficiency and a high applicability to different kinds of fuel assembly configurations. The results show clearly that design of a HPLWR fuel assembly is a highly challenging task. At the same time, sub-channel analysis provides some important guidelines for the design of a HPLWR fuel assembly. (authors)

  4. Fluid dynamic effects on precision cleaning with supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.R.; Hogan, M.O.; Silva, L.J.

    1994-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff have assembled a small supercritical fluids parts cleaning test stand to characterize how system dynamics affect the efficacy of precision cleaning with supercritical carbon dioxide. A soiled stainless steel coupon, loaded into a ``Berty`` autoclave, was used to investigate how changes in system turbulence and solvent temperature influenced the removal of test dopants. A pulsed laser beam through a fiber optic was used to investigate real-time contaminant removal. Test data show that cleaning efficiency is a function of system agitation, solvent density, and temperature. These data also show that high levels of cleaning efficiency can generally be achieved with high levels of system agitation at relatively low solvent densities and temperatures. Agitation levels, temperatures, and densities needed for optimal cleaning are largely contaminant dependent. Using proper system conditions, the levels of cleanliness achieved with supercritical carbon dioxide compare favorably with conventional precision cleaning methods. Additional research is currently being conducted to generalize the relationship between cleaning performance and parameters such as contaminant solubilities, mass transfer rates, and solvent agitation. These correlations can be used to optimize cleaning performance, system design, and time and energy consumption for particular parts cleaning applications.

  5. Viral inactivation of human bone tissue using supercritical fluid extraction.

    PubMed

    Fages, J; Poirier, B; Barbier, Y; Frayssinet, P; Joffret, M L; Majewski, W; Bonel, G; Larzul, D

    1998-01-01

    A new bone tissue process using supercritical carbon dioxide fluid extraction (SFE) has been evaluated for its ability to inactivate or eliminate viruses. Four viruses, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), Sindbis virus, polio Sabin type I virus, and pseudorabies virus (PRV), were exposed to four different processing steps. In addition to supercritical CO2, hydrogen peroxide, sodium hydroxide, and ethanol treatments were evaluated. The mean cumulated reduction factors (log10) for the four viruses exposed to these four steps were > 14.2 for HIV-1, > 18.2 for Sindbis virus, > 24.4 for poliovirus, and > 17.6 for PRV. The mean reduction factors obtained by the supercritical fluid extraction alone were > 4.0, > 4.3, > 6.6, and > 4.0, respectively. These results demonstrate that the SFE process is effective in inactivating viruses on human femoral heads, and provides a level of inactivation similar to that obtained by traditional cleaning methods. It is proposed that CO2 SFE be incorporated as a routine step in the processing of bone allografts for transplantation either to replace or supplement existing procedures.

  6. Solubility in supercritical solvents: A comparison of theory and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomberli, Bruno Luca

    1998-12-01

    Solubility at supercritical conditions is studied using thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. The Redlich- Kwong equation of state, virial equation of state and fluctuation theory are used to predict the chemical potential for pure and mixed Lennard-Jones fluids. Where literature results are unavailable, Monte Carlo simulations employing the Widom particle insertion method are also carried out to determine the chemical potential at the same conditions. Several methods are shown to achieve an accuracy on the order of five percent. Based on the success of these theories, qualitative studies of cavity-interaction contributions to the chemical potential and the effect of clustering in supercritical solvation are conducted. Finally, fluctuation theory is shown to be the only available method suitable for ab initio calculations of the chemical potential involving anisotropic potentials. A suitable potential for naphthalene-carbon dioxide systems is developed from existing multi-site exp-6-1 potentials and predictions of the chemical potential of infinitely- dilute naphthalene in supercritical carbon dioxide are made as an example of a possible application of this method.

  7. Intermolecular interactions and the thermodynamic properties of supercritical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yigzawe, Tesfaye M.; Sadus, Richard J.

    2013-05-01

    The role of different contributions to intermolecular interactions on the thermodynamic properties of supercritical fluids is investigated. Molecular dynamics simulation results are reported for the energy, pressure, thermal pressure coefficient, thermal expansion coefficient, isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities, isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, and speed of sound of fluids interacting via both the Lennard-Jones and Weeks-Chandler-Andersen potentials. These properties were obtained for a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and densities. For each thermodynamic property, an excess value is determined to distinguish between attraction and repulsion. It is found that the contributions of intermolecular interactions have varying effects depending on the thermodynamic property. The maxima exhibited by the isochoric and isobaric heat capacities, isothermal compressibilities, and thermal expansion coefficient are attributed to interactions in the Lennard-Jones well. Repulsion is required to obtain physically realistic speeds of sound and both repulsion and attraction are necessary to observe a Joule-Thomson inversion curve. Significantly, both maxima and minima are observed for the isobaric and isochoric heat capacities of the supercritical Lennard-Jones fluid. It is postulated that the loci of these maxima and minima converge to a common point via the same power law relationship as the phase coexistence curve with an exponent of β = 0.32. This provides an explanation for the terminal isobaric heat capacity maximum in supercritical fluids.

  8. Process for treating effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.M.; Shapiro, C.

    1995-12-31

    The present invention relates generally to a method for treating and recycling the effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor and more specifically to a method for treating and recycling the effluent by expanding the effluent without extensive cooling. Supercritical water oxidation is the oxidation of fuel, generally waste material, in a body of water under conditions above the thermodynamic critical point of water. The current state of the art in supercritical water oxidation plant effluent treatment is to cool the reactor effluent through heat exchangers or direct quench, separate the cooled liquid into a gas/vapor stream and a liquid/solid stream, expand the separated effluent, and perform additional purification on gaseous, liquid, brine and solid effluent. If acid gases are present, corrosion is likely to occur in the coolers. During expansion, part of the condensed water will revaporize. Vaporization can damage the valves due to cavitation and erosion. The present invention expands the effluent stream without condensing the stream. Radionuclides and suspended solids are more efficiently separated in the vapor phase. By preventing condensation, the acids are kept in the much less corrosive gaseous phase thereby limiting the damage to treatment equipment. The present invention also reduces the external energy consumption, by utilizing the expansion step to also cool the effluent.

  9. Supercritical nitrogen processing for the purification of reactive porous materials.

    PubMed

    Stadie, Nicholas P; Callini, Elsa; Mauron, Philippe; Borgschulte, Andreas; Züttel, Andreas

    2015-05-15

    Supercritical fluid extraction and drying methods are well established in numerous applications for the synthesis and processing of porous materials. Herein, nitrogen is presented as a novel supercritical drying fluid for specialized applications such as in the processing of reactive porous materials, where carbon dioxide and other fluids are not appropriate due to their higher chemical reactivity. Nitrogen exhibits similar physical properties in the near-critical region of its phase diagram as compared to carbon dioxide: a widely tunable density up to ~1 g ml(-1), modest critical pressure (3.4 MPa), and small molecular diameter of ~3.6 Å. The key to achieving a high solvation power of nitrogen is to apply a processing temperature in the range of 80-150 K, where the density of nitrogen is an order of magnitude higher than at similar pressures near ambient temperature. The detailed solvation properties of nitrogen, and especially its selectivity, across a wide range of common target species of extraction still require further investigation. Herein we describe a protocol for the supercritical nitrogen processing of porous magnesium borohydride.

  10. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Metal Chelate: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xin; Liu, Qinli; Hou, Xiongpo; Fang, Tao

    2017-03-04

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), as a new green extraction technology, has been used in extracting various metal species. The solubilities of chelating agents and corresponding metal chelates are the key factors which influence the efficiency of SFE. Other main properties of them such as stability and selectivity are also reviewed. The extraction mechanisms of mainly used chelating agents are explained by typical examples in this paper. This is the important aspect of SFE of metal ions. Moreover, the extraction efficiencies of metal species also depend on other factors such as temperature, pressure, extraction time and matrix effect. The two main complexation methods namely in-situ and on-line chelating SFE are described in detail. As an efficient chelating agent, tributyl phosphate-nitric acid (TBP-HNO3) complex attracts much attention. The SFE of metal ions, lanthanides and actinides as well as organometallic compounds are also summarized. With the proper selection of ligands, high efficient extraction of metal species can be obtained. As an efficient sample analysis method, supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is introduced in this paper. Recently, the extraction method combining ionic liquids (ILs) with supercritical fluid has been becoming a novel technology for treating metal ions. The kinetics related to SFE of metal species is discussed with some specific examples.

  11. Dehydrating and Sterilizing Wastes Using Supercritical CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ian J.

    2006-01-01

    A relatively low-temperature process for dehydrating and sterilizing biohazardous wastes in an enclosed life-support system exploits (1) the superior mass-transport properties of supercritical fluids in general and (2) the demonstrated sterilizing property of supercritical CO2 in particular. The wastes to be treated are placed in a chamber. Liquid CO2, drawn from storage at a pressure of 850 psi (approx.=5.9 MPa) and temperature of 0 C, is compressed to pressure of 2 kpsi (approx.=14 MPa) and made to flow into the chamber. The compression raises the temperature to 10 C. The chamber and its contents are then further heated to 40 C, putting the CO2 into a supercritical state, in which it kills microorganisms in the chamber. Carrying dissolved water, the CO2 leaves the chamber through a back-pressure regulator, through which it is expanded back to the storage pressure. The expanded CO2 is refrigerated to extract the dissolved water as ice, and is then returned to the storage tank at 0 C

  12. Ultra Efficient Engine Technology Systems Integration and Environmental Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daggett, David L.; Geiselhart, Karl A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This study documents the design and analysis of four types of advanced technology commercial transport airplane configurations (small, medium large and very large) with an assumed technology readiness date of 2010. These airplane configurations were used as a platform to evaluate the design concept and installed performance of advanced technology engines being developed under the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program. Upon installation of the UEET engines onto the UEET advanced technology airframes, the small and medium airplanes both achieved an additional 16% increase in fuel efficiency when using GE advanced turbofan engines. The large airplane achieved an 18% increase in fuel efficiency when using the P&W geared fan engine. The very large airplane (i.e. BWB), also using P&W geared fan engines, only achieved an additional 16% that was attributed to a non-optimized airplane/engine combination.

  13. Formation of methotrexate-PLLA-PEG-PLLA composite microspheres by microencapsulation through a process of suspension-enhanced dispersion by supercritical CO2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ai-Zheng; Wang, Guang-Ya; Wang, Shi-Bin; Li, Li; Liu, Yuan-Gang; Zhao, Chen

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to improve the drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, and sustained-release properties of supercritical CO2-based drug-loaded polymer carriers via a process of suspension-enhanced dispersion by supercritical CO2 (SpEDS), which is an advanced version of solution-enhanced dispersion by supercritical CO2 (SEDS). Methods Methotrexate nanoparticles were successfully microencapsulated into poly (L-lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(L-lactide) (PLLA-PEG-PLLA) by SpEDS. Methotrexate nanoparticles were first prepared by SEDS, then suspended in PLLA-PEG-PLLA solution, and finally microencapsulated into PLLA-PEG-PLLA via SpEDS, where an “injector” was utilized in the suspension delivery system. Results After microencapsulation, the composite methotrexate (MTX)-PLLA-PEG-PLLA microspheres obtained had a mean particle size of 545 nm, drug loading of 13.7%, and an encapsulation efficiency of 39.2%. After an initial burst release, with around 65% of the total methotrexate being released in the first 3 hours, the MTX-PLLA-PEG-PLLA microspheres released methotrexate in a sustained manner, with 85% of the total methotrexate dose released within 23 hours and nearly 100% within 144 hours. Conclusion Compared with a parallel study of the coprecipitation process, microencapsulation using SpEDS offered greater potential to manufacture drug-loaded polymer microspheres for a drug delivery system. PMID:22787397

  14. Blended polymer materials extractable with supercritical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Mei

    Supercritical carbon dioxide is drawing more and more attention because of its unique solvent properties along with being environmentally friendly. Historically most of the commercial interests of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction are in the food industry, pharmaceutical industry, environmental preservation and polymer processing. Recently attention has shifted from the extraction of relatively simple molecules to more complex systems with a much broader range of physical and chemical transformations. However the available data show that a lot of commercially valuable substances are not soluble in supercritical carbon dioxide due to their polar structures. This fact really limits the application of SCF extraction technology to much broader industrial applications. Therefore, the study of a polymer's solubility in a given supercritical fluid and its thermodynamic behavior becomes one of the most important research topics. The major objective of this dissertation is to develop a convenient and economic way to enhance the polymer's solubility in supercritical carbon dioxide. Further objective is to innovate a new process of making metal casting parts with blended polymer materials developed in this study. The key technique developed in this study to change a polymer's solubility in SCF CO2 is to thermally blend a commercially available and CO2 non-soluble polymer material with a low molecular weight CO2 soluble organic chemical that acts as a co-solute. The mixture yields a plastic material that can be completely solubilized in SCF CO2 over a range of temperatures and pressures. It also exhibits a variety of physical properties (strength, hardness, viscosity, etc.) depending on variations in the mixture ratio. The three organic chemicals investigated as CO2 soluble materials are diphenyl carbonate, naphthalene, and benzophenone. Two commercial polymers, polyethylene glycol and polystyrene, have been investigated as CO2 non-soluble materials. The chemical

  15. Polarization and spectral shift of benzophenone in supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, T L; Georg, H C; Coutinho, K; Canuto, S

    2009-04-30

    Monte Carlo simulation and quantum mechanics calculations based on the INDO/CIS and TD-DFT methods were utilized to study the solvatochromic shift of benzophenone when changing the environment from normal water to supercritical (P = 340.2 atm and T = 673 K) condition. Solute polarization increases the dipole moment of benzophenone, compared to gas phase, by 88 and 35% in normal and supercritical conditions, giving the in-solvent dipole value of 5.8 and 4.2 D, respectively. The average number of solute-solvent hydrogen bonds was analyzed, and a large decrease of 2.3 in normal water to only 0.8 in the supercritical environment was found. By using these polarized models of benzophenone in the two different conditions of water, we performed MC simulations to generate statistically uncorrelated configurations of the solute surrounded by the solvent molecules and subsequent quantum mechanics calculations on these configurations. When changing from normal to supercritical water environment, INDO/CIS calculations explicitly considering all valence electrons of the 235 solvent water molecules resulted in a solvatochromic shift of 1425 cm(-1) for the most intense pi-pi* transition of benzophenone, that is, slightly underestimated in comparison with the experimentally inferred result of 1700 cm(-1). TD-B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p) calculations on the same configurations but with benzophenone electrostatically embedded in the 320 water molecules resulted in a solvatochromic shift of 1715 cm(-1) for this transition, in very good agreement with the experimental result. When using the unpolarized model of the benzophenone, this calculated solvatochromic shift was only 640 cm(-1). Additional calculations were also made by using BHandHLYP/6-311+G(2d,p) to analyze the effect of the asymptotic decay of the exchange functional. This study indicates that, contrary to the general expectation, there is a sizable solute polarization even in the low-density regime of supercritical condition and

  16. Uranium extraction from TRISO-coated fuel particles using supercritical CO2 containing tri-n-butyl phosphate.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liyang; Duan, Wuhua; Xu, Jingming; Zhu, Yongjun

    2012-11-30

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are advanced nuclear systems that will receive heavy use in the future. It is important to develop spent nuclear fuel reprocessing technologies for HTGR. A new method for recovering uranium from tristructural-isotropic (TRISO-) coated fuel particles with supercritical CO(2) containing tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) as a complexing agent was investigated. TRISO-coated fuel particles from HTGR fuel elements were first crushed to expose UO(2) pellet fuel kernels. The crushed TRISO-coated fuel particles were then treated under O(2) stream at 750°C, resulting in a mixture of U(3)O(8) powder and SiC shells. The conversion of U(3)O(8) into solid uranyl nitrate by its reaction with liquid N(2)O(4) in the presence of a small amount of water was carried out. Complete conversion was achieved after 60 min of reaction at 80°C, whereas the SiC shells were not converted by N(2)O(4). Uranyl nitrate in the converted mixture was extracted with supercritical CO(2) containing TBP. The cumulative extraction efficiency was above 98% after 20 min of online extraction at 50°C and 25 MPa, whereas the SiC shells were not extracted by TBP. The results suggest an attractive strategy for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from HTGR to minimize the generation of secondary radioactive waste.

  17. Development of supercritical fluid extraction and supercritical fluid chromatography purification methods using rapid solubility screening with multiple solubility chambers.

    PubMed

    Gahm, Kyung H; Huang, Ke; Barnhart, Wesley W; Goetzinger, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Rapid solubility screening in diverse supercritical fluids (SCFs) was carried out via multiple solubility chambers with a trapping device and online ultraviolet (UV) detection. With this device, it was possible to rapidly study the solubility variations of multiple components in a mixture. Results from solubility studies have been used to develop efficient supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) methods. After the investigation of solubilities of theophylline and caffeine in several neat organic solvents and SCFs, advantages of SFE over conventional organic solvent extraction were demonstrated with a model mixture of theophylline and caffeine. The highest solubility ratio of 1:40 (theophylline:caffeine) was observed in the SCF with 20% acetonitrile (MeCN), where a ratio of 1:11 was the highest in the neat organic solvents. A model mixture of theophylline:caffeine (85:15 w/w, caffeine as an impurity) was successfully purified by SFE by leveraging the highest solubility difference. The SCF with 20% MeCN selectively removed caffeine and left theophylline largely intact. Rapid SCF solubility screening was applied to development of SFE and SFC methods in a drug discovery environment. Two successful applications were demonstrated with proprietary Amgen compounds to either remove an achiral impurity before chiral purification or enhance chiral chromatographic throughput.

  18. Wave-induced loss of ultra-relativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts.

    PubMed

    Shprits, Yuri Y; Drozdov, Alexander Y; Spasojevic, Maria; Kellerman, Adam C; Usanova, Maria E; Engebretson, Mark J; Agapitov, Oleksiy V; Zhelavskaya, Irina S; Raita, Tero J; Spence, Harlan E; Baker, Daniel N; Zhu, Hui; Aseev, Nikita A

    2016-09-28

    The dipole configuration of the Earth's magnetic field allows for the trapping of highly energetic particles, which form the radiation belts. Although significant advances have been made in understanding the acceleration mechanisms in the radiation belts, the loss processes remain poorly understood. Unique observations on 17 January 2013 provide detailed information throughout the belts on the energy spectrum and pitch angle (angle between the velocity of a particle and the magnetic field) distribution of electrons up to ultra-relativistic energies. Here we show that although relativistic electrons are enhanced, ultra-relativistic electrons become depleted and distributions of particles show very clear telltale signatures of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave-induced loss. Comparisons between observations and modelling of the evolution of the electron flux and pitch angle show that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves provide the dominant loss mechanism at ultra-relativistic energies and produce a profound dropout of the ultra-relativistic radiation belt fluxes.

  19. Wave-induced loss of ultra-relativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Drozdov, Alexander Y.; Spasojevic, Maria; Kellerman, Adam C.; Usanova, Maria E.; Engebretson, Mark J.; Agapitov, Oleksiy V.; Zhelavskaya, Irina S.; Raita, Tero J.; Spence, Harlan E.; Baker, Daniel N.; Zhu, Hui; Aseev, Nikita A.

    2016-09-01

    The dipole configuration of the Earth's magnetic field allows for the trapping of highly energetic particles, which form the radiation belts. Although significant advances have been made in understanding the acceleration mechanisms in the radiation belts, the loss processes remain poorly understood. Unique observations on 17 January 2013 provide detailed information throughout the belts on the energy spectrum and pitch angle (angle between the velocity of a particle and the magnetic field) distribution of electrons up to ultra-relativistic energies. Here we show that although relativistic electrons are enhanced, ultra-relativistic electrons become depleted and distributions of particles show very clear telltale signatures of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave-induced loss. Comparisons between observations and modelling of the evolution of the electron flux and pitch angle show that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves provide the dominant loss mechanism at ultra-relativistic energies and produce a profound dropout of the ultra-relativistic radiation belt fluxes.

  20. Wave-induced loss of ultra-relativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts

    PubMed Central

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Drozdov, Alexander Y.; Spasojevic, Maria; Kellerman, Adam C.; Usanova, Maria E.; Engebretson, Mark J.; Agapitov, Oleksiy V.; Zhelavskaya, Irina S.; Raita, Tero J.; Spence, Harlan E.; Baker, Daniel N.; Zhu, Hui; Aseev, Nikita A.

    2016-01-01

    The dipole configuration of the Earth's magnetic field allows for the trapping of highly energetic particles, which form the radiation belts. Although significant advances have been made in understanding the acceleration mechanisms in the radiation belts, the loss processes remain poorly understood. Unique observations on 17 January 2013 provide detailed information throughout the belts on the energy spectrum and pitch angle (angle between the velocity of a particle and the magnetic field) distribution of electrons up to ultra-relativistic energies. Here we show that although relativistic electrons are enhanced, ultra-relativistic electrons become depleted and distributions of particles show very clear telltale signatures of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave-induced loss. Comparisons between observations and modelling of the evolution of the electron flux and pitch angle show that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves provide the dominant loss mechanism at ultra-relativistic energies and produce a profound dropout of the ultra-relativistic radiation belt fluxes. PMID:27678050

  1. Control system options and strategies for supercritical CO2 cycles.

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Kulesza, K. P.; Sienicki, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Oregon State Univ.

    2009-06-18

    The Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton Cycle is a promising alternative to Rankine steam cycle and recuperated gas Brayton cycle energy converters for use with Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs), Lead-Cooled Fast Reactors (LFRs), as well as other advanced reactor concepts. The S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle offers higher plant efficiencies than Rankine or recuperated gas Brayton cycles operating at the same liquid metal reactor core outlet temperatures as well as reduced costs or size of key components especially the turbomachinery. A new Plant Dynamics Computer Code has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory for simulation of a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle energy converter coupled to an autonomous load following liquid metal-cooled fast reactor. The Plant Dynamics code has been applied to investigate the effectiveness of a control strategy for the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle for the STAR-LM 181 MWe (400 MWt) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor. The strategy, which involves a combination of control mechanisms, is found to be effective for controlling the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle over the complete operating range from 0 to 100 % load for a representative set of transient load changes. While the system dynamic analysis of control strategy performance for STARLM is carried out for a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle energy converter incorporating an axial flow turbine and compressors, investigations of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle have identified benefits from the use of centrifugal compressors which offer a wider operating range, greater stability near the critical point, and potentially further cost reductions due to fewer stages than axial flow compressors. Models have been developed at Argonne for the conceptual design and performance analysis of centrifugal compressors for use in the SCO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle. Steady state calculations demonstrate the wider operating range of centrifugal compressors versus axial compressors installed in a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle as

  2. Supercritical fluid extraction of particulate and adsorbent materials. Part 2. Final report, February 1985-January 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.W.; Smith, R.D.

    1987-12-01

    The physical properties of supercritical fluids allow similar solvent strengths as liquids, but with higher diffusion coefficients, lower viscosities, and an extended temperature range that provides the potential for more-rapid and efficient extraction rates than possible with liquids. The report describes expanded studies conducted to evaluate the applicability and efficiency of analytical supercritical fluid extraction and related methodologies. These studies included the development of quantitative off-line supercritical fluid extraction methodology and a comparison to traditional Soxhlet extraction, the development and evaluation of on-line supercritical fluid extraction-gas chromatography for combined sample preparation and analysis, and direct supercritical fluid extraction-mass spectrometry for the monitoring of specific extraction profiles as a function of time. The sample matrices included an air particulate sample and XAD-2 resin, polyurethane foam, and Spherocarb adsorbents that were spiked with various model compounds. Carbon dioxide, isobutane, and methanol modified (20 mole %) carbon dioxide were utilized as supercritical fluid systems. Related studies on the evaluation of the quantitative analysis capability of a fluorescence detection supercritical fluid chromatography method and the development of viable solute focusing methods for capillary supercritical fluid chromatography were also conducted.

  3. Experimental study of elliptical jet from supercritical to subcritical conditions using planar laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2015-03-15

    The study of fluid jet dynamics at supercritical conditions involves strong coupling between fluid dynamic and thermodynamic phenomena. Beyond the critical point, the liquid-vapor coexistence ceases to exist, and the fluid exists as a single phase known as supercritical fluid with its properties that are entirely different from liquids and gases. At the critical point, the liquids do not possess surface tension and latent heat of evaporation. Around the critical point, the fluid undergoes large changes in density and possesses thermodynamic anomaly like enhancement in thermal conductivity and specific heat. In the present work, the transition of the supercritical and near-critical elliptical jet into subcritical as well as supercritical environment is investigated experimentally with nitrogen and helium as the surrounding environment. Under atmospheric condition, a liquid jet injected from the elliptical orifice exhibits axis switching phenomena. As the injection temperature increases, the axis switching length also increases. Beyond the critical temperature, the axis switching is not observed. The investigation also revealed that pressure plays a major role in determining the thermodynamic transition of the elliptical jet only for the case of supercritical jet injected into subcritical chamber conditions. At larger pressures, the supercritical jet undergoes disintegration and formation of droplets in the subcritical environment is observed. However, for supercritical jet injection into supercritical environment, the gas-gas like mixing behavior is observed.

  4. Use of liquid/supercritical CO2 extraction process for butanol recovery from fermentation broth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order for butanol fermentation to be a viable option, it is essential to recover it from fermentation broth using economical alternate in-situ product recovery techniques such as liquid/supercritical CO2 extraction as compared to distillation. This technique (liquid CO2 extraction & supercritical...

  5. Determination of solvation kinetics in supercritical fluids. Project summary, August 15, 1993--May 3, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, F.V.

    1994-08-01

    This project is directed on determining effects of supercritical fluids on salvation and chemical reactions. Sub-projects are: understanding the effects of neat and entrainer-modified supercritical fluids on solute-fluid interactions; determining the influence of supercritical fluids on energetics and dynamics of solute conformation; and probing effects of continuous phase density on internal dynamics of reverse micelles formed in supercritical fluids. In order to follow these fast molecular-level processes, modern picosecond in-situ optical spectroscopy is being used. To date this work has: helped define how ``diffusion controlled`` reactions proceed in supercritical fluids; determined how and on what time scale entrainers preferentially solvate solutes in the near-critical region; shown that the conformation (i.e., reactivity) of flexible solutes can be altered easily with fluid density; shown how lateral diffusion within reverse micelles (formed in supercritical alkanes) is affected by the continuous phase density; and begun to probe how the conformation of polymers can be controlled with supercritical fluids. This is leading to a better molecular-level understanding of the chemistry of supercritical fluids.

  6. Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Chromatography Using a Lee Scientific Series 600 SFE/SFC System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    Dioxide and Ethylene. Journal of Chemical Engineering Data , 26:47. Lee, M.L. and K.E. Markides 1987 Chromatography with Supercritical Fluids. Science...Publishers, Stoneham, MA. McHugh, M.A., and M.E. Paulaitis 1980 Solid Solubilities of Naphthalene and Biphenyle in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide. Journal of Chemical Engineering Data , 25

  7. SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON MIXTURES FROM CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Highly contaminated (with PAHs) topsoils were extracted with supercritical CO2 to determine the feasibility and mechanism of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE). Effect of SCF density, temperature, cosolvent type and amount, and of slurrying the soil with water were ...

  8. Comparison of the experimental aerodynamic characteristics of theoretically and experimentally designed supercritical airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. D.

    1974-01-01

    A lifting airfoil theoretically designed for shockless supercritical flow utilizing a complex hodograph method has been evaluated in the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel at design and off-design conditions. The experimental results are presented and compared with those of an experimentally designed supercritical airfoil which were obtained in the same tunnel.

  9. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Regeneration of Activated Carbon Loaded with Contaminants from Rocky Mountain Arsenal Well Water.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    15 111-7 GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION ISOTHERMS THERMALLY REACTIVATED CARBON .............. 16 I IV-1 PROCESS FLOW DIAGRAM FOR... PROCESSING COST OF ACTIVATED CHARCOAL REGENERATION BY SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE PROCESS ........................... 25 l IV-4 SENSITIVITY OF GAC...regenerate adsorbents such as granular activated carbon loaded with a broad variety of organic adsorbates. This regeneration process uses a supercritical

  10. Effects of Natural Osmolytes on the Protein Structure in Supercritical CO2: Molecular Level Evidence.

    PubMed

    Monhemi, Hassan; Housaindokht, Mohammad Reza; Nakhaei Pour, Ali

    2015-08-20

    Protein instability in supercritical CO2 limits the application of this green solvent in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. CO2 molecules act as a protein denaturant at high pressure under supercritical conditions. Here, for the first time, we show that natural osmolytes could stabilize protein conformation in supercritical CO2. Molecular dynamics simulation is used to monitor the effects of adding different natural osmolytes on the conformation and dynamics of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (CI2) in supercritical CO2. Simulations showed that CI2 is denatured at 200 bar in supercritical CO2, which is in agreement with experimental observations. Interestingly, the protein conformation remains native after addition of ∼1 M amino acid- and sugar-based osmolyte models. These molecules stabilize protein through the formation of supramolecular self-assemblies resulting from macromolecule-osmolyte hydrogen bonds. Nevertheless, trimethylamine N-oxide, which is known as a potent osmolyte for protein stabilization in aqueous solutions, amplifies protein denaturation in supercritical CO2. On the basis of our structural analysis, we introduce a new mechanism for the osmolyte effect in supercritical CO2, an "inclusion mechanism". To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that introduces the application of natural osmolytes in a supercritical fluid and describes mechanistic insights into osmolyte action in nonaqueous media.

  11. Improvement of dissolution property of poorly water-soluble drug by supercritical freeze granulation.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Ryoichi; Hara, Yuko; Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Watano, Satoru

    2009-10-01

    The dissolution property of the poorly water-soluble drug, flurbiprofen (FP) was improved by a novel supercritical freeze granulation using supercritical carbon dioxide. Supercritical freeze granulation was defined as a production method of the granulated substances by using the dry ice to generate intentionally for the rapid atomization of the supercritical carbon dioxide to the atmospheric pressure. This process utilized a rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS) process with the mixture of the drug and lactose. In the supercritical freeze granulation, needle-like FP fine particles were obtained which adhered to the surface of lactose particles, which did not dissolve in supercritical carbon dioxide. The number of FP particles that adhered to the surface of particles decreased with an increase in the ratio of lactose added, leading to markedly improve the dissolution rate. This improvement was caused not only by the increase in the specific surface area but also the improvement of the dispersibility of FP in water. It is thus concluded that the supercritical freeze granulation is a useful technique to improve the dissolution property of the poorly water-soluble flurbiprofen.

  12. Ultra-efficient Engine Diameter Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daggett, David L.; Brown, Stephen T.; Kawai, Ron T.

    2003-01-01

    Engine fan diameter and Bypass Ratio (BPR) optimization studies have been conducted since the beginning of the turbofan age with the recognition that reducing the engine core jet velocity and increasing fan mass flow rate generally increases propulsive efficiency. However, performance tradeoffs limit the amount of fan flow achievable without reducing airplane efficiency. This study identifies the optimum engine fan diameter and BPR, given the advanced Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) powerplant efficiencies, for use on an advanced subsonic airframe. Engine diameter studies have historically focused on specific engine size options, and were limited by existing technology and transportation infrastructure (e.g., ability to fit bare engines through aircraft doors and into cargo holds). This study is unique in defining the optimum fan diameter and drivers for future 2015 (UEET) powerplants while not limiting engine fan diameter by external constraints. This report follows on to a study identifying the system integration issues of UEET engines. This Engine Diameter study was managed by Boeing Phantom Works, Seattle, Washington through the NASA Glenn Revolutionary Aero Space Engine Research (RASER) contract under task order 10. Boeing Phantom Works, Huntington Beach, completed the engine/airplane sizing optimization, while the Boeing Commercial Airplane group (BCA) provided design oversight. A separate subcontract to support the overall project was issued to Tuskegee University.

  13. Ultra-clean CCD Cryostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiries, S.; Iwert, O.; Cavadore, C.; Geimer, C.; Hummel, E.

    A reproducible method to achieve ultra-clean CCD cryostats is presented, including a list of suitable materials and necessary treatments. In addition, proper handling under clean-room conditions and suitable molecular sieves to eliminate contamination on the detector surface in cold cryostats for years are described.

  14. Supercritical fluid (SCF) technologies: Assessment of applicability to installation restoration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-03-01

    USAEC has conducted an evaluation of supercritical fluid (SCF) technologies for their applicability to treatment of explosives, chlorinated hydrocarbons, and metals in soils, water, and/or waste sludge media. Off-specification explosives and propellants that have traditionally been open burned or openly detonated were also examined. Supercritical fluids are substances which have been heated and compressed to above their critical temperatures and pressures and which possess unique transport and mass transfer properties. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) uses the solvating properties of supercritical fluids to extract one or more organic components from a mixture into a supercritical solvent (commonly CO2). The concentrated extract stream may then be recycled, reclaimed, or destroyed by other methods.

  15. On the cluster composition of supercritical water combining molecular modeling and vibrational spectroscopic data.

    PubMed

    Tassaing, T; Garrain, P A; Bégué, D; Baraille, I

    2010-07-21

    The present study is aimed at a detailed analysis of supercritical water structure based on the combination of experimental vibrational spectra as well as molecular modeling calculations of isolated water clusters. We propose an equilibrium cluster composition model where supercritical water is considered as an ideal mixture of small water clusters (n=1-3) at the chemical equilibrium and the vibrational spectra are expected to result from the superposition of the spectra of the individual clusters, Thus, it was possible to extract from the decomposition of the midinfrared spectra the evolution of the partition of clusters in supercritical water as a function of density. The cluster composition predicted by this model was found to be quantitatively consistent with the near infrared and Raman spectra of supercritical water analyzed using the same procedure. We emphasize that such methodology could be applied to determine the portion of cluster in water in a wider thermodynamic range as well as in more complex aqueous supercritical solutions.

  16. Liquid Behavior at Critical and Supercritical Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Huei-Huang; Gross, Klaus W.

    1989-01-01

    At a JANNAF workshop, the issue of fluids at and above the critical point was discussed to obtain a better understanding of similar conditions in combustion chambers of rocket engines. Invited experts from academic, industrial, and government institutions presented the most recent physical, numerical, and experimental advances. During the final discussion period, it was agreed that: (1) no analytical capability exists to simulate subject conditions; (2) mechanisms reflected by opalescence, the solubility of gases, other interfacial phenomena listed, and fluorescence diagnostics are new and important; (3) multicomponent mixtures, radiation, critical fluctuation, and other recorded ones pose unknown effects; and (4) various identified analytical and experimental actions must be initiated in a mutually supporting sequence.

  17. Ultra-high Temperature Emittance Measurements for Space and Missile Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan; Crandall, David

    2009-01-01

    Advanced modeling and design efforts for many aerospace components require high temperature emittance data. Applications requiring emittance data include propulsion systems, radiators, aeroshells, heatshields/thermal protection systems, and leading edge surfaces. The objective of this work is to provide emittance data at ultra-high temperatures. MSFC has a new instrument for the measurement of emittance at ultra-high temperatures, the Ultra-High Temperature Emissometer System (Ultra-HITEMS). AZ Technology Inc. developed the instrument, designed to provide emittance measurements over the temperature range 700-3500K. The Ultra-HITEMS instrument measures the emittance of samples, heated by lasers, in vacuum, using a blackbody source and a Fourier Transform Spectrometer. Detectors in a Nicolet 6700 FT-IR spectrometer measure emittance over the spectral range of 0.4-25 microns. Emitted energy from the specimen and output from a Mikron M390S blackbody source at the same temperature with matched collection geometry are measured. Integrating emittance over the spectral range yields the total emittance. The ratio provides a direct measure of total hemispherical emittance. Samples are heated using lasers. Optical pyrometry provides temperature data. Optical filters prevent interference from the heating lasers. Data for Inconel 718 show excellent agreement with results from literature and ASTM 835. Measurements taken from levitated spherical specimens provide total hemispherical emittance data; measurements taken from flat specimens mounted in the chamber provide near-normal emittance data. Data from selected characterization studies will be presented. The Ultra-HITEMS technique could advance space and missile technologies by advancing the knowledge base and the technology readiness level for ultra-high temperature materials.

  18. General corrosion properties of modified PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel in supercritical water as a fuel cladding candidate material for supercritical water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazono, Y.; Iwai, T.; Abe, H.

    2010-03-01

    The Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) has been designed and investigated because of its high thermal efficiency and plant simplification. There are some advantages including the use of a single phase coolant with high enthalpy but there are numerous potential problems, particularly with materials. As the operating temperature of supercritical water reactor will be between 280°C and 620°C with a pressure of 25MPa, the selection of materials is difficult and important. Austenitic stainless steels were selected for possible use in supercritical water systems because of their corrosion resistance and radiation resistance. The PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) as a nuclear fuel cladding material for a Na-cooled fast breeder reactor. The corrosion data of PNC1520 in supercritical water (SCW) is required but does not exist. The purpose of the present study is to research the corrosion properties for PNC1520 austenitic stainless steel in supercritical water. The supercritical water corrosion test was performed for the standard PNC1520 (1520S) and the Ti-additional type of PNC1520 (1520Ti) by using a supercritical water autoclave. Corrosion tests on the austenitic 1520S and 1520Ti steels in supercritical water were performed at 400, 500 and 600°C with exposures up to 1000h. The amount of weight gain, weight loss and weight of scale were evaluated after the corrosion test in supercritical water for both austenitic steels. After 1000h corrosion test performed, the weight gains of both austenitic stainless steels were less than 2 g/m2 at 400°C and 500°C . But both weight gain and weight loss of 1520Ti were larger than those of 1520S at 600°C . By increasing the temperature to 600°C, the surface of 1520Ti was covered with magnetite formed in supercritical water and dissolution of the steel alloying elements has been observed. In view of corrosion, 1520S may have larger possibility than 1520Ti to adopt a

  19. Ultra-Large Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Rodney; Coverstone, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    UltraSail is a next-generation ultra-large (km2 class) sail system. Analysis of the launch, deployment, stabilization, and control of these sails shows that high-payload-mass fractions for interplanetary and deep-space missions are possible. UltraSail combines propulsion and control systems developed for formation-flying microsatellites with a solar sail architecture to achieve controllable sail areas approaching 1 km2. Electrically conductive CP-1 polyimide film results in sail subsystem area densities as low as 5 g/m2. UltraSail produces thrust levels many times those of ion thrusters used for comparable deep-space missions. The primary innovation involves the near-elimination of sail-supporting structures by attaching each blade tip to a formation- flying microsatellite, which deploys the sail and then articulates the sail to provide attitude control, including spin stabilization and precession of the spin axis. These microsatellite tips are controlled by microthrusters for sail-film deployment and mission operations. UltraSail also avoids the problems inherent in folded sail film, namely stressing, yielding, or perforating, by storing the film in a roll for launch and deployment. A 5-km long by 2 micrometer thick film roll on a mandrel with a 1 m circumference (32 cm diameter) has a stored thickness of 5 cm. A 5 m-long mandrel can store a film area of 25,000 m2, and a four-blade system has an area of 0.1 sq km.

  20. Supercritical fluid chromatography for separation and preparation of tautomeric 7-epimeric spiro oxindole alkaloids from Uncaria macrophylla.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenzhi; Zhang, Yibei; Pan, Huiqin; Yao, Changliang; Hou, Jinjun; Yao, Shuai; Cai, Luying; Feng, Ruihong; Wu, Wanying; Guo, Dean

    2017-02-05

    Increasing challenge arising from configurational interconversion in aqueous solvent renders it rather difficult to isolate high-purity tautomeric reference standards and thus largely hinders the holistic quality control of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Spiro oxindole alkaloids (SOAs), as the markers for the medicinal Uncaria herbs, can easily isomerize in polar or aqueous solvent via a retro-Mannich reaction. In the present study, supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) is utilized to separate and isolate two pairs of 7-epimeric SOAs, including rhynchophylline (R) and isorhynchophylline (IR), corynoxine (C) and corynoxine B (CB), from Uncaria macrophylla. Initially, the solvent that can stabilize SOA epimers was systematically screened, and acetonitrile was used to dissolve and as the modifier in SFC. Then, key parameters of ultra-high performance SFC (ultra-performance convergence chromatography, UPC(2)), comprising stationary phase, additive in modifier, column temperature, ABPR pressure, and flow rate, were optimized in sequence. Two isocratic UPC(2) methods were developed on the achiral Torus 1-AA and Torus Diol columns, suitable for UV and MS detection, respectively. MCI gel column chromatography fractionated the U. macrophylla extract into two mixtures (R/IR and C/CB). Preparative SFC, using a Viridis Prep Silica 2-EP OBD column and acetonitrile-0.2% diethylamine in CO2 as the mobile phase, was finally employed for compound purification. As a result, the purity of four SOA compounds was all higher than 95%. Different from reversed-phase HPLC, SFC, by use of water-free mobile phase (inert CO2 and aprotic modifier), provides a solution to rapid analysis and isolation of tautomeric reference standards for quality control of TCM.

  1. Optimization of supercritical phase and combined supercritical/subcritical conversion of lignocellulose for hexose production by using a flow reaction system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Lu, Wen-Jing; Wu, Hua-Yong; Liu, Jin-Wen; Wang, Hong-Tao

    2012-12-01

    A flow reaction system was utilized to investigate lignocellulose conversion using combined supercritical/subcritical conditions for hexose production. Initially, investigation of cellulose hydrolysis in supercritical water and optimization of reaction parameters were done. Oligosaccharide yields reached over 30% at cellulose concentrations of 3-5 gL(-1) and reaction times of 6-10s at 375 °C, and 2.5-4 gL(-1) and 8-10s at 380 °C. Temperatures above 380 °C were not appropriate for the supercritical phase in the combined process. Subsequently, conversion of lignocellulosic materials under combined supercritical/subcritical conditions was studied. Around 30% hexose was produced from corn stalks under the optimal parameters for supercritical (380 °C, 23-24 MPa, 9-10s) and subcritical (240 °C, 8-9 MPa, 45-50s) phases. Flow systems utilizing the combined supercritical/subcritical technology present a promising method for lignocellulosic conversion. The results of this study provide an important guide for the operational optimization and practical application of the proposed system.

  2. The separation of particles from supercritical water oxidation effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Dell'Orco, P.C.

    1991-08-01

    The development of a solids separation system is essential to the implementation of supercritical water oxidation as a commercial process. Like all waste disposal processes, supercritical water oxidation produces a residue. This final ash must eventually be removed from the effluent stream. Limited studies have investigated solids separations near supercritical water conditions (374.2 {degrees}C, 3205 psi). Therefore, a ten millimeter diameter hydrocyclone with an underflow receiver was evaluated for its ability to achieve the separation of fine particles from water. Temperature was varied from 20{degrees}C to 389{degrees}C while pressure was maintained at 3600 psi (24.8 MPa). Mass flow rates varied from 0.015 to 0.049 kg/s. Particle concentrations in feed streams ranged from 400 to 1200 mg/L. Three different particulates, Min-U-Sil 5 (quartz SiO{sub 2}), zirconium dioxide (ZrO{sub 2}), and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) were studied. These particles ranged in diameter from below one micron to ten microns. Low pressure (0-200 psi), room temperature (20{degrees}C) studies were also conducted where flow rate and feed concentration were variables. Solids removal efficiencies were determined for all experiments. Solid removals were as high as 99% at elevated temperatures. Particle size distributions provided information on particle sizes separated. Particles removed with efficiencies of 50, 90, and 95 per cent (cut sizes) were determined. Ninety per cent cut sizes below one micron were reported for several elevated temperature experiments. Empirical models for use in engineering design were developed for the prediction of solid removal efficiencies and pressure drops.

  3. Reactions of inorganic nitrogen species in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Dell`Orco, P.C.

    1994-12-31

    Redox reactions of nitrate salts with NH3 and methanol were studied in near-critical and supercritical water at 350 to 530 C and constant pressure of 302 bar. Sodium nitrate decomposition reactions were investigated at similar conditions. Reactions were conducted in isothermal tubular reactor under plug flow. For kinetic modeling, nitrate and nitrite reactants were lumped into an NO{sub x}{sup -} reactant; kinetic expressions were developed for MNO{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X and sodium nitrate decomposition reactions. The proposed elementary reaction mechanism for MNO{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X reaction indicated that NO{sub 2} was the primary oxidizing species and that N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O selectivities could be determined by the form of MNO{sub 3} used. This suggest a nitrogen control strategy for use in SCWO (supercritical water oxidation) processes; nitrate or NH3 could be used to remove the other, at reaction conditions far less severe than required by other methods. Reactions of nitrate with methanol indicated that nitrate was a better oxidant than oxygen in supercritical water. Nitrogen reaction products included NH3 and nitrite, while inorganic carbon was the major carbon reaction product. Analysis of excess experiments indicated that the reaction at 475 C was first order in methanol concentration and second order in NO{sub x}{sup -} concentration. In order to determine phase regimes for these reactions, solubility of sodium nitrate was determined for some 1:1 nitrate electrolytes. Solubilities were measured at 450 to 525 C, from 248 to 302 bar. A semi-empirical solvation model was shown to adequately describe the experimental sodium nitrate solubilities. Solubilities of Li, Na, and K nitrates revealed with cations with smaller ionic radii had greater solubilities with nitrate.

  4. Dynamics of a supercritical composite shaft mounted on viscoelastic supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnier, O.; Hochard, C.

    2014-01-01

    The damping in a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate is greater than that which occurs in most metallic materials. In the supercritical regime, the damping can trigger unstable whirl oscillations, which can have catastrophic effects. The vibrations occurring in a supercritical composite drive shaft are investigated here in order to predict instabilities of this kind. A simply supported carbon/epoxy composite tube mounted on viscoelastic supports is studied, using an approximation of the Rayleigh-Timoshenko equation. The damping process is assumed to be hysteretic. The composite behavior is described in terms of modulus and loss factor, taking homogenized values. The critical speeds are obtained in several analytical forms in order to determine the effects of factors such as the rotatory inertia, the gyroscopic forces, the transverse shear and the supports stiffness. Assuming that the hysteretic damping can be expressed in terms of the equivalent viscous model, the threshold speed is obtained in the form of an analytical criterion. The influence of the various factors involved is quantified at the first critical speed of a subcritical composite shaft previously described in the literature. The influence of the coupling mechanisms on the unsymmetrical composite laminate and the end fittings is also investigated using a finite element model. None of these parameters were found to have a decisive influence in this case. Those having the greatest effects were the transverse shear and the supports stiffness. The effects of the composite stacking sequence, the shaft length and the supports stiffness on the threshold speed were then investigated. In particular, drive shafts consisting only of ±45° or ±30° plies can be said to be generally unstable in the supercritical regime due to their very high loss factors.

  5. Ultra Wide Band RFID Neutron Tags for Nuclear Materials Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Nekoogar, F; Dowla, F; Wang, T

    2010-01-27

    Recent advancements in the ultra-wide band Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology and solid state pillar type neutron detectors have enabled us to move forward in combining both technologies for advanced neutron monitoring. The LLNL RFID tag is totally passive and will operate indefinitely without the need for batteries. The tag is compact, can be directly mounted on metal, and has high performance in dense and cluttered environments. The LLNL coin-sized pillar solid state neutron detector has achieved a thermal neutron detection efficiency of 20% and neutron/gamma discrimination of 1E5. These performance values are comparable to a fieldable {sup 3}He based detector. In this paper we will discuss features about the two technologies and some potential applications for the advanced safeguarding of nuclear materials.

  6. An Updated Assessment of NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong Michael T.; Jones, Scott M.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) project features advanced aeropropulsion technologies that include highly loaded turbomachinery, an advanced low-NOx combustor, high-temperature materials, and advanced fan containment technology. A probabilistic system assessment is performed to evaluate the impact of these technologies on aircraft CO2 (or equivalent fuel burn) and NOx reductions. A 300-passenger aircraft, with two 396-kN thrust (85,000-lb) engines is chosen for the study. The results show that a large subsonic aircraft equipped with the current UEET technology portfolio has very high probabilities of meeting the UEET minimum success criteria for CO2 reduction (-12% from the baseline) and LTO (landing and takeoff) NOx reductions (-65% relative to the 1996 International Civil Aviation Organization rule).

  7. Phytochemical composition of fractions isolated from ten Salvia species by supercritical carbon dioxide and pressurized liquid extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Šulniūtė, Vaida; Pukalskas, Audrius; Venskutonis, Petras Rimantas

    2017-06-01

    Ten Salvia species, S. amplexicaulis, S. austriaca, S. forsskaolii S. glutinosa, S. nemorosa, S. officinalis, S. pratensis, S. sclarea, S. stepposa and S. verticillata were fractionated using supercritical carbon dioxide and pressurized liquid (ethanol and water) extractions. Fifteen phytochemicals were identified using commercial standards (some other compounds were identified tentatively), 11 of them were quantified by ultra high pressure chromatography (UPLC) with quadruple and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q/TOF, TQ-S). Lipophilic CO2 extracts were rich in tocopherols (2.36-10.07mg/g), while rosmarinic acid was dominating compound (up to 30mg/g) in ethanolic extracts. Apigenin-7-O-β-d-glucuronide, caffeic and carnosic acids were quantitatively important phytochemicals in the majority other Salvia spp. Antioxidatively active constituents were determined by using on-line high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis combined with 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay (HPLC-DPPH). Development of high pressure isolation process and comprehensive characterisation of phytochemicals in Salvia spp. may serve for their wider applications in functional foods and nutraceuticals.

  8. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Based Processing of PEP Binder Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    ac.d-base rre S)wh« l^L SJTÄ molecule acl as an proton donor and the carbony. oxygen in the po.ymer *.an electrondonor However, Kazarian and...nonpolar cosolvent (Kiran and Xiong, 1993). Oxidized polyethylene is obtained by processing PE in an oxygen atmosphere where hydroxide, aldehyde, and...supercritical fluid solvent of meres a iS50 to 500 psi to remove traces of air. Liquid cosolvent is added with a syringe. The supercntical fluid solven

  9. Large-eddy simulation of trans- and supercritical injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, H.; Niedermeier, C. A.; Jarczyk, M.; Pfitzner, M.; Hickel, S.; Adams, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    In a joint effort to develop a robust numerical tool for the simulation of injection, mixing, and combustion in liquid rocket engines at high pressure, a real-gas thermodynamics model has been implemented into two computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, the density-based INCA and a pressure-based version of OpenFOAM. As a part of the validation process, both codes have been used to perform large-eddy simulations (LES) of trans- and supercritical nitrogen injection. Despite the different code architecture and the different subgrid scale turbulence modeling strategy, both codes yield similar results. The agreement with the available experimental data is good.

  10. Truncated Connectivities in a Highly Supercritical Anisotropic Percolation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, Rodrigo G.; de Lima, Bernardo N. B.; Sanchis, Rémy

    2013-12-01

    We consider an anisotropic bond percolation model on , with p=( p h , p v )∈[0,1]2, p v > p h , and declare each horizontal (respectively vertical) edge of to be open with probability p h (respectively p v ), and otherwise closed, independently of all other edges. Let with 0< x 1< x 2, and . It is natural to ask how the two point connectivity function behaves, and whether anisotropy in percolation probabilities implies the strict inequality . In this note we give an affirmative answer in the highly supercritical regime.

  11. Subcritical-supercritical bifurcation crossover in directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D.; Williams, L.; Cummins, H. )

    1994-12-01

    The Mullins-Sekerka planar-cellular instability in directional solidification should be subcritical when the partition coefficient [ital k][lt]0.45 and latent heat is ignored. However, Merchant and Davis [Phys. Rev. Lett. [bold 63], 573 (1989)] predicted that as the solute concentration is reduced, the increasingly important thermal diffusion field would lead to a crossover from a subcritical to a supercritical bifurcation. We have performed directional solidification experiments on a series of succinonitrile samples containing different concentrations of Coumarin 152, and have found preliminary evidence for the predicted crossover at a concentration [ital C][sub [ital t

  12. Interconnectivity analysis of supercritical CO₂-foamed scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Lemon, Greg; Reinwald, Yvonne; White, Lisa J; Howdle, Steven M; Shakesheff, Kevin M; King, John R

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes a computer algorithm for the determination of the interconnectivity of the pore space inside scaffolds used for tissue engineering. To validate the algorithm and its computer implementation, the algorithm was applied to a computer-generated scaffold consisting of a set of overlapping spherical pores, for which the interconnectivity was calculated exactly. The algorithm was then applied to micro-computed X-ray tomography images of supercritical CO(2)-foamed scaffolds made from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), whereby the effect of using different weight average molecular weight polymer on the interconnectivity was investigated.

  13. Solid crystallization by rapid expansion of supercritical ternary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo, C.; Wubbolts, F. E.; Rodríguez-Clemente, R.; van Rosmalen, G. M.

    1999-03-01

    The objective of the present work was to examine the effect of a solid entrainer in the RESS-process. A RESS-equipment with two extraction columns running in series was used to perform the experiments. Salicylic acid or phenanthrene was used as a solute and benzoic acid as a cosolute. The presence of the cosolute modifies solid crystal size distribution, since it alters solute solubility in the supercritical phase. Homogeneous solid mixtures are obtained after expansion. Alternatively, if the aim is to precipitate a pure compound, solid-solid separation could be aided by selective adsorption into an adsorbent.

  14. The optical immersion effect in disperse systems with supercritical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Yuvchenko, S. A.; Ushakova, O. V.; Tyagnibedin, D. A.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2015-04-01

    The method of optical immersion of randomly inhomogeneous media with porous structures into a supercritical fluid (SCF) is considered. Growth in the fluid density upon isothermal increase in the pressure leads to growth in the refractive index and, accordingly, in diffuse transmission of light through a layer of immersed medium. Experimental data on the small-angle diffuse transmission of a model scattering medium (filter paper, PTFE ribbon) are presented for various SCF pressures. Values of the transport length of laser radiation in these media are recovered as dependent on the SCF refractive index.

  15. Hydroetching of high surface area ceramics using moist supercritical fluids

    DOEpatents

    Fryxell, Glen; Zemanian, Thomas S.

    2004-11-02

    Aerogels having a high density of hydroxyl groups and a more uniform pore size with fewer bottlenecks are described. The aerogel is exposed to a mixture of a supercritical fluid and water, whereupon the aerogel forms a high density of hydroxyl groups. The process also relaxes the aerogel into a more open uniform internal structure, in a process referred to as hydroetching. The hydroetching process removes bottlenecks from the aerogels, and forms the hydrogels into more standard pore sizes while preserving their high surface area.

  16. Free convective heat transfer to supercritical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, R. J.; Hahne, E. W. P.

    1980-12-01

    Experiments on free convective heat transfer from electrically heated platinum wires and a platinum strip to supercritical carbon dioxide were performed for a wide range of bulk conditions. It is shown that heat transfer can be predicted by a conventional Nusselt-type correlation if the dimensionless numbers are based on integrated thermophysical properties in order to account for large changes in these properties. The anomaly of thermal conductivity has to be considered. Agreement between the experimental results and the correlation is within 10 percent even for very thin wires when for those a correction factor is introduced.

  17. Ideality contours and thermodynamic regularities in supercritical molecular fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desgranges, Caroline; Margo, Abigail; Delhommelle, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    Using Expanded Wang-Landau simulations, we calculate the ideality contours for 3 molecular fluids (SF6, CO2 and H2O). We analyze how the increase in polarity, and thus, in the strength of the intermolecular interactions, impacts the contours and thermodynamic regularities. This effect results in the increase in the Boyle and H parameters, that underlie the Zeno line and the curve of ideal enthalpy. Furthermore, a detailed analysis reveals that dipole-dipole interactions lead to much larger enthalpic contributions to the Gibbs free energy. This accounts for the much higher temperatures and pressures that are necessary for supercritical H2O to achieve ideal-like thermodynamic properties.

  18. Free-jet expansion of supercritical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Imane Ghaleb

    2003-10-01

    Numerical and experimental analyses of the structure of supersonic free-jet expansions of supercritical CO2 into the atmosphere and impacting on a flat plate are presented. Such expansions are important to technology used by chemical engineers in materials processing, known as the rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS). Numerical calculations for the axisymmetric, two-dimensional expansion are based on a time-dependent finite difference method known as the two-step predictor-corrector Lax-Wendroff technique, incorporating the Redlich-Kwong or Peng-Robinson equations of state to model supercritical CO2. A quasi-one-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle approximation is also studied to test our numerical methods for the axisymmetric free-jet, to study the vibrational relaxation of CO2, and to study the clustering and condensation during the expansion. Experimental mass flow rates for the free-jet expansion from two different types of sources (orifice and capillary) are studied and compared to one-dimensional numerical results. Optical shadowgraph measurements of the axisymmetric free-jet and associated shock wave structure are compared to the axisymmetric numerical results. Impact pressure and temperature along the flat plate are measured and compared to numerical results, as is a temperature probe of the free-jet expansion. We find that the numerical methods are able to reproduce the flow rate and free-jet structure very well. The temperature and pressure profiles agree reasonably well, except for temperature along the impacted plate. The disagreement with temperature at the plate is due to neglect of heat transfer at the plate and, at higher pressures, to condensation in the expansion. Our results suggest that approximations based on ideal gases and quasi-one-dimensional flow analysis, often used by RESS researchers, may be useful for these supercritical fluid flows. The preliminary calculations and experiments indicate that condensation is important

  19. Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction for PCBS in lake sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, L.A.; Leddy, D.G.

    1996-10-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with CO{sub 2} of freshwater sediments spiked with selected PCB congeners has been studied at MTU for several years in order to determine the best experimental conditions for analysis. Soxhlet extraction has been used as the method for comparison. The bases for comparison are time requirements, equipment and supply costs, percent recoveries, precision, limit of detection, accuracy and sample size. Results show that SFE yields quantitative recoveries of the PCB cogeners analyzed and is comparable to Soxhlet extraction. Extraction efficiencies are found to be especially dependent on the extraction temperature.

  20. Unsteady Airloads on a Sinusoidally Oscillating Supercritical Airfoil.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    hodograph method of Boerstoel Codes i/or ( Ref. 1). e𔃻" l (*) At present Dr. Yoshihara is employed by the Boeing Co. -3-- rMemorandum AE-79-01 5 Emphasis...nas een performed on a-model of an oscillating supercritical airfoil, 7f which the geometry has been generated with tne hodograph method of Boerstoel ...Te:argest -teviatilons sn’- JW Up r--rte ar ru"r of i arC-’ 1, -..- ero rie . r C-acun1t’e, ;a’ a ar-e bowto" calculated cu;rve. Near th -sun e,4,,, he niessur