Science.gov

Sample records for advanced undergraduate courses

  1. Development of an advanced undergraduate course in acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, Kent L.; Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Sommerfeldt, Scott D.

    2016-03-01

    Within many physics undergraduate programs, acoustics is given only a cursory treatment, usually within an introductory course. Because acoustics is a natural vehicle for students to develop intuition about wave phenomena, an advanced undergraduate acoustics course has been developed at Brigham Young University. Although it remains an elective course, enrollment has increased steadily since its inception. The course has been taken by students in physics, applied physics, physics teaching, and mechanical and electrical engineering. In addition to providing training for students motivated by interest in undergraduate research, internship, employment, and graduate schooling opportunities in acoustics, the course facilitates connections between various areas of physics. Explicit connections are made to mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, optics, quantum mechanics, and experimental and computational laboratory courses. Active learning is emphasized through Just-in-Time-Teaching and course structure. Homework exercises are both theoretical and practical and often require making and interpreting of graphs. For example, students may model traffic noise as a series of uncorrelated monopoles or examine highway barrier effectiveness using Fresnel diffraction techniques. Additionally, students participate in resumé-building measurements and learn to report their results in the form of technical memoranda. Course evaluations and post-graduation student surveys rate it among the most valuable undergraduate student courses offered.

  2. Integrating recent advances in neuroscience into undergraduate neuroscience and physiology courses.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Corey L

    2002-12-01

    Neuroscience has enjoyed tremendous growth over the past 20 years, including a substantial increase in the number of neuroscience departments, programs, and courses at the undergraduate level. To meet the need of new neuroscience courses, there has also been growth in the number of introductory neuroscience textbooks designed for undergraduates. However, textbooks typically trail current knowledge by five to ten years, especially in neuroscience where our understanding is increasing rapidly. Consequently, it is often important to supplement neuroscience and physiology textbooks with information about recent findings in neuroscience. To design supplementary educational material, it is essential first to identify the educational objectives of the program and the characteristics of the learners, which can differ dramatically between undergraduate and graduate or professional students. Four principles that may serve the selection and design of supplementary material for undergraduate neuroscience and physiology courses are that (1) material must be interesting to the undergraduates, (2) material should reinforce previously learned concepts, (3) students must be adequately prepared, and (4) the teacher and student must have sufficient appropriate resources. PMID:12443998

  3. Astronomical Data in Undergraduate courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, William I.; Swift, Carrie; Hughes, Kelli; Burke, Christopher J. F.; Burgess, Colin C.; Elrod, Aunna V.; Howard, Brittany; Stahl, Lucas; Matzke, David; Bord, Donald J.

    2016-06-01

    We present status and plans for our ongoing efforts to develop data analysis and problem-solving skills through Undergraduate Astronomy instruction. While our initiatives were developed with UM-Dearborn’s student body primarily in mind, they should be applicable for a wide range of institution and of student demographics. We focus here on two strands of our effort.Firstly, students in our Introductory Astronomy (ASTR 130) general-education course now perform several “Data Investigations”, in which they interrogate the Hubble Legacy Archive to illustrate important course concepts. This was motivated in part by the realization that typical public data archives now include tools to interrogate the observations that are sufficiently accessible that introductory astronomy students can use them to perform real science, albeit mostly at a descriptive level. We are continuing to refine these investigations, and, most importantly, to critically assess their effectiveness in terms of the student learning outcomes we wish to achieve. This work is supported by grant HST-EO-13758, provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.Secondly, at the advanced-undergraduate level, students taking courses in our Astronomy minor are encouraged to gain early experience in techniques of astronomical observation and analysis that are used by professionals. We present two example projects from the Fall 2015 iteration of our upper-division course ASTR330 (The Cosmic Distance Ladder), one involving Solar System measurements, the second producing calibrated aperture photometry. For both projects students conducted, analysed, and interpreted observations using our 0.4m campus telescope, and used many of the same analysis tools as professional astronomers. This work is supported partly from a Research Initiation and Seed grant from the

  4. Advancing Kohlberg through Codes: Using Professional Codes To Reach the Moral Reasoning Objective in Undergraduate Ethics Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, Ginny; Ingram, Michael T.

    The development of moral reasoning as a key course objective in undergraduate communication ethics classes can be accomplished by the critical and deliberate introduction of professional codes of ethics and the internalization of values found in those codes. Notably, "fostering moral reasoning skills" and "surveying current ethical practice" were…

  5. Mechatronic system design course for undergraduate programmes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, A.; Tutunji, T.; Al-Sharif, L.

    2011-08-01

    Technology advancement and human needs have led to integration among many engineering disciplines. Mechatronics engineering is an integrated discipline that focuses on the design and analysis of complete engineering systems. These systems include mechanical, electrical, computer and control subsystems. In this paper, the importance of teaching mechatronic system design to undergraduate engineering students is emphasised. The paper offers the collaborative experience in preparing and delivering the course material for two universities in Jordan. A detailed description of such a course is provided and a case study is presented. The case study used is a final year project, where students applied a six-stage design procedure that is described in the paper.

  6. Student Satisfaction in Large Undergraduate Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolliger, Doris U.; Wasilik, Oksana

    2012-01-01

    Researchers investigated perceived satisfaction of undergraduate students with high-enrollment online course sections at a research-intensive university. A modified survey instrument was administered to all undergraduate students enrolled in 2 online statistics courses in which interaction was not a central element of course design. Students were…

  7. Electrochemistry "Discovery" Course for Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Michael Alan; Gupta, Vijay K.

    1997-07-01

    We developed a chemistry selected topics course at Central State University, "Introduction to Laboratory Techniques in Electrochemistry" to: (1) give undergraduates hands-on experience with electrochemical measurements, (2) prepare students for summer research in Fuel Cell and Battery technology. Since students "learn by doing", the course is suitable for undergraduates from sophomore to senior levels. Students complete 6 laboratories, based on a "less is more" philosophy which emphasizes analytic and creative process rather than mandatory topical coverage. Eight electrochemical experiments are available: Construction of Zinc-Copper battery stacks, Lead Acid Battery discharge-charge cycles, Conductimetric titration of aspirin with Ammonium Hydroxide, Ion Selective Electrode determination of Fluoride in water, Cyclic Voltammetry of Potassium Ferricyanide solution, Cyclic Voltammetry of Sulfuric acid on Platinum working electrode, Anodic Stripping Voltammetry of Lead ion in solution, Differential Pulse Polarography of Lead ion in solution. Topics discussed in lecture include: chemical definitions, electrical definitions, Oxidation-Reduction reactions, Electrochemical series, Electrodes, Electrochemical Cells, direct Coulometry, electrolysis, electrochemical process efficiency, equilibrium Potentiometry, real Cell Voltages, Ion Selective Electrode types and designs, reference electrode designs, working electrode materials, pH buffers, Cyclic Voltammetry, Anodic Stripping Voltammetry, Polarography, differential pulse Polarography, and simple electrochemical instrumentation circuits.

  8. Association between Adult Attachment Representations and Undergraduate Student Course Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henson, Alisha M.; Scharfe, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Students' course evaluations often play an important role in career advancement for faculty. The authors examined the association between attachment representations of parents and course evaluations in a sample of 230 undergraduate students. They found a significant negative association between attachment anxiety with parents and course…

  9. Undergraduate Psychology Courses Preferred by Graduate Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Timothy J.; Reisinger, Debra L.; Jordan-Fleming, Mary Kay

    2012-01-01

    Information about the undergraduate psychology courses preferred by graduate programs is useful for a number of purposes, including (a) advising psychology majors who are interested in graduate school, (b) undergraduate curriculum planning, and (c) examining whether graduate programs' preferences reflect national guidelines for the undergraduate…

  10. A Green Marketing Course for Business Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudell, Fredrica

    2011-01-01

    Since the 1970s, periodic calls have been made for incorporation of sustainability issues into marketing and other business courses. Now more than ever, we need to prepare students for careers in the green economy. This article will describe the author's experience teaching a Green Marketing course to business undergraduates. A review of content,…

  11. A CAL-Based Undergraduate Genetics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garbutt, K.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes a second-year undergraduate practical course in quantitative genetics and biometrics, based upon computer-assisted learning (CAL); and discusses the educational benefits of the course, some problems encountered, and some implications of the extensive use of CAL. (Author/CMV)

  12. Genomics and Bioinformatics in Undergraduate Curricula: Contexts for Hybrid Laboratory/Lecture Courses for Entering and Advanced Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Louise; Cresawn, Steven G.; Monroe, Jonathan D.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging interest in genomics in the scientific community prompted biologists at James Madison University to create two courses at different levels to modernize the biology curriculum. The courses are hybrids of classroom and laboratory experiences. An upper level class uses raw sequence of a genome (plasmid or virus) as the subject on which to…

  13. Data Mining of Undergraduate Course Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jian, Yuheng Helen; Javaad, Sohail Syed; Golab, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we take a new look at the problem of analyzing course evaluations. We examine ten years of undergraduate course evaluations from a large Engineering faculty. To the best of our knowledge, our data set is an order of magnitude larger than those used by previous work on this topic, at over 250,000 student evaluations of over 5,000…

  14. Introducing the Microcomputer into Undergraduate Tax Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillaway, Manson P.; Savage, Allan H.

    Although accountants have used computers for tax planning and tax return preparation for many years, tax education has been slow to reflect the increasing role of computers in tax accounting. The following are only some of the tasks that a business education department offering undergraduate tax courses for accounting majors should perform when…

  15. Studying Charged Particle Optics: An Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovalle, V.; Otomar, D. R.; Pereira, J. M.; Ferreira, N.; Pinho, R. R.; Santos A. C. F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes some computer-based activities to bring the study of charged particle optics to undergraduate students, to be performed as a part of a one-semester accelerator-based experimental course. The computational simulations were carried out using the commercially available SIMION program. The performance parameters, such as the focal…

  16. Student Performance in Undergraduate Economics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumford, Kevin J.; Ohland, Matthew W.

    2011-01-01

    Using undergraduate student records from six large public universities from 1990 to 2003, the authors analyze the characteristics and performance of students by major in two economics courses: Principles of Microeconomics and Intermediate Microeconomics. This article documents important differences across students by major in the principles course…

  17. Establishing Common Course Objectives for Undergraduate Exercise Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Shawn R.

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate exercise physiology is a ubiquitous course in undergraduate kinesiology/exercise science programs with a broad scope and depth of topics. It is valuable to explore what is taught within this course. The purpose of the present study was to facilitate an understanding of what instructors teach in undergraduate exercise physiology, how…

  18. Thematic course design for an undergraduate photonics engineering course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoop, Barry L.

    2009-06-01

    The traditional approach to undergraduate engineering course design is to first present underlying theoretical concepts in the course curriculum and then subsequently apply these theoretical concepts to system-level applications. A traditional photonics engineering course, for example, first reviews electromagnetic field theory, addressing essential concepts from geometrical and wave optics followed by an investigation of the interaction of photons with materials. Building upon these fundamental principles, the students then study the operating principles and design considerations of photoemitters, photodetectors, optical waveguides, and optical modulators. Individual devices are then combined in the design, construction and testing of a system - an example being a fiber optic communication link. This approach is often frustrating for the students because it is the applications that motivated them to study the subject and in many cases they have lost focus and interest well-before the applications are covered. This challenge can be overcome by deliberate course design where relevant thematic applications are introduced early in the course and routinely revisited as a referent. This approach has been shown to effectively motivate student-centric, inquiry-based learning. This thematic course design framework was applied to an undergraduate photonics engineering course,1,2 at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point where an emphasis was placed on inquiry-based investigation of a wavelength division multiplexing communication system introduced during the first lesson of the course and subsequently revisited throughout the remainder of the course. The underlying theory necessary to understand foundational concepts, device behavior and subsystem operation was presented in a just-in-time fashion.

  19. Impacting Society through Astronomy Undergraduate Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleigh, Sharon

    2015-04-01

    A high percentage of non-science majors enroll in undergraduate, introductory astronomy courses across the country. The perception of the astronomy course as being easier than the ``hard sciences'' and the idea that the course will focus on ``pretty pictures'', influences the interests of the non-science majors. Often the students that enroll in these courses will not take other science courses, resulting in the only opportunity to teach college students about basic scientific concepts that impact their lives. Vast misconceptions about the nature of science, the role of science and scientists in society, and social issues embedded in scientific information, impact the decisions that individuals make about every day events. In turn, these decisions influence the policies that construct our society. This talk will provide an overview of the common misconceptions and discuss how they impact our society as a whole. The research presented provides evidence of the impact that introductory college astronomy courses have on changing these everyday misconceptions and influencing non-science majors' ideas about science in society. The research suggests that introductory courses designed for non-science majors are extremely important in impacting our society, and begs for a stronger understanding and implementation of best practices for teaching and learning in the college classroom environment.

  20. Teaching climate change in undergraduate courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Although anthropogenic climate change is generally accepted in the scientific community, there is considerable skepticism among the general population and, therefore, in undergraduate students of all majors. Students are often asked by their peers, family members, and others, whether they ``believe'' climate change is occurring and what should be done about it (if anything). I will present my experiences and recommendations for teaching the physics of climate change to both physics and non-science majors. For non-science majors, the basic approach is to try to develop an appreciation for the scientific method (particularly peer-reviewed research) in a course on energy and the environment. For physics majors, the pertinent material is normally covered in their undergraduate courses in modern physics and thermodynamics. Nevertheless, it helps to review the basics, e.g. introductory quantum mechanics (discrete energy levels of atomic systems), molecular spectroscopy, and blackbody radiation. I have done this in a separate elective topics course, titled ``Physics of Climate Change,'' to help the students see how their knowledge gives them insight into a topic that is very volatile (socially and politically).

  1. An Undergraduate Course in Modeling and Simulation of Multiphysics Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz-Rodriguez, Estanislao; Vazquez-Arenas, Jorge; Ricardez-Sandoval, Luis A.

    2010-01-01

    An overview of a course on modeling and simulation offered at the Nanotechnology Engineering undergraduate program at the University of Waterloo. The motivation for having this course in the undergraduate nanotechnology curriculum, the course structure, and its learning objectives are discussed. Further, one of the computational laboratories…

  2. Light, Imaging, Vision: An interdisciplinary undergraduate course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Philip

    The vertebrate eye is fantastically sensitive instrument, capable of registering the absorption of a single photon, and yet generating very low noise.Using eyes as a common thread helps motivate undergraduates to learn a lot of physics, both fundamental and applied to scientific imaging and neuroscience. I'll describe an undergraduate course, for students in several science and engineering majors, that takes students from the rudiments of probability theory to the quantum character of light, including modern experimental methods like fluorescence imaging and Förster resonance energy transfer. After a digression into color vision, we then see how the Feynman principle explains the apparently wavelike phenomena associated to light, including applications like diffraction, subdiffraction imaging, total internal reflection and TIRF microscopy. Then we see how scientists documented the single-quantum sensitivity of the eye seven decades earlier than `ought' to have been possible, and finally close with the remarkable signaling cascade that delivers such outstanding performance.Course materials are available upon request. Partially supported by the NSF under Grants EF-0928048 and DMR-0832802.

  3. Using Presentation Software to Flip an Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Neil; Li, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    An undergraduate analytical chemistry course has been adapted to a flipped course format. Course content was provided by video clips, text, graphics, audio, and simple animations organized as concept maps using the cloud-based presentation platform, Prezi. The advantages of using Prezi to present course content in a flipped course format are…

  4. Incorporating Primary Literature in Undergraduate Crop Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Lori K.; Simmons, Steve R.

    2006-01-01

    Primary literature is an underutilized learning resource for undergraduate courses in crop science. Reading assignments from scientific journals were utilized in an undergraduate University of Minnesota crop physiology course at Southwest Minnesota State University from 2002 to 2004. The subjects of the articles corresponded to the lecture topics.…

  5. Improving Student Discussions in Graduate and Undergraduate Courses: Transforming the Discussion Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soranno, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    Student discussions are a common teaching approach in graduate and advanced undergraduate courses because of their benefits to student learning, and to future professional development for natural resources professionals. However, traditional student-led discussions often are ineffective at meeting course and learning objectives and suffer from…

  6. Active Learning in a Neuroethics Course Positively Impacts Moral Judgment Development in Undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Odeh, Desiree; Dziobek, Derek; Jimenez, Nathalia Torres; Barbey, Christopher; Dubinsky, Janet M

    2015-01-01

    The growing neuroscientific understanding of the biological basis of behaviors has profound social and ethical implications. To address the need for public awareness of the consequences of these advances, we developed an undergraduate neuroethics course, Neuroscience and Society, at the University of Minnesota. Course evolution, objectives, content, and impact are described here. To engage all students and facilitate undergraduate ethics education, this course employed daily reading, writing, and student discussion, case analysis, and team presentations with goals of fostering development of moral reasoning and judgment and introducing application of bioethical frameworks to topics raised by neuroscience. Pre- and post-course Defining Issues Test (DIT) scores and student end-of-course reflections demonstrated that course objectives for student application of bioethical frameworks to neuroethical issues were met. The active-learning, student-centered pedagogical approaches used to achieve these goals serve as a model for how to effectively teach neuroethics at the undergraduate level. PMID:25838802

  7. Bibliographic Instruction in the Undergraduate Research Methods Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Frederick E.

    1991-01-01

    Outlines an undergraduate geography research methods course that emphasizes bibliographic instruction. Suggests incorporating selected developmental materials. Recommends that students discover materials pertaining to their own areas of interest through systematic search procedures. Includes several sample assignments. (DK)

  8. Advancing Research on Undergraduate Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Susan Rundell

    2013-01-01

    This special issue of "Journal of Research in Science Teaching" reflects conclusions and recommendations in the "Discipline-Based Education Research" (DBER) report and makes a substantial contribution to advancing the field. Research on undergraduate science learning is currently a loose affiliation of related fields. The…

  9. A Multidisciplined Teaching Reform of Biomaterials Course for Undergraduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Feng; Pu, Fang; Liu, Haifeng; Niu, Xufeng; Zhou, Gang; Li, Deyu; Fan, Yubo; Feng, Qingling; Cui, Fu-zhai; Watari, Fumio

    2015-12-01

    The biomaterials science has advanced in a high speed with global science and technology development during the recent decades, which experts predict to be more obvious in the near future with a more significant position for medicine and health care. Although the three traditional subjects, such as medical science, materials science and biology that act as a scaffold to support the structure of biomaterials science, are still essential for the research and education of biomaterials, other subjects, such as mechanical engineering, mechanics, computer science, automatic science, nanotechnology, and Bio-MEMS, are playing more and more important roles in the modern biomaterials science development. Thus, the research and education of modern biomaterials science should require a logical integration of the interdisciplinary science and technology, which not only concerns medical science, materials science and biology, but also includes other subjects that have been stated above. This article focuses on multidisciplinary nature of biomaterials, the awareness of which is currently lacking in the education at undergraduate stage. In order to meet this educational challenge, we presented a multidisciplinary course that referred to not only traditional sciences, but also frontier sciences and lasted for a whole academic year for senior biomaterials undergraduate students with principles of a better understanding of the modern biomaterials science and meeting the requirements of the future development in this area. The course has been shown to gain the recognition of the participants by questionaries and specific "before and after" comments and has also gained high recognition and persistent supports from our university. The idea of this course might be also fit for the education and construction of some other disciplines.

  10. Creating a New Undergraduate Engineering Laboratory Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bau, Haim H.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a course recently developed at the University of Pennsylvania in mechanical engineering which emphasizes computer applications to laboratory instruction. Discusses the course objectives and explains the computer simulations and experiments utilized in the course. (TW)

  11. Advanced Placement Course Description. Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Entrance Examination Board, New York, NY.

    The Advanced Placement (AP) program is a cooperative educational effort of secondary schools, colleges, and the College Board that consists of 30 college-level courses and examinations in 17 academic disciplines for highly motivated students in secondary schools. AP courses are offered in more than 11,000 high schools and are recognized by nearly…

  12. An Experience Teaching an Undergraduate Level Course in Biophysics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feizabadi, Mitra Shojania

    2009-01-01

    The importance of including concepts, examples, and techniques from mathematics and the physical and information sciences in biology courses to fulfill the need of today's undergraduates has been the principle motivation for developing interdisciplinary biology-focused courses. Although this movement started many years ago, developing and offering…

  13. "The Physics of Life," an Undergraduate General Education Biophysics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2015-01-01

    Improving the scientific literacy of non-scientists is an important aim, both because of the ever-increasing impact of science on our lives and because understanding science enriches our experience of the natural world. One route to improving scientific literacy is via general education undergraduate courses--i.e. courses for students not majoring…

  14. What Do Undergraduate Course Syllabi Say about Information Literacy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, Britt; Gonzalez, Melissa; Stanny, Claudia J.

    2016-01-01

    Librarians seek opportunities to improve outreach to faculty and promote shared interests in information literacy. A comprehensive review of syllabi for all undergraduate courses offered during one academic term examined course-level learning outcomes and graded assignments to see how well they aligned with the five Association of College and…

  15. Reforming an Undergraduate Environmental Science Course for Nonscience Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazempour, Mahsa; Amirshokoohi, Aidin

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the key components of a reform-based introductory undergraduate environmental science course for nonscience majors and elementary teacher candidates as well as the impact of such components on the participants. The main goals for the course were to actively engage the students in their learning and, in doing so, to enhance…

  16. Biochemistry in Undergraduate Health Courses: Structure and Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Irani F.; Batista, Nildo A.

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the following aspects of teaching biochemistry in undergraduate health courses: objectives, number of hours, time in which the subject is studied, selection of content, teaching strategies, and evaluation methodologies used. Fifty-three courses distributed in 13 areas within the health field and offered by 12 institutions…

  17. Minimum Competencies for Teaching Undergraduate Sport Philosophy Courses. Guidance Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Although sport philosophy is considered to be a sub-discipline with its own unique body of knowledge, sport philosophy is more commonly offered as a single course rather than a degree program. Therefore, these guidelines are offered specifically for the teaching of a single course at the undergraduate level. In order to be effective, the course…

  18. The Most Frequently Listed Courses in the Undergraduate Psychology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Baron; McCann, Lee I.

    1999-01-01

    Explores the most frequently listed undergraduate psychology courses for four institutional types by analyzing 400 college catalogs. Reports that some segmentation continues in the research methodology and developmental areas, the balance of natural and social science courses appear stable, and there are no signs of a change toward vocationalism.…

  19. Biochemistry of Neuromuscular Diseases: A Course for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohlendieck, Kay

    2002-01-01

    This article outlines an undergraduate course focusing on supramolecular membrane protein complexes involved in the molecular pathogenesis of neuromuscular disorders. The emphasis of this course is to introduce students to the key elements involved in the ion regulation and membrane stabilization during muscle contraction and the role of these…

  20. A Course Designed for Undergraduate Biochemistry Students to Learn about Cultural Diversity Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benore-Parsons, Marilee

    2006-01-01

    Biology, biochemistry, and other science students are well trained in science and familiar with how to conduct and evaluate scientific experiments. They are less aware of cultural issues or how these will impact their careers in research, education, or as professional health care workers. A course was developed for advanced undergraduate science…

  1. Advancing beyond AP Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Bruce G.

    2009-01-01

    A quiet revolution is picking up steam in the nation's private secondary schools, with broad implications for college admissions and for teaching and learning on both sides of the transition from high school to college. About 50 of the nation's leading college-preparatory schools have opted out of the College Board's Advanced Placement (AP)…

  2. Undergraduate Students' Resistance to Study Skills Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuksel, Sedat

    2006-01-01

    Research indicate that students generally fail to benefit from study skills courses and show resistance to this course in higher education level. The purpose of this research is to investigate reasons why students show resistance to the course of study skills and habits. In this research, a qualitative design utilizing retrospective interviews was…

  3. Using Computers in Undergraduate Economics Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Saul Z.; Harmon, Oscar

    Seven computer assignments for undergraduate economics students that concentrate on building a foundation for programming higher level mathematical calculations are described. The purpose of each assignment, the computer program for it, and the correct answers are provided. "Introduction to Text Editing" acquaints the student with some basic…

  4. Queer Theory in the Undergraduate Writing Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koski, Fran F.

    Teachers committed to breaking the silence on lesbian and gay issues in college-level writing classes can consult a growing body of literature by teachers similarly committed. None of this literature, however, has yet identified ways to bring readers in "queer" theory to the undergraduate writing class. Examining the work of four teachers who are…

  5. An Undergraduate Course on Operating Systems Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Engineering, Washington, DC. Commission on Education.

    This report is from Task Force VIII of the COSINE Committee of the Commission on Education of the National Academy of Engineering. The task force was established to formulate subject matter for an elective undergraduate subject on computer operating systems principles for students whose major interest is in the engineering of computer systems and…

  6. Sample Undergraduate Linguistics Courses. Linguistics in the Undergraduate Curriculum, Appendix 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linguistic Society of America, Washington, DC.

    Thirty-six nontraditional undergraduate courses in linguistics are described. Course topics include: animal communication, bilingualism, sociolinguistics, introductory linguistics, language and formal reasoning, language and human conflict, language and power, language and sex, language and the brain, language planning, language typology and…

  7. Developing and Implementing an Undergraduate Finance Capstone Course for Both Onground and Online Course Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiechowski, Linda S.

    2010-01-01

    Capstone courses provide an opportunity to integrate several topics and to help prepare students for the real world. This paper examines the process of developing an undergraduate finance capstone course for both onground (face-to-face) and online course delivery. The process begins with the determination of the core competencies employers require…

  8. An Undergraduate Course in American Popular Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fried, Stephen B.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a special topics course in American popular psychology. Course objectives are to trace the history of the popularization of psychology in America; discuss the efforts of William James, G. Stanley Hall, and others; and evaluate the quality of various examples of popular psychology. (MJP)

  9. Active Learning by Design: An Undergraduate Introductory Public Health Course

    PubMed Central

    Yeatts, Karin B.

    2014-01-01

    Principles of active learning were used to design and implement an introductory public health course. Students were introduced to the breadth and practice of public health through team and individual-based activities. Team assignments covered topics in epidemiology, biostatistics, health behavior, nutrition, maternal and child health, environment, and health policy. Students developed an appreciation of the population perspective through an “experience” trip and related intervention project in a public health area of their choice. Students experienced several key critical component elements of a public health undergraduate major; they explored key public health domains, experience public health practice, and integrated concepts with their assignments. In this paper, course assignments, lessons learned, and student successes are described. Given the increased growth in the undergraduate public health major, these active learning assignments may be of interest to undergraduate public health programs at both liberal arts colleges and research universities. PMID:25566526

  10. A Shack Interferometer Setup for Optical Testing in Undergraduate Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Righini, Alberto; Salas, Matias; Sordini, Andrea; Vanzi, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    The Shack interferometer is a simple and effective device to test optical surfaces in reflection and optical systems in transmission. An essential setup on a reduced scale with a minimum number of components is presented, suited to gain familiarity and practice with optical testing in a laboratory course for undergraduate students. The basic…

  11. An Undergraduate Nanotechnology Engineering Laboratory Course on Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, D.; Fagan, R. D.; Hesjedal, T.

    2011-01-01

    The University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada, is home to North America's first undergraduate program in nanotechnology. As part of the Nanotechnology Engineering degree program, a scanning probe microscopy (SPM)-based laboratory has been developed for students in their fourth year. The one-term laboratory course "Nanoprobing and Lithography"…

  12. A Methods-Based Biotechnology Course for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakrabarti, Debopam

    2009-01-01

    This new course in biotechnology for upper division undergraduates provides a comprehensive overview of the process of drug discovery that is relevant to biopharmaceutical industry. The laboratory exercises train students in both cell-free and cell-based assays. Oral presentations by the students delve into recent progress in drug discovery.…

  13. Teaching Ethnic Psychology to Undergraduates: Course Development, Delivery, and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Dan; And Others

    This paper discusses the development, delivery, and evaluation of university undergraduate courses in ethnic psychology, which is defined as research and literature about four major racial/ethnic minority groups, Asian American/Pacific Islanders, Black Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans. Following a brief history of the role of…

  14. Black Hole Thermodynamics in an Undergraduate Thermodynamics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Barry R.; McLeod, Robert J.

    1980-01-01

    An analogy, which has been drawn between black hole physics and thermodynamics, is mathematically broadened in this article. Equations similar to the standard partial differential relations of thermodynamics are found for black holes. The results can be used to supplement an undergraduate thermodynamics course. (Author/SK)

  15. Nationwide Survey of the Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Laura J.; Roehrig, Gillian H.

    2015-01-01

    A nationwide survey of the undergraduate physical chemistry course was conducted to investigate the depth and breadth of content that is covered, how content is delivered, how student understanding is assessed, and the experiences and beliefs of instructors. The survey was administered to instructors of physical chemistry (N = 331) at American…

  16. Student Opinions and Perceptions of Undergraduate Thermodynamics Courses in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ugursal, V. Ismet; Cruickshank, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a fundamental foundation of all engineering disciplines. A vast majority of engineering undergraduate programmes contain one or more courses on thermodynamics, and many engineers use thermodynamics every day to analyse or design energy systems. However, there is extensive anecdotal evidence as well as a wide range of published…

  17. The flipped classroom: strategies for an undergraduate nursing course.

    PubMed

    Schlairet, Maura C; Green, Rebecca; Benton, Melissa J

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the authors' experience with flipping a fundamental concepts of nursing course for students in an undergraduate baccalaureate program. Authors describe implementing a flipped class, practical strategies to transform students' learning experience, and lessons learned. This article serves as a guide to faculty and programs seeking to develop and implement the flipped class model in nursing education. PMID:25290966

  18. An Undergraduate Electrical Engineering Course on Computer Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Engineering Education, Washington, DC.

    Outlined is an undergraduate electrical engineering course on computer organization designed to meet the need for electrical engineers familiar with digital system design. The program includes both hardware and software aspects of digital systems essential to design function and correlates design and organizational aspects of the subject. The…

  19. Formative plus Summative Assessment in Large Undergraduate Courses: Why Both?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazer, Nirit

    2014-01-01

    One of the main challenges in large undergraduate courses in higher education, especially those with multiple-sections, is to monitor what is going on at the section level and to track the consistency across sections in both instruction and grading. In this paper, it can be argued that a combination of both formative and summative assessment is…

  20. Undergraduate Mathematics Students' Emotional Experiences in Linear Algebra Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez-Sierra, Gustavo; García-González, María del Socorro

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about students' emotions in the field of Mathematics Education that go beyond students' emotions in problem solving. To start filling this gap this qualitative research has the aim to identify emotional experiences of undergraduate mathematics students in Linear Algebra courses. In order to obtain data, retrospective focus group…

  1. Promoting Research Writing in an Undergraduate Measurement Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Anita N.; Matthews, Tracey D.; Cucina, Irene M.; Tritschler, Kathleen A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce a 12-step approach for an abbreviated research project to promote research writing in an undergraduate measurement course. This 12-step approach assumes a 14-week semester schedule that is common among many colleges and universities. The steps for the proposed research project include selecting a topic,…

  2. Are Prerequisite Courses Necessary for Success in Advanced Courses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, Colleen E.; Gilman, David A.

    The effect of enrollment in prerequisite courses on success in advanced courses was examined in a study of a sample of students who completed a business cooperative experiences program between 1994-1995 and 2001-2002. Of the 163 students in the sample, 80 completed the prerequisite courses (Technology Lab I and II) before the advanced course, and…

  3. Engaging the community through an undergraduate biomedical physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Ness, G. R.; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2012-12-01

    We report on the development of an undergraduate biomedical physics course at Portland State University, motivated by both student interest and the desire of the university's Physics Department to provide an interdisciplinary intermediate-level physics course. The course was developed through the community engagement of physicians, clinical researchers, and basic science researchers. Class meetings were a combination of regular and guest lectures, hands-on exercises, web-based activities, class discussions, and a student poster information session for patrons at a local science museum. The course inspired students to engage in research projects in biomedical physics that enhance their understanding of science and education as well as benefit the learning of future students. Furthermore, this course offers an opportunity for traditionally underrepresented groups in physics courses, such as women, to gain additional exposure to physics.

  4. Remediation Trends in an Undergraduate Anatomy Course and Assessment of an Anatomy Supplemental Study Skills Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutte, Audra Faye

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy A215: Basic Human Anatomy (Anat A215) is an undergraduate human anatomy course at Indiana University Bloomington (IUB) that serves as a requirement for many degree programs at IUB. The difficulty of the course, coupled with pressure to achieve grades for admittance into specific programs, has resulted in high remediation rates. In an…

  5. Establishing common course objectives for undergraduate exercise physiology.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Shawn R

    2015-12-01

    Undergraduate exercise physiology is a ubiquitous course in undergraduate kinesiology/exercise science programs with a broad scope and depth of topics. It is valuable to explore what is taught within this course. The purpose of the present study was to facilitate an understanding of what instructors teach in undergraduate exercise physiology, how it compares with various guidelines, and to continue the conversation regarding what should be taught. A survey was created using course outcomes from the American Society of Exercise Physiologists, National Association for Sport and Physical Education, Ivy's 2007 Quest article, the National Athletic Training Association, the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, and 36 undergraduate exercise physiology course syllabi. The 134-item survey was disseminated to individuals who use exercise physiology: university faculty members, clinical exercise physiologists, researchers, and other practitioners on various exercise physiology lists; 2,009 surveys were sent, and 322 surveys were completed (16% rate of return). There was a high degree of agreement about a lot of important content in undergraduate exercise physiology. Instructors of exercise physiology should focus their curriculum on regulation and homeostasis (including adaptation, fatigue, and recovery), aerobic systems, bioenergetics, muscle physiology, and fitness principles. In addition, attention should be paid to performance and technical skills. In conclusion, it is up to exercise physiologists to ensure quality of knowledge and practice. Doing so will improve the uniformity and quality of practitioners within the various kinesiology/exercise science fields and increase the value of a Kinesiology/Exercise Science degree and set it apart from other healthcare providers and fitness professionals. PMID:26628652

  6. Mechatronic System Design Course for Undergraduate Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleem, A.; Tutunji, T.; Al-Sharif, L.

    2011-01-01

    Technology advancement and human needs have led to integration among many engineering disciplines. Mechatronics engineering is an integrated discipline that focuses on the design and analysis of complete engineering systems. These systems include mechanical, electrical, computer and control subsystems. In this paper, the importance of teaching…

  7. Flipped Classrooms for Advanced Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomory, Annette; Watson, Sunnie Lee

    2015-01-01

    This article explains how issues regarding dual credit and Advanced Placement high school science courses could be mitigated via a flipped classroom instructional model. The need for advanced high school courses will be examined initially, followed by an analysis of advanced science courses and the reform they are experiencing. Finally, it will…

  8. Tools for the advancement of undergraduate statistics education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffner, Andrew Alan

    To keep pace with advances in applied statistics and to maintain literate consumers of quantitative analyses, statistics educators stress the need for change in the classroom (Cobb, 1992; Garfield, 1993, 1995; Moore, 1991a; Snee, 1993; Steinhorst and Keeler, 1995). These authors stress a more concept oriented undergraduate introductory statistics course which emphasizes true understanding over mechanical skills. Drawing on recent educational research, this dissertation attempts to realize this vision by developing tools and pedagogy to assist statistics instructors. This dissertation describes statistical facets, pieces of statistical understanding that are building blocks of knowledge, and discusses DIANA, a World-Wide Web tool for diagnosing facets. Further, I show how facets may be incorporated into course design through the development of benchmark lessons based on the principles of collaborative learning (diSessa and Minstrell, 1995; Cohen, 1994; Reynolds et al., 1995; Bruer, 1993; von Glasersfeld, 1991) and activity based courses (Jones, 1991; Yackel, Cobb and Wood, 1991). To support benchmark lessons and collaborative learning in large classes I describe Virtual Benchmark Instruction, benchmark lessons which take place on a structured hypertext bulletin board using the technology of the World-Wide Web. Finally, I present randomized experiments which suggest that these educational developments are effective in a university introductory statistics course.

  9. Undergraduate physics course innovations and their impact on student learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, Heidi Louise

    Over the last several decades, the efficacy of the traditional lecture-based instructional model for undergraduate physics courses has been challenged. As a result, a large number of reform-oriented instructional innovations have been developed, enacted, and studied in undergraduate physics courses around the globe---all with the intended purpose of improving student learning. This thesis satisfies the need for a comprehensive synthesis of the effectiveness of these course innovations by analyzing: (1) the types of innovations that have been enacted, (2) the impact of these innovations on student learning, and (3) the common features of effective innovations. An exhaustive literature search for studies published after 1990 on undergraduate physics course innovations yielded 432 articles which were then coded with respect to the characteristics of the innovations used as well as the methodological characteristics of the studies. These codes facilitated a descriptive analysis which characterized the features of the pool of studies. These studies were then meta-analyzed in order to evaluate the effect of innovations on student learning. Finally, a case-study analysis was conducted in order to identify the critical characteristics of effective innovations. Results indicate that most innovations focus on introductory mechanics and use some combination of conceptually oriented tasks, collaborative learning, and technology. The overall effect of course innovations has been positive, but with the caveat that a large number of studies suffer from poor methodological designs and potential threats to validity. In addition, over half of the studies had to be eliminated from the meta-analysis because they did not report the data necessary for an effect size to be calculated. Despite these limitations the results of the meta-analysis indicated that there was one innovation which had particularly high effect sizes---Workshop/Studio Physics---an innovation which involves an

  10. Development of a University Undergraduate Course Sequence about the Extension System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braverman, Marc T.; Gunter, Katherine; Galloway, Robin; Moore, Karlie J.; Hoel, Brandi; Rennekamp, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Many undergraduates are interested in community-based programming, but at most land-grants undergraduates have little contact with Extension. This article describes a grant project that developed two undergraduate courses about Extension and community-based, experiential education. The academic-year course incorporates lecture, discussion, guest…

  11. Anticipation of Personal Genomics Data Enhances Interest and Learning Environment in Genomics and Molecular Biology Undergraduate Courses.

    PubMed

    Weber, K Scott; Jensen, Jamie L; Johnson, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    An important discussion at colleges is centered on determining more effective models for teaching undergraduates. As personalized genomics has become more common, we hypothesized it could be a valuable tool to make science education more hands on, personal, and engaging for college undergraduates. We hypothesized that providing students with personal genome testing kits would enhance the learning experience of students in two undergraduate courses at Brigham Young University: Advanced Molecular Biology and Genomics. These courses have an emphasis on personal genomics the last two weeks of the semester. Students taking these courses were given the option to receive personal genomics kits in 2014, whereas in 2015 they were not. Students sent their personal genomics samples in on their own and received the data after the course ended. We surveyed students in these courses before and after the two-week emphasis on personal genomics to collect data on whether anticipation of obtaining their own personal genomic data impacted undergraduate student learning. We also tested to see if specific personal genomic assignments improved the learning experience by analyzing the data from the undergraduate students who completed both the pre- and post-course surveys. Anticipation of personal genomic data significantly enhanced student interest and the learning environment based on the time students spent researching personal genomic material and their self-reported attitudes compared to those who did not anticipate getting their own data. Personal genomics homework assignments significantly enhanced the undergraduate student interest and learning based on the same criteria and a personal genomics quiz. We found that for the undergraduate students in both molecular biology and genomics courses, incorporation of personal genomic testing can be an effective educational tool in undergraduate science education. PMID:26241308

  12. A Broadly Implementable Research Course in Phage Discovery and Genomics for First-Year Undergraduate Students

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Tuajuanda C.; Burnett, Sandra H.; Carson, Susan; Caruso, Steven M.; Clase, Kari; DeJong, Randall J.; Dennehy, John J.; Denver, Dee R.; Dunbar, David; Elgin, Sarah C. R.; Findley, Ann M.; Gissendanner, Chris R.; Golebiewska, Urszula P.; Guild, Nancy; Hartzog, Grant A.; Grillo, Wendy H.; Hollowell, Gail P.; Hughes, Lee E.; Johnson, Allison; King, Rodney A.; Lewis, Lynn O.; Li, Wei; Rosenzweig, Frank; Rubin, Michael R.; Saha, Margaret S.; Sandoz, James; Shaffer, Christopher D.; Taylor, Barbara; Temple, Louise; Vazquez, Edwin; Ware, Vassie C.; Barker, Lucia P.; Bradley, Kevin W.; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Pope, Welkin H.; Russell, Daniel A.; Cresawn, Steven G.; Lopatto, David; Bailey, Cheryl P.; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Engaging large numbers of undergraduates in authentic scientific discovery is desirable but difficult to achieve. We have developed a general model in which faculty and teaching assistants from diverse academic institutions are trained to teach a research course for first-year undergraduate students focused on bacteriophage discovery and genomics. The course is situated within a broader scientific context aimed at understanding viral diversity, such that faculty and students are collaborators with established researchers in the field. The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Science Education Alliance Phage Hunters Advancing Genomics and Evolutionary Science (SEA-PHAGES) course has been widely implemented and has been taken by over 4,800 students at 73 institutions. We show here that this alliance-sourced model not only substantially advances the field of phage genomics but also stimulates students’ interest in science, positively influences academic achievement, and enhances persistence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. Broad application of this model by integrating other research areas with large numbers of early-career undergraduate students has the potential to be transformative in science education and research training. PMID:24496795

  13. An undergraduate taught course on consciousness and mind.

    PubMed

    Kronemer, Sharif I; Yates, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Consciousness remains a mystery despite centuries of inquiry, but neuroscience research is beginning to offer insights into the conscious brain. Although the influence of neuroscience in decoding consciousness is growing, it is distinctly absent from collegiate education. Many psychology and neuroscience textbooks devote a single paragraph or an appendix to consciousness. Simultaneously absent from undergraduate education are opportunities for students to practice teaching skills. Our course, Consciousness and Mind (PSYC 499), was designed to address these inadequacies. The course was designed and taught by an undergraduate student at Ohio Wesleyan University and supervised by the Director of the Neuroscience program. The class met once a week for a three hour block period, which required active engagement to keep students interested and motivated. Several novel class activities were designed to hold student attention and offer a checkpoint for the student-instructor to assess the strength of the preceding lecture. These activities included varied group discussions, an animal-mind debate, a movie screening, and a final presentation. The course received positive feedback from all who participated. Although the once-a-week class period offered a manageable workload for the student-instructor, more frequent meetings would have strengthened the interaction with the material. With preparation, motivated students, and frequent feedback from a seasoned professional, a student-instructed course can be a rewarding experience for all involved. PMID:23493499

  14. An Undergraduate Taught Course on Consciousness and Mind

    PubMed Central

    Kronemer, Sharif I.; Yates, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Consciousness remains a mystery despite centuries of inquiry, but neuroscience research is beginning to offer insights into the conscious brain. Although the influence of neuroscience in decoding consciousness is growing, it is distinctly absent from collegiate education. Many psychology and neuroscience textbooks devote a single paragraph or an appendix to consciousness. Simultaneously absent from undergraduate education are opportunities for students to practice teaching skills. Our course, Consciousness and Mind (PSYC 499), was designed to address these inadequacies. The course was designed and taught by an undergraduate student at Ohio Wesleyan University and supervised by the Director of the Neuroscience program. The class met once a week for a three hour block period, which required active engagement to keep students interested and motivated. Several novel class activities were designed to hold student attention and offer a checkpoint for the student-instructor to assess the strength of the preceding lecture. These activities included varied group discussions, an animal-mind debate, a movie screening, and a final presentation. The course received positive feedback from all who participated. Although the once-a-week class period offered a manageable workload for the student-instructor, more frequent meetings would have strengthened the interaction with the material. With preparation, motivated students, and frequent feedback from a seasoned professional, a student-instructed course can be a rewarding experience for all involved. PMID:23493499

  15. Open-ended projects in undergraduate optics and lasers courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, Chad

    This talk will describe the format and experience of undergraduate Lasers and Optics courses at Bethel University. The courses, which include a rigorous lecture portion, are built on open-ended research projects that have a novel aspect. They begin with four weeks of small student groups rotating between several standard laser and optics laboratory exercises. These may include, for example, alignment and characterization of a helium neon laser and measurements with a Michelson interferometer or a scanning Fabry-Pérot optical cavity. During the following seven weeks of the course, student groups (2-4 people) choose and pursue research questions in the lab. Their work culminates in a group manuscript typeset in and a twenty-minute presentation to the class. Projects in the spring, 2014 Optics course included experiments with ultracold lithium atoms in a magneto-optical trap, optical tweezers, digital holography and adaptive optics. Projects in the spring, 2015 Lasers course included ultrafast optics with a mode-locked erbium fiber laser, quantum optics, surface plasmon lasers (led by Nathan Lindquist) and a low-cost, near-infrared spectrometer. Several of these projects are related to larger scale, funded research in the physics department. The format and experience in Lasers and Optics is representative of other upper-level courses at Bethel, including Fluid Mechanics and Computer Methods. A physics education research group from the University of Colorado evaluated the spring, 2015 Lasers course. They focused on student experimental attitudes and measurements of student project ownership.

  16. Nanotechnology and Society: A discussion-based undergraduate course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahan, Charles; Leung, Ricky; Zenner, G. M.; Ellison, K. D.; Crone, W. C.; Miller, Clark A.

    2006-05-01

    Nanotechnology has emerged as a broad, exciting, yet ill-defined field of scientific research and technological innovation. There are important questions about the technology's potential economic, social, and environmental implications. We discuss an undergraduate course on nanoscience and nanotechnology for students from a wide range of disciplines, including the natural and social sciences, the humanities, and engineering. The course explores these questions and the broader place of technology in contemporary societies. The course is built around active learning methods and seeks to develop the students' critical thinking skills, written and verbal communication abilities, and general knowledge of nanoscience and nanoengineering concepts. Continuous assessment was used to gain information about the effectiveness of class discussions and enhancement of student understanding of the interaction between nanotechnology and society.

  17. Expanding Course Goals beyond Disciplinary Boundaries: Physiology Education in an Undergraduate Course on Psychoactive Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Near, Joseph A.; Martin, Bruce J.

    2007-01-01

    The topic of psychoactive drugs is one of inherent interest to college students. We used this insight to design and implement a multidisciplinary undergraduate course with psychoactive drugs as the central theme. The Medical Science of Psychoactive Drugs examines the biological mechanisms underlying all major effects of psychoactive drugs,…

  18. Predictors of Enrolling in Online Courses: An Exploratory Study of Students in Undergraduate Marketing Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontenot, Renée J.; Mathisen, Richard E.; Carley, Susan S.; Stuart, Randy S.

    2015-01-01

    An exploratory study of undergraduate students enrolled in marketing courses at a Southeastern regional university was conducted to determine the motivations and characteristics of marketing students who plan to be online learners and examined for differences between those who have taken and those who have not taken online classes. An online…

  19. The Field Course Effect: Gains in Cognitive Learning in Undergraduate Biology Students Following a Field Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, Eric; Gilburn, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Field work and field courses within undergraduate biology degrees have been under threat in recent years for multiple reasons and while there has been widespread support from learned societies, academic staff and students for the retention of field study, there has been little research to support the perceived value of field teaching within this…

  20. A Model for Collaborative Learning in Undergraduate Climate Change Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teranes, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    Like several colleges and universities across the nation, the University of California, San Diego, has introduced climate change topics into many existing and new undergraduate courses. I have administered a program in this area at UCSD and have also developed and taught a new lower-division UCSD course entitled "Climate Change and Society", a general education course for non-majors. This class covers the basics of climate change, such as the science that explains it, the causes of climate change, climate change impacts, and mitigation strategies. The teaching methods for this course stress interdisciplinary approaches. I find that inquiry-based and collaborative modes of learning are particularly effective when applied to science-based climate, environmental and sustainability topics. Undergraduate education is often dominated by a competitive and individualistic approach to learning. In this approach, individual success is frequently perceived as contingent on others being less successful. Such a model is at odds with commonly stated goals of teaching climate change and sustainability, which are to equip students to contribute to the debate on global environmental change and societal adaptation strategies; and to help students become better informed citizens and decision makers. I present classroom-tested strategies for developing collaborative forms of learning in climate change and environmental courses, including team projects, group presentations and group assessment exercises. I show how critical thinking skills and long-term retention of information can benefit in the collaborative mode of learning. I find that a collaborative learning model is especially appropriate to general education courses in which the enrolled student body represents a wide diversity of majors, class level and expertise. I also connect collaborative coursework in interdisciplinary environmental topics directly to applications in the field, where so much "real-world" achievement in

  1. Outcomes of a Research-Driven Laboratory and Literature Course Designed to Enhance Undergraduate Contributions to Original Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasche, Madeline E.

    2004-01-01

    This work describes outcomes of a research-driven advanced microbiology laboratory and literature research course intended to enhance undergraduate preparation for and contributions to original research. The laboratory section was designed to teach fundamental biochemistry and molecular biology techniques in the context of an original research…

  2. A Longitudinal Study of Grades in 144 Undergraduate Courses. AIR Forum Paper 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prather, James E.; And Others

    The trends from 1970-75 in course-by-course grading at a large public urban university are described. A total of 144 undergraduate courses were analyzed to determine if systematic grade inflation was occurring. Multiple linear regressions were fitted to more than 125,000 final course grades by courses. Most course grading patterns showed little…

  3. Undergraduate Course and Curriculum Development Program and Calculus and the Bridge to Calculus Program: 1993 Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA. Div. of Undergraduate Education.

    The Undergraduate Course and Curriculum Development Program of the National Science Foundation supports the development of courses in all disciplines to improve the quality of undergraduate courses and curricula in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology. The purpose of the program in Curriculum Development in Mathematics: Calculus and…

  4. Toward a Conceptual Framework for Measuring the Effectiveness of Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experiences in Undergraduate Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownell, Sara E.; Kloser, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent calls for reform have advocated for extensive changes to undergraduate science lab experiences, namely providing more authentic research experiences for students. Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences (CUREs) have attempted to eschew the limitations of traditional "cookbook" laboratory exercises and have received…

  5. Climate Literacy: Progress in AMS Climate Studies Undergraduate Course in Meteorology Program at Jackson State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    AMS Climate Studies is an introductory college-level course developed by the American Meteorological Society for implementation at undergraduate institutions nationwide and increasing involvement of under-represented groups The course places students in a dynamic and highly motivational educational environment where they investigate Earth's climate system using real-world environmental data. The AMS Climate Studies course package consists of a textbook, investigations manual, course website, and course management system-compatible files. Instructors can use these resources in combinations that make for an exciting learning experience for their students. The AMS Climate Studies Diversity Project Workshop participation is on a first-come, first-serve basis as determined by the date-of-receipt of the License Order Form. To grow AMS Diversity Programs to their fullest extent, institutions are encouraged to nominate course instructors who did not previously attend Diversity Project workshops. Until three months before the workshop, two-thirds of the workshop positions would be reserved for institutions new to AMS Diversity Projects. The AMS five day course implementation workshop was held in Washington, DC, during May 24-29, 2012. It covered essential course topics in climate science and global climate change, and strategies for course implementation. Talks would feature climate science and sustainability experts from Federal agencies and area research institutions, such as NASA, NOAA, University of Maryland, Howard University, George Mason University, and other Washington, DC, area institutions. The workshop would also include visits to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and NOAA's Climate Prediction Center. JSU Meteorology Program will be offering AMS Climate Studies undergraduate course under MET 210: Climatology in spring 2014. AMS Climate Studies is offered as a 3 credit hour laboratory course with 2 lectures and 1 lab sessions per week. Although this course places

  6. Using text messaging in an undergraduate nursing course.

    PubMed

    Richardson, April; Littrell, Ofelia M; Challman, Sandra; Stein, Pamela

    2011-02-01

    Text messaging is a popular means of communication among young adults. Consequently, this mode of communication may be used to positively influence students in their academic studies. In this study, students were given the opportunity to receive text or e-mail messages regarding lecture content. Short message reminders, in the form of texts or e-mails, were used to send bite-sized course content to undergraduate nursing students. Messages included questions that would be answered in the next day's lecture or reiterated a main point presented in the previous day's lecture. Following a survey at the end of the course, text users responded positively toward this pedagogical approach and felt the use of text messaging enhanced their learning experience. E-mail users reported a short message reminder was moderately useful to their study of anatomy. These results suggest text messaging may be a valuable tool for educators as they seek to incorporate technology into the classroom. PMID:21210609

  7. Advanced Internship: A High-Impact, Low-Cost, Super-Capstone Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Peter S.; Goldstein, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    In an earlier issue of this journal, the authors described a capstone course, Internship, that both "caps" the undergraduate experience and functions as a "bridge" to the world beyond college. Here, they describe a sequel to that course, Advanced Internship, which both extends and enhances the "capping" and "bridging" experiences. The bridging…

  8. Integration of a Communicating Science Module into an Advanced Chemistry Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renaud, Jessica; Squier, Christopher; Larsen, Sarah C.

    2006-01-01

    A communicating science module was introduced into an advanced undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. The module was integrated into the course such that students received formal instruction in communicating science interwoven with the chemistry laboratory curriculum. The content of the communicating science module included three…

  9. Undergraduate Programs and Courses in the Mathematical Sciences: CUPM Curriculum Guide, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, William; Bressoud, David; Epp, Susanna; Ganter, Susan; Haver, Bill; Pollatsek, Harriet

    2004-01-01

    The Mathematical Association of America's Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM) is charged with making recommendations to guide mathematical sciences departments in designing undergraduate curricula. "Undergraduate Programs and Courses in the Mathematical Sciences: CUPM Curriculum Guide, 2004" is based on four years of work,…

  10. Advanced Placement Courses and American Indian Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, George; Slate, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Enrollment in Advanced Placement (AP) courses and performance on Advanced Placement examinations for American Indians in the U.S. for 2007 was analyzed. Scores on AP examinations, overall and then for five AP courses, were compared to the AP examination scores of White students. In every case, American Indians had AP examination scores that were…

  11. Bridging the Undergraduate Curriculum Using an Integrated Course-Embedded Undergraduate Research Experience (ICURE)

    PubMed Central

    Russell, James E.; D’Costa, Allison R.; Runck, Clay; Barnes, David W.; Barrera, Alessandra L.; Hurst-Kennedy, Jennifer; Sudduth, Elizabeth B.; Quinlan, Erin L.; Schlueter, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The traditional undergraduate program of study incorporates a selection of classes that represent a broad spectrum of subdisciplines. Unfortunately, few curricula successfully integrate concepts in all subdisciplines, giving undergraduates the misconception that there is a lack of application or connectedness between class subjects. An integrated course-embedded research experience (ICURE) was initiated to redress this problem by bridging classes within one discipline in an effort to engage undergraduates in a long-term analysis of biodiversity. The approach was both inclusive and longitudinal: 1) the ICURE bridge brought students from different classes and levels of instruction together with faculty members in a research project with a common goal—chronicling the changing face of the local environment in biological terms; and 2) research data collected were maintained and supplemented each semester and year in an online biodiversity database. Analysis of content and attitudinal gains suggested the integrated research protocol increased student comprehension and confidence. Results are discussed in terms of future amendments to instructional design and potential research applications. Though this program was concentrated on one discipline, there is no reason to assume other disciplines could not take advantage of similar research connections. PMID:25681416

  12. Bridging the undergraduate curriculum using an integrated course-embedded undergraduate research experience (ICURE).

    PubMed

    Russell, James E; D'Costa, Allison R; Runck, Clay; Barnes, David W; Barrera, Alessandra L; Hurst-Kennedy, Jennifer; Sudduth, Elizabeth B; Quinlan, Erin L; Schlueter, Mark

    2015-03-01

    The traditional undergraduate program of study incorporates a selection of classes that represent a broad spectrum of subdisciplines. Unfortunately, few curricula successfully integrate concepts in all subdisciplines, giving undergraduates the misconception that there is a lack of application or connectedness between class subjects. An integrated course-embedded research experience (ICURE) was initiated to redress this problem by bridging classes within one discipline in an effort to engage undergraduates in a long-term analysis of biodiversity. The approach was both inclusive and longitudinal: 1) the ICURE bridge brought students from different classes and levels of instruction together with faculty members in a research project with a common goal-chronicling the changing face of the local environment in biological terms; and 2) research data collected were maintained and supplemented each semester and year in an online biodiversity database. Analysis of content and attitudinal gains suggested the integrated research protocol increased student comprehension and confidence. Results are discussed in terms of future amendments to instructional design and potential research applications. Though this program was concentrated on one discipline, there is no reason to assume other disciplines could not take advantage of similar research connections. PMID:25681416

  13. NTTC Course 315: Advanced Water Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Navy, Washington, DC.

    This publication is the examination booklet used for a home study course in water treatment. This course is the advanced part of a series produced by the Department of the Navy. This publication is designed to be used in conjunction with a course textbook. Each of the four examinations contained in this document are referenced to a specific…

  14. Undergraduate courses for enhancing design ability in naval architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyu-Yeul; Ku, Namkug; Cha, Ju-Hwan

    2013-09-01

    Contemporary lectures in undergraduate engineering courses typically focus on teaching major technical knowledge-based theories in a limited time. Therefore, most lectures do not allow the students to gain understanding of how the theories are applied, especially in Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering departments. Shipyards require students to acquire practical ship design skills in undergraduate courses. To meet this requirement, two lectures are organized by the authors; namely, "Planning Procedure of Naval Architecture & Ocean Engineering" (PNAOE) and "Innovative Ship Design" (ISD). The concept of project-based and collaborative learning is applied in these two lectures. In the PNAOE lecture, sophomores receive instruction in the designing and building of model ships, and the students' work is evaluated in a model ship contest. This curriculum enables students to understand the concepts of ship design and production. In the ISD lecture, seniors learn how to develop their creative ideas about ship design and communicate with members of group. They are encouraged to cooperate with others and understand the ship design process. In the capstone design course, students receive guidance to facilitate understanding of how the knowledge from their sophomore or junior classes, such as fluid mechanics, statics, and dynamics, can be applied to practical ship design. Students are also encouraged to compete in the ship design contest organized by the Society of Naval Architects of Korea. Moreover, the effectiveness of project-based and collaborative learning for enhancing interest in the shipbuilding Industry and understanding the ship design process is demonstrated by citing the PNAOE and ISD lectures as examples.

  15. Developing an undergraduate geography course on digital image processing of remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    Problems relating to the development of a digital image processing course in an undergraduate geography environment is discussed. Computer resource requirements, course prerequisites, and the size of the study area are addressed.

  16. Student Academic Performance in Undergraduate Managerial-Accounting Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Twaijry, Abdulrahman Ali

    2010-01-01

    The author's purpose was to identify potential factors possibly affecting student performance in three sequential management-accounting courses: Managerial Accounting (MA), Cost Accounting (CA), and Advanced Managerial Accounting (AMA) within the Saudi Arabian context. The sample, which was used to test the developed hypotheses, included 312…

  17. Assessing and Improving the Quality of Undergraduate Teaching in China: The Course Experience Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Hongbiao; Wang, Wenlan

    2015-01-01

    Assessing and improving the quality of undergraduate teaching is an important issue in China. Using the Course Experience Questionnaire, this study examined the quality of undergraduate teaching by investigating the relationships between students' course experience, the learning outcomes demonstrated by the students and the learning environment.…

  18. How Do Students' Accounts of Sociology Change over the Course of Their Undergraduate Degrees?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashwin, Paul; Abbas, Andrea; McLean, Monica

    2014-01-01

    In this article we examine how students' accounts of the discipline of sociology change over the course of their undergraduate degrees. Based on a phenomenographic analysis of 86 interviews with 32 sociology and criminology students over the course of their undergraduate degrees, we constituted five different ways of accounting for sociology.…

  19. Global Interconnectedness and Multiculturalism in Undergraduate Sociology Courses in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Kyoung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    This study attempts to explain a process of inserting global transnational elements into an undergraduate sociology course. After a review of global themes covered in introductory sociology textbooks, the author administered two projects (Global Multiculturalism and Sociology of Wal-Mart) in an undergraduate sociology course. The current study…

  20. Development of an Undergraduate Course--Internet-Based Instrumentation and Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhuang, Hanqi; Morgera, Salvatore D.

    2007-01-01

    The objective, strategy, and implementation details of a new undergraduate course, Internet-based Instrumentation and Control, are presented. The course has a companion laboratory that is supported by the National Science Foundation and industry. The combination is offered to senior-level undergraduate engineering students interested in sensing,…

  1. Toward a Singleton Undergraduate Computer Graphics Course in Small and Medium-Sized Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shesh, Amit

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the evolution of a single undergraduate computer graphics course over five semesters, driven by a primary question: if one could offer only one undergraduate course in graphics, what would it include? This constraint is relevant to many small and medium-sized colleges that lack resources, adequate expertise, and enrollment…

  2. Project Kaleidoscope: Advancing What Works in Undergraduate STEM Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrod, S.

    2011-12-01

    In 1989, Project Kaleidoscope (PKAL) published its first report, What Works: Building Natural Science Communities, on reforming undergraduate STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education. Since then, PKAL has grown into a national organization comprised of a diverse group of over 6500 STEM educators who are committed to advancing "what works." The PKAL mission is to be a national leader in catalyzing the efforts of people, institutions, organizations and networks to move from analysis to action in significantly improving undergraduate student learning and achievement in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). Specifically, PKAL's strategic goals are to: 1) Promote the development and wider use of evidence-based teaching, learning and assessment approaches, 2) Build individual and organizational capacity to lead change in STEM education, and 3) Engage the broader community of external stakeholders - professional and disciplinary societies, business and industry groups, accreditation organizations, educational associations, governmental agencies, philanthropic organizations - in achieving our mission. PKAL achieves these goals by serving as the nexus of an interconnected and multidisciplinary web of people, ideas, strategies, evidence and resources focused on systemic change in undergraduate STEM education. PKAL also provides resources on critical issues, such as teaching using pedagogies of engagement, and engages interested faculty, campuses and professional societies in national projects and programs focused on cutting edge issues in STEM education. One of these projects - Mobilizing Disciplinary Societies for a Sustainable Future - is engaging eleven disciplinary societies, including the National Association of Geoscience Teachers, in defining specific resources, faculty development programs and goals focused on promoting undergraduate STEM courses that: 1) provide more knowledge about real-world issues; 2) connect these real

  3. Student opinions and perceptions of undergraduate thermodynamics courses in engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismet Ugursal, V.; Cruickshank, Cynthia A.

    2015-11-01

    Thermodynamics is a fundamental foundation of all engineering disciplines. A vast majority of engineering undergraduate programmes contain one or more courses on thermodynamics, and many engineers use thermodynamics every day to analyse or design energy systems. However, there is extensive anecdotal evidence as well as a wide range of published literature indicating that students often struggle to understand thermodynamic principles. In an effort to understand students' attitudes and perception of thermodynamics, including their expectations, experience and frustrations, an investigation was conducted. Following a review of the literature on the teaching and learning of thermodynamics in engineering, a survey questionnaire was developed and administered to close to a 1000 students in 17 thermodynamics classes at 13 universities in 7 countries. Survey results were analysed using statistical methods. This paper presents the findings of this investigation.

  4. Korean Advanced Course, Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This is the first of 7 readers for continuation training in Korean after the completion of the "Korean Basic Course" prepared by the Defense Language Institute. Units 1-11 are practical situation dialogues written for the course and center on topics related to sports, social events, police administration, and dialects. Interviews with key…

  5. Flipped Classrooms for Advanced Science Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomory, Annette; Watson, Sunnie Lee

    2015-12-01

    This article explains how issues regarding dual credit and Advanced Placement high school science courses could be mitigated via a flipped classroom instructional model. The need for advanced high school courses will be examined initially, followed by an analysis of advanced science courses and the reform they are experiencing. Finally, it will conclude with an explanation of flipped classes as well as how they may be a solution to the reform challenges teachers are experiencing as they seek to incorporate more inquiry-based activities.

  6. Report of the Polymer Core Course Committee: Polymer Principles in the Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Course, Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Demonstrates, with a set of definitive examples, how polymer principles can be introduced into the first undergraduate physical chemistry course in a very natural way. The intent is to encourage introduction of polymer-related material into conventional physical chemistry courses without sacrificing any rigor associated with such courses. (JN)

  7. Towards Cognitive Coherence In Physics Learning: Image-ability Of Undergraduate Solid State Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S.; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2010-07-01

    Based on the famous work of K. Lynch [7] on image-ability of a cityscape, recently a city of physics analogy has been proposed by A.E. Tabor et al.[8] to enhance the cognitive coherence of physics as a subject. The idea of both Lynch and A. abor. et al. is being extended in this paper to image-ability of an undergraduate Solid State Physics course to bring forth cognitive coherence of the subject in a global manner. In this paper an image-ability map of the course is presented both in a pictorial and tabular format with recognition of sections of the syllabus as districts and sub districts. Further in each district and sub district, key concepts as land marks, variables involved as nodes, key physical equations as paths and limits on variables as edges or boundaries are identified through peer discussion among a group of teachers who are teaching this course for the last couple of years. This exercise has helped not only in mental mapping of the subject but focusing on hitherto isolated and advanced topics provided in the syllabus as leading to a very different mental recreational spots in the cityscape of undergraduate Solid State Physics.

  8. The Effect of Online Chapter Quizzes on Exam Performance in an Undergraduate Social Psychology Course

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Bethany C.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.

    2009-01-01

    Assigned textbook readings are a common requirement in undergraduate courses, but students often do not complete reading assignments or do not do so until immediately before an exam. This may have detrimental effects on learning and course performance. Regularly scheduled quizzes on reading material may increase completion of reading assignments and therefore course performance. This study examined the effectiveness of compulsory, mastery-based, weekly reading quizzes as a means of improving exam and course performance. Completion of reading quizzes was related to both better exam and course performance. The discussion includes recommendations for the use of quizzes in undergraduate courses. PMID:20046908

  9. The Effect of Online Chapter Quizzes on Exam Performance in an Undergraduate Social Psychology Course.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Bethany C; Kiviniemi, Marc T

    2009-01-01

    Assigned textbook readings are a common requirement in undergraduate courses, but students often do not complete reading assignments or do not do so until immediately before an exam. This may have detrimental effects on learning and course performance. Regularly scheduled quizzes on reading material may increase completion of reading assignments and therefore course performance. This study examined the effectiveness of compulsory, mastery-based, weekly reading quizzes as a means of improving exam and course performance. Completion of reading quizzes was related to both better exam and course performance. The discussion includes recommendations for the use of quizzes in undergraduate courses. PMID:20046908

  10. Experience in teaching intensive course of thermal physics for undergraduate physics students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Farkhad

    2009-03-01

    This talk of non-technical nature describes experience of the author in teaching the intensive course of thermal physics for the undergraduate physics students at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Spain. After brief introduction to the program, description of the WEB support of the course, I shall describe practical classes ( home-works, visits to the Laboratories, experimental demonstrations, typical problems and typical topics for presentations on the advanced thermodynamics, etc. ). I shall further discuss different possible actions to wake up an interest of the students to the thermal physics and ways to simulate their active participation in the class discussions. I also describe different schemes employed in the last few years to evaluate effectively and clearly the students work and knowledge. Finally, I will analyze the efficiency of our methodic in improving teaching of thermal physics at University level.

  11. The Advanced Course in Professional Selling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loe, Terry; Inks, Scott

    2014-01-01

    More universities are incorporating sales content into their curriculums, and although the introductory courses in professional sales have much common ground and guidance from numerous professional selling texts, instructors teaching the advanced selling course lack the guidance provided by common academic tools and materials. The resulting…

  12. Korean Advanced Course: Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This is the second of seven readers, prepared by the Defense Language Institute, for continuation training in Korean after the Basic Course. The 20 reading lessons, printed in Korean script, have been drawn from several readers published by the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Korea in 1970. Each unit concludes with a set of questions and…

  13. The Annotated Bibliography and Citation Behavior: Enhancing Student Scholarship in an Undergraduate Biology Course

    PubMed Central

    Rux, Erika M.; Flaspohler, John A.

    2007-01-01

    Contemporary undergraduates in the biological sciences have unprecedented access to scientific information. Although many of these students may be savvy technologists, studies from the field of library and information science consistently show that undergraduates often struggle to locate, evaluate, and use high-quality, reputable sources of information. This study demonstrates the efficacy and pedagogical value of a collaborative teaching approach designed to enhance information literacy competencies among undergraduate biology majors who must write a formal scientific research paper. We rely on the triangulation of assessment data to determine the effectiveness of a substantial research paper project completed by students enrolled in an upper-level biology course. After enhancing library-based instruction, adding an annotated bibliography requirement, and using multiple assessment techniques, we show fundamental improvements in students' library research abilities. Ultimately, these improvements make it possible for students to more independently and effectively complete this challenging science-based writing assignment. We document critical information literacy advances in several key areas: student source-type use, annotated bibliography enhancement, plagiarism reduction, as well as student and faculty/librarian satisfaction. PMID:18056306

  14. Cavity Ring down Spectroscopy Experiment for an Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacewicz, T.; Wasylczyk, P.; Kowalczyk, P.; Semczuk, M.

    2007-01-01

    A simple experiment is described that permits advanced undergraduates to learn the principles and applications of the cavity ring down spectroscopy technique. The apparatus is used for measurements of low concentrations of NO[subscript 2] produced in air by an electric discharge. We present the setup, experimental procedure, data analysis and some…

  15. Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment in Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, H. W.; Graves, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    An advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is described. Tunnel junctions were fabricated, the tunneling spectra of several molecules absorbed on the surface of aluminum oxide measured, and mode assignments made for several of the prominent peaks in spectra using results obtained from optical…

  16. Some Specifications for an Undergraduate Course in Digital Subsystems. An Interim Report of the Cosine Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Engineering Education, Washington, DC.

    This report describes an undergraduate course in digital subsystems. The course is divided into two major parts. Part I is entitled Electronic Circuits and Functional Units. The material in this part of the course proceeds from simple understandings of circuits to the progressively more complex functional units. Early emphasis is placed on basic…

  17. Use of Concept Mapping in an Undergraduate Introductory Exercise Physiology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henige, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Physiology is often considered a challenging course for students. It is up to teachers to structure courses and create learning opportunities that will increase the chance of student success. In an undergraduate exercise physiology course, concept maps are assigned to help students actively process and organize information into manageable and…

  18. Faculty Views on the Appropriateness of Teaching Undergraduate Psychology Courses Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandernach, B. Jean; Mason, Teresa; Forrest, Krista D.; Hackathorn, Jana

    2012-01-01

    This study examines faculty views concerning the appropriateness of teaching specific undergraduate psychology courses in an online format. Faculty express concern about teaching methodology and counseling/clinical content courses online, but endorse teaching introductory and nonclinical content courses in either format; faculty report diverse…

  19. A Structured Approach to Honours Undergraduate Research Course, Evaluation Rubrics and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoukhi, Amar

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to the Honours Undergraduate Research Course design and implementation. The course design process, assessment and evaluation rubrics are provided. Lessons learned and the experience of the faced challenges and opportunities for two cohort offerings of the course during the winter terms of 2011 and 2012 are…

  20. Increasing Student Responsibility and Active Learning in an Undergraduate Capstone Finance Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, David; Bianco, Candy

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the effectiveness of factors in designing and delivering a complex, capstone course in an undergraduate major in finance. The course uses an instructional delivery system that is contrasted to the standard lecture format and has a broader set of objectives than is usually specified for a finance course. An objective of the…

  1. Assessment of Problem-Based Learning in the Undergraduate Statistics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpiak, Christie P.

    2011-01-01

    Undergraduate psychology majors (N = 51) at a mid-sized private university took a statistics examination on the first day of the research methods course, a course for which a grade of "C" or higher in statistics is a prerequisite. Students who had taken a problem-based learning (PBL) section of the statistics course (n = 15) were compared to those…

  2. The Design and Implementation of a Career Orientation Course for Undergraduate Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several years I have taught a career orientation course at St. John Fisher College. This course was designed to increase student awareness of potential careers following their undergraduate studies in our Biology program. Additionally, the course has also been used as a model for similar experiences in our Psychology, Chemistry,…

  3. Current Status of Undergraduate, Nonprofessional Pharmacology Courses Taught in Colleges of Pharmacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerald, Michael C.

    1976-01-01

    Of the 57 colleges of pharmacy surveyed, 33 are currently offering a total of 44 elective, undergraduate, nonprofessional pharmacology courses, and seven contemplate initiating such courses by 1977. The courses generally cover three areas: social and legal aspects of drug usage and nonprescription consumerism; pharmacology of the drugs of abuse;…

  4. Incorporating Applied Undergraduate Research in Senior to Graduate Level Remote Sensing Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henley, Richard B.; Unger, Daniel R.; Kulhavy, David L.; Hung, I-Kuai

    2016-01-01

    An Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture (ATCOFA) senior spatial science undergraduate student engaged in a multi-course undergraduate research project to expand his expertise in remote sensing and assess the applied instruction methodology employed within ATCOFA. The project consisted of performing a change detection…

  5. Chinese Undergraduates' Perceptions of Teaching Quality and the Effects on Approaches to Studying and Course Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Hongbiao; Wang, Wenlan; Han, Jiying

    2016-01-01

    The quality of undergraduate teaching is an issue under heated dispute in China. This study examined Chinese undergraduate students' perceptions of teaching quality and the effects on their approaches to studying and course satisfaction. A sample of 2,043 students from two full-time universities in mainland China responded to a questionnaire…

  6. Testing Effect and Complex Comprehension in a Large Introductory Undergraduate Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagliarulo, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Traditional undergraduate biology courses are content intensive, requiring students to understand and remember large amounts of information in short periods of time. Yet most students maintain little of the material encountered during their education. Poor knowledge retention is a main cause of academic failure and high undergraduate attrition…

  7. 38 CFR 21.7670 - Measurement of courses leading to a standard, undergraduate college degree.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Measurement of courses leading to a standard, undergraduate college degree. 21.7670 Section 21.7670 Pensions, Bonuses, and... leading to a standard, undergraduate college degree. Except as provided in § 21.7672, VA will measure...

  8. Assessment of Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experiences: A Meeting Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auchincloss, Lisa Corwin; Laursen, Sandra L.; Branchaw, Janet L.; Eagan, Kevin; Graham, Mark; Hanauer, David I.; Lawrie, Gwendolyn; McLinn, Colleen M.; Pelaez, Nancy; Rowland, Susan; Towns, Marcy; Trautmann, Nancy M.; Varma-Nelson, Pratibha; Weston, Timothy J.; Dolan, Erin L.

    2014-01-01

    The Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experiences Network (CUREnet) was initiated in 2012 with funding from the National Science Foundation program for Research Coordination Networks in Undergraduate Biology Education. CUREnet aims to address topics, problems, and opportunities inherent to integrating research experiences into undergraduate…

  9. A Combination Course and Lab-Based Approach to Teaching Research Skills to Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danowitz, Amy M.; Brown, Ronald C.; Jones, Clinton D.; Diegelman-Parente, Amy; Taylor, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate research is an important capstone experience that provides students with the conceptual and technical aptitude for graduate or industrial research. However, this experience is often compressed into a single term in a course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE) or run by individual faculty members for select students on an…

  10. Reinforcing Comprehensive Business Learning through an Undergraduate Retailing Course: A Prospectus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Irfan

    2009-01-01

    Undergraduate programs in business are expected to provide a comprehensive learning for their students in order to prepare them to be able to deal with complex business problems in their jobs. Business schools attempt to provide this learning through various curricular design strategies. This paper proposes the use of an undergraduate course in…

  11. Using High-Performance Graphics Machines in an Undergraduate CAD Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Allan; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Explains the approach taken at Colorado State University in a collegewide undergraduate computer-aided design (CAD) course. Reviews the topic areas covered, project requirements, and assesses the use of high-performance graphics devices. (ML)

  12. Learning Activities for an Undergraduate Mineralogy/Petrology Course-"I Am/We Are."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodell, Philip C.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces an entry level mineralogy/igneous petrology course designed for undergraduate students and presents a series of learning activities based on individual and cooperative learning. Includes 18 references. (Author/YDS)

  13. Origin of Life: An Interdisciplinary Course in Chemical Evolution for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, L. J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary undergraduate level course which includes aspects of astronomy, biology, biochemistry, geology and physics. A description of the Keller style Personalized System of Instruction is included. (CP)

  14. Theories of the Universe: A One Semester Course for Honors Undergraduates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimmock, John O.; Adams, Mitzi; Sever, Tom

    1999-01-01

    For the last two years The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) has delivered a one semester course entitled Theories of The Universe as a seminar for undergraduate honors students. The enrollment is limited to fifteen students to encourage a maximum amount of interaction and discussion. The course has been team-taught enlisting the support of four scientists from the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center as well as UAH faculty from the history, philosophy, biology and physics departments. The course mixes history, mythology, philosophy, religion, and, of course, science and astronomy. The course traces mankind's view of the universe and how that has changed from about 30,000 years BCE to the current observations and models. Starting with a brief history of mankind we trace the evolution of ideas including Prehistoric European, Babylonian, Egyptian, Asian, North, Central and South American, African, Chinese, Greek, Middle Ages, Copernican, Galileo, Kepler, the Renaissance and Enlightenment, Newton, Einstein, and Hawking etc. Namely, we try to touch on just about every different view to puzzles of quantum cosmology, missing mass and the cosmological constant. By the end of the course, students should have a good understanding of: (1) the human desire and need for understanding; (2) the interplay between observations, modeling and theory development, and the need for revisions based on further observations; (3) the role of developing technology in advancing knowledge; (4) the evolution of our views of the universe and our relation to it; and (5) where we are today in our quest. Students are required to write two term papers and present them to the class. The final exam is a open discussion on our views of what we have learned.

  15. Advanced Selling: A Comprehensive Course Sales Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarrington-Young, Susan; Castleberry, Stephen B.; Coleman, Joshua T.

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive project for the Advanced Selling course that has been tested at three universities is introduced. After selecting an industry and a company, students engage in a complete industry analysis, a company sales analysis, a sales-specific SWOT analysis, complete a ride day with a salesperson in that firm, then present their findings in a…

  16. SNAB: A New Advanced Level Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiss, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Of all the sciences, biology has probably made the most rapid progress in recent years and the need for this to be reflected in a new Advanced Level biology course has long been recognised in the UK. After wide-ranging consultation and successful piloting in over 50 schools and colleges in England and Wales, the new Salters-Nuffield Advanced…

  17. Assessing an Advanced Level Introductory Sociology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keesler, Venessa A.; Fermin, Baranda J.; Schneider, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    In 2001, the governing council of the American Sociological Association (ASA) appointed Professor Caroline Persell of New York University to launch a task force with the goal of creating an advanced high school sociology curriculum that would also be a model for introductory sociology courses in colleges and universities. The principle goal of the…

  18. Undergraduate Biology Lab Courses: Comparing the Impact of Traditionally Based "Cookbook" and Authentic Research-Based Courses on Student Lab Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownell, Sara E.; Kloser, Matthew J.; Fukami, Tadishi; Shavelson, Rich

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, several reports have recommended a shift in undergraduate biology laboratory courses from traditionally structured, often described as "cookbook," to authentic research-based experiences. This study compares a cookbook-type laboratory course to a research-based undergraduate biology laboratory course at a Research 1…

  19. Bridging the Undergraduate Curriculum Using an Integrated Course-Embedded Undergraduate Research Experience (ICURE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, James E.; D'Costa, Allison R.; Runck, Clay; Barnes, David W.; Barrera, Alessandra L.; Hurst-Kennedy, Jennifer; Sudduth, Elizabeth B.; Quinlan, Erin L.; Schlueter, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The traditional undergraduate program of study incorporates a selection of classes that represent a broad spectrum of subdisciplines. Unfortunately, few curricula successfully integrate concepts in all subdisciplines, giving undergraduates the misconception that there is a lack of application or connectedness between class subjects. An integrated…

  20. An Online Elective Course for Undergraduate Students on Common Prescription Medications

    PubMed Central

    Janke, Kristin K.; Bumgardner, Melissa A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To design, implement, and evaluate an online elective course on common prescription medications for undergraduate (pre- and non-health professional) students. Design An 8-module online course on common prescription medications was designed following the ADDIE (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation) instructional design model and offered to students for 8 consecutive semesters. Assessment Following each offering, performance data were analyzed and a course review conducted, including evaluation of entrance survey data and course evaluations. Direct analysis of data over 2 offerings and grade distribution comparisons over all 8 offerings, demonstrated consistent knowledge gains. Feedback from course evaluations and a continual increase in enrollment over the 8 semesters indicated student satisfaction with the course. Conclusion Systematic design and quality assurance/improvement strategies resulted in the successful establishment of an online pharmacotherapy course for undergraduate, nonpharmacy students. PMID:19657502

  1. Peer Learning and Support of Technology in an Undergraduate Biology Course to Enhance Deep Learning

    PubMed Central

    Tsaushu, Masha; Tal, Tali; Sagy, Ornit; Kali, Yael; Gepstein, Shimon; Zilberstein, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This study offers an innovative and sustainable instructional model for an introductory undergraduate course. The model was gradually implemented during 3 yr in a research university in a large-lecture biology course that enrolled biology majors and nonmajors. It gives priority to sources not used enough to enhance active learning in higher education: technology and the students themselves. Most of the lectures were replaced with continuous individual learning and 1-mo group learning of one topic, both supported by an interactive online tutorial. Assessment included open-ended complex questions requiring higher-order thinking skills that were added to the traditional multiple-choice (MC) exam. Analysis of students’ outcomes indicates no significant difference among the three intervention versions in the MC questions of the exam, while students who took part in active-learning groups at the advanced version of the model had significantly higher scores in the more demanding open-ended questions compared with their counterparts. We believe that social-constructivist learning of one topic during 1 mo has significantly contributed to student deep learning across topics. It developed a biological discourse, which is more typical to advanced stages of learning biology, and changed the image of instructors from “knowledge transmitters” to “role model scientists.” PMID:23222836

  2. Beyond the Cell: Using Multiscalar Topics to Bring Interdisciplinarity into Undergraduate Cellular Biology Courses.

    PubMed

    Weber, Carolyn F

    2016-01-01

    Western science has grown increasingly reductionistic and, in parallel, the undergraduate life sciences curriculum has become disciplinarily fragmented. While reductionistic approaches have led to landmark discoveries, many of the most exciting scientific advances in the late 20th century have occurred at disciplinary interfaces; work at these interfaces is necessary to manage the world's looming problems, particularly those that are rooted in cellular-level processes but have ecosystem- and even global-scale ramifications (e.g., nonsustainable agriculture, emerging infectious diseases). Managing such problems requires comprehending whole scenarios and their emergent properties as sums of their multiple facets and complex interrelationships, which usually integrate several disciplines across multiple scales (e.g., time, organization, space). This essay discusses bringing interdisciplinarity into undergraduate cellular biology courses through the use of multiscalar topics. Discussing how cellular-level processes impact large-scale phenomena makes them relevant to everyday life and unites diverse disciplines (e.g., sociology, cell biology, physics) as facets of a single system or problem, emphasizing their connections to core concepts in biology. I provide specific examples of multiscalar topics and discuss preliminary evidence that using such topics may increase students' understanding of the cell's position within an ecosystem and how cellular biology interfaces with other disciplines. PMID:27146162

  3. Beyond the Cell: Using Multiscalar Topics to Bring Interdisciplinarity into Undergraduate Cellular Biology Courses

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Carolyn F.

    2016-01-01

    Western science has grown increasingly reductionistic and, in parallel, the undergraduate life sciences curriculum has become disciplinarily fragmented. While reductionistic approaches have led to landmark discoveries, many of the most exciting scientific advances in the late 20th century have occurred at disciplinary interfaces; work at these interfaces is necessary to manage the world’s looming problems, particularly those that are rooted in cellular-level processes but have ecosystem- and even global-scale ramifications (e.g., nonsustainable agriculture, emerging infectious diseases). Managing such problems requires comprehending whole scenarios and their emergent properties as sums of their multiple facets and complex interrelationships, which usually integrate several disciplines across multiple scales (e.g., time, organization, space). This essay discusses bringing interdisciplinarity into undergraduate cellular biology courses through the use of multiscalar topics. Discussing how cellular-level processes impact large-scale phenomena makes them relevant to everyday life and unites diverse disciplines (e.g., sociology, cell biology, physics) as facets of a single system or problem, emphasizing their connections to core concepts in biology. I provide specific examples of multiscalar topics and discuss preliminary evidence that using such topics may increase students’ understanding of the cell’s position within an ecosystem and how cellular biology interfaces with other disciplines. PMID:27146162

  4. Basic English Writing: An Experimental Course Structure against Semantic Misinterpretation in Undergraduate Student Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    In, Fan-yu; Liao, Hui-Chuan

    2008-01-01

    Course designs for Basic English Writing classes vary from one course to another. The objective of this study was to investigate the semantic misinterpretation of English words found in the English compositions written by native-Chinese-speaking undergraduate students and to overcome if such a barrier occurred in the process of writing. First,…

  5. Instructors' Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior in Teaching Undergraduate Physical Education Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filho, Paulo Jose Barbosa Gutierres; Monteiro, Maria Dolores Alves Ferreira; da Silva, Rudney; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze adapted physical education instructors' views about the application of the theory of planned behavior (TpB) in teaching physical education undergraduate courses. Participants ("n" = 17) were instructors of adapted physical activity courses from twelve randomly selected institutions of higher…

  6. Lessons Learned from Undergraduate Students in Designing a Science-Based Course in Bioethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loike, John D.; Rush, Brittany S.; Schweber, Adam; Fischbach, Ruth L.

    2013-01-01

    Columbia University offers two innovative undergraduate science-based bioethics courses for student majoring in biosciences and pre-health studies. The goals of these courses are to introduce future scientists and healthcare professionals to the ethical questions they will confront in their professional lives, thus enabling them to strategically…

  7. Clarity in Teaching and Active Learning in Undergraduate Microbiology Course for Non-Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; McGinnis, J. Randy; Pease, Rebecca; Dai, Amy H.; Schalk, Kelly A.; Benson, Spencer

    2010-01-01

    We investigated a pedagogical innovation in an undergraduate microbiology course (Microbes and Society) for non-majors and education majors. The goals of the curriculum and pedagogical transformation were to promote active learning and concentrate on clarity in teaching. This course was part of a longitudinal project (Project Nexus) which…

  8. An Undergraduate Course and Laboratory in Digital Signal Processing with Field Programmable Gate Arrays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer-Base, U.; Vera, A.; Meyer-Base, A.; Pattichis, M. S.; Perry, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, an innovative educational approach to introducing undergraduates to both digital signal processing (DSP) and field programmable gate array (FPGA)-based design in a one-semester course and laboratory is described. While both DSP and FPGA-based courses are currently present in different curricula, this integrated approach reduces the…

  9. Using Microcomputer Simulations in the Classroom: Examples from Undergraduate and Faculty Computer Literacy Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Jeffrey A.

    Examples of the use of computer simulations in two undergraduate courses, (American Foreign Policy and Introduction to International Politics), and a faculty computer literacy course on simulations and artificial intelligence, are provided in this compilation of various instructional items. A list of computer simulations available for various…

  10. A Computational-Modeling Course for Undergraduate Students in Chemical Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hessley, Rita K.

    2004-01-01

    The PC-based software technology, a computational-modeling course, for undergraduate chemistry students helps them to understand the molecular modeling in a better way. This course would be able to accommodate a wider array of topics and a greater depth of theory as the modeling is increasingly incorporated into the chemistry curriculum.

  11. 10 Ways to Improve Instructor Effectiveness in an Undergraduate Exercise Physiology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acquaviva, John

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a variety of teaching strategies in one of the most difficult courses undergraduates are required to take: exercise physiology. This course is unique because it challenges students to constantly recall and apply complex concepts to a variety of exercise modes, intensities, and conditions. Further, both the…

  12. Undergraduate Introductory Quantitative Chemistry Laboratory Course: Interdisciplinary Group Projects in Phytoremediation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Engelen, Debra L.; Suljak, Steven W.; Hall, J. Patrick; Holmes, Bert E.

    2007-01-01

    The laboratory course around the phytoremediation is designed to develop both individual skills and promote cooperative learning while starting students work on projects in a specific area of environmental chemistry and analysis. Many research-active undergraduate institutions have developed courses, which are interdisciplinary in nature that…

  13. A First-Year Chemistry Undergraduate "Course Community" at a Large, Research-Intensive University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De La Franier, Brian J.; Diep, Jenny; Menzies, Perry J. C.; Morra, Barbora; Koroluk, Katherine J.; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the integration of a cocurricular "Community" into a first-year undergraduate chemistry course at the University of Toronto. The Community has been in existence since 2006, with over 700 students being involved. Its broad objectives have been three-fold: to inform course members about departmental resources and…

  14. Peer Feedback in a Large Undergraduate Blended Course: Perceptions of Value and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertmer, Peggy A.; Richardson, Jennifer C.; Lehman, James D.; Newby, Timothy J.; Cheng, Xi; Mong, Christopher; Sadaf, Ayesha

    2010-01-01

    This study examined students' perceptions of peer feedback and learning in a large, undergraduate course that incorporated supplementary online discussions. Peer feedback (PF) was facilitated via an automated rating system, within Blackboard discussion forums, for half of the students enrolled in the course. Following the peer feedback process,…

  15. Psychological Type and Undergraduate Student Achievement in Pharmacy Course in Military Medical University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Ru; Shan, Shou-qin; Tian, Jian-quan

    2007-01-01

    The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) was given to 264 students in an undergraduate Pharmacy course at a military medical university. Selected MBTI personality types were compared for achievement in the course using a t-test to compare total points earned. High grades were earned by students stronger in the traits of introversion (I) and judgment…

  16. Transitioning from Expository Laboratory Experiments to Course-Based Undergraduate Research in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Ted M.; Ricciardo, Rebecca; Weaver, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    General chemistry courses predominantly use expository experiments that shape student expectations of what a laboratory activity entails. Shifting within a semester to course-based undergraduate research activities that include greater decision-making, collaborative work, and "messy" real-world data necessitates a change in student…

  17. Known Structure, Unknown Function: An Inquiry-Based Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Cynthia; Price, Carol W.; Lee, Christopher T.; Dewald, Alison H.; Cline, Matthew A.; McAnany, Charles E.; Columbus, Linda; Mura, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate biochemistry laboratory courses often do not provide students with an authentic research experience, particularly when the express purpose of the laboratory is purely instructional. However, an instructional laboratory course that is inquiry- and research-based could simultaneously impart scientific knowledge and foster a student's…

  18. The Views of Undergraduates about Problem-Based Learning Applications in a Biochemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarhan, Leman; Ayyildiz, Yildizay

    2015-01-01

    The effect of problem-based learning (PBL) applications in an undergraduate biochemistry course on students' interest in this course was investigated through four modules during one semester. Students' views about active learning and improvement in social skills were also collected and evaluated. We conducted the study with 36 senior students from…

  19. Teaching a Course on Psychology Ethics to Undergraduates: An Experiential Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plante, Thomas G.

    1998-01-01

    Details a course for teaching ethics to undergraduates. Argues that participation in service-learning experiences teaches students about moral philosophy and ethical principles for psychologists, and helps them become more sensitive to complex ethical dilemmas involved in psychology and related fields. Reports that students' course evaluations are…

  20. Using Personal Interest Portfolios to Promote Engagement and Improve Student Learning in a Large Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkett, M.; Neff, L.; Pieper, S.

    2012-01-01

    Portfolios are used for many purposes; however, data describing their utility in promoting student engagement and learning in large undergraduate survey courses have not been reported. A large survey course presents a number of teaching and learning challenges that portfolios help to address, such as the ability of the teacher to maintain student…

  1. Promoting Active Engagement in Health Research: Lessons from an Undergraduate Gerontology Capstone Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Emily J.; Kinney, Jennifer M.; Kart, Cary S.

    2008-01-01

    With National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Aging (NIH/NIA) (R15/AREA) funding, the authors offered a four-credit hour undergraduate research course that was cross-listed in gerontology and sociology. This capstone course was aimed at providing students with the opportunity to (1) gain knowledge about diabetes and racial/ethnic…

  2. Attitudes, Knowledge, and Behavior Before and After an Undergraduate Health and Lifestyle Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClaran, Diane M.; Breakey, Robin Sarris

    A one credit mini-course consisting of six two-hour seminars exploring concepts of health promotion and personal responsibility for health was offered to undergraduate students. The course included in-depth coverage of health-related decisionmaking processes, effective strategies for changing personal behaviors, self care for common illnesses,…

  3. The Domains of Undergraduate International Business and International Management Courses in Accredited Schools of Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Janet S.; Veliyath, Rajaram

    2003-01-01

    This study compared undergraduate international business and international management course syllabi from 190 management departments at accredited U.S. business schools. Comparisons revealed considerable overlap in topic areas in the two courses. The findings indicate the need for greater domain clarity and differentiation in objectives, topic…

  4. Integrating Undergraduate Peer Mentors into Liberal Arts Courses: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Tania

    2008-01-01

    This article presents research and narratives on the integration of course-based peer learning assistants into seven courses. A new curricular peer mentoring program was piloted in the 2005-2006 academic year in an interdisciplinary liberal arts college at a large Canadian research university. Undergraduate students enrolled in a practicum course…

  5. Microcomputer Simulated Experiments in the Teaching of Multi-Channel Laser System in an Undergraduate Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sing, Lee; Chee, Chia Teck

    1997-01-01

    Describes a simulation done by students in a Year 4 undergraduate physics laboratory course on pulse technology. The course objective was to provide students with experience in computation pulsed electrical circuits and in comparing the computation with experiments. Results showed that the microcomputer simulated experiments made for a more…

  6. Peer Learning and Support of Technology in an Undergraduate Biology Course to Enhance Deep Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaushu, Masha; Tal, Tali; Sagy, Ornit; Kali, Yael; Gepstein, Shimon; Zilberstein, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This study offers an innovative and sustainable instructional model for an introductory undergraduate course. The model was gradually implemented during 3 yr in a research university in a large-lecture biology course that enrolled biology majors and nonmajors. It gives priority to sources not used enough to enhance active learning in higher…

  7. Green Chemistry and Sustainability: An Undergraduate Course for Science and Nonscience Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Erin M.

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate lecture course in Green Chemistry and Sustainability has been developed and taught to a "multidisciplinary" group of science and nonscience majors. The course introduced students to the topics of green chemistry and sustainability and also immersed them in usage of the scientific literature. Through literature…

  8. Transition from Traditional to ICT-Enhanced Learning Environments in Undergraduate Chemistry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barak, Miri

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a three-year study conducted among chemistry instructors (professors and teaching assistants) at a post-secondary institution. The goal was to explore the integration process of information and communication technologies (ICT) into traditional teaching. Four undergraduate chemistry courses incorporated a course website, an…

  9. Student Perceptions of an Upper-Level, Undergraduate Human Anatomy Laboratory Course without Cadavers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Shirley J.

    2012-01-01

    Several programs in health professional education require or are considering requiring upper-level human anatomy as prerequisite for their applicants. Undergraduate students are confronted with few institutions offering such a course, in part because of the expense and logistical issues associated with a cadaver-based human anatomy course. This…

  10. Implementation and Evaluation of a Values Clarification Activity for a Large Undergraduate Human Sexuality Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederer, Alyssa M.

    2016-01-01

    Values clarification is an important tool that helps individuals to clarify their beliefs about sexuality-related issues. This lesson plan provides instructions for a 1-hour values clarification activity for a large undergraduate human sexuality course that serves as an introduction to course content and tone, stimulates students' initial thinking…

  11. Perceptions of Course Value and Issues of Specialization in Undergraduate Music Teacher Education Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groulx, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Music educators (n = 601) responded to a survey designed to investigate what undergraduate music education curricular changes might be desired to better serve the profession. Participants rated the value of the 20 most common types of courses in a music teacher education program. The highest rated courses were student teaching, ensembles, applied…

  12. Tracking Undergraduate Student Achievement in a First-Year Physiology Course Using a Cluster Analysis Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, S. J.; White, S.; Power, N.

    2015-01-01

    A cluster analysis data classification technique was used on assessment scores from 157 undergraduate nursing students who passed 2 successive compulsory courses in human anatomy and physiology. Student scores in five summative assessment tasks, taken in each of the courses, were used as inputs for a cluster analysis procedure. We aimed to group…

  13. "Sexing the Subject": Evoking "Sex" in Teaching an Undergraduate Course about Sexuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Louisa

    2009-01-01

    This paper seeks to explore the relation between sexuality and pedagogy. This theoretical concern is examined with reference to two key pedagogical moments during a first-year undergraduate course about schooling and sexuality. Through critical reflection of these episodes it is argued that when sexuality is the intellectual focus of a course, the…

  14. Learner-Centered Teaching and Assessment in an Undergraduate Field Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paradis, Thomas W.; Dexter, Leland R.

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduate geography field courses are relatively rare at American universities, though they can exemplify well the fundamental tenets of learner-centered education. This article reports on an intensive three-week field analysis course taught at Northern Arizona University at Flagstaff, within the Department of Geography, Planning, and…

  15. Experiences in Developing an Experimental Robotics Course Program for Undergraduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Seul

    2013-01-01

    An interdisciplinary undergraduate-level robotics course offers students the chance to integrate their engineering knowledge learned throughout their college years by building a robotic system. Robotics is thus a core course in system and control-related engineering education. This paper summarizes the experience of developing robotics courses…

  16. An Evaluation of a Course That Introduces Undergraduate Students to Authentic Aerospace Engineering Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mena, Irene B.; Schmitz, Sven; McLaughlin, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation and assessment of an aerospace engineering course in which undergraduate students worked on research projects with graduate research mentors. The course was created using the principles from cooperative learning and project-based learning, and consisted of students working in small groups on a complex,…

  17. Russian: Advanced Course. Advanced Grammar, Lessons 1-24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This volume of an advanced Russian course designed by the Defense Language Institute seeks to develop a more comprehensive knowledge of the structural features of Russian and an enlarged vocabulary. The learning accomplished orally in class is reinforced in written exercises at home. Instructional materials concentrate on morphology, syntax, and…

  18. Recombinant DNA Technology. A Topics Course for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parson, Kathleen A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the development of a topics course offered jointly by the chemistry and biology departments at Macalester College (Minnesota). Outlines the syllabus for the course. Discusses teaching and laboratory methods used. (CW)

  19. Who Is Repeating Anatomy? Trends in an Undergraduate Anatomy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutte, Audra F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy courses frequently serve as prerequisites or requirements for health sciences programs. Due to the challenging nature of anatomy, each semester there are students remediating the course (enrolled in the course for a second time), attempting to earn a grade competitive for admissions into a program of study. In this retrospective study,…

  20. Course-Based Undergraduate Research--It Can Be Accomplished!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allyn, Debra A.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a senior seminar course in the Health and Human Performance (HHP) Department at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls. All students in the HHP department are required to complete the course. The emphases within HHP include physical education, health education, and exercise and sport science. In this course students learn…

  1. Including Non-Traditional Instrumentation in Undergraduate Environmental Chemistry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, J. David; Orvis, Jessica N.; Smith, C. Jimmy; Manley, Citabria; Rice, Jeanette K. 2

    2004-01-01

    Non-traditional instrumentation was obtained for Georgia Southern undergraduates to attain fundamental environmental education through unique laboratory experiences. In this context, the method for including a direct mercury analyzer into both major and non-major environmental laboratories is reported.

  2. Communication and Conflict Resolution: A Prototype Course for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Clyde

    To provide students with experience in conflict resolution, 44 undergraduates were trained in theories and practical methods of resolving conflicts and of communicating in their relationships with family, friends of the opposite sex, roommates, and peer groups. During five sessions of 3 hours each, the experimental sections explored by means of…

  3. A Computer Security Course in the Undergraduate Computer Science Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spillman, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the importance of computer security and considers criminal, national security, and personal privacy threats posed by security breakdown. Several examples are given, including incidents involving computer viruses. Objectives, content, instructional strategies, resources, and a sample examination for an experimental undergraduate computer…

  4. Predicting Success for Actuarial Students in Undergraduate Mathematics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard Manning; Schumacher, Phyllis A.

    2005-01-01

    A study of undergraduate actuarial graduates found that math SAT scores, verbal SAT scores, percentile rank in high school graduating class, and percentage score on a college mathematics placement exam had some relevance to forecasting the students' grade point averages in their major. For both males and females, percentile rank in high school…

  5. An Introductory Undergraduate Course Covering Animal Cell Culture Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mozdziak, Paul E.; Petitte, James N.; Carson, Susan D.

    2004-01-01

    Animal cell culture is a core laboratory technique in many molecular biology, developmental biology, and biotechnology laboratories. Cell culture is a relatively old technique that has been sparingly taught at the undergraduate level. The traditional methodology for acquiring cell culture training has been through trial and error, instruction when…

  6. Service Learning in an Undergraduate Social Work Research Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postlethwait, Ariana

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined student experiences (n = 111) in an undergraduate social work (BSW) research seminar in which a service learning (SL) project was the primary focus. Student groups of approximately six or seven worked with local agencies to develop a research plan for the agency. Students found the SL project to be a positive experience.…

  7. Teaching Analytical Method Development in an Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanigan, Katherine C.

    2008-01-01

    Method development and assessment, central components of carrying out chemical research, require problem-solving skills. This article describes a pedagogical approach for teaching these skills through the adaptation of published experiments and application of group-meeting style discussions to the curriculum of an undergraduate instrumental…

  8. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Undergraduate Multicultural Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Charisse

    2014-01-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) recently revised their "Guidelines for the undergraduate psychology major" in 2013. In this updated version diversity is included in the broad goal of ethical and social responsibility in a diverse world. Indicators associated with this goal include student awareness of prejudice within…

  9. Interdisciplinary Training in Mathematical Biology through Team-based Undergraduate Research and Courses

    PubMed Central

    Walston, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by BIO2010 and leveraging institutional and external funding, Truman State University built an undergraduate program in mathematical biology with high-quality, faculty-mentored interdisciplinary research experiences at its core. These experiences taught faculty and students to bridge the epistemological gap between the mathematical and life sciences. Together they created the infrastructure that currently supports several interdisciplinary courses, an innovative minor degree, and long-term interdepartmental research collaborations. This article describes how the program was built with support from the National Science Foundation's Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biology and Mathematics program, and it shares lessons learned that will help other undergraduate institutions build their own program. PMID:20810960

  10. An investigation of assessment and feedback practices in fully asynchronous online undergraduate mathematics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenholm, Sven; Alcock, Lara; Robinson, Carol

    2015-11-01

    Research suggests it is difficult to learn mathematics in the fully asynchronous online (FAO) instructional modality, yet little is known about associated teaching and assessment practices. In this study, we investigate FAO mathematics assessment and feedback practices in particular consideration of both claims and findings that these practices have a powerful influence on learning. A survey questionnaire was constructed and completed by 70 FAO undergraduate mathematics instructors, mostly from the USA, who were each asked to detail their assessment and feedback practices in a single FAO mathematics course. Alongside these questions, participants also answered the 16-item version of the Approaches to Teaching Inventory. In addition, a novel feedback framework was also created and used to examine how feedback practices may be related to participants' approaches to teaching. Results show that assessment and feedback practices are varied and complex: in particular, we found there was not a simple emphasis on summative assessment instruments, nor a concomitant expectation these would always be invigilated. Though richer assessment feedback appears to be emphasized, evidence suggests this feedback may not be primarily directed at advancing student learning. Moreover, we found evidence of a reliance on computer--human interactions (e.g. via computer-assisted assessment systems) and further evidence of a decline in human interactions, suggesting a dynamic that is both consistent with current online learning theory and claims FAO mathematics courses are becoming commodified. Several avenues for further research are suggested.

  11. Undergraduate Students' Perceptions of an Inquiry-Based Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballone Duran, Lena; McArthur, Julia; van Hook, Stephen

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine middle childhood students'' perceptions of the learning environment in a reform-based physics course. A lecture-style, introductory physics course was modified into an inquiry-based course designed for preservice middle childhood teachers through the collaborative efforts of faculty in the Colleges of Education and Arts and Sciences. Focus group interviews were conducted to examine students'' perceptions. The results suggested that the students initially felt a level of frustration with a new constructivist experience; however, they were able to embrace the inquiry method and expressed a desire for additional specialized content courses for preservice teachers.

  12. Implementing Problem-Based Learning in an Undergraduate Psychology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searight, H. Russell; Searight, Barbara K.

    2009-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a small-group pedagogical technique widely used in fields such as business, medicine, engineering, and architecture. In PBL, pre-written cases are used to teach core course content. PBL advocates state that course material is more likely to be retained and applied when presented as cases reflecting "real life"…

  13. Impact of a Student Success Course on Undergraduate Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoops, Leah D.; Yu, Shirley L.; Burridge, Andrea Backscheider; Wolters, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Both community colleges and four-year institutions offer Student Success Courses (SSCs) to promote student engagement (self-regulated learning, SRL) and performance (grades, retention, and graduation). However, little work has been done to examine the holistic impact of SSC interventions or to determine which aspects of course curriculum most…

  14. Two Undergraduate Process Modeling Courses Taught Using Inductive Learning Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soroush, Masoud; Weinberger, Charles B.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript presents a successful application of inductive learning in process modeling. It describes two process modeling courses that use inductive learning methods such as inquiry learning and problem-based learning, among others. The courses include a novel collection of multi-disciplinary complementary process modeling examples. They were…

  15. Developing Critical Thinking in Undergraduate Courses: A Philosophical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Calvin S.

    2002-01-01

    Examines how 20th century philosophers of science have influenced current physics educational research. Examines the introduction of a study of these philosophers in several courses, including the calculus-based introductory physics course on optics and modern physics. Concludes that students seem to have made a marked improvement in their…

  16. Evaluation of the Redesign of an Undergraduate Cell Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Laura April; Harris, dik; Schmid, Richard F.; Vogel, Jackie; Western, Tamara; Harrison, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This article offers a case study of the evaluation of a redesigned and redeveloped laboratory-based cell biology course. The course was a compulsory element of the biology program, but the laboratory had become outdated and was inadequately equipped. With the support of a faculty-based teaching improvement project, the teaching team redesigned the…

  17. Design of a Dynamic Undergraduate Green Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    The green chemistry course taught at Westminster College (PA) incorporates nontraditional teaching techniques and texts to educate future chemists about the importance of using green chemistry principles. The course is designed to introduce green chemistry concepts and demonstrate their inherent necessity by discussing historical missteps by the…

  18. Accelerator Physics: An Undergraduate Course in Experimental Nuclear Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielder, Douglas S.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses a 2-semester-hour experimental physics course utilizing a 0.5 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator. The course requires the completion of six or seven laboratory projects including complete written reports, and theory is emphasized only to the extent needed to understand the projects. (MLH)

  19. A Thermal Management of Electronics Course and Laboratory for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okamoto, Nicole; Hsu, Tai-Ran; Bash, Cullen E.

    2009-01-01

    A novel thermal management of electronics course with an associated laboratory has been developed for mechanical, electrical, and computer engineering students. The lecture topics, term project, computer modeling project, and six associated experiments that were built from scratch are described. Over half of the course lectures as well as all lab…

  20. Short communication: Characteristics of student success in an undergraduate physiology and anatomy course.

    PubMed

    Gwazdauskas, F C; McGilliard, M L; Corl, B A

    2014-10-01

    Several factors affect the success of students in college classes. The objective of this research was to determine what factors affect success of undergraduate students in an anatomy and physiology class. Data were collected from 602 students enrolled in the Agriculture and Life Sciences (ALS) 2304 Animal Physiology and Anatomy course from 2005 through 2012. The data set included 476 females (79.1%) and 126 males (20.9%). Time to complete exams was recorded for each student. For statistical analyses, students' majors were animal and poultry sciences (APSC), agricultural sciences, biochemistry, biological sciences, dairy science, and "other," which combined all other majors. All analyses were completed using the GLIMMIX procedure of SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC). Gender, major, matriculation year, major by year interaction, gender by year interaction, and time to complete the exam affected final course grade. The significant gender effect was manifested in the final grade percentage of 75.9 ± 0.4 for female students compared with 72.3 ± 0.6 for male students. Junior males had final course grades comparable with those of females, but sophomore and senior males had lower final course grades than other combinations. Biology majors had a final grade of 82.4 ± 0.6 and this grade was greater than all other majors. Students classified as "other" had a final score of 74.4 ± 0.8, which was greater than agricultural science majors (69.5 ± 0.9). The APSC grade (72.6 ± 0.5) was higher than the agricultural science majors. Junior students had significantly greater final grades (76.1 ± 0.5) than sophomores (73.3 ± 0.6) and seniors (72.9 ± 0.9). All biology students had greater final grades than all other majors, but biochemistry juniors had greater final course grades than APSC, agricultural science, and dairy science juniors. "Other" seniors had greater final course grades than agricultural science seniors. The regression for time to complete the exam was

  1. Children's Literature in the Undergraduate Course on Communication Research Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Students will develop positive attitudes toward communication research by linking new values and principles with the familiar values and principles contained in children's literature. Course: Communication Research Methods.

  2. a Climate Change Course for Engineering Undergraduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaniyala, S.; Powers, S. E.; DeWaters, J.

    2012-12-01

    As part of Clarkson University's NASA-funded Project-Based Global Climate Change Education project, a new three-credit climate change course for engineers was developed and has been taught for three years to over 60 students, The course was structured to be highly quantitative and was taught using an inquiry-based pedagogical approach. As part of this course, students used climate data from ground stations and satellites to determine changes in key climate parameters over the past several decades and used results from global climate models to ascertain the extent of likely climate change for different economic and social scenarios. The students were also introduced to mitigation efforts, concentrated on alternate energy choices, energy conservation, and geoengineering solutions, with a focus on the immediacy of these efforts. Teams of students each defined a research question and completed a data-driven project focusing on likely local impacts for different economic and social scenarios or on the necessary mitigation efforts to achieve desirable climate targets. Some sample projects include: effect of climate change on NY state apple industry and relation between energy choices and CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. The impact of the course on the students was assessed with a combination of quantitative and qualitative approaches that used pre-post climate literacy and engineering self-efficacy surveys as well as qualitative focus group discussions at the end of the course. On a whole, the survey results suggest a statistically significant increase in students' climate literacy at the end of the course, with a significant increase in students' knowledge of climate change concepts (p<<0.001), and significantly more positive responses on questions related to their attitudes towards climate change related issues (p<0.01) and their climate-related behaviors (p<0.02). As part of this presentation, I will discuss the development of the course and results of the course

  3. In Situ Teaching: Fusing Labs & Lectures in Undergraduate Science Courses to Enhance Immersion in Scientific Research

    PubMed Central

    Round, Jennifer; Lom, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate courses in the life sciences at most colleges and universities are traditionally composed of two or three weekly sessions in a classroom supplemented with a weekly three-hour session in a laboratory. We have found that many undergraduates can have difficulty making connections and/or transferring knowledge between lab activities and lecture material. Consequently, we are actively developing ways to decrease the physical and intellectual divides between lecture and lab to help students make more direct links between what they learn in the classroom and what they learn in the lab. In this article we discuss our experiences teaching fused laboratory biology courses that intentionally blurred the distinctions between lab and lecture to provide undergraduates with immersive experiences in science that promote discovery and understanding. PMID:26240531

  4. Evaluation of the Redesign of an Undergraduate Cell Biology Course

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Laura April; Harris, dik; Schmid, Richard F.; Vogel, Jackie; Western, Tamara

    2009-01-01

    This article offers a case study of the evaluation of a redesigned and redeveloped laboratory-based cell biology course. The course was a compulsory element of the biology program, but the laboratory had become outdated and was inadequately equipped. With the support of a faculty-based teaching improvement project, the teaching team redesigned the course and re-equipped the laboratory, using a more learner-centered, constructivist approach. The focus of the article is on the project-supported evaluation of the redesign rather than the redesign per se. The evaluation involved aspects well beyond standard course assessments, including the gathering of self-reported data from the students concerning both the laboratory component and the technical skills associated with the course. The comparison of pre- and postdata gave valuable information to the teaching team on course design issues and skill acquisition. It is argued that the evaluation process was an effective use of the scarce resources of the teaching improvement project. PMID:19255138

  5. Music and Community: Interdependence and Shared Learning in an Undergraduate Elementary Music Methods Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koops, Lisa Huisman

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the author investigated the creation of a community of learners in an under- graduate elementary music methods course. Participants included undergraduate students (n = 23) and a professor at a Midwestern liberal arts college. Data consisted of fieldnotes from class observations and interviews with the professor and students. The…

  6. Effectiveness of Inquiry-Based Learning in an Undergraduate Exercise Physiology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nybo, Lars; May, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of changing a laboratory physiology course for undergraduate students from a traditional step-by-step guided structure to an inquiry-based approach. With this aim in mind, quantitative and qualitative evaluations of learning outcomes (individual subject-specific tests and group interviews)…

  7. Exploring the Learning Problems and Resource Usage of Undergraduate Industrial Design Students in Design Studio Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Wenzhi

    2016-01-01

    Design is a powerful weapon for modern companies so it is important to have excellent designers in the industry. The purpose of this study is to explore the learning problems and the resources that students use to overcome problems in undergraduate industrial design studio courses. A survey with open-type questions was conducted to collect data.…

  8. Content-Intensive Courses in an Undergraduate Science Education Minor and Impacts on Participating Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czworkowski, John; Seethaler, Sherry

    2013-01-01

    The California Teach Program at the University of California, San Diego, recruits and prepares undergraduates interested in teaching science and mathematics. One of the products of the program is a set of courses taught by faculty in science disciplines that integrate subject matter with theories of learning and instruction, with the goal of…

  9. 34 CFR 691.6 - Duration of student eligibility-undergraduate course of study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Duration of student eligibility-undergraduate course of study. 691.6 Section 691.6 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (CONTINUED) ACADEMIC COMPETITIVENESS GRANT (ACG) AND NATIONAL SCIENCE...

  10. A Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience Investigating p300 Bromodomain Mutations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanle, Erin K.; Tsun, Ian K.; Strahl, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) provide an opportunity for students to engage in experiments with outcomes that are unknown to both the instructor and students. These experiences allow students and instructors to collaboratively bridge the research laboratory and classroom, and provide research experiences for a large…

  11. Research and Teaching: Development of Undergraduate Teaching Assistants as Effective Instructors in STEM Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philipp, Stephanie B.; Tretter, Thomas; Rich, Christine V.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the development of peer mentoring skills and deepening of content knowledge by trained and supported undergraduate teaching assistants working with students in entry-level STEM courses across nine departments at a large research-intensive U.S. university.

  12. Assessment of Knowledge and Level of Satisfaction of Nursing Undergraduates in a Pressure Ulcer Online Course

    PubMed Central

    Aroldi, Juscilynne B. C.; Peres, Heloisa H. H.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the effectiveness of two different educational modalities in an online course on pressure ulcers by comparing the degree of knowledge and level of satisfaction of nursing undergraduate students. The result will ground the adoption of Information and Communication Technologies in the teaching process in nursing. PMID:24199036

  13. Approaches to the Teaching of Bioethics and Professional Ethics in Undergraduate Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downie, Roger; Clarkeburn, Henriikka

    2005-01-01

    The role of ethics in bioscience undergraduate degrees is now widely accepted, but how ethics should be taught, who should teach it and what the curriculum should include are matters for debate. This article discusses teaching strategies: specialist options, or embed ethics in other courses, or both; use of professional philosophers, or…

  14. Comparing Assessment Methods as Predictors of Student Learning in an Undergraduate Mathematics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorter, Nichole A.; Young, Cynthia Y.

    2011-01-01

    This experiment was designed to determine which assessment method: continuous assessment (in the form of daily in-class quizzes), cumulative assessment (in the form of online homework), or project-based learning, best predicted student learning (dependent upon post-test grades) in an undergraduate mathematics course. Participants included 117…

  15. The Relevance of Sport and Exercise Psychology in Undergraduate Course Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Christopher T.; Robbins, Jamie E.

    2015-01-01

    Given the growth of Sport and Exercise Psychology (SEP) in recent decades, and the interdisciplinary nature of research and practice in the field, it may be particularly relevant in undergraduate courses and textbooks. However, no studies to date have examined the relative presence of the field. Accordingly, a primary aim of the study described in…

  16. Embedding Information Literacy in a First-Year Business Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Robin; Becker, Karen; Clark, Lynette; Collins, Sue

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a project to embed information literacy skills development in a first-year undergraduate business course at an Australian university. In accordance with prior research suggesting that first-year students are over-confident about their skills, the project used an optional online quiz to allow students to pre-test their…

  17. Designing the Sustainable Foodshed: A Cross-Disciplinary Undergraduate Environmental Studies Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Nevin

    2010-01-01

    This article demonstrates the educational value of an undergraduate course that integrates design and the liberal arts to teach about ecological systems, using study of the university campus as the means to connect theory and practice. It presents the curricular goals, objectives, results, and lessons learned from a qualitative case study of a…

  18. A Portable Bioinformatics Course for Upper-Division Undergraduate Curriculum in Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floraino, Wely B.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the challenges that bioinformatics education is facing and describes a bioinformatics course that is successfully taught at the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, to the fourth year undergraduate students in biological sciences, chemistry, and computer science. Information on lecture and computer practice…

  19. An Undergraduate Course in Adult Development: When the Virtual Adult Is an Adult

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    An aspect of an undergraduate psychology course on adult development was the preparation of case records on adults who consented to be studied. Participants (1) developed their abilities to observe and accurately record adult behavior across a variety of ages and contexts; (2) withheld judgments about behavior when evidence was lacking; (3)…

  20. A 10-Year Assessment of Information and Communication Technology Tasks Required in Undergraduate Agriculture Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, Leslie D.; Johnson, Donald M.; Cox, Casandra

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to assess required information and communication technology (ICT) tasks in selected undergraduate agriculture courses in a land-grant university during a 10-year period. Selected agriculture faculty members in the fall 1999 (n = 63), 2004 (n = 55), and 2009 (n = 64) semesters were surveyed to determine the ICT tasks they required…

  1. Investigation of the Reasons of Negative Perceptions of Undergraduate Students Regarding the Modern Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aksakalli, Ayhan; Salar, Riza; Turgut, Umit

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the negative perceptions of undergraduate students regarding modern physics course and the causes of their negative perceptions have been investigated. For this investigation, a qualitative and quantitative method (mix method) was chosen for data collection and analysis. The study group of the research consists of a total of 169…

  2. Student Usage Patterns and Perceptions for Differentiated Lab Exercises in an Undergraduate Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mok, H. N.

    2012-01-01

    Differentiated instruction in the form of tiered take-home lab exercises was implemented for students of an undergraduate-level programming course. This paper attempts to uncover the perceptions and usage patterns of students toward these new lab exercises using a comprehensive survey. Findings reveal that these tiered exercises are generally very…

  3. Student Perceptions of Effective Use of Tablet PC Recorded Lectures in Undergraduate Mathematics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Caroline; Sneddon, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    Tablet PCs have been increasingly used in undergraduate courses to create recorded lectures that are close copies of the live lectures. Research has shown that students are largely positive about the availability of tablet PC recorded lectures. However, there is some concern that the availability of such faithful recordings may encourage students…

  4. Effects of Active Learning on Enhancing Student Critical Thinking in an Undergraduate General Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kyoungna; Sharma, Priya; Land, Susan M.; Furlong, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    To enhance students' critical thinking in an undergraduate general science course, we designed and implemented active learning modules by incorporating group-based learning with authentic tasks, scaffolding, and individual reports. This study examined the levels of critical thinking students exhibited in individual reports and the students'…

  5. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Collaborative Computer-Intensive Projects in an Undergraduate Psychometrics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barchard, Kimberly A.; Pace, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    Undergraduate psychometrics classes often use computer-intensive active learning projects. However, little research has examined active learning or computer-intensive projects in psychometrics courses. We describe two computer-intensive collaborative learning projects used to teach the design and evaluation of psychological tests. Course…

  6. Computer, Video, and Rapid-Cycling Plant Projects in an Undergraduate Plant Breeding Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, T. E.

    1993-01-01

    Studies the perceived effectiveness of four student projects involving videotape production, computer conferencing, microcomputer simulation, and rapid-cycling Brassica breeding for undergraduate plant breeding students in two course offerings in consecutive years. Linking of the computer conferencing and video projects improved the rating of the…

  7. The Pattern of History of Psychology Teaching on British Undergraduate Psychology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Graham

    2005-01-01

    Teaching of History of Psychology is likely to become increasingly important as the British Psychological Society's 2002 guidelines for approved undergraduate courses are implemented. Results of a survey of History of Psychology teaching during the academic year 1999-2000 are summarised and discussed in the light of these new requirements. While…

  8. Creative Learning in a Microdevice Research-Inspired Elective Course for Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minerick, Adrienne R.

    2010-01-01

    An implementation and assessment of three creative-learning mechanisms in a research-inspired split undergraduate/graduate course in Analytical Microdevice Technology is described. Microscale research is challenging to incorporate into the classroom due to the phenomena length-scales and the creating learning strategies were used to promote…

  9. Bringing Environmental Sustainability to Undergraduate Engineering Education: Experiences in an Inter-Disciplinary Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aurandt, Jennifer; Borchers, Andrew Scott; Lynch-Caris, Terri; El-Sayed, Jacqueline; Hoff, Craig

    2012-01-01

    This paper chronicles the development of an interdisciplinary course in environmentally conscious design at Kettering University, a technologically focused Midwestern university. Funded by the National Science Foundation, a team of six faculty members at Kettering University adapted work done by Ford Motor Company to educate undergraduate STEM…

  10. Student Perceptions of the Cell Biology Laboratory Learning Environment in Four Undergraduate Science Courses in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Juan, Joaquin; Pérez-Cañaveras, Rosa M.; Segovia, Yolanda; Girela, Jose Luis; Martínez-Ruiz, Noemi; Romero-Rameta, Alejandro; Gómez-Torres, Maria José; Vizcaya-Moreno, M. Flores

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology is an academic discipline that organises and coordinates the learning of the structure, function and molecular composition of cells in some undergraduate biomedical programs. Besides course content and teaching methodologies, the laboratory environment is considered a key element in the teaching of and learning of cell biology. The…

  11. The Use of a Computer Algebra System in Capstone Mathematics Courses for Undergraduate Mathematics Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Gary A.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the use of a computer algebra system in a capstone mathematics course for undergraduate mathematics majors preparing to teach secondary school mathematics. Provides sample exercises intended to demonstrate how the power of a computer algebra system such as MAPLE can contribute to desired outcomes including reinforcing and strengthening…

  12. Faculty Beliefs about the Purposes for Teaching Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Michael R.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a phenomenographic analysis of faculty beliefs about the purposes for teaching upper-division physical chemistry courses in the undergraduate curriculum. A purposeful sampling strategy was used to recruit a diverse group of faculty for interviews. Collectively, the participating faculty regularly teach or have taught…

  13. A Systematic Approach to Educating the Emerging Adult Learner in Undergraduate Management Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dachner, Alison M.; Polin, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Management education research has provided educators with new instructional tools to improve course design and update the methods used in the classroom. In an effort to provide the typical undergraduate management student with the best possible learning experience and outcomes, it is important to recognize how and why these new activities benefit…

  14. Reader Comment: Is a Doctorate Necessary to Teach Undergraduate Engineering Courses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Edwin G.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses some of the reasons in favor of hiring non-Ph.D's to teach undergraduate engineering courses. Also presents results of a survey at the United States Merchant Marine Academy to determine student opinions on the importance of a doctorate to teaching. Results indicate non-Ph.D's earned a higher rating. (BC)

  15. Investigating the Perceptions of UKM Undergraduates towards an English for Science and Technology Online Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thang, Siew Ming; Bidmeshki, Leila

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the perceptions of Malaysian undergraduates of the Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) towards an online English for science and technology course in terms of their improvement in reading skills and strategies, their autonomy and their motivation. These three areas were used as the focal…

  16. Growth Patterns and E-Moderating Supports in Asynchronous Online Discussions in an Undergraduate Blended Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghadirian, Hajar; Ayub, Ahmad Fauzi Mohd; Bakar, Kamariah Binti Abu; Hassanzadeh, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a case study of asynchronous online discussions' (AOD) growth patterns in an undergraduate blended course to address the gap in our current understanding of how threads are developed in peer-moderated AODs. Building on a taxonomy of thread pattern proposed by Chan, Hew and Cheung (2009), growth patterns of thirty-six forums…

  17. Blogging as a Social Medium in Undergraduate Courses: Sense of Community Best Predictor of Perceived Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Top, Ercan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine pre-service teachers' sense of community, perception of collaborative learning, and perceived learning. Fifty pre-service teachers from two undergraduate ICT courses which incorporated blogs participated in this study. The data were obtained via three online questionnaires (Collaborative Learning scale,…

  18. Graduate Attribute Attainment in a Multi-Level Undergraduate Geography Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mager, Sarah; Spronken-Smith, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    We investigated students' perceptions of graduate attributes in a multi-level (second and third year) geography course. A case study with mixed methodology was employed, with data collected through focus groups and a survey. We found that undergraduate geography students can identify the skills, knowledge and attributes that are developed…

  19. Enhancing an Undergraduate Business Statistics Course: Linking Teaching and Learning with Assessment Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairfield-Sonn, James W.; Kolluri, Bharat; Rogers, Annette; Singamsetti, Rao

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines several ways in which teaching effectiveness and student learning in an undergraduate Business Statistics course can be enhanced. First, we review some key concepts in Business Statistics that are often challenging to teach and show how using real data sets assist students in developing deeper understanding of the concepts.…

  20. Integrating the Graduate, Undergraduate and Education Curricula: Training Qualified Staff for the Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Pamela L.; And Others

    To explore the quality of the basic course in speech communication it is useful to examine the role of graduate teaching assistants (GTA) and undergraduate teaching assistants (UTA). The first goal was to search the literature for information concerning the use (or lack thereof) of GTAs and UTAs and to explore the potential benefits and drawbacks…

  1. On Solid Legal Ground: Bringing Information Literacy to Undergraduate-Level Law Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryesky, Kenneth H.

    2007-01-01

    The complexities of the Internet and other electronic data technologies have greatly heightened the information literacy needs of students in all subjects. Law courses are common components of many undergraduate programs and other settings external to a law degree program. The field of law has many information literacy aspects which are…

  2. Crossing the Atlantic: Integrating Cross-Cultural Experiences into Undergraduate Business Courses Using Virtual Communities Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luethge, Denise J.; Raska, David; Greer, Bertie M.; O'Connor, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Today's business school academics are tasked with pedagogy that offers students an understanding of the globalization of markets and the cross-cultural communication skills needed in today's business environment. The authors describe how a virtual cross-cultural experience was integrated into an undergraduate business course and used as an…

  3. Evaluating the Use of Reflective Practice in a Nonprofessional, Undergraduate Clinical Communication Skills Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beveridge, Tyler S.; Fruchter, Lauren L.; Sanmartin, Cleo V.; deLottinville, Carl B.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the quality of reflective practice being achieved in educational settings is inadequate. Our study aims to determine the level of reflection present in written student reflections in a nonprofessional undergraduate course. We also seek to explore student and instructor perspectives on the value of reflective practices.…

  4. Incorporating Domestic Violence Awareness through an Undergraduate Reading Course Focused on Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lelli, Colleen M.

    2010-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined preservice teachers' awareness of domestic violence through an undergraduate reading course which focused on children's literature. Pre and post surveys were administered to preservice teachers to determine whether their knowledge and skills in recognizing signs of domestic violence in behaviors of the elementary…

  5. Expectations and Implementations of the Flipped Classroom Model in Undergraduate Mathematics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naccarato, Emilie; Karakok, Gulden

    2015-01-01

    The flipped classroom model is being used more frequently in undergraduate mathematics courses. As with any new teaching model, in-depth investigations of both various implementation styles and how the new model improves student learning are needed. Currently, many practitioners have been sharing their implementations of this model. However, there…

  6. A Collaborative Project to Integrate Information Literacy Skills into an Undergraduate Psychology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkett, Melissa; Hughes, Amy

    2013-01-01

    A collaborative project between an academic librarian and faculty member was implemented in an undergraduate psychology course with the goal of integrating specific information literacy learning outcomes relating to students' use of resources. As part of a semester-long, cumulative project, students' annotated bibliography assignments (N = 67),…

  7. 34 CFR 691.6 - Duration of student eligibility-undergraduate course of study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duration of student eligibility-undergraduate course of study. 691.6 Section 691.6 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ACADEMIC COMPETITIVENESS GRANT (ACG) AND NATIONAL SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS ACCESS...

  8. 34 CFR 691.6 - Duration of student eligibility-undergraduate course of study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Duration of student eligibility-undergraduate course of study. 691.6 Section 691.6 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (CONTINUED) ACADEMIC...

  9. Teaching Structure: Student Use of Software Tools for Understanding Macromolecular Structure in an Undergraduate Biochemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaswal, Sheila S.; O'Hara, Patricia B.; Williamson, Patrick L.; Springer, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    Because understanding the structure of biological macromolecules is critical to understanding their function, students of biochemistry should become familiar not only with viewing, but also with generating and manipulating structural representations. We report a strategy from a one-semester undergraduate biochemistry course to integrate use of…

  10. Guidelines for an Introductory Undergraduate Course in Physical Education Teacher Education. Guidance Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castelli, Darla M.; Woods, Amelia M.; Lambdin, Dolly; Hall, Tina; Webster, Colin

    2010-01-01

    The intent of teacher education is to develop a person's skill, knowledge and ability to foster learning in pre-K-12 education settings. Preparation in this field of education carries added complexities, in that physical educators must address psychomotor, cognitive and affective goals. An introductory course for undergraduates should overview the…

  11. The Flipped Class: A Method to Address the Challenges of an Undergraduate Statistics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Stephanie Gray

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate statistics courses are perceived as challenging by both students and instructors. Students' attitudes, motivation, math anxiety, and preparedness can negatively impact the student and instructor experience and have the potential to negatively impact student learning. This article describes an attempt to address some of these…

  12. A Writing-Intensive, Methods-Based Laboratory Course for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colabroy, Keri L.

    2011-01-01

    Engaging undergraduate students in designing and executing original research should not only be accompanied by technique training but also intentional instruction in the critical analysis and writing of scientific literature. The course described here takes a rigorous approach to scientific reading and writing using primary literature as the model…

  13. Investigating the Use of a Digital Library in an Inquiry-Based Undergraduate Geology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apedoe, Xornam S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a qualitative research study designed to investigate the opportunities and obstacles presented by a digital library for supporting teaching and learning in an inquiry-based undergraduate geology course. Data for this study included classroom observations and field-notes of classroom practices, questionnaires, and…

  14. Participation in Research Program: A Novel Course in Undergraduate Education of Life Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Xuanwei; Lin, Juan; Yin, Yizhou; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2007-01-01

    A novel course, "Participation in Research Program (PRP)" in life sciences is open for 1st to 3rd year undergraduates. PRP introduces the principles of a variety of biological methods and techniques and also offers an opportunity to explore some specific knowledge in more detail prior to thesis research. In addition, the PRP introduces some…

  15. Online Video Tutorials Increase Learning of Difficult Concepts in an Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Yi; Swenson, Sandra; Lents, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Educational technology has enhanced, even revolutionized, pedagogy in many areas of higher education. This study examines the incorporation of video tutorials as a supplement to learning in an undergraduate analytical chemistry course. The concepts and problems in which students faced difficulty were first identified by assessing students'…

  16. Making the Grade in Undergraduate Biology Courses: Factors that Distinguish High and Low Achievers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nist, Sherrie L.; And Others

    The factors that influence the performance of undergraduate students in introductory biology courses were studied, considering cognitive, metacognitive, and behavioral factors. From 612 participants volunteering, 52 consistent high performers and 57 consistent low performers were selected. Information was collected on their study habits,…

  17. Strategies for Using Peer-Assisted Learning Effectively in an Undergraduate Bioinformatics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Casey; Ayon, Carlos; Moberg-Parker, Jordan; Levis-Fitzgerald, Marc; Sanders, Erin R.

    2013-01-01

    This study used a mixed methods approach to evaluate hybrid peer-assisted learning approaches incorporated into a bioinformatics tutorial for a genome annotation research project. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from undergraduates who enrolled in a research-based laboratory course during two different academic terms at UCLA.…

  18. Integrating Hands-On Undergraduate Research in an Applied Spatial Science Senior Level Capstone Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulhavy, David L.; Unger, Daniel R.; Hung, I-Kuai; Douglass, David

    2015-01-01

    A senior within a spatial science Ecological Planning capstone course designed an undergraduate research project to increase his spatial science expertise and to assess the hands-on instruction methodology employed within the Bachelor of Science in Spatial Science program at Stephen F Austin State University. The height of 30 building features…

  19. Assessment within the Augustana Model of Undergraduate Discipline-Specific Information Literacy Credit Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goebel, Nancy; Neff, Paul; Mandeville, Angie

    2007-01-01

    Augustana (located in Camrose, Alberta, Canada, and formerly known as Augustana University College) is an undergraduate liberal arts and sciences faculty of the University of Alberta with an enrollment of approximately 1,100 students. The fall of 2001 marked the inception of for-credit discipline-specific information literacy (IL) course offerings…

  20. Assessing the Effectiveness of Undergraduate Diversity Courses Using the Multicultural Experiences Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    You, Di; Matteo, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The Multicultural Experiences Questionnaire (MEQ) is a validated and easy-to-administer tool for assessing individuals' multicultural competencies (Narvaez & Hill, 2010). The current study examined the utility of the MEQ for assessing the impact of undergraduate diversity courses. A total of 137 students in six university-designated diversity…

  1. Industrial Chemistry: A Series of New Courses at the Undergraduate Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jasinski, Jerry P.; Miller, Robert E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes four courses in the undergraduate bachelor of science program in industrial chemistry at Keene State College (NH). They are (1) introduction to industrial chemistry; (2) polymers--synthesis and separation techniques; (3) inorganic industrial processes; and (4) organic industrial processes. (JN)

  2. "I Hate History": A Study of Student Engagement in Community College Undergraduate History Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrotta, Katherine Assante; Bohan, Chara Haeussler

    2013-01-01

    Many instructors seek to improve student engagement, but determining how to achieve student engagement can be complex and complicated. The authors sought to explore how the implementation of active-learning strategies in undergraduate history courses at a metropolitan community college using graphic organizers and group discussion impacted student…

  3. Tracheobronchial Cast Production and Use in an Undergraduate Human Anatomy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Lee Anne

    2008-01-01

    Silastic E RTV silicone was used to produce tracheobronchial cast for use in an undergraduate human anatomy course. Following air-drying, the trachea and lungs were injected with E RTV silicone and allowed to cure for 24 hr. The parenchyma was then removed from the tracheobronchial cast by maceration and boiling and then whitened in a 10% solution…

  4. 38 CFR 21.7670 - Measurement of courses leading to a standard, undergraduate college degree.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Measurement of courses leading to a standard, undergraduate college degree. 21.7670 Section 21.7670 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Educational Assistance for Members of the...

  5. Princeton Science and Engineering Education Initiative: Revising Undergraduate Environmental Science Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riihimaki, C. A.; Sealfon, C. D.; Paine, E. N.; O'Donnell, F. C.; Caylor, K. K.; Wilcove, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Science and Engineering Education Initiative at Princeton University aims to inspire and prepare all undergraduates, irrespective of their majors, to become scientifically and technologically literate citizens and decision-makers. Launched by the faculty on the Council on Science and Technology in September 2011, the initiative involves revising and creating science and engineering courses that emphasize the role of science in society. The course "Fundamentals of Environmental Studies" will serve as a model course for the initiative starting with revisions to the course in Fall 2012. Given the general interest undergraduates have for sustainability topics and the obvious connections between sustainability and society, this course should generate ample interest from students across the campus. We have begun the Initiative by defining student-centered learning goals and surveying students' attitudes towards science and engineering. Course by course, we are also gradually applying research-based teaching methods to better align course activities with learning goals, assessing learning gains, and creating a repository of successful methods and courses. Among the changes to "Fundamentals of Environmental Studies" will be a greater emphasis on science communication, such as incorporating an assignment in which students track the evolution of communicating a research project, from journal article to newspaper coverage to editorials.

  6. Enticing Students to Enter into Undergraduate Research: The Instrumentality of an Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S.; Johnson, Melissa L.

    2010-01-01

    To encourage students to seek research opportunities with campus faculty, one large university in the Southeast created a course entitled Science for All. A major goal of the course was to encourage students to work directly with faculty on research projects of their interest. Overall, the findings show that some of the participants began to…

  7. Incorporating Scientific Publishing into an Undergraduate Neuroscience Course: A Case Study Using IMPULSE

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Leslie Sargent; Allen, Laura; Cronise, Kim; Juneja, Natasha; Kohn, Rebecca; McClellan, Katherine; Miller, Ashley; Nazir, Azka; Patel, Andy; Sweitzer, Sarah M.; Vickery, Erin; Walton, Anna; Young, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The journal IMPULSE offers undergraduates worldwide the opportunity to publish research and serve as peer reviewers for the submissions of others. Undergraduate faculty have recognized the journal’s value in engaging students working in their labs in the publication process. However, integration of scientific publication into an undergraduate laboratory classroom setting has been lacking. We report here on a course at Ursinus College where 20 students taking Molecular Neurobiology were required to submit manuscripts to IMPULSE. The syllabus allowed for the laboratory research to coincide with the background research and writing of the manuscript. Students completed their projects on the impact of drugs on the Daphnia magna nervous system while producing manuscripts ready for submission by week 7 of the course. Findings from a survey completed by the students and perceptions of the faculty member teaching the course indicated that students spent much more time writing, were more focused on completing the assays, completed the assays with larger data sets, were more engaged in learning the scientific concepts and were more thorough with their revisions of the paper knowing that it might be published. Further, the professor found she was more thorough in critiquing students’ papers knowing they would be externally reviewed. Incorporating journal submission into the course stimulated an in depth writing experience and allowed for a deeper exploration of the topic than students would have experienced otherwise. This case study provides evidence that IMPULSE can be successfully used as a means of incorporating scientific publication into an undergraduate laboratory science course. This approach to teaching undergraduate neuroscience allows for a larger number of students to have hands-on research and scientific publishing experience than would be possible with the current model of a few students in a faculty member’s laboratory. This report illustrates that IMPULSE

  8. Incorporating Scientific Publishing into an Undergraduate Neuroscience Course: A Case Study Using IMPULSE.

    PubMed

    Jones, Leslie Sargent; Allen, Laura; Cronise, Kim; Juneja, Natasha; Kohn, Rebecca; McClellan, Katherine; Miller, Ashley; Nazir, Azka; Patel, Andy; Sweitzer, Sarah M; Vickery, Erin; Walton, Anna; Young, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The journal IMPULSE offers undergraduates worldwide the opportunity to publish research and serve as peer reviewers for the submissions of others. Undergraduate faculty have recognized the journal's value in engaging students working in their labs in the publication process. However, integration of scientific publication into an undergraduate laboratory classroom setting has been lacking. We report here on a course at Ursinus College where 20 students taking Molecular Neurobiology were required to submit manuscripts to IMPULSE. The syllabus allowed for the laboratory research to coincide with the background research and writing of the manuscript. Students completed their projects on the impact of drugs on the Daphnia magna nervous system while producing manuscripts ready for submission by week 7 of the course. Findings from a survey completed by the students and perceptions of the faculty member teaching the course indicated that students spent much more time writing, were more focused on completing the assays, completed the assays with larger data sets, were more engaged in learning the scientific concepts and were more thorough with their revisions of the paper knowing that it might be published. Further, the professor found she was more thorough in critiquing students' papers knowing they would be externally reviewed. Incorporating journal submission into the course stimulated an in depth writing experience and allowed for a deeper exploration of the topic than students would have experienced otherwise. This case study provides evidence that IMPULSE can be successfully used as a means of incorporating scientific publication into an undergraduate laboratory science course. This approach to teaching undergraduate neuroscience allows for a larger number of students to have hands-on research and scientific publishing experience than would be possible with the current model of a few students in a faculty member's laboratory. This report illustrates that IMPULSE can

  9. Developing an International Combined Applied Surgical Science and Wet Lab Simulation Course as an Undergraduate Teaching Model

    PubMed Central

    Sideris, Michail; Papalois, Apostolos; Tsoulfas, Georgios; Majumder, Sanjib; Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Koletsis, Efstratios; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Lymperopoulos, Nikolaos; Papagrigoriadis, Savvas; Papalois, Vassilios; Zografos, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Background. Essential Skills in the Management of Surgical Cases (ESMSC) is an international, animal model-based course. It combines interactive lectures with basic ex vivo stations and more advanced wet lab modules, that is, in vivo dissections and Heart Transplant Surgery on a swine model. Materials and Methods. Forty-nine medical students (male, N = 27, female N = 22, and mean age = 23.7 years) from King's College London (KCL) and Greek Medical Schools attended the course. Participants were assessed with Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS), as well as Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs). Paired t-test associations were used to evaluate whether there was statistically significant improvement in their performance. Aim. To evaluate the effectiveness of a combined applied surgical science and wet lab simulation course as a teaching model for surgical skills at the undergraduate level. Results. The mean MCQ score was improved by 2.33/32 (P < 0.005). Surgical skills competences, as defined by DOPS scores, were improved in a statically significant manner (P < 0.005 for all paired t-test correlations). Conclusions. ESMSC seems to be an effective teaching model, which improves the understanding of the surgical approach and the basic surgical skills. In vivo models could be used potentially as a step further in the Undergraduate Surgical Education. PMID:26613083

  10. Attendance and Student Performance in Undergraduate Chemistry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyubartseva, Ganna; Mallik, Uma Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest that attendance may be one of the key factors which influence student performance. Although there have been many studies in introductory science courses, there have been virtually no studies which analyze and compare students' performance from different types of institutions as well as different level of classes. Our study…

  11. Assessing Practical Laboratory Skills in Undergraduate Molecular Biology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Lynne; Koenders, Annette; Gynnild, Vidar

    2012-01-01

    This study explored a new strategy of assessing laboratory skills in a molecular biology course to improve: student effort in preparation for and participation in laboratory work; valid evaluation of learning outcomes; and students' employment prospects through provision of evidence of their skills. Previously, assessment was based on written…

  12. Case studies approach for an undergraduate astrobiology course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burko, Lior M.; Enger, Sandra

    2013-04-01

    Case studies is a well known and widely used method in law schools, medical schools, and business schools, but relatively little used in physics or astronomy courses. We developed an astrobiology course based strongly on the case studies approach, and after teaching it first at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, we have adapted it and are now teaching it at Alabama A&M University, a HBCU. The case studies approach uses several well tested and successful teaching methods - including group work, peer instruction, current interest topics, just-in-time teaching, &c. We have found that certain styles of cases are more popular among students than other styles, and will revise our cases to reflect such student preferences. We chose astrobiology -- an inherently multidisciplinary field -- because of the popularity of the subject matter, its frequent appearance in the popular media (news stories about searches for life in the universe, the discovery of Earth-like exoplanets, etc, in addition to SciFi movies and novels), and the rapid current progress in the field. In this talk we review briefly the case studies method, the styles of cases used in our astrobiology course, and student response to the course as found in our assessment analysis.

  13. Evidence for Experiential Learning in Undergraduate Teaching Farm Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazurkewicz, Melissa; Harder, Amy; Roberts, T. Grady

    2012-01-01

    Higher education institutions are attempting to use teaching farms to provide hands-on learning experiences to students, but there is a lack of research on the degree of cognitive engagement at teaching farms. Kolb's model provided the theoretical framework for assessing evidence of experiential learning in courses using teaching farms.…

  14. A Research-Based Development Economics Course for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Prakarsh; Guo, Hongye; Morales, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The authors present details of a research-based course in development economics taught at a private liberal arts college. There were three key elements in this class: teaching of applied econometrics, group presentations reviewing published and working papers in development economics, and using concepts taught in class to write an original…

  15. Students' Perceptions of Blog Use in an Undergraduate Linguistics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koç, Didem Koban; Koç, Serdar Engin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the perceptions of learners' blog use in a Linguistics course offered in an English Language Teaching program at one of the largest government universities in Turkey. A total of 71 students participated in the study. The students were asked to respond to several blog questions about the linguistics lectures…

  16. A Strategy to Reduce Plagiarism in an Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belter, Ronald W.; du Pre, Athena

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated how effective an online academic integrity module was at reducing the occurrence of plagiarism in a written assignment for a university course. In a preintervention comparison group, plagiarism was detected in 25.8% of papers submitted, compared with only 6.5% in the group that completed the academic integrity module. The…

  17. Integrating Scientific Inquiry into an Undergraduate Applied Remote Sensing Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivanpillai, R.

    2015-12-01

    Inquiry-based learning (IBL) methods require students to engage in learning activities instead of focusing on learning concepts and facts. Working with the instructor, students have to formulate their research questions, collect and analyze data, and arrive at conclusions. In other words, the focus is shifted from preparing for exams to learning to apply the concepts introduced in the classroom. This experience could result in better understanding of the scientific concepts but instructors have to devote more time for designing and implementing IBL methods in their classroom. At the University of Wyoming, an applied remote sensing course has been taught since 2008. Students enrolled in this course are required to complete a project that is designed around IBL methods. Students do not receive detailed instructions for completing their project, but are trained to develop their own research questions, design an experiment, review literature, and collect, analyze and interpret their data. Additionally they learn about uncertainties and strategies for addressing them at various stages of their project. This presentation will describe the work involved in designing, implementing and mentoring students to successfully complete the course requirements and learn scientific research methods. Lessons learned from this course could provide insights to other instructors interested in implementing IBL or other active learning methods in their classroom.

  18. Cooperative Learning in a Soil Mechanics Course at Undergraduate Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinho-Lopes, M.; Macedo, J.; Bonito, F.

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of the Bologna Process enforced a significant change on traditional learning models, which were focused mainly on the transmission of knowledge. The results obtained in a first attempt at implementation of a cooperative learning model in the Soil Mechanics I course of the Department of Civil Engineering of the University of…

  19. A Second-Year Undergraduate Course in Applied Differential Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahidy, Thomas Z.

    1991-01-01

    Presents the framework for a chemical engineering course using ordinary differential equations to solve problems with the underlying strategy of concisely discussing the theory behind each solution technique without extensions to formal proofs. Includes typical class illustrations, student responses to this strategy, and reaction of the…

  20. Clearing the Fog from the Undergraduate Course in Linear Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Damon

    2007-01-01

    For over a decade it has been a common observation that a "fog" passes over the course in linear algebra once abstract vector spaces are presented. See [2, 3]. We show how this fog may be cleared by having the students translate "abstract" vector-space problems to isomorphic "concrete" settings, solve the "concrete" problem either by hand or with…

  1. The Use of Case Studies in an Undergraduate Biochemistry Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornely, Kathleen

    1998-04-01

    Most college biochemistry courses are taught in a format in which the professor lectures and the student memorizes. Although this is the best method for conveying large amounts of material, it puts the student in the position of passive learner. The lecture-based format has not been abandoned, but has been supplemented with case study projects assigned to the students upon completion of the intermediary metabolism unit. The case study assignment is modeled on similar exercises carried out in medical school biochemistry courses in the US and around the world. A description of the assignment follows: a group of 4-5 students is given a case study which gives the medical history of a patient with an inherited metabolic disease. The group is asked to provide biochemical explanations for the patient's symptoms and to suggest an effective course of treatment. The evaluation consists of a short paper that the students write as a group. The assignment provides the opportunity for small group interaction within a larger class and emphasizes cooperative-collaborative learning. Students learn by researching the topic on their own and debating it in small group discussions, and in so doing, gain a sense of confidence in themselves and the material they have learned over the course of the semester. Solving a "real-life" problem helps develop analytical and higher-order thinking skills and allows the students to see how biochemical concepts they have learned apply to a clinical situation.

  2. The Future of Physics in the Undergraduate Education of Biologists: Beyond the Algebra Based Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leone, Charles

    2005-03-01

    The success of quantitative and computational methods of research in the biological sciences has incited calls for change in the undergraduate biological sciences curriculum. This reevaluation of the biology curriculum presents physicists with an opportunity to rethink and rebuild service courses such as the introductory algebra based physics course. Beyond the one-year introductory course, some of the more ambitious curricular reforms include calls for a third semester of physics for students who plan on doing biomedical research. This talk will briefly explore the open question of how we can best serve the evolving needs of our colleagues in biology by considering the calls for change in the biology curriculum such as BIO 2010 and reviewing the current state of the introductory physics course for biologists. In addition, this talk will review the successes and failures of research based courses such as the introductory calculus-based physics course for biologists at Cal State San Marcos.

  3. Physics of climate change, taught as a topics a course for undergraduate physics majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Michael

    2012-10-01

    While anthropogenic (human-caused) climate change is generally accepted in the scientific community, there is considerable skepticism among the general population. Science students are often asked by their peers, family members, and others, whether they ``believe'' climate change is occurring and what should be done about it (if anything). While the pertinent material is covered in undergraduate physics courses, it helps to review the basics in order to develop an educated perspective on this topic that is very volatile (socially and politically). The basic topics are introductory quantum mechanics (discrete energy levels of atomic systems), molecular spectroscopy, blackbody radiation, and appreciation for the scientific method (particularly peer-reviewed research). These topics are usually covered in undergraduate modern physics and thermodynamics courses, but a separate course on climate change (taught in Spring 2012) helped ``put things together'' for both the students and their professor.

  4. SCALE-UP Your Astronomy and Physics Undergraduate Courses to Incorporate Heliophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rawi, Ahlam N.; Cox, Amanda; Hoshino, Laura; Fitzgerald, Cullen; Cebulka, Rebecca; Rodriguez Garrigues, Alvar; Montgomery, Michele; Velissaris, Chris; Flitsiyan, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Although physics and astronomy courses include heliophysics topics, students still leave these courses without knowing what heliophysics is and how heliophysics relates to their daily lives. To meet goals of NASA's Living With a Star Program of incorporating heliophysics into undergraduate curriculum, UCF Physics has modified courses such as Astronomy (for non-science majors), Astrophysics, and SCALE-UP: Electricity and Magnetism for Engineers and Scientists to incorporate heliophysics topics. In this presentation, we discuss these incorporations and give examples that have been published in NASA Wavelength. In an associated poster, we present data on student learnin

  5. Assessment of Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experiences: A Meeting Report

    PubMed Central

    Auchincloss, Lisa Corwin; Laursen, Sandra L.; Branchaw, Janet L.; Eagan, Kevin; Graham, Mark; Hanauer, David I.; Lawrie, Gwendolyn; McLinn, Colleen M.; Pelaez, Nancy; Rowland, Susan; Towns, Marcy; Trautmann, Nancy M.; Varma-Nelson, Pratibha; Weston, Timothy J.; Dolan, Erin L.

    2014-01-01

    The Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experiences Network (CUREnet) was initiated in 2012 with funding from the National Science Foundation program for Research Coordination Networks in Undergraduate Biology Education. CUREnet aims to address topics, problems, and opportunities inherent to integrating research experiences into undergraduate courses. During CUREnet meetings and discussions, it became apparent that there is need for a clear definition of what constitutes a CURE and systematic exploration of what makes CUREs meaningful in terms of student learning. Thus, we assembled a small working group of people with expertise in CURE instruction and assessment to: 1) draft an operational definition of a CURE, with the aim of defining what makes a laboratory course or project a “research experience”; 2) summarize research on CUREs, as well as findings from studies of undergraduate research internships that would be useful for thinking about how students are influenced by participating in CUREs; and 3) identify areas of greatest need with respect to CURE assessment, and directions for future research on and evaluation of CUREs. This report summarizes the outcomes and recommendations of this meeting. PMID:24591501

  6. Four years' experience of an undergraduate medical nutrition course.

    PubMed Central

    Powell-Tuck, J; Summerbell, C; Holsgrove, G; Garrow, J S

    1997-01-01

    In 1992 the medical colleges of The Royal London and St Bartholomew's hospitals launched a new curriculum in which basic medical sciences were to be integrated with early exposure to clinical medicine in the first phase. The curriculum was to be modular and integrative, combining clinical and medical-science-based teaching of body systems, rather than the traditional teaching by departmental discipline. We describe the inception, content and evaluation of a 7-day course on nutrition which was developed as part of this curriculum. It was rated highly by the students, whose feedback led to important modifications. The programme works well in practice, and could provide a useful guide for other schools about to set up nutrition courses for medical students. PMID:9068433

  7. Designing and Implementing a New Advanced Level Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Angela; Reiss, Michael J.; Rowell, Cathy; Scott, Anne

    2003-01-01

    Salters-Nuffield Advanced Biology is a new advanced level biology course, piloted from September 2002 in England with around 1200 students. This paper discusses the reasons for developing a new advanced biology course at this time, the philosophy of the project and how the materials are being written and the specification devised. The aim of the…

  8. "On the job" learning: A bioinformatics course incorporating undergraduates in actual research projects and manuscript submissions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jason T; Harris, Justine C; Lopez, Oscar J; Valverde, Laura; Borchert, Glen M

    2015-01-01

    The sequencing of whole genomes and the analysis of genetic information continues to fundamentally change biological and medical research. Unfortunately, the people best suited to interpret this data (biologically trained researchers) are commonly discouraged by their own perceived computational limitations. To address this, we developed a course to help alleviate this constraint. Remarkably, in addition to equipping our undergraduates with an informatic toolset, we found our course design helped prepare our students for collaborative research careers in unexpected ways. Instead of simply offering a traditional lecture- or laboratory-based course, we chose a guided inquiry method, where an instructor-selected research question is examined by students in a collaborative analysis with students contributing to experimental design, data collection, and manuscript reporting. While students learn the skills needed to conduct bioinformatic research throughout all sections of the course, importantly, students also gain experience in working as a team and develop important communication skills through working with their partner and the class as a whole, and by contributing to an original research article. Remarkably, in its first three semesters, this novel computational genetics course has generated 45 undergraduate authorships across three peer-reviewed articles. More importantly, the students that took this course acquired a positive research experience, newfound informatics technical proficiency, unprecedented familiarity with manuscript preparation, and an earned sense of achievement. Although this course deals with analyses of genetic systems, we suggest the basic concept of integrating actual research projects into a 16-week undergraduate course could be applied to numerous other research-active academic fields. PMID:25643604

  9. Admission selection criteria as predictors of outcomes in an undergraduate medical course: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Annette; Puddey, Ian B

    2011-01-01

    Background In 1998, a new selection process which utilised an aptitude test and an interview in addition to previous academic achievement was introduced into an Australian undergraduate medical course. Aims To test the outcomes of the selection criteria over an 11-year period. Methods 1174 students who entered the course from secondary school and who enrolled in the MBBS from 1999 through 2009 were studied in relation to specific course outcomes. Regression analyses using entry scores, sex and age as independent variables were tested for their relative value in predicting subsequent academic performance in the 6-year course. The main outcome measures were assessed by weighted average mark for each academic year level; together with results in specific units, defined as either ‘knowledge'-based or ‘clinically’ based. Results Previous academic performance and female sex were the major independent positive predictors of performance in the course. The interview score showed positive predictive power during the latter years of the course and in a range of ‘clinically' based units. This relationship was mediated predominantly by the score for communication skills. Conclusions Results support combining prior academic achievement with the assessment of communication skills in a structured interview as selection criteria into this undergraduate medical course. PMID:21592024

  10. Popularization of remote sensing education and general course construction in undergraduate education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing'ai; Sheng, Zhongyao; Yu, Han

    2014-03-01

    The construction of a course focused on remote sensing is important because it cultivates college students' geographic abilities and popularizes remote sensing technology. Using internet datasets, this article compares data from general undergraduate courses at almost 100 universities located in the United States and China with 3 years of experimental teaching data from the general undergraduate "Remote sensing Region" course at Beijing Normal University. The comparison focuses on curricular concepts, course content, website construction and the popularity of the remote sensing topic. Our research shows that the "remote sensing region" course can promote the geographic abilities of college students by popularizing remote sensing observation technology. The course can improve the overall quality of college students by breaking major barriers, and it can promote global and national consciousness by presenting material with global and regional relevancy. Remote sensing imaging has become known as the third most intuitive geographic language after text and maps. The general remote sensing course have the three following developmental qualities: interdisciplinarity, popularization and internationalization.

  11. Lessons learned from undergraduate students in designing a science-based course in bioethics.

    PubMed

    Loike, John D; Rush, Brittany S; Schweber, Adam; Fischbach, Ruth L

    2013-01-01

    Columbia University offers two innovative undergraduate science-based bioethics courses for student majoring in biosciences and pre-health studies. The goals of these courses are to introduce future scientists and healthcare professionals to the ethical questions they will confront in their professional lives, thus enabling them to strategically address these bioethical dilemmas. These courses incorporate innovative pedagogical methods, case studies, and class discussions to stimulate the students to think creatively about bioethical issues emerging from new biotechnologies. At the end of each course, each student is required to submit a one-page strategy detailing how he or she would resolve a bioethical dilemma. Based on our experience in teaching these courses and on a qualitative analysis of the students' reflections, we offer recommendations for creating an undergraduate science-based course in bioethics. General recommendations include: 1) integrating the science of emerging biotechnologies, their ethical ramifications, and contemporary bioethical theories into interactive class sessions; 2) structuring discussion-based classes to stimulate students to consider the impact of their moral intuitions when grappling with bioethical issues; and 3) using specific actual and futuristic case studies to highlight bioethical issues and to help develop creative problem-solving skills. Such a course sparks students' interests in both science and ethics and helps them analyze bioethical challenges arising from emerging biotechnologies. PMID:24297296

  12. Communication skills course in an Indian undergraduate dental curriculum: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sangappa, Sunila B; Tekian, Ara

    2013-08-01

    This study assessed the impact of a course on communication skills for third-year undergraduate dental students at a dental institute in India. A randomized pretest, posttest controlled trial was conducted with all the students from four cohorts of third-year dental undergraduate students, divided into an intervention group (n=30) and a control group (n=30). The course was developed using Kern's six-step approach to curriculum development. Needs assessment was ascertained, and readings, lectures, and role-plays with real and simulated patients were implemented. Encounters of students during two patient interviews (simulated and real) were rated by two raters using a twenty-seven-item dental consultation communication checklist with a rating scale 0 to 3. Students completed a questionnaire regarding their acceptance of the course. A 2×2 (group × time) ANOVA with group as a between-subjects factor (control vs. experimental) and time as a within-subjects factor (pre vs. post) was performed. The two groups did not differ at pretest but differed significantly at posttest. This study showed that simply attending to patients during a clinical course did not improve professional communication skills. In contrast, the implementation of a course on communication skills did improve the students' dentist-patient interactions. Integrating the teaching and development of a relevant, outcome-based course on communication skills provided clear evidence of communication skills acquisition among these dental students. The course could be introduced in other Indian dental schools. PMID:23929580

  13. A Multidisciplined Teaching Reform of Biomaterials Course for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Feng; Pu, Fang; Liu, Haifeng; Niu, Xufeng; Zhou, Gang; Li, Deyu; Fan, Yubo; Feng, Qingling; Cui, Fu-zhai; Watari, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    The biomaterials science has advanced in a high speed with global science and technology development during the recent decades, which experts predict to be more obvious in the near future with a more significant position for medicine and health care. Although the three traditional subjects, such as medical science, materials science and biology…

  14. Exploring factors affecting attrition of male students from an undergraduate nursing course: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Stott, Amanda

    2007-05-01

    This article reports the findings of a qualitative study that investigated the factors influencing both the academic and clinical practice performance of undergraduate male nursing students at a regional Australian university. The impetus for the study evolved from the recognition that, despite increasing numbers of males choosing to undertake nursing as a career, attrition by males from nursing courses continues to be problematic. In a profession that is hallmarked by critical staff shortages, it was viewed as important to investigate reasons contributing to the attrition of male nursing students enrolled in undergraduate nursing courses. The informants for the research were eight male nursing students enrolled internally in the Bachelor of Nursing course at a regional university in Australia. Data were collected using in-depth interviews and written narratives in the form of a diary. Data were analysed using thematic analysis, the findings revealing that male nursing students face particular challenges from an academic and clinical practice perspective during their university experience. For example, themes identified from interviews and narratives highlighted the fact that there is a tendency for male nursing students to feel isolated and excluded from an academic and clinical perspective. As well as this, the informants in this study clearly highlighted their preference for engaging in the technical aspects of nursing. The implications for nurse educators are emphasized and from this, educational strategies are suggested to facilitate the retention of male nursing students in undergraduate nursing courses. PMID:16887238

  15. Using Free Computational Resources to Illustrate the Drug Design Process in an Undergraduate Medicinal Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, Ricardo P.; Andrade, Saulo F.; Mantoani, Susimaire P.; Eifler-Lima, Vera L.; Silva, Vinicius B.; Kawano, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in, and dissemination of, computer technologies in the field of drug research now enable the use of molecular modeling tools to teach important concepts of drug design to chemistry and pharmacy students. A series of computer laboratories is described to introduce undergraduate students to commonly adopted "in silico" drug design…

  16. Introducing Programmable Logic to Undergraduate Engineering Students in a Digital Electronics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todorovich, E.; Marone, J. A.; Vazquez, M.

    2012-01-01

    Due to significant technological advances and industry requirements, many universities have introduced programmable logic and hardware description languages into undergraduate engineering curricula. This has led to a number of logistical and didactical challenges, in particular for computer science students. In this paper, the integration of some…

  17. Use of a blog in an undergraduate nursing leadership course.

    PubMed

    Reed, Shelly J; Edmunds, Debra

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the use of a blog in a senior leadership clinical nursing course was analyzed qualitatively through two means; focus group interviews of those using the blog, and analysis of blog content. Initial feelings expressed by students were annoyance and intimidation concerning the blogging assignment. These feelings quickly dissipated, with students verbalizing many positive aspects related to the blog, including having a place to reflect, feeling connected as a group, valuing feedback provided by their peers, and learning from theirs and others' experiences. The mechanics of having to synthesize their thoughts in written form, in a shared venue was also identified by students to be helpful for their learning. Blog posts were primarily related to student experiences, with students identifying a "lesson learned" in most posts. Student comments were geared to providing support of fellow students, through words of encouragement or through sharing similar experiences. Instructors felt the blog, in addition to helping students to synthesize their thoughts, helped to monitor how students were learning and progressing throughout the semester, and helped them to transition from nursing student to practicing professional. The researchers concluded that blogging in a senior leadership clinical nursing course promotes reflection is an effective way to enhance student learning. PMID:26299700

  18. Learning Chemistry Research outside the Laboratory: New Graduate and Undergraduate Courses in Research Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildcrout, Steven M.

    2002-11-01

    Without guidance, research students may delay choosing a research advisor and a research problem or may encounter difficulties in understanding the goal and significance of their work and staying focused on it. The students may find writing the thesis or final report to be problematic. To ameliorate such problems at Youngstown State University, we help students structure their research experience by using two courses in research methodology, required respectively for graduate and undergraduate chemistry students as they begin their research projects. The courses include traditional classroom sessions with discussion, as well as exercises in writing and speaking, critiquing a journal article and thesis, and preparing a research proposal. Students work with both the course instructor and the research advisor, integrating the coursework into the students' research projects. Although such courses are not widely used elsewhere, our students and faculty find these courses valuable.

  19. Using Online Space Weather Modeling Resources in a Capstone Undergraduate Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemohn, M.

    2012-04-01

    The University of Michigan offers a senior-undergraduate-level course entitled, "Space Weather Modeling," taken by all of the space weather concentration students in the Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences department. This is the capstone course of our undergraduate series, using the foundational knowledge from the previous courses towards an integrative large-scale numerical modeling study. A fraction of the graduate students also take this course. Because the state-of-the-art modeling capabilities are well beyond what is possible in a single term of programming, this course uses available online model resources, in particular the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), a multi-agency facility hosted by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Students learn not only how to use the codes, but also the various options of what equations to solve to model a specific region of space and the various numerical approaches for implementing the equations within a code. The course is project-based, consisting of multiple written reports and oral presentations, and the technical communication skills are an important component of the grading rubric. Students learn how to conduct a numerical modeling study by critiquing several space weather modeling journal articles, and then carry out their our studies with several of the available codes. In the end, they are familiarized with the available models to know the ranges of validity and applicability for a wide array of space weather applications.

  20. Cooperative learning in a Soil Mechanics course at undergraduate level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho-Lopes, M.; Macedo, J.; Bonito, F.

    2011-05-01

    The implementation of the Bologna Process enforced a significant change on traditional learning models, which were focused mainly on the transmission of knowledge. The results obtained in a first attempt at implementation of a cooperative learning model in the Soil Mechanics I course of the Department of Civil Engineering of the University of Aveiro, Portugal, are presented and discussed. The students were confronted with situations recreating a professional atmosphere in Geotechnics. Mandatory project team assignments to be prepared in groups were implemented, where each student had to fulfil specific and rotational roles, namely, laboratory/informatics technician, analyst, reporter and coordinator. To assess the implemented model, several strategies were used: students' feedback; marks monitoring; questionnaires.

  1. [Expansion of undergraduate courses in nursing: dilemmas and contradictions facing the labor market].

    PubMed

    Silva, Kênia Lara; de Sena, Roseni Rosângela; Grillo, Maria José Cabral; Gandra, Elen Cristiane; da Silveira, Marília Rezende

    2013-10-01

    We sought to analyze, from the perspective of professors and students, the reasons and consequences of the expansion of undergraduate courses in nursing, discussing the dilemmas and the contradictions confronting the labor market. It was a qualitative study with data obtained from focus groups, conducted in 18 undergraduate nursing courses in the state of Minas Gerais, during the period of February to October of 2011. The narratives were submitted to critical discourse analysis. The results indicated that the education of the nurse was permeated by insecurity as to the future integration into the labor market. The insecurity translates into dilemmas that referred to employability and the precariousness of the working conditions. In this context, employment in the family health strategy emerges as a mirage. One glimpses the need for a political agenda with the purpose of discussion about education, the labor market and the determinants of these processes. PMID:24346464

  2. Hybrid Lecture-Online Format Increases Student Grades in an Undergraduate Exercise Physiology Course at a Large Urban University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarlin, Brian K.

    2008-01-01

    Hybrid courses allow students additional exposure to course content that is not possible in a traditional classroom environment. This exposure may lead to an improvement in academic performance. In this report, I describe the transition of a large undergraduate exercise physiology course from a traditional lecture format to a hybrid…

  3. Students Helping Students: Evaluating a Pilot Program of Peer Teaching for an Undergraduate Course in Human Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Paul A.; Love Green, Jennifer K.; Illerbrun, Sara L.; Holness, Duncan A.; Illerbrun, Samantha J.; Haus, Kara A.; Poirier, Sylvianne M.; Sveinson, Katherine L.

    2016-01-01

    The educational literature generally suggests that supplemental instruction (SI) is effective in improving academic performance in traditionally difficult courses. A pilot program of peer teaching based on the SI model was implemented for an undergraduate course in human anatomy. Students in the course were stratified into three groups based on…

  4. Blending Curriculum with Research in an Undergraduate Petrology Course: A Recipe for Success?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, D. A.; Semken, S. C.

    2009-12-01

    In this presentation we discuss the design, key curricular elements, and strengths and weaknesses of an undergraduate course in the Department of Geosciences at Fort Lewis College that was recast to focus on petrologic studies in the Southern Rocky Mountains and Colorado Plateau. Redesign of the course retained an additional petrology option in the curriculum and offered undergraduates a richer opportunity to learn and practice science-research skills. This course emphasizes direct engagement and student responsibility for learning: traits valuable in transforming undergraduates into experienced and competent professionals. Previous offerings of this course have been field based, each having a unique context for research. The primary pedagogical strategy was to blend field studies with inquiry to promote authentic, student-driven research. Students applied and tested their prior knowledge, and used observational and interpretative skills, to investigate major regional rock bodies and geologic histories, as opposed to completing a set of activities with predefined outcomes. In 2010, students will work on an NSF-funded project to test hypotheses on the origin and evolution of mafic magmas of the Navajo volcanic field. This research will most involve petrographic and microanalytical techniques on rock specimens with a subordinate amount of field work. Formative and summative assessment data for previous offerings of this course reveal that these classes have an impact on the academic interests and future successes of students. Assessment data collected from students, and other faculty that interacted with them, indicate that students in this research-oriented petrology course have gained a greater understanding of the elements and complications of research. They have also developed geologic skills and a passion for geologic research that have influenced subsequent academic (and later career) paths of the students.

  5. The Impact of a Business Ethics Course on the Moral Development of Undergraduate and Graduate Business Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigel, Kenneth S.

    2002-01-01

    Pre/posttest data from 177 graduate and 196 undergraduate students in business ethics courses involving case studies and class debate showed that women and undergraduates made the most postcourse gains. Humanities majors had markedly higher posttest scores than any other majors. (Contains 13 references.) (SK)

  6. Getting the Most Out of Dual-Listed Courses: Involving Undergraduate Students in Discussion through Active Learning Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Leslie Lyons; Burkhardt, Bethany L.; Benneyworth, Laura M.; Tasich, Christopher M.; Duncan, Benjamin R.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides readers with details concerning the implementation of four active learning techniques used to help undergraduate students critically discuss primary literature. On the basis of undergraduate and graduate student perceptions and experiences, the authors suggest techniques to enhance the quality of dual-listed courses and…

  7. Science Café Course: An Innovative Means of Improving Communication Skills of Undergraduate Biology Majors

    PubMed Central

    Goldina, Anna; Weeks, Ophelia I.

    2014-01-01

    To help bridge the increasing gap between scientists and the public, we developed an innovative two-semester course called Science Café. In this course, undergraduate biology majors learn to develop communication skills to be better able to explain science concepts and current developments in science to non-scientists. Students develop and host outreach events on various topics relevant to the community, thereby increasing interactions between budding scientists and the public. Such a Science Café course emphasizes development of science communication skills early, at the undergraduate level, and empowers students to use their science knowledge in everyday interactions with the public to increase science literacy, get involved in the local community and engage the public in a dialogue on various pressing science issues. We believe that undergraduate science majors can be great ambassadors for science and are often overlooked since many aspire to go on to medical/veterinary/pharmacy schools. However, science communication skills are especially important for these types of students because when they become healthcare professionals, they will interact with the public as part of their everyday jobs and can thus be great representatives for the field. PMID:24839510

  8. Student adoption and perception of lecture podcasts in undergraduate bachelor of science in nursing courses.

    PubMed

    Kardong-Edgren, Suzan; Emerson, Roberta

    2010-07-01

    The current study reports student use and perceptions of podcasted course lectures in an undergraduate Bachelor of Science in Nursing program. Prior to the current study, the majority of students were not familiar with the use of podcasts in education. Student use of the podcasts grew as they became familiar with the format. Students reported that podcasts helped them study and improved their grades. Faculty reported increased class absenteeism, although students reported no change in course attendance as a result of the availability of podcasts. PMID:20210270

  9. Advanced Simulation in Undergraduate Pilot Training: Systems Integration. Final Report (February 1972-March 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, D. F.; Terry, C.

    The Advanced Simulator for Undergraduate Pilot Training (ASUPT) was designed to investigate the role of simulation in the future Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT) program. The problem addressed in this report was one of integrating two unlike components into one synchronized system. These two components were the Basic T-37 Simulators and their…

  10. Teaching Culture and Improving Language Skills through a Cinematic Lens: A Course on Spanish Film in the Undergraduate Spanish Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Julie L.

    2001-01-01

    Explores the role of a course on Spanish cinema in an undergraduate, university-level curriculum in terms of its potential to acquaint students with significant cultural issues and to develop language skills. (Author/VWL)

  11. An interdisciplinary approach to a day-long palliative care course for undergraduate students

    PubMed Central

    Latimer, E J; Deakin, A; Ingram, C; O'Brien, L; Smoke, M; Wishart, L

    1999-01-01

    Although it is desirable that students in the health sciences be educated together to prepare them for interdisciplinary practice, many educational programs remain discipline specific. An undergraduate course in palliative care, originally designed for medical students at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., was expanded in 1993 to include students from various health sciences programs in the region. The course introduces students to the components of palliative care and its interdisciplinary nature in a problem-based way and directs students to additional educational resources. The authors describe the planning, content and evaluation of the course material. The observed decline in attendance by medical students, which coincided with the introduction of the interdisciplinary format, warrants further investigation. Future directions of the course are discussed. PMID:10513281

  12. Developing state-of-the-art Cosmology courses for undergraduate non-science students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Aleman, Ramon

    2007-04-01

    All undergraduate students at the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras are required to take a General Studies interdisciplinary science course as a requisite for graduation. We have successfully developed a new course for non-science majors that deal in current topics of interest including Big Bang cosmology, the uses and misuses of anthropic principle as a philosophical guide for scientists, dark energy and accelerated expansion, string theory and quantum gravity, and the current controversy of Intelligent Design vs Evolution by Natural Selection as explanations for the origins of life on Earth, intelligence and free will in sentient beings. The course was designed with help of philosophers, neuroscientists, biologists and physicists to present science as interesting, exciting, and socially useful sets of ``stories'' to people who usually dislike and misunderstand traditional science courses.

  13. The General Electric Advanced Course in Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Donald R.

    A three-year, in-house engineering course offered to selected General Electric Company engineers is discussed. It is designed to develop the ability to identify and solve real engineering problems. The course may be taken concurrently with college courses in a cooperative program that can result in a graduate degree in engineering. (MLH)

  14. Advanced Marketing/Coop Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Bobby

    This document contains the information required to present a 1-year school course that is the capstone class of a 2-year marketing major and is designed for high school students wishing to develop the skills required for entry into the marketing industry. The document begins with a rationale, brief course description, list of course objectives,…

  15. The Advanced Composition Course at GMI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swift, Marvin H.

    The General Motors Institute (GMI), a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Motors Corporation, was created to provide leaders for its parent organization. GMI is a fully accredited undergraduate college that offers degrees in industrial, electrical, and mechanical engineering and in industrial administration. Since people in business and…

  16. Real World Projects in an Advanced Instructional Design Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracey, Monica W.; Chatervert, Lake, Kristy; Wilson, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This design case focuses on the redesign of Advanced Instructional Design, a capstone course taught in a Midwestern university's Masters of Training and Development program. The goal of the course was to have students integrate knowledge and skills from previous courses including needs assessment, introduction to instructional design, and program…

  17. Advanced Placement Course Enrollment and School-Level Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard-Brak, Lucy; McGaha-Garnett, Valerie; Burley, Hansel

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined access to Advanced Placement (AP) courses as a function of these school characteristics (e.g., percentage of ethnic minority and lower socioeconomic status) and then examined AP course enrollment as a function of both access to AP courses and these school characteristics. Using structural equation modeling techniques,…

  18. Do Grade Weights Promote More Advanced Course-Taking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopfenstein, Kristin; Lively, Kit

    2016-01-01

    When calculating class rank, high schools often give additional weight to grades earned in College Board Advanced Placement (AP) courses as an incentive for students to take hard courses. This paper examines changes in student course-taking behavior after an increase in AP grade weights at Texas high schools. We find that raising the magnitude of…

  19. Redesign of a Required Undergraduate Pharmacy Management Course to Improve Student Engagement and Concept Retention

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To change the structure of a required pharmacy management course to make it more interactive and engaging for students. Design. The course is a required component of undergraduate curriculum and is completed over 2 semesters during the students’ third year. Changes included requiring students to lead classroom discussions and complete a business plan in groups. Assessment. A questionnaire centering on methods of delivery, course content, and outcomes was distributed in 2 academic years, with 74.7% of students responding. Even though the redesigned course required more time, there was strong support for the course among students because they realized the content contributed to their learning. Conclusion. A major course redesign is a big commitment by faculty members, but if done through consultations with former and current students, it can be rewarding for all involved. Students overwhelmingly embraced the changes to the course as they realized the restructuring and the resulting increase in workload were necessary to raise the relevance of the course to their future professional practice. PMID:23275666

  20. The Synthesis and Proton NMR Spectrum of Methyl 7-Cycloheptatrienylacetate: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurch, G. R., Jr.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes an advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment designed to give the senior chemistry student an opportunity to apply several synthetic and purification techniques as well as possibilities for the application of NMR spectroscopy. (CS)

  1. The Physics of Life: A Biophysics Course for Non-science Major Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-03-01

    Enhancing the scientific literacy of non-scientists is an important goal, both because of the ever-increasing impact of science and technology on people's lives, and because understanding contemporary science enables enriching insights into the workings of nature. One route to improving scientific literacy is via general education undergraduate courses - i.e. courses intended for students not majoring in the sciences or engineering - which in many cases provide these students' last formal exposure to science. I describe here a course on biophysics for non-science-major undergraduates recently developed at the University of Oregon. Biophysics, I claim, is a particularly useful vehicle for addressing scientific literacy. It involves important and general scientific concepts, demonstrates connections between basic science and tangible, familiar phenomena related to health and disease, and illustrates how scientific insights proceed not in predictable paths, but rather by applying tools and perspectives from disparate fields in creative ways. In addition, it highlights the far-reaching impact of physics research. I describe the general design of this course and the specific content of a few of its modules, as well as noting aspects of enrollment and evaluation. This work is affiliated with the University of Oregon's Science Literacy Program, supported by a grant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

  2. ‘The physics of life,’ an undergraduate general education biophysics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2015-05-01

    Improving the scientific literacy of non-scientists is an important aim, both because of the ever-increasing impact of science on our lives and because understanding science enriches our experience of the natural world. One route to improving scientific literacy is via general education undergraduate courses—i.e. courses for students not majoring in the sciences or engineering. Because it encompasses a variety of important scientific concepts, demonstrates connections between basic science and real-world applications and illustrates the creative ways in which scientific insights develop, biophysics is a useful subject with which to promote scientific literacy. I describe here a course on biophysics for non-science-major undergraduates recently developed at the University of Oregon (Eugene, OR, USA), noting its design, which spans both macroscopic and microscopic topics, and the specific content of a few of its modules. I also describe evidence-based pedagogical approaches adopted in teaching the course and aspects of course enrollment and evaluation.

  3. An Undergraduate Course to Bridge the Gap between Textbooks and Scientific Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiegant, Fred; Scager, Karin; Boonstra, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a one-semester Advanced Cell Biology course that endeavors to bridge the gap between gaining basic textbook knowledge about cell biology and learning to think and work as a researcher. The key elements of this course are 1) learning to work with primary articles in order to get acquainted with the field of choice, to learn…

  4. Engaging Undergraduate Education Majors in the Practice of Astronomy through a Coherent Science Content Storyline Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Julia; Palma, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    For the next generation of students to learn astronomy as both a body of knowledge and a process of continually extending, refining, and revising that knowledge, teachers at all levels must learn how to engage their students in the practices of astronomy. This begins by designing science coursework for undergraduate education majors in ways that reflect how we hope they will teach their own future students. We have designed an undergraduate astronomy course for elementary education majors around a coherent science content storyline (CSCS) framework in order to investigate methods that support education majors’ uptake of astronomy practices. CSCS instruction purposefully sequences lessons in ways that make explicit the connections between science ideas in order to move students towards increasingly sophisticated explanations for a single big idea in science. We used this framework to organize our course around a series of astronomical investigations that build towards a big idea in astronomy: how the formation model explains current patterns observed in the Solar System. Each investigation helps students begin to explain observations of the Solar System from a coherent, systems-based perspective as they make choices on how to design their own data collection and analysis strategies. Through these investigations, future teachers begin to view astronomy as a process of answering scientific questions using evidence-based explanations and model-based reasoning. The course design builds on our prior research into students’ ideas about Solar System phenomena and its formation as well as students’ ideas about how astronomers carry out investigations. Preliminary results, based on analysis of student conversations during in-class investigations, science notebook entries, and scientific reports, suggest that the course helps students learn to construct evidence-based explanations while also increasing the accuracy of the explanations for astronomical phenomena. We will

  5. Advanced Livestock Production: A Course of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Larry E.

    With the introduction of specialized courses of study in the third and fourth year of high school, it has become necessary to do more specialized work in the area of livestock production. The course is designed to provide a guideline to encourage intensified studies in this area, and outlines materials and methods, time allotment, and the use of…

  6. Effects of an undergraduate HIV/AIDS course on students’ HIV risk

    PubMed Central

    Marsiglia, Flavio F.; Jacobs, Bertram L.; Nieri, Tanya; Smith, Scott J.; Salamone, Damien; Booth, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    This study utilizes a quasi-experimental pre- and post-test survey design to examine the effects of a course, called HIV/AIDS: Science, Behavior, and Society, on undergraduate students’ HIV knowledge, attitudes and risky sexual behaviors. With the assistance of social work faculty the course incorporates experiential learning pedagogy and a transdisciplinary perspective. Although the course was not designed as a prevention program, the theory of health behavior suggests the incorporation of experiential learning will impact crucial HIV/AIDS attitudes and behaviors. When regression models were applied, relative to the comparison group (N = 111), the HIV/AIDS class students (N = 79) reported an increase in post-test HIV knowledge, perceived susceptibility to HIV among females, and a reduction of risky sexual attitudes among sexually active students. PMID:24058288

  7. An undergraduate course, and new textbook, on ``Physical Models of Living Systems''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Philip

    2015-03-01

    I'll describe an intermediate-level course on ``Physical Models of Living Systems.'' The only prerequisite is first-year university physics and calculus. The course is a response to rapidly growing interest among undergraduates in several science and engineering departments. Students acquire several research skills that are often not addressed in traditional courses, including: basic modeling skills, probabilistic modeling skills, data analysis methods, computer programming using a general-purpose platform like MATLAB or Python, dynamical systems, particularly feedback control. These basic skills, which are relevant to nearly any field of science or engineering, are presented in the context of case studies from living systems, including: virus dynamics; bacterial genetics and evolution of drug resistance; statistical inference; superresolution microscopy; synthetic biology; naturally evolved cellular circuits. Publication of a new textbook by WH Freeman and Co. is scheduled for December 2014. Supported in part by EF-0928048 and DMR-0832802.

  8. A constructivist approach to e-text design for use in undergraduate physiology courses.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Ashley E; Rozell, Timothy G

    2015-09-01

    Electronic textbooks, or e-texts, will have an increasingly important role in college science courses within the next few years due to the rising costs of traditional texts and the increasing availability of software allowing instructors to create their own e-text. However, few guidelines exist in the literature to aid instructors in the development and design specifically of e-texts using sound learning theories; this is especially true for undergraduate physiology e-texts. In this article, we describe why constructivism is a very important educational theory for e-text design and how it may be applied in e-text development by instructors. We also provide examples of two undergraduate physiology e-texts that were designed in accordance with this educational theory but for learners of quite different backgrounds and prior knowledge levels. PMID:26330033

  9. Investigating the nursing practitioners perspectives about undergraduate nursing internship and apprenticeship courses: is renewing required?

    PubMed

    Jamalmohammadi, Ali; Asghari, Mohammad; Shajari, Jila; Modares, Maryam

    2013-09-01

    Nurses' professional capacity plays an important role in the health system to achieve their mission. This study aimed to investigate the perspectives of nursing practitioners about undergraduate nursing internship and apprenticeship courses and possible ways of renewing the courses. This cross sectional survey was performed over 258 bachelors and practitioners of nursing graduates of Alborz University of medical sciences in the second half of 2012. Based on a multi-stage sampling schedule, questionnaires were used to collect data about the perspectives of nursing practitioners about undergraduate nursing internship and apprenticeship courses. There were 81.4% of females and 80.6%, 17.1% and 2.3% of organizational post of participants were nurse, head nurse and supervisor respectively. The occupied posts for 60.1%, 25.6% and 14.1% of subjects, respectively were nurse, head nurse and the supervisor. The application of the internship and apprenticeship courses in bachelor of nursing were in moderate to high levels. The highest percentages of responses for internship and apprenticeship training courses were in internal surgery nursing and special nursing and the minimum percentage of responses were for community hygiene nursing and mental health nursing. Due to observing moderate to high levels of fulfillment and lack of compliance of training courses, renewing to improve the quality and effectiveness of training programs are highly recommended. This can be effective in the future of nursing career and provide a practical training environment to achieve the goals of theoretical training and can lead nurses to become specialized in their field. PMID:23985116

  10. Teaching Synthetic Biology, Bioinformatics and Engineering to Undergraduates: The Interdisciplinary Build-a-Genome Course

    PubMed Central

    Dymond, Jessica S.; Scheifele, Lisa Z.; Richardson, Sarah; Lee, Pablo; Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan; Bader, Joel S.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2009-01-01

    A major challenge in undergraduate life science curricula is the continual evaluation and development of courses that reflect the constantly shifting face of contemporary biological research. Synthetic biology offers an excellent framework within which students may participate in cutting-edge interdisciplinary research and is therefore an attractive addition to the undergraduate biology curriculum. This new discipline offers the promise of a deeper understanding of gene function, gene order, and chromosome structure through the de novo synthesis of genetic information, much as synthetic approaches informed organic chemistry. While considerable progress has been achieved in the synthesis of entire viral and prokaryotic genomes, fabrication of eukaryotic genomes requires synthesis on a scale that is orders of magnitude higher. These high-throughput but labor-intensive projects serve as an ideal way to introduce undergraduates to hands-on synthetic biology research. We are pursuing synthesis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes in an undergraduate laboratory setting, the Build-a-Genome course, thereby exposing students to the engineering of biology on a genomewide scale while focusing on a limited region of the genome. A synthetic chromosome III sequence was designed, ordered from commercial suppliers in the form of oligonucleotides, and subsequently assembled by students into ∼750-bp fragments. Once trained in assembly of such DNA “building blocks” by PCR, the students accomplish high-yield gene synthesis, becoming not only technically proficient but also constructively critical and capable of adapting their protocols as independent researchers. Regular “lab meeting” sessions help prepare them for future roles in laboratory science. PMID:19015540

  11. Getting the Most Out of Dual-Listed Courses: Involving Undergraduate Students in Discussion Through Active Learning Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasich, C. M.; Duncan, L. L.; Duncan, B. R.; Burkhardt, B. L.; Benneyworth, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Dual-listed courses will persist in higher education because of resource limitations. The pedagogical differences between undergraduate and graduate STEM student groups and the underlying distinction in intellectual development levels between the two student groups complicate the inclusion of undergraduates in these courses. Active learning techniques are a possible remedy to the hardships undergraduate students experience in graduate-level courses. Through an analysis of both undergraduate and graduate student experiences while enrolled in a dual-listed course, we implemented a variety of learning techniques used to complement the learning of both student groups and enhance deep discussion. Here, we provide details concerning the implementation of four active learning techniques - role play, game, debate, and small group - that were used to help undergraduate students critically discuss primary literature. Student perceptions were gauged through an anonymous, end-of-course evaluation that contained basic questions comparing the course to other courses at the university and other salient aspects of the course. These were given as a Likert scale on which students rated a variety of statements (1 = strongly disagree, 3 = no opinion, and 5 = strongly agree). Undergraduates found active learning techniques to be preferable to traditional techniques with small-group discussions being rated the highest in both enjoyment and enhanced learning. The graduate student discussion leaders also found active learning techniques to improve discussion. In hindsight, students of all cultures may be better able to take advantage of such approaches and to critically read and discuss primary literature when written assignments are used to guide their reading. Applications of active learning techniques can not only address the gap between differing levels of students, but also serve as a complement to student engagement in any science course design.

  12. COMPRES Mineral Physics Educational Modules for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnley, P. C.; Thomas, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) is a community-based consortium whose goal is to advance and facilitate experimental high pressure research in the Earth Sciences. An important aspect of this goal is sharing our knowledge with the next generation of researchers. To facilitate this, we have created a group of web-based educational modules on mineral physics topics. The modules reside in the On Cutting Edge, Teaching Mineralogy collection on the Science Education Resource Center (SERC) website. Although the modules are designed to function as part of a full semester course, each module can also stand alone. Potential users of the modules include mineral physics faculty teaching "bricks and mortar" classes at their own institutions, or in distance education setting, mineralogy teachers interested in including supplementary material in their mineralogy class, undergraduates doing independent study projects and graduate students and colleagues in other sub-disciplines who wish to brush up on a mineral physics topic. We used the modules to teach an on-line course entitled "Introduction to Mineral Physics" during the spring 2012 semester. More than 20 students and postdocs as well as 15 faculty and senior scientists participated in the course which met twice weekly as a webinar. Recordings of faculty lectures and student-led discussions of journal articles are now available upon request and edited versions of the lectures will be incorporated into the educational modules. Our experience in creating the modules and the course indicates that the use of 1) community-generated internet-based resources and 2) webinars to enable shared teaching between faculty at different universities, has the potential to both enrich graduate education and create efficiencies for university faculty.;

  13. Mathematical tasks, study approaches, and course grades in undergraduate mathematics: a year-by-year analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Wes; Merchant, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    Students approach learning in different ways, depending on the experienced learning situation. A deep approach is geared toward long-term retention and conceptual change while a surface approach focuses on quickly acquiring knowledge for immediate use. These approaches ultimately affect the students' academic outcomes. This study takes a cross-sectional look at the approaches to learning used by students from courses across all four years of undergraduate mathematics and analyses how these relate to the students' grades. We find that deep learning correlates with grade in the first year and not in the upper years. Surficial learning has no correlation with grades in the first year and a strong negative correlation with grades in the upper years. Using Bloom's taxonomy, we argue that the nature of the tasks given to students is fundamentally different in lower and upper year courses. We find that first-year courses emphasize tasks that require only low-level cognitive processes. Upper year courses require higher level processes but, surprisingly, have a simultaneous greater emphasis on recall and understanding. These observations explain the differences in correlations between approaches to learning and course grades. We conclude with some concerns about the disconnect between first year and upper year mathematics courses and the effect this may have on students.

  14. Methods of teaching the physics of climate change in undergraduate physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Although anthropogenic climate change is generally accepted in the scientific community, there is considerable skepticism among the general population and, therefore, in undergraduate students of all majors. Students are often asked by their peers, family members, and others, whether they ``believe'' climate change is occurring and what should be done about it (if anything). I will present my experiences and recommendations for teaching the physics of climate change to both physics and non-science majors. For non-science majors, the basic approach is to try to develop an appreciation for the scientific method (particularly peer-reviewed research) in a course on energy and the environment. For physics majors, the pertinent material is normally covered in their undergraduate courses in modern physics and thermodynamics. Nevertheless, it helps to review the basics, e.g. introductory quantum mechanics (discrete energy levels of atomic systems), molecular spectroscopy, and blackbody radiation. I have done this in a separate elective topics course, titled ``Physics of Climate Change,'' to help the students see how their knowledge gives them insight into a topic that is very volatile (socially and politically).

  15. Known structure, unknown function: An inquiry‐based undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Cynthia; Price, Carol W.; Lee, Christopher T.; Dewald, Alison H.; Cline, Matthew A.; McAnany, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Undergraduate biochemistry laboratory courses often do not provide students with an authentic research experience, particularly when the express purpose of the laboratory is purely instructional. However, an instructional laboratory course that is inquiry‐ and research‐based could simultaneously impart scientific knowledge and foster a student's research expertise and confidence. We have developed a year‐long undergraduate biochemistry laboratory curriculum wherein students determine, via experiment and computation, the function of a protein of known three‐dimensional structure. The first half of the course is inquiry‐based and modular in design; students learn general biochemical techniques while gaining preparation for research experiments in the second semester. Having learned standard biochemical methods in the first semester, students independently pursue their own (original) research projects in the second semester. This new curriculum has yielded an improvement in student performance and confidence as assessed by various metrics. To disseminate teaching resources to students and instructors alike, a freely accessible Biochemistry Laboratory Education resource is available at http://biochemlab.org. © 2015 The Authors Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 43(4):245–262, 2015. PMID:26148241

  16. A course-based undergraduate research experience investigating p300 bromodomain mutations.

    PubMed

    Shanle, Erin K; Tsun, Ian K; Strahl, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) provide an opportunity for students to engage in experiments with outcomes that are unknown to both the instructor and students. These experiences allow students and instructors to collaboratively bridge the research laboratory and classroom, and provide research experiences for a large number of students relative to traditional individual mentored research. Here, we describe a molecular biology CURE investigating the impact of clinically relevant mutations found in the bromodomain of the p300 transcriptional regulator on acetylated histone interaction. In the CURE, students identified missense mutations in the p300 bromodomain using the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database and hypothesized the effects of the mutation on the acetyl-binding function of the domain. They cloned and purified the mutated bromodomain and performed peptide pulldown assays to define its potential to bind to acetylated histones. Upon completion of the course, students showed increased confidence performing molecular techniques and reported positively on doing a research project in class. In addition, results generated in the classroom were further validated in the research laboratory setting thereby providing a new model for faculty to engage in both course-based and individual undergraduate research experiences. PMID:26537758

  17. Causal Attributions of Success and Failure Made by Undergraduate Students in an Introductory-Level Computer Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawi, N.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the causal attributions of business computing students in an introductory computer programming course, in the computer science department at Notre Dame University, Louaize. Forty-five male and female undergraduates who completed the computer programming course that extended for a 13-week semester…

  18. Foundation Degrees in Geography and Tourism: A Critical Reflection on Student Experiences and the Implications for Undergraduate Degree Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simm, David; Marvell, Alan; Schaaf, Rebecca; Winlow, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, some UK Geography Departments have diversified their range of courses to offer Foundation degrees (Fds), providing students with alternative routes through higher education (HE). These courses are delivered either offsite at further education colleges (FECs), embedded within an undergraduate programme at higher education…

  19. Bringing Service-Learning to Scale in an Undergraduate Reading Foundations Course: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, I. A. G.; Doepker, G. M.; Morbitt, D.

    2012-01-01

    This study documents the effects of service-learning as it was introduced and brought to scale in an introductory undergraduate course in Reading Foundations for students seeking to become early and middle childhood education teachers. Participants included multiple cohorts of students in multiple instantiations of the course taught with and…

  20. Developing a Problem-Based Course Based on Needs Analysis to Enhance English Reading Ability of Thai Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosuwon, Takwa; Woodrow, Lindy

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a needs analysis underlying a proposed business English reading course using a problem-based learning approach designed to enhance English reading abilities of Thai undergraduate students. As part of a work in progress, the needs analysis survey was done prior to the course design with the major stakeholders in business and…

  1. What is Comprehensive Sexuality Education Really All About? Perceptions of Students Enrolled in an Undergraduate Human Sexuality Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfarb, Eva S.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use qualitative evaluation techniques to explore the perceptions of students enrolled in undergraduate human sexuality classes regarding their expectations for the course as well as outcomes. One hundred forty-eight students were surveyed at the beginning and again at the end of the semester long course. While…

  2. Teaching Bioprocess Engineering to Undergraduates: Multidisciplinary Hands-On Training in a One-Week Practical Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkel, Marius; Zwick, Michaela; Beuker, Janina; Willenbacher, Judit; Baumann, Sandra; Oswald, Florian; Neumann, Anke; Siemann-Herzberg, Martin; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Bioprocess engineering is a highly interdisciplinary field of study which is strongly benefited by practical courses where students can actively experience the interconnection between biology, engineering, and physical sciences. This work describes a lab course developed for 2nd year undergraduate students of bioprocess engineering and related…

  3. The Nobel Peace Prize and Peace Studies. "Styles of Leadership: An Undergraduate Course Based upon the Prize."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merikangas, Robert J.

    An undergraduate honors course on the Nobel Peace Prize winners at the University of Maryland focuses on styles of leadership and includes three main areas of attention: (1) the inner journey, or heart of the peacemaker, (2) leadership exercised through organizations and movements, and (3) the rhetoric of the leader. The course was divided into a…

  4. Technological Culture and the Human Prospect: An Evaluation of a New Undergraduate Interdisciplinary Team-Taught Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Counelis, James Steve

    An evaluation of an undergraduate interdisciplinary team-taught course entitled "Technological Culture and the Human Prospect" is presented. The pilot course attempts to deal with (1) the need for curricular innovation, (2) the need for faculty development, (3) the need to build flexible curricula with greater sensitivity for student motivation…

  5. A Laboratory Course for Teaching Laboratory Techniques, Experimental Design, Statistical Analysis, and Peer Review Process to Undergraduate Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gliddon, C. M.; Rosengren, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a 13-week laboratory course called Human Toxicology taught at the University of Otago, New Zealand. This course used a guided inquiry based laboratory coupled with formative assessment and collaborative learning to develop in undergraduate students the skills of problem solving/critical thinking, data interpretation and…

  6. Benefits and Limitations of Online Instruction in Natural Science Undergraduate Liberal Arts Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddicoat, Joseph; Roberts, Godfrey; Liddicoat, Kendra; Porzecanski, Ana Luz; Mendez, Martin; McMullen, David

    2013-04-01

    Online courses in the Natural Sciences are taught three ways at New York University to undergraduate students majoring in the liberal arts and professional programs - synchronous courses in which students communicate online with the instructor and classmates in real time, asynchronous courses when faculty present course material for students to access and learn at their leisure, and hybrid or blended courses when part is taught asynchronously and part is taught face-to-face in a classroom with all students present. We have done online courses each way - Global Ecology (synchronous); Stars, Planets, and Life (synchronous and asynchronous); Darwin to DNA: An Overview of Evolution (asynchronous); Biodiversity Conservation (asynchronous); and Biology of Hunger and Population (blended). We will present the advantages and challenges we experienced teaching courses online in this fashion. Besides the advantages listed in the description for this session, another can be programmed learning that allows a set of sequential steps or a more complex branching of steps that allows students to repeat lessons multiple times to master the material. And from an academic standpoint, course content and assessment can be standardized, making it possible for each student to learn the same material. Challenges include resistance to online learning by a host of stakeholders who might be educators, students, parents, and the community. Equally challenging might be the readiness of instructors and students to teach and learn online. Student integrity issues such as plagiarism and cheating are a concern in a course taught online (Thormann and Zimmerman, 2012), so we will discuss our strategies to mitigate them.

  7. Environmental Change Science Literacy Through Writing: Successes in an Undergraduate Writing and Composition Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Basic science literacy, especially with regards to environmental change science, is often lacking in traditional K- 12 and undergraduate education. This generally leads to broad misconceptions based on distorted presentations of science in the media. Current educational research suggests that the teaching and learning of science can happen in many ways, whether it is through lectures, labs, research, inquiry or informal learning activities. This study was motivated by the desire to investigate the ability to teach environmental change science content in the non-traditional mode of an undergraduate composition and writing course. This technique offers educators another option for the integration of climate and environmental change material into their curriculum. The study incorporates the assessment and evaluation of student writing, in-class participation and student self- evaluations from "Writing about Change: Global Environmental Change and Society" a writing course that fulfils a requirement to graduate from the University of California - Santa Cruz. The course was taught Winter Quarter 2007 with a total of 28 days of instruction and the participation of 20 undergraduate students. The overarching goals of this study can be broadly classified as attitudinal, skills development and content retention. This study was designed to address three broad questions related to the above broad goals: i) Did students leave the class more comfortable and confident with environmental change issues and content? ii) Did students develop skills that are useful for reading and writing about scientific material? iii) What did students learn (retain): more general concepts or specific facts regarding climate and environmental change? Preliminary analysis and coding of student work clearly show that students were successful in developing skills for understanding and utilizing scientific information via writing and making thoughtful judgments regarding the reliability of environmental

  8. Report of the Polymer Core Course Committee: Inclusion of Polymer Topics into Undergraduate Inorganic Chemistry Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Norman E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Suggests polymer topics for study in inorganic chemistry courses. Commercial materials (including list of inorganic compounds utilized in polymer industry), anchored metal catalysis, polymers modified or formed by coordination, polysiloxanes, phosphazene or phosphonitrilic halide polymers, and hetergeneous polymerization catalysts are considered.…

  9. Non-uniformly polarized beams across their transverse profiles: an introductory study for undergraduate optics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquero, Gemma; Vargas-Balbuena, Javier

    2004-11-01

    We provide a simple theoretical study of beams non-uniformly polarized across their transverse sections which can be introduced in undergraduate optics courses. In order to generate such beams we propose to use a slightly convergent (or divergent) linearly and uniformly polarized beam impinging on an anisotropic uniaxial material with the beam propagation direction along the optic axis. Analytical expressions for the Jones vector, Stokes parameters, ellipticity and azimuth at each point of the transverse section, perpendicular to the propagation direction, are obtained at the output of this system. By means of these parameters a detailed description of the state of polarization across the transverse profile is given.

  10. Assignment of World Wide Web virtual museum projects in undergraduate geoscience courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, R. Timothy

    1997-06-01

    Internet World Wide Web virtual museum projects are viable alternatives to the traditional term paper in undergraduate geoscience courses. Hyper Text Markup Language is so easy to use that students are not distracted from researching their topic, and are thus able to gather sufficient background data. In fact, the intelligent and creative integration of text and accompanying digital artifacts require a level of understanding of the material that is not often achieved during the writing of traditional term papers. Most significantly, the students are motivated to create high-calibre documents by the knowledge that their projects will be exposed to a global audience.

  11. Design and evaluation of an online teaching strategy in an undergraduate psychiatric nursing course.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Jane S; Marfurt, Stephanie; daCunha, Miguel; Engebretson, Joan

    2005-12-01

    Psychiatric nurse educators are challenged to prepare graduates in meeting the needs of individuals with a mental illness within an increasingly technology-based environment. This requires the development and evaluation of educational strategies that immerse students in web-based learning. This article presents an overview of a hybrid teaching design that includes classroom teaching and asynchronous threaded discussion in a teaching module in an undergraduate psychiatric nursing course. Evaluation of student preferences, advantages and disadvantages, and learning, as well as qualitative evaluation of students' description of critical thinking, supports the value of online teaching in psychiatric nursing education. PMID:16308126

  12. A Writing-Intensive Course Improves Biology Undergraduates' Perception and Confidence of Their Abilities to Read Scientific Literature and Communicate Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownell, Sara E.; Price, Jordan V.; Steinman, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Most scientists agree that comprehension of primary scientific papers and communication of scientific concepts are two of the most important skills that we can teach, but few undergraduate biology courses make these explicit course goals. We designed an undergraduate neuroimmunology course that uses a writing-intensive format. Using a mixture of…

  13. Using Zebrafish to Implement a Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience to Study Teratogenesis in Two Biology Laboratory Courses.

    PubMed

    Sarmah, Swapnalee; Chism, Grady W; Vaughan, Martin A; Muralidharan, Pooja; Marrs, Jim A; Marrs, Kathleen A

    2016-08-01

    A course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE) spanning three semesters was introduced into freshman and sophomore biology classes, with the hypothesis that participation in a CURE affects skills in research, communication, and collaboration, which may help students persist in science. Student research projects were centered on the hypothesis that nicotine and caffeine exposure during early development affects gastrulation and heart development in zebrafish. First, freshmen generated original data showing distinct effects of embryonic nicotine and caffeine exposure on zebrafish heart development and function. Next, Cell Biology laboratory students continued the CURE studies and identified novel teratogenic effects of nicotine and caffeine during gastrulation. Finally, new freshmen continued the CURE research, examining additional toxicant effects on development. Students designed new protocols, made measurements, presented results, and generated high-quality preliminary data that were studied in successive semesters. By implementing this project, the CURE extended faculty research and provided a scalable model to address national goals to involve more undergraduates in authentic scientific research. In addition, student survey results support the hypothesis that CUREs provide significant gains in student ability to (1) design experiments, (2) analyze data, and (3) make scientific presentations, translating into high student satisfaction and enhanced learning. PMID:26829498

  14. Advanced Management Communication: An Elective Course in Corporate Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argenti, Paul A.

    1986-01-01

    Proposes a college-level elective course in advanced management communication that would teach future managers how to communicate with shareholders, the media, financial analysts, and the labor force. (SRT)

  15. An Intermediate Advanced Level Israeli Hebrew Refresher Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanc, Haim

    "An Intermediate-Advanced Level Israeli Hebrew Refresher Course" comprises an audiolingual course in seven volumes. "Book I" contains introductory notes on Israeli Hebrew, the sound system, and phonology drills. These preface 21 lessons (three units of seven lessons each) which consist of vocabulary practices, narratives, dialogs, grammar notes,…

  16. An Intermediate-Advanced Level Laotian Refresher Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English Language Services, Inc., Washington, DC.

    These instructional materials have been prepared for students who have completed an introductory college-level Laotian course of one year or more or have had an "intensive" course of several months. The "Refresher" materials contained in Book I are intended to prepare the student for the intermediate-advanced materials in Books II and III. Each of…

  17. An Advanced Reading and Writing Course for Science Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholz, Celeste M.

    In July and August of 1980, material writers at the University of California-Los Angeles designed a course that would focus on the various reading and writing skills that science scholars would need for successful graduate study in the United States. The scholars were advanced learners of English from various science fields, and the course was to…

  18. Factors that Predict Who Takes Advanced Courses in Cognitive Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pehlivanidis, Artemios

    2007-01-01

    Training in Cognitive Therapy (CT) includes theoretical and didactic components combined with clinical supervision. An introductory course in CT might satisfy training needs in psychotherapy and help in the selection of those trainees who wish to continue to an advanced training level. Predictors of success at such an introductory course have been…

  19. Student-Designed Service-Learning Projects in an Undergraduate Neurobiology Course.

    PubMed

    Northcutt, Katharine V

    2016-03-01

    One of the challenges in teaching a service-learning course is obtaining student buy-in from all students in the course. To circumvent this problem, I have let students in my undergraduate Neurobiology course design their own service-learning projects at the beginning of the semester. Although this can be chaotic because it requires last-minute planning, I have made it successful through facilitating student communication in the classroom, requiring thorough project proposals, meeting with students regularly, and monitoring group progress through written reflection papers. Most of my students have strong opinions about the types of projects that they want to carry out, and many students have used connections that they have already made with local organizations. Almost all projects that students have designed to this point involve teaching basic concepts of neurobiology to children of various ages while simultaneously sparking their interest in science. Through taking ownership of the project and designing it such that it works well with their strengths, interests, and weekly schedule, students have become more engaged in service learning and view it as a valuable experience. Despite some class time being shifted away from more traditional assignments, students have performed equally well in the course, and they are more eager to talk with others about course concepts. Furthermore, the feedback that I have received from community partners has been excellent, and some students have maintained their work with the organizations. PMID:27047599

  20. A portable bioinformatics course for upper-division undergraduate curriculum in sciences.

    PubMed

    Floriano, Wely B

    2008-09-01

    This article discusses the challenges that bioinformatics education is facing and describes a bioinformatics course that is successfully taught at the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, to the fourth year undergraduate students in biological sciences, chemistry, and computer science. Information on lecture and computer practice topics, free for academic use software and web links required for the laboratory exercises and student surveys for two instances of the course, is presented. This course emphasizes hands-on experience and focuses on developing practical skills while providing a solid knowledge base for critically applying these skills. It is designed in blocks of 1-hour lecture followed by 2 hours of computer laboratory exercises, both covering the same general topic, for a total of 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of computer practice. The heavy computational aspect of this course was designed to use a single multiprocessor computer server running Linux, accessible from laptops through Virtual Network Computing sessions. The laptops can be either provided by the institution or owned by the individual students. This configuration avoids the need to install and maintain bioinformatics software on each laptop. Only a single installation is required for most bioinformatics software on the Linux server. The content of this course and its software/hardware configuration are well suited for institutions with no dedicated computer laboratory. This author believes that the same model can be successfully implemented in other institutions, especially those who do not have a strong instructional computer technology support such as community colleges and small universities. PMID:21591215

  1. Student-Designed Service-Learning Projects in an Undergraduate Neurobiology Course

    PubMed Central

    Northcutt, Katharine V.

    2016-01-01

    One of the challenges in teaching a service-learning course is obtaining student buy-in from all students in the course. To circumvent this problem, I have let students in my undergraduate Neurobiology course design their own service-learning projects at the beginning of the semester. Although this can be chaotic because it requires last-minute planning, I have made it successful through facilitating student communication in the classroom, requiring thorough project proposals, meeting with students regularly, and monitoring group progress through written reflection papers. Most of my students have strong opinions about the types of projects that they want to carry out, and many students have used connections that they have already made with local organizations. Almost all projects that students have designed to this point involve teaching basic concepts of neurobiology to children of various ages while simultaneously sparking their interest in science. Through taking ownership of the project and designing it such that it works well with their strengths, interests, and weekly schedule, students have become more engaged in service learning and view it as a valuable experience. Despite some class time being shifted away from more traditional assignments, students have performed equally well in the course, and they are more eager to talk with others about course concepts. Furthermore, the feedback that I have received from community partners has been excellent, and some students have maintained their work with the organizations. PMID:27047599

  2. Incorporating a collaborative web-based virtual laboratory in an undergraduate bioinformatics course.

    PubMed

    Weisman, David

    2010-01-01

    Face-to-face bioinformatics courses commonly include a weekly, in-person computer lab to facilitate active learning, reinforce conceptual material, and teach practical skills. Similarly, fully-online bioinformatics courses employ hands-on exercises to achieve these outcomes, although students typically perform this work offsite. Combining a face-to-face lecture course with a web-based virtual laboratory presents new opportunities for collaborative learning of the conceptual material, and for fostering peer support of technical bioinformatics questions. To explore this combination, an in-person lecture-only undergraduate bioinformatics course was augmented with a remote web-based laboratory, and tested with a large class. This study hypothesized that the collaborative virtual lab would foster active learning and peer support, and tested this hypothesis by conducting a student survey near the end of the semester. Respondents broadly reported strong benefits from the online laboratory, and strong benefits from peer-provided technical support. In comparison with traditional in-person teaching labs, students preferred the virtual lab by a factor of two. Key aspects of the course architecture and design are described to encourage further experimentation in teaching collaborative online bioinformatics laboratories. PMID:21567782

  3. Prospective Elementary Teachers' Analysis of Children's Science Talk in an Undergraduate Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, Danielle B.; Swanson, Lauren H.; Otero, Valerie K.

    2014-02-01

    We investigated how prospective teachers used physics content knowledge when analyzing the talk of elementary children during special activities in an undergraduate physics content course designed for prospective teachers. We found that prospective teachers used content knowledge to reflect on their own learning and to identify students' science ideas and restate these ideas in scientific terms. Based on this research, we inferred that analyzing children's ideas through videos provides a meaningful context for applying conceptual physics knowledge in physics courses. Activities that are embedded within a disciplinary curriculum, such as those studied here, may help prospective teachers learn to use disciplinary knowledge in exactly the type of activity in which their content knowledge will be most useful: listening to and interpreting children's science ideas.

  4. Prospective Elementary Teachers' Analysis of Children's Science Talk in an Undergraduate Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, Danielle B.; Swanson, Lauren H.; Otero, Valerie K.

    2012-10-01

    We investigated how prospective teachers used physics content knowledge when analyzing the talk of elementary children during special activities in an undergraduate physics content course designed for prospective teachers. We found that prospective teachers used content knowledge to reflect on their own learning and to identify students' science ideas and restate these ideas in scientific terms. Based on this research, we inferred that analyzing children's ideas through videos provides a meaningful context for applying conceptual physics knowledge in physics courses. Activities that are embedded within a disciplinary curriculum, such as those studied here, may help prospective teachers learn to use disciplinary knowledge in exactly the type of activity in which their content knowledge will be most useful: listening to and interpreting children's science ideas.

  5. An evidence based approach to undergraduate physical assessment practicum course development.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brenda; Nix, Elizabeth; Norman, Bilinda; McPike, H Dawn

    2014-05-01

    Physical assessment is an important component of professional nursing practice. New nurse graduates experience difficulty transitioning the traditional head to toe physical assessment into real world nursing practice. This study was conducted to provide current data concerning physical assessment competencies utilized consistently by registered nurses. This quantitative study used a 126 item survey mailed to 900 Registered Nurses. Participants used a Likert-type scale to report frequency of use for physical assessment competencies. Thirty seven competencies were determined to be essential components of the physical assessment, 18 were determined supplemental, and 71 were determined to be non-essential. Transition of the new graduate nurse into professional practice can be enhanced by focusing content in physical assessment practicum courses on the essential competencies of physical assessment. Faculty for the university has analyzed data from this study to support evidence based changes to the undergraduate nursing program physical assessment practicum course. PMID:24083881

  6. [Understanding the intentions of actions of a multiprofessional teaching staff at a nursing undergraduate course].

    PubMed

    Prado, Cláudia; Leite, Maria Madalena Januário

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the intentions of actions of a nursing teaching staff and the ones from other healthcare areas at a nursing undergraduate course. Four teachers from each category were interviewed using the guiding question: What do you expect from your teaching action in this nursing course? It was used the social phenomenology by Alfred Schütz as the referential of analysis. It was revealed that the intention of actions from the teaching staff are working with the students seeing them as future professionals trying to make them reflect on their knowledge, attitudes and behaviors, hoping them to think in a critical way, make decisions and be technically competent. They also want to collaborate for the students' self-growth, believing that being a teaching staff member is being a researcher helping students to acquire investigative view and having intention to provide meaningful contends to students' personal and professional lives. PMID:20835658

  7. [Undergraduate nursing students experience of a computer-based learning course].

    PubMed

    Alves, Rosa Helena Kreutz; Cogo, Ana Luísa Petersen

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to get to know how undergraduate nursing students at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul Nursing School experienced the computer-based learning (CBL) course: "Socio-historical process in nursing education". Five female students, who had attended the course the previous semester, were interviewed. Data were analyzed according to the thematic analysis. The final categories were: "the students' experience in the use of computer technologies" and "the students in relation to the computer-based learning experience". The flexibilization of study time and venue was pointed out as a positive factor. The students realized that CBL requires more effort and dedication when compared to conventional learning activities. We concluded that computer-based learning is an inclusive modality that allows access of students who are already involved in the labor market. PMID:19320351

  8. Vietnamese Advanced Course: Typical North Vietnamese Expressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This text, prepared by the Defense Language Institute (DLI), is a dictionary of idioms which lists 621 words, phrases, and expressions frequently used in newspapers, magazines, and literary works published in North Vietnam. It is intended for use as a reference work for DLI courses in Vietnamese. Entries are listed alphabetically, translated, and…

  9. Implementation of case studies in undergraduate didactic nursing courses: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The implementation of unfolding scenario-based case studies in the didactic classroom is associated with learner-centered education. The utilization of learner-centered pedagogies, such as case studies, removes the focus from the instructor and instead places it on the student. Learner-centered pedagogies are believed to improve students’ levels of cognition. The purpose of this study was to examine how nurse educators are implementing the pedagogies of case studies in their undergraduate didactic courses. The goal was to examine, document, report, and, ultimately, implement the strategies. Methods Purposeful sampling was utilized in this qualitative, multisite-designed study. For each of the four participants, three separate site visits were completed. Observations and post-observational interviews took place at each site visit. Transcribed data from interviews, observations, and course documents were imported into the computer program Nvivo8. Repetitive comparative analysis was utilized to complete the data coding process. Results The guiding research question of this study sought to investigate the implementation strategies of case studies in didactic nursing courses. The implementation of case studies by the participants reflected two primary patterns: Formal Implementation (FI) and Informal Implementation (II) of case studies. The FI of case studies was further divided into two subcategories: Formal Implementation of case studies used Inside the Classroom setting (FIIC) and Formal Implementation of cases studies used Outside of the Classroom (FIOC). Conclusion Results of this investigation have led to an increased understanding of implementation strategies of unfolding scenario-based case studies in undergraduate nursing didactic courses. Data collected were rich in the description of specific methodologies for utilization of case studies and may serve as a resource for faculty in development of creative strategies to enhance the didactic

  10. Student-Generated Scientific Inquiry for Elementary Education Undergraduates: Course Development, Outcomes and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, Irene; Atkins, Leslie

    2013-02-01

    While some researchers have argued for science classrooms that embrace open-inquiry by engaging students in doing science as scientists do (cf. National Research Council [NRC] 1996; Driver et al. in Sci Educ 84:287-312, 2000; Windschitl et al. in Sci Educ 87(1):112-143, 2008), others have argued that open-inquiry is impractical, ineffective, and perhaps even counter-productive towards promoting normative scientific ideas (cf. Kirschner et al. in Educ Psychol 41(2):75-86, 2006; Settlage in J Sci Teach Educ 18:461-467, 2007). One of the challenges in informing the debate on this issue is the scarcity of well-documented courses that engage students in open-inquiry characteristic of scientific research. This paper describes the design, implementation, and outcomes of such a course for undergraduates planning on becoming elementary teachers. The goal of the class was to immerse future teachers in authentic, open-inquiry (without specific learning goals related to scientific concepts) in hopes that students would come away with a deeper understanding of the nature of science (NOS) and improved attitudes towards science. Data collected from a variety of sources indicate that an authentic, open-inquiry experience is feasible to implement in an undergraduate setting, gives students a more sophisticated NOS understanding, improves students' attitudes towards science and open-inquiry, and changes the way they intend to teach science in their future classrooms.

  11. Teaching Spatial Thinking in Undergraduate Geology Courses Using Tools and Strategies from Cognitive Science Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormand, C. J.; Shipley, T. F.; Dutrow, B. L.; Goodwin, L. B.; Hickson, T. A.; Tikoff, B.; Atit, K.; Gagnier, K. M.; Resnick, I.

    2015-12-01

    Spatial visualization is an essential skill in the STEM disciplines, including the geological sciences. Undergraduate students, including geoscience majors in upper-level courses, bring a wide range of spatial skill levels to the classroom. Students with weak spatial skills may struggle to understand fundamental concepts and to solve geological problems with a spatial component. However, spatial thinking skills are malleable. Using strategies that have emerged from cognitive science research, we developed a set of curricular materials that improve undergraduate geology majors' abilities to reason about 3D concepts and to solve spatially complex geological problems. Cognitive science research on spatial thinking demonstrates that predictive sketching, making visual comparisons, gesturing, and the use of analogy can be used to develop students' spatial thinking skills. We conducted a three-year study of the efficacy of these strategies in strengthening the spatial skills of students in core geology courses at three universities. Our methodology is a quasi-experimental quantitative design, utilizing pre- and post-tests of spatial thinking skills, assessments of spatial problem-solving skills, and a control group comprised of students not exposed to our new curricular materials. Students taught using the new curricular materials show improvement in spatial thinking skills. Further analysis of our data, to be completed prior to AGU, will answer additional questions about the relationship between spatial skills and academic performance, spatial skills and gender, spatial skills and confidence, and the impact of our curricular materials on students who are struggling academically. Teaching spatial thinking in the context of discipline-based exercises has the potential to transform undergraduate education in the geological sciences by removing one significant barrier to success.

  12. Advancing STEM Undergraduate Learning: Preparing the Nation's Future Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfund, Christine; Mathieu, Robert; Austin, Ann; Connolly, Mark; Manske, Brian; Moore, Katie

    2012-01-01

    Graduate students and post-doctoral scholars at research universities will shape the future of undergraduate education in the natural and social sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics (the STEM disciplines) in the United States. In 2009 alone, more than 41,000 doctorates were awarded in STEM fields, and if employment trends hold,…

  13. A New Antarctic Field Course for Undergraduates at Michigan State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tweedie, C. E.; Hesse, J.; Hollister, R. D.; Roberts, P.; Wilson, J.; Wilson, M. I.; Webber, P. J.

    2003-12-01

    Field courses in remote and extreme environments immerse students in new and unfamiliar cultural and environmental settings where the impact from learning is high and the conventional wisdom, mindsets, and life skills of students are challenged. Through the Office of Study Abroad at Michigan State University (MSU), a new field course for undergraduates entitled `Studies in Antarctic System Science' embraces these principles. The three week, 6 credit course will be convened for the first time during the 2003-04 austral summer and will feature field based activities and classroom sessions beginning in Ushuaia, Tierra Del Fuego, Argentina. The defining experience of the program will be a cruise of the Antarctic Peninsula on a tourist ship partnered to the International Association of Antarctic Tour Operators (IAATO). This cruise will include landings on a daily basis at various sites of interest and international research stations en route. In 2003-04, the course will comprise 20 students and three faculty members from MSU. The non-major course curriculum has been compiled from materials based on original research by program faculty, relevant literature, information obtained directly from the international research community, and the Antarctic tourist industry. Subject areas will span multiple disciplines including palaeohistory and ecology, oceanography, climatology, geology and glaciology, marine, terrestrial and aerobiology, early exploration, policy and management, and the potential impacts from climate change and humans. It is intended that the course be repeated on an annual basis and that the curriculum be expanded to include greater coverage of ongoing research activities, especially NSF funded research. We welcome contact and feedback from educators and scientists interested in this endeavor, especially those who would like to broaden the impact of their own education interests or research by offering materials that could enhance the curriculum of the course

  14. Teaching Sustainable Water Resources and Low Impact Development: A Project Centered Course for First-Year Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianfrani, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    Teaching Sustainable Water Resources and Low Impact Development: A Project Centered Course for First-Year Undergraduates Christina M. Cianfrani Assistant Professor, School of Natural Science, Hampshire College, 893 West Avenue, Amherst, MA 01002 Sustainable water resources and low impact development principles are taught to first-year undergraduate students using an applied design project sited on campus. All students at Hampshire College are required to take at least one natural science course during their first year as part of their liberal arts education. This requirement is often met with resistance from non-science students. However, ‘sustainability’ has shown to be a popular topic on campus and ‘Sustainable Water Resources’ typically attracts ~25 students (a large class size for Hampshire College). Five second- or third-year students are accepted in the class as advanced students and serve as project leaders. The first-year students often enter the class with only basic high school science background. The class begins with an introduction to global water resources issues to provide a broad perspective. The students then analyze water budgets, both on a watershed basis and a personal daily-use basis. The students form groups of 4 to complete their semester project. Lectures on low impact design principles are combined with group work sessions for the second half of the semester. Students tour the physical site located across the street from campus and begin their project with a site analysis including soils, landcover and topography. They then develop a building plan and identify preventative and mitigative measures for dealing with stormwater. Each group completes TR-55 stormwater calculations for their design (pre- and post-development) to show the state regulations for quantity will be met with their design. Finally, they present their projects to the class and prepare a formal written report. The students have produced a wide variety of creative

  15. Pleasure and pain: teaching neuroscientific principles of hedonism in a large general education undergraduate course.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J; Stellar, James R; Kraft, Tamar T; Loiacono, Ilyssa; Bajnath, Adesh; Rotella, Francis M; Barrientos, Alicia; Aghanori, Golshan; Olsson, Kerstin; Coke, Tricia; Huang, Donald; Luger, Zeke; Mousavi, Seyed Ali Reza; Dindyal, Trisha; Naqvi, Naveen; Kim, Jung-Yo

    2013-01-01

    In a large (250 registrants) general education lecture course, neuroscience principles were taught by two professors as co-instructors, starting with simple brain anatomy, chemistry, and function, proceeding to basic brain circuits of pleasure and pain, and progressing with fellow expert professors covering relevant philosophical, artistic, marketing, and anthropological issues. With this as a base, the course wove between fields of high relevance to psychology and neuroscience, such as food addiction and preferences, drug seeking and craving, analgesic pain-inhibitory systems activated by opiates and stress, neuroeconomics, unconscious decision-making, empathy, and modern neuroscientific techniques (functional magnetic resonance imaging and event-related potentials) presented by the co-instructors and other Psychology professors. With no formal assigned textbook, all lectures were PowerPoint-based, containing links to supplemental public-domain material. PowerPoints were available on Blackboard several days before the lecture. All lectures were also video-recorded and posted that evening. The course had a Facebook page for after-class conversation and one of the co-instructors communicated directly with students on Twitter in real time during lecture to provide momentary clarification and comment. In addition to graduate student Teaching Assistants (TAs), to allow for small group discussion, ten undergraduate students who performed well in a previous class were selected to serve as discussion leaders. The Discussion Leaders met four times at strategic points over the semester with groups of 20-25 current students, and received one credit of Independent Study, thus creating a course within a course. The course grade was based on weighted scores from two multiple-choice exams and a five-page writing assignment in which each student reviewed three unique, but brief original peer-review research articles (one page each) combined with expository writing on the first

  16. Pleasure and Pain: Teaching Neuroscientific Principles of Hedonism in a Large General Education Undergraduate Course

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.; Stellar, James R.; Kraft, Tamar T.; Loiacono, Ilyssa; Bajnath, Adesh; Rotella, Francis M.; Barrientos, Alicia; Aghanori, Golshan; Olsson, Kerstin; Coke, Tricia; Huang, Donald; Luger, Zeke; Mousavi, Seyed Ali Reza; Dindyal, Trisha; Naqvi, Naveen; Kim, Jung-Yo

    2013-01-01

    In a large (250 registrants) general education lecture course, neuroscience principles were taught by two professors as co-instructors, starting with simple brain anatomy, chemistry, and function, proceeding to basic brain circuits of pleasure and pain, and progressing with fellow expert professors covering relevant philosophical, artistic, marketing, and anthropological issues. With this as a base, the course wove between fields of high relevance to psychology and neuroscience, such as food addiction and preferences, drug seeking and craving, analgesic pain-inhibitory systems activated by opiates and stress, neuroeconomics, unconscious decision-making, empathy, and modern neuroscientific techniques (functional magnetic resonance imaging and event-related potentials) presented by the co-instructors and other Psychology professors. With no formal assigned textbook, all lectures were PowerPoint-based, containing links to supplemental public-domain material. PowerPoints were available on Blackboard several days before the lecture. All lectures were also video-recorded and posted that evening. The course had a Facebook page for after-class conversation and one of the co-instructors communicated directly with students on Twitter in real time during lecture to provide momentary clarification and comment. In addition to graduate student Teaching Assistants (TAs), to allow for small group discussion, ten undergraduate students who performed well in a previous class were selected to serve as discussion leaders. The Discussion Leaders met four times at strategic points over the semester with groups of 20–25 current students, and received one credit of Independent Study, thus creating a course within a course. The course grade was based on weighted scores from two multiple-choice exams and a five-page writing assignment in which each student reviewed three unique, but brief original peer-review research articles (one page each) combined with expository writing on the first

  17. Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Structure from Motion teaching resources for undergraduate field education courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt-Sitaula, B. A.; Shervais, K.; Crosby, C. J.; Douglas, B. J.; Niemi, N. A.; Wang, G.; Charlevoix, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Fieldwork is an integral part of the geosciences and there is a longstanding tradition of teaching field methods as part of the undergraduate curriculum. As new technology changes the ways in which we scientifically examine the Earth, and as workforce development demands evolve, there is growing interest in introducing these new technologies into field education courses. In collaboration with field education instructors, UNAVCO, the National Science Foundation's geodetic facility, has developed a module of teaching resources to integrate terrestrial lidar scanning into field courses. An NSF facility is well positioned to develop scalable resources that can then be distributed or adapted for broader implementation. The modules can also be accomplished using Structure from Motion methods in place of lidar scanning. Modules goals are for students to be able to: (A) design and conduct a complex TLS survey to address a geologic research question and (B) articulate the societal impetus for answering these research questions and identify why TLS is the appropriate method in some circumstances. The module is comprised of five units: (1) Introduction to survey design, (2) Stratigraphic section analysis, (3) Fault scarp analysis, (4) Geomorphic change detection, (5) Student-led survey design summative assessment. The modules, apart from the Introduction, are independent, thus select modules can be employed in a given field setting. Prototype module materials were developed from the last five years of UNAVCO support of undergraduate field courses. The current versions of the modules were tested in summer 2015 at the Indiana University and University of Michigan field camps. Results show that the majority of students are able to achieve the intended learning goals. Module materials are available on the UNAVCO Education and Community Engagement website.

  18. Where do students struggle in the field? Computer-aided evaluation of mapping errors from an undergraduate Field Geology summer course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, K. A.; Petrie, G.

    2014-12-01

    Extended field-based summer courses provide an invaluable field experience for undergraduate majors in the geosciences. These courses often utilize the construction of geological maps and structural cross sections as the primary pedagogical tool to teach basic map orientation, rock identification and structural interpretation. However, advances in the usability and ubiquity of Geographic Information Systems in these courses presents new opportunities to evaluate student work. In particular, computer-based quantification of systematic mapping errors elucidates the factors influencing student success in the field. We present a case example from a mapping exercise conducted in a summer Field Geology course at a popular field location near Dillon, Montana. We use a computer algorithm to automatically compare the placement and attribution of unit contacts with spatial variables including topographic slope, aspect, bedding attitude, ground cover and distance from starting location. We compliment analyses with anecdotal and survey data that suggest both physical factors (e.g. steep topographic slope) as well as structural nuance (e.g. low angle bedding) may dominate student frustration, particularly in courses with a high student to instructor ratio. We propose mechanisms to improve student experience by allowing students to practice skills with orientation games and broadening student background with tangential lessons (e.g. on colluvial transport processes). As well, we suggest low-cost ways to decrease the student to instructor ratio by supporting returning undergraduates from previous years or staging mapping over smaller areas. Future applications of this analysis might include a rapid and objective system for evaluation of student maps (including point-data, such as attitude measurements) and quantification of temporal trends in student work as class sizes, pedagogical approaches or environmental variables change. Long-term goals include understanding and

  19. An Approach for Group, Undergraduate Research Experiences in Courses Across the Geology Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, M.; Kinner, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    At Western Carolina University, a past NSF CCLI grant helped embed project-based learning throughout the geology curriculum, including a senior capstone seminar in which groups of students conduct authentic undergraduate research (UR). These curricular changes showed many high-level educational benefits to the group senior capstone research and the benefits of complex, technical projects at all levels of the curriculum if project goals and guidance for students is appropriate for their level, skills, and experiences. A current NSF TUES grant, now in its 3rd year, is formally assessing the impact of students participating in group UR experiences embedded in traditional courses at all curricular levels to determine if they have similar benefits to students conducting individually-mentored research. An ancillary goal is to develop a transferable, sustainable model for this approach, so UR experiences can formally broaden to more students at more levels. At this time, we have taught about 100 students in five research-based courses at all levels of the curriculum. Student's perceived strong benefits of their UR experience, and have been evaluated with quantitative (URSSA) and qualitative (focus groups) data. Benefits of their experiences are high related to personal growth and the scientific process and relatively low in research skills. Qualitative data shows students value 1) the open-ended nature of the authentic research questions, 2) group collaboration, and 3) hands-on learning. Similarity of student results across different courses reflect a now stable approach we have developed for courses with group UR experiences. Key elements to our approach are 1) an ongoing, broad research program (in our case, an on-campus hydrologic research station), 2) strategically assigned student groups (no. 3-6), group responsibilities that include a mix of individual and group assignments, and peer assessments, 3) student research fellows that help run the research station and

  20. Eating behaviour among undergraduate students. Comparing nutrition students with other courses.

    PubMed

    Poínhos, Rui; Alves, Diogo; Vieira, Elisée; Pinhão, Sílvia; Oliveira, Bruno M P M; Correia, Flora

    2015-01-01

    Our main aim was to compare eating behaviour between Portuguese undergraduate nutrition students and students attending other courses. Several eating behaviour dimensions were compared between 154 nutrition students and 263 students from other areas. Emotional and external eating were assessed by the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire, dietary restraint was measured using the flexible and rigid control of eating behaviour subscales, binge eating was measured using the Binge Eating Scale, and eating self-efficacy using the General Eating Self-Efficacy Scale. Higher levels of flexible and rigid control were found in nutrition students from both sexes when compared to students from other courses. Female nutrition students also presented higher binge eating levels than their colleagues from other courses. To our knowledge no other work has previously assessed all eating behaviour dimensions considered in the current study among nutrition students. Besides the results by themselves, the data obtained from this study provide several clues to further studies to be developed regarding the still rarely approached issue of eating behaviour among nutrition students. PMID:25240638

  1. Professional Development as a critical course in an undergraduate geology curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredrick, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    In today's economy and job market, "workplace readiness" has become a popular buzzword applied to educational efficacy and worthiness. This additional attention to employment outcomes for undergraduate students adds pressure on faculty, as they come under greater scrutiny from administration and prospective students. It is an important marketing tool for programs to report their placement numbers. In our geology program at California University, even though we have had several years of successful placement of our graduates, we have struggled with student buy-in until they are seniors looking at an uncertain future. In recent years, it has become apparent that a greater proportion of our students are not prepared for university-level work when they enter college. They are unprepared for the rigors of critical thinking and quantitative analyses. A way to help them get more serious about their professional career at an earlier stage of education is to demonstrate to them what they do not know. Beginning this year, we have implemented a new, required course, Professional Development for Geologists. It is not a novel idea, in terms of design, but its application as a required course within the major and the students' option of taking it multiple times seems to be a new approach. The course is structured to work with students to develop their skills for the job market, graduate school, and improve general professionalism.

  2. A new course and textbook on Physical Models of Living Systems, for science and engineering undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Philip

    2015-03-01

    I'll describe an intermediate-level course on ``Physical Models of Living Systems.'' The only prerequisite is first-year university physics and calculus. The course is a response to rapidly growing interest among undergraduates in a broad range of science and engineering majors. Students acquire several research skills that are often not addressed in traditional courses: Basic modeling skills Probabilistic modeling skills Data analysis methods Computer programming using a general-purpose platform like MATLAB or Python Dynamical systems, particularly feedback control. These basic skills, which are relevant to nearly any field of science or engineering, are presented in the context of case studies from living systems, including: Virus dynamics Bacterial genetics and evolution of drug resistance Statistical inference Superresolution microscopy Synthetic biology Naturally evolved cellular circuits. Work supported by NSF Grants EF-0928048 and DMR-0832802.

  3. The Impact of a Required Undergraduate Health and Wellness Course on Students' Awareness and Knowledge of Physical Activity and Chronic Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuruganti, Usha

    2014-01-01

    As part of the undergraduate curriculum, the Faculty of Kinesiology at the University of New Brunswick (UNB) requires all students to take an undergraduate course in physical activity, health and wellness in their third year of study. This capstone course allows students to integrate concepts from their program regarding physical activity,…

  4. Modeling course-based undergraduate research experiences: an agenda for future research and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Corwin, Lisa A; Graham, Mark J; Dolan, Erin L

    2015-03-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) are being championed as scalable ways of involving undergraduates in science research. Studies of CUREs have shown that participating students achieve many of the same outcomes as students who complete research internships. However, CUREs vary widely in their design and implementation, and aspects of CUREs that are necessary and sufficient to achieve desired student outcomes have not been elucidated. To guide future research aimed at understanding the causal mechanisms underlying CURE efficacy, we used a systems approach to generate pathway models representing hypotheses of how CURE outcomes are achieved. We started by reviewing studies of CUREs and research internships to generate a comprehensive set of outcomes of research experiences, determining the level of evidence supporting each outcome. We then used this body of research and drew from learning theory to hypothesize connections between what students do during CUREs and the outcomes that have the best empirical support. We offer these models as hypotheses for the CURE community to test, revise, elaborate, or refute. We also cite instruments that are ready to use in CURE assessment and note gaps for which instruments need to be developed. PMID:25687826

  5. Modeling Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experiences: An Agenda for Future Research and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Corwin, Lisa A.; Graham, Mark J.; Dolan, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) are being championed as scalable ways of involving undergraduates in science research. Studies of CUREs have shown that participating students achieve many of the same outcomes as students who complete research internships. However, CUREs vary widely in their design and implementation, and aspects of CUREs that are necessary and sufficient to achieve desired student outcomes have not been elucidated. To guide future research aimed at understanding the causal mechanisms underlying CURE efficacy, we used a systems approach to generate pathway models representing hypotheses of how CURE outcomes are achieved. We started by reviewing studies of CUREs and research internships to generate a comprehensive set of outcomes of research experiences, determining the level of evidence supporting each outcome. We then used this body of research and drew from learning theory to hypothesize connections between what students do during CUREs and the outcomes that have the best empirical support. We offer these models as hypotheses for the CURE community to test, revise, elaborate, or refute. We also cite instruments that are ready to use in CURE assessment and note gaps for which instruments need to be developed. PMID:25687826

  6. Evaluation of the quality of the teaching-learning process in undergraduate courses in Nursing 1

    PubMed Central

    González-Chordá, Víctor Manuel; Maciá-Soler, María Loreto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify aspects of improvement of the quality of the teaching-learning process through the analysis of tools that evaluated the acquisition of skills by undergraduate students of Nursing. Method: prospective longitudinal study conducted in a population of 60 secondyear Nursing students based on registration data, from which quality indicators that evaluate the acquisition of skills were obtained, with descriptive and inferential analysis. Results: nine items were identified and nine learning activities included in the assessment tools that did not reach the established quality indicators (p<0.05). There are statistically significant differences depending on the hospital and clinical practices unit (p<0.05). Conclusion: the analysis of the evaluation tools used in the article "Nursing Care in Welfare Processes" of the analyzed university undergraduate course enabled the detection of the areas for improvement in the teachinglearning process. The challenge of education in nursing is to reach the best clinical research and educational results, in order to provide improvements to the quality of education and health care. PMID:26444173

  7. Expectations and implementations of the flipped classroom model in undergraduate mathematics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naccarato, Emilie; Karakok, Gulden

    2015-10-01

    The flipped classroom model is being used more frequently in undergraduate mathematics courses. As with any new teaching model, in-depth investigations of both various implementation styles and how the new model improves student learning are needed. Currently, many practitioners have been sharing their implementations of this model. However, there has not yet been an investigation of the various implementations of the model to discern general trends in this movement. With this research goal in mind, we conducted a study exploring various implementations of the flipped classroom model by interviewing 19 faculty members who experienced using this model at 14 different institutes. Results indicate that participants had similar motivations for implementation; however, subsequent implementations were different. In addition, we share participants' perspectives on (a) student learning of pre-requisite, procedural and conceptual knowledge, and (b) how this particular model promotes such knowledge developments. Finally, we provide suggestions for future implementations and research regarding this particular teaching model.

  8. The effect of a nontraditional undergraduate science course on teacher and student performance in elementary science teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staples, Kimberly Ardena

    This study investigated the differential effects of experiences in nontraditional and traditional undergraduate science courses on the science teaching and learning of undergraduate education majors, elementary classroom teachers, and students. The ability for teachers to demonstrate knowledge through inquiry, critical analysis, and synthesis of the subject is clearly articulated as a requirement in the National Science Education Standards (National Research Council, 1996) and the National Accreditation of Teacher Education (2000). To meet this goal, science instruction in higher education requires reform to effectively prepare elementary undergraduate education majors in science content. The research study included a sample of 264 participants from a single university that represented undergraduate education majors, college science instructors, elementary classroom teachers, and elementary classroom students. Short term and long term learning outcomes of undergraduate education majors and classroom teachers were evaluated for the effect of experiences in a nontraditional college science course. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected through questionnaires, standardized tests, surveys, oral and written interviews, and observations of undergraduate and elementary science lessons. A triangulation of the data results revealed that modeling, active engagement, project-based activities, and cooperative learning positively affected undergraduate education majors' science teaching efficacy, science content mastery, and elementary teacher performance in science classroom instruction. Standardized test scores revealed higher achievement in science among elementary students of teachers experienced in a nontraditional science course than students of teachers experienced only in traditional learning environments. The results of this study support the call for reform in college science teaching. The standards based context in which science content was delivered

  9. Using Research Data to Stimulate Critical Thinking in Undergraduate Geoscience Courses: Examples and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, D. L.; Moore, G. F.; Bangs, N. L.; Tobin, H.

    2007-12-01

    The results of major research initiatives, such as NSF-MARGINS, IODP and its predecessors DSDP and ODP, Ridge 2000, and NOAA's Ocean Explorer and Vents Programs provide a rich library of resources for inquiry-based learning in undergraduate classes in the geosciences. These materials are scalable for use in general education courses for the non-science major to upper division major and graduate courses, which are both content-rich and research-based. Examples of these materials include images and animations drawn from computer presentations at research workshops and audio/video clips from web sites, as well as data repositories, which can be accessed through GeoMapApp, a data exploration and visualization tool developed as part of the Marine Geoscience Data System by researchers at the LDEO (http://www.geomapapp.org/). Past efforts have focused on recreating sea-going research experiences by integrating and repurposing these data in web-based virtual environments to stimulate active student participation in laboratory settings and at a distance over the WWW. Virtual expeditions have been created based on multibeam mapping of the seafloor near the Golden Gate, bathymetric transects of the major ocean basins, subduction zone seismicity and related tsunamis, water column mapping and submersible dives at hydrothermal vents, and ocean drilling of deep-sea sediments to explore climate change. Students also make use of multichannel seismic data provided through the Marine Seismic Data Center of UTIG to study subduction zone processes at convergent plate boundaries. We will present the initial stages of development of a web-based virtual expedition for use in undergraduate classes, based on a recent 3-D seismic survey associated with the NanTroSEIZE program of NSF-MARGINS and IODP to study the properties of the plate boundary fault system in the upper limit of the seismogenic zone off Japan.

  10. Brownfield Action Online - An Interactive Undergraduate Science Course in Environmental Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddicoat, Joseph; Bower, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Brownfield Action (BA) is a web-based, interactive, three dimensional digital space and learning simulation in which students form geotechnical consulting companies and work collectively to explore problems in environmental forensics. Created at Barnard College (BC) in conjunction with the Center for New Media Teaching and Learning at Columbia University, BA has a 12-year history at BC of use in one semester of a two-semester Introduction to Environmental Science course that is taken by more than 100 female undergraduate non-science majors to satisfy their science requirement. The pedagogical methods and design of the BA model are grounded in a substantial research literature focused on the design, use, and effectiveness of games and simulation in education. The successful use of the BA simulation at BC and 14 other institutions in the U.S. is described in Bower et al. (2011 and 2014). Soon to be taught online to non-traditional undergraduate students, BA has 15 modules that include a reconnaissance survey; scale; topographic, bedrock, and water table maps; oral and written reports from residents and the municipal government; porosity and permeability measurements of the regolith (sand) in the area of interest; hydrocarbon chemistry; direction and velocity of groundwater flow; and methods of geophysical exploration (soil gas, ground penetrating radar, magnetic metal detection, excavation, and drilling). Student performance is assessed by weekly exercises and a semester ending Environmental Site Assessment Phase I Report that summarizes the individual and collective discoveries about a contaminated subsurface plume that emanates from a leaking underground storage tank at a gasoline station upgrade from the water well that serves the surrounding community. Texts for the course are Jonathan Harr's A Civil Action and Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, which are accompanied by questions that direct the reading.

  11. Scientific reasoning skills development in the introductory biology courses for undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schen, Melissa S.

    Scientific reasoning is a skill of critical importance to those students who seek to become professional scientists. Yet, there is little research on the development of such reasoning in science majors. In addition, scientific reasoning is often investigated as two separate entities: hypothetico-deductive reasoning and argumentation, even though these skills may be linked. With regard to argumentation, most investigations look at its use in discussing socioscientific issues, not in analyzing scientific data. As scientists often use the same argumentation skills to develop and support conclusions, this avenue needs to be investigated. This study seeks to address these issues and establish a baseline of both hypothetico-deductive reasoning and argumentation of scientific data of biology majors through their engagement in introductory biology coursework. This descriptive study investigated the development of undergraduates' scientific reasoning skills by assessing them multiple times throughout a two-quarter introductory biology course sequence for majors. Participants were assessed at the beginning of the first quarter, end of the first quarter, and end of the second quarter. A split-half version of the revised Lawson Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning (LCTSR) and a paper and pencil argumentation instrument developed for this study were utilized to assess student hypothetico-deductive reasoning and argumentation skills, respectively. To identify factors that may influence scientific reasoning development, demographic information regarding age, gender, science coursework completed, and future plans was collected. Evidence for course emphasis on scientific reasoning was found in lecture notes, assignments, and laboratory exercises. This study did not find any trends of improvement in the students' hypothetico-deductive reasoning or argumentation skills either during the first quarter or over both quarters. Specific difficulties in the control of variables and

  12. Enhancing Students' Critical Thinking in Science: A Two-Year Design Based Exploration in a Large Undergraduate Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoo, Suhyun

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how to enhance students' critical thinking in an introductory undergraduate science course. As a design experiment, this study aimed to design, develop, implement, and refine learning activities, and investigate how the learning activities worked in fostering students' critical thinking in a large size…

  13. Implications from Self-Efficacy and Attribution Theories for an Understanding of Undergraduates' Motivation in a Foreign Language Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Pei-Hsuan Peggy; Schallert, Diane L.

    2008-01-01

    Although studies on self-efficacy and attribution have independently contributed to the motivation literature, these two constructs have rarely been considered together in the domain of foreign language learning. Here, 500 undergraduates in Spanish, German, and French courses were asked to report whether test scores represented a successful or…

  14. Prospective Elementary Teachers' Analysis of Children's Science Talk in an Undergraduate Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Danielle B.; Swanson, Lauren H.; Otero, Valerie K.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how prospective teachers used physics content knowledge when analyzing the talk of elementary children during special activities in an undergraduate physics content course designed for prospective teachers. We found that prospective teachers used content knowledge to reflect on their own learning and to identify students'…

  15. Team Knowledge Sharing Intervention Effects on Team Shared Mental Models and Student Performance in an Undergraduate Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikorski, Eric G.; Johnson, Tristan E.; Ruscher, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a shared mental model (SMM) based intervention on student team mental model similarity and ultimately team performance in an undergraduate meteorology course. The team knowledge sharing (TKS) intervention was designed to promote team reflection, communication, and improvement planning.…

  16. "Entering Research": A Course that Creates Community and Structure for Beginning Undergraduate Researchers in the STEM Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balster, Nicholas; Pfund, Christine; Rediske, Raelyn; Branchaw, Janet

    2010-01-01

    Undergraduate research experiences have been shown to enhance the educational experience and retention of college students, especially those from underrepresented populations. However, many challenges still exist relative to building community among students navigating large institutions. We developed a novel course called "Entering Research" that…

  17. An Investigation of the Status of Piano Teacher Training in Taiwan from the Perspective of Undergraduate Piano Pedagogy Course Offerings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Ju-Yu

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the status of piano teacher training in Taiwan. A survey questionnaire and two groups of interviewees facilitated research to conduct the study. The information gained from survey questionnaires documents the content of undergraduate piano pedagogy courses in Taiwanese universities and colleges. The…

  18. A Little More than Chalk and Talk: Results from a Third National Survey of Teaching Methods in Undergraduate Economics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Michael; Becker, William E.

    2008-01-01

    In 1995, 2000, and 2005, the authors surveyed U.S. academic economists to investigate how economics is taught in four different types of undergraduate courses at postsecondary institutions. They especially looked for any changes in teaching methods that occurred over this decade, when there were several prominent calls for economists and…

  19. Information Fluency for Undergraduate Biology Majors: Applications of Inquiry-based Learning in a Developmental Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, Kathleen M.; Eastman, Deborah A.

    2008-01-01

    Many initiatives for the improvement of undergraduate science education call for inquiry-based learning that emphasizes investigative projects and reading of the primary literature. These approaches give students an understanding of science as a process and help them integrate content presented in courses. At the same time, general initiatives to…

  20. Geoscience Education Research Project: Student Benefits and Effective Design of a Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kortz, Karen M.; van der Hoeven Kraft, Katrien J.

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate research has been shown to be an effective practice for learning science. While this is a popular discussion topic, there are few full examples in the literature for introductory-level students. This paper describes the Geoscience Education Research Project, an innovative course-based research experience designed for…

  1. In the Field: Increasing Undergraduate Students' Awareness of Extension through a Blended Project-Based Multimedia Production Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loizzo, Jamie; Lillard, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate students at land-grant institutions across the country are often unaware of the depth and breadth of Extension services and careers. Agricultural communication students collaborated with an Extension programmatic team in a blended and project-based course at Purdue University to develop online videos about small farm agricultural…

  2. Investigations of Protein Structure and Function Using the Scientific Literature: An Assignment for an Undergraduate Cell Physiology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulnix, Amy B.

    2003-01-01

    Undergraduate biology curricula are being modified to model and teach the activities of scientists better. The assignment described here, one that investigates protein structure and function, was designed for use in a sophomore-level cell physiology course at Earlham College. Students work in small groups to read and present in poster format on…

  3. Academic Achievement among First Semester Undergraduate Psychology Students: The Role of Course Experience, Effort, Motives and Learning Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diseth, Age; Pallesen, Stale; Brunborg, Geir Scott; Larsen, Svein

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between multiple predictors of academic achievement, including course experience, students' approaches to learning (SAL), effort (amount of time spent on studying) and prior academic performance (high school grade point average--HSGPA) among 442 first semester undergraduate psychology students. Correlation…

  4. Southern Black Culture: The African Heritage and the American Experience. Syllabi for Undergraduate Courses in the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spelman Coll., Atlanta, GA.

    The document presents 17 syllabi for undergraduate humanities courses treating black culture. This first volume of syllabi was prepared by participants in a 1981 Humanities Institute at Spelman College as part of an National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) grant. The document is divided into two parts. Part one, the bulk of the document, is…

  5. Southern Black Culture: The African Heritage and the American Experience. Syllabi for Undergraduate Courses in the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spelman Coll., Atlanta, GA.

    The document presents 23 syllabi for undergraduate humanities courses treating black culture in the 20th century. This second volume of syllabi was prepared by participants in a 1982 Humanities Institute at Spelman College as part of a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) grant. The document contains 23 syllabi designed to cover the history…

  6. A LEGO Mindstorms NXT Approach for Teaching at Data Acquisition, Control Systems Engineering and Real-Time Systems Undergraduate Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz-Martin, A.; Fernandez-Madrigal, J. A.; Galindo, C.; Gonzalez-Jimenez, J.; Stockmans-Daou, C.; Blanco-Claraco, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    LEGO Mindstorms NXT robots are being increasingly used in undergraduate courses, mostly in robotics-related subjects. But other engineering topics, like the ones found in data acquisition, control and real-time subjects, also have difficult concepts that can be well understood only with good lab exercises. Such exercises require physical…

  7. Physicist + Geologist points to Geophysics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julian, Glenn M.; Stueber, Alan M.

    1974-01-01

    A two-quarter introductory course in geophysics at the advanced undergraduate/beginning graduate level is described. An outline of course content is provided, and mechanics of instruction are discussed. (DT)

  8. A May American Economic Review Papers Seminar and an Analytic Project for Advanced Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Catherine S.

    2004-01-01

    The author describes two learning activities for teaching economics at the advanced undergraduate level: a May American Economic Review (AER) papers seminar and an analytic project. Both activities help students learn to "do economics." The May AER papers seminar promotes in-depth synthesis and interpretation on the basis of printed session papers…

  9. An Advanced Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Exploring NIR Spectroscopy and Chemometrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanke, Randall; Stauffer, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    An advanced undergraduate chemistry laboratory experiment to study the advantages and hazards of the coupling of NIR spectroscopy and chemometrics is described. The combination is commonly used for analysis and process control of various ingredients used in agriculture, petroleum and food products.

  10. Advanced Undergraduate-Laboratory Experiment on Electron Spin Resonance in Single-Crystal Ruby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Lee A.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    An electron-spin-resonance experiment which has been successfully performed in an advanced undergraduate physics laboratory is described. A discussion of that part of the theory of magnetic resonance necessary for the understanding of the experiment is also provided in this article. (DT)

  11. Curriculum for the Twenty-First Century: Recent Advances in Economic Theory and Undergraduate Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, William D.

    2011-01-01

    Undergraduate economics lags behind cutting-edge economic theory. The author briefly reviews six related advances that profoundly extend and deepen economic analysis: game-theoretic modeling, collective-action problems, information economics and contracting, social preference theory, conceptualizing rationality, and institutional theory. He offers…

  12. A Comprehensive Microfluidics Device Construction and Characterization Module for the Advanced Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piunno, Paul A. E.; Zetina, Adrian; Chu, Norman; Tavares, Anthony J.; Noor, M. Omair; Petryayeva, Eleonora; Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Veglio, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    An advanced analytical chemistry undergraduate laboratory module on microfluidics that spans 4 weeks (4 h per week) is presented. The laboratory module focuses on comprehensive experiential learning of microfluidic device fabrication and the core characteristics of microfluidic devices as they pertain to fluid flow and the manipulation of samples.…

  13. An Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Space Physics Course: Understanding the Process of Science Through One Field's Colorful History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Ramon E.

    1996-01-01

    Science education in this country is in its greatest period of ferment since the post-Sputnik frenzy a generation ago. In that earlier time, however, educators' emphasis was on producing more scientists and engineers. Today we recognize that all Americans need a good science background. The ability to observe, measure, think quantitatively, and reach logical conclusions based on available evidence is a set of skills that everyone entering the workforce needs to acquire if our country is to be competitive in a global economy. Moreover, as public policy increasingly crystallizes around scientific issues, it is critical that citizens be educated in science so that they may provide informed debate and on these issues. In order to develop this idea more fully, I proposed to teach a historically based course about space physics as an honors course at the University of Maryland-College Park (UMCP). The honors program at UMCP was established to foster broad-based undergraduate courses that utilize innovative teaching techniques to provide exemplary education to a select group of students. I designed an introductory course that would have four basic goals: to acquaint students with geomagnetic and auroral phenomena and their relationship to the space environment; to examine issues related to the history of science using the evolution of the field as an example; to develop familiarity with basic skills such as describing and interpreting observations, analyzing scientific papers, and communicating the results of their own research; and to provide some understanding of basic physics, especially those aspect that play a role in the near-earth space environment.

  14. General chemistry courses that can affect achievement: An action research study in developing a plan to improve undergraduate chemistry courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shweikeh, Eman

    Over the past 50 years, considerable research has been dedicated to chemistry education. In evaluating principal chemistry courses in higher education, educators have noted the learning process for first-year general chemistry courses may be challenging. The current study investigated perceptions of faculty, students and administrators on chemistry education at three institutions in Southern California. Via action research, the study sought to develop a plan to improve student engagement in general chemistry courses. A mixed method was utilized to analyze different perceptions on key factors determining the level of commitment and engagement in general chemistry education. The approach to chemistry learning from both a faculty and student perspective was examined including good practices, experiences and extent of active participation. The research study considered well-known measures of effective education with an emphasis on two key components: educational practices and student behavior. Institutional culture was inclusively assessed where cognitive expectations of chemistry teaching and learning were communicated. First, the extent in which faculty members are utilizing the "Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education" in their instruction was explored. Second, student attitudes and approaches toward chemistry learning were examined. The focus was on investigating student understanding of the learning process and the structure of chemistry knowledge. The seven categories used to measure students' expectations for learning chemistry were: effort, concepts, math link, reality link, outcome, laboratory, and visualization. This analysis represents the views of 16 faculty and 140 students. The results validated the assertion that students need some competencies and skills to tackle the challenges of the chemistry learning process to deeply engage in learning. A mismatch exists between the expectations of students and those of the faculty

  15. Evaluation and lessons learned from an undergraduate service learning course providing youth-focused relationship education.

    PubMed

    McElwain, Alyssa; Finnegan, Vanessa; Whittaker, Angela; Kerpelman, Jennifer; Adler-Baeder, Francesca; Duke, Adrienne

    2016-10-01

    Adolescent romantic relationships are known to have a significant impact on individual well-being and development. However, few teens experience formal education about the knowledge and skills necessary for building healthy romantic relationships. In response, a statewide relationship education initiative was developed at a large university in a Southeastern state. Undergraduates who enrolled in a service learning course in Human Development and Family Studies partnered with this initiative and implemented a relationship education program targeting high school students. A service learning model is used in this initiative because it offers opportunities for students' professional development and experiential learning. The present article provides a formative and illustrative summative evaluation of the service learning program. Specifically, the primary aims of this paper are to 1) provide an overview of the service learning course components; 2) describe preparation of the service learning students and their implementation of the relationship education program; 3) discuss challenges and lessons learned; and 4) offer initial evidence of effectiveness by showing change in targeted outcomes for the high school student recipients of the relationship education program. PMID:27367554

  16. Tracking undergraduate student achievement in a first-year physiology course using a cluster analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Brown, S J; White, S; Power, N

    2015-12-01

    A cluster analysis data classification technique was used on assessment scores from 157 undergraduate nursing students who passed 2 successive compulsory courses in human anatomy and physiology. Student scores in five summative assessment tasks, taken in each of the courses, were used as inputs for a cluster analysis procedure. We aimed to group students into high-achieving (HA) and low-achieving (LA) clusters and to determine the ability of each summative assessment task to discriminate between HA and LA students. The two clusters identified in each semester were described as HA (n = 42) and LA (n = 115) in semester 1 (HA1 and LA1, respectively) and HA (n = 91) and LA (n = 42) in semester 2 (HA2 and LA2, respectively). In both semesters, HA and LA means for all inputs were different (all P < 0.001). Nineteen students moved from the HA1 group into the LA2 group, whereas 68 students moved from the LA1 group into the HA2 group. The overall order of importance of inputs that determined group membership was different in semester 1 compared with semester 2; in addition, the within-cluster order of importance in LA groups was different compared with HA groups. This method of analysis may 1) identify students who need extra instruction, 2) identify which assessment is more effective in discriminating between HA and LA students, and 3) provide quantitative evidence to track student achievement. PMID:26628649

  17. The role of service-user feedback in undergraduate nursing courses.

    PubMed

    Ward, Sue; Benbow, Judith

    2016-07-14

    There is an increasing expectation that service users should contribute in a meaningful way to student nurse education courses. This article describes how service-user feedback on undergraduate student nurses' performance during practice learning opportunities (PLOs) gives an insight into the qualities service users value in student nurses. At Cardiff University, the new Bachelor of Nursing course, launched in September 2012, took into account the Nursing and Midwifery (NMC) standards for preregistration, implementing a mechanism for service users to feed back on students' clinical performance. To facilitate this service, user/carer feedback pages were inserted into the students' bound clinical practice portfolio. A large sample of the clinical portfolios (n=100) from one cohort across adult, child and mental health nursing fields were examined at the end of year 1, year 2 and again at the end of year 3, and service users' comments collated. In considering the words used by service users, the authors propose that they reflected the six fundamental values-or 6Cs-of care, compassion, competence, communication, courage and commitment that underpin the delivery of excellent care. Conclusions drawn from the feedback were that students exhibited the caring and professional qualities that service users value, and indeed showed the dignity and respect for patients and people that the profession demands. PMID:27409785

  18. Numerical Models for Exploration and Visualization of Complex Geological Phenomena in an Undergraduate Structural Geology Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinen, L. A.

    2008-12-01

    Computational science methods are often used to investigate and illustrate complex geological phenomena. To provide geology students with opportunities to both visualize and explore such phenomena, I have incorporated the program Poly3D into an undergraduate Structural Geology course. Poly3D is a three- dimensional boundary-element program developed at Stanford University, and is well suited to modeling joints and faults in a homogeneous, isotropic, linear-elastic whole or half space. In a series of guided inquiries throughout the course, students use Poly3D to explore the relationships between rock properties, joint/fault geometries, applied stresses or displacements, and the resultant deformation. With each subsequent assignment, student independence in the investigation increases, from initial visualizations of stresses at crack tips and investigation of controls on joint spacing, to individual and/or team proposals and research projects investigating specific student-generated questions in structural geology. I will present initial results from this teaching experiment and examples of the projects which have been executed, including the preparation students received to be able to use the program. Discussion and suggestions (particularly about effective means of conducting rigorous long-term assessment of student learning) are strongly encouraged.

  19. ImmuneQuest: Assessment of a Video Game as a Supplement to an Undergraduate Immunology Course.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Stacey L

    2016-05-01

    The study of immunology, particularly in this day and age, is an integral aspect of the training of future biologists, especially health professionals. Unfortunately, many students lose interest in or lack true comprehension of immunology due to the jargon of the field, preventing them from gaining a true conceptual understanding that is essential to all biological learning. To that end, a new video game, ImmuneQuest, has been developed that allows undergraduate students to "be" cells in the immune system, finding and attacking pathogens, while answering questions to earn additional abilities. The ultimate goal of ImmuneQuest is to allow students to understand how the major cells in the immune system work together to fight disease, rather than focusing on them as separate entities as is more commonly done in lecture material. This work provides the first assessment of ImmuneQuest in an upper-level immunology course. Students had significant gains in learning of information presented in ImmuneQuest compared with information discussed in lecture only. Furthermore, while students found the game "frustrating" at times, they agreed that the game aided their learning and recommended it for future courses. Taken together, these results suggest that ImmuneQuest appears to be a useful tool to supplement lecture material and increase student learning and comprehension. PMID:27158304

  20. ImmuneQuest: Assessment of a Video Game as a Supplement to an Undergraduate Immunology Course

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Stacey L.

    2016-01-01

    The study of immunology, particularly in this day and age, is an integral aspect of the training of future biologists, especially health professionals. Unfortunately, many students lose interest in or lack true comprehension of immunology due to the jargon of the field, preventing them from gaining a true conceptual understanding that is essential to all biological learning. To that end, a new video game, ImmuneQuest, has been developed that allows undergraduate students to “be” cells in the immune system, finding and attacking pathogens, while answering questions to earn additional abilities. The ultimate goal of ImmuneQuest is to allow students to understand how the major cells in the immune system work together to fight disease, rather than focusing on them as separate entities as is more commonly done in lecture material. This work provides the first assessment of ImmuneQuest in an upper-level immunology course. Students had significant gains in learning of information presented in ImmuneQuest compared with information discussed in lecture only. Furthermore, while students found the game “frustrating” at times, they agreed that the game aided their learning and recommended it for future courses. Taken together, these results suggest that ImmuneQuest appears to be a useful tool to supplement lecture material and increase student learning and comprehension. PMID:27158304

  1. Targeting Critical Thinking Skills in a First-Year Undergraduate Research Course.

    PubMed

    Carson, Susan

    2015-12-01

    TH!NK is a new initiative at NC State University focused on enhancing students' higher-order cognitive skills. As part of this initiative, I explicitly emphasized critical and creative thinking in an existing bacteriophage discovery first-year research course. In addition to the typical activities associated with undergraduate research such as review of primary literature and writing research papers, another strategy employed to enhance students' critical thinking skills was the use of discipline-specific, real-world scenarios. This paper outlines a general "formula" for writing scenarios, as well as several specific scenarios created for the described course. I also present how embedding aspects of the scenarios in reviews of the primary literature enriched the activity. I assessed student gains in critical thinking skills using a pre-/posttest model of the Critical Thinking Assessment Test (CAT), developed by Tennessee Technological University. I observed a positive gain trend in most of the individual skills assessed in the CAT, with a statistically significant large effect on critical thinking skills overall in students in the test group. I also show that a higher level of critical thinking skills was demonstrated in research papers written by students who participated in the scenarios compared with similar students who did not participate in the scenario activities. The scenario strategy described here can be modified for use in biology and other STEM disciplines, as well as in diverse disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. PMID:26753022

  2. A Study of Faculty Approaches to Teaching Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Michael Ryan

    Chemistry education researchers have not adequately studied teaching and learning experiences at all levels in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum leaving gaps in discipline-based STEM education communities understanding about how the upper- division curricula works (National Research Council, 2012b; Towns, 2013). This study explored faculty approaches to teaching in upper-division physical chemistry course settings using an interview-based methodology. Two conceptualizations of approaches to teaching emerged from a phenomenographic analysis of interview transcripts: (1) faculty beliefs about the purposes for teaching physical chemistry and (2) their conceptions of their role as an instructor in these course settings. Faculty who reported beliefs predominantly centered on helping students develop conceptual knowledge and problem-solving skills in physical chemistry often worked with didactic models of teaching, which emphasized the transfer of expert knowledge to students. When faculty expressed beliefs that were more inclusive of conceptual, epistemic, and social learning goals in science education they often described more student-centered models of teaching and learning, which put more responsibilities on them to facilitate students' interactive engagement with the material and peers during regularly scheduled class time. Knowledge of faculty thinking, as evinced in a rich description of their accounts of their experience, provides researchers and professional developers with useful information about the potential opportunities or barriers that exist for helping faculty align their beliefs and goals for teaching with research-based instructional strategies.

  3. Targeting Critical Thinking Skills in a First-Year Undergraduate Research Course

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Susan

    2015-01-01

    TH!NK is a new initiative at NC State University focused on enhancing students’ higher-order cognitive skills. As part of this initiative, I explicitly emphasized critical and creative thinking in an existing bacteriophage discovery first-year research course. In addition to the typical activities associated with undergraduate research such as review of primary literature and writing research papers, another strategy employed to enhance students’ critical thinking skills was the use of discipline-specific, real-world scenarios. This paper outlines a general “formula” for writing scenarios, as well as several specific scenarios created for the described course. I also present how embedding aspects of the scenarios in reviews of the primary literature enriched the activity. I assessed student gains in critical thinking skills using a pre-/posttest model of the Critical Thinking Assessment Test (CAT), developed by Tennessee Technological University. I observed a positive gain trend in most of the individual skills assessed in the CAT, with a statistically significant large effect on critical thinking skills overall in students in the test group. I also show that a higher level of critical thinking skills was demonstrated in research papers written by students who participated in the scenarios compared with similar students who did not participate in the scenario activities. The scenario strategy described here can be modified for use in biology and other STEM disciplines, as well as in diverse disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. PMID:26753022

  4. Advanced Mathematics Course-Taking: A Focus on Gender Equifinality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    You, Sukkyung; Sharkey, Jill D.

    2012-01-01

    High school mathematics achievement predicts future success. Potentially different factors that lead to success for boys versus girls, termed equifinality, are not well understood. Such factors are needed to inform interventions to increase numbers of students taking advanced mathematics courses and going on into science and mathematics careers.…

  5. The Role of Gender and Friendship in Advanced Course Taking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riegle-Crumb, Catherine; Farkas, George; Muller, Chandra

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the role of friends in girls' and boys' advanced course taking and explores whether friends' characteristics are particularly important for girls' math and science attainment. With the use of data from Adolescent Health and Academic Achievement and the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Heath, the results indicate that…

  6. Beginning an Advanced Placement Music Course. Edition Y.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, William; And Others

    The College Entrance Examination Board has prepared this publication to help secondary school teachers develop Advanced Placement (AP) courses in music. The discussion of strategy recommendations, reading materials, and record collections should be adapted to suit local preferences and individual skills. An opening section of general remarks…

  7. A Course and Curriculum in Advanced Technical Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farkas, David

    A course in advanced technical communication was developed at West Virginia University for upper-division students in engineering and the sciences and those planning careers in technical communication. The first four weeks of the semester are spent copy editing, with the students learning to use standard editing marks and keeping an editor's style…

  8. An Intermediate-Advanced Level Malay Refresher Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Oliver; And Others

    The first unit of this eight-volume refresher course in intermediate-advanced level Malay presents a detailed description of the Malay sound system, with phonological examples in both official (Latin) orthography and phonetic transcription. The remaining units in Book I--Part One (Units 2-4) and the five units in the second volume (Book I--Part…

  9. Learning physical biology via modeling and simulation: A new course and textbook for science and engineering undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Philip

    To a large extent, undergraduate physical-science curricula remain firmly rooted in pencil-and-paper calculation, despite the fact that most research is done with computers. To a large extent, undergraduate life-science curricula remain firmly rooted in descriptive approaches, despite the fact that much current research involves quantitative modeling. Not only does our pedagogy not reflect current reality; it also creates a spurious barrier between the fields, reinforcing the narrow silos that prevent students from connecting them. I'll describe an intermediate-level course on ``Physical Models of Living Systems.'' The prerequisite is first-year university physics and calculus. The course is a response to rapidly growing interest among undergraduates in a broad range of science and engineering majors. Students acquire several research skills that are often not addressed in traditional undergraduate courses: •Basic modeling skills; •Probabilistic modeling skills; •Data analysis methods; •Computer programming using a general-purpose platform like MATLAB or Python; •Pulling datasets from the Web for analysis; •Data visualization; •Dynamical systems, particularly feedback control. Partially supported by the NSF under Grants EF-0928048 and DMR-0832802.

  10. The All-Asteroids Lab Course: Kepler's Laws, Collisions, And Authentic Undergraduate Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, Andrew W.; Rector, T. A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a 12-week undergraduate laboratory sequence based entirely on asteroids and the hazards they pose. This curriculum has been designed primarily for use in an introductory Solar System Astronomy course, but it can be broken into smaller segments for a variety of course scenarios and educational goals. The course begins with a four-lab sequence based on our new online Java applet OrbitMaster, (adapted from AstroArts’ OrbitViewer under the GNU General Public License). OrbitMaster allows the user to alter an asteroid's orbital parameters and monitor its position and speed relative to both Sun and Earth. It also detects close approaches and collisions with Earth, and calculates revised speeds due to Earth's gravity. Students are able to confirm Kepler's laws, examine orbital properties that produce impacts, discover the kinetic energy-crater size relationship, understand the regional/global consequences of impacts, and experiment with deflection strategies. A three-lab sequence follows that examines the orbit-refinement and changing impact odds of 2007 WD5, which briefly had a 4% chance of hitting Mars in 2008. These labs introduce software that allows students to make astrometric measurements, fit orbital parameters, and predict future positions and uncertainties. They then use these tools in a four-lab research project to improve their own asteroids’ orbits, using images from the SDSS and WIYN 0.9-meter telescopes. Their work culminates in a presentation to their peers and submission of their astrometric measurements to the Minor Planet Center for publication. This effort is part of our NSF CCLI grant to develop Research Based Science Education (RBSE) curricula for non-majors. We have designed six projects that allow students to learn science by actually doing science. These projects are now being tested at six institutions around the country, and will eventually be distributed to a national audience.

  11. Visualizing MARGINS Data in Undergraduate Courses using GeoMapApp (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, L. R.

    2009-12-01

    Undergraduates can explore continental margins and plate boundaries through two exercises, Profiling Earth's Surface using GeoMapApp and What Kind of Continental Margin am I? Active or Passive? Both activities introduce students to GeoMapApp, an easy-to-use mapping program focused on marine geology and geophysics developed at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. In the Profiling Earth's Surface exercise, students relate large-scale continental and oceanic landforms to lithospheric plates, the underlying asthenosphere, earthquakes, and volcanoes. After using GeoMapApp to create a profile showing elevation, students add additional geologic features by hand. In the What Kind of Continental Margin am I? activity, students use GeoMapApp to investigate earthquake data to locate subducting slabs; examine topographic data to determine volcanic arc locations relative to trenches; and integrate earthquake, volcano, and bathymetric data to distinguish between passive and active margins. A webinar recorded in the summer of 2009, Teaching with MARGINS Data and GeoMapApp, illustrates how to use this and two other related activities. Students in introductory-level courses are likely to take about an hour to complete each exercise. To use GeoMapApp, students must download the freely available software to their Mac or PC (www.geomapapp.org) and maintain an internet connection to access base maps and datasets. On-line tutorials describing specific GeoMapApp functions are available to assist both students and faculty. Both activities were created in direct response to the NSF-funded Mini-Lessons initiative to develop undergraduate teaching modules to utilize MARGINS resources, including scientific data and visualization tools such as GeoMapApp. The exercises and the webinar are part of the MARGINS Data in the Classroom collection available at the on-line Science Education Resource Center at Carleton College (serc.carleton.edu/margins).

  12. NanTroSEIZE in 3-D: Creating a Virtual Research Experience in Undergraduate Geoscience Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, D. L.; Bangs, N. L.; Moore, G. F.; Tobin, H.

    2009-12-01

    Marine research programs, both large and small, have increasingly added a web-based component to facilitate outreach to K-12 and the public, in general. These efforts have included, among other activities, information-rich websites, ship-to-shore communication with scientists during expeditions, blogs at sea, clips on YouTube, and information about daily shipboard activities. Our objective was to leverage a portion of the vast collection of data acquired through the NSF-MARGINS program to create a learning tool with a long lifespan for use in undergraduate geoscience courses. We have developed a web-based virtual expedition, NanTroSEIZE in 3-D, based on a seismic survey associated with the NanTroSEIZE program of NSF-MARGINS and IODP to study the properties of the plate boundary fault system in the upper limit of the seismogenic zone off Japan. The virtual voyage can be used in undergraduate classes at anytime, since it is not directly tied to the finite duration of a specific seagoing project. The website combines text, graphics, audio and video to place learning in an experiential framework as students participate on the expedition and carry out research. Students learn about the scientific background of the program, especially the critical role of international collaboration, and meet the chief scientists before joining the sea-going expedition. Students are presented with the principles of 3-D seismic imaging, data processing and interpretation while mapping and identifying the active faults that were the likely sources of devastating earthquakes and tsunamis in Japan in 1944 and 1948. They also learn about IODP drilling that began in 2007 and will extend through much of the next decade. The website is being tested in undergraduate classes in fall 2009 and will be distributed through the NSF-MARGINS website (http://www.nsf-margins.org/) and the MARGINS Mini-lesson section of the Science Education Resource Center (SERC) (http

  13. Results from a model of course-based undergraduate research in the first- and second-year chemistry curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Gabriela

    2014-03-01

    The Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education (CASPiE) is a project funded by the URC program of the NSF Chemistry Division. The purpose of CASPiE was to provide students in first and second year laboratory courses with authentic research experiences as a gateway to more traditional forms of undergraduate research. Each research experience is a 6- to 8-week laboratory project based on and contributing to the research work of the experiment's author through data or preparation of samples. The CASPiE program has resulted in a model for engaging students in undergraduate research early in their college careers. To date, CASPiE has provided that experience to over 6000 students at 17 different institutions. Evaluation data collected has included student surveys, interviews and longitudinal analysis of performance. We have found that students' perceptions of their understanding of the material and the discipline increase over the course of the semester, whereas they are seen to decrease in the control courses. Students demonstrate a greater ability to explain the meaning and purpose of their experimental procedures and results and provide extensions to the experimental design, compared not only to control courses but also compared to inquiry-based courses. Longitudinal analysis of grades indicates a possible benefit to performance in courses related to the discipline two and three years later. A similar implementation in biology courses has demonstrated an increase in critical thinking scores. Work supported by the National Science Foundation, Division of Chemistry.

  14. A Rooftop Radio Observatory: A New Method for Teaching Science Fundamentals to Advanced Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, C.; Cudaback, D.; Heiles, C.; Treffers, R.; Hancox, C.; Millan, R.; Parthasarathy, R.

    1996-05-01

    This paper reports on an innovative teaching style for the instruction of advanced undergraduates in experimental science fundamentals. Working under the belief that a complete education includes both theoretical work and ``hands-on'' laboratory experience, a radio observatory has been created on top of the U. C. Berkeley Astronomy Department building. Class work with this observatory give students an understanding of: (1) components of a radio telescope system, (2) system operation and trouble-shooting, (3) observation strategies, (4) data collection and reduction, and (5) presentation and visualization of results. Our antenna consists of a two meter tall pyramidal horn optimized to observe the 21 cm atomic hydrogen transition. The receiver consists of a double-heterodyning system with a PC to sample and Fourier transform the signal and generate a power spectrum. System components were constructed by students with guidance from faculty members. Students using this system obtain power spectra representing the Doppler shifted HI line, as a function of galactic coordinate. Students derive results including basic galactic structure and rotation and mass curves. Further technical information is presented in the accompanying poster paper. Close contact between students and equipment is essential for successful comprehension of fundamental concepts. The system is constructed such that most components can be individually examined or assembled on a bench-top in a configuration the student wishes to explore. We believe that systems which perform real astronomy can be duplicated by other universities. The small scale of the antenna as well as the strength of the HI line require a small allocation of resources to implement an observation system. The ``hands-on'' approach compliments theoretical course work, in addition to providing practical experience for students who may not be inclined towards graduate school. Finally, this educational technique is exportable and

  15. The Role of Gender and Friendship in Advanced Course Taking

    PubMed Central

    Riegle-Crumb, Catherine; Farkas, George; Muller, Chandra

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the role of friends in girls' and boys' advanced course taking and explores whether friends' characteristics are particularly important for girls' math and science attainment. With the use of data from Adolescent Health and Academic Achievement and the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Heath, the results indicate that same-sex friends' academic performance significantly predicts course taking in all subjects for girls, but not for boys. Furthermore, for math and science only, the effects of friends' performance are greater in the context of a predominantly female friendship group, which suggests that such groups provide a counterpoint to the gendered stereotypes and identities of those subjects. PMID:20333274

  16. Systematic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum Progam Award and Course and Curriculum Development Program Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-06-01

    Eight awards in chemistry curriculum development for FY1996 have been announced. One award, to a consortium centered at the University of California-Los Angeles, represents the fifth award in the Systemic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum program. Although no proposals will be accepted in this program for either planning or full grants for FY1997, it is anticipated that proposals will be accepted in June of 1997 for projects that would adapt and adopt materials developed by the five funded consortia: Molecular Science centered at the University of California-Los Angeles; ChemLinks centered at Beloit College; MolecularChem Consortium centered at the University of California-Berkeley; Workshop Chemistry centered at CUNY City College; and New Traditions centered at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Seven awards have been made in the Course and Curriculum Development program. This ongoing program continues to accept proposals in chemistry as usual. Systemic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum Program Award. Molecular Science. Orville L. Chapman University of California-Los Angeles DUE 9555605 FY96 725,000 FY97 575,000, FY98 575,000 FY99 275,000, FY00 275,000 The UCLA-CSUF-Community College Alliance (24 area community colleges that have worked together for more than 15 years) proposes a sweeping restructuring of the lower division chemistry curriculum and the auxiliary learning and assessment processes. In forming our new curriculum, we reject the positivist approach to science education in favor of a constructivist approach that emphasizes problem solving and exploratory learning. We make this change in order to focus on the developing key skills, traits, and abilities of our students. Our new curriculum, the Molecular Science Curriculum, cuts across departments and disciplines to embrace all activities that involve the study of atoms and molecules. In particular, environmental science, materials science, and molecular life science have

  17. Student Conceptions of Eutrophication in a Field-Based Undergraduate Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowbotham, K. L.; Petcovic, H. L.; Koretsky, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    Little research regarding student conceptions of complex environmental systems and biogeochemical cycles has been published. We investigate the nature of student ideas about such systems and cycles in a newly developed a field course for upper level undergraduate Geoscience and Environmental Studies majors in which students engage in problem-based learning and work collaboratively to investigate a real-world environmental system - eutrophication of an urban lake in Kalamazoo, MI. Classroom work focuses on a weekly pre-instruction “question of the day” (QED). After answering QEDs individually, students gather in groups to create and illustrate consensus answers. The instructor then typically presents a “mini-lecture” to address the QED’s content. Students spend a substantial amount of class time outside the classroom in both lab and field settings. Once they have gained familiarity with relevant lab and field techniques, students design and execute a field sampling strategy to assess lake quality. Near the end of the course, students present their research in a public poster session and a written summary report. Thus far, the course has been offered in the 2009 and 2010 fall terms to a total of 34 students. Data collection during each term includes experience, attitude, and knowledge surveys; students’ individual and group work; and a series of interviews with ~ 25% of the students in the course. The experience survey examines students’ prior courses, research, and relevant work experience. The attitude survey assesses novelty space (comfort and preparation for coursework). The multiple choice knowledge survey functions as a pre/post-test, assessing students’ knowledge of relevant biogeochemistry. Upon examination of conceptual issues that emerged in the 2009 interview data, this survey was modified for the 2010 fall term to focus on key concepts and include actual student misconceptions as the multiple choice items' distracters. Semi

  18. Advanced Simulation in Undergraduate Pilot Training: Automatic Instructional System. Final Report for the Period March 1971-January 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faconti, Victor; Epps, Robert

    The Advanced Simulator for Undergraduate Pilot Training (ASUPT) was designed to investigate the role of simulation in the future Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT) program. The Automated Instructional System designed for the ASUPT simulator was described in this report. The development of the Automated Instructional System for ASUPT was based upon…

  19. Systematic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum Progam Award and Course and Curriculum Development Program Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-06-01

    Eight awards in chemistry curriculum development for FY1996 have been announced. One award, to a consortium centered at the University of California-Los Angeles, represents the fifth award in the Systemic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum program. Although no proposals will be accepted in this program for either planning or full grants for FY1997, it is anticipated that proposals will be accepted in June of 1997 for projects that would adapt and adopt materials developed by the five funded consortia: Molecular Science centered at the University of California-Los Angeles; ChemLinks centered at Beloit College; MolecularChem Consortium centered at the University of California-Berkeley; Workshop Chemistry centered at CUNY City College; and New Traditions centered at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Seven awards have been made in the Course and Curriculum Development program. This ongoing program continues to accept proposals in chemistry as usual. Systemic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum Program Award. Molecular Science. Orville L. Chapman University of California-Los Angeles DUE 9555605 FY96 725,000 FY97 575,000, FY98 575,000 FY99 275,000, FY00 275,000 The UCLA-CSUF-Community College Alliance (24 area community colleges that have worked together for more than 15 years) proposes a sweeping restructuring of the lower division chemistry curriculum and the auxiliary learning and assessment processes. In forming our new curriculum, we reject the positivist approach to science education in favor of a constructivist approach that emphasizes problem solving and exploratory learning. We make this change in order to focus on the developing key skills, traits, and abilities of our students. Our new curriculum, the Molecular Science Curriculum, cuts across departments and disciplines to embrace all activities that involve the study of atoms and molecules. In particular, environmental science, materials science, and molecular life science have

  20. Controversies in Neuroscience: A Literature-Based Course for First Year Undergraduates that Improves Scientific Confidence While Teaching Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Willard, Amanda M.; Brasier, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Controversies in Neuroscience is a half-semester elective for first year science students at Carnegie Mellon University with an emphasis on discussing primary literature to highlight current research topics and to introduce students to neuroscience. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of teaching first-year students using a literature-only approach, we took advantage of an opportunity to teach the same topics to a traditional textbook-based upper division course as to the first year seminar. Students in both courses took surveys at the beginning and end of the course, and self-reported confidence levels as well as exam scores were compared. At the conclusion of both courses, students reported increased level of comfort with scientific terminology and methodology. In addition, students enrolled in the first-year seminar performed at least as well or better than students involved in the upper division course on exam material. These results suggest that first year students are capable of making great strides in learning and understanding scientific principles strictly through exposure to primary literature, even with little or no access to a standard textbook. Furthermore, introducing students to primary literature-based courses early on in their undergraduate career can increase enthusiasm for learning science and improve confidence with neuroscience concepts and methodology. We therefore conclude that it is valuable to provide students opportunities to critically evaluate scientific literature early in their undergraduate careers. PMID:24693264

  1. Controversies in Neuroscience: A Literature-Based Course for First Year Undergraduates that Improves Scientific Confidence While Teaching Concepts.

    PubMed

    Willard, Amanda M; Brasier, D J

    2014-01-01

    Controversies in Neuroscience is a half-semester elective for first year science students at Carnegie Mellon University with an emphasis on discussing primary literature to highlight current research topics and to introduce students to neuroscience. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of teaching first-year students using a literature-only approach, we took advantage of an opportunity to teach the same topics to a traditional textbook-based upper division course as to the first year seminar. Students in both courses took surveys at the beginning and end of the course, and self-reported confidence levels as well as exam scores were compared. At the conclusion of both courses, students reported increased level of comfort with scientific terminology and methodology. In addition, students enrolled in the first-year seminar performed at least as well or better than students involved in the upper division course on exam material. These results suggest that first year students are capable of making great strides in learning and understanding scientific principles strictly through exposure to primary literature, even with little or no access to a standard textbook. Furthermore, introducing students to primary literature-based courses early on in their undergraduate career can increase enthusiasm for learning science and improve confidence with neuroscience concepts and methodology. We therefore conclude that it is valuable to provide students opportunities to critically evaluate scientific literature early in their undergraduate careers. PMID:24693264

  2. Human sciences in the first semester of the dental undergraduate course at the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.

    PubMed

    Röding, K

    1999-08-01

    The first 9 weeks of the dental undergraduate education at the Karolinska Institutet comprises a transition course, designed to introduce students to university studies leading to professional qualifications in patient-related health sciences. 1 week has been set aside for the theme Man and Society, highlighting the importance of the human sciences for the development of behavioural skills necessary for achieving professionalism and a holistic patient concept. Some essential ethical questions are addressed: intercultural communication, empathy, professional demeanour and the development of professional competence, and group dynamics. In this context, more specific subjects are considered, such as the emergence of the multicultural society and its implications for health services, interpersonal skills and patient communication in the health and medical fields. There are several reasons for including this theme, which forms the basis for the ethical and communicative strands throughout the entire curriculum. As 30-40% of freshmen dental students are of non-Swedish origin, it is essential to include cultural awareness seminars. Another reason is that within the EU, cultural and communicative skills are recognised proficiencies for health professionals; it is also acknowledged that effective delivery of health care may be impeded by misunderstandings in communication and conflict in ethical beliefs. Group discussions are scheduled during the week in order to allow the students to discuss their own experiences related to the theme. The students are also given a written assignment in relation to one of the seminars; the report is assessed as a part of the examination. The week is concluded by a plenum discussion summarising the group discussions. To date, 4 course evaluations, with a response rate of 92.5%, show that 97.3% of the students were positive to the theme as a whole or to specific seminars held during the week, especially intercultural communication, ethics and

  3. Undergraduate Syllabi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Teaching in the Addictions, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents sample undergraduate syllabi for seven addiction counseling courses. Courses include: Group Interventions in Substance Abuse and Addiction; Recovery and Relapse Prevention Methods; Group Counseling I and II; and Co-Occurring Disorders. (GCP)

  4. Value Added: History of Physics in a ``Science, Technology, and Society'' General Education Undergraduate Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuenschwander, Dwight

    2016-03-01

    In thirty years of teaching a capstone ``Science, Technology, and Society'' course to undergraduate students of all majors, I have found that, upon entering STS, to most of them the Manhattan Project seems about as remote as the Civil War; few can describe the difference between nuclear and large non-nuclear weapons. With similar lack of awareness, many students seem to think the Big Bang was dreamed up by science sorcerers. One might suppose that a basic mental picture of weapons that held entire populations hostage should be part of informed citizenship. One might also suppose that questions about origins, as they are put to nature through evidence-based reasoning, should be integral to a culture's identity. Over the years I have found the history of physics to be an effective tool for bringing such subjects to life for STS students. Upon hearing some of the history behind (for example) nuclear weapons and big bang cosmology, these students can better imagine themselves called upon to help in a Manhattan Project, or see themselves sleuthing about in a forensic science like cosmology. In this talk I share sample student responses to our class discussions on nuclear weapons, and on cosmology. The history of physics is too engaging to be appreciated only by physicists.

  5. Video-based self-assessment: implementation and evaluation in an undergraduate nursing course.

    PubMed

    Yoo, M S; Son, Y J; Kim, Y S; Park, J H

    2009-08-01

    This research was performed to investigate the effects of video-based self-assessment on the ability of nursing students to accurately measure vital signs, their communication skills, and their satisfaction. This research was conducted between March 2007 and June 2007 as a quasi-experimental control-group, pretest-posttest design. The study population was composed of 40 second-year student nurses who enrolled in a fundamentals of nursing course of a college of nursing, Ajou University in Korea. Results of the research indicate that there was a statistically significant difference in exam scores for assessing long-term memory video-review group demonstrating higher scores. Student satisfaction was also significantly higher in the video-review group than in the control group. These results may suggest video-based self-assessment is a beneficial and effective instructional method of training undergraduate nursing students to develop awareness of their strengths and weaknesses, and to improve their clinical and communication skills. PMID:19167789

  6. Stereospecificity of NAD+/NADH Reactions: A Project Experiment for Advanced Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowrey, Jonathan S.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Presents background information, materials needed, and experimental procedures to study enzymes dependent on pyridine nucleotide coenzymes (NAD/NADH). The experiments, suitable for advanced organic or biochemistry courses, require approximately 10-15 hours to complete. (SK)

  7. Patient Simulation Software to Augment an Advanced Pharmaceutics Course

    PubMed Central

    Schonder, Kristine

    2011-01-01

    Objective To implement and assess the effectiveness of adding a pharmaceutical care simulation program to an advanced therapeutics course. Design PharmaCAL (University of Pittsburgh), a software program that uses a branched-outcome decision making model, was used to create patient simulations to augment lectures given in the course. In each simulation, students were presented with a challenge, given choices, and then provided with consequences specific to their choices. Assessments A survey was administered at the end of the course and students indicated the simulations were enjoyable (92%), easy to use (90%), stimulated interest in critically ill patients (82%), and allowed for application of lecture material (91%). A 5-item presimulation and postsimulation test on the anemia simulation was administered to assess learning. Students answered significantly more questions correctly on the postsimulation test than on the presimulation test (p < 0.001). Seventy-eight percent of students answered the same 5 questions correctly on the final examination. Conclusion Patient simulation software that used a branched-outcome decision model was an effective supplement to class lectures in an advanced pharmaceutics course and was well-received by pharmacy students. PMID:21519411

  8. Learning Style versus Time Spent Studying and Career Choice: Which Is Associated with Success in a Combined Undergraduate Anatomy and Physiology Course?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farkas, Gary J.; Mazurek, Ewa; Marone, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    The VARK learning style is a pedagogical focus in health care education. This study examines relationships of course performance vs. VARK learning preference, study time, and career plan among students enrolled in an undergraduate anatomy and physiology course at a large urban university. Students (n?=?492) from the fall semester course completed…

  9. An Analysis of Undergraduate Grades by Course in Relation to Student Ability Levels, Programs of Study and Longitudinal Trends. Report No. 76-15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prather, James E.; Smith, Glynton

    Investigated are final letter grades in undergraduate courses at Georgia State University from fall 1970 to fall 1975. Grades were examined course-by-course in relation to ability levels, programs of study and longitudinal trends. An analysis was undertaken to determine if "grade inflation" had taken place. The sample was based on records of 9,338…

  10. Information literacy in an inquiry course for first-year science undergraduates: a simplified 3C approach.

    PubMed

    Rangachari, P K; Rangachari, Usha

    2007-06-01

    In this article, we describe a simplified approach to teach students to assess information obtained from diverse sources. Three broad categories (credibility, content, and currency; 3C) were used to evaluate information from textbooks, monographs, popular magazines, scholarly journals, and the World Wide Web. This 3C approach used in an inquiry course for freshmen in an undergraduate science program can be readily transferred to other settings. PMID:17562907

  11. Long-term effects of course-embedded undergraduate research: The CASPiE longitudinal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szteinberg, Gabriela A.

    The Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education (CASPiE) is a National Science Foundation funded initiative that seeks to introduce first- and second-year undergraduate students to research in their mainstream laboratory courses. To investigate the effects of this research-based curriculum, a longitudinal study was initiated at Purdue University (PU) and University of Illinois-Chicago (UIC), where CASPiE was implemented in a portion of laboratory sections of a general chemistry course (CHEM 116 at PU/CHEM 114 at UIC). The study examined the long-term effects of the CASPiE program on students' chemistry course performance, research involvement, and retention in STEM majors and future careers. The results of the academic records analyses showed that PU CASPiE students from the opt-in semesters, i.e. those when students chose to enroll in the CASPiE sections, were higher-achieving students from the beginning of their college years and performed significantly higher than the students in the traditional sections. There were no significant differences in chemistry course performance among PU students from the randomly assigned semester. However, looking from the first semester chemistry course to the upper 300 level chemistry courses, randomly assigned PU students from the traditional sections had a significant performance decrease. The CASPiE students had a performance decrease that was not significant. At UIC, there were no significant differences between CASPiE and traditional students' chemistry performance. Analyses of the academic records also revealed that there were no differences in STEM major retention between CASPiE and traditional students, from both PU and UIC. However, CASPiE students from UIC and the ones from the opt-in sections at PU graduated faster in average than traditional students. Students' responses to an online survey showed that there were no differences in students' choice of future plans in STEM or non-STEM fields (such as graduate or

  12. Debates of science vs. religion in undergraduate general education cosmology courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Aleman, Ramon

    2015-04-01

    Recent advances in theoretical physics such as the discovery of the Higgs boson or the BICEP2 data supporting inflation can be part of the general science curriculum of non-science majors in a cosmology course designed as part of the General Education component. Yet to be a truly interdisciplinary experience one must deal with the religious background and faith of most of our students. Religious faith seems to be important in their lives, but the philosophical outlook of sciences like cosmology or evolutionary biology is one in which God is an unnecessary component in explaining the nature and origin of the universe. We will review recent advances in cosmology and suggestions on how to establish a respectful and intelligent science vs. religion debate in a transdisciplinary general education setting.

  13. Climate-Literacy Laboratory Exercises for Undergraduate Students in an Introductory Weather and Climate Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, J.; Elliott, W.; Criswell, B.; Morrow, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    A suite of NASA-sponsored, Web-based exercises are in development for an introductory weather and climate course at Georgia State University (GSU) to improve climate literacy among undergraduate students. An extremely small percentage of the students are STEM majors. The exercises make extensive use of NASA resources and are guided in part by the concepts in Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Science. At least two thousand undergraduate students have completed a majority of the exercises over the past two years. Nine of the twelve exercises in the course are connected strongly to climate literacy. The topics of those nine exercises are as follows: (1) Solar Irradiance, (2) Stratospheric Ozone, (3) Tropospheric Air, (4) The Carbon Cycle, (5) Global Surface Temperature, (6) Glacial-Interglacial Cycles, (7) Temperature Changes during the Past Millennium, (8) Climate & Ecosystems, and (9) Current & Future Climate Change. Two of the exercises (Tropospheric Air and The Carbon Cycle) make use of carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements made by students themselves and by a stationary CO2 monitor at GSU. The three remaining exercises, The Hadley Cell, Atlanta Weather, and Air Pollution, are less connected to multiple climate-literacy concepts; nonetheless, they provide a more complete experience for the students in the understanding of climate processes, differences between weather and climate, and human impacts on the atmosphere. All exercises are based on an inquiry-based learning cycle (i.e. 7 Es) and require substantial amounts of engagement, applied thinking, and critical thinking by the students. Not only do students become knowledgeable about the essential principles of climate change, especially global warming, but extensive use of geographical-information software and hand-held measurement devices has provided students with training in geography and technology. Student attitudes towards the labs were gathered via an on-line, anonymous survey from

  14. Just-in-Time Teaching in undergraduate physics courses: Implementation, learning, and perceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Jessica Hewitt

    Regardless of discipline, a decades-long battle has ensued within nearly every classroom in higher education: instructors getting students to come to class prepared to learn. In response to this clash between teacher expectations and frequent student neglect, a group of four physics education researchers developed a reformed instructional strategy called Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT). This dissertation investigates the following three areas: 1) the fidelity with which undergraduate physics instructors implement JiTT, 2) whether student performance predicts student perception of their instructor's fidelity of JiTT implementation, and 3) whether student perception of their instructor's fidelity of JiTT implementation correlates with student views of their physics course. A blend of quantitative data (e.g., students grades, inventory scores, and questionnaire responses) are integrated with qualitative data (e.g., individual faculty interviews, student focus group discussions, and classroom observations). This study revealed no statistically significant relationship between instructors who spent time on a predefined JiTT critical component and their designation as a JiTT user or non-user. While JiTT users implemented the pedagogy in accordance with the creators' intended ideal vision, many also had trouble reconciling personal concerns about their role as a JiTT adopter and the anticipated demand of the innovation. I recommend that this population of faculty members can serve as a JiTT model for other courses, disciplines, and/or institutions. Student performance was not a predictor of student perception instructor fidelity of JiTT implementation. Additionally, the majority of students in this study reported they read their textbook prior to class and that JiTT assignments helped them prepare for in-class learning. I found evidence that exposure to the JiTT strategy may correlate with a more favorable student view of their physics course. Finally, according to students

  15. Design Of Instructional Objectives Of Undergraduate Solid State Physics Course: A First Step To Physics Education Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S.; Sastri, O.; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2010-07-01

    It is well known that most of the undergraduate study in India is conducted through the affiliate system in which affiliated colleges run the courses prescribed by a Board of Studies of the affiliating University in the form of a syllabus, which happens to be the only academic link between the students, teachers and the examiners. This document is limited only to defining the contents of the course without any hint about the instructional/learning objectives. Given these limitations of the existing course structure an attempt has been made to define the instructional/learning objectives for an undergraduate course of study in Solid State Physics prescribed in B. Sc. (Honours and Pass Course) in Physics of Himachal Pradesh University, India. It is not only the first step to enhance learning but to make teaching research based as well, as has been practiced in US and West as a foundation of Physics Education Research. The instructional objectives/learning objectives are written using Mager's approach and classified using Bloom's taxonomy. An effort has also been made to make it ready for adoption in the classroom.

  16. Experimental Design, Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, and Multivariate Calibration: An Advanced Project in a Chemometrics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Oliveira, Rodrigo R.; das Neves, Luiz S.; de Lima, Kassio M. G.

    2012-01-01

    A chemometrics course is offered to students in their fifth semester of the chemistry undergraduate program that includes an in-depth project. Students carry out the project over five weeks (three 8-h sessions per week) and conduct it in parallel to other courses or other practical work. The students conduct a literature search, carry out…

  17. a Matter of Confidence: Gender Differences in Attitudes Toward Engaging in Lab and Course Work in Undergraduate Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micari, Marina; Pazos, Pilar; Hartmann, Mitra J. Z.

    Although there has been a great deal of research on women's experiences in engineering study, there has been little attempt to connect experiential factors to performance in both course and lab. This two-phase study investigated gender differences in undergraduates' experiences in a fluid mechanics course as well as the relationship between experiential factors and student performance in that course. One hundred forty-seven students at a Midwestern research university completed questionnaires related to course experience and perceived engagement. Data were also collected on final grade for 89 students in the second round of data collection. Relative to men, women reported less confidence that they could avoid mistakes in the lab, less experience with mechanical items, less perceived ability in engineering relative to classmates, and less perceived skill in tasks requiring navigation or maneuvering through space. Feelings of engagement were related to grade, but no gender differences were found in either engagement or grade.

  18. Impact of Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Research in Mathematics and Biology on the Development of a New Course Integrating Five STEM Disciplines

    PubMed Central

    Caudill, Lester; Hill, April; Lipan, Ovidiu

    2010-01-01

    Funded by innovative programs at the National Science Foundation and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Richmond faculty in biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics, and computer science teamed up to offer first- and second-year students the opportunity to contribute to vibrant, interdisciplinary research projects. The result was not only good science but also good science that motivated and informed course development. Here, we describe four recent undergraduate research projects involving students and faculty in biology, physics, mathematics, and computer science and how each contributed in significant ways to the conception and implementation of our new Integrated Quantitative Science course, a course for first-year students that integrates the material in the first course of the major in each of biology, chemistry, mathematics, computer science, and physics. PMID:20810953

  19. A case-study of a socio-scientific issues curricular and pedagogical intervention in an undergraduate microbiology course: A focus on informal reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schalk, Kelly A.

    The purpose of this investigation was to measure specific ways a student interest SSI-based curricular and pedagogical affects undergraduates' ability informally reason. The delimited components of informal reasoning measured were undergraduates' Nature of Science conceptualizations and ability to evaluate scientific information. The socio-scientific issues (SSI) theoretical framework used in this case-study has been advocated as a means for improving students' functional scientific literacy. This investigation focused on the laboratory component of an undergraduate microbiology course in spring 2008. There were 26 participants. The instruments used in this study included: (1) Individual and Group research projects, (2) journals, (3) laboratory write-ups, (4) a laboratory quiz, (5) anonymous evaluations, and (6) a pre/post article exercise. All instruments yielded qualitative data, which were coded using the qualitative software NVivo7. Data analyses were subjected to instrumental triangulation, inter-rater reliability, and member-checking. It was determined that undergraduates' epistemological knowledge of scientific discovery, processes, and justification matured in response to the intervention. Specifically, students realized: (1) differences between facts, theories, and opinions; (2) testable questions are not definitively proven; (3) there is no stepwise scientific process; and (4) lack of data weakens a claim. It was determined that this knowledge influenced participants' beliefs and ability to informally reason. For instance, students exhibited more critical evaluations of scientific information. It was also found that undergraduates' prior opinions had changed over the semester. Further, the student interest aspect of this framework engaged learners by offering participants several opportunities to influentially examine microbiology issues that affected their life. The investigation provided empirically based insights into the ways undergraduates' interest

  20. The Annotated Bibliography and Citation Behavior: Enhancing Student Scholarship in an Undergraduate Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaspohler, Molly R.; Rux, Erika M.; Flaspohler, John A.

    2007-01-01

    Contemporary undergraduates in the biological sciences have unprecedented access to scientific information. Although many of these students may be savvy technologists, studies from the field of library and information science consistently show that undergraduates often struggle to locate, evaluate, and use high-quality, reputable sources of…

  1. Course-Integrated Undergraduate Research Experiences Structured at Different Levels of Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadelson, Louis S.; Walters, Linda; Waterman, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Enhancing undergraduate students' preparation and interest in science careers frequently involves engagement in authentic research experiences. Traditional undergraduate research (UR) one-to-one faculty-to-student ratio is challenged by demand and cost, motivating the development of alternative approaches to offering these experiences. Embracing…

  2. A Series of Molecular Dynamics and Homology Modeling Computer Labs for an Undergraduate Molecular Modeling Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Donald E.; Guayasamin, Ryann C.; Kieffer, Madeleine E.

    2010-01-01

    As computational modeling plays an increasingly central role in biochemical research, it is important to provide students with exposure to common modeling methods in their undergraduate curriculum. This article describes a series of computer labs designed to introduce undergraduate students to energy minimization, molecular dynamics simulations,…

  3. Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experiences Can Make Scientific Research More Inclusive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bangera, Gita; Brownell, Sara E.

    2014-01-01

    Current approaches to improving diversity in scientific research focus on graduating more science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors, but graduation with a STEM undergraduate degree alone is not sufficient for entry into graduate school. Undergraduate independent research experiences are becoming more or less a prerequisite…

  4. 38 CFR 21.7670 - Measurement of courses leading to a standard, undergraduate college degree.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... leading to a standard, undergraduate college degree. 21.7670 Section 21.7670 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION... leading to a standard, undergraduate college degree. Except as provided in § 21.7672, VA will measure...

  5. 38 CFR 21.7670 - Measurement of courses leading to a standard, undergraduate college degree.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... leading to a standard, undergraduate college degree. 21.7670 Section 21.7670 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION... leading to a standard, undergraduate college degree. Except as provided in § 21.7672, VA will measure...

  6. 38 CFR 21.7670 - Measurement of courses leading to a standard, undergraduate college degree.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... leading to a standard, undergraduate college degree. 21.7670 Section 21.7670 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION... leading to a standard, undergraduate college degree. Except as provided in § 21.7672, VA will measure...

  7. Group processing in an undergraduate biology course for preservice teachers: Experiences and attitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberger, Lauren Brownback

    Group processing is a key principle of cooperative learning in which small groups discuss their strengths and weaknesses and set group goals or norms. However, group processing has not been well-studied at the post-secondary level or from a qualitative or mixed methods perspective. This mixed methods study uses a phenomenological framework to examine the experience of group processing for students in an undergraduate biology course for preservice teachers. The effect of group processing on students' attitudes toward future group work and group processing is also examined. Additionally, this research investigated preservice teachers' plans for incorporating group processing into future lessons. Students primarily experienced group processing as a time to reflect on past performance. Also, students experienced group processing as a time to increase communication among group members and become motivated for future group assignments. Three factors directly influenced students' experiences with group processing: (1) previous experience with group work, (2) instructor interaction, and (3) gender. Survey data indicated that group processing had a slight positive effect on students' attitudes toward future group work and group processing. Participants who were interviewed felt that group processing was an important part of group work and that it had increased their group's effectiveness as well as their ability to work effectively with other people. Participants held positive views on group work prior to engaging in group processing, and group processing did not alter their atittude toward group work. Preservice teachers who were interviewed planned to use group work and a modified group processing protocol in their future classrooms. They also felt that group processing had prepared them for their future professions by modeling effective collaboration and group skills. Based on this research, a new model for group processing has been created which includes extensive

  8. Gendered Fields: Sports and Advanced Course Taking in High School

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Jennifer; Crissey, Sarah R.; Riegle-Crumb, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the association between sports participation and course taking in high school, specifically comparing subjects with varied gendered legacies—science and foreign language. Analyses of a nationally representative longitudinal sample (N=5,447) of U.S. adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health and the linked Adolescent Health and Academic Achievement transcript study show that male and female athletes are more likely than non-athletes to take both advanced foreign language and Physics, largely because of their higher academic orientation. However, the association between sports participation and course taking was strongest for girls’ Physics coursework, suggesting that sports may provide girls with a unique opportunity to develop the skills and confidence to persevere in the masculine domain of science. PMID:20221304

  9. Using Quality Circles to Enhance Student Involvement and Course Quality in a Large Undergraduate Food Science and Human Nutrition Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, S. J.; Parmer, M. S.; Bohn, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    Large undergraduate classes are a challenge to manage, to engage, and to assess, yet such formidable classes can flourish when student participation is facilitated. One method of generating authentic student involvement is implementation of quality circles by means of a Student Feedback Committee (SFC), which is a volunteer problem-solving and…

  10. Entering Research: A course that creates community and structure for beginning undergraduate researchers in the STEM disciplines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balster, N.

    2009-12-01

    The benefits of undergraduate research are well documented such that these experiences have been incorporated into many school curricula. However, students still face many challenges (e.g. community establishment, identifying a mentor) when beginning research or are insufficiently supported to be successful in them. To help students overcome these challenges, we developed a novel course, called Entering Research, which helps undergraduates navigate the research experience and provides a supportive community of peers and experienced researchers as course facilitators. Following a teaching as research model, we studied the impact of this course over the three years it has been offered (2006-09). To date, 83 students who completed the course were given a pre and post assessment of learning gains (77% response). These students were also asked to answer a series of questions related to confidence, skills, and knowledge at course end, which we also compared to a group of similar students (n=92) who did not take the course, but were engaged in undergraduate research (63% response). Overall, we found that students value the Entering Research course, as they rated all of the topics covered in the seminar as helpful to their learning. Learning about research ethics and developing a research proposal were rated as most helpful, while web-based discussions and visiting peer laboratories were ranked lowest among the 20 survey questions. Relative to the post assessments, when aggregated by category, confidence, skill, and knowledge all significantly increased: knowledge at 22%, followed by skills (13%), and confidence (10%). All but two areas of confidence were self-rated as significant gains (p<0.01). All but two skills showed significant increases (p<0.01). And all five knowledge questions increased significantly (p<0.01). To test if these gains were related to the course, we compared these results to control group assessments. Students in the Entering Research course were

  11. Astrophysics: An Integrative Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutsche, Graham D.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a one semester course in introductory stellar astrophysics at the advanced undergraduate level. The course aims to integrate all previously learned physics by applying it to the study of stars. After a brief introductory section on basic astronomical measurements, the main topics covered are stellar atmospheres, stellar structure, and…

  12. Project for the Institution of an Advanced Course in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorani, M.; Nobili, G.

    2006-06-01

    A project for an advanced course in physics at the master level, is presented in great detail. The goal of this project is to create a specific and rigorous training for those who want to carry out experimental and theoretical research on "anomalies" in physical science, especially from the point of view of atmospheric physics, plasma physics, photonic physics, biophysics, astronomy and astrophysics. A specific training in powering mental skills is planned as well. The planned teaching program is presented as a two-year course where the following subjects are intended to be taught: cognitive techniques (I and II), radiation physics (I and II), biophysics (I and II), bioastronomy (I and II), history of physics (I and II), didactics of physics, physics of atmospheric plasmas, physics of non-stationary photonic events, physics of non-linear processes, complements of quantum mechanics, quantum informatics, research methodology in physics and astronomy, computer science methods in physics and astronomy, optoelectronics, radioelectronics. Detailed teaching programs, didactics methods, and performance evaluation, are presented for each subject. The technical content of this project is preceded by an ample introduction that shows all the reasons of this kind of physics course, particularly aimed at innovation in physical science.

  13. A writing-intensive course improves biology undergraduates' perception and confidence of their abilities to read scientific literature and communicate science.

    PubMed

    Brownell, Sara E; Price, Jordan V; Steinman, Lawrence

    2013-03-01

    Most scientists agree that comprehension of primary scientific papers and communication of scientific concepts are two of the most important skills that we can teach, but few undergraduate biology courses make these explicit course goals. We designed an undergraduate neuroimmunology course that uses a writing-intensive format. Using a mixture of primary literature, writing assignments directed toward a layperson and scientist audience, and in-class discussions, we aimed to improve the ability of students to 1) comprehend primary scientific papers, 2) communicate science to a scientific audience, and 3) communicate science to a layperson audience. We offered the course for three consecutive years and evaluated its impact on student perception and confidence using a combination of pre- and postcourse survey questions and coded open-ended responses. Students showed gains in both the perception of their understanding of primary scientific papers and of their abilities to communicate science to scientific and layperson audiences. These results indicate that this unique format can teach both communication skills and basic science to undergraduate biology students. We urge others to adopt a similar format for undergraduate biology courses to teach process skills in addition to content, thus broadening and strengthening the impact of undergraduate courses. PMID:23471252

  14. Students' attitudes towards science and science learning in an introductory undergraduate biology course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floro, Nicole

    Science education strives to cultivate individuals who understand scientific concepts as well as the nature of science and science learning. This study focused on the potential benefits of the flipped classroom on students' attitudes towards science and science learning. Our study investigated changes in and effects of students' attitudes towards science and science learning in a flipped introductory biology course at the University of Massachusetts Boston. We used The Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Biology to assess students' attitudes at pre and post-instruction. We investigated the effect of a flipped classroom on students' attitudes towards science and science learning by measuring the impact of different teaching approaches (flipped vs. traditional lecture). Following the prior literature, we hypothesized that there would be a negative shift in students' attitudes over the semester in the traditional classroom and that this negative shift would not occur in the flipped. Our results showed there was no significant difference in the shift of students' attitudes between the traditional and flipped sections. We also examined the relationship between students' attitudes and academic performance. We hypothesized there would be a positive correlation between students' attitudes and their academic performance, as measured by exam average. In support of the prior literature, we found a significant positive correlation. Finally, we examined whether the relationship between students' attitudes and performance was mediated by learning behavior. Specifically, we considered if students with more favorable attitudes solved more on-line problems correctly and whether this aspect of problem solving was associated with greater achievement. We hypothesized there would be a positive correlation between attitudes and problem solving behavior as well as problem solving behavior and achievement. We did not find a significant correlation between attitudes and

  15. Information fluency for undergraduate biology majors: applications of inquiry-based learning in a developmental biology course.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Kathleen M; Eastman, Deborah A

    2008-01-01

    Many initiatives for the improvement of undergraduate science education call for inquiry-based learning that emphasizes investigative projects and reading of the primary literature. These approaches give students an understanding of science as a process and help them integrate content presented in courses. At the same time, general initiatives to promote information fluency are being promoted on many college and university campuses. Information fluency refers to discipline-specific processing of information, and it involves integration of gathered information with specific ideas to form logical conclusions. We have implemented the use of inquiry-based learning to enhance and study discipline-specific information fluency skills in an upper-level undergraduate Developmental Biology course. In this study, an information literacy tutorial and a set of linked assignments using primary literature analysis were integrated with two inquiry-based laboratory research projects. Quantitative analysis of student responses suggests that the abilities of students to identify and apply valid sources of information were enhanced. Qualitative assessment revealed a set of patterns by which students gather and apply information. Self-assessment responses indicated that students recognized the impact of the assignments on their abilities to gather and apply information and that they were more confident about these abilities for future biology courses and beyond. PMID:18316808

  16. "I Know This Is Supposed to Be More Like the Real World, but . . .": Student Perceptions of a PBL Implementation in an Undergraduate Materials Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Holly R.; Tawfik, Andrew A.; Jonassen, David H.; Winholtz, Robert A.; Khanna, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative case study examines the initial implementation of a problem-based version of an undergraduate course in materials science for the purpose of identifying areas of improvement to the curriculum prior to a planned second implementation. The course was designed around problems that students work in small teams to solve under the…

  17. Effects of an Online Learning Community on Active and Reflective Learners' Learning Performance and Attitudes in a Face-to-Face Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhan, Zehui; Xu, Fuyin; Ye, Huiwen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an Online Learning Community (OLC) on active and reflective learners' learning performance and attitude in a face-to-face undergraduate digital design course. 814 freshmen in an introductory digital design course were randomly assigned to one of two treatments: one offered students an OLC,…

  18. Forensics as a Gateway: Promoting Undergraduate Interest in Science, and Graduate Student Professional Development through a First-Year Seminar Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charkoudian, Louise K.; Heymann, Jared J.; Adler, Marc J.; Haas, Kathryn L.; Mies, Kassy A.; Bonk, James F.

    2008-01-01

    A group of five graduate students and a faculty mentor used the cultural popularity of forensics to develop a first-year undergraduate seminar. This course fulfilled two main objectives: First, the graduate student instructors developed professionally through a two-year process of creating, instructing, and revising a course. Second, a variety of…

  19. A High-Enrollment Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience Improves Student Conceptions of Scientific Thinking and Ability to Interpret Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownell, Sara E.; Hekmat-Scafe, Daria S.; Singla, Veena; Seawell, Patricia Chandler; Imam, Jamie F. Conklin; Eddy, Sarah L.; Stearns, Tim; Cyert, Martha S.

    2015-01-01

    We present an innovative course-based undergraduate research experience curriculum focused on the characterization of single point mutations in p53, a tumor suppressor gene that is mutated in more than 50% of human cancers. This course is required of all introductory biology students, so all biology majors engage in a research project as part of…

  20. Assessing the Impact of Computer-Based Formative Evaluations in a Course of English as a Foreign Language for Undergraduate Kinesiology Students in Chile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzeri, Santos; Cabezas, Ximena; Ojeda, Luis; Leiva, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of computer-based formative evaluations in an undergraduate English course for second semester kinesiology students at the Universidad Austral de Chile-Valdivia (UACh). The target of the course is to improve the students' online reading comprehension skills in their field. A preliminary study was carried out in order…

  1. Writing and Communicating in the Geosciences: A 1-credit required course to prepare undergraduates for independent research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St John, K. K.; Courtier, A. M.; Pyle, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    With increasing numbers of majors (currently 130) and an independent research requirement of all undergraduates in our program, the Department of Geology and Environmental Science at James Madison University sought a means to streamline and formalize instruction of research practices we deem fundamental to all sub-disciplines in the geosciences. Therefore, in Fall 2010, we developed a research preparation course called 'Writing and Communicating in the Geosciences,' which is now required for all Geology BS and Earth Science BA undergraduate students. This 1-credit course must be completed prior to students' senior year, and is a pre-requisite to a minimum of 2-credits of independent research required of all majors. 'Writing and Communicating in the Geosciences' is designed to prepare students for independent research by providing them with opportunities to develop, practice, and gain feedback on a variety of writing and communication skills. It is our goal that after taking this course, students are able to identify primary literature using the library data-based systems, critically discuss peer-reviewed papers, write abstracts, use accepted referencing styles in bibliographies, and effectively make scientific posters and give oral presentations. The class is offered every semester and is always co-taught by two faculty members from the department. Curriculum and instruction is designed to balance student workload, faculty workload, and strategies toward meeting the course learning objectives. Students informally report at the time of enrollment that this is a perceived as a rigorous 'rite-of-passage' course. Informal feedback from past students has been positive, suggesting that the greatest benefits manifest later, as former students apply the course-developed skills to projects in their upper-level courses, their independent research projects, and their graduate research. Faculty feedback has been similarly positive, with department colleagues commenting that

  2. Integrating Clinical Neuropsychology into the Undergraduate Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puente, Antonio E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Claims little information exists in undergraduate education about clinical neuropsychology. Outlines an undergraduate neuropsychology course and proposes ways to integrate the subject into existing undergraduate psychology courses. Suggests developing specialized audio-visual materials for telecourses or existing courses. (NL)

  3. The CLEM Model: Path Analysis of the Mediating Effects of Attitudes and Motivational Beliefs on the Relationship between Perceived Learning Environment and Course Performance in an Undergraduate Non-Major Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partin, Matthew L.; Haney, Jodi J.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the following questions were addressed in an undergraduate non-major biology course using a large lecture format: Is there a relationship between students' perceptions of their learning environment and course performance, and what roles do motivation and attitudes play in mediating that relationship? The purpose of this study was to…

  4. Long-term impact of undergraduate science reform courses on the pedagogical content knowledge of kindergarten through sixth grade inservice teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Donna P.

    This study explores the long-term impact of faculty-created reformed undergraduate science courses on the pedagogical content knowledge of kindergarten-6th grade inservice elementary teachers who took these reform courses during their undergraduate programs. On-site case studies were completed with 35 faculty instructors teaching entry-level undergraduate science courses at 20 higher education institutions, and 91 elementary inservice teachers. The sample was selected from a national population of diverse colleges and universities that had undergone reform in one or more of their undergraduate science courses. The data collection protocol involved classroom observations, interviews, artifact analysis, semi-structured interviews, and field notes from multiple instruments and sources. Data were collected during on-site visits from instructors and their graduated students. Quantitative and qualitative analysis identified variations in faculty instructors', as well as inservice teachers', perceptions and observations of the intended and enacted teaching goals, instruction, student difficulties, and rationale for teaching a specific science concept in observed science lessons. These perceptions and observations, identified as science pedagogical content knowledge (PCK), varied significantly among both faculty instructors and inservice elementary teachers who experienced the undergraduate reformed science courses taught by these same faculty instructors.

  5. Assembly of a Modular Fluorimeter and Associated Software: Using LabVIEW in an Advanced Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algar, W. Russ; Massey, Melissa; Krull, Ulrich J.

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory activity for an upper-level undergraduate course in instrumental analysis has been created around LabVIEW. Students learn rudimentary programming and interfacing skills during the construction of a fluorimeter assembled from common modular components. The fluorimeter consists of an inexpensive data acquisition module, LED light…

  6. Capturing intergenerativity: the use of student reflective journals to identify learning within an undergraduate course in gerontological nursing.

    PubMed

    Davies, Susan M; Reitmaier, Amy B; Smith, Linda Reveling; Mangan-Danckwart, Deborah

    2013-03-01

    The benefits of intergenerational contact between older and young adults have been demonstrated; yet, nursing programs have underexplored the potential of such relationships for enhancing student learning. This article presents an analysis of student reflective journals as part of an evaluation of an undergraduate gerontological nursing course. The course aims to create positive learning experiences by involving older adults as partners in student learning. Older adults are recruited to receive visits from a designated student to share aspects of their life and experiences. Students write reflective journals based on these visits as a method of evaluating their learning. A framework analysis of 80 journals completed by 59 students identified four major themes representing the impact of these visits on student learning: becoming aware, making connections, seeing the unique person, and valuing intergenerational relationships. The analysis suggests the relevance of the concept of intergenerativity in illuminating shared benefits of the practicum experience. PMID:23402281

  7. The Interactive Impact of Race and Gender on High School Advanced Course Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corra, Mamadi; Carter, J. Scott; Carter, Shannon K.

    2011-01-01

    Data from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction archive are used to assess the joint effect of race and gender on advanced academic (advanced placement and honors) course enrollment within a school district with an open enrollment policy. Using student SAT scores; the authors compare expected levels of advanced course enrollment for…

  8. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: An Undergraduate Chemical Laboratory Safety Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, L. Jewel

    1982-01-01

    Describes a two-quarter hour college chemistry course focusing on laboratory safety. Includes lists of topics/assignments, problem sets (toxicology, storage, and energy) and videotapes, films, and slide sets used in the course. (JN)

  9. Practical Experience with Learning Objectives in an Undergraduate Crop Physiology Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, E. Ann; Michaels, T. E.

    1989-01-01

    Addresses four concerns faced by educators incorporating specific features of learning objectives into a course: structure of the course, students' acceptance of changes, time commitment required of professors, and format interference with presentation of subject-matter. (RT)

  10. Fudging the Numbers: Distributing Chocolate Influences Student Evaluations of an Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youmans, Robert J.; Jee, Benjamin D.

    2007-01-01

    Student evaluations provide important information about teaching effectiveness. Research has shown that student evaluations can be mediated by unintended aspects of a course. In this study, we examined whether an event unrelated to a course would increase student evaluations. Six discussion sections completed course evaluations administered by an…

  11. Enhancing the Benefits of Service-Learning in Undergraduate Psychology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenzel, L. Mickey

    The benefits of including service-learning in courses were studied with 35 students enrolled in each of 2 classes in child psychology, 15 students in each of 2 courses on substance abuse, and 16 first-year students in 1 introductory psychology class. Service-learning placements for the psychology courses included school tutoring programs for…

  12. Comparative Psychology as an Effective Supplement to Undergraduate Core Psychology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Nathaniel R.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the design and implementation of a 1-credit-hour seminar in comparative psychology as a supplement to an introductory biopsychology course. The purpose of the course was to introduce students to the ecological and evolutionary aspects of animal behavior by building on topics that are introduced in many biopsychology courses.…

  13. Linking Architecture and History in the Teaching of Undergraduates: A Three Course Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAninch, Christopher

    The architecture sequence at Hiram College, Ohio, which consists of three courses and supervised volunteer work at restoration sites in the region, is described. The sequence links American architecture and the broader areas of cultural history and literature, and the courses are open to any student in the college. The introductory course examines…

  14. A Rationale and Outline for an Undergraduate Course on the Philosophy and History of Science for Life Science Students

    PubMed Central

    Hockberger, Philip E.; Miller, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    There are compelling reasons for teaching a philosophy of science course to undergraduate life science students. The main reason is to help them understand that modern science is not based upon a single, consistent philosophical system; nor is it based upon common sense, or a method, set of rules or formulas that can be used to make unerring predictions. Rather, science is a dynamic process that is constantly being modified and refined to reflect and encompass an ever-expanding set of hypotheses, observations, and theories. To illustrate these points, we developed a course that examined the history and philosophical underpinnings of modern science, and we discussed famous experiments that challenged the prevailing norm and led to Kuhnian revolutions in scientific thought. Building upon this knowledge, students investigated how different philosophical systems address controversial social issues in the biological sciences. They examined the teaching of intelligent design and creationism in public schools, the implications of legalized abortion and physician-assisted suicide, the potential impact of DNA fingerprinting on human rights and racism, the promise and pitfalls of stem cell research, and the neurobiological basis of consciousness and its relevance to mental health therapies and the animal rights movement. We believe undergraduate life science students should be exposed to these issues and have an opportunity to develop informed opinions about them before they graduate from college. Exploration of such topics will help them become better prepared for the inevitable public debates that they will face as science educators, researchers, and leaders of society. PMID:21289866

  15. The construction and validation of an instrument for the assessment of graduates of undergraduate nursing courses 1

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Maria Aparecida; Ohara, Conceição Vieira da Silva; de Domenico, Edvane Birelo Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to construct an instrument for the assessment of graduates of undergraduate nursing courses and to validate this instrument through the consensus of specialists. Method: methodological study. In order to elaborate the instrument, documental analysis and a literature review were undertaken. Validation took place through use of the Delphi Conference, between September 2012 and September 2013, in which 36 specialists from Brazilian Nursing participated. In order to analyze reliability, the Cronbach alpha coefficient, the item/total correlation, and the Pearson correlation coefficient were calculated. Results: the instrument was constructed with the participation of specialist nurses representing all regions of Brazil, with experience in lecturing and research. The first Delphi round led to changes in the first instrument, which was restructured and submitted to another round, with a response rate of 94.44%. In the second round, the instrument was validated with a Cronbach alpha of 0.75. Conclusion: the final instrument possessed three dimensions related to the characterization of the graduate, insertion in the job market, and evaluation of the professional training process. This instrument may be used across the territory of Brazil as it is based on the curricular guidelines and contributes to the process of regulation of the quality of the undergraduate courses in Nursing. PMID:27305184

  16. A Rationale and Outline for an Undergraduate Course on the Philosophy and History of Science for Life Science Students.

    PubMed

    Hockberger, Philip E; Miller, Richard J

    2005-09-01

    There are compelling reasons for teaching a philosophy of science course to undergraduate life science students. The main reason is to help them understand that modern science is not based upon a single, consistent philosophical system; nor is it based upon common sense, or a method, set of rules or formulas that can be used to make unerring predictions. Rather, science is a dynamic process that is constantly being modified and refined to reflect and encompass an ever-expanding set of hypotheses, observations, and theories. To illustrate these points, we developed a course that examined the history and philosophical underpinnings of modern science, and we discussed famous experiments that challenged the prevailing norm and led to Kuhnian revolutions in scientific thought. Building upon this knowledge, students investigated how different philosophical systems address controversial social issues in the biological sciences. They examined the teaching of intelligent design and creationism in public schools, the implications of legalized abortion and physician-assisted suicide, the potential impact of DNA fingerprinting on human rights and racism, the promise and pitfalls of stem cell research, and the neurobiological basis of consciousness and its relevance to mental health therapies and the animal rights movement. We believe undergraduate life science students should be exposed to these issues and have an opportunity to develop informed opinions about them before they graduate from college. Exploration of such topics will help them become better prepared for the inevitable public debates that they will face as science educators, researchers, and leaders of society. PMID:21289866

  17. Finding Clarity by Fostering Confusion: Reflections on Teaching an Undergraduate Integrated Biological Systems Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Kirsten H.

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate biology programs in smaller liberal arts colleges are increasingly becoming focused on health science fields. This narrowing of focus potentially decreases opportunities for these students to explore other sub-fields of biology. This perspectives article highlights how one small university in Connecticut decided to institute a…

  18. Exploring Students' Perceptions of Science and Inquiry in a Reform-Based Undergraduate Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazempour, Mahsa; Amirshokoohi, Aidin; Harwood, William

    2012-01-01

    This study is part of ongoing research investigating the experiences of undergraduate students who enroll in an integrated inquiry-based biology program during their freshman year. The purpose of this study was to explore students' perspectives on the program and their perceptions of science and scientific inquiry after completing the program.…

  19. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Tutor Training for Problem Based Learning in Undergraduate Psychology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mühlfelder, Manfred; Konermann, Tobias; Borchard, Linda-Marie

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe a "Train the Tutor" programme (TtT) for developing the metacognitive skills, facilitator skills, and tutor skills of students in a problem based learning (PBL) context. The purpose of the programme was to train 2nd and 3rd year undergraduate students in psychology to become effective PBL tutors for…

  20. Topics, Texts, and Critical Approaches: Integrating Dimensions of Liberal Learning in an Undergraduate Management Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spee, James C.; Fraiberg, Allison

    2015-01-01

    In light of recent critiques of management education, this article examines the "Carnegie Report's" argument that the core components of liberal arts education (Analytical Thinking, Multiple Framing, The Reflective Exploration of Meaning, and Practical Reasoning) can and should be integrated into the undergraduate business…