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Sample records for advanced unresectable pancreatic

  1. [Conversion Surgery for Initially Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Following Gemcitabine plus Nab-Paclitaxel - A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Shuji; Nishiyama, Ryo; Kaneda, Takayoshi; Yokota, Mitsuo; Kawamata, Hiroshi; Tajima, Hiroshi; Kaizu, Takashi; Kumamoto, Yusuke; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Okuwaki, Kosuke; Iwai, Tomohisa; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Erina; Hara, Atsuko; Ichinoe, Masaaki; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2017-02-01

    We report a case of unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer successfully resected after gemcitabine(GEM)plus nab-paclitaxel(PTX)treatment. A 68-year-old man was referred to our institution with jaundice. We diagnosed pancreatic head cancer using computed tomography(CT)and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. We initially diagnosed it as locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer because of extensive invasion to the portal vein. GEM plus nab- PTX was administered to the patient as systemic chemotherapy. After 9 courses of chemotherapy, a CT scan revealed that the tumor had significantly reduced in size and range of portal vein invasion. Therefore, we performed pancreaticoduodenectomy with resection of the portal vein and achieved R0 resection. Currently, the patient is alive without recurrence. Therefore, conversion surgery after treatment with GEM plus nab-PTX chemotherapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer should be considered.

  2. SBRT in unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer: preliminary results of a mono-institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To assess the efficacy and safety of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with either unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma or by locally recurrent disease after surgery. Methods Between January 2010 and October 2011, 30 patients with unresectable or recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma underwent exclusive SBRT. Twenty-one patients (70%) presented with unresectable locally advanced disease and 9 patients (30%) showed local recurrence after surgery. No patients had metastatic disease. Gemcitabine-based chemotherapy was administered to all patients before SBRT. Prescription dose was 45Gy in 6 daily fractions of 7.5Gy. SBRT was delivered using the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) by RapidArc. Primary end-point of this study was freedom from local progression (FFLP), secondary end-points were overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS) and toxicity. Results Median Clinical Target Volume (CTV) was 25.6 cm3 (3.2-78.8 cm3) and median Planning Target Volume (PTV) was 70.9 cm3 (20.4- 205.2 cm3). The prescription dose was delivered in 25 patients (83%), in 5 patients (17%) it was reduced to 36Gy in 6 fractions not to exceed the dose constraints of organs at risk (OARs). Median follow-up was 11 months (2–28 months). FFLP was 91% at 6 months, 85% at median follow-up and 77% at 1 and 2 years. For the group with prescription dose of 45Gy, FFLP was 96% at 1 and 2 years. The median PFS was 8 months. The OS was 47% at 1 year and median OS was 11 months. At the end of the follow-up, 9 patients (32%) were alive and 4 (14%) were free from progression. No patients experienced G ≥ 3 acute toxicity. Conclusions Our preliminary results show that SBRT can obtain a satisfactory local control rate for unresectable locally advanced and recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This fractionation schedule is feasible, and no G ≥ 3 toxicity was observed. SBRT is an effective emerging technique in the multi

  3. SBRT in unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer: preliminary results of a mono-institutional experience.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Angelo; Comito, Tiziana; Alongi, Filippo; Navarria, Pierina; Iftode, Cristina; Mancosu, Pietro; Reggiori, Giacomo; Clerici, Elena; Rimassa, Lorenza; Zerbi, Alessandro; Fogliata, Antonella; Cozzi, Luca; Tomatis, Stefano; Scorsetti, Marta

    2013-06-21

    To assess the efficacy and safety of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with either unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma or by locally recurrent disease after surgery. Between January 2010 and October 2011, 30 patients with unresectable or recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma underwent exclusive SBRT. Twenty-one patients (70%) presented with unresectable locally advanced disease and 9 patients (30%) showed local recurrence after surgery. No patients had metastatic disease. Gemcitabine-based chemotherapy was administered to all patients before SBRT. Prescription dose was 45Gy in 6 daily fractions of 7.5Gy. SBRT was delivered using the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) by RapidArc. Primary end-point of this study was freedom from local progression (FFLP), secondary end-points were overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS) and toxicity. Median Clinical Target Volume (CTV) was 25.6 cm3 (3.2-78.8 cm3) and median Planning Target Volume (PTV) was 70.9 cm3 (20.4- 205.2 cm3). The prescription dose was delivered in 25 patients (83%), in 5 patients (17%) it was reduced to 36Gy in 6 fractions not to exceed the dose constraints of organs at risk (OARs). Median follow-up was 11 months (2-28 months). FFLP was 91% at 6 months, 85% at median follow-up and 77% at 1 and 2 years. For the group with prescription dose of 45Gy, FFLP was 96% at 1 and 2 years. The median PFS was 8 months. The OS was 47% at 1 year and median OS was 11 months. At the end of the follow-up, 9 patients (32%) were alive and 4 (14%) were free from progression. No patients experienced G ≥ 3 acute toxicity. Our preliminary results show that SBRT can obtain a satisfactory local control rate for unresectable locally advanced and recurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This fractionation schedule is feasible, and no G ≥ 3 toxicity was observed. SBRT is an effective emerging technique in the multi-modality treatment of locally advanced pancreatic tumors.

  4. Contemporary Management of Borderline Resectable and Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Andrew; Cardona, Kenneth; Alese, Olatunji B.; Maithel, Shishir K.; Kooby, David; Landry, Jerome; El-Rayes, Bassel F.

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas remains a highly lethal disease, with less than 5% survival at 5 years. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) and locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) account for approximately 30% of newly diagnosed cases of PC. The objective of BRPC therapy is to downstage the tumor to allow resection; the objective of LAPC therapy is to control disease and improve survival. There is no consensus on the definitions of BRPC and LAPC, which leads to major limitations in designing clinical trials and evaluating their results. A multimodality approach is always needed to ensure proper utilization and timing of chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery in the management of this disease. Combination chemotherapy regimens (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, and gemcitabine [FOLFIRINOX] and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel) have improved overall survival in metastatic disease. The role of combination chemotherapy regimens in BRPC and LAPC is an area of active investigation. There is no consensus on the dose, modality, and role of radiation therapy in the treatment of BRPC and LAPC. This article reviews the literature and highlights the areas of controversy regarding management of BRPC and LAPC. Implications for Practice: Pancreatic cancer is one of the worst cancers with regard to survival, even at early stages of the disease. This review evaluates all the evidence for the stages in which the cancer is not primarily resectable with surgery, known as borderline resectable or locally advanced unresectable. Recently, advancements in radiation techniques and use of better combination chemotherapies have improved survival and tolerance. There is no consensus on description of stages or treatment sequences (chemotherapy, chemoradiation, radiation), nor on the best chemotherapy regimen. The evidence behind the treatment paradigm for these stages of pancreatic cancer is summarized. PMID:26834159

  5. Perioperative high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Waniczek, Dariusz; Piecuch, Jerzy; Mikusek, Wojciech; Arendt, Jerzy; Białas, Brygida

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to present an original technique of catheter implantation for perioperative HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy in patients after palliative operations of unresectable locally advanced pancreatic tumors and to estimate the influence of perioperative HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy on pain relief in terminal pancreatic cancer patients. Material and methods Eight patients with pancreatic tumors located in the head of pancreas underwent palliative operations with the use of HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy. All patients qualified for surgery reported pain of high intensity and had received narcotic painkillers prior to operation. During the last phase of the surgery, the Nucletron® catheters were implanted in patients to prepare them for later perioperative brachytherapy. Since the 6th day after surgery HDR brachytherapy was performed. Before each brachytherapy fraction the location of implants were checked using fluoroscopy. A fractional dose was 5 Gy and a total dose was 20 Gy in the area of radiation. A comparative study of two groups of patients (with and without brachytherapy) with stage III pancreatic cancer according to the TNM scale was taken in consideration. Results and Conclusions The authors claim that the modification of catheter implantation using specially designed cannula, facilitates the process of inserting the catheter into the tumor, shortens the time needed for the procedure, and reduces the risk of complications. Mean survival time was 5.7 months. In the group of performed brachytherapy, the mean survival time was 6.7 months, while in the group of no brachytherapy performed – 4.4 months. In the group of brachytherapy, only one patient increased the dose of painkillers in the last month of his life. Remaining patients took constant doses of medicines. Perioperative HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy could be considered as a practical application of adjuvant therapy for pain relief in patients with an advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:27895674

  6. Perioperative high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Waniczek, Dariusz; Piecuch, Jerzy; Rudzki, Marek; Mikusek, Wojciech; Arendt, Jerzy; Białas, Brygida

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the study was to present an original technique of catheter implantation for perioperative HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy in patients after palliative operations of unresectable locally advanced pancreatic tumors and to estimate the influence of perioperative HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy on pain relief in terminal pancreatic cancer patients. Eight patients with pancreatic tumors located in the head of pancreas underwent palliative operations with the use of HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy. All patients qualified for surgery reported pain of high intensity and had received narcotic painkillers prior to operation. During the last phase of the surgery, the Nucletron(®) catheters were implanted in patients to prepare them for later perioperative brachytherapy. Since the 6(th) day after surgery HDR brachytherapy was performed. Before each brachytherapy fraction the location of implants were checked using fluoroscopy. A fractional dose was 5 Gy and a total dose was 20 Gy in the area of radiation. A comparative study of two groups of patients (with and without brachytherapy) with stage III pancreatic cancer according to the TNM scale was taken in consideration. The authors claim that the modification of catheter implantation using specially designed cannula, facilitates the process of inserting the catheter into the tumor, shortens the time needed for the procedure, and reduces the risk of complications. Mean survival time was 5.7 months. In the group of performed brachytherapy, the mean survival time was 6.7 months, while in the group of no brachytherapy performed - 4.4 months. In the group of brachytherapy, only one patient increased the dose of painkillers in the last month of his life. Remaining patients took constant doses of medicines. Perioperative HDR-Ir192 brachytherapy could be considered as a practical application of adjuvant therapy for pain relief in patients with an advanced pancreatic cancer.

  7. Radiofrequency ablation for unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fegrachi, Samira; Besselink, Marc G; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Molenaar, Izaak Quintus

    2014-01-01

    Background: Median survival in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer lies in the range of 9–15 months. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) may prolong survival, but data on its safety and efficacy are scarce. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library with the syntax ‘(radiofrequency OR RFA) AND (pancreas OR pancreatic)’ for studies published until 1 January 2012. In addition, a search of the proceedings of conferences on pancreatic disease that took place during 2009–2011 was performed. Studies with fewer than five patients were excluded as they were considered to be case reports. The primary endpoint was survival. Secondary endpoints included morbidity and mortality. Results: Five studies involving a total of 158 patients with pancreatic cancer treated with RFA fulfilled the eligibility criteria. These studies reported median survival after RFA of 3–33 months, morbidity related to RFA of 4–37%, mortality of 0–19% and overall morbidity of 10–43%. Pooling of data was not appropriate as the study populations and reported outcomes were heterogeneous. Crucial safety aspects included ensuring a maximum RFA tip temperature of < 90 °C and ensuring minimum distances between the RFA probe and surrounding structures. Conclusions: Radiofrequency ablation seems to be feasible and safe when it is used with the correct temperature and at an appropriate distance from vital structures. It appears to have a positive impact on survival. Multicentre randomized trials are necessary to determine the true effect size of RFA and to minimize the impacts of selection and publication biases. PMID:23600801

  8. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy in patients with borderline resectable and unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Michele; Ramella, Sara; Valeri, Sergio; Caputo, Damiano; Floreno, Barnaba; Trecca, Pasquale; Trodella, Luca Eolo; Trodella, Lucio; D’Angelillo, Rolando Maria; Coppola, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    There is not a clear consensus regarding the optimal treatment of locally advanced pancreatic disease. There is a potential role for neoadjuvant therapy to treat micrometastatic disease with chemotherapy, as well as for the treatment of local disease with radiotherapy. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of induction chemotherapy with oxaliplatin and gemcitabine followed by a high weekly dose of gemcitabine concurrent to radiation therapy in patients with borderline resectable and unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. In our study, 41 patients with pancreatic cancer were evaluated. In all cases an accurate pre-treatment staging was performed. Patients with evidence of metastatic disease were excluded, and thus a total of 34 patients were consequently enrolled. Of these, twenty-seven patients (80%) had locally advanced unresectable tumours, seven patients (20%) had borderline resectable disease. This protocol treatment represents a well-tolerated promising approach. Fifteen patients (55.5%) underwent surgical radical resection. With a median follow-up of 20 months, the median PFS and OS were 20 months and 19.2 months, respectively. The median OS for borderline resectable patients was 21.5 months compared with 14 months for unresectable patients (p = 0.3). Continued optimization in multimodality therapy and an accurate patient selection remain crucial points for the appropriate treatment of these patients. PMID:28378800

  9. Prognostic factors and sites of metastasis in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Renata D’Alpino; Speers, Caroline; McGahan, Colleen E; Renouf, Daniel J; Schaeffer, David F; Kennecke, Hagen F

    2015-01-01

    Due to differences in natural history and therapy, clinical trials of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer have recently been subdivided into unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and metastatic disease. We aimed to evaluate prognostic factors in LAPC patients who were treated with first-line chemotherapy and describe patterns of disease progression. Patients with LAPC who initiated first-line palliative chemotherapy, 2001–2011 at the BC Cancer Agency were included. A retrospective chart review was conducted to identify clinicopathologic variables, treatment, and subsequent sites of metastasis. Kaplan–Meier and Cox-regression survival analyses were performed. A total of 244 patients were included in this study. For the majority of patients (94.3%), first-line therapy was single-agent gemcitabine. About 144 (59%) patients developed distant metastatic disease and the most frequent metastatic sites included peritoneum/omentum (42.3%), liver (41%), lungs (13.9%), and distant lymph nodes (9%). Median overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort was 11.7 months (95% CI, 10.6–12.8). Development of distant metastases was associated with significantly inferior survival (HR 3.56, 95% CI 2.57–4.93), as was ECOG 2/3 versus 0/1 (HR 1.69, 95% CI 1.28–2.23), CA 19.9 > 1000 versus ≤1000 (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.19–2.14) and female gender, (HR 1.57, 95% CI 1.19–2.08). In this population-based study, 41% of LAPC patients treated with first-line chemotherapy died without evidence of distant metastases. Prognostic factors for LAPC were baseline performance status, elevated CA 19.9, gender, and development of distant metastasis. Results highlight the heterogeneity of LAPC and the importance of locoregional tumor control. PMID:25891650

  10. Prognostic factors and sites of metastasis in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Renata D'Alpino; Speers, Caroline; McGahan, Colleen E; Renouf, Daniel J; Schaeffer, David F; Kennecke, Hagen F

    2015-08-01

    Due to differences in natural history and therapy, clinical trials of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer have recently been subdivided into unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and metastatic disease. We aimed to evaluate prognostic factors in LAPC patients who were treated with first-line chemotherapy and describe patterns of disease progression. Patients with LAPC who initiated first-line palliative chemotherapy, 2001-2011 at the BC Cancer Agency were included. A retrospective chart review was conducted to identify clinicopathologic variables, treatment, and subsequent sites of metastasis. Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression survival analyses were performed. A total of 244 patients were included in this study. For the majority of patients (94.3%), first-line therapy was single-agent gemcitabine. About 144 (59%) patients developed distant metastatic disease and the most frequent metastatic sites included peritoneum/omentum (42.3%), liver (41%), lungs (13.9%), and distant lymph nodes (9%). Median overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort was 11.7 months (95% CI, 10.6-12.8). Development of distant metastases was associated with significantly inferior survival (HR 3.56, 95% CI 2.57-4.93), as was ECOG 2/3 versus 0/1 (HR 1.69, 95% CI 1.28-2.23), CA 19.9 > 1000 versus ≤ 1000 (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.19-2.14) and female gender, (HR 1.57, 95% CI 1.19-2.08). In this population-based study, 41% of LAPC patients treated with first-line chemotherapy died without evidence of distant metastases. Prognostic factors for LAPC were baseline performance status, elevated CA 19.9, gender, and development of distant metastasis. Results highlight the heterogeneity of LAPC and the importance of locoregional tumor control.

  11. Phase I study of oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Taketo . E-mail: yama.take@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Ishihara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Shirai, Yoshihiko; Nakagawa, Akihiko; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Uno, Takashi; Ito, Hisao; Saisho, Hiromitsu

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 at escalating doses from 60 to 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Results: Sixteen patients were enrolled in this study. Three patients received S-1 at 60 mg/m{sup 2}/day, 3 at 70 mg/m{sup 2}/day, and 10 at 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Though 1 patient at the final dose level (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) experienced a dose limiting toxicity (biliary infection with Grade 3 neutropenia), the MTD was not reached in this study. The most common toxicities were anorexia and leukocytopenia, with Grade 3 toxicity occurring in 31% and 6.3% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The recommended dose of S-1 with concurrent radiotherapy was determined to be 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Oral S-1 and radiotherapy is well tolerated and feasible and should be further investigated.

  12. Prospective small bowel mucosal assessment immediately after chemoradiotherapy of unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer using capsule endoscopy: a case series.

    PubMed

    Yamashina, Takeshi; Takada, Ryoji; Uedo, Noriya; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Hanaoka, Noboru; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Ioka, Tatsuya; Ishihara, Ryu; Teshima, Teruki; Nishiyama, Kinji; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    In this case series, three consecutive patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (ULAPC) underwent capsule endoscopy (CE) before and after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) to evaluate duodenal and jejunal mucosa, and to examine the relationship between CE findings and dose distribution. CE after CRT showed duodenitis and proximal jejunitis in all three patients. The most inflamed region was the third part of the duodenum, and in dose distribution, this was the closest region to the center of irradiation. This case series shows that CE can safely diagnose acute duodenitis and proximal jejunitis caused by CRT for ULAPC, and that dose distribution is possible to predict the degree of duodenal and jejunal mucosal injuries.

  13. Phase II Study of Oral S-1 and Concurrent Radiotherapy in Patients With Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Ishihara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Hara, Taro; Denda, Tadamichi; Tawada, Katsunobu; Imagumbai, Toshiyuki; Araki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Mitsuhiro; Hatano, Kazuo; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Uno, Takashi; Ito, Hisao; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative that has demonstrated favorable antitumor activity in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate safety and efficacy of S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day from day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35. Two weeks after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, maintenance chemotherapy with S-1 was administered for 28 days every 6 weeks until progression. Results: Thirty-four patients were enrolled in this study. The most common Grade 3 toxicities during chemoradiotherapy were anorexia (24%) and nausea (12%). The overall response rate was 41% (95% confidence interval, 25%-58%) and overall disease control rate (partial response plus stable disease) was 97%. More than 50% decrease in serum CA 19-9 was seen in 27 of 29 evaluable patients (93%). The median progression-free survival was 8.7 months. The median overall survival and 1-year survival rate were 16.8 months and 70.6%, respectively. Conclusions: Oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy exerted a promising antitumor activity with acceptable toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. This combination therapy seems to be an attractive alternative to conventional chemoradiotherapy using 5-fluorouracil infusion.

  14. Prospective small bowel mucosal assessment immediately after chemoradiotherapy of unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer using capsule endoscopy: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Yamashina, Takeshi; Takada, Ryoji; Uedo, Noriya; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Hanaoka, Noboru; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Ioka, Tatsuya; Ishihara, Ryu; Teshima, Teruki; Nishiyama, Kinji; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    In this case series, three consecutive patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (ULAPC) underwent capsule endoscopy (CE) before and after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) to evaluate duodenal and jejunal mucosa, and to examine the relationship between CE findings and dose distribution. CE after CRT showed duodenitis and proximal jejunitis in all three patients. The most inflamed region was the third part of the duodenum, and in dose distribution, this was the closest region to the center of irradiation. This case series shows that CE can safely diagnose acute duodenitis and proximal jejunitis caused by CRT for ULAPC, and that dose distribution is possible to predict the degree of duodenal and jejunal mucosal injuries. PMID:27366048

  15. Unresectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Eight Years Later

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, Kate; Malhotra, Reetu; Peche, William; Langell, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, and is considered uniformly fatal when patients present with unresectable, advanced-stage disease at the time of diagnosis. Long-term survival of patients with advanced-stage pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains rare, despite advances in adjuvant chemoradiation protocols. A 73-year-old male presented to our emergency department with abdominal pain and a history of biopsy-proven, stage III pancreatic adenocarcinoma. His initial staging CT scan and trans-duodenal ultrasound had demonstrated a stage IIa (T3, N0, Mx) lesion. On surgical exploration, he was up-staged to stage III (T4, N0, Mx), noting encasement of the superior mesenteric vessels and involvement of the portal vein. He underwent palliative choledochojejunostomy and was treated with 4 months of oxaliplatin and capecitabine, with concurrent radiation therapy (50.4 Gy), followed by 4 months of gemcitabine. After 7 months, the patient withdrew from therapy due to treatment intolerance. He then turned to self-medication with non-traditional herbal therapies. After 3 years of surveillance, he was lost to follow-up until presenting to our facility with abdominal pain 8 years after his initial diagnosis. On diagnostic CT scan during his current presentation for abdominal pain, he was found to have no evidence of pancreatic cancer. Based on our review of the literature, we present the longest known survival of a patient with surgically unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Further study of this patient’s phenotypic or genotypic characteristics may provide insight into better therapeutic agents, or a predictive subset of patients who will benefit from specific chemotherapeutic options. PMID:28983358

  16. Unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma with complete clinical response following chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Erol; Ulaş, Murat; Çolakoğlu, Muhammet Kadri; Özer, İlter; Bostancı, Erdal Birol; Akoğlu, Musa

    2015-01-01

    Locally advanced or metastatic disease is present in 2/3s of patients with pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer patients are assessed as resectable, potentially resectable (borderline) and unresectable according to pre-operative examinations. The chance for operability may be enhanced by using adjuvant-neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy, radiotherapy or both. The rates of R0 resection may be increased by means of treatment delivered this way. This case report presents a pancreatic adenocarcinoma case that was assessed to be resectable but was identified to be unresectable during surgical exploration, thus received adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The patient was then re-evaluated, identified as resectable and received pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:25931951

  17. Phase 1 Pharmacogenetic and Pharmacodynamic Study of Sorafenib With Concurrent Radiation Therapy and Gemcitabine in Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chiorean, E. Gabriela; Schneider, Bryan P.; Akisik, Fatih M.; Perkins, Susan M.; Anderson, Stephen; Johnson, Cynthia S.; DeWitt, John; Helft, Paul; Clark, Romnee; Johnston, Erica L.; Spittler, A. John; Deluca, Jill; Bu, Guixue; Shahda, Safi; Loehrer, Patrick J.; Sandrasegaran, Kumar; Cardenes, Higinia R.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To define the safety, efficacy, and pharmacogenetic and pharmacodynamic effects of sorafenib with gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine 1000 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously weekly × 3 every 4 weeks per cycle for 1 cycle before CRT and continued for up to 4 cycles after CRT. Weekly gemcitabine 600 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously was given during concurrent intensity modulated radiation therapy of 50 Gy to gross tumor volume in 25 fractions. Sorafenib was dosed orally 400 mg twice daily until progression, except during CRT when it was escalated from 200 mg to 400 mg daily, and 400 mg twice daily. The maximum tolerated dose cohort was expanded to 15 patients. Correlative studies included dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and angiogenesis genes polymorphisms (VEGF-A and VEGF-R2 single nucleotide polymorphisms). Results: Twenty-seven patients were enrolled. No dose-limiting toxicity occurred during induction gemcitabine/sorafenib followed by concurrent CRT. The most common grade 3/4 toxicities were fatigue, hematologic, and gastrointestinal. The maximum tolerated dose was sorafenib 400 mg twice daily. The median progression-free survival and overall survival for 25 evaluable patients were 10.6 and 12.6 months, respectively. The median overall survival for patients with VEGF-A -2578 AA, -1498 CC, and -1154 AA versus alternate genotypes was 21.6 versus 14.7 months. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI demonstrated higher baseline K{sup trans} in responding patients. Conclusions: Concurrent sorafenib with CRT had modest clinical activity with increased gastrointestinal toxicity in localized unresectable pancreatic cancer. Select VEGF-A/VEGF-R2 genotypes were associated with favorable survival.

  18. Neoadjuvant gemcitabine, docetaxel, and capecitabine followed by gemcitabine and capecitabine/radiation therapy and surgery in locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sherman, William H; Chu, Kyung; Chabot, John; Allendorf, John; Schrope, Beth Ann; Hecht, Elizabeth; Jin, Brian; Leung, David; Remotti, Helen; Addeo, Gisella; Postolov, Inna; Tsai, Wei; Fine, Robert L

    2015-03-01

    This prospective study was undertaken to assess toxicity, resectability, and survival in pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients presenting with locally advanced, unresectable disease treated with neoadjuvant gemcitabine, docetaxel, and capecitabine (GTX) and gemcitabine and capecitabine (GX)/radiation therapy (RT). All patients presenting to the Pancreas Center were evaluated for eligibility. Forty-five patients (mean age, 64 years; range, 44-83 years)-34 patients deemed unresectable because of arterial involvement and 11 patients deemed unresectable because of extensive venous involvement-were treated with 6 cycles of GTX. Those with arterial involvement were treated with GX/RT after chemotherapy. The GTX and GX/RT treatments were tolerated with the expected drug-related toxicities. There were no bowel perforations, cases of pancreatitis, or delayed strictures. Among those with arterial involvement, 29 underwent subsequent resection, with 20 (69%) achieving R0 resections. All 11 patients with venous-only involvement underwent resection, with 8 achieving R0 resections and 3 achieving complete pathologic responses. For the arterial arm, the 1-year survival rate was 71% (24 of 34 patients), and the median survival was 29 months (95% confidence interval, 21-38 months). Thirteen patients (38%) have not relapsed (range, 5-49+ months). For the venous arm, the median survival has not been reached at more than 42 months. Six patients (55%) in the venous arm did not experience recurrence (range, 6.2-42+ months). GTX plus GX/RT is an effective neoadjuvant regimen that can be safely administered to patients up to at least the age of 83 years. It is associated with a high response rate, a high rate of R0 resections, and prolonged overall survival. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  19. Dose escalation of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer patients with CyberKnife: protocol of a phase I study.

    PubMed

    Qing, Shui-Wang; Ju, Xiao-Ping; Cao, Yang-Sen; Zhang, Huo-Jun

    2017-01-09

    Dose escalation of SBRT for locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients had been reported in several studies in one or three fractions, and phase I protocol was developed to investigate the maximum tolerated dose with CyberKnife for locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer patients in five fractions. The study is designed as a mono-center phase I study. The primary endpoint is to determine the maximum tolerated dose by frequency of III/IV GI (gastrointestinal) toxicity. Adverse events (AE) according to Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) version 4. Doses of 7 Gy, 7.5 Gy, 8 Gy, 8.5 Gy, 9 Gy, 9.5Gy x 5 respectively would be delivered while meeting with normal tissue constraints. A minimum of three patients will be included for each dosage level. And an interval is 4 weeks from the first patient treatment to the next patient treatment at each dose level. The maximal tolerated dose will be defined as the dose for which at least two patients in three, or at least three patients in nine, will present with a limiting toxicity. Since the dose and fractions of SBRT treatment for locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients are still unknown, we propose to conduct a Phase I study determining the maximum tolerated dose of CyberKnife SBRT for the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic tumor based on a 5 fractions treatment regimen. This trial protocol has been approved by the Ethics committee of Changhai hospital. The ethics number is 2016-030-01. Clinical trials number: NCT02716207 . Date of registration: 20 March 2016.

  20. Current Surgical Aspects of Palliative Treatment for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karapanos, Konstantinos; Nomikos, Iakovos N.

    2011-01-01

    Despite all improvements in both surgical and other conservative therapies, pancreatic cancer is steadily associated with a poor overall prognosis and remains a major cause of cancer mortality. Radical surgical resection has been established as the best chance these patients have for long-term survival. However, in most cases the disease has reached an incurable state at the time of diagnosis, mainly due to the silent clinical course at its early stages. The role of palliative surgery in locally advanced pancreatic cancer mainly involves patients who are found unresectable during open surgical exploration and consists of combined biliary and duodenal bypass procedures. Chemical splanchnicectomy is another modality that should also be applied intraoperatively with good results. There are no randomized controlled trials evaluating the outcomes of palliative pancreatic resection. Nevertheless, data from retrospective reports suggest that this practice, compared with bypass procedures, may lead to improved survival without increasing perioperative morbidity and mortality. All efforts at developing a more effective treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancer have been directed towards neoadjuvant and targeted therapies. The scenario of downstaging tumors in anticipation of a future oncological surgical resection has been advocated by trials combining gemcitabine with radiation therapy or with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib, with promising early results. PMID:24212633

  1. Phase 2 Multi-institutional Trial Evaluating Gemcitabine and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Joseph M; Chang, Daniel T; Goodman, Karyn A; Dholakia, Avani S; Raman, Siva P; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Griffith, Mary E; Pawlik, Timothy M; Pai, Jonathan S; O'Reilly, Eileen; Fisher, George A; Wild, Aaron T; Rosati, Lauren M; Zheng, Lei; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Laheru, Daniel A; Columbo, Laurie A; Sugar, Elizabeth A; Koong, Albert C

    2015-01-01

    Background This phase 2 multi-institutional study was designed to determine whether gemcitabine (GEM) with fractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) results in acceptable late grade 2 to 4 gastrointestinal toxicity when compared with a prior trial of GEM with single-fraction SBRT in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Methods A total of 49 patients with LAPC received up to 3 doses of GEM (1000 mg/m2) followed by a 1-week break and SBRT (33.0 gray [Gy] in 5 fractions). After SBRT, patients continued to receive GEM until disease progression or toxicity. Toxicity was assessed using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [version 4.0] and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Patients completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and pancreatic cancer-specific QLQ-PAN26 module before SBRT and at 4 weeks and 4 months after SBRT. Results The median follow-up was 13.9 months (range, 3.9-45.2 months). The median age of the patients was 67 years and 84% had tumors of the pancreatic head. Rates of acute and late (primary endpoint) grade ≥2 gastritis, fistula, enteritis, or ulcer toxicities were 2% and 11%, respectively. QLQ-C30 global quality of life scores remained stable from baseline to after SBRT (67 at baseline, median change of 0 at both follow-ups; P>.05 for both). Patients reported a significant improvement in pancreatic pain (P = .001) 4 weeks after SBRT on the QLQ-PAN26 questionnaire. The median plasma carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) level was reduced after SBRT (median time after SBRT, 4.2 weeks; 220 U/mL vs 62 U/mL [P<.001]). The median overall survival was 13.9 months (95% confidence interval, 10.2 months-16.7 months). Freedom from local disease progression at 1 year was 78%. Four patients (8%) underwent margin-negative and lymph node-negative surgical resections. Conclusions

  2. Updated Long-Term Outcomes and Prognostic Factors for Patients With Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Intraoperative Radiotherapy at the Massachusetts General Hospital, 1978 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Sophie; Hong, Theodore S.; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Castillo, Carlos Fernandez-del; Thayer, Sarah P.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Ryan, David P.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Willett, Christopher G.; Lillemoe, Keith D.; Warshaw, Andrew L.; Wo, Jennifer Y.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND In the current study, the authors evaluated long-term outcomes, intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT)-related toxicity, and prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) among patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) who received IORT as part of their treatment at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). METHODS Medical records were reviewed for 194 consecutive patients with unresectable LAPC who were treated with IORT at MGH between 1978 and 2010. OS was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were evaluated at the univariate level by the log-rank test and at the multivariate level by the Cox proportional hazards model. Rates of disease progression and treatment toxicity were calculated. RESULTS The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year survival rates were 49%, 16%, and 6%, respectively. Six patients (3%) survived for > 5 years. The median OS was 12.0 months. Among 183 patients with known post-IORT disease status, the 2-year local progression-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 41% and 28%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, an IORT applicator diameter ≤ 8 cm (hazards ratio [HR], 0.51; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.30–0.84 [P = .009]), a Charlson age-comorbidity index ≤3 (HR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.31–0.73 [P = .001]), and receipt of chemotherapy (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.33–0.66 [P < .001]) predicted improved OS. The median OS for patients with all 3 positive prognostic factors was 21.2 months. CONCLUSIONS Well-selected patients with LAPC with small tumors and low Charlson age-comorbidity indices can achieve good long-term survival outcomes with a treatment regimen that incorporates chemotherapy and IORT. PMID:24006012

  3. [A Case of Unresectable Advanced Rectal Cancer with a Pancreatic Tumor That Was Successfully Treated with FOLFIRINOX].

    PubMed

    Yabe, Nobushige; Murai, Shinji; Ozawa, Hiroki; Yokose, Takahiro; Oto, Ippei; Yoshikawa, Takahisa; Kitasato, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Hirotomo; Kojima, Kenji; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2016-11-01

    A 72-year-old man was admitted to our hospital department in September 2014 because of a positive fecal occult blood test.Colonoscopy showed a type 2 tumor in half of the AV 15 cm rectosigmoid colon.Histology of the biopsy indicated a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, and the RAS gene test found wild type.On CT examination, there were multiple liver lung metastases and a 30mm diameter tumor with pancreatic duct extension to the pancreatic body.A PET-CT examination had a high SUVmax at the same site.Because of the location of the tumor EUS-FNA was not used.However, the possibility of pancreatic body cancer could not be denied after the CT examination.Treatment by radical resection was impossible because of the spread of the cancer so we selected chemotherapy.Undeniable pancreatic metastasis of rectal cancer, pancreatic cancer was used as a prognostic factor as double cancer of rectal cancer and pancreatic cancer, from that UGT1A1 test side effects appearance was a low-risk decision, was selected FOLFIRINOX in the treatment regimen.After 25 cycles, the pancreatic body tumor and liver metastases and also the primary tumor were reduced, the multiple lung metastases disappeared, and disease control was good.Side effects were diarrhea on the day of administration of irinotecan, but this was controllable by administering oral loperamide when starting the infusion.Grade 3 or more peripheral neuropathy has not developed, and this regimen is continuing.Pancreatic cancer is a solid cancer with a poor prognosis; if you do not reach the tissue diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic cancer, was a case in which no choice but to select a regimen to carcinoma of the prognostic.

  4. Phase 2 Trial of Induction Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Cetuximab Followed by Selective Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiation in Patients With Borderline Resectable or Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Esnaola, Nestor F.; Chaudhary, Uzair B.; O'Brien, Paul; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Camp, E. Ramsay; Thomas, Melanie B.; Cole, David J.; Montero, Alberto J.; Hoffman, Brenda J.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Orwat, Kelly P.; Marshall, David T.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 2 study, the safety and efficacy of induction gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab followed by selective capecitabine-based chemoradiation in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (BRPC or LAPC, respectively). Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy repeated every 14 days for 6 cycles, combined with weekly cetuximab. Patients were then restaged; “downstaged” patients with resectable disease underwent attempted resection. Remaining patients were treated with chemoradiation consisting of intensity modulated radiation therapy (54 Gy) and concurrent capecitabine; patients with borderline resectable disease or better at restaging underwent attempted resection. Results: A total of 39 patients were enrolled, of whom 37 were evaluable. Protocol treatment was generally well tolerated. Median follow-up for all patients was 11.9 months. Overall, 29.7% of patients underwent R0 surgical resection (69.2% of patients with BRPC; 8.3% of patients with LAPC). Overall 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 62%, and median PFS was 10.4 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. In patients with LAPC, median OS was 9.3 months; in patients with BRPC, median OS was 24.1 months. In the group of patients who underwent R0 resection (all of which were R0 resections), median survival had not yet been reached at the time of analysis. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated in patients with BRPC or LAPC, and almost one-third of patients underwent R0 resection. Although OS for the entire cohort was comparable to that in historical controls, PFS and OS in patients with BRPC and/or who underwent R0 resection was markedly improved.

  5. A randomized multi-center phase II trial of the angiogenesis inhibitor Cilengitide (EMD 121974) and gemcitabine compared with gemcitabine alone in advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friess, Helmut; Langrehr, Jan M; Oettle, Helmut; Raedle, Jochen; Niedergethmann, Marco; Dittrich, Christian; Hossfeld, Dieter K; Stöger, Herbert; Neyns, Bart; Herzog, Peter; Piedbois, Pascal; Dobrowolski, Frank; Scheithauer, Werner; Hawkins, Robert; Katz, Frieder; Balcke, Peter; Vermorken, Jan; van Belle, Simon; Davidson, Neville; Esteve, Albert Abad; Castellano, Daniel; Kleeff, Jörg; Tempia-Caliera, Adrien A; Kovar, Andreas; Nippgen, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    Background Anti-angiogenic treatment is believed to have at least cystostatic effects in highly vascularized tumours like pancreatic cancer. In this study, the treatment effects of the angiogenesis inhibitor Cilengitide and gemcitabine were compared with gemcitabine alone in patients with advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Methods A multi-national, open-label, controlled, randomized, parallel-group, phase II pilot study was conducted in 20 centers in 7 countries. Cilengitide was administered at 600 mg/m2 twice weekly for 4 weeks per cycle and gemcitabine at 1000 mg/m2 for 3 weeks followed by a week of rest per cycle. The planned treatment period was 6 four-week cycles. The primary endpoint of the study was overall survival and the secondary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS), response rate, quality of life (QoL), effects on biological markers of disease (CA 19.9) and angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor), and safety. An ancillary study investigated the pharmacokinetics of both drugs in a subset of patients. Results Eighty-nine patients were randomized. The median overall survival was 6.7 months for Cilengitide and gemcitabine and 7.7 months for gemcitabine alone. The median PFS times were 3.6 months and 3.8 months, respectively. The overall response rates were 17% and 14%, and the tumor growth control rates were 54% and 56%, respectively. Changes in the levels of CA 19.9 went in line with the clinical course of the disease, but no apparent relationships were seen with the biological markers of angiogenesis. QoL and safety evaluations were comparable between treatment groups. Pharmacokinetic studies showed no influence of gemcitabine on the pharmacokinetic parameters of Cilengitide and vice versa. Conclusion There were no clinically important differences observed regarding efficacy, safety and QoL between the groups. The observations lay in the range of other clinical studies in this setting. The

  6. Multimodality treatment of unresectable hepatic metastases from pancreatic glucagonoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Villani, Laura; Bernardo, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Glucagonomas are pancreatic islet cell tumors arising from the alpha cells which belong to neuroendocrine tumors. They frequently metastasize to the liver. We report the case of a 52- year old man with a pancreatic glucagonoma with synchronous multiple liver metastases treated by surgery, transarterial chemoembolization, percutaneous radiofrequency thermal ablation and long-acting octreotide. Our report confirms that a multimodal approach is very effective in patients with unresectable liver metastases from pancreatic endocrine tumors providing long-lasting palliation and probably prolonging survival. PMID:21139900

  7. Duodenal Toxicity After Fractionated Chemoradiation for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick; Das, Prajnan; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Beddar, Sam; Briere, Tina; Pham, Mary; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Crane, Christopher H.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Improving local control is critical to improving survival and quality of life for patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC). However, previous attempts at radiation dose escalation have been limited by duodenal toxicity. In order to guide future studies, we analyzed the clinical and dosimetric factors associated with duodenal toxicity in patients undergoing fractionated chemoradiation for LAPC. Methods and Materials: Medical records and treatment plans of 106 patients with LAPC who were treated with chemoradiation between July 2005 and June 2010 at our institution were reviewed. All patients received neoadjuvant and concurrent chemotherapy. Seventy-eight patients were treated with conventional radiation to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions; 28 patients received dose-escalated radiation therapy (range, 57.5-75.4 Gy in 28-39 fractions). Treatment-related toxicity was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess prognostic influence of clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related factors by using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. Results: Twenty patients had treatment-related duodenal toxicity events, such as duodenal inflammation, ulceration, and bleeding. Four patients had grade 1 events, 8 had grade 2, 6 had grade 3, 1 had grade 4, and 1 had grade 5. On univariate analysis, a toxicity grade ≥2 was associated with tumor location, low platelet count, an absolute volume (cm{sup 3}) receiving a dose of at least 55 Gy (V{sub 55} {sub Gy} > 1 cm{sup 3}), and a maximum point dose >60 Gy. Of these factors, only V{sub 55} {sub Gy} ≥1 cm{sup 3} was associated with duodenal toxicity on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 6.7; range, 2.0-18.8; P=.002). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a duodenal V{sub 55} {sub Gy} >1 cm{sup 3} is an important dosimetric predictor of grade 2 or greater duodenal toxicity and establishes it as a

  8. Prognostic Significance of Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine: Analysis of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Dose Escalation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Schipper, Matthew; Zalupski, Mark M.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Abrams, Ross; Francis, Isaac R.; Khan, Gazala; Leslie, William; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Although established in the postresection setting, the prognostic value of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is less clear. We examined the prognostic utility of CA19-9 in patients with unresectable LAPC treated on a prospective trial of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with unresectable LAPC were treated at the University of Michigan on a phase 1/2 trial of IMRT dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. CA19-9 was obtained at baseline and during routine follow-up. Cox models were used to assess the effect of baseline factors on freedom from local progression (FFLP), distant progression (FFDP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Stepwise forward regression was used to build multivariate predictive models for each endpoint. Results: Thirty-eight patients were eligible for the present analysis. On univariate analysis, baseline CA19-9 and age predicted OS, CA19-9 at baseline and 3 months predicted PFS, gross tumor volume (GTV) and black race predicted FFLP, and CA19-9 at 3 months predicted FFDP. On stepwise multivariate regression modeling, baseline CA19-9, age, and female sex predicted OS; baseline CA19-9 and female sex predicted both PFS and FFDP; and GTV predicted FFLP. Patients with baseline CA19-9 ≤90 U/mL had improved OS (median 23.0 vs 11.1 months, HR 2.88, P<.01) and PFS (14.4 vs 7.0 months, HR 3.61, P=.001). CA19-9 progression over 90 U/mL was prognostic for both OS (HR 3.65, P=.001) and PFS (HR 3.04, P=.001), and it was a stronger predictor of death than either local progression (HR 1.46, P=.42) or distant progression (HR 3.31, P=.004). Conclusions: In patients with unresectable LAPC undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy, baseline CA19-9 was independently prognostic even after established prognostic factors were controlled for, whereas CA19-9 progression

  9. Multicenter, randomized, open-label Phase II study comparing S-1 alternate-day oral therapy with the standard daily regimen as a first-line treatment in patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamaue, Hiroki; Shimizu, Atsushi; Hagiwara, Yasuhiro; Sho, Masayuki; Yanagimoto, Hiroaki; Nakamori, Shoji; Ueno, Hideki; Ishii, Hiroshi; Kitano, Masayuki; Sugimori, Kazuya; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Imaoka, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Daisuke; Ueda, Kazuki; Nebiki, Hiroko; Nagakawa, Tatsuya; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Isao; Ohashi, Yasuo; Shirasaka, Tetsuhiko

    2017-04-01

    Non-inferiority for overall survival (OS) following alternate-day treatment with the oral anticancer drug S-1 compared with standard daily treatment was assessed in Japanese patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer in a multicenter, randomized, phase II study. This trial was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (no. 000008604). Chemotherapy-naïve patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer were randomly assigned 2:1 to treatment with alternate-day (twice daily on alternate days from days 1 through 42 of a 42-day cycle) or daily (twice daily on days 1 through 28 of a 42-day cycle) treatment with S-1. The primary endpoint was OS. Secondary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS), time to treatment failure, response rate, quality of life assessments, and safety. A total of 190 patients were enrolled, of which 185 were included in the final analysis (alternate-day: 121; daily: 64). Median OS was 9.4 for the alternate-day group and 10.4 months for the daily group [hazard ratio (HR), 1.19; 95% credible interval, 0.86 to 1.64], indicating that non-inferiority of alternate-day treatment to daily treatment was not demonstrated. Median PFS was 3.0 for the alternate-day group and 4.2 months for the daily group (HR, 1.65; 95% credible interval, 1.20-2.29). The incidence of anorexia, fatigue, neutrophils, pigmentation, and pneumonitis was lower in alternate-day treatment compared with daily treatment. S-1 for advanced pancreatic cancer should be taken daily as recommended, based on the decreased OS and PFS and marginal improvement in safety observed in the alternate-day group.

  10. Concurrent gemcitabine and radiotherapy with and without neoadjuvant gemcitabine for locally advanced unresectable or resected pancreatic cancer: A phase I-II study

    SciTech Connect

    Brade, Anthony . E-mail: anthony.brade@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Brierley, James; Oza, Amit; Gallinger, Steven; Cummings, Bernard; MacLean, Martha; Pond, Gregory R.; Hedley, David; Wong Shun; Townsley, Carol; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Moore, Malcolm

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of biweekly gemcitabine with concurrent radiotherapy (RT) for resected and locally advanced (LA) pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had either LA or resected pancreatic cancer. Between March 1999 and July 2001, 63 patients (31 with LA and 32 with resected disease) were treated. Of the 63 patients, 28 were enrolled in a Phase I study of increasing radiation doses (35 Gy [n = 7], 43.75 Gy [n = 11], and 52.5 Gy [n = 10] given within 4, 5, or 6 weeks, respectively, in 1.75-Gy fractions) concurrently with 40 mg/m{sup 2} gemcitabine biweekly. Subsequently, 35 were enrolled in a Phase II study with the addition of induction gemcitabine 1000 mg/m{sup 2} within 7 or 8 weeks to concurrent biweekly gemcitabine (40 mg/m{sup 2}) and 52.5 Gy RT within 6 weeks. Results: In the LA population, the best response observed was a complete response in 1, partial response in 3, stable disease in 10, and progressive disease in 17. In the phase II trial, gemcitabine plus RT was not delivered to 8 patients because of progression with induction gemcitabine alone (n = 5) or by patient request (n = 3). On intent-to-treat analysis, the median survival in the LA patients was 13.9 months and the 2-year survival rate was 16.1%. In the resected population, the median progression-free survival was 8.3 months, the median survival was 18.4 months, and the 2- and 5-year survival rate was 36% and 19.4%, respectively. The treatment was well tolerated; the median gemcitabine dose intensity was 96% of the planned dose in the neoadjuvant and concurrent portions of the Phase II study. No treatment-related deaths occurred. Conclusion: Biweekly gemcitabine (40 mg/m{sup 2}) concurrently with RT (52.5 Gy in 30 fractions of 1.75 Gy) with or without induction gemcitabine is safe and tolerable and shows efficacy in patients with LA and resected pancreatic cancer.

  11. Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robert C G

    2016-12-01

    The diagnosis for locally advanced pancreatic cancer is based on high-quality cross-sectional imaging, which shows tumor invasion into the celiac/superior mesenteric arteries and/or superior mesenteric/portal venous system that is not reconstructable. The optimal management of these patients is evolving quickly with the advent of newer chemotherapeutics, radiation, and nonthermal ablation modalities. This article presents the current status of initial chemotherapy, surgical therapy, ablative therapy, and radiation therapy for patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Surgical resection offers the best chance of long-term disease control and the only chance for cure for patients with nonmetastatic exocrine pancreatic cancer.

  12. Intraoperative electron beam irradiation for patients with unresectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, W.U.; Wood, W.C.; Tepper, J.E.; Warshaw, A.L.; Orlow, E.L.; Kaufman, S.D.; Battit, G.E.; Nardi, G.L.

    1984-09-01

    Since 1978 we have used electron beam intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) to deliver higher radiation doses to pancreatic tumors than are possible with external beam techniques while minimizing the dose to the surrounding normal tissues. Twenty-nine patients with localized, unresectable, pancreatic carcinoma were treated by electron beam IORT in combination with conventional external radiation therapy (XRT). The primary tumor was located in the head of the pancreas in 20 patients, in the head and body in six patients, and in the body and tail in three. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given in 23 of the 29 patients. The last 13 patients have received misonidazole (3.5 mg/M2) just prior to IORT (20 Gy). At present 14 patients are alive and 11 are without evidence of disease from 3 to 41 months after IORT. The median survival is 16.5 months. Eight patients have failed locally in the IORT field and two others failed regionally. Twelve patients have developed distant metastases, including five who failed locally or regionally. We have seen no local recurrences in the 12 patients who have been treated with misonidazole and have completed IORT and XRT while 10 of 15 patients treated without misonidazole have recurred locally. Because of the shorter follow-up in the misonidazole group, this apparent improvement is not statistically significant. Fifteen patients (52%) have not had pain following treatment and 22 (76%) have had no upper gastrointestinal or biliary obstruction subsequent to their initial surgical bypasses and radiation treatments. Based on the good palliation generally obtained, the 16.5-month median survival, and the possible added benefit from misonidazole, we are encouraged to continue this approach.

  13. Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Concurrent Radiotherapy for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, James D.; Adusumilli, Saroja; Griffith, Kent A.; Ray, Michael E.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ben-Josef, Edgar . E-mail: edgarb@med.umich.edu

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Full-dose gemcitabine and concurrent radiotherapy is a promising treatment approach in unresectable pancreatic cancer. This study was conducted to assess the pattern of failure and toxicity associated with the use of conformal treatment volumes, omitting prophylactic lymph node irradiation. Methods and Materials: Seventy-four patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer were treated between 1997 and 2005 with full-dose (1000 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 1, 8, and 15) gemcitabine and concurrent radiotherapy (36 Gy [median] in 15 daily fractions). The planning target volume (PTV) was limited to the gross tumor volume (GTV) plus 1-cm margin. Patient computed tomography (CT) scans were systematically reviewed to determine the pattern of failure. Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression models were used to analyze freedom from local progression (FFLP), distant failure, overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.6 months (20.6 months in living patients), the 1-year and 2-year FFLP rates were 64% and 38%, respectively. Four patients (5%) failed in the peripancreatic lymph nodes (3 in-field and 1 marginal failure). Median OS was 11.2 months. Analyzed as a time-dependent covariate, local failure was a significant predictor of OS (p = 0.0074). Sixteen patients (22%) had significant gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity ({>=} Grade 3). PTV correlated with significant GI toxicity (p = 0.007). Conclusions: Freedom from local progression in unresectable pancreatic cancer is suboptimal. In conjunction with full-dose gemcitabine, the use of conformal fields encompassing only the GTV helps reduce toxicity and does not result in marginal failures. Our findings provide rationale for intensification of local therapy in conjunction with more effective systemic therapy.

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) combined with chemotherapy for unresected pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gurka, Marie K.; Kim, Christine; He, Ruth; Charabaty, Aline; Haddad, Nadim; Johnson, Lynt; Jackson, Patrick; Weiner, Louis; Marshall, John L; Collins, Sean P.; Pishvaian, Michael J.; Unger, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The role of conventionally fractionated radiation therapy in the management of unresectable pancreatic cancer is controversial. One concern about concurrent chemoradiation relates to the timing of chemotherapy. In contrast to conventional radiation therapy, SBRT delivers high doses in a shorter duration resulting in minimal disruption in chemotherapy. Here we report our results of patients treated with SBRT and chemotherapy for inoperable pancreatic cancer. Methods Thirty-eight consecutive patients treated with SBRT and chemotherapy for locally advanced, borderline resectable, and medically inoperable at our institution from January 2008 to December 2012 were included in this retrospective analysis. Treatment was delivered in 5 fractions of 5 or 6 Gy per fraction over five days. Median time from diagnosis to SBRT was 1.9 months. Toxicities were scored using the CTCAE v.3. Survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results The median age was 70 years (range 45 – 90). ECOG performance status ranged from 0 – 3. Thirty-four patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Four other patients received sequential chemotherapy. Median OS was 14.3 months and median PFS was 9.2 months from diagnosis. From radiation, OS and PFS were 12.3 months and 6.8 months, respectively. The overall local control rate was 79%. Acute toxicity was minimal. Severe late SBRT-related toxicities included one grade 3 gastric outlet obstruction, one grade 4 biliary stricture and a grade 5 gastric hemorrhage. Conclusions SBRT combined with chemotherapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer is convenient, feasible and generally well tolerated. The outcomes of SBRT combined with chemotherapy compare favorably to the results of treatment with chemotherapy and conventional radiation therapy. PMID:25171298

  15. Complete Response after Treatment with Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation with Prolonged Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced, Unresectable Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Pompa, Tiffany A.; Jeurkar, Chetan; Li, Hui; Soundararajan, Suganthi; Poli, Jaganmohan; Styler, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Surgery is the only chance for cure in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. In unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) suggests chemotherapy and consideration for radiation in cases of unresectable LAPC. Here we present a rare case of unresectable LAPC with a complete histopathological response after chemoradiation followed by surgical resection. A 54-year-old female presented to our clinic in December 2013 with complaints of abdominal pain and 30-pound weight loss. An MRI demonstrated a mass in the pancreatic body measuring 6.2 × 3.2 cm; biopsy revealed proven ductal adenocarcinoma. Due to splenic vein/artery and contiguous celiac artery encasement, she was deemed surgically unresectable. She was started on FOLFIRINOX therapy (three cycles), intensity modulated radiation to a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions concurrent with capecitabine, followed by FOLFIRI, and finally XELIRI. After 8 cycles of ongoing XELIRI completed in March 2015, restaging showed a remarkable decrease in tumor size, along with PET-CT revealing no FDG-avid uptake. She was reevaluated by surgery and taken for definitive resection. Histopathological evaluation demonstrated a complete R0 resection and no residual tumor. Based on this patient and literature review, this strategy demonstrates potential efficacy of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with prolonged chemotherapy, followed by surgery, which may improve outcomes in patients deemed previously unresectable. PMID:28373919

  16. Phase I Trial of Consolidative Radiotherapy with Concurrent Bevacizumab, Erlotinib and Capecitabine for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gunther, Jillian R.; Munsell, Mark F.; Das, Prajnan; Minsky, Bruce D.; Delclos, Marc E.; Chatterjee, Deyali; Wang, Huamin; Clemons, Marilyn; George, Geena; Singh, Pankaj K.; Katz, Matthew H.; Fleming, Jason B.; Javle, Milind M.; Wolff, Robert A.; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Crane, Christopher H.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the safety, tolerability and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of addition of erlotinib to bevacizumab and capecitabine-based definitive chemoradiation (CRT) in unresectable pancreatic cancer. Methods Seventeen patients with CT-staged, biopsy-proven unresectable pancreatic cancer were enrolled between 3/2008 and 10/2010. Prior chemotherapy was permitted. Two patients each were enrolled at dose levels (DLs) 1–4 and 9 patients at DL 5. All patients received 50.4 Gy (GTV only) in 28 fractions with concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab and erlotinib. Dose of each drug was escalated in 5 DLs using the continual reassessment method. Bevacizumab was escalated from 5mg/Kg q2weeks (DLs 1–4) to 10mg/Kg q2weeks (DL 5); daily erlotinib from 100mg/day (DLs 1–2) to 150 mg/Kg (DLs 3–5); and capecitabine from 400mg/m2 twice daily on days of radiation (DL 1) to 650mg/m2 (DLs 2–3) to 825 mg/m2 (DLs 4–5). Reassessment for potential resection was performed 6–8 weeks later. Results Sixteen patients received gemcitabine-based chemotherapy prior to CRT. With a median clinical follow-up of 10 months, no grade 3 toxicities were observed in DLs 1–4. Three (33%) patients at DL 5 developed a grade 3 acute toxicity (2 diarrhea, 1 rash). No grade 4 or 5 toxicities were seen. DL 4 was selected as the MTD; therefore, the recommended doses in combination with radiation are: bevacizumab, 5mg/Kg q2weeks; erlotinib, 150 mg/Kg daily; and capecitabine, 825mg/m2 BID. Median survival was 17.4 months. Of the five patients who underwent resection, 4 were originally deemed locally advanced and 1 was borderline resectable. Three patients had excellent pathological response (2 complete response and 20% viable tumor) at surgery, and the 2 patients with complete response are still alive at 61 and 67 months of follow up with no local or distant failures. Conclusions This chemoradiation regimen at the recommended dose levels is safe and tolerable for patients with unresectable

  17. Use of irreversible electroporation in unresectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation is a non-thermal injury ablative modality that has been in clinical use since 2008 in the treatment of locally advanced soft tissue tumors. It has been reported to be utilized intraoperatively, laparoscopically or percutaneously. The method of action of IRE relies on a high voltage (maximum 3,000 volts) small microsecond pulse lengths (70 to 90 microseconds) to induce cell membrane porosity which leads to slow/protracted cell death over time. One of the largest unmet needs in oncology that IRE has been utilized is in locally advanced (stage III) pancreatic cancer. Recent studies have demonstrated the safety and palliation with encouraging improvement in overall survival. Its inherent limitation still remains tissue heterogeneity and the unique settings based on tumor histology and prior induction therapy. There remains a high technical demand of the end-user and the more extensive knowledge transfer which makes the learning curve longer in order to achieve appropriate and safe utilization. PMID:26151062

  18. The incremental benefit of EUS for identifying unresectable disease among adults with pancreatic adenocarcinoma: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    James, Paul D.; Zhang, Mei; Belletrutti, Paul J.; Mohamed, Rachid; Ghali, William; Roberts, Derek J.; Martel, Guillaume; Heitman, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims It is unclear to what extent EUS influences the surgical management of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This systematic review sought to determine if EUS evaluation improves the identification of unresectable disease among adults with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients and methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, bibliographies of included articles and conference proceedings for studies reporting original data regarding surgical management and/or survival among patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, from inception to January 7th 2017. Our main outcome was the incremental benefit of EUS for the identification of unresectable disease (IBEUS). The pooled IBEUS were calculated using random effects models. Heterogeneity was explored using stratified meta-analysis and meta-regression. Results Among 4,903 citations identified, we included 8 cohort studies (study periods from 1992 to 2007) that examined the identification of unresectable disease (n = 795). Random effects meta-analysis suggested that EUS alone identified unresectable disease in 19% of patients (95% confidence interval [CI], 10–33%). Among those studies that considered portal or mesenteric vein invasion as potentially resectable, EUS alone was able to identify unresectable disease in 14% of patients (95% CI 8–24%) after a CT scan was performed. Limitations The majority of the included studies were retrospective. Conclusions EUS evaluation is associated with increased identification of unresectable disease among adults with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:28319148

  19. Ablation Strategies for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Linecker, Michael; Pfammatter, Thomas; Kambakamba, Patryk; DeOliveira, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of novel and somewhat effective chemotherapy against pancreas cancer, several groups developed a new interest on locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Unresectable tumors constitute up to 80% of pancreatic cancer (PC) at the time of diagnosis and are associated with a 5-year overall survival of less than 5%. To control those tumors locally, with perhaps improved patients survival, significant advances were made over the last 2 decades in the development of ablation methods including cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, high intensity focused ultrasound and irreversible electroporation (IRE). Many suggested a call for caution for possible severe or lethal complications in using such techniques on the pancreas. Most fears were on the heating or freezing of the pancreas, while non-thermal ablation (IRE) could offer safer approaches. The multimodal therapies along with high-resolution imaging guidance have created some enthusiasm toward ablation for LAPC. The impact of ablation techniques on primarily non-resectable PC remains, however, unclear.

  20. Feasibility of pancreatectomy following high-dose proton therapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, Kathryn E; Nichols, R Charles; Morris, Christopher G; Bose, Debashish; Hughes, Steven J; Stauffer, John A; Celinski, Scott A; Johnson, Elizabeth A; Zaiden, Robert A; Mendenhall, Nancy P; Rutenberg, Michael S

    2017-04-27

    To review surgical outcomes for patients undergoing pancreatectomy after proton therapy with concomitant capecitabine for initially unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. From April 2010 to September 2013, 15 patients with initially unresectable pancreatic cancer were treated with proton therapy with concomitant capecitabine at 1000 mg orally twice daily. All patients received 59.40 Gy (RBE) to the gross disease and 1 patient received 50.40 Gy (RBE) to high-risk nodal targets. There were no treatment interruptions and no chemotherapy dose reductions. Six patients achieved a radiographic response sufficient to justify surgical exploration, of whom 1 was identified as having intraperitoneal dissemination at the time of surgery and the planned pancreatectomy was aborted. Five patients underwent resection. Procedures included: Laparoscopic standard pancreaticoduodenectomy (n = 3), open pyloris-sparing pancreaticoduodenectomy (n = 1), and open distal pancreatectomy with irreversible electroporation (IRE) of a pancreatic head mass (n = 1). The median patient age was 60 years (range, 51-67). The median duration of surgery was 419 min (range, 290-484), with a median estimated blood loss of 850 cm(3) (range, 300-2000), median ICU stay of 1 d (range, 0-2), and median hospital stay of 10 d (range, 5-14). Three patients were re-admitted to a hospital within 30 d after discharge for wound infection (n = 1), delayed gastric emptying (n = 1), and ischemic gastritis (n = 1). Two patients underwent R0 resections and demonstrated minimal residual disease in the final pathology specimen. One patient, after negative pancreatic head biopsies, underwent IRE followed by distal pancreatectomy with no tumor seen in the specimen. Two patients underwent R2 resections. Only 1 patient demonstrated ultimate local progression at the primary site. Median survival for the 5 resected patients was 24 mo (range, 10-30). Pancreatic resection for patients with initially unresectable cancers is

  1. Feasibility of pancreatectomy following high-dose proton therapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, Kathryn E; Nichols, R Charles; Morris, Christopher G; Bose, Debashish; Hughes, Steven J; Stauffer, John A; Celinski, Scott A; Johnson, Elizabeth A; Zaiden, Robert A; Mendenhall, Nancy P; Rutenberg, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    AIM To review surgical outcomes for patients undergoing pancreatectomy after proton therapy with concomitant capecitabine for initially unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS From April 2010 to September 2013, 15 patients with initially unresectable pancreatic cancer were treated with proton therapy with concomitant capecitabine at 1000 mg orally twice daily. All patients received 59.40 Gy (RBE) to the gross disease and 1 patient received 50.40 Gy (RBE) to high-risk nodal targets. There were no treatment interruptions and no chemotherapy dose reductions. Six patients achieved a radiographic response sufficient to justify surgical exploration, of whom 1 was identified as having intraperitoneal dissemination at the time of surgery and the planned pancreatectomy was aborted. Five patients underwent resection. Procedures included: Laparoscopic standard pancreaticoduodenectomy (n = 3), open pyloris-sparing pancreaticoduodenectomy (n = 1), and open distal pancreatectomy with irreversible electroporation (IRE) of a pancreatic head mass (n = 1). RESULTS The median patient age was 60 years (range, 51-67). The median duration of surgery was 419 min (range, 290-484), with a median estimated blood loss of 850 cm3 (range, 300-2000), median ICU stay of 1 d (range, 0-2), and median hospital stay of 10 d (range, 5-14). Three patients were re-admitted to a hospital within 30 d after discharge for wound infection (n = 1), delayed gastric emptying (n = 1), and ischemic gastritis (n = 1). Two patients underwent R0 resections and demonstrated minimal residual disease in the final pathology specimen. One patient, after negative pancreatic head biopsies, underwent IRE followed by distal pancreatectomy with no tumor seen in the specimen. Two patients underwent R2 resections. Only 1 patient demonstrated ultimate local progression at the primary site. Median survival for the 5 resected patients was 24 mo (range, 10-30). CONCLUSION Pancreatic resection for patients with initially

  2. A phase III trial of pemetrexed plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine in patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Oettle, H; Richards, D; Ramanathan, R K; van Laethem, J L; Peeters, M; Fuchs, M; Zimmermann, A; John, W; Von Hoff, D; Arning, M; Kindler, H L

    2005-10-01

    This randomized phase III study compared the overall survival (OS) of pemetrexed plus gemcitabine (PG) versus standard gemcitabine (G) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer and no prior systemic therapy (including 5-fluorouracil as a radiosensitizer) were randomized to receive either 1,250 mg/m(2) gemcitabine on days 1 and 8 plus pemetrexed 500 mg/m(2) after gemcitabine on day 8 (PG arm) of each 21-day cycle, or gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8 and 15 of each 28-day cycle (G arm). Five hundred and sixty-five patients with well-balanced baseline characteristics were randomly assigned (283 PG, 282 G). OS was not improved on the PG arm (6.2 months) compared with the G arm (6.3 months) (P=0.8477). Progression-free survival (3.9 versus 3.3 months; P=0.1109) and time to treatment failure (3 versus 2.2 months; P=0.2680) results were similar. Tumor response rate (14.8% versus 7.1%; P=0.004) was significantly better on the PG arm. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia (45.1% versus 12.8%), thrombocytopenia (17.9% versus 6.2%), anemia (13.9% versus 2.9%), febrile neutropenia (9.9% versus 0.4%; all P <0.001) and fatigue (15% versus 6.6%; P=0.002) were significantly more common on the PG arm. Four treatment-related deaths occurred on the PG arm and none in the G arm. Pemetrexed plus gemcitabine therapy did not improve OS. Single-agent gemcitabine remains the standard of care for advanced pancreatic cancer.

  3. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary, Pancreatic, Urothelial, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  4. Irreversible electroporation of locally advanced pancreatic neck/body adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Irreversible electroporation (IRE) of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the neck has been used to palliate appropriate stage 3 pancreatic cancers without evidence of metastasis and who have undergone appropriate induction therapy. Currently there has not been a standardized reported technique for pancreatic mid-body tumors for patient selection and intra-operative technique. Patients Subjects are patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body/neck who have undergone appropriate induction chemotherapy for a reasonable duration. Main outcome measures Technique of open IRE of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the neck/body is described, with the emphasis on intra-operative ultrasound and intra-operative electroporation management. Results The technique of open IRE of the pancreatic neck/body with bracketing of the celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery with continuous intraoperative ultrasound imaging and consideration of intraoperative navigational system is described. Conclusions IRE of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body/neck is feasible for appropriate patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:26029461

  5. Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Enrique Domínguez-Muñoz, J

    2016-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the definition of the disease, the etiological diagnosis of idiopathic disease, the correlation between fibrosis degree and pancreatic secretion in the early stages of chronic pancreatitis, the treatment of the disease and of pain, the clinical relevance of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. A new mechanistic definition of chronic pancreatitis has been proposed. Genetic testing is mainly of help in patients with relapsing idiopathic pancreatitis. A significant correlation has been shown between the degree of pancreatic fibrosis as evaluated by elastography and pancreatic secretion of bicarbonate. New data supports the efficacy of antioxidants and simvastatin for the therapy of chronic pancreatitis. The pancreatoscopy-guided intraductal lithotripsy is an effective alternative to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with chronic calcifying pancreatitis. The presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significant risk of cardiovascular events. Fine needle biopsy and contrast enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography are of help for the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and its differential diagnosis with pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis.

  7. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Retrospective Analysis of 144 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Ito, Yoshinori; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Jingu, Keiichi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shinichi; Wada, Hitoshi; Kokubo, Masaki; Ogo, Etsuyo; Etoh, Hidehiro; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Takayama, Makoto; Nemoto, Kenji; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) + external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for unresectable pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 144 patients treated with IORT, with or without, EBRT were reviewed. One hundred and thirteen patients (78.5%) were treated with IORT + EBRT and 114 patients (79.2%) were treated in conjunction with chemotherapy. The median doses of IORT and EBRT were 25 Gy and 45 Gy, respectively. The median follow-up of all 144 patients was 9.6 months (range, 0.5-69.7 months). Results: At the time of this analysis, 131 of 144 patients (91.0%) had disease recurrences. Local progression was observed in 60 patients (41.7%), and the 2-year local control (LC) rate in all patients was 44.6%. Patients treated with IORT, with or without, EBRT had significantly more favorable LC (2-year LC, 50.9%) than those treated with IORT without EBRT (p = 0.0004). The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate and the median survival time in all 144 patients were 14.7% and 10.5 months, respectively. Patients treated with chemotherapy had a significantly favorable OS than those treated without chemotherapy (p < 0.0001). On univariate analysis, chemotherapy use alone had a significant impact on OS and on multivariate analysis; chemotherapy use was a significant prognostic factor. Late gastrointestinal morbidity of National Cancer Institute-Common Terminology Criteria Grade 3 was observed in 2 patients (1.4%). Conclusion: IORT + EBRT yields a relatively favorable LC rate for unresectable pancreatic cancer with low frequency of severe late toxicity, and IORT combined with chemotherapy conferred a survival benefit compared with IORT without chemotherapy.

  8. Preoperative evaluation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma with synchronous liver metastasis: Diagnosis and assessment of unresectability

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hao-Jun; Jin, Chen; Fu, De-Liang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify predictors for synchronous liver metastasis from resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and assess unresectability of synchronous liver metastasis. METHODS Retrospective records of PDAC patients with synchronous liver metastasis who underwent simultaneous resections of primary PDAC and synchronous liver metastasis, or palliative surgical bypass, were collected from 2007 to 2015. A series of pre-operative clinical parameters, including tumor markers and inflammation-based indices, were analyzed by logistic regression to figure out predictive factors and assess unresectability of synchronous liver metastasis. Cox regression was used to identify prognostic factors in liver-metastasized PDAC patients after surgery, with intention to validate their conformance to the indications of simultaneous resections and palliative surgical bypass. Survival of patients from different groups were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Intra- and post-operative courses were compared, including complications. PDAC patients with no distant metastases who underwent curative resection served as the control group. RESULTS CA125 > 38 U/mL (OR = 12.397, 95%CI: 5.468-28.105, P < 0.001) and diabetes mellitus (OR = 3.343, 95%CI: 1.539-7.262, P = 0.002) independently predicted synchronous liver metastasis from resectable PDAC. CA125 > 62 U/mL (OR = 5.181, 95%CI: 1.612-16.665, P = 0.006) and age > 62 years (OR = 3.921, 95%CI: 1.217-12.632, P = 0.022) correlated with unresectability of synchronous liver metastasis, both of which also indicated a worse long-term outcome of liver-metastasized PDAC patients after surgery. After the simultaneous resections, patients with post-operatively elevated serum CA125 levels had shorter survival than those with post-operatively reduced serum CA125 levels (7.7 mo vs 16.3 mo, P = 0.013). The survival of liver-metastasized PDAC patients who underwent the simultaneous resections was similar to that of non-metastasized PDAC patients who

  9. Endoscopic biliary drainage for patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer with obstructive jaundice who are to undergo gemcitabine chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Takasawa, Osamu; Fujita, Naotaka; Kobayashi, Go; Noda, Yutaka; Ito, Kei; Horaguchi, Jun

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess optimum endoscopic biliary drainage (EBD) in cases with unresectable pancreatic cancer in the era of gemcitabine (GEM). METHODS: Thirty patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer, who presented with jaundice and underwent chemotherapy using GEM after EBD were included in this study (GEM group). Fifteen cases with the same clinical manifestation and stage of pancreatic cancer treated with EBD alone were also included as controls. A covered metallic stent (CMS) or a plastic stent (PS) was used for EBD. The mean survival time (MST) in each group, risk factors of survival time, type of stent used and associated survival time, occlusion rate of stent, patency period of stent, and risk factors of stent occlusion were evaluated. RESULTS: MST in the GEM group was longer than that in the control (9.9 mo vs 6.2 mo). In the GEM group, the survival time was not different between those who underwent metallic stenting and those who underwent plastic stenting. Stent occlusion occurred in 60% of the PS group and 7% of the CMS group. The median stent patency in the PS-GEM group and the CMS-GEM group was 5 mo and 7.5 mo, respectively. Use of a PS was the only risk factor of stent occlusion. CONCLUSION: A CMS is recommended in cases presenting with jaundice due to unresectable pancreatic cancer, since the use of a CMS makes it possible to continue chemotherapy using GEM without repetition of stent replacement. PMID:17143944

  10. Radiation therapy combined with Adriamycin or 5-fluorouracil for the treatment of locally unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. Gastrointestinal Tumor Study Group

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    One hundred fifty-seven patients with locally unresectable pancreatic carcinoma were randomly allocated to therapy with radiation and 5-fluorouracil or radiation and Adriamycin (doxorubicin). A total of 138 of 143 analyzable patients have died, and no differences in the relative survival impact of the treatments have been observed. Toxicity on the Adriamycin arm was more substantial and primarily attributable to Adriamycin chemotherapy after the completion of radiotherapy.

  11. Radiation Therapy With Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Klaudia U.; Feng, Felix Y.; Griffith, Kent A.; Francis, Isaac R.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Desai, Sameer; Murphy, James D.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: We completed a Phase I trial of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with previously untreated pancreatic cancer. The results of a subset of patients with unresectable disease who went on to receive planned additional therapy are reported here. Methods and Materials: All patients received two 28-day cycles of gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15) and oxaliplatin (40-85 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 15, per a dose-escalation schema). Radiation therapy was delivered concurrently with Cycle 1 (27 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions). At 9 weeks, patients were reassessed for resectability. Those deemed to have unresectable disease were offered a second round of treatment consisting of 2 cycles of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin and 27 Gy of radiation therapy (total, 54 Gy). Radiation was delivered to the gross tumor volume plus 1 cm by use of a three-dimensional conformal technique. We used the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events to assess acute toxicity. Late toxicity was scored per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Computed tomography scans were reviewed to determine pattern of failure, local response, and disease progression. Kaplan-Meier methodology and Cox regression models were used to evaluate survival and freedom from failure. Results: Thirty-two patients from the Phase I dose-escalation study had unresectable disease, three of whom had low-volume metastatic disease. Of this group, 16 patients went on to receive additional therapy to complete a total of 4 cycles of chemotherapy and 54 Gy of concurrent radiation. For this subset, 38% had at least a partial tumor response at a median of 3.2 months. Median survival was 11.8 months (range, 4.4-26.3 months). The 1-year freedom from local progression rate was 93.8% (95% confidence interval, 63.2-99.1). Conclusions: Radiation therapy to 54 Gy with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine and oxaliplatin is well tolerated and results in favorable rates of local tumor

  12. Concurrent Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Unresectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Impact of Adjuvant Chemotherapy on Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Ito, Yoshinori; Hirokawa, Naoki; Shibuya, Keiko; Kokubo, Masaki; Ogo, Etsuyo; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Saito, Tsutomu; Onishi, Hiroshi; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Nemoto, Kenji; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze results of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using gemcitabine (GEM) for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Records of 108 patients treated with concurrent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and GEM were reviewed. The median dose of EBRT in all 108 patients was 50.4 Gy (range, 3.6-60.8 Gy), usually administered in conventional fractionations (1.8-2 Gy/day). During radiotherapy, most patients received GEM at a dosage of 250 to 350 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously weekly for approximately 6 weeks. After CCRT, 59 patients (54.6%) were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy (AC), mainly with GEM. The median follow-up for all 108 patients was 11.0 months (range, 0.4-37.9 months). Results: Initial responses after CCRT for 85 patients were partial response: 26 patients, no change: 51 patients and progressive disease: 8 patients. Local progression was observed in 35 patients (32.4%), and the 2-year local control (LC) rate in all patients was 41.9%. Patients treated with total doses of 50 Gy or more had significantly more favorable LC rates (2-year LC rate, 42.9%) than patients treated with total doses of less than 50 Gy (2-year LC rate, 29.6%). Regional lymph node recurrence was found in only 1 patient, and none of the 57 patients with clinical N0 disease had regional lymph node recurrence. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate and the median survival time in all patients were 23.5% and 11.6 months, respectively. Patients treated with AC had significantly more favorable OS rates (2-year OS, 31.8%) than those treated without AC (2-year OS, 12.4%; p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, AC use and clinical T stage were significant prognostic factors for OS. Conclusions: CCRT using GEM yields a relatively favorable LC rate for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and CCRT with AC conferred a survival benefit compared to CCRT without AC.

  13. Capecitabine, Temozolomide and Bevacizumab for Metastatic or Unresectable Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-21

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  14. Interstitial iodine-125 implant in the management of unresectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, A.M.; Puthawala, A.A.; Neblett, D.L.

    1983-09-01

    Eighteen patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the head, body and tail of the pancreas were treated by a combination of biliary bypass, external and interstitial irradiation at Southern California Cancer Center of California Hospital Medical Center, Los Angeles, and Memorial Hospital Medical Center of Long Beach, Long Beach, CA, from July 31, 1975 to December 31, 1980. A dose of 3000 to 5000 rad was delivered to the pancreas and regional lymph nodes by external irradiation utilizing megavoltage units and 10,000 to 15,000 rad to the pancreas and metastatic lymph nodes by permanent Iodine-125 implants. In this group of 18 patients with unresectable carcinoma of the pancreas, excellent palliation of pain, jaundice and vomiting was achieved, with a median survival of 14 months.

  15. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the prediction of the fibrosis degree of the gland, the evaluation of patients with asymptomatic hyperenzimemia, the medical and surgical treatment of abdominal pain and the knowledge of the natural history of the autoimmune pancreatitis. In patients with indetermined EUS findings of chronic pancreatitis, a new endoscopic ultrasound examination in the follow-up is of help to confirm or to exclude the disease. Smoking, number of relapses, results of pancreatic function tests and EUS findings allow predicting the degree of pancreatic fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Antioxidant therapy has shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Development of intestinal bacterial overgrowth is frequent in patients with chronic pancreatitis, but its impact on symptoms is unknown and deserves further investigations. Finally, autoimmune pancreatitis relapses in about half of the patients with either type 1 or type 2 disease; relapses frequently occur within the first two years of follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of the disease, the pharmacological treatment of pain, and knowledge of the natural history of autoimmune pancreatitis. New evidence supports the relatively low prevalence of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, and the role of tobacco in triggering the etiopathogenic mechanisms of chronic pancreatitis is better understood. Some studies have identified certain factors that are associated with having a positive genetic test in adults with chronic idiopathic pancreatitis, which should help to select those patients who should undergo genetic studies. Antioxidant therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Finally, the development of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency is a very common finding during the long-term follow-up of patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. Smoking also seems to play a role in this type of pancreatitis.

  17. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Jain, Sanjay; Goldstein, Michael; Miksad, Rebecca; Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Brennan, Darren M.D.; Callery, Mark; Vollmer, Charles

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis. Conventional concurrent chemoradiotherapy requires 6 weeks of daily treatment and can be arduous. We explored the safety and effectiveness of a 3-day course of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) followed by gemcitabine in this population. Patients and Methods: A total of 36 patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with {>=}12 months of follow-up were included. They received three fractions of 8, 10, or 12 Gy (total dose, 24-36 Gy) of SBRT according to the tumor location in relation to the stomach and duodenum, using fiducial-based respiratory motion tracking on a robotic radiosurgery system. The patients were then offered gemcitabine for 6 months or until tolerance or disease progression. Results: With an overall median follow-up of 24 months (range, 12-33), the local control rate was 78%, the median overall survival time was 14.3 months, the median carbohydrate antigen 19-9-determined progression-free survival time was 7.9 months, and the median computed tomography-determined progression-free survival time was 9.6 months. Of the 36 patients, 28 (78%) eventually developed distant metastases. Six patients (17%) were free of progression at the last follow-up visit (range, 13-30 months) as determined by normalized tumor markers with stable computed tomography findings. Nine Grade 2 (25%) and five Grade 3 (14%) toxicities attributable to SBRT occurred. Conclusion: Hypofractionated SBRT can be delivered quickly and effectively in patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with acceptable side effects and minimal interference with gemcitabine chemotherapy.

  18. Randomised trial of gemcitabine versus flec regimen given intra-arterially for patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Cantore, M; Fiorentini, G; Luppi, G; Rosati, G; Caudana, R; Piazza, E; Comella, G; Ceravolo, C; Miserocchi, L; Mambrini, A; Del Freo, A; Zamagni, D; Aitini, E; Marangolo, M

    2003-12-01

    Gemcitabine is considered the golden standard treatment for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Intra-arte-rial drug administration had shown a deep rationale with some interesting results. In a multicenter phase III trial, we compared gemcitabine given weekly with a combination of 5-fluoruracil, leucovorin, epirubicin, carboplatin (FLEC) administered intra-arteriously as first-line therapy in unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients were randomly assigned to receive gemcitabine at a dose of 1,000 mg/m2 over 30 minutes intravenously weekly for 7 weeks, followed by 1 week of rest, then weekly for 3 weeks every 4 weeks or 5-fluoruracil 1,000 mg/m2, leucovorin 100 mg/m2, epirubicin 60 mg/m2, carboplatin 300 mg/m2 infused bolus intra-arteriously at three-weekly interval for 3 times. The primary end point was overall survival, while time to treatment failure, response rate, clinical benefit response were secondary endpoints. Sixty-seven patients were randomly allocated gemcitabine and 71 were allocated FLEC intra-arterially. Patients treated with FLEC lived for significantly longer than patients on gemcitabine (p=.036). Survival at 1 year was increased from 21% in the gemcitabine group to 35% in the FLEC group. Median survival was 7.9 months in the FLEC group and 5.8 months in the gemcitabine group. Median time to treatment failure was longer with FLEC (5.3 vs 4.2 months for FLEC vs gemcitabine respectively; p=.013). Clinical benefit was similar in both groups (17.9% for gemcitabine and 26.7% for FLEC; p=NS). CT-scan partial response was similar in both group (5.9% for gemcitabine and 14% for FLEC; p=NS). Toxicity profiles were different. Compared with gemcitabine, FLEC regimen given intra-arteriously, improved survival in patient with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  19. Outcomes of concurrent chemoradiotherapy versus chemotherapy alone for advanced-stage unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Il; Park, Joong-Won; Kim, Bo Hyun; Woo, Sang Myung; Kim, Tae Hyun; Koh, Young Hwan; Lee, Woo Jin; Kim, Chang-Min

    2013-12-21

    A standard treatment for unresectable advanced-stage intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCC) has not yet been established. Although neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) and liver transplantation are associated with long-term survival in select patients, the outcomes of CCRT for advanced-stage unresectable IHCC remain unclear. The aim of our study was to evaluate the outcomes of CCRT in patients with unresectable advanced-stage IHCC. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients with unresectable advanced stage (stage IVa or IVb) IHCC who were pathologically diagnosed and treated at National Cancer Center, Korea, from June 2001 to March 2012. Of the total of 92 patients, 25 (27.1%) received capecitabine plus cisplatin (XP) chemotherapy with external radiotherapy (RT) (XP-CCRT group) and 67 (72.8%) received XP chemotherapy alone (XP group). The clinical characteristics and outcomes of the 2 groups were compared. The 92 patients comprised 72 male and 20 female patients, with a median age of 58 years (range 26-78 years). The baseline clinical characteristics of the 2 groups were similar. Patients in the XP-CCRT group received a mean 44.7 Gy of RT and a mean 5.6 cycles of XP chemotherapy, whereas patients in the XP group received a mean 4.0 cycles. The disease control rate was higher in the XP-CCRT group than in the XP group, but the difference was not statistically significant (56.0% vs. 41.5%, p = 0.217). Although neutropenia was significantly more frequent in the XP-CCRT than in the XP group (48% vs. 9%, p < 0.001), the rates of other toxicities and > grade 3 toxicities did not differ. At a median follow-up of 5.3 months, PFS (4.3 vs. 1.9 months, p = 0.001) and OS (9.3 vs. 6.2 months, p = 0.048) were significantly longer in the XP-CCRT than in the XP group. XP-CCRT was well tolerated and was associated with longer PFS and OS than XP chemotherapy alone in patients with unresectable advanced IHCC. Controlled randomized

  20. [A case of curative resection after downsizing chemotherapy in initially unresectable locally advanced intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yu; Suzuki, Takayuki; Kato, Atsushi; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Furukawa, Katsunori; Takayashiki, Tsukasa; Kuboki, Satoshi; Takano, Shigetsugu; Okamura, Daiki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Sakai, Nozomu; Kagawa, Shingo; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2014-11-01

    This case report describes an 83-year-old man with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma who was referred by a local hospital. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed a large tumor in hepatic segments 4, 5, and 8 involving the right hepatic vein and inferior vena cava, which is normally indicative of an unresectable locally advanced tumor. After systemic chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin, the observed decrease in the level of tumor marker suggested that the cancer was responding to treatment, while radiological findings showed the main tumor shrunk without the presence of distant metastases. Thus, hepatic left trisectionectomy with bile duct resection was performed after portal vein embolization. Pathological examination revealed negative margins (R0). Eighteen months after surgery, the patient is free of disease and shows no signs of recurrence. An initially unresectable, locally advanced biliary tract cancer may be down sized by chemotherapy, which makes radical resection possible, at least in a proportion of patients. This approach provides longer survival and may have a potential for disease eradication as a new multidisciplinary approach for patients with unresectable locally advanced biliary tract cancer.

  1. Photodynamic therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandanayake, N. S.; Huggett, M. T.; Bown, S. G.; Pogue, B. W.; Hasan, T.; Pereira, S. P.

    2010-02-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma ranks as the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the USA. Patients usually present late with advanced disease, limiting attempted curative surgery to 10% of cases. Overall prognosis is poor with one-year survival rates of less than 10% with palliative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Given these dismal results, a minimally invasive treatment capable of local destruction of tumor tissue with low morbidity may have a place in the treatment of this disease. In this paper we review the preclinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) studies which have shown that it is possible to achieve a zone of necrosis in normal pancreas and implanted tumour tissue. Side effects of treatment and evidence of a potential survival advantage are discussed. We describe the only published clinical study of pancreatic interstitial PDT, which was carried out by our group (Bown et al Gut 2002), in 16 patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. All patients had evidence of tumor necrosis on follow-up imaging, with a median survival from diagnosis of 12.5 months. Finally, we outline a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin single fibre PDT followed by standard gemcitabine chemotherapy which our group is currently undertaking in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Randomized controlled studies are also planned.

  2. Factors that influence survival in unresectable metastatic or locally advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chao-Wen; King, Tai-Ming; Wang, Hsin-Tai; Wang, Jui-Ho

    2011-12-01

    Half of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) have metastasis during the whole course of the disease. Fewer than 10% of those are still alive at 5 years. Locally advanced CRC accounts for 7% to 33% of CRC relapses. Of these, only a small number of patients are resectable with a curative intent. Management of unresectable metastatic or locally advanced CRC is a significant challenge. In this study, we focus on patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic CRC and analyze survival rate and prognostic factors influencing the survival. There were 277 patients identified. Several clinicopathologic parameters were evaluated. To determine the prognostic impact of the factors in survival, all parameters were tested from their relationship in Cox-regression model and Cox proportional hazards model. Survival curves were generated according to Kaplan-Meier method and the differences in survival were determined by employing the log-rank test. Three factors that influence the survival were identified: one or more than two organs involved (p = 0.041), higher carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level (p = 0.001), and different salvage treatment (p < 0.001). In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, there were significant differences between patients with one and more than two organs involved (p = 0.027), different ranges of CEA level (p = 0.004), and different salvage treatment (p < 0.001). We clearly demonstrated three factors that influence the survival, including more than two organs involved, higher CEA level, and different salvage treatment. The higher the CEA level and the more organs (≥2) involved, the worse the survival. Even in patients with unresectable metastatic or locally advanced, aggressive treatment with target therapy seems to have survival benefit.

  3. Scoring of Prognostic Parameters in Patients with Unresectable Advanced or Recurrent Colorectal Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ikeguchi, Masahide; Shimoda, Ryugo; Yamamoto, Manabu; Maeta, Yoshihiko; Ashida, Keigo; Saito, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Background Suitable chemotherapy is needed to prolong the survival of patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. We scored the periodical changes of several prognostic markers during chemotherapy in patients with this type of cancer to discern the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Methods Twenty consecutive patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer were enrolled. All patients underwent combination chemotherapy with oxaliplatin or irinotecan plus 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin. Neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), serum C-reactive protein (CRP), serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and serum albumin (ALB) were compared between the two periods (before chemotherapy and 3 months after it was started) in each patient. The scoring system was as follows: points are added when a patient shows a decrease of NLR, CRP and CEA and an increase of ALB at 3 months after the start of chemotherapy with a possible final score of +4. On the other hand, points are reduced if a patient shows an elevation of NLR, CRP and CEA and a decrease of ALB at 3 months after the start of chemotherapy with a possible final score of −4. Results At 3 months after the start of first line chemotherapy, 13 patients showed positive scores but 7 patients showed zero or minus scores. According to our scoring system, we found the mean survival time (MST) of the 13 patients with plus scores was 34 months and this was significantly better than that of the 7 patients who showed zero or minus scores (P = 0.0008). Conclusion Our new scoring system is useful but when we find that first line chemotherapy is ineffective, we need to change it to second line chemotherapy as soon as possible. That may be the best treatment for patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. PMID:24179314

  4. Arterial complication of irreversible electroporation procedure for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Yahya; Tezcaner, Tugan; Aydın, Hüseyin Onur; Boyvat, Fatih; Moray, Gökhan

    2016-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a non-thermal ablation technique used especially in locally advanced pancreatic carcinomas that are considered surgically unresectable. We present the first case of acute superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion secondary to pancreatic IRE procedure that has not been reported before in the literature. A 66-year-old man underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. IRE procedure was applied to the patient during laparotomy under general anesthesia. After finishing the procedure, an acute intestinal ischemia was detected. A conventional vascular angiography was performed and a metallic stent was successfully placed to the SMA and blood flow was maintained. It is important to be careful in such cases of tumor involvement of SMA when evaluating for IRE procedure of pancreatic tumor. PMID:27795815

  5. [A Case of Successful Curative Resection Following Downsizing Chemotherapy in Initially Unresectable Locally Advanced Gallbladder Carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Shinmura, Kazuyasu; Kaiho, Takashi; Yanagisawa, Shinji; Okamoto, Ryo; Nishimura, Masaki; Kobayashi, Soichi; Okaniwa, Akira; Mun, Yangi; Tsuchiya, Shunichi; Chiba, Ryoji

    2015-11-01

    A 58-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with high fever and right upper abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a bulky tumor of the gallbladder with liver invasion, metastases to para-aortic lymph nodes, and extensive infiltration to Glisson's sheath. The tumor was initially considered to be unresectable locally advanced gallbladder carcinoma with inflammation, and she received 6 courses of chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus cisplatin. Subsequently, the inflammation was extinguished, and CT showed the main tumor shrunk and the Glisson's sheath infiltration disappeared; however, a liver metastasis existed in segment 5. Thus, S4a plus S5 hepatic segmentectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection and regional and para-aortic lymphadenectomy was performed. The pathological diagnosis was pT3a, pN1, pM1 (Hep, LYM), fStage ⅣB. Curative resection was then performed. If selected according to their response to downsizing chemotherapy, conversion therapy might therefore be an effective multidisciplinary treatment for patients with initially unresectable locally advanced gallbladder carcinoma.

  6. Definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Yoo-Kang; Lee, Jong Hoon; Lee, Myung-Ah; Chun, Hoo-Geun; Kim, Dong-Goo; You, Young Kyoung; Hong, Tae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Survival outcome of locally advanced pancreatic cancer has been poor and little is known about prognostic factors of the disease, especially in locally advanced cases treated with concurrent chemoradiation. This study was to analyze overall survival and prognostic factors of patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Materials and Methods Medical records of 34 patients diagnosed with unresectable pancreatic cancer and treated with definitive CCRT, from December 2003 to December 2012, were reviewed. Median prescribed radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 41.4 to 55.8 Gy), once daily, five times per week, 1.8 to 3 Gy per fraction. Results With a mean follow-up of 10 months (range, 0 to 49 months), median overall survival was 9 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 40% and 10%, respectively. Median and mean time to progression were 5 and 7 months, respectively. Prognostic parameters related to overall survival were post-CCRT CA19-9 (p = 0.02), the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) status (p < 0.01), and radiation dose (p = 0.04) according to univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, post-CCRT CA19-9 value below 180 U/mL and ECOG status 0 or 1 were statistically significant independent prognostic factors associated with improved overall survival (p < 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). Conclusion Overall treatment results in locally advanced pancreatic cancer are relatively poor and few improvements have been accomplished in the past decades. Post-treatment CA19-9 below 180 U/mL and ECOG performance status 0 and 1 were significantly associated with an improved overall survival. PMID:25061572

  7. Resection versus other treatments for locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Kumar, Senthil; Davidson, Brian R; Fusai, Giuseppe

    2014-02-27

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive cancer. Resection of the cancer is the only treatment with the potential to achieve long-term survival. However, a third of patients with pancreatic cancer have locally advanced cancer involving adjacent structures such as blood vessels which are not usually removed because of fear of increased complications after surgery. Such patients often receive palliative treatment. Resection of the pancreas along with the involved vessels is an alternative to palliative treatment for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. To compare the benefits and harms of surgical resection versus palliative treatment in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 12), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, and trial registers until February 2014. We included randomised controlled trials comparing pancreatic resection versus palliative treatments for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (irrespective of language or publication status). Two authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and independently extracted the data. We analysed the data with both the fixed-effect and random-effects models using Review Manager (RevMan). We calculated the hazard ratio (HR), risk ratio (RR) or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on an intention-to-treat analysis. We identified two trials comparing pancreatic resection versus other treatments for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Ninety eight patients were randomised to pancreatic resection (n = 47) or palliative treatment (n = 51) in the two trials included in this review. Both trials were at high risk of bias. Both trials included patients who had locally advanced pancreatic cancer which involved the serosa anteriorly or retroperitoneum posteriorly or involved the blood vessels. Such pancreatic cancers would be considered

  8. Phase I Study of Conformal Radiotherapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine With Erlotinib for Unresected Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, John M.; Margolis, Jeffrey; Jury, Robert P.; Balaraman, Savitha; Cotant, Matthew B.; Ballouz, Samer; Boxwala, Iqbal G.; Jaiyesimi, Ishmael A.; Nadeau, Laura; Hardy-Carlson, Maria; Marvin, Kimberly S.; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the recommended dose of radiotherapy when combined with full-dose gemcitabine and erlotinib for unresected pancreas cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresected pancreatic cancer (Zubrod performance status 0-2) were eligible for the present study. Gemcitabine was given weekly for 7 weeks (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) with erlotinib daily for 8 weeks (100 mg). A final toxicity assessment was performed in Week 9. Radiotherapy (starting at 30 Gy in 2-Gy fractions, 5 d/wk) was given to the gross tumor plus a 1-cm margin starting with the first dose of gemcitabine. A standard 3 plus 3 dose escalation (an additional 4 Gy within 2 days for each dose level) was used, except for the starting dose level, which was scheduled to contain 6 patients. In general, Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal toxicity was considered a dose-limiting toxicity, except for Grade 3 anorexia or Grade 3 fatigue alone. Results: A total of 20 patients were treated (10 men and 10 women). Nausea, vomiting, and infection were significantly associated with the radiation dose (p = .01, p = .03, and p = .03, respectively). Of the 20 patients, 5 did not complete treatment and were not evaluable for dose-escalation purposes (3 who developed progressive disease during treatment and 2 who electively discontinued it). Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in none of 6 patients at 30 Gy, 2 of 6 at 34 Gy, and 1 of 3 patients at 38 Gy. Conclusion: The results of the present study have indicated that the recommended Phase II dose is 30 Gy in 15 fractions.

  9. Radiotherapy of unresectable pancreatic carcinoma: a six year experience with 104 patients. [/sup 125/I; Betatron

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, R.; Dobelbower, R.R.; Mohiuddin, M.; Rosato, F.E.; Weiss, S.M.

    1981-12-01

    From 1974 to 1980, 104 patients with unresectable carcinoma of the pancreas were seen in the Department of Radiation Therapy at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Sixty-six patients were accepted for definitive therapy. Of these, 48 patients received precision high dose radiotherapy to a dose of 6800 rad on the 45 MeV Betatron, using either photons alone or mixed photon and high energy electron beams. Eighty-nine percent of the patients completed treatment as per the protocol. Relief of symptoms was obtained in 65% of patients. Median survival was 10 months. In spite of the high doses employed, 67% of the patients had evidence of recurrent tumor in the treatment volume at the time of death. In view of the high incidence of local failure with precision high dose therapy alone, a protocol using Iodine-125 implantation to supplement the external beam therapy was developed in 1978. Since then, 18 patients with disease confined to the region of the pancreas were treated with the combination of Iodine-125 implantation and precision high dose therapy. Eighty-five percent of the patients completed treatment. Follow-up ranges from eight to 22 months. None of the patients completing the treatment protocol have developed local recurrence of tumor. These results are presented together with details of the treatment technique, normal tissue reactions and implications for future approaches to the treatment of localized unresectable cancer of the pancreas.

  10. Radiotherapy of unresectable pancreatic carcinoma: a six year experience with 104 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, R.; Dobelbower, R.R.; Mohiuddin, M.; Rosato, F.E.; Weiss, S.M.

    1981-12-01

    From 1974 to 1980, 104 patients with unresectable carcinoma of the pancreas were seen in the Department of Radiation Therapy at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Sixty-six patients were accepted for definitive therapy. Of these, 48 patients received precision high dose radiotherapy to a dose of 6800 rad on the 45 MeV Betatron, using either photons alone or mixed photon and high energy electron beams. Eighty-nine percent of the patients completed treatment as per the protocol. Relief of symptoms was obtained in 65% of patients. Median survival was 10 months. In spite of the high doses employed, 67% of the patients had evidence of recurrent tumor in the treatment volume at the time of death. In view of the high incidence of local failure with precision high dose therapy alone, a protocol using Iodine-125 implantation to supplement the external beam therapy was developed in 1978. Since then, 18 patients with disease confined to the region of the pancreas were treated with the combination of Iodine-125 implantation and precision high dose therapy. Eighty-five percent of the patients completed treatment. Follow-up ranges from eight to 22 months. None of the patients completing the treatment protocol have developed local recurrence of tumor. These results are presented together with details of the treatment technique, normal tissue reactions and implications for future approaches to the treatment of localized unresectable cancer of the pancreas.

  11. Latest advances in pancreatic tumours.

    PubMed

    Lariño Noia, José

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer continues to have a bleak prognosis. Hardly any therapeutic advances have been made in the last few years and consequently most efforts have focused on preventing its development and on diagnosing precursor lesions. In this regard, the use of statins as a preventive factor and the implementation of screening programmes in high-risk patients are gaining ground. In the field of treatment, there is greater focus on the role of neoadjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer and on a multimodal approach to the disease, with few advances in effective novel therapies. Most studies concerned cystic tumours of the pancreas, especially intraductal mucinous papillary tumour, with its known potential for malignant transformation. Multiple studies were devoted to validation of the 2012 Fukuoka international guidelines and the highly controversial 2015 AGA guidelines. Notable among these studies were those demonstrating the suboptimal positive predictive value and questioning important aspects of the guidelines, such as discontinuation of follow-up or the criteria for surgical referral. Notable among diagnostic procedures were cystoscopy and endoscopic ultrasound-guided needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy as the most promising techniques due to their high efficacy and negative predictive value in detecting mucinous cystic lesions. There were also a large number of studies on the natural history of intraductal papillary mucinous tumours, which help deepen knowledge of these entities and the search for predictive factors of cancer development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Defect in assimilation following combined radiation and chemotherapy in patients with locally unresectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Barkin, J.S.; Kalser, M.H.; Thomsen, S.; Redlhammer, D.

    1982-11-15

    The relative contributions of high-dose irradiation and/or chemotherapy to the nutritional problems of patients with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma were evaluated by study of pancreatic exocrine function and jejunal function and morphologic findings in ten patients before and after treatment. Nutrient assimilation studies included determination of serum carotene levels, D-xylose absorption and fat absorption. Crosby capsule biopsy specimen of jejunal mucosa were evaluated with light microscopy. Fat assimilation was the only parameter of nutritional function to significantly worsen after therapy. Low serum carotene levels present in the patients before therapy remained low but did not significantly change after treatment. D-xylose absorption and the morphologic structure of the jejunal mucosa were normal before and after treatment. These findings support the previous observations that the nutritional problems of the patient with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma are due to pancreatic insufficiency and that high dose irradiation and chemotherapy can exacerbate the pancreatic insufficiency but do not produce jejunal dysfunction. Therefore, it is suggested that pancreatic exocrine replacement therapy may improve the nutritional status of these patients.

  13. Estimating Optimal Dose of Twice-Weekly Gemcitabine for Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma: Mature Results of GEMRT-01 Phase I Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Girard, Nicolas; Mornex, Francoise; Bossard, Nadine; Ychou, Marc; Chauffert, Bruno; Wautot, Virginie

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To accurately determine the maximal tolerated dose, feasibility, and antitumor activity of concurrent chemoradiotherapy including twice-weekly gemcitabine in patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with histologically proven adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were included in this Phase I trial. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 50 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy with twice-weekly gemcitabine was administered during the 5 weeks of radiotherapy, from an initial dose of 30 mg/m{sup 2}. The gemcitabine doses were escalated in 10-mg/m{sup 2} increments in a three-plus-three design, until dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Results: A total of 35 patients were included in the trial. The feasibility of chemoradiotherapy was high, because all the patients received the planned total radiation dose, and 26 patients (74%) received {>=}70% of the planned chemotherapy dose. The mean total delivered dose of gemcitabine was 417 mg/m{sup 2} (i.e., 77% of the prescribed dose). The maximal tolerated dose of twice-weekly gemcitabine was 70 mg/m{sup 2}. Of the 35 patients, 13 had a partial response (37%) and 21 had stable disease (60%). Overall, the median survival and the 6-, 12-, and 18-month survival rates were 10.6 months and 82%, 31%, and 11%, respectively. Survival was significantly longer in patients with an initial performance status of 0 or 1 (p = .004). Conclusion: Our mature data have indicated that gemcitabine doses can be increased {<=}70 mg/m{sup 2}, when delivered twice-weekly with concurrent radiotherapy. This combination shows promises to achieve better recurrence-free and overall survival. These results will serve as a basis for further implementation of the multimodal treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

  14. Systematic review of minimally invasive ablation treatment for locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Lucchina, Natalie; Petrillo, Mario; Floridi, Chiara; Piacentino, Filippo; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Fonio, Paolo; Fontana, Federico; Fugazzola, Carlo; Brunese, Luca; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2014-07-01

    Unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer with or without metastatic disease is associated with a very poor prognosis. Ablation techniques are based on direct application of chemical, thermal, or electrical energy to a tumor, which leads to cellular necrosis. Initial studies about ablation therapies of the pancreas were associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which limited widespread adoption. Modifications to the various applications, in particular combining the techniques with high-quality imaging and intra-operative approach has enabled real-time treatment monitoring and significant improvements in safety. Inoperable cases of pancreatic cancer have been treated by various ablation techniques in the last few years with promising results. The purpose of this review is to present the current status of local ablative therapies in the treatment of pancreatic advanced tumor.

  15. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3–5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15–28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection. PMID:27029741

  16. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Crane, Christopher H

    2016-08-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3-5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15-28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  17. Novel agents for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akinleye, Akintunde; Iragavarapu, Chaitanya; Furqan, Muhammad; Cang, Shundong; Liu, Delong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is relatively insensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Therefore, novel agents targeting dysregulated pathways (MAPK/ERK, EGFR, TGF-β, HEDGEHOG, NOTCH, IGF, PARP, PI3K/AKT, RAS, and Src) are being explored in clinical trials as monotherapy or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. This review summarizes the most recent advances with the targeted therapies in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26369833

  18. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Pretreatment Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 Level Indicates Tumor Response, Early Distant Metastasis, Overall Survival, and Therapeutic Selection in Localized and Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Tae; Lee, Woo Jin; Woo, Sang Myung; Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae; Moon, Sung Ho; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Sang Soo; Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Joong-Won

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The use of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer has been disputed because of high probability of distant metastasis. Thus, we analyzed the effect of clinical parameters on tumor response, early distant metastasis within 3 months (DM{sup 3m}), and overall survival to identify an indicator for selecting patients who would benefit from CRT. Methods and Materials: This study retrospectively analyzed the data from 84 patients with localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer who underwent CRT between August 2002 and October 2009. Sex, age, tumor size, histological differentiation, N classification, pre- and post-treatment carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 level, and CA 19-9 percent decrease were analyzed to identify risk factors associated with tumor response, DM{sup 3m}, and overall survival. Results: For all 84 patients, the median survival time was 12.5 months (range, 2-31.9 months), objective response (complete response or partial response) to CRT was observed in 28 patients (33.3%), and DM{sup 3m} occurred in 24 patients (28.6%). Multivariate analysis showed that pretreatment CA 19-9 level ({<=}400 vs. >400 U/ml) was significantly associated with tumor response (45.1% vs. 15.2%), DM{sup 3m} (19.6% vs. 42.4%), and median overall survival time (15.1 vs. 9.7 months) (p < 0.05 for all three parameters). Conclusion: For patients with localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer, pretreatment CA 19-9 level could be helpful in predicting tumor response, DM{sup 3m}, and overall survival and identifying patients who will benefit from CRT.

  20. Electrochemotherapy for the Treatment of Unresectable Locoregionally Advanced Cutaneous Melanoma: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Aguado-Romeo, M J; Benot-López, S; Romero-Tabares, A

    2017-03-01

    Electrochemotherapy is a therapeutic option for the treatment of cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases from melanoma and other tumors. The procedure consists of the administration of anticancer drugs followed by locally applied electrical impulses to achieve an effect known as electroporation, which facilitates entry into the cytosol of drugs that cannot cross the cell membrane. The aim of this review is to evaluate the evidence that supports the use of electrochemotherapy as a therapeutic strategy in melanoma. We conducted a qualitative systematic review of the literature using advanced searches of bibliographic databases and full text reviews. Seven studies (3 systematic reviews and 4 cases series) were selected. The quality of the evidence was not good, but the coincidence of results for certain variables supports their consistency. Results of the meta-analyses favored electrochemotherapy over chemotherapy. Electrochemotherapy appears to be an effective procedure for the local treatment of malignant tumor nodules (evidence of intermediate or low quality). This inexpensive method is simple to apply, well tolerated, and achieves objective responses under certain circumstances. There is no evidence that electrochemotherapy alters the natural course of the disease and it should therefore be considered a palliative treatment. With an evidence level of 1- (minus), electrochemotherapy can be recommended for the palliative treatment of unresectable, locoregionally advanced melanoma (grade B recommendation). Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Phase I study of a chloroquine-gemcitabine combination in patients with metastatic or unresectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Samaras, Panagiotis; Tusup, Marina; Nguyen-Kim, Thi Dan Linh; Seifert, Burkhardt; Bachmann, Helga; von Moos, Roger; Knuth, Alexander; Pascolo, Steve

    2017-10-04

    Following a previously published pre-clinical validation, this phase I study evaluated the safety, maximum tolerated dose, anti-tumour activity and immune status of a gemcitabine-chloroquine combination as a first- or late-line treatment in patients with metastatic or unresectable pancreatic cancer. In this 3 + 3 dose escalation study, patients received a single weekly standard dose of intravenous gemcitabine, followed by single weekly oral intake of 100, 200 or 300 mg of chloroquine. Tumour response was assessed using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors version 1.1. Immune status was evaluated by RT-PCR to measure the relative expression of immune-related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Overall, nine patients [median age 72 years; interquartile range (IQR), 68-78 years] were treated. No dose-limiting toxicities as defined in the protocol were observed. Three patients experienced partial response, and two patients had stable disease. The median time to progression was 4 months (95% CI 0.8-7.2), and the median overall survival was 7.6 months (95% CI 5.3-9.9). Among 86 assayed immune genes, three were significantly differentially expressed in PBMCs from responding versus non-responding patients: interferon-gamma receptor-1, toll-like receptor 2, and beta-2 microglobulin. The addition of chloroquine to gemcitabine was well tolerated and showed promising effects on the clinical response to the anti-cancer chemotherapy. Based on these initial results, the efficacy of the gemcitabine-chloroquine combination should be further assessed.

  2. Cost-effectiveness of sorafenib versus SBRT for unresectable advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Leung, Henry W C; Liu, Chung-Feng; Chan, Agnes L F

    2016-05-18

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been shown to improve overall survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. This study aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of SBRT compared to sorafenib which is the only drug for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. A Markov decision-analytic model was performed to compare the cost-effectiveness of SBRT and sorafenib for unresectable advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Patients transitioned between three health states: stable disease, progression disease and death. We calculated the data on cost from the perspective of our National Health Insurance Bureau. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to determine the impact of several variables. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) for sorafenib compared to SBRT was NT$3,788,238 per quality-adjusted life year gained (cost/QALY), which was higher than the willingness to pay threshold of Taiwan according to WHO's guideline. One-way sensitivity analysis revealed that the utility of progression disease for the sorafenib treatment, utility of progression free survival for SBRT, utility of progression free survival for sorafenib, utility of PFS to progression disease for SBRT and transition probability of progression disease to dead for SBRT were the most sensitive parameters in all cost scenarios. The Monte-Carlo simulation demonstrated that the probability of cost-effectiveness at a willingness to pay threshold of NT$ 2,213,145 per QALY was 100 % and 0 % chance for SBRT and sorafenib. This study indicated that SBRT for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma is cost-effective at a willingness to pay threshold as defined by WHO guideline in Taiwan.

  3. Advances in Hereditary Colorectal and Pancreatic Cancers.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Meghan L; Germansky, Katharine A; Yurgelun, Matthew B

    2016-07-01

    Innovations in genetic medicine have led to improvements in the early detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer for patients with inherited risks of gastrointestinal cancer, particularly hereditary colorectal cancer and hereditary pancreatic cancer. This review provides an update on recent data and key advances that have improved the identification, understanding, and management of patients with hereditary colorectal cancer and hereditary pancreatic cancer. This review details recent and emerging data that highlight the developing landscape of genetics in hereditary colorectal and pancreatic cancer risk. A summary is provided of the current state-of-the-art practices for identifying, evaluating, and managing patients with suspected hereditary colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer risk. The impact of next-generation sequencing technologies in the clinical diagnosis of hereditary gastrointestinal cancer and also in discovery efforts of new genes linked to familial cancer risk are discussed. Emerging targeted therapies that may play a particularly important role in the treatment of patients with hereditary forms of colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer are also reviewed. Current approaches for pancreatic cancer screening and the psychosocial impact of such procedures are also detailed. Given the availability of new diagnostic, risk-reducing, and therapeutic strategies that exist for patients with hereditary risk of colorectal or pancreatic cancer, it is imperative that clinicians be vigilant about evaluating patients for hereditary cancer syndromes. Continuing to advance genetics research in hereditary gastrointestinal cancers will allow for more progress to be made in personalized medicine and prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Efficacy of gemcitabine for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: comparison with 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tada, Minoru; Arizumi, Toshihiko; Arizumi, Masatoshi; Nakai, Yousuke; Sasaki, Takashi; Kogure, Hirofumi; Togawa, Osamu; Matsubara, Saburo; Tsujino, Takeshi; Hirano, Kenji; Sasahira, Naoki; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Kawabe, Takao; Omata, Masao

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of gemcitabine alone has not been established in comparison with conventional chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Of 180 consecutive patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer, 93 were locally advanced. Among these 93 patients, 45 were treated with gemcitabine, 18 with concurrent radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy, and 30 received best supportive care (BSC). In cases of metastatic disease, 42 were treated with gemcitabine and 32 received BSC. Overall survival and adverse events were analyzed retrospectively. Median survival time and 1-year survival rate were 11.6, 9.3, 6.7, 7.8 and 2.4 months and 47, 39, 27, 21 and 7% in the groups of gemcitabine, chemoradiotherapy, BSC of locally advanced cancer, and in those of gemcitabine, BSC of metastatic disease, respectively. Gemcitabine and chemoradiotherapy prolonged overall survival time compared with BSC (p = 0.0071). No significant difference in survival was observed between gemcitabine and chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cases. Adverse events >grade 3 were observed in 25 of 87 (29%) of gemcitabine-treated and in 3 of 18 (17%) of chemoradiotherapy-treated patients. Gemcitabine monotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer could be as effective as previous chemoradiotherapy. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hart, Phil A; Zen, Yoh; Chari, Suresh T

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a form of chronic pancreatitis that is characterized clinically by frequent presentation with obstructive jaundice, histologically by a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with fibrosis, and therapeutically by a dramatic response to corticosteroid therapy. Two distinct diseases, type 1 and type 2 AIP, share these features. However, these 2 diseases have unique pancreatic histopathologic patterns and differ significantly in their demographic profiles, clinical presentation, and natural history. Recognizing the popular and long-standing association of the term "AIP" with what is now called "type 1 AIP," we suggest using "AIP" solely for type 1 AIP and to acknowledge its own distinct disease status by using "idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis" (IDCP) for type 2 AIP. AIP is the pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). The etiopathogenesis of AIP and IgG4-RD is largely unknown. However, the remarkable effectiveness of B-cell depletion therapy with rituximab in patients with AIP and IgG4-RD highlights the crucial role of B cells in its pathogenesis. IDCP is less commonly recognized, and little is known about its pathogenesis. IDCP has no biomarker but is associated with inflammatory bowel disease in ~25% of patients. Recently, the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP identified combinations of features that are diagnostic of both diseases. Both AIP and IDCP are corticosteroid responsive; however, relapses are common in AIP and rare in IDCP. Therefore, maintenance therapy with either an immunomodulator (eg, azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, or mycophenolate mofetil) or rituximab is often necessary for patients with AIP. Long-term survival is excellent for both patients with AIP and patients with IDCP.

  6. Systemic Therapies for Advanced Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Nitya; Reidy-Lagunes, Diane

    2016-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are a rare tumor type, and comprise 1-2% of all pancreatic neoplasms. When nonfunctional (i.e. nonhormone secreting), these tumors generally cause few symptoms and often go unnoticed for several years; for this reason, they are rarely localized at presentation, and are typically diagnosed in the presence of metastatic disease, most commonly to the liver. Although pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors can be less aggressive than other tumor types, the management poses a significant challenge because of the heterogeneous clinical presentations and varying degrees of aggressiveness. The therapy of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors includes a multimodality approach and can often include surgery, liver-directed therapies (i.e. embolization), as well as targeted and cytotoxic systemic treatments. A variety of systemic therapies have been developed for the management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. These therapies include somatostatin analogs (octreotide or lanreotide), a select group of cytotoxic chemotherapy agents (alkylating, fluorouracil and platinum drugs), as well as targeted or biologic agents (everolimus and sunitinib). This chapter will review the available systemic therapy options for advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:26614372

  7. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2012-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases could be a risk factor for acute pancreatitis (AP), specifically hypertension and ischemic heart disease. Smoking is associated with AP (OR 2.34), with the association being less marked than with chronic pancreatitis. Moreover, smoking may worsen the prognosis of AP. The bedside index for severity in AP (BISAP) prognostic system has a similar ability to predict mortality to the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) index and is much simpler to calculate. Magnetic resonance imaging is a safe technique (it does not radiate the patient) and is useful in the diagnosis of complications, severity prediction and clinical decision making. Peripancreatic venous thrombosis is frequent in AP and is rarely associated with gastric variceal bleeding or mesenteric ischemia. The treatment of organized pancreatic necrosis by combined endoscopic and percutaneous drainage is safe and effective, avoiding the need for surgery. Aggressive fluid therapy does not seem to improve the outcome of patients with AP. The administration of early enteral nutrition in mild-moderate AP reduces abdominal pain and the risk of intolerance of oral refeeding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Capecitabine and radiation therapy preceded and followed by combination chemotherapy in advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Bryan J.; McGinn, Cornelius J.; Chang, Alfred E.; Colletti, Lisa M.; Normolle, Daniel P.; Hejna, Gwen F. P.A.; Zalupski, Mark M. . E-mail: Zalupski@umich.edu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the tolerance and toxicity of radiation therapy (RT) and capecitabine in patients with advanced, unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. To control micrometastatic disease, combination chemotherapy (gemcitabine and cisplatin) before and after combined modality therapy (CMT) was planned. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer were eligible. Gemcitabine 1000 mg/m{sup 2} and cisplatin 35 mg/m{sup 2} were administered on Days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle for two cycles. RT was then given to a dose of 50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions. Patients were treated with capecitabine 1330 mg/m{sup 2} daily during RT. After CMT, two additional cycles of gemcitabine and cisplatin completed the treatment. Results: Twenty-three patients were treated. Eighteen patients completed CMT. One patient was removed from study during CMT for toxicity issues. Treatment delays and dose reductions were common during the final two cycles of gemcitabine and cisplatin as a result of myelosuppression. Median survival was 10.1 months (95% confidence interval [CI] = 7.6, 13.7) for all 23 patients and 12.8 months (95% CI = 8.2, 18.9) for 18 patients without metastasis. Conclusion: Combined modality therapy with RT and capecitabine was well tolerated. Chemotherapy after CMT was difficult to complete owing to cumulative myelosuppression. Survival, response, and toxicity were comparable to infusional 5-fluorouracil and RT.

  9. Sorafenib Tosylate and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Unresectable, or Metastatic Gallbladder Cancer or Cholangiocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Extrahepatic Bile Duct Adenocarcinoma; Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma; Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma With Squamous Metaplasia; Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Gallbladder Carcinoma; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma

  10. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2013-10-01

    The present article analyzes the main presentations on acute pancreatitis (AP) in Digestive Disease Week 2013. Perfusion computed tomography allows early diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin predicts the development of acute renal failure, severe AP and death. Factors associated with greater fluid sequestration in AP are alcoholic etiology, an elevated hematocrit, and the presence of criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome; fluid sequestration is associated with a worse outcome. True pseudocysts (fluid collections without necrosis for more than 4 weeks) are a highly infrequent complication in AP. Patients with necrotic collections have a poor prognosis, especially if associated with infection. A meta-analysis on fluid therapy suggests that early aggressive fluid administration is associated with higher mortality and more frequent respiratory complications. According to a meta-analysis, enteral nutrition initiated within 24 hours of admission improves the outcome of AP compared with later initiation of enteral nutrition. Pentoxifylline could be a promising alternative in AP; a double-blind randomized study showed that this drug reduced the length of hospital and intensive care unit stay, as well as the need for intensive care unit admission. The association of octreotide and celecoxib seems to reduce the frequency of organ damage compared with octreotide alone. Mild AP can be managed in the ambulatory setting through hospital-at-home units after a short, 24-hour admission.

  11. A phase II study of concomitant boost radiation plus concurrent weekly cisplatin for locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Medina, José Antonio; Rueda, Antonio; de Pasos, Antonio Sacchetti; Contreras, Jorge; Cobo, Manuel; Moreno, Paloma; Benavides, Manuel; Villanueva, Asunción; Alba, Emilio

    2006-04-01

    This phase II study evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of weekly cisplatin along with concomitant boost accelerated radiation regimen in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinoma. A total of 94 patients (median age, 58 years) with UICC stage III (n = 19) and IV (n = 75) cancer of the oropharynx, larynx, hypopharynx and oral cavity were included. Patients received radiotherapy with a concomitant boost scheme (1.8 Gy on days 1-40 and 1.5 Gy boost on days 25-40 with a total dose of 72 Gy) and concurrent cisplatin, 40 mg/m(2) weekly, for the first 4 weeks. Most patients (95%) received both radiation and chemotherapy according to protocol. Toxicity was manageable with grade III mucositis and pharyngeal-oesophageal toxicity in 85 and 50% of patients, respectively. Haematological toxicity was mild. Four patients (4%) died due to complications. With a median follow of 41 months, median overall survival and time to progression were 27 and 25 months, respectively. The estimated overall survival at 4 years was 41%. Concomitant boost accelerated radiation plus concurrent weekly cisplatin is a feasible schedule in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinoma, with acceptable toxicity and survival data.

  12. Denosumab in advanced/unresectable giant-cell tumour of bone (GCTB): For how long?

    PubMed

    Palmerini, E; Chawla, N S; Ferrari, S; Sudan, M; Picci, P; Marchesi, E; Leopardi, M Piccinni; Syed, I; Sankhala, K K; Parthasarathy, P; Mendanha, W E; Pierini, M; Paioli, A; Chawla, S P

    2017-05-01

    Giant-cell tumours of bone (GCTB) are RANK/RANK-ligand (RANKL) positive, aggressive and progressive osteolytic tumours. Denosumab, a RANKL inhibitor, was FDA-approved for adults and skeletally mature adolescents with unresectable GCTB or when surgical resection is likely to result in severe morbidity. Data on long-term toxicity and activity of denosumab monthly 'GCTB-schedule' (120 mg per 12/year, 1440 mg total dose/year) are lacking. Patients with GCTB receiving denosumab, 120 mg on days 1, 8, 15, 29 and every 4 weeks thereafter, from 2006 to 2015 treated in two centres were included. Long-term toxicity was evaluated. Ninety-seven patients were identified. 43 patients underwent resection of the tumour with a median time on denosumab treatment of 12 months (range 6-45 months). Fifty-four patients had unresectable GCTB's (male/female 23/31, median age 35 years [range: 13-76 years], 26% presented with lung metastases, 31% had primary tumor located to the spine, 63% were relapsed after previous surgery) with a median time on denosumab of 54 months (9-115 months). In the unresectable GCTB group, tumour control and clinical benefits were observed in all patients undergoing denosumab, whereas 40% of patients discontinuing denosumab had tumour progression after a median of 8 months (range 7-15 months). Overall, six (6%) patients developed osteonecrosis of jaw (ONJ): 1/43 (2%) in the resectable group, 5/54 (9%) in the unresectable group, with a 5-year ONJ-free survival of 92% (95% CI 84-100). Only patients with prolonged treatment experienced mild peripheral neuropathy (6/54, 11%), skin rash (5/54, 9%), hypophosphataemia (2/54, 4%) and atypical femoral fracture (2/54, 4%). Prolonged treatment with denosumab has sustained activity in GCTB, with a mild toxicity profile. The dose-dependent toxicity observed recommends a careful and strict monitoring of patients who need prolonged treatment. Decreased dose-intensity schedules should be further explored in unresectable

  13. Tumor size as measured at initial X-ray examination, not length of bile duct stricture, predicts survival in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Forssell, Henrik; Pröh, Katrin; Wester, Michael; Krona, Hans

    2012-09-25

    The survival of unresectable pancreatic cancer patients is extremely poor. The aim of this study was to examine if tumor size could predict survival length in order to optimize patient care. A retrospective observational study was performed on 185 consecutive patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer (ICD10: C250-2 and C258) who were diagnosed from 2003 to May 2010. The patients' initial radiographs at presentation of symptoms were reviewed by the same radiologist, and tumor extent was determined. The largest tumor diameter of the primary tumor was measured in 132 patients, 22 by an ultrasound and the other patients by a CT scan. In 53 patients, the tumor size could not be delimited and measured. Seventy-five patients (41%) had liver metastases at presentation of symptoms. Median survival for the entire patient group was only 119 days. The median diameter of the patient's largest tumor was 4.35 cm, while the sample groups ranged from 1.2 to 14 cm. Patients were divided into two groups: those with a largest tumor diameter of ≤ 4.3 cm (66 patients) and those with a largest tumor diameter of > 4.3 cm (66 patients). Median survival for these groups was 149 and 94 days (p = 0.019), respectively. Cox regression showed a hazard ratio for tumor size of 1.48 (95% CI 1.02, 2.07) (p = 0.038), adjusted for the gemcitabine treatment which had been given to 49 patients and the presence of liver metastasis. In 88 patients, stricture length could be measured at ERCP. When comparing stricture lengths of ≤ 2 cm and > 2 cm, no difference in survival time was noted within a Kaplan-Meier analysis. The size of the maximum tumor diameter of the primary tumor during the initial X-ray examination of patients with pancreatic cancer may predict survival time for those patients who had no surgical resection. Stricture length at ERCP gave no information on survival.

  14. Clinical features and response to systemic therapy in a historical cohort of advanced or unresectable mucosal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Shoushtari, Alexander N; Bluth, Mark J; Goldman, Debra A; Bitas, Christiana; Lefkowitz, Robert A; Postow, Michael A; Munhoz, Rodrigo R; Buchar, Gauri; Hester, Robert H; Romero, Jacqueline A; Fitzpatrick, Laura J; Weiser, Martin R; Panageas, Katherine S; Wolchok, Jedd D; Chapman, Paul B; Carvajal, Richard D

    2017-02-01

    There are very few data available regarding the pattern of first metastases in resected mucosal melanomas (MMs) as well as the response of advanced MM to cytotoxic therapy. A retrospective, single-institution cohort was assembled of all patients with advanced/unresectable MM between 1995 and 2012 who had received systemic therapy with available imaging (N=81). Responses to first-line and second-line systemic therapy were assessed using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1. The relationship between response, overall survival, and clinical covariates was investigated using Cox proportional hazards regression. Primary sites included anorectal (N=31, 38%), vulvovaginal (N=28, 35%), head and neck (N=21, 26%), and gallbladder (N=1, 1%) mucosa. Seven percent of patients had their first relapse in the brain. Cytotoxic therapy represented 82 and 51% of first-line and second-line regimens. The best response achieved in the first-line setting was similar for single-agent [10%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1-32%] and combination alkylator therapy (8%; 95% CI: 2-21%). Median overall survival from first-line treatment was 10.3 months (95% CI: 8.7-13.9 months). Patients with elevated lactic dehydrogenase [hazard ratio (HR): 1.87, 95% CI: 1.10-3.19, P=0.020] and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 1-2 (HR: 1.69, 95% CI: 1.05-2.72, P=0.030) had a higher risk of death, whereas patients with 12-week objective responses had a lower risk of death (HR: 0.12, 95% CI: 0.04-0.41, P<0.001). Cytotoxic systemic therapy has modest activity in advanced/unresectable MM, belying its adjuvant benefit. Patients whose tumors have an objective response to therapy have a lower probability of death. Brain imaging should be considered in routine surveillance.

  15. Safety and feasibility of Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer: results of a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Paiella, Salvatore; Butturini, Giovanni; Frigerio, Isabella; Salvia, Roberto; Armatura, Giulia; Bacchion, Matilde; Fontana, Martina; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Martone, Enrico; Bassi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the safety of the NanoKnife Low Energy Direct Current (LEDC) System (Irreversible Electroporation, IRE) in order to treat patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Prospective, nonrandomized, single-center clinical evaluation of ten patients with a cytohystological diagnosis of unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) that was no further responsive to standard treatments. The primary outcome was the rate of procedure-related abdominal complications. The secondary endpoints included the evaluation of the short-term efficacy of IRE through the evaluation of tumor reduction at imaging and biological tumor response as shown by CA 19-9, clinical assessments and patient quality of life. Ten patients (5 males, 5 females) were enrolled, with a median age of 66 and median tumor size of 30 mm. All patients were treated successfully with a median procedure time of 79.5 min. Two procedure-related complications were described in one patient (10%): a pancreatic abscess with a pancreoduodenal fistula. Three patients had early progression of disease: one patient developed pulmonary metastases 30 days post-IRE and two patients had liver metastases 60 days after the procedure. We registered an overall survival of 7.5 months (range: 2.9-15.9). IRE is a safe procedure in patients with LAPC and may represent a new technological option in the treatment and multimodality management of this disease. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Radiotherapy Technical Considerations in the Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: American-French Consensus Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Huguet, Florence; Goodman, Karyn A.; Azria, David; Racadot, Severine; Abrams, Ross A.

    2012-08-01

    Summary: Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose

  17. Phase II study of plitidepsin 3-hour infusion every 2 weeks in patients with unresectable advanced medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Baudin, Eric; Droz, Jean P; Paz-Ares, Luis; van Oosterom, Allan T; Cullell-Young, Martin; Schlumberger, Martin

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the antitumor response, time-to-event efficacy endpoints and toxicity of plitidepsin (Aplidin) 5 mg/m as a 3-hour intravenous (i.v.) infusion every 2 weeks in patients with unresectable advanced medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Sixteen patients with MTC and disease progression or large tumor burden received plitidepsin. Tumor response and time-related parameters were evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Secondary efficacy endpoints were marker response (calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen), clinical benefit and quality of life. Safety was assessed using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria. A total of 141 cycles (median, 9 per patient; range, 1-24) were administered. No complete responses or partial responses (PR) were found, and 12 patients had stable disease for >8 weeks. Median follow-up was 15.0 months. Median time to progression was 5.3 months. Median overall survival could not be calculated, but 86.7% and 66.0% of patients were alive at 6 and 12 months. Marker response included 1 unconfirmed PR and 2 stabilizations for calcitonin, and 1 unconfirmed PR and 4 stabilizations for calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen. One patient showed clinical benefit. Quality of life scores generally decreased during the study. Most treatment-related adverse events were mild or moderate. Grade 3 lymphopenia was the only severe hematological toxicity found (2 patients). Severe nonhematological toxicities were grade 3 creatine phosphokinase increase (2 patients, with no myalgia or muscular weakness) and transient grade 3 alanine aminotransferase increase (5 patients). Single-agent plitidepsin given as 3-hour i.v. infusions every 2 weeks was generally well tolerated but showed limited clinical activity in patients with unresectable advanced MTC.

  18. Risk Factors for Esophageal Fistula Associated With Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Unresectable Esophageal Cancer: A Supplementary Analysis of JCOG0303.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Takahiro; Mizusawa, Junki; Sudo, Kazuki; Honma, Yoshitaka; Kato, Ken; Igaki, Hiroyasu; Tsubosa, Yasuhiro; Shinoda, Masayuki; Nakamura, Kenichi; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2016-05-01

    Esophageal fistula is a critical adverse event in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced esophageal cancer. However, risk factors associated with esophageal fistula formation in patients receiving CRT have not yet been elucidated.We retrospectively analyzed data obtained from 140 patients who were enrolled in a phase II/III trial comparing low-dose cisplatin with standard-dose cisplatin administered in combination with 5-flurouracil and concomitant radiotherapy. Inclusion criteria were performance status (PS) 0 to 2 and histologically proven thoracic esophageal cancer clinically diagnosed as T4 and/or unresectable lymph node metastasis for which definitive CRT was applicable. Risk factors for esophageal fistula were examined with univariate analysis using Fisher exact test and multivariate analysis using logistic regression models.Esophageal fistula was observed in 31 patients (22%). Of these, 6 patients developed fistula during CRT. Median time interval between the date of CRT initiation and that of fistula diagnosis was 100 days (inter quartile range, 45-171). Esophageal stenosis was the only significant risk factor for esophageal fistula formation both in univariate (P = 0.026) and in multivariate analyses (odds ratio, 2.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-5.92, P = 0.025). Other clinicopathological factors, namely treatment arm, age, sex, PS, primary tumor location, T stage, lymph node invasion to adjacent organs, blood cell count, albumin level, and body mass index, were not risk factors fistula formation.Esophageal stenosis was a significant risk factor for esophageal fistula formation in patients treated with CRT for unresectable locally advanced thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

  19. Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Unresectable Liver or Biliary Tract Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-08

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  20. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Herman, Joseph; Schulick, Rich; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patients’ management have also taken place. Evidence is beginning to show that screening first-degree relatives of individuals with several family members affected by pancreatic cancer can identify non-invasive precursors of this malignant disease. The incidence of and number of deaths caused by pancreatic tumours have been gradually rising, even as incidence and mortality of other common cancers have been declining. Despite developments in detection and management of pancreatic cancer, only about 4% of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localised to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Unfortunately, 80–85% of patients present with advanced unresectable disease. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer responds poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, we need to understand the biological mechanisms that contribute to development and progression of pancreatic tumours. In this Seminar we will discuss the most common and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:21620466

  1. Efficacy of nimotuzumab plus gemcitabine usage as first-line treatment in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Su, Dan; Jiao, Shun-Chang; Wang, Li-Jie; Shi, Wei-Wei; Long, Yan-Yan; Li, Juan; Bai, Li

    2014-03-01

    Advanced pancreatic cancer patients have poor prognosis and scarcely respond to conventional therapies. Clinical trials support the use of molecular-targeted therapy against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the contribution of a monoclonal antibody against EGFR, nimotuzumab, to standard gemcitabine therapy. Patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were assigned to receive gemcitabine plus nimotuzumab. The primary end point was overall survival, whereas the secondary end points included progression-free survival, objective response, and adverse side effects. A total of 18 eligible patients were accrued between December 2007 and July 2010. The disease control rate, calculated as the sum of complete response, partial response, and stable disease, was 55.6%. The median overall survival time was 9.29 months (95% CI, 5.499 to 13.072). The median progression-free survival was 3.71 months (95% CI, 2.526 to 4.902), and the 1-year survival rate was 38.9%. Of all the patients, 88.8% had at least one adverse side effect; however, no grade 4 adverse side effect was reported. Nimotuzumab as a high-purity humanized monoclonal antibody with favorable safety profile, its value in the treatment of pancreatic cancer along with gemcitabine, particularly in the comprehensive treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer, is appealing for further prospective randomized large-scale clinical trials.

  2. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy treatment of pancreatic stones complicated with advanced stage autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kanai, Keita; Oguchi, Takaya; Asano, Jumpei; Ito, Tetsuya; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Arakura, Norikazu; Uehara, Takeshi; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2015-03-10

    Although most patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) respond favorably to prednisolone therapy, some individuals who later suffer from pancreatic calculi may require additional extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) treatment. This study compares the efficacy of ESWL for calculi in AIP with that in ordinary chronic pancreatitis (CP) and proposes a new treatment approach for pancreatic duct stones occurring in AIP. We examined the clinical records of 8 patients with chronic stage AIP and 92 patients with ordinary CP who received ESWL for pancreatic calculi. The AIP group was significantly older than the CP group (69.0 vs. 56.5 years, P = 0.018). With regard to the indications for ESWL, chronic pain was significantly less frequent in the chronic stage AIP group (0% vs. 45.7%, P = 0.001), whereas preservation of pancreatic function was significantly more frequent (75% vs. 19.6%, P = 0.001). Compared with the CP group, the AIP group tended to exhibit pancreatic duct stenosis proximal to pancreatic calculi and had a lower rate of complete extraction of stones from the main pancreatic duct. Histopathological analysis of a patient with chronic stage AIP revealed widely distributed nodular pancreatitis, which was characteristic of ordinary CP, along with isolated areas of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis. Different approaches are needed for the treatment of pancreatic calculi in chronic stage AIP and ordinary CP. Specifically, it appears that intensive ESWL therapy can be avoided or delayed in AIP if the patient displays: (1) advanced age, (2) little or no chronic pain or pancreatitis, and (3) pancreatic duct stenosis proximal to pancreatic stones. In such cases, the benefit of ESWL treatment may be outweighed by the risks involved in this procedure.

  3. A Single-institution Experience with Open Irreversible Electroporation for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Li; Chen, Yong-Liang; Su, Ming; Liu, Tian; Xu, Kai; Liang, Feng; Gu, Wan-Qing; Lu, Shi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC) is characterized by poor prognosis despite recommended concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Irreversible electroporation (IRE) has emerged as a potential option for the management of unresectable pancreatic cancer. This study was conducted to evaluate the safety and short-term efficacy of open IRE for the treatment of LAPC. Methods: Retrospective data of 25 consecutive patients receiving IRE for T3 lesions from July 2015 to June 2016 at a single center were analyzed. The perioperative and long-term IRE-related complications were reviewed to evaluate the safety of the procedure. The tumor reduction and biological response were analyzed through computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging; the serum level of CA19-9 was measured as a secondary endpoint to evaluate the short-term efficacy of IRE. Results: All patients were successfully treated; the median tumor size was 4.2 cm and the median IRE time was 36 min. Four intraoperative procedure-related complications were observed (16%): two transient hypertensive episodes, one hypotension case, and one transient supraventricular tachycardia case. Nine postoperative complications were described, including three Grade A pancreatic fistulas, three delayed gastric emptying, one acute pancreatitis, one upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and one portal vein thrombosis. The overall rate of stable disease was 28%, 36% achieved partial response, and lower serum CA19-9 levels were recorded in all patients at discharge. Conclusions: IRE is feasible for the treatment of LAPC and is a reasonable intervention strategy owing to its combined attributes of safety and efficacy. PMID:27958223

  4. Escalated radiation dose alone vs. concurrent chemoradiation for locally advanced and unresectable rectal cancers: results from phase II randomized study.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Reena; Mohandas, K M; Shukla, P J; Shrikhande, S V; Mahantshetty, U; Chopra, S; Goel, M; Mehta, S; Patil, P; Ramadwar, M; Deodhar, K; Arya, S; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2013-07-01

    This trial was undertaken to compare the rates of resectability between patients treated with neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation vs. boosted radiotherapy alone. Patients with clinically unresectable rectal cancer were randomized to receive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to pelvis (45 Gy) with concurrent oral Capecitabine (CRT group; Arm 1) or EBRT to pelvis (45 Gy) alone followed by 20 Gy dose of localized radiotherapy boost to the primary tumor site (RT with boost group, Arm 2). All patients were assessed for resectability after 6 weeks by clinical examination and by CT scan and those deemed resectable underwent surgery. A total of 90 patients were randomized, 46 to Arm 1 and 44 to Arm 2. Eighty seven patients (44 in Arm 1 and 41 in Arm 2) completed the prescribed treatment protocol. Overall resectability rate was low in both the groups; R0 resection was achieved in 20 (43 %) patients in Arm 1 vs. 15 (34 %) in Arm 2. Adverse factors that significantly affected the resectability rate in both the groups were extension of tumor to pelvic bones and signet ring cell pathology. Complete pathological response was seen in 7 and 11 %, respectively. There was greater morbidity such as wound infection and delayed wound healing in Arm 2 (16 vs. 40 %; p = 0.03). Escalated radiation dose without chemotherapy does not achieve higher complete (R0) tumor resectability in locally advanced inoperable rectal cancers, compared to concurrent chemoradiation.

  5. Treatment of pancreatic insufficiency using pancreatic extract in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: a pilot study (PICNIC).

    PubMed

    Zdenkowski, Nicholas; Radvan, George; Pugliese, Leanna; Charlton, Julie; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Fraser, Allison; Bonaventura, Antonino

    2017-06-01

    Survival with advanced pancreatic cancer is less than 12 months. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency may contribute to pancreatic cancer-related cachexia, via nutrient malabsorption. We aimed to determine the feasibility of prescribing pancreatic extract (Creon®) for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, without frank malabsorption, were randomised in this feasibility study to pancreatic extract 50,000 units with meals and 25,000 units with snacks, or placebo. Standardised dietary advice was given. Anti-cancer and supportive care treatments were permitted. Outcomes included weight, body mass index (BMI), quality of life (QLQC30, PAN26), survival and nutritional assessment (PG-SGA). Eighteen patients were randomised before study closure due to slow recruitment. Baseline characteristics were well matched. Weight loss prior to randomisation was numerically greater in the pancreatic extract group (mean 0.7 vs 2.2 kg). Weight loss was numerically greater in the placebo group, however not significantly. No differences in BMI or nutrition score were seen. Quality of life did not differ between study groups. Median overall survival was 17 (95% CI 8.1-48.7) weeks in the control group, and 67.6 (95% CI 14.1-98.4) weeks in the pancreatic extract group (p = 0.1063). Only 17% (18/106) of potentially eligible patients were recruited, related to patient/family reluctance, rapid clinical deterioration and patients already prescribed pancreatic extract. A moderate pill burden was noted. Despite intriguing survival results, this study was not sufficiently feasible to proceed to a fully powered comparative study. A multi-centre study would be required to exclude a significant difference in outcomes.

  6. Is there a standard of care for the management of advanced pancreatic cancer?. Highlights from the Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium. Orlando, FL, USA. January 25-27, 2008.

    PubMed

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2008-03-08

    Despite advances in our understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of pancreatic cancer, the outcome for this disease remains dismal. Gemcitabine, the standard chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer, offers modest improvement of tumor-related symptoms and marginal advantage of survival. Many chemotherapeutic and targeted agents have been pitted against or combined with gemcitabine in randomized phase III trials and no drug was shown to be superior to single-agent gemcitabine except two gemcitabine-containing combinations: capecitabine plus gemcitabine vs. gemcitabine and erlotinib. In this article, the author debates: "Is there a standard of care for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer?". In addition, he summarizes the key studies presented at the "Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium" held in Orlando, FL, USA on January 25-27, 2008. The studies discussed here include the following: i) a phase I study of a chemotherapy doublet gemcitabine plus capecitabine, combined with a biologic doublet (bevacizumab plus erlotinib) in patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma (abstract #141); ii) a phase II study of gemcitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib in locally advanced and metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (abstract #151); iii) final results of the multicenter phase II study on gemcitabine, capecitabine, and bevacizumab in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (abstract #198); iv) interim results from a phase II study of volociximab in combination with gemcitabine in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer (abstract #142); v) a pilot study of combination chemotherapy with S-1 and irinotecan for advanced pancreatic cancer (abstract #155); vi) a multicenter phase II study of gemcitabine and S-1 combination chemotherapy in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer (abstract #212); vii) a phase I/II study of PHY906 plus capecitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma (abstract #260); and viii) the final results of a phase II trial of

  7. Pathological Complete Response and Long-Term Survival in a Very Elderly Patient after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced, Unresectable Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Mitsuyoshi; Mori, Hirohito; Ebara, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    We address the pathological complete response and long-term survival of elderly patients after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced, unresectable gastric cancer. An 83-year-old man was hospitalized for upper abdominal pain. Gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a large tumor spanning from the gastric angle to the antrum, and extending to the duodenum. Histological analysis of the biopsy specimen revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Computed tomography images showed thickening of the gastric wall and invasion of the body and head of the pancreas, but did not show distant metastases. The patient was diagnosed with unresectable gastric cancer, and was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy using S-1 (80 mg/m2) and paclitaxel (60 mg/m2). After the third course of chemotherapy, gastrointestinal endoscopy and abdominal computed tomography revealed a remarkable reduction in tumor size. This reduction allowed distal gastrectomy to be conducted. Histological examination of the specimen revealed no cancer cells in the primary lesion or lymph nodes. The patient was treated with adjuvant chemotherapy of oral tegafur-uracil (300 mg/day) for one year after surgery. He lived for five years after surgery without recurrence. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy using S-1 and paclitaxel is a potent strategy for improving survival in very elderly patients with unresectable gastric cancer. PMID:25298899

  8. Pilot study with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin for advanced or unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schmidinger, M; Wenzel, C; Locker, G J; Muehlbacher, F; Steininger, R; Gnant, M; Crevenna, R; Budinsky, A C

    2001-01-01

    We performed a pilot-study on pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Seventeen patients received 40 mg/m2 PLD intravenously every 4 weeks. A clinical benefit response was achieved in 50% (complete remission 7%, minor remission 7%, stable disease 36%). Toxicities were moderate. In view of these encouraging findings, further studies appear warranted. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747325

  9. Role of gastric bypass in patients with unresectable advanced carcinoma of stomach.

    PubMed

    Maturu, Nagarjuna V; Pai, Dinker R; Prasad, Vishnu N R

    2008-12-01

    Role of bypass as a palliative surgery for advanced gastric cancer remains controversial. To determine the role of bypass in advanced gastric cancer in comparision to resection as gold standard. Hospital-based retrospective outcome as study. Patients were divided into three groups: group I (gastric resection), group II (bypass) and group III (exploratory laparotomy alone). The three groups were analysed for palliation of symptoms, operative morbidity and mortality and survival. Chi-square, Fischer, One-way Anova, Unpaired-t, Kaplan-Meier analysis. In-hospital morbidity was 19.38% (19 patients) for the entire study group. Bypass group had a lower morbidity rate as compared to the resection group (p=0.029). In-hospital mortality rate was 6.12% (6 patients) for the entire study group. Mortality rates did not differ between the groups. Patient satisfaction with palliation of symptoms was similar between gastric bypass and resection. Gastric resection group had significantly better survival (p=0.002) compared to the nonresective procedures. However, gastric bypass did not confer any survival benefit over exploratory laparotomy (p=0.501). Gastric bypass can be done when resection is not possible as it palliates symptoms on par with resection and is associated with low operative morbidity though it does not improve the survival outlook of patients.

  10. Advances in diagnosis, treatment and palliation of pancreatic carcinoma: 1990-2010

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Chakshu; Eltawil, Karim M; Renfrew, Paul D; Walsh, Mark J; Molinari, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Several advances in genetics, diagnosis and palliation of pancreatic cancer (PC) have occurred in the last decades. A multidisciplinary approach to this disease is therefore recommended. PC is relatively common as it is the fourth leading cause of cancer related mortality. Most patients present with obstructive jaundice, epigastric or back pain, weight loss and anorexia. Despite improvements in diagnostic modalities, the majority of cases are still detected in advanced stages. The only curative treatment for PC remains surgical resection. No more than 20% of patients are candidates for surgery at the time of diagnosis and survival remains quite poor as adjuvant therapies are not very effective. A small percentage of patients with borderline non-resectable PC might benefit from neo-adjuvant chemoradiation therapy enabling them to undergo resection; however, randomized controlled studies are needed to prove the benefits of this strategy. Patients with unresectable PC benefit from palliative interventions such as biliary decompression and celiac plexus block. Further clinical trials to evaluate new chemo and radiation protocols as well as identification of genetic markers for PC are needed to improve the overall survival of patients affected by PC, as the current overall 5-year survival rate of patients affected by PC is still less than 5%. The aim of this article is to review the most recent high quality literature on this topic. PMID:21412497

  11. Efficacy of preoperative chemotherapy regimens in patients with initially unresectable locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma: capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX) or with epirubicin (EOX)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhuang, Rong-yuan; Yu, Yi-yi; Yu, Shan; Hou, Jun; Ji, Yuan; Sun, Yi-hong; Shen, Kun-tang; Shen, Zhen-bin; Liu, Feng-lin; Zhao, Nai-qing; Liu, Tian-shu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the effectiveness of EOX (capecitabine, oxaliplatin and epirubicin) compared with XELOX (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) as preoperative chemotherapy for initially unresectable locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods This is a prospective observational study. Patients with unresectable locally advanced gastric cancer were performed EOX regimen or XELOX regimen at the discretion of the investigators. They were assessed for response every 2 cycles by CT (computed tomography) scan. A multidisciplinary team reassessed resectability after 4 cycles. The primary endpoint was the response rate. Secondary end points included the R0 resection rate, survival and adverse events. Results From November 2008 to May 2015, 242 patients were enrolled; 112 of them were assigned to EOX regimen and 130 to XELOX regimen. The response rates were 33.0% and 33.8% respectively in EOX group and XELOX group (P = 0.997). After 4 cycles of chemotherapy, 63 patients (56.3%) in EOX group and 81 patients (62.3%) in XELOX group received radical operation (P = 0.408). There was no significant difference in progress-free survival (PFS, 12.0m vs. 15.4m, P = 0.925) and overall survival (OS, 25.7m vs. 29.0m, P = 0.783) in two groups. In addition, more adverse effects occurred in EOX group, such as more leucopenia (22.3% vs. 10.0%, P = 0.014), neutropenia (23.2% vs. 11.5%, P = 0.025), fatigue (11.6% vs. 3.8%, P = 0.041) and vomiting (10.7% vs. 2.3%, P = 0.015). Conclusions For unresectable locally advanced gastric cancer patients, XELOX regimen showed similar effects in response rate, radical resection rate and survival benefits, but with less toxicity effects. PMID:27602586

  12. Advanced endoscopic ultrasound management techniques for preneoplastic pancreatic cystic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Hafiz Muhammad Sharjeel; Bharmal, Sheila; Duman, Deniz Guney; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Turner, Brian G

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions can be benign, premalignant or malignant. The recent increase in detection and tremendous clinical variability of pancreatic cysts has presented a significant therapeutic challenge to physicians. Mucinous cystic neoplasms are of particular interest given their known malignant potential. This review article provides a brief but comprehensive review of premalignant pancreatic cystic lesions with advanced endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) management approaches. A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed, Cochrane, OVID and EMBASE databases. Preneoplastic pancreatic cystic lesions include mucinous cystadenoma and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. The 2012 International Sendai Guidelines guide physicians in their management of pancreatic cystic lesions. Some of the advanced EUS management techniques include ethanol ablation, chemotherapeutic (paclitaxel) ablation, radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy. In future, EUS-guided injections of drug-eluting beads and neodymium:yttrium aluminum agent laser ablation is predicted to be an integral part of EUS-guided management techniques. In summary, International Sendai Consensus Guidelines should be used to make a decision regarding management of pancreatic cystic lesions. Advanced EUS techniques are proving extremely beneficial in management, especially in those patients who are at high surgical risk. PMID:27574295

  13. A Phase I, Dose-Finding Study of Sorafenib in Combination with Gemcitabine and Radiation Therapy in Patients with Unresectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Grupo Español Multidisciplinario en Cáncer Digestivo (GEMCAD) Study

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Jorge; García-Mora, Carmen; Martín, Marta; Petriz, Ma Lourdes; Feliu, Jaime; Sánchez-Santos, Ma Elena; Ayuso, Juan Ramón; Fuster, David; Conill, Carlos; Maurel, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Sorafenib, an oral inhibitor of B-raf, VEGFR2, and PDGFR2-beta, acts against pancreatic cancer in preclinical models. Due to the radio-sensitization activity of both sorafenib and gemcitabine, we designed a multicenter, phase I trial to evaluate the safety profile and the recommended dose of this combination used with concomitant radiation therapy. Methods Patients with biopsy-proven, unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma (based on vascular invasion detected by computed tomography) were treated with gemcitabine (300 mg/m2 i.v. weekly ×5 weeks) concurrently with radiation therapy (45 Gy in 25 fractions) and sorafenib (escalated doses in a 3+3 design, from 200 to 800 mg/day). Radiation portals included the primary tumor but not the regional lymph nodes. Patients with planning target volumes (PTV) over 500 cc were excluded. Cases not progressing during chemoradiation were allowed to continue with sorafenib until disease progression. Results Twelve patients were included. Three patients received 200 mg/day, 6 received 400 mg/day, and 3 received 800 mg/day; PTVs ranged from 105 to 500 cc. No dose-limiting toxicities occurred. The most common grade 2 toxicities were fatigue, neutropenia, nausea, and raised serum transaminases. Treatment was discontinued in one patient because of a reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy. There were no treatment-related deaths. Conclusion The addition of sorafenib to concurrent gemcitabine and radiation therapy showed a favorable safety profile in unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. A dose of 800 mg/day is recommended for phase II evaluation. Trial Registration EudraCT 2007-003211-31 ClinicalTrials.gov 00789763 PMID:24416138

  14. A phase I, dose-finding study of sorafenib in combination with gemcitabine and radiation therapy in patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a Grupo Español Multidisciplinario en Cáncer Digestivo (GEMCAD) study.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Jorge; García-Mora, Carmen; Martín, Marta; Petriz, Ma Lourdes; Feliu, Jaime; Sánchez-Santos, Ma Elena; Ayuso, Juan Ramón; Fuster, David; Conill, Carlos; Maurel, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Sorafenib, an oral inhibitor of B-raf, VEGFR2, and PDGFR2-beta, acts against pancreatic cancer in preclinical models. Due to the radio-sensitization activity of both sorafenib and gemcitabine, we designed a multicenter, phase I trial to evaluate the safety profile and the recommended dose of this combination used with concomitant radiation therapy. Patients with biopsy-proven, unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma (based on vascular invasion detected by computed tomography) were treated with gemcitabine (300 mg/m2 i.v. weekly ×5 weeks) concurrently with radiation therapy (45 Gy in 25 fractions) and sorafenib (escalated doses in a 3+3 design, from 200 to 800 mg/day). Radiation portals included the primary tumor but not the regional lymph nodes. Patients with planning target volumes (PTV) over 500 cc were excluded. Cases not progressing during chemoradiation were allowed to continue with sorafenib until disease progression. Twelve patients were included. Three patients received 200 mg/day, 6 received 400 mg/day, and 3 received 800 mg/day; PTVs ranged from 105 to 500 cc. No dose-limiting toxicities occurred. The most common grade 2 toxicities were fatigue, neutropenia, nausea, and raised serum transaminases. Treatment was discontinued in one patient because of a reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy. There were no treatment-related deaths. The addition of sorafenib to concurrent gemcitabine and radiation therapy showed a favorable safety profile in unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. A dose of 800 mg/day is recommended for phase II evaluation. EudraCT 2007-003211-31 ClinicalTrials.gov 00789763.

  15. Afatinib Dimaleate and Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Pancreatic Cancer or Biliary Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-04

    Advanced Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Bile Duct Carcinoma; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer

  16. Nanovector-based therapies in advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chang-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Systemic therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer has been largely disappointing owing to the unfavorable pharmacokinetic profile and poor penetration of current chemotherapeutic agents ,as well as the fragile patient population with compromised tolerance to toxic chemotherapies. Nanovectors can provide passive drug delivery through abnormal tumor neo-vasculature microanatomy or active targeting via binding to receptors or macromolecules associated with the tumor. In such a manner, nanovector-based therapy may not only modulate the pharmacokinetics and therapeutic index of chemotherapeutic agents but also provide new treatment options in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. In this article, we present the rationale and currently available clinical results of nanovector-based therapies to highlight the potential use of this class of agent in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:22811849

  17. [A case of unresectable advanced gastric cancer responding remarkably to combined chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and low-dose cisplatin].

    PubMed

    Yasumoto, K; Iwamoto, M; Hoshiko, M; Kawabata, S; Fujii, T; Morimatsu, M; Takeda, J; Kakegawa, T

    1995-11-01

    A 62-year-old male patient complaining epigastralgia was diagnosed as having Borrmann type 2 gastric concer (por). The primary lesion was unresectable, so the patient was treated by combined chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and low-dose cisplatin for 4 weeks, which resulted in the disappearance of primary tumor and a remarkable reduction of metastatic lymph nodes. The patient has a good quality of life without any sign of recurrence now.

  18. A Phase II Trial of Cetuximab, Gemcitabine, 5-Fluorouracil, and Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Nonmetastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Piperdi, Bilal; Bathini, Venu; Walsh, William V.; Yunus, Shakeeb; Tseng, Jennifer F.; Whalen, Giles F.; Wassef, Wahid Y.; Kadish, Sidney P.; FitzGerald, Thomas J.; Mikule, Christine; Wang, Yuxia; Grossman, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. A minority of patients present with localized disease and surgical resection still offers patients the only hope for long-term survival. Locally advanced pancreatic cancer is defined as surgically unresectable, but has no evidence of distant metastases. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cetuximab in combination with gemcitabine and 5-FU along with radiation therapy in locally advanced non-resectable, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, using progression free survival as the primary end point. METHODS: This was a prospective, single arm, open label pilot phase II study to evaluate the anti-tumor activity of gemcitabine (200 mg/m2 per week) and cetuximab (250 mg/m2 per week after an initial 400 mg/m2 loading dose) with continuous infusion 5-FU (800 mg/m2 over 96 hours) and daily concurrent external beam radiation therapy (50.4 Gy total dose) for six weeks (cycle 1) in patients with non-metastatic, locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Following neoadjuvant treatment, subjects were re-evaluated for response and surgical candidacy with restaging scans. After resection, or also if not resected; subjects received further therapy with four 28-day cycles (cycles 2-5) of weekly gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) and cetuximab (250 mg/m2) on days 1, 8, and 15. RESULTS: Between 2006 and 2011, twenty-six patients were screened and eleven of them were enrolled in the study. Most common reasons for screen failures were having resectable disease, metastatic disease or co-morbidity. Ten patients were able to tolerate and complete cycle 1 of chemoradiotherapy. One patient stopped the study prematurely due to grade III diarrhea. All except this one patient received planned radiation therapy. The response evaluation after cycle 1 showed one Partial Response, eight Stable Disease and two Progressive Disease. Four patients subsequently underwent surgical

  19. Phase I study of safety and pharmacokinetics of the anti-MUC16 antibody-drug conjugate DMUC5754A in patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer or unresectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, J F; Moore, K N; Birrer, M J; Berlin, S; Matulonis, U A; Infante, J R; Wolpin, B; Poon, K A; Firestein, R; Xu, J; Kahn, R; Wang, Y; Wood, K; Darbonne, W C; Lackner, M R; Kelley, S K; Lu, X; Choi, Y J; Maslyar, D; Humke, E W; Burris, H A

    2016-11-01

    MUC16 is a tumor-specific antigen overexpressed in ovarian (OC) and pancreatic (PC) cancers. The antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), DMUC5754A, contains the humanized anti-MUC16 monoclonal antibody conjugated to the microtubule-disrupting agent, monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE). This phase I study evaluated safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics of DMUC5754A given every 3 weeks (Q3W, 0.3-3.2 mg/kg) or weekly (Q1W, 0.8-1.6 mg/kg) to patients with advanced recurrent platinum-resistant OC or unresectable PC. Biomarker studies were also undertaken. Patients (66 OC, 11 PC) were treated with DMUC5754A (54 Q3W, 23 Q1W). Common related adverse events (AEs) in >20% of patients (all grades) over all dose levels were fatigue, peripheral neuropathy, nausea, decreased appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, alopecia, and pyrexia in Q3W patents, and nausea, vomiting, anemia, fatigue, neutropenia, alopecia, decreased appetite, diarrhea, and hypomagnesemia in Q1W patients. Grade ≥3-related AE in ≥5% of patients included neutropenia (9%) and fatigue (7%) in Q3W patients, and neutropenia (17%), diarrhea (9%), and hyponatremia (9%) in Q1W patients. Plasma antibody-conjugated MMAE (acMMAE) and serum total antibody exhibited non-linear PK across tested doses. Minimal accumulation of acMMAE, total antibody, or unconjugated MMAE was observed. Confirmed responses (1 CR, 6 PRs) occurred in OC patients whose tumors were MUC16-positive by IHC (2+ or 3+). Two OC patients had unconfirmed PRs; six OC patients had stable disease lasting >6 months. For CA125, a cut-off of ≥70% reduction was more suitable for monitoring treatment response due to the binding and clearance of serum CA125 by MUC16 ADC. We identified circulating HE4 as a potential novel surrogate biomarker for monitoring treatment response of MUC16 ADC and other anti-MUC16 therapies in OC. DMUC5754A has an acceptable safety profile and evidence of anti-tumor activity in patients with MUC16-expressing tumors. Objective responses were

  20. Locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma: are we making progress?. Highlights from the "2011 ASCO Annual Meeting". Chicago, IL, USA; June 3-7, 2011.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Ng, John; Allendorf, John; Saif, Muhammad W

    2011-07-08

    Pancreatic cancer, as the 4th leading cause of cancer death in the U.S., remains a challenging disease for all oncologists. Less than 20% of all cases could be potentially cured by surgical resection, while the majority of cases are deemed either unresectable or metastatic upon diagnosis. In this year's American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, several studies were presented with novel approaches towards treating locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The LAP-07 study, a large phase III study with two separate randomizations, updated their accrual status, but with no interim data yet reported (Abstract #e14619). A single institutional review study reported its promising results on the incorporation of interferon to chemoradiation, but the toxicities could be concerning (Abstract #e14648). Abstract #e14607 demonstrated promising survival data from a tri-modality approach incorporating local and systemic chemotherapy concurrent with external beam radiation as well as radiofrequency ablation. The tolerability of sorafenib in locally advanced pancreatic cancer was shown in a small phase I study (Abstract #e14525). CyberKnife® stereotactic body radiation therapy was investigated as a modality for local palliation (Abstract #e14506). More effective therapeutic agents and approaches are still needed in this difficult disease. This highlight article will focus on the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  1. Guadecitabine and Durvalumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Liver, Pancreatic, Bile Duct, or Gallbladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-19

    Extrahepatic Bile Duct Adenocarcinoma, Biliary Type; Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma, Biliary Type; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Gallbladder Cancer AJCC V7; Stage III Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage III Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma AJCC v7; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Hepatocellular Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma AJCC v7; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma; Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma

  2. Systemic therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer: individualising cytotoxic therapy.

    PubMed

    Collins, Dearbhaile Catherine; Morris, Patrick Glyn

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive solid tumour associated with a high risk of local invasion and metastatic spread. In the absence of validated screening approaches, many patients present with advanced, incurable disease. Despite advances in treatment, the prognosis for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer remains poor. The benefits of surgical resection and radiation are unproven in this setting and, as patients generally present with distant metastases, systemic therapy forms the mainstay of treatment. The importance of selecting the optimal cytotoxic therapy remains to be critical to improving outcome and retaining quality of life. This review sets out to compare the current therapies available for advanced pancreatic cancer. This review examines the evolution of the systemic management of advanced pancreatic cancer, with a particular focus on the landmark Phase III trials identified from an extensive PubMed and Google scholar literature search. The article summarises the cytotoxic agents in use and the results of two decades of clinical trials to culminate in an almost doubling of survival in clinical trials. In the concluding expert opinion, the challenges interpreting and translating trial results into clinical practice are discussed, where patients are often older and of worse performance status. In the future, novel biomarkers might be used to tailor therapy.

  3. Survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer after iodine125 seeds implantation brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Quanli; Deng, Muhong; Lv, Yao; Dai, Guanghai

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Brachytherapy with iodine125-labeled seeds (125I-seeds) implantation is increasingly being used to treat tumors because of its positional precision, minimal invasion, least damage to noncancerous tissue due to slow and continuous release of radioactivity and facilitation with modern medical imaging technologies. This study evaluates the survival and pain relief outcomes of the 125I-seeds implantation brachytherapy in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Methods: Literature search was carried out in multiple electronic databases (Google Scholar, Embase, Medline/PubMed, and Ovid SP) and studies reporting I125 seeds implantation brachytherapy in pancreatic cancer patients with unresectable tumor were selected by following predetermined eligibility criteria. Random effects meta-analysis was performed to achieve inverse variance weighted effect size of the overall survival rate after the intervention. Sensitivity and subgroups analyses were also carried out. Results: Twenty-three studies (824 patients’ data) were included in the meta-analysis. 125I-seeds implantation brachytherapy alone was associated with 8.98 [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.94, 11.03] months (P < 0.00001) overall survival with 1-year survival of 25.7 ± 9.3% (mean ± standard deviation; SD) and 2-year survival was 17.9 ± 8.6% (mean ± SD). In stage IV pancreatic cancer patients, overall survival was 7.13 [95% CI: 4.75, 9.51] months (P < 0.00001). In patients treated with 125I-seeds implantation along with 1 or more therapies, overall survival was 11.75 [95% CI: 9.84, 13.65] months (P < 0.00001) with 1-year survival of 47.4 ± 22.75% (mean ± SD) and 2-year survival was 16.97 ± 3.1% (mean ± SD). 125I-seeds brachytherapy was associated with relief of pain in 79.7 ± 9.9% (mean ± SD) of the patients. Conclusions: Survival of pancreatic cancer patients after 125I-seeds implantation brachytherapy is found to be 9 months

  4. Advances in pancreatic cancer research: moving towards early detection.

    PubMed

    He, Xiang-Yi; Yuan, Yao-Zong

    2014-08-28

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal forms of cancer. Substantial progress has been made in the understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patient management have been significant. However, most patients (nearly 80%) who present with locally advanced or metastatic disease have an extremely poor prognosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localized to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Therefore, the early detection of pancreatic cancer may benefit patients with PDAC. However, its low rate of incidence and the limitations of current screening strategies make early detection difficult. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of PDAC suggest that it is possible to detect PDAC in early stages and even identify precursor lesions. The presence of new-onset diabetes mellitus in the early phase of pancreatic cancer may provide clues for its early diagnosis. Advances in the identification of novel circulating biomarkers including serological signatures, autoantibodies, epigenetic markers, circulating tumor cells and microRNAs suggest that they can be used as potential tools for the screening of precursors and early stage PDAC in the future. However, proper screening strategies based on effective screening methodologies need to be tested for clinical application.

  5. Direct costs associated with the disease management of patients with unresectable advanced non-small-cell lung cancer in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Pompen, Marjolein; Gok, Murat; Novák, Annoesjka; van Wuijtswinkel, Rob; Biesma, Bonne; Schramel, Franz; Stigt, Jos; Smit, Hans; Postmus, Pieter

    2009-04-01

    Disease management and costs of treatment of patients with unresectable advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in The Netherlands are not well known. A retrospective medical chart review was performed by collecting data from the time of diagnosis until the time of death or the end of the evaluation period. In addition to the demographic data, information was collected on the overall management of the patient. Hospital resource utilisation data collected included number of outpatient specialist visits, number and length of hospitalisation, type and number of diagnostic and laboratory procedures, type and number of radiotherapy cycles and detailed information on chemotherapy. To evaluate the economic impact of second-line treatment, a distinction was made between patients who received only best supportive care (BSC, group A) and those who received chemotherapy as a second-line treatment in addition to BSC (group B). The study was performed from the hospital perspective and reports on 2005 costs. Of 102 patients, 74 belonged to group A and 28 to group B. Patient management included a multidisciplinary approach, the extent of which depended on symptoms of the disease and presence of metastases. The average total treatment cost per patient per year of unresectable advanced NSCLC in The Netherlands was euro32,840 in group A and euro31,187 in group B. In both groups, hospitalisation was the major cost driver. In group B second-line chemotherapy was the second largest contributor of the costs. In spite of the difference in numbers of treatment lines provided to patients in groups A and B the total average costs per patient per year were comparable. Overall, the management of unresectable advanced NSCLC appeared to conform with current guidelines in The Netherlands. These patients show high medical resource consumption, with hospitalisation being the main cost driver in both groups. As economic arguments are becoming increasingly important in medical decision making on

  6. Feasibility, tolerability, and efficacy of the concurrent addition of erlotinib to thoracic radiotherapy in locally advanced unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer: a Phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Enrique; Martínez, Maite; Rico, Mikel; Hernández, Berta; Casas, Francesc; Viñolas, Nuria; Pérez-Casas, Ana; Dómine, Manuel; Mínguez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although many studies have confirmed the synergic effects of combining chemotherapy (CT) and radiotherapy (RT), clinical data evaluating safety and efficacy of erlotinib in combination with RT in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are limited. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility, tolerability, and efficacy of the concurrent addition of erlotinib to the standard three-dimensional conformal thoracic RT in patients with unresectable or locally advanced NSCLC who are not candidates for receiving standard CT. Patients and methods Feasibility and tolerability, assessed by evaluating adverse events (AEs), and effectiveness, by calculating progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and objective response rate (ORR), were analyzed in 30 patients receiving RT alone and 60 receiving RT and erlotinib. Results Erlotinib with RT showed an extended CSS and a higher rate of complete responses compared with RT alone. No differences between groups were found regarding OS, PFS, and ORR. AEs were significantly higher in the combined treatment, which mainly included cutaneous toxicity, dyspnea, fatigue, hyporexia, diarrhea, and infection. Erlotinib did not increase the toxicity produced by RT. Conclusion The combination of erlotinib with RT produced, in our study, a scarce clinical benefit in the treatment of unresectable or locally advanced NSCLC, limited to complete responses and longer CSS rate compared with RT alone. Increased toxicity events were associated with combined therapy, which mainly included cutaneous toxicity. In our opinion, further studies in molecularly unselected lung cancer patients treated with EGFR TKIs and RT are not indicated. The use of biomarkers for the identification of patients that are most likely to benefit from this treatment is an essential next step in the research of this condition. PMID:27042098

  7. Resection of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer without Regression of Arterial Encasement After Modern-Era Neoadjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Michael D; Rashid, M Farzan; Rosario, Vilma L; Schrope, Beth A; Steinman, Jonathan A; Hecht, Elizabeth M; Chabot, John A

    2017-09-11

    Modern-era systemic therapy for locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma (LAPC) offers improved survival relative to historical regimens but not necessarily improved radiographic downstaging to allow more patients to undergo resection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival, progression, and pathologic outcomes after resection of LAPC that did not regress from > 180 degrees arterial encasement after neoadjuvant therapy. Sixty-one LAPC patients were brought to the operating room after neoadjuvant therapy for NCCN-defined unresectable pancreatic cancer between 2012 and 2017. Pts were explored with intent of pancreatectomy and irreversible electroporation for margin extension; 5 (8%) had metastatic lesions on exploratory laparoscopy and were excluded from analyses. Imaging was re-examined to confirm LAPC prior to surgery. Data were analyzed from a prospective pancreatic cancer database. Patients had arterial involvement of the celiac axis (37.5%) and/or superior mesenteric artery (42.9%) and/or an extended length of the common hepatic (n = 44.6%) artery. Twenty-nine males and 27 females, median 65 years of age, received neoadjuvant gemcitabine-based (58.9%) or FOLFIRINOX (35.7%) chemotherapy and stereotactic body (42.9%) or intensity-modulated (51.8%) radiation therapy. Median months from initiation of neoadjuvant therapy to surgery was 7.5. Sixty-one percent underwent Whipple, 21% distal, and 18% modified Appleby procedures; 57% patients underwent venous reconstruction. Ninety-day mortality was 2%. An R0 margin was achieved in 80%, and 53% were N0. Median overall and progression-free survival was 18.5 (95%CI 12.27-32.33) and 8.5 months (95%CI 6.0-15.0), respectively. One- and 3-year survival from surgery was 68.5% (95%CI 53.0-79.7) and 39.0% (95%CI 23.7-53.8), respectively. With modern-era neoadjuvant therapy, R0 resections can be achieved in a majority of non-metastatic patients with locally advanced, unresectable disease based on cross

  8. Surgical outcomes of post chemoradiotherapy unresectable locally advanced rectal cancers improve with interim chemotherapy, is FOLFIRINOX better than CAPOX?

    PubMed Central

    Engineer, Reena; Ramaswamy, Anant; Sahu, Arvind; Zanwar, Saurabh; Arya, Suprita; Chopra, Supriya; Bal, Munita; Patil, Prachi; Desouza, Ashwin; Saklani, Avanish

    2016-01-01

    Background Role of chemotherapy in patients who continue to have unresectable disease after pre-operative chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) remains largely unaddressed. Methods Patients with LA rectal cancer from January 2013 to June 2015 were evaluated. Post-CRT, patients, who were deemed unresectable, were considered for further interim chemotherapy (i-CT). Results Seventy six patients (15%) with median age of 38.5 years received i-CT after CRT. About 61.8% patients receiving i-CT managed to undergo a definitive surgery and the extent of surgery was reduced in 48.7% patients. With the median follow up of 19 months, the estimated 2-year event free survival (EFS) of 48% and OS was 56%. The estimated 2-year OS was 81% in mucinous tumors whereas it was 44.4% in signet ring pathology (P=0.045). The 2-year OS of 86% for whom surgery was done vs. 38% (2-year OS) in whom surgery was not done (P=0.011). Survival was better in conservative surgery group vs. total pelvic exenteration (TPE) vs. no surgery (2-year OS: 84% vs. 59.1% vs. 38%; P=0.033). In the CAPE-OX group, 71.4% (14/23) underwent surgery whereas 75.9% (29/47) in the 5-FU plus irinotecan plus oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) group with EFS (P=0.570) and OS (P=0.120). In conservative surgery group, OS was better in FOLFIRINOX (2-year OS: 95.7%) vs. capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (CAPOX) (2-year OS: 70%) (P=0.012). Conclusions i-CT can lead to improved resection rates, improved survivals and downstaging with acceptable toxicity. FOLFIRINOX appears to better over CAPOX, specifically in whom conservative surgery is feasible. PMID:28078119

  9. Advancement in treatment and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer with radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a major health problem. Conventional imaging modalities show limited accuracy for reliable assessment of the tumor. Recent researches suggest that molecular imaging techniques with tracers provide more biologically relevant information and are benefit for the diagnosis of the cancer. In addition, radiopharmaceuticals also play more important roles in treatment of the disease. This review summaries the advancement of the radiolabeled compounds in the theranostics of PC. PMID:26909131

  10. Management of advanced pancreatic cancer in daily clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Jacopo; Piacentini, Paolo; Bonetti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this outcome study was to evaluate the management of advanced pancreatic cancer in a real-world clinical practice; few such experiences have been reported in the literature. A retrospective analysis was performed of all consecutive patients with advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma followed at our medical oncology unit between January 2003 and December 2013. We evaluated 78 patients, mostly with metastatic disease (64.1%). Median follow-up was 10.77 months, by which time 74 patients (94.9%) had died. Median overall survival was 8.29 months. Median age was 67 years. In univariate analysis, pain at onset (p = 0.020), ECOG performance status (p<0.001), stage (p = 0.047), first-line chemotherapy (p<0.001), second-line chemotherapy (p<0.001) and weight loss at diagnosis (p = 0.029) were factors that had an impact on overall survival. In multivariate analysis, the presence of pain at onset (p = 0.043), stage (p = 0.003) and second-line chemotherapy (p = 0.004) were confirmed as independent prognostic factors. Our data, derived from daily clinical practice, confirmed advanced pancreatic cancer as an aggressive malignant disease with a very short expected survival. Second-line treatment seems to provide an advantage in terms of overall survival in patients who showed a partial response as their best response to first-line treatment.

  11. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Young Seok; Kim, Mi-Sook; Yoo, Sung Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Yang, Kwang Mo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Choi, Chul Won; Lee, Dong Han; Kim, Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kang, Hye Jin; Kim, YoungHan

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical application of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients with a focus on local efficacy and toxicity. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients with locally advanced and nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer who had been treated between 2004 and 2006. Follow-up duration ranged from 4 to 41 months (median, 14.5 months). A total dose of 40 Gy was delivered in 20 fractions using a conventional three-field technique, and then a single fraction of 14, 15, 16, or 17 Gy SBRT was administered as a boost without a break. Twenty-one patients received chemotherapy. Overall and local progression-free survival were calculated and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: One-year overall survival and local progression-free survival rates were 60.0% and 70.2%, respectively. One patient (3%) developed Grade 4 toxicity. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 response was found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that a SBRT boost provides a safe means of increasing radiation dose. Based on the results of this study, we recommend that a well controlled Phase II study be conducted on locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  12. A Phase I/II Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation (IMRT) Dose Escalation With Concurrent Fixed-dose Rate Gemcitabine (FDR-G) in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Josef, Edgar; Schipper, Mathew; Francis, Isaac R.; Hadley, Scott; Ten-Haken, Randall; Lawrence, Theodore; Normolle, Daniel; Simeone, Diane M.; Sonnenday, Christopher; Abrams, Ross; Leslie, William; Khan, Gazala; Zalupski, Mark M.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Local failure in unresectable pancreatic cancer may contribute to death. We hypothesized that intensification of local therapy would improve local control and survival. The objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose delivered by intensity modulated radiation with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (FDR-G), freedom from local progression (FFLP), and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of adenocarcinoma, radiographically unresectable, performance status of 0-2, absolute neutrophil count of {>=}1500/mm{sup 3}, platelets {>=}100,000/mm{sup 3}, creatinine <2 mg/dL, bilirubin <3 mg/dL, and alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase {<=}2.5 Multiplication-Sign upper limit of normal. FDR-G (1000 mg/m{sup 2}/100 min intravenously) was given on days -22 and -15, 1, 8, 22, and 29. Intensity modulated radiation started on day 1. Dose levels were escalated from 50-60 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as gastrointestinal toxicity grade (G) {>=}3, neutropenic fever, or deterioration in performance status to {>=}3 between day 1 and 126. Dose level was assigned using TITE-CRM (Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method) with the target dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) rate set to 0.25. Results: Fifty patients were accrued. DLTs were observed in 11 patients: G3/4 anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and/or dehydration (7); duodenal bleed (3); duodenal perforation (1). The recommended dose is 55 Gy, producing a probability of DLT of 0.24. The 2-year FFLP is 59% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32-79). Median and 2-year overall survival are 14.8 months (95% CI: 12.6-22.2) and 30% (95% CI 17-45). Twelve patients underwent resection (10 R0, 2 R1) and survived a median of 32 months. Conclusions: High-dose radiation therapy with concurrent FDR-G can be delivered safely. The encouraging efficacy data suggest that outcome may be improved in unresectable patients through intensification of local

  13. Recent advances in pancreatic cancer: biology, treatment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Singh, Divya; Upadhyay, Ghanshyam; Srivastava, Rakesh K; Shankar, Sharmila

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in United States. Efforts have been made towards the development of the viable solution for its treatment with constrained accomplishment because of its complex biology. It is well established that pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs), albeit present in a little count, contribute incredibly to PC initiation, progression, and metastasis. Customary chemo and radiotherapeutic alternatives, however, expands general survival, the related side effects are the significant concern. Amid the most recent decade, our insight about molecular and cellular pathways involved in PC and role of CSCs in its progression has increased enormously. Presently the focus is to target CSCs. The herbal products have gained much consideration recently as they, usually, sensitize CSCs to chemotherapy and target molecular signaling involved in various tumors including PC. Some planned studies have indicated promising results proposing that examinations in this course have a lot to offer for the treatment of PC. Although preclinical studies uncovered the importance of herbal products in attenuating pancreatic carcinoma, limited studies have been conducted to evaluate their role in clinics. The present review provides a new insight to recent advances in pancreatic cancer biology, treatment and current status of herbal products in its anticipation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Current therapeutic strategies for advanced pancreatic cancer: A review for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Spadi, Rosella; Brusa, Federica; Ponzetti, Agostino; Chiappino, Isabella; Birocco, Nadia; Ciuffreda, Libero; Satolli, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) would become the second leading cause of cancer death in the near future, despite representing only 3% of new cancer diagnosis. Survival improvement will come from a better knowledge of risk factors, earlier diagnosis, better integration of locoregional and systemic therapies, as well as the development of more efficacious drugs rising from a deeper understanding of disease biology. For patients with unresectable, non-metastatic disease, combined strategies encompassing primary chemotherapy and radiation seems to be promising. In fit patients, new polychemotherapy regimens can lead to better outcomes in terms of slight but significant survival improvement associated with a positive impact on quality of life. The upfront use of these regimes can also increase the rate of radical resections in borderline resectable and locally advanced PC. Second line treatments showed to positively affect both overall survival and quality of life in fit patients affected by metastatic disease. At present, oxaliplatin-based regimens are the most extensively studied. Nonetheless, other promising drugs are currently under evaluation. Presently, in addition to surgery and conventional radiation therapy, new locoregional treatment techniques are emerging as alternative options in the multimodal approach to patients or diseases not suitable for radical surgery. As of today, in contrast with other types of cancer, targeted therapies failed to show relevant activity either alone or in combination with chemotherapy and, thus, current clinical practice does not include them. Up to now, despite the fact of extremely promising results in different tumors, also immunotherapy is not in the actual therapeutic armamentarium for PC. In the present paper, we provide a comprehensive review of the current state of the art of clinical practice and research in PC aiming to offer a guide for clinicians on the most relevant topics in the management of this disease. PMID:26862489

  15. Erlotinib in Treating Patients With Unresectable Liver, Bile Duct, or Gallbladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  16. Unresectable hepatoblastoma: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Trobaugh-Lotrario, Angela D; Meyers, Rebecka L; O’Neill, Allison F; Feusner, James H

    2017-01-01

    Although rare, hepatoblastoma is the most common pediatric liver tumor. Complete resection is a critical component for cure; however, most patients will have tumors that are not resected at diagnosis. For these patients, administration of neoadjuvant chemotherapy renders tumors resectable in most patients. For patients whose tumors remain unresectable after chemotherapy, liver transplantation is indicated (in the absence of active unresectable metastatic disease). In patients whose tumors remain unresectable after conventional chemotherapy, interventional techniques may serve as a promising option to reduce tumor size, decrease systemic toxicity, decrease need for liver transplantation, and increase feasibility of tumor resection. PMID:28203111

  17. Impact of Metformin on Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Survival: Too Little, Too Late?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Xiao; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Metformin offers no survival advantage in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. Despite promising experimental evidence suggesting an anti-tumor effect of metformin, its impact on the survival of advanced pancreatic cancer is likely very limited. Future studies may need to consider its role in early-stage pancreatic cancer. PMID:26637275

  18. External Beam Radiotherapy Plus 24-Hour Continuous Infusion of Gemcitabine in Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma: Long-Term Results of a Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mattiucci, Gian C.; Morganti, Alessio G.; Valentini, Vincenzo; Ippolito, Edy; Alfieri, Sergio; Antinori, Armando; Crucitti, Antonio; D'Agostino, Giuseppe R.; Di Lullo, Liberato; Luzi, Stefano; Mantini, Giovanna; Smaniotto, Daniela; Doglietto, Gian B.; Cellini, Numa

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of gemcitabine-based chemoradiation (CT-RT) in treating patients (pts) affected by locally advanced pancreatic cancers (LAPC). Methods and Materials: Weekly gemcitabine (100 mg/m{sup 2}) was given as a 24-hour infusion during the course of three-dimensional radiotherapy (50.4 Gy to the tumor, 39.6 Gy to the nodes). After CT-RT, pts received five cycles of sequential chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2}; 1, 8, q21). Response rate was assessed according to World Health Organization criteria 6 weeks after the end of CT-RT. Local control (LC), time to progression (TTP), metastases-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by the Kaplan Meier method. Results: Forty pts (male/female 22/18; median age 62 years, range, 36-76) were treated from 2000 to 2005. The majority had T4 tumour (n = 34, 85%), six pts (15%) had T3 tumour. Sixteen pts (40%) were node positive at diagnosis. Grade 3-4 acute toxicity was observed in 21 pts (52.5%). Thirty pts (75%) completed the treatment schedule. A clinical response was achieved in 12 pts (30%). With a median follow-up of 76 months (range, 32-98), 2-year LC was 39.6% (median, 12 months), 2-year TTP was 18.4% (median, 10 months), and 2-year MFS was 29.7% (median, 10 months). Two-year OS (25%; median, 15.5 months) compared with our previous study on 5-fluorouracil-based CT-RT (2.8%) was significantly improved (p <0.001). Conclusions: Gemcitabine CT-RT seems correlated with improved outcomes. Healthier patients who are likely to complete the treatment schedule may benefit most from this therapy.

  19. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered. PMID:25053938

  20. Fast neutron irradiation for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.P.; Schein, P.S.; MacDonald, J.S.; Woolley, P.V.; Ornitz, R.; Rogers, C.

    1981-11-01

    Nineteen patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer and one patient with islet cell cancer were treated with 1700-1500 neutron rad alone or in combination with 5-fluorouracil to exploit the theoretic advantages of higher linear energy of transfer, and lower oxygen enhancement ratio of neutrons. Only 5 of 14 (36%) obtained partial tumor regression. The median survival for all patients with pancreatic cancer was 6 months, which is less than that reported with 5-fluorouracil and conventional photon irradiation. Gastrointestinal toxicity was considerable; hemorhagic gastritis in five patients, colitis in two and esophagitis in one. One patient developed radiation myelitis. We therefore, caution any enthusiasm for this modality of therapy until clear evidence of a therapeutic advantage over photon therapy is demonstrated in controlled clinical trials.

  1. Endoscopic Palliation of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coté, Gregory A.; Sherman, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopy has an increasingly important role in the palliation of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Endoscopic biliary drainage is still requested in the majority of patients who present with obstructive jaundice, and the increased use of self-expandable metallic stents has reduced the incidence of premature stent occlusion. First-line use of metallic stents is expected to be utilized more frequently as neoadjuvant protocols are improved. The efficacy of endoscopy for palliating gastroduodenal obstruction has advanced with the development of through-the-scope, self-expandable gastroduodenal stents. There have been advances in pain management, with endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis reducing opiate requirements and pain for patients with unresectable malignancy. Future applications of endoscopy in pancreatic cancer may include fine needle injection of chemotherapeutic and other agents into the lesion itself. This review will summarize the evidence of endoscopy in the management of patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23187846

  2. Interaction of gonadal status with systemic inflammation and opioid use in determining nutritional status and prognosis in advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Skipworth, Richard J E; Moses, Alastair G W; Sangster, Kathryn; Sturgeon, Catharine M; Voss, Anne C; Fallon, Marie T; Anderson, Richard A; Ross, James A; Fearon, Kenneth C H

    2011-03-01

    Hypogonadism has been linked with systemic inflammation and opioid use in males with advanced cancer. We aimed to investigate the interaction of gonadal status with systemic inflammation and opioids in determining nutritional status and prognosis in advanced pancreatic cancer. One hundred and seventy-five patients (92 males, 83 postmenopausal females) with unresectable pancreatic cancer were studied. Serum sex steroids (total testosterone [TT], calculated free testosterone [cFT], oestradiol, sex hormone binding globulin), gonadotropins (follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinising hormone) and pro-inflammatory mediators (C-reactive protein [CRP], interleukin-6 [IL-6], soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor 75 [sTNFR75]) were measured, and nutritional assessment and opioid use recorded. Seventy-three percent of males were hypogonadal (by cFT definition). cFT correlated positively with BMI (r (2) =0.349; p< 0.001) and grip strength (r (2) = 0.229; p = 0.034) and inversely with weight loss (r (2) = -0.287; p = 0.007), CRP (r (2) = -0.426; p < 0.001) and IL-6 (r (2) = -0.303; p = 0.004). CRP (p= 0.007), opioid dosage (p = 0.009) and BMI (p = 0.005) were independent determinants of cFT on ANOVA. Hypogonadal males demonstrated worsened survival compared with eugonadal patients (TT: OR of death = 2.87; p < 0.001; cFT: OR = 2.26; p = 0.011). Furthermore, male opioid use was associated with decreased TT (p < 0.001) and cFT (p < 0.001) and worsened survival (OR = 1.96; p = 0.012). In contrast, 18% of postmenopausal females exhibited premenopausal ("hyperoestrogenic") oestradiol levels. Oestradiol correlated positively with sTNFR75 (r (2) = 0.299; p = 0.008). CRP (p < 0.001) was an independent determinant of oestradiol. Hyperoestrogenic females demonstrated worsened survival compared with eugonadal patients (OR = 2.43; p = 0.013). In males with pancreatic cancer, systemic

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced and Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer Is Effective and Well Tolerated

    SciTech Connect

    Chuong, Michael D.; Springett, Gregory M.; Freilich, Jessica M.; Park, Catherine K.; Weber, Jill M.; Mellon, Eric A.; Hodul, Pamela J.; Malafa, Mokenge P.; Meredith, Kenneth L.; Hoffe, Sarah E.; Shridhar, Ravi

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides high rates of local control (LC) and margin-negative (R0) resections for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC), respectively, with minimal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A single-institution retrospective review was performed for patients with nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer treated with induction chemotherapy followed by SBRT. SBRT was delivered over 5 consecutive fractions using a dose painting technique including 7-10 Gy/fraction to the region of vessel abutment or encasement and 5-6 Gy/fraction to the remainder of the tumor. Restaging scans were performed at 4 weeks, and resectable patients were considered for resection. The primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Seventy-three patients were evaluated, with a median follow-up time of 10.5 months. Median doses of 35 Gy and 25 Gy were delivered to the region of vessel involvement and the remainder of the tumor, respectively. Thirty-two BRPC patients (56.1%) underwent surgery, with 31 undergoing an R0 resection (96.9%). The median OS, 1-year OS, median PFS, and 1-year PFS for BRPC versus LAPC patients was 16.4 months versus 15 months, 72.2% versus 68.1%, 9.7 versus 9.8 months, and 42.8% versus 41%, respectively (all P>.10). BRPC patients who underwent R0 resection had improved median OS (19.3 vs 12.3 months; P=.03), 1-year OS (84.2% vs 58.3%; P=.03), and 1-year PFS (56.5% vs 25.0%; P<.0001), respectively, compared with all nonsurgical patients. The 1-year LC in nonsurgical patients was 81%. We did not observe acute grade ≥3 toxicity, and late grade ≥3 toxicity was minimal (5.3%). Conclusions: SBRT safely facilitates margin-negative resection in patients with BRPC pancreatic cancer while maintaining a high rate of LC in unresectable patients. These data support the expanded implementation of SBRT for pancreatic cancer.

  4. [A Case of Double Cancer of Initially Unresectable Sigmoid Colon Cancer and Advanced Gastric Cancer Treated with Curative Resection after mFOLFOX6 Therapy].

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Toru; Aoki, Kazunori; Mitsuhashi, Yuto; Tomiura, Satoko; Suto, Akiko; Miura, Takuya; Ikenaga, Shojirokazunori; Shibasaki, Itaru; Endo, Masaaki

    2016-03-01

    A 61-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of a complaint of blood in stool. He was diagnosed with advanced colon and gastric cancers. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a sigmoid tumor with invasion to the bladder, a metastatic tumor in the lateral segmental branch of the left hepatic lobe, and ascites. He was diagnosed with initially unresectable double cancer. Ileostomy was performed immediately, and he was treated with modified (m) FOLFOX6 regimen (oxaliplatin in combination with infusional 5-fluorouracil/Leucovorin). After 6 courses of the mFOLFOX6 regimen, CT revealed that the primary lesion of the sigmoid colon and liver metastasis had reduced in size, and the ascites had disappeared. Gastroscopy revealed that the gastric cancer had disappeared. Biopsy results were negative. Accordingly, his gastric cancer was diagnosed as treatment effect Grade 3. After 8 courses of mFOLFOX6 therapy, sigmoidectomy, partial resection of the bladder, and partial resection of the liver were performed. Gastric cancer was not resected in accordance with his will. Although 40 months has passed after the radical resection, neither the sigmoid colon cancer nor the gastric cancer recurred.

  5. Complete pathological response following down-staging chemoradiation in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: Challenging the boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Khan, AZ; Pitsinis, V; Mudan, SS

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy, relatively resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which usually presents late. Disease specific mortality approaches unity despite advances in adjuvant therapy. We present the first reported case of complete pathological response following neoadjuvant therapy in a locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:18081235

  6. Phase I dose-finding study of sorafenib with FOLFOX4 as first-line treatment in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yihebali; Yang, Jianliang; Yang, Sheng; Sun, Yongkun; Jia, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and efficacy of sorafenib in combination with FOLFOX4 (oxaliplatin/leucovorin (LV)/5-fluorouracil) as first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer, we performed a phase I dose-finding study in nine evaluable patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Methods According to modified Fibonacci method, the design of this study was to guide elevation of the sorafenib dosage to the next level (from 200 mg twice daily to 400 mg twice daily and then, if tolerated, 600 mg twice daily). If the patient achieved complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD) after eight cycles of treatment, combination chemotherapy was scheduled to be discontinued and sorafenib monotherapy continued at the original dose until either disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Results In sorafenib 200 mg twice daily group, DLT was observed in 1 of 6 patients, and in 400 mg twice daily group, it was observed in 2 of 3 patients. Seven of 9 (77.8%) evaluable patients achieved PR, with a median overall survival (OS) of 11.8 [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.9-14.7] months. Common adverse effects include hand-foot syndrome, leukopenia, neutropenia, anorexia, and nausea. Conclusions Twice-daily dosing of sorafenib 200 mg in combination with FOLFOX4 was proven effective and safe for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer, and could be an appropriate dosage for subsequent phase II clinical studies. PMID:26157320

  7. Phase II multi-institutional prospective randomised trial comparing S-1+paclitaxel with S-1+cisplatin in patients with unresectable and/or recurrent advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mochiki, E; Ogata, K; Ohno, T; Toyomasu, Y; Haga, N; Fukai, Y; Aihara, R; Ando, H; Uchida, N; Asao, T; Kuwano, H

    2012-01-01

    Background: A combination of S-1 and cisplatin has been shown to be effective with acceptable safety for the first-line treatment of far-advanced gastric cancer in Japan. This is the first randomised phase II trial to compare S-1+paclitaxel with S-1+cisplatin in this setting. Methods: Patients with unresectable and/or recurrent advanced gastric cancer were randomly assigned to receive one of the two regimens: S-1 (40 mg m−2 twice daily) on days 1–14 plus paclitaxel (60 mg m−2) on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 4-week cycle (S-1+paclitaxel) or S-1 (40 mg m−2 twice daily) on days 1–21 plus cisplatin (60 mg m−2) on day 8 of a 5-week cycle (S-1+cisplatin). The primary end point was the response rate (RR). Secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and safety. Results: A total of 83 patients were eligible for safety and efficacy analyses. In the S-1+paclitaxel and S-1+cisplatin groups, RRs (52.3% vs 48.7% P=0.74) and median PFS (9 vs 6 months; P=0.50) were similar. The median OS was similar in the S-1+paclitaxel and S-1+cisplatin groups (16 vs 17 months; P=0.84). The incidence of grade 3 or higher haematological toxicity was 19.0% with S-1+paclitaxel and 19.5% with S-1+cisplatin. The incidence of grade 3 or higher non-haematological toxicity was 14.2% with S-1+paclitaxel and 17.1% with S-1+cisplatin. Conclusion: S-1+paclitaxel was suggested to be a feasible and effective non-platinum-based regimen for chemotherapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Our results should be confirmed in multicenter, phase III-controlled clinical trials. PMID:22617130

  8. A double-blind placebo-controlled, randomised study comparing gemcitabine and marimastat with gemcitabine and placebo as first line therapy in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bramhall, S R; Schulz, J; Nemunaitis, J; Brown, P D; Baillet, M; Buckels, J A C

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer death in the western world and the prognosis for unresectable disease remains poor. Recent advances in conventional chemotherapy and the development of novel ‘molecular’ treatment strategies with different toxicity profiles warrant investigation as combination treatment strategies. This randomised study in pancreatic cancer compares marimastat (orally administered matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor) in combination with gemcitabine to gemcitabine alone. Two hundred and thirty-nine patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer were randomised to receive gemcitabine (1000 mg m−2) in combination with either marimastat or placebo. The primary end-point was survival. Objective tumour response and duration of response, time to treatment failure and disease progression, quality of life and safety were also assessed. There was no significant difference in survival between gemcitabine and marimastat and gemcitabine and placebo (P=0.95 log-rank test). Median survival times were 165.5 and 164 days and 1-year survival was 18% and 17% respectively. There were no significant differences in overall response rates (11 and 16% respectively), progression-free survival (P=0.68 log-rank test) or time to treatment failure (P=0.70 log-rank test) between the treatment arms. The gemcitabine and marimastat combination was well tolerated with only 2.5% of patients withdrawn due to presumed marimastat toxicity. Grade 3 or 4 musculoskeletal toxicities were reported in only 4% of the marimastat treated patients, although 59% of marimastat treated patients reported some musculoskeletal events. The results of this study provide no evidence to support a combination of marimastat with gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The combination of marimastat with gemcitabine was well tolerated. Further studies of marimastat as a maintenance treatment following a response or stable disease on gemcitabine may be justified

  9. [Application value of core needle biopsy technique in the pathological diagnosis of locally advanced pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Che, Xu; Zhang, Jianwei; Chen, Yingtai; Sun, Yuemin; Wang, Chengfeng

    2015-04-14

    To explore the application value of core needle biopsy technique in the pathological diagnosis of locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients. During April 2007 to April 2014, retrospective analysis was conducted for 36 patients of locally advanced pancreatic cancer to summarize the clinical data of core needle biopsy technique. And the relevant data included clinical features, pathological findings and puncture-related complications. Regular postoperative follow-ups were conducted. All received pathological examination of core needle biopsy. And the pathological diagnoses were pancreatic cancer (n=29), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (n=2) and chronic pancreatitis (n=5). During the follow-ups, liver metastasis was pathologically confirmed postoperatively at Months 4 and 6 months among 5 chronic pancreatitis patients. The remainder was followed up for over 12 months. There was neither change in size nor metastasis. One case was diagnosed at Peking Union Hospital as autoimmune pancreatitis while another 2 cases had a clinical diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. The accuracy of core needle puncture was 94.4%. There were 2 cases of postoperative pancreatic fistula in class A. Bleeding complication was absent. The application of core needle biopsy technique is both safe and effective in the pathological diagnosis of locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  10. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Summary Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors including well differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) and neuroendocrine carcinomas (pNECs). The incidence of pNENs has increased over the past few decades. Although, the understanding and interest for this tumor have also increased significantly, the debate about classification and diagnosis continues. Although the primary treatment for pNENs is surgical resection, there is still a lack of effective therapeutic options for patients with advanced unresectable pNENs. Although many therapeutic methods have proven effective, the choice of treatment and specific programs are still unclear. Our article presents an overview of pNENs, with a focus on their diagnostic work-up, clinical presentation and treatment options. PMID:28357177

  11. Natural Products as Adjunctive Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer: Recent Trends and Advancements

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guogang; Zou, Gangyong; Yu, Haiqing

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a type of common malignant tumors with high occurrence in the world. Most patients presented in clinic had pancreatic cancer at advanced stages. Furthermore, chemotherapy or radiotherapy had very limited success in treating pancreatic cancer. Complementary and alternative medicines, such as natural products/herbal medicines, represent exciting adjunctive therapies. In this review, we summarize the recent advances of using natural products/herbal medicines, such as Chinese herbal medicine, in combination with conventional chemotherapeutic agents to treat pancreatic cancer in preclinical and clinical trials. PMID:28232946

  12. Survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer after iodine125 seeds implantation brachytherapy: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Han, Quanli; Deng, Muhong; Lv, Yao; Dai, Guanghai

    2017-02-01

    Brachytherapy with iodine-labeled seeds (I-seeds) implantation is increasingly being used to treat tumors because of its positional precision, minimal invasion, least damage to noncancerous tissue due to slow and continuous release of radioactivity and facilitation with modern medical imaging technologies. This study evaluates the survival and pain relief outcomes of the I-seeds implantation brachytherapy in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Literature search was carried out in multiple electronic databases (Google Scholar, Embase, Medline/PubMed, and Ovid SP) and studies reporting I seeds implantation brachytherapy in pancreatic cancer patients with unresectable tumor were selected by following predetermined eligibility criteria. Random effects meta-analysis was performed to achieve inverse variance weighted effect size of the overall survival rate after the intervention. Sensitivity and subgroups analyses were also carried out. Twenty-three studies (824 patients' data) were included in the meta-analysis. I-seeds implantation brachytherapy alone was associated with 8.98 [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.94, 11.03] months (P < 0.00001) overall survival with 1-year survival of 25.7 ± 9.3% (mean ± standard deviation; SD) and 2-year survival was 17.9 ± 8.6% (mean ± SD). In stage IV pancreatic cancer patients, overall survival was 7.13 [95% CI: 4.75, 9.51] months (P < 0.00001). In patients treated with I-seeds implantation along with 1 or more therapies, overall survival was 11.75 [95% CI: 9.84, 13.65] months (P < 0.00001) with 1-year survival of 47.4 ± 22.75% (mean ± SD) and 2-year survival was 16.97 ± 3.1% (mean ± SD). I-seeds brachytherapy was associated with relief of pain in 79.7 ± 9.9% (mean ± SD) of the patients. Survival of pancreatic cancer patients after I-seeds implantation brachytherapy is found to be 9 months, whereas a combined treatment with I-seeds brachytherapy and other therapies was

  13. Phase I Study of DMOT4039A, an Antibody-Drug Conjugate Targeting Mesothelin, in Patients with Unresectable Pancreatic or Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Weekes, Colin D; Lamberts, Laetitia E; Borad, Mitesh J; Voortman, Johannes; McWilliams, Robert R; Diamond, Jennifer R; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Verheul, Henk M; Lieu, Christopher H; Kim, George P; Wang, Yulei; Scales, Suzie J; Samineni, Divya; Brunstein, Flavia; Choi, YounJeong; Maslyar, Daniel J; Colon-Otero, Gerardo

    2016-03-01

    DMOT4039A, a humanized anti-mesothelin mAb conjugated to the antimitotic agent monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE), was given to patients with pancreatic and ovarian cancer every 3 weeks (0.2-2.8 mg/kg; q3w) or weekly (0.8-1.2 mg/kg). A 3+3 design was used for dose escalation followed by expansion at the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) to evaluate safety and pharmacokinetics. Antitumor response was evaluated per RECIST 1.1 and serum CA19-9 or CA125 declines. Tumor mesothelin expression was determined by IHC. Seventy-one patients (40 pancreatic cancer; 31 ovarian cancer) were treated with DMOT4039A. For the q3w schedule (n = 54), the MTD and RP2D was 2.4 mg/kg, with dose-limiting toxicities of grade 3 hyperglycemia and grade 3 hypophosphatemia at 2.8 mg/kg. For the weekly schedule (n = 17), the maximum assessed dose was 1.2 mg/kg, with further dose escalations deferred because of toxicities limiting scheduled retreatment in later cycles, and therefore the RP2D level for the weekly regimen was determined to be 1 mg/kg. Across both schedules, the most common toxicities were gastrointestinal and constitutional. Treatment-related serious adverse events occurred in 6 patients; 4 patients continued treatment following dose reductions. Drug exposure as measured by antibody-conjugated MMAE and total antibody was generally dose proportional over all dose levels on both schedules. A total of 6 patients had confirmed partial responses (4 ovarian; 2 pancreatic) with DMOT4039A at 2.4 to 2.8 mg/kg i.v. q3w. DMOT4039A administered at doses up to 2.4 mg/kg q3w and 1.0 mg/kg weekly has a tolerable safety profile and antitumor activity in both pancreatic and ovarian cancer. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Long-term outcomes and prognostic factors in 78 Japanese patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a single-center retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lingaku; Igarashi, Hisato; Fujimori, Nao; Hijioka, Masayuki; Kawabe, Ken; Oda, Yoshinao; Jensen, Robert T.; Ito, Tetsuhide

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite an increase in the number of Japanese patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms, long-term outcomes and prognostic factors, especially for those with advanced disease, remain unclear. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 78 patients with unresectable pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms treated at our hospital from January 1987 to March 2015. Survival analyses were performed using Kaplan–Meier methods. Prognostic significance of several clinicopathological factors were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses using a Cox regression model. Results Median overall survivals of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (n = 64) and pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (n = 14) were 83.7 and 9.1 months, respectively (hazard ratio: 0.02, 95% confidence interval: 0.01–0.08, P < 0.001). Although no significant differences were observed using a Ki-67 cut-off value of 2% (hazard ratio: 0.46, 95% confidence interval: 0.16–1.13, P = 0.0989), a Ki-67 cut-off of 10% was a significant predictor in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (hazard ratio: 9.95, 95% confidence interval, 3.01–32.97, P < 0.001). Treatment after the advent of targeted therapy (hazard ratio: 0.07, 95% confidence interval: 0.03–0.19, P < 0.001) and the presence of bone metastases (hazard ratio: 4.38, 95% confidence interval: 1.42–11.29, P = 0.013) were significant prognostic factors in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor evaluated by univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis also revealed that a Ki-67 index ≥10% (hazard ratio: 38.8, 95% confidence interval: 8.42–226.62, P < 0.001), approval of targeted therapy (hazard ratio: 0.02, 95% confidence interval: 0.00–0.11, P < 0.001) and bone metastases (hazard ratio: 5.56, 95% confidence interval: 1.10–24.00, P = 0.039) were independent prognostic factors. Conclusions We elucidated the long-term outcomes and prognostic factors in Japanese patients with advanced pancreatic

  15. Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy With Mitomycin C and Cisplatin in Advanced Unresectable Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Phase I-II Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Strojan, Primoz Karner, Katarina; Smid, Lojze; Soba, Erika; Fajdiga, Igor; Jancar, Boris; Anicin, Aleksandar; Budihna, Marjan; Zakotnik, Branko

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of concomitant chemoradiotherapy with mitomycin C and cisplatin in the treatment of advanced unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: Treatment consisted of conventional radiotherapy (70 Gy in 35 fractions), mitomycin C 15 mg/m{sup 2} IV, applied after the delivery of 10 Gy, and cisplatin at an initial dose of 10 mg/m{sup 2}/d IV, applied during the last 10 fractions of irradiation ('chemoboost'). The cisplatin dose was escalated with respect to the toxic side effects by 2 mg/m{sup 2}/d up to the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or at the most 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d (Phase I study), which was tested in the subsequent Phase II study. Results: All 36 patients had Stage T4 and/or N3 disease, and the majority had oropharyngeal (50%) or hypopharyngeal (39%) primary tumors. Six patients were treated at each of the three cisplatin dose levels tested (Phase I study). Dose-limiting toxicity was not reached even at 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d of cisplatin, which was determined as the MTD and tested in an additional 18 patients (Phase II study). After a median follow-up time of 48 months, 4-year locoregional control, failure-free, and overall survival rates were 30%, 14%, and 20%, respectively. In 24 patients treated at the cisplatin dose level of 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d, the corresponding rates were 40%, 20%, and 22%, respectively. Conclusion: Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with mitomycin C and cisplatin 'chemoboost' at 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d is feasible, with encouraging survival results if the extremely poor disease profile of the treated patients is considered.

  16. Advances in the Genetic Screening, Work-up, and Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Frucht, Harold; Stevens, Peter D.; Fogelman, David R.; Verna, Elizabeth C.; Chen, Johnson; Chabot, John A.; Fine, Robert L.

    2004-10-01

    Familiarity with the updated results in genetic screening and work-up presented here is essential to early diagnosis and possible cure. In the metastatic setting, we most frequently begin with the GTX regimen, consisting of Gemcitabine, Taxotere, and Xeloda. The regimen is based on our laboratory data demonstrating a synergistic increase in cell killing of pancreatic cancer cell lines. The combination takes advantage of the selective cell cycle effects of each of the three drugs. In our initial experience, we have seen a response rate of 40% at metastatic sites and 31% at the primary site after nine cycles of GTX. We are now conducting a formal phase II protocol to confirm these results. The median survival of this group of patients (at least 10.4 months) is as long as, or longer than other currently used regimens. In those patients who do not tolerate GTX or progress despite the regimen, we have found that a regimen of the same three drugs, administered on a different schedule, can produce responses. In the neoadjuvant (unresectable) setting, we treat with GTX initially and then follow with radiation; gemcitabine is used as a radiosensitizer during this treatment. An aggressive surgical approach with a team of surgeons were able to resect for cure 12 of the 16 patients who were initially unresectable; one year survival of these 12 was 100%; 2 year survival was 50%. Future work in this disease should focus on targeted agents such as bevacizumab.

  17. Advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a review of current treatment strategies and developing therapies

    PubMed Central

    Teague, Andrea; Lim, Kian-Huat

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the deadliest solid malignancies. A large proportion of patients are diagnosed with locally advanced or metastatic disease at the time of presentation and, unfortunately, this severely limits the number of patients who can undergo surgical resection, which offers the only chance for cure. Recent therapeutic advances for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer have extended overall survival, but prognosis still remains grim. Given that traditional chemotherapy is ineffective in curing advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, current research is taking a multidirectional approach in the hopes of developing more effective treatments. This article reviews the major clinical trial data that is the basis for the current chemotherapy regimens used as first- and second-line treatments for advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. We also review the current ongoing clinical trials, which include the use of agents targeting the oncogenic network signaling of K-Ras, agents targeting the extracellular matrix, and immune therapies. PMID:25755680

  18. Advances in counselling and surveillance of patients at risk for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Randall E; Lerch, Markus M; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Neoptolemos, John P; Whitcomb, David C; Hruban, Ralph H; Brentnall, Teresa A; Lynch, Henry T; Canto, Marcia I

    2007-01-01

    Even with significant advances in imaging and our understanding of pancreatic cancer genetics, the survival rates for pancreatic cancer remain quite dismal. Although still at an early stage, there are efforts in place to develop surveillance and prevention strategies for people at high risk for pancreatic cancer. This comprehensive review article summarises the predispositions that put people at a high risk of developing pancreatic cancer and the current status in the counselling and surveillance of these people using not only available medical literature, but also incorporating international expert opinion. PMID:17872573

  19. Modeling Combined Chemotherapy and Particle Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Durante, Marco; Tommasino, Francesco; Yamada, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the only cancer for which deaths are predicted to increase in 2014 and beyond. Combined radiochemotherapy protocols using gemcitabine and hypofractionated X-rays are ongoing in several clinical trials. Recent results indicate that charged particle therapy substantially increases local control of resectable and unresectable pancreas cancer, as predicted from previous radiobiology studies considering the high tumor hypoxia. Combination with chemotherapy improves the overall survival (OS). We compared published data on X-ray and charged particle clinical results with or without adjuvant chemotherapy calculating the biological effective dose. We show that chemoradiotherapy with protons or carbon ions results in 1 year OS significantly higher than those obtained with other treatment schedules. Further hypofractionation using charged particles may result in improved local control and survival. A comparative clinical trial using the standard X-ray scheme vs. the best current standard with carbon ions is crucial and may open new opportunities for this deadly disease. PMID:26217585

  20. Risk factors for latent distant organ metastasis detected by staging laparoscopy in patients with radiologically defined locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Karabicak, Ilhan; Satoi, Sohei; Yanagimoto, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Tomohisa; Hirooka, Satoshi; Yamaki, So; Kosaka, Hisashi; Inoue, Kentaro; Matsui, Yoichi; Kon, Masanori

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to identify risk factors for latent distant organ metastasis in patients with radiographically defined locally advanced (RDLA) pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). RDLA disease was defined as unresectable disease without distant organ metastasis based on resectability status by NCCN guidelines. Between January 2005 and November 2015, 110 consecutive patients underwent staging laparoscopy to rule out latent distant metastasis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify risk factors for latent distant organ metastasis or peritoneal metastasis (PM), defined as peritoneal dissemination and/or positive peritoneal lavage cytology (PPC). Latent distant organ metastasis was diagnosed by staging laparoscopy in 62 patients. PPC was found in 23%, peritoneal dissemination in 19%, and liver metastasis in 15%. Univariate analysis showed tumor location, preoperative CA 19-9 level and tumor size, and multivariate analysis revealed tumor size >55 mm and CA 19-9 level >60 IU/ml as risk factors for latent distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis showed pancreas body-tail tumors and tumor size >42 mm as risk factors for PM; 65.4% of pancreas body-tail tumors >42 mm had PM. Patients with large pancreas body-tail tumors and high CA 19-9 level are at greater risk for latent distant organ metastasis or PM, and should undergo staging laparoscopy routinely for accurate diagnosis (UMIN000023125). © 2016 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  1. Erlotinib and Cetuximab With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Kidney, Colorectal, Head and Neck, Pancreatic, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-10

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx

  2. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: clinical features, diagnosis and medical treatment: advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Jensen, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) comprise with gastrointestinal carcinoids, the main groups of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). Although these two groups of GI-NETs share many features including histological aspects; over-/ectopic expression of somatostatin receptors; the ability to ectopically secrete hormones/peptides/amines which can result in distinct functional syndromes; similar approaches used for tumor localization and some aspects of treatment, it is now generally agreed they should be considered separate. They differ in their pathogenesis, hormonal syndromes produced, many aspects of biological behavior and most important, in their response to certain anti-tumor treatment (chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapies). In this chapter the clinical features of the different types of pNETs will be considered as well as aspects of their diagnosis and medical treatment of the hormone-excess state. Emphasis will be on controversial areas or recent advances. The other aspects of the management of these tumors (surgery, treatment of advanced disease, tumor localization) are not dealt with here, because they are covered in other chapters in this volume. PMID:23582916

  3. Challenges and advances in mouse modeling for human pancreatic tumorigenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wanglong

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is critical for developed countries, where its rate of diagnosis has been increasing steadily annually. In the past decade, the advances of pancreatic cancer research have not contributed to the decline in mortality rates from pancreatic cancer—the overall 5-year survival rate remains about 5% low. This number only underscores an obvious urgency for us to better understand the biological features of pancreatic carcinogenesis, to develop early detection methods, and to improve novel therapeutic treatments. To achieve these goals, animal modeling that faithfully recapitulates the whole process of human pancreatic cancer is central to making the advancements. In this review, we summarize the currently available animal models for pancreatic cancer and the advances in pancreatic cancer animal modeling. We compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of three major categories of these models: (1) carcinogen-induced; (2) xenograft and allograft; and (3) genetically engineered mouse models. We focus more on the genetically engineered mouse models, a category which has been rapidly expanded recently for their capacities to mimic human pancreatic cancer and metastasis, and highlight the combinations of these models with various newly developed strategies and cell-lineage labeling systems. PMID:23114842

  4. Phase II Study of Gemcitabine, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab in Patients With Advanced Unresectable or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balar, Arjun V.; Apolo, Andrea B.; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Mironov, Svetlana; Iasonos, Alexia; Trout, Alisa; Regazzi, Ashley M.; Garcia-Grossman, Ilana R.; Gallagher, David J.; Milowsky, Matthew I.; Bajorin, Dean F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although gemcitabine and carboplatin (GCa) is a standard option for patients with advanced urothelial cancer (UC) who are ineligible for cisplatin, outcomes remain poor. This trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab with GCa in advanced UC. Patients and Methods Patients with Karnofsky performance status of 60% to 70%, creatinine clearance less than 60 mL/min, visceral metastasis, or solitary kidney were eligible and received a lead-in dose of bevacizumab 10 mg/kg followed 2 weeks later by gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8 and carboplatin at area under the [concentration-time] curve (AUC) 5.0 or 4.5 and bevacizumab 15 mg/kg on day 1 every 21 days for six cycles. Patients achieving at least stable disease (SD) continued bevacizumab 15 mg/kg every 21 days for 18 additional cycles. The study was powered to detect a 50% improvement in median progression-free survival (PFS) over a historical control. Results Fifty-one patients, median age 67 years (range, 42 to 83 years), were enrolled onto the study and were evaluable for toxicity. Twenty (39%) experienced grade 3 to 4 toxicity, and 10 (20%) had thromboembolic events (deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism). Four received one or fewer cycles leaving 47 evaluable for outcomes. Twenty-three (49%) achieved response (three complete; 20 partial), and 11 had SD. Median PFS was 6.5 months (95% CI, 4.7 to 7.8 months); PFS was greater in the carboplatin AUC 5.0 group (P = .04). Median overall survival (OS) was 13.9 months. Conclusion The 95% one-sided lower confidence bound of 4.77 months for median PFS did not meet the predesignated PFS of more than 4.8 months considered sufficient for further study. Median OS was greater than expected. An ongoing phase III trial in patients who are eligible for therapy with cisplatin will define the role of bevacizumab in UC. PMID:23341513

  5. Phase II study of gemcitabine, carboplatin, and bevacizumab in patients with advanced unresectable or metastatic urothelial cancer.

    PubMed

    Balar, Arjun V; Apolo, Andrea B; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Mironov, Svetlana; Iasonos, Alexia; Trout, Alisa; Regazzi, Ashley M; Garcia-Grossman, Ilana R; Gallagher, David J; Milowsky, Matthew I; Bajorin, Dean F

    2013-02-20

    Although gemcitabine and carboplatin (GCa) is a standard option for patients with advanced urothelial cancer (UC) who are ineligible for cisplatin, outcomes remain poor. This trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab with GCa in advanced UC. Patients with Karnofsky performance status of 60% to 70%, creatinine clearance less than 60 mL/min, visceral metastasis, or solitary kidney were eligible and received a lead-in dose of bevacizumab 10 mg/kg followed 2 weeks later by gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8 and carboplatin at area under the [concentration-time] curve (AUC) 5.0 or 4.5 and bevacizumab 15 mg/kg on day 1 every 21 days for six cycles. Patients achieving at least stable disease (SD) continued bevacizumab 15 mg/kg every 21 days for 18 additional cycles. The study was powered to detect a 50% improvement in median progression-free survival (PFS) over a historical control. Fifty-one patients, median age 67 years (range, 42 to 83 years), were enrolled onto the study and were evaluable for toxicity. Twenty (39%) experienced grade 3 to 4 toxicity, and 10 (20%) had thromboembolic events (deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism). Four received one or fewer cycles leaving 47 evaluable for outcomes. Twenty-three (49%) achieved response (three complete; 20 partial), and 11 had SD. Median PFS was 6.5 months (95% CI, 4.7 to 7.8 months); PFS was greater in the carboplatin AUC 5.0 group (P = .04). Median overall survival (OS) was 13.9 months. The 95% one-sided lower confidence bound of 4.77 months for median PFS did not meet the predesignated PFS of more than 4.8 months considered sufficient for further study. Median OS was greater than expected. An ongoing phase III trial in patients who are eligible for therapy with cisplatin will define the role of bevacizumab in UC.

  6. Efficacy of Sequential Ipilimumab Monotherapy versus Best Supportive Care for Unresectable Locally Advanced/Metastatic Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bang, Yung-Jue; Cho, Jae Yong; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Jin Won; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Ajani, Jaffer A; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Balogh, Agnes; Sanchez, Teresa; Moehler, Markus

    2017-10-01

    Purpose: Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein-4 interactions, enhances T-cell activation and promotes tumor immunity. This phase II study evaluated the safety and efficacy of ipilimumab monotherapy versus best supportive care (BSC) among patients with advanced/metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer who achieved at least stable disease with first-line chemotherapy.Experimental Design: Eligible patients were randomized to ipilimumab 10 mg/kg every 3 weeks for four doses, then 10 mg/kg every 12 weeks for up to 3 years, or BSC, which could include continuation of fluoropyrimidine until progression or toxicity. The primary endpoint was immune-related progression-free survival (irPFS); secondary endpoints included PFS by modified World Health Organization criteria and overall survival (OS).Results: Of 143 patients screened, 57 were randomized to each arm. irPFS with ipilimumab versus BSC was not improved [2.92 months, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.61-5.16 vs. 4.90 months, 95% CI, 3.45-6.54, HR = 1.44; 80% CI, 1.09-1.91; P = 0.097], resulting in study cessation. At study closeout, which occurred 8 months after the interim analysis, the median OS durations were 12.7 months (95% CI, 10.5-18.9) and 12.1 months (95% CI, 9.3-not estimable), respectively. Grade 3/4 treatment-related adverse events occurred in 23% of ipilimumab-treated patients, in whom diarrhea (9%) and fatigue (5%) were most frequent, and in 9% of active BSC-treated patients.Conclusions: Although ipilimumab at 10 mg/kg was manageable, it did not improve irPFS versus BSC. However, comparable median OS of approximately 1 year and a favorable safety profile support the investigation of ipilimumab in combination with other therapies for advanced gastric cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 23(19); 5671-8. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Immunotherapy for patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma: a promising treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Lian, Zhouyang; Liang, Long; Chen, Wenbo; Luo, Xiaoning; Pei, Shufang; Mo, Xiaokai; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Wenhui; Ouyang, Fusheng; Guo, Baoliang; Liang, Changhong; Zhang, Shuixing

    2017-01-01

    There are limited data on the safety and efficacy of immunotherapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (APC). A meta-analysis of single-arm trials is proposed to assess the efficacy and safety of immunotherapy for APC. Eighteen relevant studies involving 527 patients were identified. The pooled disease control rate (DCR), overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), and 1-year survival rate were estimated as 59.32%, 7.90 months, 4.25 months, and 30.12%, respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that the pooled OS, PFS, and 1-year survival rate were significantly higher for autologous activated lymphocyte therapy compared with peptide-based vaccine therapy (OS: 8.28 months vs. 7.40 months; PFS: 6.04 months vs. 3.86 months; 1-year survival rate: 37.17% vs. 19.74%). Another subgroup analysis demonstrated that the pooled endpoints were estimated as obviously higher for immunotherapy plus chemotherapy compared with immunotherapy alone (DCR: 62.51% vs. 47.63%; OS: 8.67 months vs. 4.91 months; PFS: 4.91 months vs. 3.34 months; 1-year survival rate: 32.32% vs. 21.43%). Of the included trials, seven trials reported no treatment related adverse events , five trials reported (16.6 3.9) % grade 3 adverse events and no grade 4 adverse events. In conclusion, immunotherapy is safe and effective in the treatment of APC. PMID:27992378

  8. Analysis of Predictors of Resection and Survival in Locally Advanced Stage III Pancreatic Cancer: Does the Nature of Chemotherapy Regimen Influence Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Bednar, Filip; Zenati, Mazen S; Steve, Jennifer; Winters, Sharon; Ocuin, Lee M; Bahary, Nathan; Hogg, Melissa E; Zeh, Herbert J; Zureikat, Amer H

    2017-05-01

    Locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) historically portends a poor prognosis. FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel have proven effective in the metastatic setting. We sought to evaluate the outcomes of these regimens compared with older regimens in LAPC. A retrospective, single institutional review of all consecutive LAPC treated with "new" (FOLFIRINOX and/or gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel) and "old" (gemcitabine or 5-FU) chemotherapy from 2010 to 2014 was performed. Univariate and multivariate predictors of resection and survival were determined. A total of 92 patients (new chemotherapy = 61, old chemotherapy = 31) were analyzed, of which 19 (21%) underwent eventual resection (median overall survival [OS] = 32 vs. 14.3 months for unresected patients, P = 0.0002). For the overall cohort, resection (hazard ratio [HR] 0.261, P = 0.014), radiation therapy (HR 0.458, P = 0.004), number of lines of chemotherapy (HR 0.486, P = 0.012), and new chemotherapy (HR 0.593 vs. old regimens, P = 0.065) were independent predictors of OS on multivariate analyses (MVA). On MVA, predictors of eventual resection were head and neck tumors (OR 0.307, P = 0.033) or SMA involvement (OR 0.285, P = 0.023). In nonresected patients (73), MVA showed treatment with new chemotherapy (HR 0.452, P = 0.006), radiation (HR 0.459, P = 0.006), and number of lines of CT (HR 0.705, P = 0.013) to be predictors of survival. In LAPC, use of FOLFIRNOX and/or gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel is associated with improved survival compared with older chemotherapy regimens, regardless of eventual resection. Tumor location and relationship to certain vasculature are important determinants of resection in this cohort.

  9. Technical tips and troubleshooting of endoscopic biliary drainage for unresectable malignant hilar biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hiroshi; Itoi, Takao; Kuwatani, Masaki; Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Kubota, Yoshimasa; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-04-01

    Unresectable malignant hilar biliary obstruction (MHBO) occurs in various diseases, such as cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, pancreatic cancer, and lymph node metastasis of the hilum of the liver. The majority of patients with advanced MHBO are not candidates for surgical resection because of the tumor location in the hepatic hilum and adjacent areas, advanced tumor stage, or comorbidities. Therefore, these patients often have a poor prognosis in terms of survival and quality of life. Most of these patients will require non-surgical, palliative biliary drainage. To date, various biliary drainage techniques for unresectable MHBO (UMHBO) have been reported. Of these techniques, endoscopic biliary drainage is currently considered to be the most safe and minimally invasive procedure. However, endoscopic biliary drainage for UMHBO is still not standardized regarding the optimal stent, drainage area, stenting method, and reintervention technique. Recently, towards standardization of this technique for UMHBO, clinical research and trials including randomized controlled trials have been performed. In this article, we reviewed the most important issues regarding endoscopic biliary drainage for UMHBO, focusing on prospective studies. We also described in detail the techniques and future perspectives of endoscopic biliary drainage in patients with UMHBO.

  10. Feasibility of Electromagnetic Transponder Use to Monitor Inter- and Intrafractional Motion in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Eric T.; Kassaee, Alireza; Mitra, Nandita; Vapiwala, Neha; Plastaras, John P.; Drebin, Jeff; Wan, Fei; Metz, James M.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of electromagnetic transponder implantation in patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Secondarily, the use of transponders to monitor inter- and intrafractional motion, and the efficacy of breath holding for limiting target motion, were examined. Methods and Materials: During routine screening laparoscopy, 5 patients without metastatic disease were implanted with transponders peri-tumorally. The Calypso System's localization and tracking modes were used to monitor inter- and intrafractional motion, respectively. Intrafractional motion, with and without breath holding, was also examined using Calypso tracking mode. Results: Transponder implantation was well tolerated in all patients, with minimal migration, aside from 1 patient who expulsed a single transponder. Interfractional motion based on mean shifts from setup using tattoos/orthogonal imaging to transponder based localization from 164 treatments was significant in all dimensions. Mean shift (in millimeters), followed by the standard deviation and p value, were as follows: X-axis: 4.5 mm (1.0, p = 0.01); Y axis: 6.4 mm (1.9, p = 0.03); and Z-axis 3.9 mm (0.6, p = 0.002). Mean intrafractional motion was also found to be significant in all directions: superior, 7.2 mm (0.9, p = 0.01); inferior, 11.9 mm (0.9, p < 0.01); anterior: 4.9 mm (0.5, p = 0.01); posterior, 2.9 mm (0.5, p = 0.02); left, 2.2 mm (0.4, p = 0.02); and right, 3.1 mm (0.6, p = 0.04). Breath holding during treatment significantly decreased tumor motion in all directions. Conclusions: Electromagnetic transponder implantation appears to be safe and effective for monitoring inter- and intrafractional motion. Based on these results a larger clinical trial is underway.

  11. FDA Approval Summary: Sunitinib for the Treatment of Progressive Well-Differentiated Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cortazar, Patricia; Zhang, Jenny J.; Tang, Shenghui; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Murgo, Anthony; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2012-01-01

    On May 20, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved sunitinib malate capsules (Sutent®; Pfizer, Inc., New York) for the treatment of progressive, well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic disease. In a phase III randomized trial, 171 patients received either sunitinib (37.5 mg) or placebo once daily. The progression-free survival (PFS) interval was the primary efficacy endpoint. Secondary endpoints included the overall survival (OS) time, objective response rate (ORR), patient-reported outcomes, and safety. Based on early results favoring sunitinib, the independent data monitoring committee recommended trial termination prior to the prespecified interim analysis. This premature analysis may have led to an overestimate of the treatment effect. In the FDA analysis of investigator-assessed PFS times, the median values for the sunitinib and placebo arms were 10.2 months and 5.4 months, respectively. The ORRs were 9.3% and 0% in the sunitinib and placebo arms, respectively. The OS data were not mature at the time of approval and were confounded by 69% crossover. Common adverse reactions in patients receiving sunitinib included diarrhea, nausea, asthenia, fatigue, neutropenia, hypertension, and palmar–plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome. Two patients on sunitinib died as a result of cardiac failure. The Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee voted eight to two that, despite residual uncertainty about the magnitude of the PFS effect because of early trial termination, sunitinib demonstrated a favorable benefit–risk profile in pNET patients. The FDA concurred with the committee's assessment and granted sunitinib regular approval for this rare malignancy with few available therapies. PMID:22836448

  12. FDA approval summary: sunitinib for the treatment of progressive well-differentiated locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Gideon M; Cortazar, Patricia; Zhang, Jenny J; Tang, Shenghui; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Murgo, Anthony; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2012-01-01

    On May 20, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved sunitinib malate capsules (Sutent®; Pfizer, Inc., New York) for the treatment of progressive, well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic disease. In a phase III randomized trial, 171 patients received either sunitinib (37.5 mg) or placebo once daily. The progression-free survival (PFS) interval was the primary efficacy endpoint. Secondary endpoints included the overall survival (OS) time, objective response rate (ORR), patient-reported outcomes, and safety. Based on early results favoring sunitinib, the independent data monitoring committee recommended trial termination prior to the prespecified interim analysis. This premature analysis may have led to an overestimate of the treatment effect. In the FDA analysis of investigator-assessed PFS times, the median values for the sunitinib and placebo arms were 10.2 months and 5.4 months, respectively. The ORRs were 9.3% and 0% in the sunitinib and placebo arms, respectively. The OS data were not mature at the time of approval and were confounded by 69% crossover. Common adverse reactions in patients receiving sunitinib included diarrhea, nausea, asthenia, fatigue, neutropenia, hypertension, and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome. Two patients on sunitinib died as a result of cardiac failure. The Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee voted eight to two that, despite residual uncertainty about the magnitude of the PFS effect because of early trial termination, sunitinib demonstrated a favorable benefit-risk profile in pNET patients. The FDA concurred with the committee's assessment and granted sunitinib regular approval for this rare malignancy with few available therapies.

  13. Preoperative chemoradiation and IOERT for unresectable or borderline resectable pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Adyr A.; Rule, William G.; Callister, Matthew G.; Reddy, K. Sudhakar; Mulligan, David C.; Collins, Joseph M.; De Petris, Giovanni; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Borad, Mitesh

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Pre-operative chemoradiation (preop CRT) plus intraoperative electron irradiation (IOERT) has been used in the multidisciplinary treatment for patients with locally advanced unresectable or borderline resectable pancreas cancer. This review was performed to evaluate survival, relapse patterns and prognostic factors in patients treated with curative intent. Methods Between January 2002 and December 2010, 48 patients with locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma received preop CRT prior to an attempt at resection and IOERT. 31/48 (65%) patients proceeded to curative-intent surgical resection. Resection status prior to preop CRT was locally unresectable (20 patients) and borderline resectable (11 patients). Preop CRT (45-50.4 Gy/25-28 Fx in 27/31) was delivered with concurrent 5FU or gemcitabine-based regimens. Subsequent gross total resection was achieved in 16 patients (R0, 11; R1, 5). IOERT was delivered in 28 patients (dose, 10-20 Gy). 16 patients also received adjuvant post-operative systemic chemotherapy. Outcomes evaluated include survival, local failure in the EBRT field (LF), central failure in the IOERT field (CF), and distant metastases. Results Resection status was predictive for survival and for patterns of relapse. For patients with at least a gross total resection after preop CRT (R0/R1; n=16) vs. no resection (n=15), both median and overall survival were improved (median 23 vs. 10 months; 2-year, 40% vs. 17%; 3-year, 40% vs. 0%; P=0.002). Liver or peritoneal relapse was documented in 22/31 patients (71%); LF/CF in 5/26 (16%). Conclusions Long term survival and disease control are achievable in select patients with borderline resectable or locally unresectable pancreas cancer when gross total surgical resection is achieved after preop CRT. Continued evaluation of curative-intent combined modality therapy is warranted in this high risk population, but additional strategies are needed to improve resectability and disease

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Karyn A

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of pancreatic cancer represents an area of some controversy. However, local disease progression remains a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality for patients with this disease. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an emerging treatment option for pancreatic cancer, primarily for locally advanced (unresectable) disease as it can provide a therapeutic benefit with significant advantages for patients' quality of life over standard conventional chemoradiation. There may also be a role for SBRT as neoadjuvant therapy for patients with borderline resectable disease to allow conversion to resectability. The objective of this review is to present the data supporting SBRT in pancreatic cancer as well as the potential limitations and caveats of current studies.

  15. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  16. Olaparib in combination with irinotecan, cisplatin, and mitomycin C in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yarchoan, Mark; Myzak, Melinda C; Johnson, Burles A; De Jesus-Acosta, Ana; Le, Dung T; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Azad, Nilofer S; Donehower, Ross C; Zheng, Lei; Oberstein, Paul E; Fine, Robert L; Laheru, Daniel A; Goggins, Michael

    2017-07-04

    Olaparib is an oral inhibitor of polyadenosine 5'-diphosphoribose polymerization (PARP) that has previously shown signs of activity in patients with BRCA mutations and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). In this phase 1 dose-escalation trial in patients with unresectable PDAC, we determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of olaparib (tablet formulation) in combination with irinotecan 70 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8 and cisplatin 25 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8 of a 28-day cycle (olaparib plus IC). We then studied the safety and tolerability of adding mitomycin C 5 mg/m2 on day 1 to this regimen (olaparib plus ICM). 18 patients with unresectable PDAC were enrolled. The MTD of olaparib plus IC was olaparib 100 mg twice-daily on days 1 and 8. The addition of mitomycin C to this dose level was not tolerated. Grade ≥3 drug-related adverse events (AEs) were encountered in 16 patients (89%). The most common grade ≥3 drug-related toxicities included neutropenia (89%), lymphopenia (72%), and anemia (22%). Two patients (11%), both of whom had remained on study for more than 12 cycles, developed drug-related myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The objective response rate (ORR) for all evaluable patients was 23%. One patient who carried a deleterious germline BRCA2 mutation had a durable clinical response lasting more than four years, but died from complications of treatment-related MDS. Olaparib had substantial toxicity when combined with IC or ICM in patients with PDAC, and this treatment combination did not have an acceptable risk/benefit profile for further study. However, durable clinical responses were observed in a subset of patients and further clinical investigation of PARP inhibitors in PDAC is warranted. This clinical trial was registered on ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT01296763.

  17. Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Johung, Kimberly; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Chang, Bryan W.

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative, but the majority of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment for patients with locally advanced disease is controversial. Therapeutic options include systemic therapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. We review the evidence to date regarding the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), as well as evolving strategies including the emerging role of targeted therapies. We propose that if radiation is used for patients with LAPC, it should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy and following a period of induction chemotherapy.

  18. Gemcitabine Alone Versus Gemcitabine Plus Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: An Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Trial

    PubMed Central

    Loehrer, Patrick J.; Feng, Yang; Cardenes, Higinia; Wagner, Lynne; Brell, Joanna M.; Cella, David; Flynn, Patrick; Ramanathan, Ramesh K.; Crane, Christopher H.; Alberts, Steven R.; Benson, Al B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the role of radiation therapy with concurrent gemcitabine (GEM) compared with GEM alone in patients with localized unresectable pancreatic cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with localized unresectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were randomly assigned to receive GEM alone (at 1,000 mg/m2/wk for weeks 1 to 6, followed by 1 week rest, then for 3 of 4 weeks) or GEM (600 mg/m2/wk for weeks 1 to 5, then 4 weeks later 1,000 mg/m2 for 3 of 4 weeks) plus radiotherapy (starting on day 1, 1.8 Gy/Fx for total of 50.4 Gy). Measurement of quality of life using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Hepatobiliary questionnaire was also performed. Results Of 74 patients entered on trial and randomly assigned to receive GEM alone (arm A; n = 37) or GEM plus radiation (arm B; n = 34), patients in arm B had greater incidence of grades 4 and 5 toxicities (41% v 9%), but grades 3 and 4 toxicities combined were similar (77% in A v 79% in B). No statistical differences were seen in quality of life measurements at 6, 15 to 16, and 36 weeks. The primary end point was survival, which was 9.2 months (95% CI, 7.9 to 11.4 months) and 11.1 months (95% CI, 7.6 to 15.5 months) for arms A and B, respectively (one-sided P = .017 by stratified log-rank test). Conclusion This trial demonstrates improved overall survival with the addition of radiation therapy to GEM in patients with localized unresectable pancreatic cancer, with acceptable toxicity. PMID:21969502

  19. Advances in the endoscopic management of pancreatic collections.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Clavijo, David; de la Higuera, Belen González; Vila, Juan J

    2015-04-16

    Treatment of pancreatic collections has experienced great progress in recent years with the emergence of alternative minimally invasive techniques comparing to the classic surgical treatment. Such techniques have been shown to improve outcomes of morbidity vs surgical treatment. The recent emergence of endoscopic drainage is noteworthy. The advent of endoscopic ultrasonography has been crucial for treatment of these specific lesions. They can be characterized, their relationships with neighboring structures can be evaluated and the drainage guided by this technique has been clearly improved compared with the conventional endoscopic drainage. Computed tomography is the technique of choice to characterize the recently published new classification of pancreatic collections. For this reason, the radiologist's role establishing and classifying in a rigorously manner the collections according to the new nomenclature is essential to making therapeutic decisions. Ideal scenario for comprehensive treatment of these collections would be those centers with endoscopic ultrasound and interventional radiology expertise together with hepatobiliopancreatic surgery. This review describes the different types of pancreatic collections: acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pancreatic pseudocysts, acute necrotic collection and walled-off necrosis; the indications and the contraindications for endoscopic drainage, the drainage technique and their outcomes. The integrated management of pancreatic collections according to their type and evolution time is discussed.

  20. The serum miR-21 level serves as a predictor for the chemosensitivity of advanced pancreatic cancer, and miR-21 expression confers chemoresistance by targeting FasL.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zhuang, Liping; Zhang, Juan; Fan, Jie; Luo, Jianmin; Chen, Hao; Wang, Kun; Liu, Luming; Chen, Zhen; Meng, Zhiqiang

    2013-06-01

    miR-21 expression in cancer tissue has been reported to be associated with the clinical outcome and activity of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer. However, resection is possible in only a minority of patients due to the advanced stages often present at the time of diagnosis, and safely obtaining sufficient quantities of pancreatic tumor tissue for molecular analysis is difficult at the unresectable stages. In this study, we investigated whether the serum level of miR-21 could be used as a predictor of chemosensitivity. We tested the levels of serum miR-21 in a cohort of 177 cases of advanced pancreatic cancer who received gemcitabine-based palliative chemotherapy. We found that a high level of miR-21 in the serum was significantly correlated with a shortened time-to-progression (TTP) and a lower overall survival (OS). The serum miR-21 level was an independent prognostic factor for both the TTP and the OS (HR 1.920; 95% CI, 1.274-2.903, p = 0.002 for TTP and HR 1.705; 95% CI, 1.147-2.535, p = 0.008 for OS). The results from a functional study showed that gemcitabine exposure down-regulated miR-21 expression and up-regulated FasL expression. The increased FasL expression following gemcitabine treatment induced cancer cell apoptosis, whereas the ectopic expression of miR-21 partially protected the cancer cells from gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Additionally, we confirmed that FasL was a direct target of miR-21. Therefore, the serum level of miR-21 may serve as a predictor of chemosensitivity in advanced pancreatic cancer. Additionally, we identified a new mechanism of chemoresistance mediated by the effects of miR-21 on the FasL/Fas pathway.

  1. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... removal is sometimes performed along with a sphincterotomy. Stent placement. Using the endoscope, the doctor places a ... a narrowed pancreatic or bile duct. A temporary stent may be placed for a few months to ...

  2. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma Using the Dorsal Approach: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffer, Hester J. Melenhorst, Marleen C. A. M.; Vogel, Jantien A.; Tilborg, Aukje A. J. M. van; Nielsen, Karin Kazemier, Geert; Meijerink, Martijn R.

    2015-06-15

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel image-guided ablation technique that is increasingly used to treat locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). We describe a 67-year-old male patient with a 5 cm stage III pancreatic tumor who was referred for IRE. Because the ventral approach for electrode placement was considered dangerous due to vicinity of the tumor to collateral vessels and duodenum, the dorsal approach was chosen. Under CT-guidance, six electrodes were advanced in the tumor, approaching paravertebrally alongside the aorta and inferior vena cava. Ablation was performed without complications. This case describes that when ventral electrode placement for pancreatic IRE is impaired, the dorsal approach could be considered alternatively.

  3. Impact of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Among Patients with Pancreatic Fistula After Gastrectomy for Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Takashi; Akiyama, Hirotoshi; Makino, Hirochika; Kimura, Jun; Takagawa, Ryo; Ono, Hidetaka A; Kunisaki, Chikara; Endo, Itaru

    2016-04-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) has been widely adopted for patients with advanced gastric cancer; however, the safety of gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy followed by NAC has not yet been evaluated. We retrospectively analyzed the influence of NAC on morbidity and mortality after gastrectomy in patients with advanced gastric cancer. A series of 364 patients with advanced gastric cancer who underwent gastrectomy without pancreatectomy between January 2008 and December 2010 at eight hospitals registered to the Yokohama Clinical Oncology Group were studied retrospectively. There were 330 patients who underwent surgical treatment immediately after diagnosis (surgery alone group) and 34 patients (NAC group) who first received NAC and then underwent surgical resection. Although there were no significant differences in the morbidity rate between the two groups, postoperative pancreatic fistula was more often observed in NAC patients than in patients of the group treated with surgery alone [5 cases (14.7%) vs. 11 cases (3.3%); p=0.011]. In the univariate analysis, NAC (p=0.029), bursectomy (p<0.001) and operative bleeding (≥300 ml, p=0.002), were significantly correlated with postoperative pancreatic fistula, and NAC [odds ratio (OR)=4.901, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.455-16.67; p=0.010] and bursectomy (OR=11.2, 95% CI=3.460-37.04; p<0.001) were independent risk factors for postoperative pancreatic fistula by multivariate analysis. The incidence of postoperative pancreatic fistula was 40.0% among patients who underwent gastrectomy with bursectomy followed by NAC. The incidence of pancreatic fistula in patients treated with NAC and bursectomy was significantly higher than that in other patients. Bursectomy may be discouraged for the prevention of pancreatic fistula from gastrectomy following NAC. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Nanovectors for anti-cancer drug delivery in the treatment of advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Chung-Tzu; Selim, Julie H; Tsai, James Y; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    Liposome, albumin and polymer polyethylene glycol are nanovector formulations successfully developed for anti-cancer drug delivery. There are significant differences in pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicity between pre- and post-nanovector modification. The alteration in clinical pharmacology is instrumental for the future development of nanovector-based anticancer therapeutics. We have reviewed the results of clinical studies and translational research in nanovector-based anti-cancer therapeutics in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, including nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel and nanoliposomal irinotecan. Furthermore, we have appraised the ongoing studies incorporating novel agents with nanomedicines in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27610018

  5. [Acute pancreatitis: recent advances in understanding its pathophysiology].

    PubMed

    Telek, G; Fehér, J; Jakab, F; Claude, R

    2000-02-06

    This article reviews the recent changes in the understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology emphasizing results deriving from the more detailed comprehension of the local and systemic aspects of the inflammatory process. The authors briefly discuss those theories that have been influencing the basic philosophies of treatment efforts. The role of premature digestive enzyme activation as the principal determinant of the pathoetiology and mortality of this disease has been questioned lately, and the inflammatory explosion has been placed into the center of attention. Simultaneously with the enzyme activation, the pancreatitogenic noxious event rapidly induces the formation of oxygen derived free radicals, activation of the transcription factor NF kappa-B, with consequent citokine production, cellular adhesion molecule upregulation and leukocyte hyperstimulation. Numerous other mediator cascades are activated in parallel, the uncontrolled surge of proinflammatory stimuli, and activity of the effector cells lead to multiple organ failure in severe cases. A genetically determined catastrophe management program is set forth in the acinar cell with pancreatitis associated protein expression and activation of the apoptosis machinery. Therapeutic approaches based on these recent findings are briefly touched upon.

  6. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    DiMagno, Matthew J; DiMagno, Eugene P

    2012-09-01

    We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis reported in 2011. Smoking increases the risk of nongallstone acute pancreatitis and the progression of acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatitis. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for acute pancreatitis. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90 000 United States Pharmacopeia units of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared with endoscopic treatment in patients advanced chronic pancreatitis with a dilated main duct ± pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with chronic pancreatitis but approximately 30% of patients have significant side effects. Patients with nongallstone-related acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis of any cause should cease smoking. Results of this year's investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in chronic pancreatitis.

  7. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Biliary Tract or Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  8. SPARC gene variants predict clinical outcome in locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Arqueros, Cristina; Salazar, Juliana; Arranz, M J; Sebio, Ana; Mora, Josefina; Sullivan, Ivana; Tobeña, María; Martín-Richard, Marta; Barnadas, Agustí; Baiget, Montserrat; Páez, David

    2017-08-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is a glycoprotein of the extracellular matrix whose expression can be altered in malignant pancreatic cells and in the adjacent stromal fibroblasts. We evaluated the possible role of SPARC gene variants as prognostic markers for locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer. We analyzed eight tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (TagSNPs) in the SPARC gene in 74 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma treated with chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy. TagSNPs were chosen using the HapMap genome browser and Haploview software 4.2 based on two predefined criteria: (1) coefficient cutoff of 0.80 and (2) minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥ 0.10. Univariate analyses revealed significant associations between four SNPs (rs17718347, rs2347128, rs3210714, and rs967527) and PFS. The rs3210714 genetic variant was also associated with OS. In the multivariate analyses, rs17718347 (HR 0.4; 95% CI 0.2-0.8; p = 0.013) and rs2347128 (HR 0.5; 95% CI 0.3-0.9; p = 0.049) remained statistically associated with PFS. In addition, patients harboring the T-A-G haplotype (rs17718347, rs1978707, rs2347128) had a better PFS (p = 0.002). Our findings suggest that SPARC polymorphisms may be useful in predicting outcome in patients with locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer.

  9. Efficacy of Capecitabine Plus Oxaliplatin Combination Chemotherapy for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer after Failure of First-Line Gemcitabine-Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kwang Hyun; Ryu, Ji Kon; Son, Jun Hyuk; Lee, Jae Woo; Jang, Dong Kee; Lee, Sang Hyub; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Second-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) that progresses following gemcitabine-based treatment has not been established. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of second-line combination chemotherapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX) in these patients. Methods Between August 2011 and May 2014, all patients who received at least one cycle of XELOX (capecitabine, 1,000 mg/m2 twice daily for 14 days; oxaliplatin, 130 mg/m2 on day 1 of a 3-week cycle) combination chemotherapy for unresectable or recurrent PDAC were retrospectively recruited. The response was evaluated every 9 weeks, and the tumor response rate, progression-free survival and overall survival, and adverse events were assessed. Results Sixty-two patients were included; seven patients (11.3%) had a partial tumor response, and 20 patients (32.3%) had stable disease. The median progression-free and overall survival were 88 days (range, 35.1 to 140.9 days) and 158 days (range, 118.1 to 197.9 days), respectively. Patients who remained stable longer with frontline therapy (≥120 days) exhibited significantly longer progression-free and overall survival. The most common grade 3 to 4 adverse events in patients were vomiting (8.1%) and anorexia (6.5%). There was one treatment-related mortality caused by severe neutropenia and typhlitis. Conclusions Second-line XELOX combination chemotherapy demonstrated an acceptable response and survival rate in patients with advanced PDAC who had failed gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. PMID:27965478

  10. A current perspective on stereotactic body radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Julian C; Czito, Brian G; Willett, Christopher G; Palta, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a formidable malignancy with poor outcomes. The majority of patients are unable to undergo resection, which remains the only potentially curative treatment option. The management of locally advanced (unresectable) pancreatic cancer is controversial; however, treatment with either chemotherapy or chemoradiation is associated with high rates of local tumor progression and metastases development, resulting in low survival rates. An emerging local modality is stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), which uses image-guided, conformal, high-dose radiation. SBRT has demonstrated promising local control rates and resultant quality of life with acceptable rates of toxicity. Over the past decade, increasing clinical experience and data have supported SBRT as a local treatment modality. Nevertheless, additional research is required to further evaluate the role of SBRT and improve upon the persistently poor outcomes associated with pancreatic cancer. This review discusses the existing clinical experience and technical implementation of SBRT for pancreatic cancer and highlights the directions for ongoing and future studies. PMID:27826200

  11. Phase I dose-escalation study of cabazitaxel administered in combination with gemcitabine in patients with metastatic or unresectable advanced solid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Puzanov, Igor; LoRusso, Patricia M.; Cohen, Roger B.; Morris, John C.; Olowokure, Olugbenga O.; Yin, Jian Y.; Doroumian, Séverine; Shen, Liji; Olszanski, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Taxane–gemcitabine combinations have demonstrated antitumor activity. This phase I study (NCT01001221) aimed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of cabazitaxel plus gemcitabine and to assess the preliminary efficacy of this combination. The patients included had metastatic or unresectable solid tumors and had exhausted standard treatment. Cohorts of three to six patients received cabazitaxel (15–20 mg/m2) before (part 1a) or after (part 1b) gemcitabine (700–1000 mg/m2) on Day 1 and gemcitabine alone on Day 8. Prophylactic growth factors were not allowed in cycle 1. In part 1a (n=12), five patients received 20 mg/m2 cabazitaxel plus 1000 mg/m2 gemcitabine (20/1000), five received 15/900, two received 15/700. In part 1b, all six patients received the lowest dose (700/15). At all doses, two or more patients experienced a DLT, regardless of administration sequence, including febrile neutropenia (n=4), grade 4 neutropenia (n=2), grade 4 thrombocytopenia (n=2), and grade 3 aspartate transaminase increase (n=1). The MTD was not established as all cohorts exceeded the MTD by definition. All patients experienced an adverse event; the most frequent all-grade nonhematologic events were fatigue (66.7%), decreased appetite (50.0%), and diarrhea (44.4%). The most frequent grade 3–4 hematologic abnormalities were neutropenia (83.3%), leukopenia (77.8%), and lymphopenia (72.2%). Toxicity was sequence-independent but appeared worse with gemcitabine followed by cabazitaxel. Durable partial responses were observed in three patients (prostate cancer, appendiceal cancer, and melanoma). The unacceptable DLTs with cabazitaxel plus gemcitabine, at doses reduced more than 25% from single-agent doses, preclude further investigation. PMID:26020806

  12. [Efficacy of whole body gamma-knife radiotherapy combined with thermochemotherapy on locally advanced pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Ping; Nie, Qing; Kang, Jing-Bo; Wang, Bin; Cai, Chang-Lan; Li, Jian-Guo; Qi, Wen-Jie

    2008-11-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are major therapies for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. This study was to evaluate the efficacy of three-dimensional conformal gamma-knife radiotherapy combined with thermochemotherapy on locally advanced pancreatic cancer. From December 2001 to January 2006, 75 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer were divided into radiotherapy group (37 patients) and combination group (38 patients). All patients received gamma-knife radiotherapy using Stereotactic Radiotherapy Gamma Rays System, with iso-dose curves of 50%-60%, tumor encircling dose of 3.0-4.5 Gy per fraction, 8-11 fractions. The patients in combination group received simultaneous thermotherapy at 41.5-43.5 celsius (1 h/fraction, twice a week for 6 times), and chemotherapy with venous administration of tegafur (0.5-1.0 g) and calcium folinate (CF, 0.2 g) for 4-6 times, or venous administration of gemcitabine (0.6-1.0 g/m2) on Days 1 and 8 and cisplatin (DDP) (20-30 mg/m2) on Days 1-3, repeated every 28 days for 3-6 cycles. At 3 months after treatment, the total response (complete remission and partial remission) rate was 70.7% (53/75); the response rate was 73.7% in combination group and 67.5% in radiotherapy group. The 1-year survival rate was 48.3%, and the 2-year survival rate was 22.1%. The 1-and 2-year survival rates were 51.2% and 26.5% in combination group, and 45.2% and 17.6% in radiotherapy group. No serious complications, such as perforation, bleeding and high fever, were seen during treatment and follow-up. 3-D conformal gamma-knife radiotherapy combined with thermochemotherapy is well tolerated and is relatively effective for most patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  13. Therapy of locally unresectable pancreatic carcinoma: a randomized comparison of high dose (6000 rads) radiation alone, moderate dose radiation (4000 rads + 5-fluorouracil), and high dose radiation + 5-fluorouracil: the Gastrointestinal Tumor Study Group. [X ray

    SciTech Connect

    Moertel, C.G.; Frytak, S.; Hahn, R.G.

    1981-10-15

    One-hundred-ninety-four eligible and evaluable patients with histologically confirmed locally unresectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were randomly assigned to therapy with high-dose (6000 rads) radiation therapy alone, to moderate-dose (4000 rads) radiation + 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and to high-dose radiation plus 5-FU. Median survival with radiation alone was only 5 1/2 months from date of diagnosis. Both 5-FU-containing treatment regimens produced a highly significant survival improvement when compared with radiation alone. Survival differences between 4000 rads plus 5-FU and 6000 rads plus 5-FU were not significant with an overall median survival of ten months. Significant prognostic variables, in addition to treatment, were pretreatment performance status and pretreatment CEA level. The toxic reactions related to the treatment are discussed.

  14. Complete Remission of Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Combined Sorafenib and Adjuvant Yttrium-90 Radioembolization.

    PubMed

    Lorenzin, Dario; Pravisani, Riccardo; Leo, Cosimo Alex; Bugiantella, Walter; Soardo, Giorgio; Carnelutti, Alessia; Umberto, Baccarani; Risaliti, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Sorafenib has improved the median overall survival of unresectable or otherwise untreatable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) of ∼3 months, compared to supportive cares. Complete response, although rare, has been reported. The authors reported herein a case of complete biochemical and radiological remission of advanced unresectable HCC with lymph node metastasis and tumoral portal vein thrombosis treated by 5 months therapy with sorafenib followed by adjuvant Yttrium-90 radioembolization. At 12 months follow-up, there is no evidence of HCC recurrence.

  15. Carcinoma of the pancreas: results of irradiation for unresectable lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Komaki, R.; Wilson, J.F.; Cox, J.D.; Kline, R.W.

    1980-02-01

    From 1973 to 1977, 20 patients who had histologically proven unresectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas with no distant metastases were irradiated at the Medical College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals. The patients received megavoltage external irradiation to minimum tumor doses ranging between 3000 rad in 4 weeks and 5700 rad in 7 weeks (median 4600 rad in 6 weeks); their actuarial survival was 54% at 12 months and 21% at 24 months. Fourteen patients who received 4500 rad or more in 6 to 7 weeks had a median survival of 13 months. Six patients received less than 4500 rad in 3 to 6 weeks, and their median survival was 7 months. At this writing, three patients are alive and apparently disease free more than 2 years after treatment. Complications were seen in two patients. One died from GI bleeding 2 months after completion of radiation therapy, and the other patient developed pancreatic insufficiency. These results and recent reports in the literature show that aggressive irradiation can result in long-term disease free survival in a small proportion of patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Further exploitation of this approach alone or combined with chemotherapy is warranted.

  16. Doxorubicin plus evofosfamide versus doxorubicin alone in locally advanced, unresectable or metastatic soft-tissue sarcoma (TH CR-406/SARC021): an international, multicentre, open-label, randomised phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Tap, William D; Papai, Zsuzsanna; Van Tine, Brian A; Attia, Steven; Ganjoo, Kristen N; Jones, Robin L; Schuetze, Scott; Reed, Damon; Chawla, Sant P; Riedel, Richard F; Krarup-Hansen, Anders; Toulmonde, Maud; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Hohenberger, Peter; Grignani, Giovanni; Cranmer, Lee D; Okuno, Scott; Agulnik, Mark; Read, William; Ryan, Christopher W; Alcindor, Thierry; Del Muro, Xavier F Garcia; Budd, G Thomas; Tawbi, Hussein; Pearce, Tillman; Kroll, Stew; Reinke, Denise K; Schöffski, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Evofosfamide is a hypoxia-activated prodrug of bromo-isophosphoramide mustard. We aimed to assess the benefit of adding evofosfamide to doxorubicin as first-line therapy for advanced soft-tissue sarcomas. We did this international, open-label, randomised, phase 3, multicentre trial (TH CR-406/SARC021) at 81 academic or community investigational sites in 13 countries. Eligible patients were aged 15 years or older with a diagnosis of an advanced unresectable or metastatic soft-tissue sarcoma, of intermediate or high grade, for which no standard curative therapy was available, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-1, and measurable disease by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors version 1.1. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive doxorubicin alone (75 mg/m(2) via bolus injection administered over 5-20 min or continuous intravenous infusion for 6-96 h on day 1 of every 21-day cycle for up to six cycles) or doxorubicin (given via the same dose procedure) plus evofosfamide (300 mg/m(2) intravenously for 30-60 min on days 1 and 8 of every 21-day cycle for up to six cycles). After six cycles of treatment, patients in the single-drug doxorubicin group were followed up expectantly whereas patients with stable or responsive disease in the combination group were allowed to continue with evofosfamide monotherapy until documented disease progression. A web-based central randomisation with block sizes of two and four was stratified by extent of disease, doxorubicin administration method, and previous systemic therapy. Patients and investigators were not masked to treatment assignment. The primary endpoint was overall survival, analysed in the intention-to-treat population. Safety analyses were done in all patients who received any amount of study drug. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01440088. Between Sept 26, 2011, and Jan 22, 2014, 640 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to a treatment group (317 to

  17. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: does chemotherapy work?

    PubMed

    Tejani, Mohamedtaki Abdulaziz; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-03-10

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are rare well-differentiated neoplasms which can be functional or non-functional. They tend to have a worse prognosis than their counterpart carcinoid tumors. Current systemic treatment options for advanced, unresectable disease include somatostatin analogs, everolimus and sunitinib. Low response rates and toxicity profiles have, thus far, limited the widespread use of cytotoxic chemotherapy in this setting. In this update, we review three abstracts from the 2014 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium that present outcomes of the use of combination capecitabine and temozolomide in patients with advanced pNET. We summarize their results and discuss the role of this regimen in treatment algorithms for metastatic pNET.

  18. L-Carnitine-supplementation in advanced pancreatic cancer (CARPAN) - a randomized multicentre trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cachexia, a >10% loss of body-weight, is one factor determining the poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer. Deficiency of L-Carnitine has been proposed to cause cancer cachexia. Findings We screened 152 and enrolled 72 patients suffering from advanced pancreatic cancer in a prospective, multi-centre, placebo-controlled, randomized and double-blinded trial to receive oral L-Carnitine (4 g) or placebo for 12 weeks. At entry patients reported a mean weight loss of 12 ± 2,5 (SEM) kg. During treatment body-mass-index increased by 3,4 ± 1,4% under L-Carnitine and decreased (−1,5 ± 1,4%) in controls (p < 0,05). Moreover, nutritional status (body cell mass, body fat) and quality-of-life parameters improved under L-Carnitine. There was a trend towards an increased overall survival in the L-Carnitine group (median 519 ± 50 d versus 399 ± 43 d, not significant) and towards a reduced hospital-stay (36 ± 4d versus 41 ± 9d,n.s.). Conclusion While these data are preliminary and need confirmation they indicate that patients with pancreatic cancer may have a clinically relevant benefit from the inexpensive and well tolerated oral supplementation of L-Carnitine. PMID:22824168

  19. Clinical and Immune Effects of Lenalidomide in Combination with Gemcitabine in Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ullenhag, Gustav J.; Mozaffari, Fariba; Broberg, Mats; Mellstedt, Håkan; Liljefors, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To assess the immunomodulatory and clinical effects of lenalidomide with standard treatment of gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were treated in first line with lenalidomide orally for 21 days of a 28 days cycle and the standard regimen for gemcitabine. In Part I, which we previously have reported, the dose of lenalidomide was defined (n = 12). In Part II, every other consecutive patient was treated with either lenalidomide (Group A, n = 11) or gemcitabine (Group B, n = 10) during cycle 1. From cycle 2 on, all Part II patients received the combination. Results A significant decrease in the proliferative response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the frequency of DCs were noted in patients at baseline compared to healthy control donors while the frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, NK-cells and MDSCs were significantly higher in patients compared to controls. In Group A, a significant increase in the absolute numbers of activated (HLA-DR+) CD4 and CD8 T cells and CD8 effector memory T cells (p<0.01) was noted during treatment. A statistical increment in the absolute numbers of Tregs were seen after cycle 1 (p<0.05). The addition of gemcitabine, reduced most lymphocyte subsets (p<0.05). In Group B, the proportion of lymphocytes remained unchanged during the study period. There was no difference in overall survival, progression free survival and survival rate at one year comparing the two groups. Discussion Patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma had impaired immune functions. Lenalidomide augmented T cell reactivities, which were abrogated by gemcitabine. However, addition of lenalidomide to gemcitabine seemed to have no therapeutic impact compared to gemcitabine alone in this non-randomized study. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01547260 PMID:28099502

  20. Efficacy and Factors Affecting Outcome of Gemcitabine Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, P.-I.; Chao, Yee; Li, C.-P.; Lee, R.-C.; Chi, K.-H.; Shiau, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-W.; Yen, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and prognostic factors of gemcitabine (GEM) concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2005, 55 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with GEM (400 mg/m{sup 2}/wk) concurrently with radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 26-61.2) at Taipei Veterans General Hospital were enrolled. GEM (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) was continued after CCRT as maintenance therapy once weekly for 3 weeks and repeated every 4 weeks. The response, survival, toxicity, and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.8 months, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 52% and 19%, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) and median time to progression (TTP) was 12.4 and 5.9 months, respectively. The response rate was 42% (2 complete responses and 21 partial responses). The major Grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (22%) and anorexia (19%). The median OS and TTP was 15.8 and 9.5 months in the GEM CCRT responders compared with 7.5 and 3.5 months in the nonresponders, respectively (both p < 0.001). The responders had a better Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (86 {+-} 2 vs. 77 {+-} 2, p = 0.002) and had received a greater GEM dose intensity (347 {+-} 13 mg/m{sup 2}/wk vs. 296 {+-} 15 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, p = 0.02) than the nonresponders. KPS and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were the most significant prognostic factors of OS and TTP. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that GEM CCRT is effective and tolerable for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The KPS and GEM dose correlated with response. Also, the KPS and CA 19-9 level were the most important factors affecting OS and TTP.

  1. Association between protein C levels and mortality in patients with advanced prostate, lung and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilts, I T; Hutten, B A; Meijers, J C M; Spek, C A; Büller, H R; Kamphuisen, P W

    2017-06-01

    Procoagulant factors promote cancer progression and metastasis. Protein C is involved in hemostasis, inflammation and signal transduction, and has a protective effect on the endothelial barrier. In mice, administration of activated protein C reduced experimental metastasis. We assessed the association between protein C and mortality in patients with three types of cancer. The study population consisted of patients with advanced prostate, non-small cell lung or pancreatic cancer, who participated in the INPACT trial (NCT00312013). The trial evaluated the addition of nadroparin to chemotherapy in patients with advanced malignancy. Patients were divided into tertiles based on protein C at baseline. The association between protein C levels and mortality was evaluated with Cox proportional hazard models. We analysed 477 patients (protein C tertiles: <97, 97-121 and ≥121%). Mean age was 65±9years; 390 (82%) were male; 191 patients (40%) had prostate cancer, 161 (34%) had lung cancer, and 125 (26%) pancreatic cancer. During a median follow-up of 10.4months, 291 patients (61%) died. Median protein C level was 107% (IQR 92-129). In the lowest tertile, 75 patients per 100 patient-years died, as compared to 60 and 54 in the middle and high tertile, respectively. Lower levels of protein C were associated with increased mortality (in tertiles: HR for trend 1.18, 95%CI 1.02-1.36, adjusted for age, sex and nadroparin use; as a continuous variable: HR 1.004, 95%CI 1.00-1.008, p=0.07). Protein C seems inversely associated with mortality in patients with advanced prostate, lung and pancreatic cancer. Further research should validate protein C as a biomarker for mortality, and explore the effects of protein C on progression of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Phase I Results of Vinorelbine With Concurrent Radiotherapy in Elderly Patients With Unresectable, Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: West Japan Thoracic Oncology Group (WJTOG3005-DI)

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Hideyuki; Seto, Takashi; Igawa, Satoshi; Tsuya, Asuka; Wada, Mayuko; Kaira, Kyoichi; Naito, Tateaki; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Masuda, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of concurrent vinorelbine and thoracic radiotherapy in elderly patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients were 71 years of age or older with unresectable Stage III NSCLC. Patients were treated with thoracic radiotherapy (60 Gy) and concurrent vinorelbine (20 mg/m{sup 2} in Level 1 and 25 mg/m{sup 2} in Level 2) on Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks for two cycles, followed by adjuvant vinorelbine (25 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks for two cycles. Results: Four patients were enrolled at Level 1. One patient experienced Grade 3 febrile neutropenia at Level 1 and the dose was escalated to Level 2. At Level 2, 2 of 6 patients experienced dose-limiting toxicities (Grade 4 neutropenia in 1 patient and Grade 3 infection in another). Three of 6 patients developed late Grade 2 or 3 pneumonitis. Therefore, the dose was de-escalated to Level 1. An additional 6 patients were enrolled at Level 1, 4 of whom experienced dose-limiting toxicities (incomplete radiotherapy because of Grade 2 pneumonitis in 1 patient and Grade 3 infection in 1, Grade 3 febrile neutropenia in 1, and Grade 3 esophagitis in 1). Moreover, late Grade 3 pneumothorax and Grade 5 pneumonitis occurred in 1 and 1 patient, respectively. Overall, Grade 2, 3 and 5 pneumonitis occurred in 3, 3, and 1 among 16 patients, respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent vinorelbine and thoracic radiotherapy resulted in a high incidence of severe pneumonitis when the standard dose of this agent was used for elderly patients. We therefore recommend caution in the use of this regimen and schedule for elderly patients.

  3. Vandetanib for the treatment of symptomatic or progressive medullary thyroid cancer in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic disease: U.S. Food and Drug Administration drug approval summary.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Katherine; Kim, Geoffrey; Maher, V Ellen; Chattopadhyay, Somesh; Tang, Shenghui; Moon, Young Jin; Song, Pengfei; Marathe, Anshu; Balakrishnan, Suchitra; Zhu, Hao; Garnett, Christine; Liu, Qi; Booth, Brian; Gehrke, Brenda; Dorsam, Robert; Verbois, Leigh; Ghosh, Debasis; Wilson, Wendy; Duan, John; Sarker, Haripada; Miksinski, Sarah Pope; Skarupa, Lisa; Ibrahim, Amna; Justice, Robert; Murgo, Anthony; Pazdur, Richard

    2012-07-15

    On April 6, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved vandetanib (Caprelsa tablets; AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP) for the treatment of symptomatic or progressive medullary thyroid cancer in patients with unresectable, locally advanced, or metastatic disease. Vandetanib is the first drug approved for this indication, and this article focuses on the basis of approval. Approval was based on the results of a double-blind trial conducted in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma. Patients were randomized 2:1 to vandetanib, 300 mg/d orally (n = 231), or to placebo (n = 100). The primary objective was demonstration of improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) with vandetanib compared with placebo. Other endpoints included evaluation of overall survival and objective response rate. The PFS analysis showed a marked improvement for patients randomized to vandetanib (hazard ratio = 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.24-0.53; P < 0.0001). The objective response rate for the vandetanib arm was 44% compared with 1% for the placebo arm. The most common grade 3 and 4 toxicities (>5%) were diarrhea and/or colitis, hypertension and hypertensive crisis, fatigue, hypocalcemia, rash, and corrected QT interval (QTc) prolongation. This approval was based on a statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in PFS. Given the toxicity profile, which includes prolongation of the QT interval and sudden death, only prescribers and pharmacies certified through the vandetanib Risk Evaluation Mitigation Strategy Program are able to prescribe and dispense vandetanib. Treatment-related risks should be taken into account when considering the use of vandetanib in patients with indolent, asymptomatic, or slowly progressing disease.

  4. Proteomic strategies in the search for novel pancreatic cancer biomarkers and drug targets: recent advances and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Orla; Henry, Michael; McVey, Gerard; Clynes, Martin; Moriarty, Michael; Meleady, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the deadliest cancers; despite a low incidence rate it is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Improvement of the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment remains the main focus of pancreatic cancer research. Rapid developments in proteomic technologies has improved our understanding of the pancreatic cancer proteome. Here, the authors summarise the recent proteomic strategies undertaken in the search for: novel biomarkers for early diagnosis, pancreatic cancer-specific proteins which may be used for novel targeted therapies and proteins which may be useful for monitoring disease progression post-therapy. Recent advances and findings discussed here provide great promise of having a significant clinical impact and improving the outcome of patients with this malignancy.

  5. Bioelectrical impedance phase angle as a prognostic indicator in advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Digant; Lis, Christopher G; Dahlk, Sadie L; Vashi, Pankaj G; Grutsch, James F; Lammersfeld, Carolyn A

    2004-12-01

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is an easy-to-use, non-invasive and reproducible technique to evaluate changes in body composition and nutritional status. Phase angle, determined by BIA, has been found to be a prognostic indicator in several chronic conditions, such as HIV, liver cirrhosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer, and in patients undergoing dialysis. The present study investigated the prognostic role of phase angle in advanced pancreatic cancer. We evaluated a case series of fifty-eight stage IV pancreatic cancer patients treated at Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Midwestern Regional Medical Center (Zion, IL, USA) between January 2000 and July 2003. BIA was conducted on all patients using a bioelectrical impedance analyser that operated at 50 kHz. The phase angle was calculated as capacitance (Xc)/resistance (R) and expressed in degrees. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival. Cox proportional hazard models were constructed to evaluate the prognostic effect of phase angle independent of other clinical and nutritional variables. The correlations between phase angle and traditional nutritional measures were evaluated using Pearson and Spearman coefficients. Patients with phase angle <5.0 degrees had a median survival time of 6.3 (95% CI 3.5, 9.2) months (n 29), while those with phase angle >5.0 degrees had a median survival time of 10.2 (95% CI 9.6, 10.8) months (n 29); this difference was statistically significant (P=0.02). The present study demonstrates that phase angle is a strong prognostic indicator in advanced pancreatic cancer. Similar studies in other cancer settings with larger sample sizes are needed to further validate the prognostic significance of the phase angle.

  6. Phase I Study of Daily Irinotecan as a Radiation Sensitizer for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fouchardiere, Christelle de la; Negrier, Sylvie; Labrosse, Hugues; Martel Lafay, Isabelle; Desseigne, Francoise; Meeus, Pierre; Tavan, David; Petit-Laurent, Fabien; Rivoire, Michel; Perol, David; Carrie, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The study aimed to determine the maximum tolerated dose of daily irinotecan given with concomitant radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and March 2008, 36 patients with histologically proven unresectable pancreas adenocarcinoma were studied prospectively. Irinotecan was administered daily, 1 to 2 h before irradiation. Doses were started at 6 mg/m{sup 2} per day and then escalated by increments of 2 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 patients. Radiotherapy was administered in 2-Gy fractions, 5 fractions per week, up to a total dose of 50 Gy to the tumor volume. Inoperability was confirmed by a surgeon involved in a multidisciplinary team. All images and responses were centrally reviewed by radiologists. Results: Thirty-six patients were enrolled over a period of 8 years through eight dose levels (6 mg/m{sup 2} to 20 mg/m{sup 2} per day). The maximum tolerated dose was determined to be 18 mg/m{sup 2} per day. The dose-limiting toxicities were nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, dehydration, and hypokalemia. The median survival time was 12.6 months with a median follow-up of 53.8 months. The median progression-free survival time was 6.5 months, and 4 patients (11.4%) with very good responses could undergo surgery. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose of irinotecan is 18 mg/m{sup 2} per day for 5 weeks. Dose-limiting toxicities are mainly gastrointestinal. Even though efficacy was not the aim of this study, the results are very promising, with a median survival time of 12.6 months.

  7. Treatment-related gastrointestinal toxicities and advanced colorectal or pancreatic cancer: A critical update.

    PubMed

    Aprile, Giuseppe; Rihawi, Karim; De Carlo, Elisa; Sonis, Stephen T

    2015-11-07

    Gastrointestinal toxicities (GIT), including oral mucositis, nausea and vomiting, and diarrhea, are common side effects of chemotherapy and targeted agents in patients with advanced colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer. Being often underreported, it is still difficult to precisely establish their burden in terms of both patient's quality of life and cancer care costs. Moreover, with the use of more intensive upfront combination regimens, the frequency of these toxicities is rapidly growing with a potential negative effect also on patient's outcome, as a result of dose reductions, delays or even discontinuation of active treatments. Thus, identifying patients at higher risk of developing GIT as well as an optimal management are paramount in order to improve patient's compliance and outcome. After the description of the main treatment-induced GIT, we discuss the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of these side effects and comment the scales commonly used to assess and grade them. We then provide a critical update on GIT incidence based on the results of key randomized trials conducted in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and advanced pancreatic cancer.

  8. Transcatheter Arterial Infusion Therapy in the Treatment of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Shibuya, Keiko; Nagata, Yasushi; Itoh, Tuyoshi; Okajima, Kaoru; Murata, Rumi; Takagi, Takehisa; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    1999-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of transcatheter arterial infusion (TAI) therapy in 18 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods: The drugs infused were epirubicin 60 mg, mitomycin C 20 mg, and 5-fluorouracil 500 mg. The efficacy of TAI was evaluated by a tumor marker (CA19-9), computed tomography (CT) findings, and postoperative histopathological specimens. Results: In 10 of 15 cases, the tumor marker level was decreased after TAI therapy. In 6 of 14 cases, CT showed a decrease in the tumor size, and in 1 case, the tumor disappeared completely. In 6 cases the tumor could be resected. Necrosis, fibrosis, and degeneration of cancer cells were seen in 3 of 4 cases for whom a histopathological evaluation was done. The median survival was 11 months. In 17 patients back pain was the chief complaint, and was reduced to a self-controlled level in 10 patients following TAI therapy. No major complications were encountered. Conclusion: TAI appears to be an effective palliative treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer.

  9. Treatment-related gastrointestinal toxicities and advanced colorectal or pancreatic cancer: A critical update

    PubMed Central

    Aprile, Giuseppe; Rihawi, Karim; De Carlo, Elisa; Sonis, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicities (GIT), including oral mucositis, nausea and vomiting, and diarrhea, are common side effects of chemotherapy and targeted agents in patients with advanced colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer. Being often underreported, it is still difficult to precisely establish their burden in terms of both patient’s quality of life and cancer care costs. Moreover, with the use of more intensive upfront combination regimens, the frequency of these toxicities is rapidly growing with a potential negative effect also on patient’s outcome, as a result of dose reductions, delays or even discontinuation of active treatments. Thus, identifying patients at higher risk of developing GIT as well as an optimal management are paramount in order to improve patient’s compliance and outcome. After the description of the main treatment-induced GIT, we discuss the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of these side effects and comment the scales commonly used to assess and grade them. We then provide a critical update on GIT incidence based on the results of key randomized trials conducted in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26557003

  10. Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil or Capecitabine With or Without Zoledronic Acid in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-23

    Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  11. A Phase I trial of preoperative eniluracil plus 5-fluorouracil and radiation for locally advanced or unresectable adenocarcinoma of the rectum and colon.

    PubMed

    Czito, Brian G; Hong, Timothy J; Cohen, Darrel P; Tyler, Douglas S; Lee, Catherine G; Anscher, Mitchell S; Ludwig, Kirk A; Seigler, Hilliard F; Mantyh, Christopher; Morse, Michael A; Lockhart, Albert C; Petros, William P; Honeycutt, Wanda; Spector, Neil L; Ertel, Phillip J; Mangum, Steve G; Hurwitz, Herbert I

    2004-03-01

    Eniluracil, an effective inactivator of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, allows for oral dosing of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which avoids the morbidity of continuous infusion 5-FU. We addressed the safety of oral eniluracil and 5-FU combined with preoperative radiotherapy and determined the recommended Phase II dose and dose-limiting toxicity in patients with locally advanced rectal and colon cancer. Patients with TNM Stage II or III rectal cancer and residual or recurrent colon cancer received eniluracil (starting at 6.0 mg/m(2) every 12 h) and 5-FU (starting at 0.6 mg/m(2) every 12 h). Eniluracil and 5-FU were given with a 5-week course of preoperative radiotherapy of 4500 cGy, with a possible 540-cGy boost. Surgery was performed approximately 4 weeks after completion of chemoradiotherapy. Twenty-two patients were enrolled; 1 patient was withdrawn owing to noncompliance. Chemotherapy was completed in all patients; radiotherapy was completed in 20 patients. The recommended Phase II dose of eniluracil and 5-FU was 8 mg/m(2) every 12 h and 0.8 mg/m(2) every 12 h, respectively. Diarrhea was the dose-limiting toxicity. Eleven of the 17 patients with primary rectal cancer underwent a sphincter-sparing procedure. One patient had a pathologic complete response. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with oral eniluracil and 5-FU is feasible and well tolerated. Additional investigation is warranted.

  12. [Comparison of the Cost-Effectiveness of the SOX and COX Regimens in Patients with Unresectable Advanced and Recurrent Colorectal Cancer Using a Clinical Decision Analysis Approach].

    PubMed

    Nagase, Satoshi; Iyoda, Tomokazu; Kanno, Hiroshi; Akase, Tomohide; Arakawa, Ichiro; Inoue, Tadao; Uetsuka, Yoshio

    2016-10-01

    Phase III clinical trials have comfirmed that the S-1 plus oxaliplatin(SOX)is inferior to the capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (COX)regimen in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.On the basis of these findings, we compared, using a clinical decision analysis-based approach, the cost-effectiveness of the SOX and COX regimens.Herein, we simulated the expected effects and costs of the SOX and COX regimens using the markov model.Clinical data were obtained from Hong's 2012 report.The cost data comprised the costs for pharmacist labor, material, inspection, and treatment for adverse event, as well as the total cost of care at the advanced stage.The result showed that the expected cost of the SOX and COX regimen was 1,538,330 yen, and 1,429,596 yen, respectively, with an expected survival rate of 29.18 months, and 28.63 months, respectively.The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of the SOX regimen was 197,698 yen/month; thus, the SOX regimen was found to be more cost-effective that the COX regimen.

  13. Chemotherapy regimens for advanced pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Advanced pancreatic cancer confers poor prognosis and treatment advancement has been slow. Recent randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have demonstrated survival benefits for combination therapy compared to gemcitabine alone. However, the comparative benefits and harms of available combination chemotherapy treatments are not clear. We therefore conducted a systematic review and Bayesian network meta-analysis to assess the comparative safety and efficacy of chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Registry of Clinical trials and abstracts from major scientific meetings were searched for RCTs published from 2002 to 2013. Key outcomes were overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), and safety including grade 3–4 febrile neutropenia, neutropenia, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue and sensory neuropathy. Bayesian network meta-analyses were conducted to calculate survival and safety outcomes using gemcitabine (GEM) as the reference comparator. Effect estimates and 95% credible intervals were calculated for each comparison. Mean ranks and the probability of being best were obtained for each treatment analyzed in the network meta-analysis. Results The search identified 23 studies involving 19 different treatment regimens and 9,989 patients. FOLFIRINOX, GEM/cisplatin/epirubicin/5FU (PEFG), GEM/NAB-paclitaxel (NAB-P), GEM/erlotinib+/-bevacizumab, GEM/capecitabine, and GEM/oxaliplatin were associated with statistically significant improvements in OS and PFS relative to gemcitabine alone and several other treatments. They were amongst the top ranked for survival outcomes amongst other treatments included. No significant differences were found for other combination chemotherapy treatments. Effect estimates from indirect comparisons matched closely to estimates derived from pairwise comparisons. Overall, combination therapies had greater risk for evaluated grade 3–4 toxicities over

  14. Phase I/II study of S-1 combined with paclitaxel in patients with unresectable and/or recurrent advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mochiki, E; Ohno, T; Kamiyama, Y; Aihara, R; Haga, N; Ojima, H; Nakamura, J; Ohsawa, H; Nakabayashi, T; Takeuchi, K; Asao, T; Kuwano, H

    2006-01-01

    Both paclitaxel and S-1 are effective against gastric cancer, but the optimal regimen for combined chemotherapy with these drugs remains unclear. This phase I/II study was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), recommended dose (RD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), and objective response rate of paclitaxel in combination with S-1. S-1 was administered orally at a fixed dose of 80 mg m−2 day−1 from days 1 to 14 of a 28-day cycle. Paclitaxel was given intravenously on days 1, 8, and 15, starting with a dose of 40 mg m−2 day−1. The dose was increased in a stepwise manner to 70 mg m−2. Treatment was repeated every 4 weeks unless disease progression was confirmed. In the phase I portion, 17 patients were enrolled. The MTD of paclitaxel was estimated to be 70 mg m−2 because 40% of the patients given this dose level (two of five) had DLT. The RD was determined to be 60 mg m−2. In the phase II portion, 24 patients, including five with assessable disease who received the RD in the phase I portion, were evaluated. The median number of treatment courses was six (range: 1–17). The incidence of the worst-grade toxicity in patients given the RD was 28 and 8%, respectively. All toxic effects were manageable. The response rate was 54.1%, and the median survival time was 15.5 months. Our phase I/II trial showed that S-1 combined with paclitaxel is effective and well tolerated in patients with advanced gastric cancer. PMID:17133268

  15. A meta-analysis of hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy and combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens in unresected locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Budach, W; Hehr, T; Budach, V; Belka, C; Dietz, K

    2006-01-01

    Background Former meta-analyses have shown a survival benefit for the addition of chemotherapy (CHX) to radiotherapy (RT) and to some extent also for the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT) and accelerated radiation therapy (AFRT) in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck. However, the publication of new studies and the fact that many older studies that were included in these former meta-analyses used obsolete radiation doses, CHX schedules or study designs prompted us to carry out a new analysis using strict inclusion criteria. Methods Randomised trials testing curatively intended RT (≥60 Gy in >4 weeks/>50 Gy in <4 weeks) on SCC of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx published as full paper or in abstract form between 1975 and 2003 were eligible. Trials comparing RT alone with concurrent or alternating chemoradiation (5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cisplatin, carboplatin, mitomycin C) were analyzed according to the employed radiation schedule and the used CHX regimen. Studies comparing conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (CFRT) with either HFRT or AFRT without CHX were separately examined. End point of the meta-analysis was overall survival. Results Thirty-two trials with a total of 10 225 patients were included into the meta-analysis. An overall survival benefit of 12.0 months was observed for the addition of simultaneous CHX to either CFRT or HFRT/AFRT (p < 0.001). Separate analyses by cytostatic drug indicate a prolongation of survival of 24.0 months, 16.8 months, 6.7 months, and 4.0 months, respectively, for the simultaneous administration of 5-FU, cisplatin-based, carboplatin-based, and mitomycin C-based CHX to RT (each p < 0.01). Whereas no significant gain in overall survival was observed for AFRT in comparison to CFRT, a substantial prolongation of median survival (14.2 months, p < 0.001) was seen for HFRT compared to CFRT (both without CHX). Conclusion RT combined with simultaneous 5-FU

  16. Interventional treatment for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Satoru; Mine, Takahiko; Sugihara, Fumie; Yasui, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Hidenori; Ueda, Tatsuo; Onozawa, Shiro; Kumita, Shin-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. The Barcelona clinic liver cancer classification is the current standard classification system for the clinical management of patients with HCC and suggests that patients with intermediate-stage HCC benefit from transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). Interventional treatments such as TACE, balloon-occluded TACE, drug-eluting bead embolization, radioembolization, and combined therapies including TACE and radiofrequency ablation, continue to evolve, resulting in improved patient prognosis. However, patients with advanced-stage HCC typically receive only chemotherapy with sorafenib, a multi-kinase inhibitor, or palliative and conservative therapy. Most patients receive palliative or conservative therapy only, and approximately 50% of patients with HCC are candidates for systemic therapy. However, these patients require therapy that is more effective than sorafenib or conservative treatment. Several researchers try to perform more effective therapies, such as combined therapies (TACE with radiotherapy and sorafenib with TACE), modified TACE for HCC with arterioportal or arteriohepatic vein shunts, TACE based on hepatic hemodynamics, and isolated hepatic perfusion. This review summarizes the published data and data on important ongoing studies concerning interventional treatments for unresectable HCC and discusses the technical improvements in these interventions, particularly for advanced-stage HCC. PMID:25309076

  17. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer.

  18. Evaluation of the impact of tumor HPV status on outcome in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) receiving cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil with or without docetaxel: a subset analysis of EORTC 24971 study.

    PubMed

    Psyrri, A; Fortpied, C; Koutsodontis, G; Avgeris, M; Kroupis, C; Goutas, N; Menis, J; Herman, L; Giurgea, L; Remenár, É; Degardin, M; Pateras, I S; Langendijk, J A; van Herpen, C M L; Awada, A; Germà-Lluch, J R; Kienzer, H R; Licitra, L; Vermorken, J B

    2017-09-01

    EORTC 24971 was a phase III trial demonstrating superiority of induction regimen TPF (docetaxel, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil) over PF (cisplatin/5-fluorouracil), in terms of progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in locoregionally advanced unresectable head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. We conducted a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data aiming to evaluate whether only HPV(-) patients (pts) benefit from adding docetaxel to PF, in which case deintensifying induction treatment in HPV(+) pts could be considered. Pretherapy tumor biopsies (blocks or slides) were assessed for high-risk HPV by p16 immunohistochemistry, PCR and quantitative PCR. HPV-DNA+ and/or p16+ tumors were subjected to in situ hybridization (ISH) and HPV E6 oncogene expression qRT-PCR analysis. Primary and secondary objectives were to evaluate the value of HPV/p16 status as predictive factor of treatment benefit in terms of PFS and OS. The predictive effect was analyzed based on the model used in the primary analysis of the study with the addition of a treatment by marker interaction term and tested at two-sided 5% significance level. Of 358, 119 pts had available tumor samples and 58 of them had oropharyngeal cancer. Median follow-up was 8.7 years. Sixteen of 119 (14%) evaluable samples were p16+ and 20 of 79 (25%) evaluable tumors were HPV-DNA+. 13 of 40 pts (33%) assessed with HPV-DNA ISH and 12 of 28 pts (43%) assessed for HPV E6 mRNA were positive. The preplanned analysis showed no statistical evidence of predictive value of HPV/p16 status for PFS (P = 0.287) or OS (P = 0.118). The incidence of HPV positivity was low in the subset of EORTC 24971 pts analyzed. In this analysis only powered to detect a large treatment by marker interaction, there was no statistical evidence that treatment effect found overall was different in magnitude in HPV(+) or HPV(-) pts. These results do not justify selection of TPF versus PF according to HPV status.

  19. Trastuzumab Emtansine for Treating HER2-Positive, Unresectable, Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer After Treatment with Trastuzumab and a Taxane: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Squires, Hazel; Stevenson, Matt; Simpson, Emma; Harvey, Rebecca; Stevens, John

    2016-07-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) (Kadcyla(®); Roche) to submit evidence of its clinical and cost-effectiveness for treating human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive, unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer after treatment with trastuzumab and a taxane. The School of Health and Related Research Technology Appraisal Group (ScHARR-TAG) at the University of Sheffield were the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG) who produced a critical review of the company's submission to NICE. The ERG also independently searched for relevant evidence and modified the submitted decision analytic model to produce a revised estimate of cost-effectiveness and examine the impact of altering some of the key assumptions. The clinical effectiveness data were taken from two randomised controlled trials that reported a significant advantage in progression-free survival (PFS) for T-DM1 over lapatinib in combination with capecitabine (EMILIA trial), and over the treatment of physician's choice (TH3RESA trial). A network meta-analysis suggested T-DM1 was the best treatment in terms of both overall survival and PFS compared with lapatinib in combination with capecitabine; trastuzumab in combination with capecitabine; and capecitabine monotherapy. Adverse event (AE) data were taken from a pooled analysis of additional trials of T-DM1 as a single agent. The most common grade 3 or greater AEs for T-DM1 were thrombocytopenia and hepatotoxicity. Following the clarification process, the manufacturer reported a deterministic incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for T-DM1 compared with lapatinib in combination with capecitabine of £167,236, the latter of which was estimated to have an ICER of £49,798 compared with capecitabine monotherapy. The ERG produced similar values of £166,429 and £50,620 respectively. All other comparators were dominated. During the appraisal, the

  20. CT Findings of Patients Treated with Irreversible Electroporation for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akinwande, Olaguoke; Ahmad, Shakeeb S.; Van Meter, Tracy; Schulz, Brittany; Martin, Robert C. G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), IRE has been shown to be safe for local disease control and palliation. As IRE continues to gain acceptance it is important to characterize the expected imaging findings. Materials and Methods. A review of our prospective soft tissue ablation registry from July 2010 to June 2013 was performed on patients who had undergone IRE for LAPC. Five masses treated with intraoperative IRE ablation for pancreatic tumors that underwent CT imaging before and after ablation were reviewed. Results and Discussion. Following IRE, the postablation bed is larger than the original ablated tumor. This ablation zone may get smaller in size (due to decreased edema and hyperemia) in the following months and more importantly remains stable provided there is no recurrence. In cases of recurrent disease there is increased size of the ablation bed, mass effect, and new or worsening vascular encasement or occlusion. Conclusion. CT imaging remains the best current imaging modality to assess post-IRE ablation changes. Serial imaging over at least 2–6 months must be employed to detect recurrence by comparing with prior studies in conjunction with clinical and serum studies. Larger imaging studies are underway to evaluate a more ideal imaging modality for this unique patient population. PMID:26649039

  1. Inhibition of renin–angiotensin system affects prognosis of advanced pancreatic cancer receiving gemcitabine

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, Y; Isayama, H; Ijichi, H; Sasaki, T; Sasahira, N; Hirano, K; Kogure, H; Kawakubo, K; Yagioka, H; Yashima, Y; Mizuno, S; Yamamoto, K; Arizumi, T; Togawa, O; Matsubara, S; Tsujino, T; Tateishi, K; Tada, M; Omata, M; Koike, K

    2010-01-01

    Background: The renin–angiotensin system (RAS) is thought to have a role in carcinogenesis, and RAS inhibition may prevent tumour growth. Methods: We retrospectively investigated the impact of angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II type-1 receptor blockers (ARBs) in 155 patients with pancreatic cancer receiving gemcitabine monotherapy. Patients were divided into three groups: the ACEI/ARB group (27 patients receiving an ACEI or ARB for hypertension (HT)), the non-ACEI/ARB with HT group (25 patients receiving antihypertensive drugs other than ACEIs or ARBs), and the non-HT group (103 patients receiving no antihypertensive drugs). Results: Patient characteristics were not different, except for age and HT medications. Progression-free survival (PFS) was 8.7 months in the ACEI/ARB group, 4.5 months in the non-ACEI/ARB with HT group, and 3.6 months in the non-HT group. Overall survival (OS) was 15.1 months in the ACEI/ARB group, 8.9 months in the non-ACEI/ARB with HT group, and 9.5 months in the non-HT group. The use of ACEIs/ARBs was a significant prognostic factor for both PFS (P=0.032) and OS (P=0.014) in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions: The ACEIs/ARBs in combination with gemcitabine might improve clinical outcomes in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Prospective trials are needed to test this hypothesis. PMID:20978506

  2. Photodynamic therapy of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (VERTPAC study): final clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggett, M. T.; Jermyn, M.; Gillams, A.; Mosse, S.; Kent, E.; Bown, S. G.; Hasan, T.; Pogue, B. W.; Pereira, S. P.

    2013-03-01

    We undertook a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) in 15 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Needle placement and laser delivery were technically successful in all patients. Thirteen patients were treated with a single laser fibre. Three treatments were carried out each at 5, 10 and 20 J/cm2; and 5 treatments (4 patients) at 40 J/cm2. A further 2 patients were treated with 2 or 3 laser fibres at 40 J/cm2. Tumour necrosis was measured on CT (computed tomography) by two radiologists 5 days after treatment. There was a clear dosedependent increase in necrosis with a median area of 20 x 16 mm (range 18 x 16 to 35 x 30 mm) at 40 J/cm2. In the 2 patients treated with multiple fibres, necrosis was 40 x 36 mm and 30 x 28 mm, respectively. There were no early complications in patients treated with a single fibre. Both patients treated with multiple fibres had evidence on CT of inflammatory change occurring anterior to the pancreas but without clinical deterioration. These results suggest that single fibre verteporfin PDT is safe in a clinical setting up to 40J/cm2 and produces a dose-dependent area of pancreatic necrosis.

  3. Recombinant EphB4-HSA Fusion Protein With Standard Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Non-Resectable Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma; Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

  4. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Oregovomab Followed by Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Nelfinavir Mesylate in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-28

    Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Resectable Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  5. Itraconazole therapy in a pancreatic adenocarcinoma patient: A case report.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, Nicholas R; Waddell, James Aubrey; Schrock, Nathan Eric

    2016-06-01

    To report the case of a patient receiving itraconazole for the treatment of histoplasmosis and his subsequent reduction in pancreatic tumor size. A 64-year-old male was diagnosed with Stage III locally advanced unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The patient was administered radiation plus chemotherapy, which included cisplatin and capecitabine. Upon restaging, the patient's tumor was again determined to be unresectable; therefore, palliative chemotherapy treatments were initiated, which included gemcitabine and erlotinib. After two gemcitabine cycles, he was admitted to the hospital because of loss of motor function due to spinal cord hemisection. After the surgery, the patient became neutropenic because of previous chemotherapy cycle and developed disseminated histoplasmosis. After he received his nine-month course of itraconazole, the pancreatic cancer was readdressed and he was then deemed to be resectable and had a Whipple procedure. Over the next several years, he showed no evidence of pancreatic metastases or relapse. Itraconazole has been shown to have many mechanisms by which it could potentially suppress tumor cell growth, which includes inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, and P-glycoprotein efflux pump. This azole antifungal has been studied in small patient populations with various types of cancers. Studies of basal cell carcinoma, nonsmall cell lung cancer, ovarian cancer, and malignant pleural mesothelioma have shown favorable results suggesting that more study of itraconazole is warranted to decide its clinical utility. There would need to be much more research performed to determine if this agent had a role as a chemotherapy agent; however, health care professionals should be aware of itraconazole's potential antineoplastic mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Advances in researches on the immune dysregulation and therapy of severe acute pancreatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi-ping; Chen, Han-qing; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Jie

    2009-01-01

    During the development and progression of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), conspicuous immune dysregulation develops, which is mainly manifested as excessive immune response in the early stage and immunosuppression in the late stage. This process involves complex changes in a variety of immune molecules and cells, such as cytokines, complements, lymphocytes, and leukocytes. With the gradual deepening of studies on the development and progression of SAP, the role of immune dysregulation in the pathogenesis of SAP has attracted more and more attention. In this article, we review the advances in research on the immune dysregulation in SAP and the immunotherapy of this disease through exploring the formation of excessive immune response and immune suppression as well as their mutual transformation. PMID:19585666

  7. Gemcitabine Compared With Gemcitabine and S-1 Combination Therapy in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Doudou; Chen, Changhao; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Rufu; Fan, Xinxiang; Bi, Zhuofei; Li, Zhihua; Liu, Yimin

    2015-09-01

    Several reports suggest that gemcitabine (GEM) plus S-1 combination (GS) is associated to prolong the survival in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer (PC). We conducted a systemic review and meta-analysis of studies comparing the safety and efficacy of GS versus GEM.Summary data from randomized trials and retrospective studies were searched in PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library. Statistical analyses were conducted to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) and relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using random-effects models. Subgroup analyses based on the chemotherapy cycles were performed to explore the efficacy and toxicity for therapy. Sensitivity analyses were conducted by removing specific studies to assess the effects of study quality.Between January 2004 and August 2012, 4 RCTs and 2 retrospective studies including a total of 1025 cases were identified. The overall survival (OS) (HR: 0.82; 95% CI, 0.70-0.96; P = 0.01) and progression-free survival (PFS) (HR: 0.65; 95% CI, 0.55-0.77; P < 0.001) for the GS arm were significantly longer than the GEM arm. The differences in objective response rate (ORR) (RR: 1.24; 95% CI, 1.17-1.33; P < 0.001) and disease control rate (DCR) were also better in the GS arm (RR: 1.37; 95% CI, 1.19-1.59; P < 0.001). Grades 3 to 4 toxicities in both the groups were similar except neutropenia and diarrhea, which were more frequent in the GS arm (P < 0.001). In the subgroup analysis, the cycle for chemotherapy every 4 weeks has equivalent efficacy and less toxicity than regimens every 3 weeks in the GS arm.The current meta-analysis suggested that GEM significantly prolonged OS and PFS when added to S-1 combination in patients with unresectable PC. GS therapy also offers better ORR and DCR than GEM monotherapy and no unexpected toxicity was evident.

  8. Phase II trial to evaluate gemcitabine and etoposide for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Marianne K; Webb, Craig P; Richardson, Patrick J; Luttenton, Charles R; Campbell, Alan D; Monroe, Thomas J; O'Rourke, Timothy J; Yost, Kathleen J; Szczepanek, Connie M; Bassett, Michelle R; Truszkowski, Kimberly J; Stein, Phyllis; Van Brocklin, Matthew W; Davis, Alan T; Bedolla, Gabriela; Vande Woude, George F; Koo, Han-Mo

    2010-08-01

    Prior studies suggest that tumor cell lines harboring RAS mutations display remarkable sensitivity to gemcitabine and etoposide. In a phase II clinical trial of patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer, we evaluated the response rate to a combination of these drugs. Forty chemo-naïve patients with nonresectable and histologically confirmed pancreatic cancer were accrued. Patients received gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) (days 1 and 8) and etoposide 80 mg/m(2) (days 8, 9, and 10; 21-day cycle). The primary end point was radiological response rate. Secondary objectives were determination of overall survival, response duration (time to progression), quality of life, toxicity, and CA 19-9 biomarker response. In 35 evaluable patients, 10 exhibited a radiological partial response and 12 had stable disease in response to treatment. Twenty patients exhibited a >20% decrease in CA 19-9 biomarker levels. Median overall survival was 6.7 months for all patients (40) and 7.2 months for evaluable patients (35). Notably, four patients survived for longer than 1 year, with two patients surviving for more than 2 years. Median time to progression for evaluable patients was 3.1 months. The median overall survival for locally advanced patients was 8.8 months and 6.75 months for metastatic patients. One-year survival was 10% for all patients and 11.4% for evaluable patients. Quality of life improved in 12 patients and remained stable in 3 of the evaluable patients. The primary dose-limiting toxicities were hematologic toxicity and fatigue. These results show that the gemcitabine and etoposide combination is generally well-tolerated and exhibits a response rate similar to other published studies. (c) 2010 AACR.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of Gemcitabine Plus Modern Radiotherapy in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Leung, Henry W C; Chan, Agnes L F; Muo, Chih-Hsin

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of gemcitabine plus modern radiotherapy versus gemcitabine alone in the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer in Taiwan. A Markov decision-analytic model was performed to compare the cost-effectiveness of 3 treatment regimens; gemcitabine alone (gem-alone), gemcitabine plus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (gem-IMRT), and gemcitabine plus stereotactic body radiotherapy (gem-SBRT). Patients transitioned between 5 health states: stable disease, local progression, distant metastasis, local and distant metastasis, and death. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for gem-IMRT and gem-SBRT compared with gem-alone were NT$27,120,168 and NT$2,145,683 per quality-adjusted life-year gained, respectively. A willingness to pay threshold of 3 times the per capita gross domestic product was adopted according to the definition of the World Health Organization. The Taiwan per capita gross domestic product in 2015 was NT$673,920 (US$22,464; 1 NT$ = US$0.03333 in Taiwan); thus, a threshold was considered as NT$2,021,760 (US$67,392). The Monte-Carlo simulation found that the probability of cost-effectiveness at a willingness to pay threshold of NT$2,021,760 per quality-adjusted life-year was 0% chance for gem-IMRT and 50% for gem-SBRT. This study indicated that gem-IMRT or gem-SBRT in locally advanced pancreatic cancer is not cost-effective at a willingness to pay as defined by World Health Organization guideline in Taiwan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gemcitabine Chemotherapy and Single-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, Devin; Goodman, Karyn A.; Lee, Florence; Chang, Stephanie; Kuo, Timothy; Quon, Andrew; Desser, Terry S.; Norton, Jeffrey; Greco, Ralph; Yang, George P.; Koong, Albert C.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: Fractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer achieves only modest local control. This prospective trial evaluated the efficacy of a single fraction of 25 Gy stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivered between Cycle 1 and 2 of gemcitabine chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, pancreatic adenocarcinoma received gemcitabine with SBRT delivered 2 weeks after completion of the first cycle. Gemcitabine was resumed 2 weeks after SBRT and was continued until progression or dose-limiting toxicity. The gross tumor volume, with a 2-3-mm margin, was treated in a single 25-Gy fraction by Cyberknife. Patients were evaluated at 4-6 weeks, 10-12 weeks, and every 3 months after SBRT. Results: All 16 patients completed SBRT. A median of four cycles (range one to nine) of chemotherapy was delivered. Three patients (19%) developed local disease progression at 14, 16, and 21 months after SBRT. The median survival was 11.4 months, with 50% of patients alive at 1 year. Patients with normal carbohydrate antigen (CA)19-9 levels either at diagnosis or after Cyberknife SBRT had longer survival (p <0.01). Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was mild, with 2 cases of Grade 2 (13%) and 1 of Grade 3 (6%) toxicity. Late gastrointestinal toxicity was more common, with five ulcers (Grade 2), one duodenal stenosis (Grade 3), and one duodenal perforation (Grade 4). A trend toward increased duodenal volumes radiated was observed in those experiencing late effects (p = 0.13). Conclusion: SBRT with gemcitabine resulted in comparable survival to conventional chemoradiotherapy and good local control. However, the rate of duodenal ulcer development was significant.

  11. Intraoperative methods to stage and localize pancreatic and duodenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Norton, J A

    1999-01-01

    Intraoperative methods to stage and localize tumors have dramatically improved. Advances include less invasive methods to obtain comparable results and precise localization of previously occult tumors. The use of new technology including laparoscopy and ultrasound has provided some of these advances, while improved operative techniques have provided others. Laparoscopy with ultrasound has allowed for improved staging of patients with pancreatic cancer and exclusion of patients who are not resectable for cure. We performed laparoscopy with ultrasound on 50 consecutive patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas or liver who appeared to have resectable tumors based on preoperative computed tomography. 22 patients (44%) were found to be unresectable because of tumor nodules on the liver and/or peritoneal surfaces or unsuspected distant nodal or liver metastases. The site of disease making the patient unresectable was confirmed by biopsy in each case. Of the 28 remaining patients in whom laparoscopic ultrasound predicted to be resectable for cure, 26 (93%) had all tumor removed. Thus laparoscopy with ultrasound was the best method to select patients for curative surgery. Intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS) has been a critical method to identify insulinomas that are not palpable. Nonpalpable tumors are most commonly in the pancreatic head. Because the pancreatic head is thick and insulinomas are small, of 9 pancreatic head insulinomas only 3 (33%) were palpable. However, IOUS precisely identified each (100%). Others have recommended blind distal pancreatectomy for individuals with insulinoma in whom no tumor can be identified. However, our data suggest that this procedure is contraindicated as these occult tumors are usually within the pancreatic head. Recent series suggest that previously missed gastrinomas are commonly in the duodenum. IOUS is not able to identify these tumors, but other methods can. Of 27 patients with 31 duodenal gastrinomas, palpation identified 19

  12. Immunobiological effects of gemcitabine and capecitabine combination chemotherapy in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Gary; Greenhalf, William; Costello, Eithne; Shaw, Victoria; Cox, Trevor; Ghaneh, Paula; Palmer, Daniel H; Neoptolemos, John P

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preclinical studies suggest that chemotherapy may enhance the immune response against pancreatic cancer. Methods: The levels of granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and the associated inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) were assessed in 38 patients receiving gemcitabine and capecitabine combination chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer within the TeloVac trial. Apoptosis (M30) and total immune response (delayed-type hypersensitivity and/or T-cell response) were also assessed and levels of apoptosis induction correlated with immune response. The telomerase GV1001 vaccine was given either sequentially (n=18) or concomitantly (n=24) with the combination chemotherapy. Results: There were no differences between baseline and post-treatment levels of CRP (P=0.19), IL-6 (P=0.19) and GM-CSF (P=0.71). There was a positive correlation between post-chemotherapy CRP and IL-6 levels (r=0.45, P=0.005) and between CRP with carbohydrate antigen-19-9 (CA19-9) levels at baseline (r=0.45, P=0.015) and post treatment (r=0.40, P=0.015). The change in CRP and IL-6 levels was positively correlated (r=0.40, P=0.012). Hazard ratios (95% CI) for baseline CA19-9 (1.30 (1.07–1.59), P=0.009) and CRP (1.55 (1.00–2.39), P=0.049) levels were each independently predictive of survival. The M30 mean matched differences between pre- and post-chemotherapy showed evidence of apoptosis in both the sequential (P=0.058) and concurrent (P=0.0018) chemoimmunotherapy arms. Respectively, 5 of 10 and 9 of 20 patients had a positive immune response but there was no association with apoptosis. Conclusions: Combination gemcitabine and capecitabine chemotherapy did not affect circulating levels of GM-CSF, IL-6 and CRP. Chemotherapy-induced apoptosis was not associated with the immunogenicity induced by the GV1001 vaccine in advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26931369

  13. Recent advances in 3D computed tomography techniques for simulation and navigation in hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masafumi

    2014-04-01

    A few years ago it could take several hours to complete a 3D image using a 3D workstation. Thanks to advances in computer science, obtaining results of interest now requires only a few minutes. Many recent 3D workstations or multimedia computers are equipped with onboard 3D virtual patient modeling software, which enables patient-specific preoperative assessment and virtual planning, navigation, and tool positioning. Although medical 3D imaging can now be conducted using various modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasonography (US) among others, the highest quality images are obtained using CT data, and CT images are now the most commonly used source of data for 3D simulation and navigation image. If the 2D source image is bad, no amount of 3D image manipulation in software will provide a quality 3D image. In this exhibition, the recent advances in CT imaging technique and 3D visualization of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic abnormalities are featured, including scan and image reconstruction technique, contrast-enhanced techniques, new application of advanced CT scan techniques, and new virtual reality simulation and navigation imaging.

  14. APN401 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-02

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Metastatic Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Solid Neoplasm; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Unresectable Solid Neoplasm

  15. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Combined Continuous Arterial Infusion and Systemic Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, O. Kusunoki, S.; Kudoh, K.; Takamori, H.; Tsuji, T.; Kanemitsu, K.; Yamashita, Y.

    2006-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of combined continuous transcatheter arterial infusion (CTAI) and systemic chemotherapy in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Methods. CTAI was performed in 17 patients with stage IV pancreatic cancer with (n = 11) or without (n = 6) liver metastasis. The reservoir was transcutaneously implanted with the help of angiography. The inferior pancreatic artery (IPA) was embolized to achieve delivery of the pancreatic blood supply through only the celiac artery. The systemic administration of gemcitabine was combined with the infusion of 5-fluorouracil via the reservoir. Treatment effects were evaluated based on the primary tumor size, liver metastasis, and survival time and factors such as tumor size, tumor location, and stage of pancreatic carcinoma; the embolized arteries were analyzed with respect to treatment effects and prognosis. Results. A catheter was fixed in the gastroduodenal artery and splenic artery in 10 and 7 patients, respectively. Complete peripancreatic arterial occlusion was successful in 10 patients. CT showed a decrease in tumor size in 6 of 17 (35%) patients and a decrease in liver metastases in 6 of 11 (55%) patients. The survival time ranged from 4 to 18 months (mean {+-} SD, 8.8 {+-} 1.5 months). Complete embolization of arteries surrounding the pancreas was achieved in 10 patients; they manifested superior treatment effects and prognoses (p < 0.05). Conclusion. In patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, long-term CTAI with systemic chemotherapy appeared to be effective not only against the primary tumor but also against liver metastases. Patients with successfully occluded peripancreatic arteries tended to survive longer.

  16. Nutritional status of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, Leah M; Bell, Diana; Thornton, Jennifer; Black, Glenda; McCorkle, Ruth; Heimburger, Douglas C; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2011-11-01

    Nutritional status may influence quality of life and prognosis among pancreatic cancer patients, yet few studies describe measures of nutritional status during treatment. We evaluated the nutritional status of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy who received baseline nutritional assessment and counseling. Fourteen newly diagnosed LAPC patients enrolled in phase I/II trials of capecitabine with concomitant radiotherapy were assessed for baseline clinical nutrition measures (body mass index, albumin, weight loss, total energy, and protein intake). Participants completed the Anorexia/Cachexia Subscale (A/CS) questionnaire at baseline and during the 6 weeks of treatment. We evaluated associations between baseline characteristics and subsequent A/CS scores with linear regression and changes in A/CS were assessed with the paired t test. We observed a statistically significant increase in mean A/CS between baseline [24.9, standard deviation (SD) = 9.7] and end of treatment (29.9, SD = 6.2). Controlling for baseline A/CS score, only weight loss greater than 5% of body weight over 1 month was associated with A/CS scores at 6 weeks (β = 10.558, standard error = 3.307, p value = 0.009) and mean A/CS scores during the last 3 weeks of treatment (β = 12.739, standard error = 2.251, p value = 0.001). After 6 weeks of chemoradiotherapy, LAPC patients reported a statistically significant improvement in appetite and weight concerns. Increases in AC/S scores were associated with higher baseline A/CS scores and weight loss of 5% or more during 1 month. Further research is needed to determine the impact of nutritional support during treatment, as improvements in this domain may impact LAPC patients' overall quality of life.

  17. A pilot clinical trial of the cholecystokinin receptor antagonist MK-329 in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Abbruzzese, J L; Gholson, C F; Daugherty, K; Larson, E; DuBrow, R; Berlin, R; Levin, B

    1992-01-01

    MK-329 is a nonpeptidal, highly specific cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonist, with affinity for pancreatic and gallbladder CCK receptors similar to CCK itself. MK-329 and its progenitor, asperlicin, can inhibit the growth of CCK receptor-positive human pancreatic cancer in athymic mice. Based on these activities and the ability of MK-329 to transiently increase food intake and enhance morphine analgesia in murine models, we conducted an open trial of MK-329 in 18 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer in whom the CCK receptor status of the tumors was unknown. Tumor response, pain control, and nutritional parameters (hunger rating, caloric intake, body weight, and anthropometrics) were serially assessed. The results of the study failed to demonstrate any impact of MK-329 on tumor progression, pain, or nutrition. Toxicity was mild and limited to nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps, with 17 of 18 patients able to tolerate treatment. While a role for MK-329 in the management of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer cannot be supported by the results of this trial, additional studies of this agent in patients with known CCK receptor-positive tumors, at escalated doses, and possibly in conjunction with other growth antagonists, appear warranted.

  18. Chemoradioimmunotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic and biliary tree adenocarcinoma: a multicenter phase II study.

    PubMed

    Recchia, Francesco; Sica, Gigliola; Candeloro, Giampiero; Bisegna, Roberta; Bratta, Massimo; Bonfili, Pierluigi; Necozione, Stefano; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Rea, Silvio

    2009-08-01

    The antitumor activity and toxicity of a multi-step treatment were evaluated in patients with locally advanced, inoperable, or incompletely resected pancreatic (Pa) and biliary tree (Bt) adenocarcinomas (ADKs). Fifty-four patients, 63% with Pa and 37% with Bt ADK, received 3 courses of cisplatin-gemcitabine induction chemotherapy. Progression-free (PF) patients were given consolidation radiotherapy with concurrent capecitabine. PF patients had, as maintenance immunotherapy (MI), interleukin 2 (1.8x10 IU) and 13-cis-retinoic acid (0.5 mg/kg) [DOSAGE ERROR CORRECTED]. Thirty-eight patients, 27 with Pa and 11 with Bt ADKs, PF after cisplatin/gemcitabine, were treated with consolidation radiotherapy with concurrent capecitabine. Fourteen PF patients, 7 with Pa and 7 with Bt ADK, received MI. Median PF and overall survivals (OS) for all 54 patients were 6.8 and 12.1 months, respectively. Patients treated with MI had a median PF survival of 16.2 months, whereas median OS had not been reached yet, after a median follow-up of 27.5 months. Grades 3 and 4 hematological and gastrointestinal in 30% and 37% of patients, respectively; grades 1 and 2 autoimmune reactions in 28% of patients. These results support the efficacy and safety of a multi-step sequential treatment in patients with locally advanced, inoperable or incompletely resected Pa and Bt ADKs.

  19. Dietary consumption of advanced glycation end products and pancreatic cancer in the prospective NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Li; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Zimmerman, Thea Palmer; Duan, Zhigang; Chen, Liang; Kahle, Lisa; Risch, Adam; Subar, Amy F; Cross, Amanda J; Hollenbeck, Albert; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary; Sinha, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a heterogeneous group of compounds present in uncooked foods as well as in foods cooked at high temperatures. AGEs have been associated with insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation in patients with diabetes. Dietary AGEs are an important contributor to the AGE pool in the body. N(ϵ)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) AGE is one of the major biologically and chemically well-characterized AGE markers. The consumption of red meat, which is CML-AGE rich, has been positively associated with pancreatic cancer in men. With the use of a published food CML-AGE database, we estimated the consumption of CML AGE in the prospective NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study and evaluated the association between CML-AGE consumption and pancreatic cancer and the mediating effect of CML AGE on the association between red meat consumption and pancreatic cancer. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate HRs and 95% CIs for pancreatic cancer. During an average of 10.5 y of follow-up, we identified 2193 pancreatic cancer cases (1407 men and 786 women) from 528,251 subjects. With the comparison of subjects in the fifth and the first quintiles of CML-AGE consumption, we observed increased pancreatic cancer risk in men (HR: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.93, P-trend = 0.003) but not women (HR: 1.14; 95% CI: 0.76, 1.72, P-trend = 0.42). Men in the highest quintile of red meat consumption had higher risk of pancreatic cancer (HR: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.70), which attenuated after adjustment for CML-AGE consumption (HR: 1.20; 95% CI: 0.95, 1.53). Dietary CML-AGE consumption was associated with modestly increased risk of pancreatic cancer in men and may partially explain the positive association between red meat and pancreatic cancer. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  20. Phase II study of paclitaxel plus the protein kinase C inhibitor bryostatin-1 in advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lam, Anthony P; Sparano, Joseph A; Vinciguerra, Vincent; Ocean, Allyson J; Christos, Paul; Hochster, Howard; Camacho, Fernando; Goel, Sanjay; Mani, Sridhar; Kaubisch, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    To determine the efficacy and toxicity of the protein kinase C inhibitor bryostatin-1 plus paclitaxel in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Each treatment cycle consisted of paclitaxel 90 mg/m by intravenous infusion over 1 hour on days 1, 8, and 16, plus bryostatin 25 mcg/m as a 1-hour intravenous infusion on days 2, 9, and 15, given every 28 days. Patients were evaluated for response after every 2 treatment cycles, and continued therapy until disease progression or prohibitive toxicity. The primary objective was to determine whether the combination produced a response rate of at least 30%. Nineteen patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma received a total of 52 cycles of therapy (range: 1-10). Patients received the combination as first-line therapy for advanced disease (N = 5) or after prior chemotherapy used alone or in combination with local therapy. No patients had a confirmed objective response. The median time to treatment failure was 1.9 months (95% confidence intervals: 1.2, 2.6 months). Reasons for discontinuing therapy included progressive disease or death in 14 patients (74%) or because of adverse events or patient choice in 5 patients (26%). The most common grade 3 to 4 toxicities included leukopenia in 26%, anemia in 11%, myalgias in 11%, gastrointestinal bleeding in 11%, infection in 10%, and thrombosis in 10%. The combination of weekly paclitaxel and bryostatin-1 is not an effective therapy for patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

  1. A dosimetric analysis of dose escalation using two intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques in locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Michael W.; Ning, Holly; Arora, Barbara; Albert, Paul S.; Poggi, Matthew; Camphausen, Kevin; Citrin, Deborah . E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To perform an analysis of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), sequential boost intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRTs), and integrated boost IMRT (IMRTi) for dose escalation in unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography images from 15 patients were used. Treatment plans were generated using 3D-CRT, IMRTs, and IMRTi for dose levels of 54, 59.4, and 64.8 Gy. Plans were analyzed for target coverage, doses to liver, kidneys, small bowel, and spinal cord. Results: Three-dimensional-CRT exceeded tolerance to small bowel in 1 of 15 (6.67%) patients at 54 Gy, and 4 of 15 (26.7%) patients at 59.4 and 64.8 Gy. 3D-CRT exceeded spinal cord tolerance in 1 of 15 patients (6.67%) at 59.4 Gy and liver constraints in 1 of 15 patients (6.67%) at 64.8 Gy; no IMRT plans exceeded tissue tolerance. Both IMRT techniques reduced the percentage of total kidney volume receiving 20 Gy (V20), the percentage of small bowel receiving 45 Gy (V45), and the percentage of liver receiving 35 Gy (V35). IMRTi appeared superior to IMRTs in reducing the total kidney V20 (p < 0.0001), right kidney V20 (p < 0.0001), and small bowel V45 (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Sequential boost IMRT and IMRTi improved the ability to achieve normal tissue dose goals compared with 3D-CRT. IMRTi allowed dose escalation to 64.8 Gy with acceptable normal tissue doses and superior dosimetry compared with 3D-CRT and IMRTs.

  2. Comparison of Intrahepatic and Pancreatic Perfusion on Fusion Images Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Assessment of Efficacy of Combined Continuous Arterial Infusion and Systemic Chemotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osama Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Takamori, Hiroshi; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro; Baba, Hideo

    2007-09-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images using a combined single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT system and to evaluate the efficacy of combined continuous transcatheter arterial infusion (CTAI) and systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Materials and Methods. CTAI was performed in 33 patients (22 men, 11 women; age range, 35-77 years; mean age, 60 years) with stage IV pancreatic cancer with liver metastasis. The reservoir was transcutaneously implanted with the help of angiography. The systemic administration of gemcitabine was combined with the infusion of 5-fluorouracil via the reservoir. In all patients we obtained fusion images using a combined SPECT/CT system. Pancreatic perfusion on fusion images was classified as perfusion presence or as perfusion absent in the pancreatic cancer. Using WHO criteria we recorded the tumor response after 3 months on multislice helical CT scans. Treatment effects were evaluated based on the pancreatic cancer, liver metastasis, and factors such as intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images. For statistical analysis we used the chi-square test; survival was evaluated by the Kaplan Meier method (log-rank test). Results. On fusion images, pancreatic and intrahepatic perfusion was recorded as hot spot and as homogeneous distribution, respectively, in 18 patients (55%) and as cold spot and heterogeneous distribution, respectively, in 15 (45%). Patients with hot spot in the pancreatic tumor and homogeneous distribution in the liver manifested better treatment results (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Patients with hot spot both in the pancreatic cancer and in the liver survived longer than those with cold spot in the pancreatic cancer and heterogeneous distribution in the liver (median {+-} SD, 16.0 {+-} 3.7 vs. 8.0 {+-} 1.4 months; p < 0.05). Conclusions. We conclude that in patients with advanced

  3. Gemcitabine as second-line chemotherapy after Folfirinox failure in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Viaud, Juliette; Brac, Clémence; Artru, Pascal; Le Pabic, Estelle; Leconte, Bérengère; Bodère, Anaïs; Pracht, Marc; Le Sourd, Samuel; Edeline, Julien; Lièvre, Astrid

    2017-06-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA) is diagnosed in most cases at an advanced stage requiring chemotherapy. Folfirinox is the standard first-line treatment. After Folfirinox failure, gemcitabine alone is routinely used as second-line therapy without data supporting this attitude. Determine the response rate and outcome of patients with advanced PA treated with gemcitabine after Folfirinox failure. We retrospectively analyzed all consecutive patients treated with gemcitabine after Folfirinox failure for a locally advanced or metastatic PA between 2009 and 2015. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Response rate, control rate and tolerability were assessed. 96 patients were included (male, 51%; median age, 62; performance status (PS) 0-1, 47%). Median duration on gemcitabine was 2.1 months. The overall disease control rate was 40%. Median OS was 3.7 months (95%CI: 2.5-5.2) and median PFS was 2.1 months (95%CI: 2.0-2.6). Reasons for treatment discontinuation were mostly progression (51%). Age at diagnosis and PS were independently associated with OS in multivariate analysis (HR of 1.86; p=0.0055 and 2.42; p<0.0001 respectively). 34 patients experienced a grade 3 adverse event. This study suggests that gemcitabine is not beneficial to all patients failing on Folfirinox first-line therapy and should be restricted to young patients with good PS. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pancreatic pseudocysts and aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Andrén-Sandberg, Åke

    2010-01-01

    A number of methods are available for the drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts, including percutaneous, endoscopic and open approaches. The author reviewed the most rently reports, and and summarized the latest advances in the pancreatic pseudocysts. PMID:22558566

  5. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cryosurgery of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Lihua; Niu, Lizhi; Korpan, Nikolai N.; Sumida, Sajio; Xiao, Yueyong; Li, Jiaping; Sutedja, Barlian; Lu, Youyong; Zuo, Jiansheng; Liu, Jianguo; Xu, Kecheng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic cancer (PC), one of the most lethal malignancies, accounts for 8% to 10% of digestive system cancers, and the incidence is increasing. Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy have been the main treatment methods but are not very effective. Cryosurgery was first used in 1984 for treatment of locally advanced PC and has since become a considerable treatment for most cases of unresectable PC. During the past decade, cryosurgery has been applied in some hospitals in China, and the newly developed technique of computed tomography– and/or ultrasound-guided percutaneous cryosurgery has shown better results than chemotherapy in cases of unresectable locally advanced PC, with the 1-year survival rate reported to be more than 50%. To develop standardized criteria for the application of cryosurgery in PC, the International Society of Cryosurgery and Asian Society of Cryosurgery assembled experts from Austria, Japan, and China to discuss treatment methods and arrive at a consensus on the indications, contraindications, and preferred techniques of PC cryosurgery. PMID:28742542

  6. "Puestow modified procedure in the era of advanced endoscopic interventions for the management of chronic lithiasic pancreatitis. A two cases report".

    PubMed

    Fragulidis, Georgios P; Vezakis, Αntonios; Dellaportas, Dionissios; Sotirova, Ira; Koutoulidis, Vassilis; Kontis, Elliseos; Polydorou, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic duct calculi in chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients are the main cause of intractable pain which is their main symptom. Decompression options of for the main pancreatic duct are both surgical and advanced endoscopic procedures. A 64-year-old male with known CP due to alcohol consumption and a 36-year-old female with known idiopathic CP and pancreatic duct calculi were managed recently in our hospital where endoscopic procedures were unsuccessful. A surgical therapy was considered and a longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy (modified Puestow procedure) in both patients was performed with excellent results. Over the last 30 years, endoscopic procedures are developed to manage pancreatic duct strictures and calculi of the main pancreatic duct in CP patients. In both of our cases endoscopic therapy was first attempted but failed to extract the pancreatic duct stones, due to their size and speculations. Modified Puestow procedure was performed for both and it was successful for long term pain relief. Despite advancement in endoscopic interventions and less invasive therapies for the management of chronic lithiasic pancreatitis we consider that classic surgical management can be appropriate in certain cases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: Flourishing Novel Approaches in the Era of Biological Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Joanne W.; Wong, Hilda; Leung, Roland; Pang, Roberta; Cheung, Tan-To; Fan, Sheung-Tat; Poon, Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    The progress in the development of systemic treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) has been slow. The mainstream treatment remains using chemotherapy including gemcitabine, FOLFIRINOX, and nab-paclitaxel. Erlotinib is the only approved biological therapy with marginal benefit. Studies of agents targeting epidermal growth factor receptor, angiogenesis, and RAS signaling have not been satisfying, and the usefulness of targeted therapy in APC is uncertain. Understanding in molecular processes and tumor biology has opened the door for new treatment strategies such as targeting insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, transforming growth factor β, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, and Notch pathway. New directions also include the upcoming immunotherapy and many novel agents that act on the microenvironment. The practice of personalized medicine using predictive biomarkers and pharmacogenomics signatures may also enhance the effectiveness of existing treatment. Future treatment approaches may involve comprehensive genomic assessment of tumor and integrated combinations of multiple agents to overcome treatment resistance. PMID:25117068

  8. Inherited pancreatic endocrine tumor syndromes: advances in molecular pathogenesis, diagnosis, management and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Robert T.; Berna, Marc J.; Bingham, David B; Norton, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) can occur in as part of four inherited disorders including: Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL), neurofibromatosis 1(NF-1) [von Recklinghausen’s disease] and the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). The relative frequency with which patients with these disorders develop PETs is MEN1>VHL>NF-1>TSC. Over the last few years there have been major advances in the understanding of the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of these disorders as well in the localization, medical and surgical treatment of the PETs in these patients. The study of the PETs in these disorders has not only provided insights into the possible pathogenesis of sporadic PETs, but have also presented a number of unique management and treatment issues, some of which are applicable to patients with sporadic PETs. Therefore the study of PETs in these uncommon disorders has provided valuable insights that in many cases are applicable to the general group of patients with sporadic PETs. In this article these areas are briefly reviewed as well as the current state of knowledge of the PETs in these disorders and the controversies that exist in their management are briefly summarized and discussed. PMID:18798544

  9. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  10. Beyond first-line chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer: An expanding array of therapeutic options?

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Evan J; Ko, Andrew H

    2014-01-01

    While an increasing number of therapeutic options are now available for the first-line treatment of locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer, the optimal choice for treatment in the second-line setting and beyond is less well defined. A variety of cytotoxic agents, either alone or in combination, have been evaluated, although primarily in the context of small single-arm or retrospective studies. Most regimens have been associated with median progression-free survival rates in the range of 2-4 mo and overall survival rates between 4-8 mo, highlighting the very poor prognosis of patients who are candidates for such treatment. Targeted therapies studied in this chemotherapy-refractory setting, meanwhile, have produced even worse efficacy results. In the current article, we review the clinical evidence for treatment of refractory disease, primarily in patients who have progressed on front-line gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. In the process, we highlight the limitations of the available data to date as well as some of the challenges in designing appropriate clinical trials in this salvage setting, including how to select an appropriate control arm given the absence of a well-established reference standard, and the importance of incorporating predictive biomarkers and quality of life measures whenever possible into study design. PMID:24605022

  11. Sesamin Ameliorates Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiang; Wang, Guo-Dong; Ma, Ming-Zhe; Deng, Ru-Yuan; Guo, Li-Qun; Zhang, Jun-Xiu; Yang, Jie-Ren; Su, Qing

    2015-06-09

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the direct modulators of β-cells, have been shown to cause insulin-producing β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis through increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Sesamin has been demonstrated to possess antioxidative activity. This study was designed to investigate whether sesamin protects against AGEs-evoked β-cell damage via its antioxidant property. The effects of sesamin were examined in C57BL/6J mice and MIN6 cell line. In in vivo studies, mice were intraperitoneally injected with AGEs (120 mg/kg) and orally treated with sesamin (160 mg/kg) for four weeks. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance and insulin releasing tests were performed. Insulin content, ROS generation and β-cell apoptosis in pancreatic islets were also measured. In in vitro studies, MIN6 cells were pretreated with sesamin (50 or 100 μM) and then exposed to AGEs (200 mg/L) for 24 h. Insulin secretion, β-cell death, ROS production as well as expression and activity of NADPH oxidase were determined. Sesamin treatment obviously ameliorated AGE-induced β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis both in vivo and in vitro. These effects were associated with decreased ROS production, down-regulated expression of p67(phox) and p22(phox), and reduced NADPH oxidase activity. These results suggest that sesamin protects β-cells from damage caused by AGEs through suppressing NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress.

  12. Prognostic Significance of a Minute Amount of Ascites During Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shinoto, Makoto; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Tomonari; Nishie, Akihiro; Asayama, Yoshiki; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Terashima, Kotaro; Asai, Kaori; Matsumoto, Keiji; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical factors for predicting overall survival (OS) and the significance of a minute amount of ascites on computed tomography (CT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Between 2003 and 2011, 48 consecutive patients with LAPC were treated with CRT. Various clinical factors, including ascites, were evaluated for correlation with OS. A subset analysis of 16 patients with a minute amount of ascites was also performed. The median survival duration and the 1-year OS rates were 11.5 months and 50%, respectively. A minute amount of ascites on CT and elevated carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) level were significantly associated with poorer OS. In 16 patients with ascites, the amount of ascites increased in the course of the disease, and these were considered to be cancerous clinically, regardless of the amount. A minute amount of ascites and CA19-9 were important prognostic factors in CRT. Any amount of ascites was considered an early indicator of peritoneal carcinomatosis in LAPC. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. Sesamin Ameliorates Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang; Wang, Guo-Dong; Ma, Ming-Zhe; Deng, Ru-Yuan; Guo, Li-Qun; Zhang, Jun-Xiu; Yang, Jie-Ren; Su, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the direct modulators of β-cells, have been shown to cause insulin-producing β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis through increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Sesamin has been demonstrated to possess antioxidative activity. This study was designed to investigate whether sesamin protects against AGEs-evoked β-cell damage via its antioxidant property. The effects of sesamin were examined in C57BL/6J mice and MIN6 cell line. In in vivo studies, mice were intraperitoneally injected with AGEs (120 mg/kg) and orally treated with sesamin (160 mg/kg) for four weeks. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance and insulin releasing tests were performed. Insulin content, ROS generation and β-cell apoptosis in pancreatic islets were also measured. In in vitro studies, MIN6 cells were pretreated with sesamin (50 or 100 μM) and then exposed to AGEs (200 mg/L) for 24 h. Insulin secretion, β-cell death, ROS production as well as expression and activity of NADPH oxidase were determined. Sesamin treatment obviously ameliorated AGE-induced β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis both in vivo and in vitro. These effects were associated with decreased ROS production, down-regulated expression of p67phox and p22phox, and reduced NADPH oxidase activity. These results suggest that sesamin protects β-cells from damage caused by AGEs through suppressing NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress. PMID:26066015

  14. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin With or Without Veliparib or Veliparib Alone in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-24

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; PALB2 Gene Mutation; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  15. Changing the course of pancreatic cancer--Focus on recent translational advances.

    PubMed

    Javle, Milind; Golan, Talia; Maitra, Anirban

    2016-03-01

    In the past decade, insightful preclinical research has led to important breakthroughs in our understanding of pancreatic cancer. Even though the vast majority of pancreatic cancers are KRAS mutated, not all pancreatic cancer tumors are "KRAS equal"; there seems to be varying dependencies on the KRAS pathway. While KRAS-targeting therapies have been disappointing in the clinic, 'synthetic lethal' approaches hold promise in this setting. The pancreatic cancer stromal microenvironment appears to have contradictory roles. While there is evidence to suggest that stromal barrier prevents drug delivery, in other circumstances, stroma can play a protective role and its disruption enhances tumor dissemination. Clinical trials aimed at manipulating the various stromal components are in progress. BRCA mutation-related pancreatic tumors illustrate a unique subtype with enhanced susceptibility to DNA damaging agents and PARP-inhibition. DNA repair defects in cancer extend beyond germ line BRCA mutation and may extend the indications for DNA repair-targeting agents. Immune strategies are an area of active investigation in pancreatic cancer. Although the initial trials of single-agent checkpoint inhibitors have been negative, combinational approaches using immune-modifying agents and vaccines appear promising and goal is to identify an 'immune-therapy responsive' profile in pancreatic cancer.

  16. Early tumor shrinkage as a predictor of favorable outcomes in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer treated with FOLFIRINOX

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Yutaro; Tagawa, Teppei; Yamamoto, Taikan; Ikusue, Toshikazu; Uto, Yu; Miyashita, Kouichirou; Toshima, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Kouji; Hisamatsu, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Wataru; Sekikawa, Takashi; Shimada, Ken; Sasaki, Yasutsuna

    2016-01-01

    There are several reports on the correlation between early tumor shrinkage (ETS) or depth of response (DpR) and survival in chemotherapies for colorectal cancer; however, few studies have investigated it in pancreatic cancer. We therefore investigated whether the ETS will predict outcomes in 59 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer treated with FOLFIRINOX therapy. The association of ETS with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was evaluated but also we addressed to the correlation between outcomes and DpR. ETS was defined as a reduction ≥ 20% of target lesions' diameters measured at 6 to 8 weeks from treatment start. DpR was percentage of maximal tumor shrinkage observed at the nadir diameter compared with baseline. Among 47 evaluable patients for the ETS, 12 (25.5%) patients experienced ETS. The ETS was significantly associated with better PFS (9.0 vs. 4.2 months) as well as OS (24.0 vs. 9.1 months); moreover, the association had a statistically significance for PFS but a strong trend for OS in multivariate analysis. The DpR was statistically significantly but weakly associated with OS. In conclusion, this is the first report that the early response to chemotherapy may predict favorable outcomes in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer treated with FOLFIRINOX therapy. PMID:27634903

  17. Preoperative Diagnostic Angiogram and Endovascular Aortic Stent Placement for Appleby Resection Candidates: A Novel Surgical Technique in the Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Trabulsi, N.; Pelletier, J. S.; Abraham, C.; Vanounou, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body and tail usually presents late and is typically unresectable. The modified Appleby procedure allows resection of pancreatic body carcinoma with celiac axis (CA) invasion. Given that the feasibility of this technique is based on the presence of collateral circulation, it is crucial to confirm the presence of an anatomical and functional collateral system. Methods. We here describe a novel technique used in two patients who were candidates for Appleby resection. We present their clinical scenario, imaging, operative findings, and postoperative course. Results. Both patients had a preoperative angiogram for assessment of anatomical circulation and placement of an endovascular stent to cover the CA. We hypothesize that this new technique allows enhancement of collateral circulation and helps minimize intraoperative blood loss when transecting the CA at its takeoff. Moreover, extra length on the CA margin may be gained, as the artery can be transected at its origin without the need for vascular clamp placement. Conclusion. We propose this novel technique in the preoperative management of patients who are undergoing a modified Appleby procedure. While further experience with this technique is required, we believe that it confers significant advantages to the current standard of care. PMID:26491217

  18. MK2206 in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Biliary Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Stage IV Distal Bile Duct Cancer; Stage IV Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma

  19. Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy through a Port-Catheter System as Preoperative Initial Therapy in Patients with Advanced Liver Dysfunction due to Synchronous and Unresectable Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Iguchi, Toshihiro; Arai, Yasuaki; Inaba, Yoshitaka Yamaura, Hidekazu; Sato, Yozo; Miyazaki, Masaya; Shimamoto, Hiroshi

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. We retrospectively evaluated the safety and efficacy of preoperative initial hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) through a port-catheter system in patients with liver dysfunction due to synchronous and unresectable liver metastases. The aim of HAIC was to improve patients' clinical condition for later surgical removal of primary colorectal cancer. Methods. Port-catheter systems were placed radiologically in 21 patients (mean age 58.6 {+-} 8.1 years) with liver dysfunction due to synchronous liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Initial HAIC of 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil was administered weekly as a 5 hr continuous infusion through this system. Surgical removal of the primary lesion was planned after HAIC improved the liver function. Results. Port-catheter system placement was successful in all patients without severe complications. Patients were followed up for a median of 309 days (range 51-998 days). After starting HAIC, no severe adverse events that caused drug loss and treatment postponement or suspension were observed in any of the patients. HAIC was performed a mean of 4.5 {+-} 3.0 times and the liver function improved in all patients. Curative (n = 18) or palliative (n = 1) surgical removal of the primary lesion was performed. The remaining 2 patients died because extrahepatic metastases developed and their performance status worsened; thus, surgery could not be performed. The median survival times of all patients and the operated patients were 309 and 386 days, respectively. Conclusion. Initial HAIC administration is a safe and efficacious method for improving liver function prior to operative resection of primary colorectal cancer in patients with liver dysfunction due to synchronous and unresectable liver metastases.

  20. Vascular enhancement pattern of mass in computed tomography may predict chemo-responsiveness in advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin Il; Shin, Jun Young; Park, Jin-Seok; Jeong, Seok; Jeon, Yong Sun; Choi, Moon Han; Choi, Hyun Jong; Moon, Jong Ho; Hwang, Jae Chul; Yang, Min Jae; Yoo, Byoung Moo; Kim, Jin Hong; Lee, Hyun Woo; Kwon, Chang-Il; Lee, Don Haeng

    Chemo-responsiveness in pancreatic cancer is known to be dependent on fibrosis and vascularity. The purpose of this study was to assess vascular enhancement in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma with or without liver metastasis in computed tomography (CT) and to analyze the correlation between enhancement patterns and chemo-responsiveness. Patients were assigned to either a responder group (partial response or stable disease) or a non-responder group (progressive disease) according to chemo-responsiveness assessed by CT before and after gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. Hounsefield unit (HU) was measured in pancreatic mass and the largest metastatic liver mass using region of interest (ROI). HU differences (ΔHU) between arterial and pre-contrast phase were calculated. Of the 101 study subjects, 78(77.2%) were assigned to the pancreas responder group {mean ΔHU (±SD), 36.7(±21.6)} and 23(22.8%) to the pancreas non-responder group {mean ΔHU (±SD), 20.6(±9.9)} (p = 0.001 for ΔHUs). Of the 46 study subjects with liver metastasis, 25(54.3%) were assigned to the liver metastasis responder group {mean ΔHU (±SD), 36.9(±21.0} and 21(45.7%) to the liver metastasis non-responder group {mean ΔHU (±SD), 17.1 (±24.0)}, (p = 0.005 for ΔHUs). CT determined mass vascular enhancement patterns may predict chemoresponse in advanced pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [The evaluation of chemoradiotherapy to unresectable hepatobiliary cancers].

    PubMed

    Akita, Hirofumi; Yamada, Terumasa; Sasaki, Yo; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Ohigashi, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Osamu; Imaoka, Shingi

    2005-10-01

    Today, there are few effective treatment options to unresectable hepatobiliary cancers. We enforced chemoradiotherapy to 7 patients who had far advanced hilar cholangiocarcinomas or hepatobiliary cancers because they could not receive radical operations. Then, we examined the effectiveness of this therapy. The radiation method was a conformation radiotherapy to 5 patients and the combination of conformation radiotherapy and RALS to 2 patients irradiated once with the radiation of 2-3 Gy. The menu of chemotherapy was the combination of 5-FU (1,250 2,500 mg/week) and CDDP (10-50 mg/week) by intravenous infusion or injection to the hepatic artery in all patients. By this therapy, 6 out of 7 patients were able to live for one year or more, and the median survival time was 1.41 years (0.65-2.65). Only two patients were judged as clinical PR by computed tomography, but the value of the tumor marker after radiotherapy was 85.7% (6/7), a decrease of 1/3 or less before the treatment. As for side effects, nausea, vomit, and appetite loss were observed in some patients. However, they were not so severe and the treatment could be easily restarted. Though various examinations are necessary, the chemoradiotherapy is expected to be useful for unresectable hepatobiliary cancers.

  2. Screening for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Canto, Marcia Irene

    2016-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly fatal disease that can only be cured by complete surgical resection. However, most patients with PC have unresectable disease at the time of diagnosis, highlighting the need to detect PC and its precursor lesions earlier in asymptomatic patients. Screening is not cost-effective for population-based screening of PC. Individuals with genetic risk factors for PC based on family history or known PC-associated genetic syndromes, however, can be a potential target for PC screening programs. This article provides an overview of the epidemiology and genetic background of familial PC and discusses diagnostic and management approaches.

  3. Long-term results of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy for nonmetastatic locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingtai; Che, Xu; Zhang, Jianwei; Huang, Huang; Zhao, Dongbing; Tian, Yantao; Li, Yexiong; Feng, Qinfu; Zhang, Zhihui; Jiang, Qinglong; Zhang, Shuisheng; Tang, Xiaolong; Huang, Xianghui; Chu, Yunmian; Zhang, Jianghu; Sun, Yuemin; Zhang, Yawei; Wang, Chengfeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To assess prognostic benefits of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy (IOERT) in patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and evaluate optimal adjuvant treatment after IOERT. A retrospective cohort study using prospectively collected data was conducted at the Cancer Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, China National Cancer Center. Two hundred forty-seven consecutive patients with nonmetastatic LAPC who underwent IOERT between January 2008 and May 2015 were identified and included in the study. Overall survival (OS) was calculated from the day of IOERT. Prognostic factors were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year actuarial survival rates were 40%, 14%, and 7.2%, respectively, with a median OS of 9.0 months. On multivariate analysis, an IOERT applicator diameter < 6 cm (hazards ratio [HR], 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47–0.97), no intraoperative interstitial sustained-release 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.32–0.66), and receipt of postoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy (HR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.04–0.25) were significantly associated with improved OS. Pain relief after IOERT was achieved in 111 of the 117 patients, with complete remission in 74 and partial remission in 37. Postoperative complications rate and mortality were 14.0% and 0.4%, respectively. Nonmetastatic LAPC patients with smaller size tumors could achieve positive long-term survival outcomes with a treatment strategy incorporating IOERT and postoperative adjuvant treatment. Chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy might be a recommended adjuvant treatment strategy for well-selected cases. Intraoperative interstitial sustained-release 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy should not be recommended for patients with nonmetastatic LAPC. PMID:27661028

  4. High-dose Helical Tomotherapy With Concurrent Full-dose Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jee Suk; Wang, Michael L.C.; Koom, Woong Sub; Yoon, Hong In; Chung, Yoonsun; Song, Si Young; Seong, Jinsil

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To improve poor therapeutic outcome of current practice of chemoradiotherapy (CRT), high-dose helical tomotherapy (HT) with concurrent full-dose chemotherapy has been performed on patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), and the results were analyzed. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients with LAPC treated with radiotherapy using HT (median, 58.4 Gy; range, 50.8-59.9 Gy) and concomitant chemotherapy between 2006 and 2009. Radiotherapy was directed to the primary tumor with a 0.5-cm margin without prophylactic nodal coverage. Twenty-nine patients (79%) received full-dose (1000 mg/m{sup 2}) gemcitabine-based chemotherapy during HT. After completion of CRT, maintenance chemotherapy was administered to 37 patients (95%). Results: The median follow-up was 15.5 months (range, 3.4-43.9) for the entire cohort, and 22.5 months (range, 12.0-43.9) for the surviving patients. The 1- and 2-year local progression-free survival rates were 82.1% and 77.3%, respectively. Eight patients (21%) were converted to resectable status, including 1 with a pathological complete response. The median overall survival and progression-free survival were 21.2 and 14.0 months, respectively. Acute toxicities were acceptable with no gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity higher than Grade 3. Severe late GI toxicity ({>=}Grade 3) occurred in 10 patients (26%); 1 treatment-related death from GI bleeding was observed. Conclusion: High-dose helical tomotherapy with concurrent full-dose chemotherapy resulted in improved local control and long-term survival in patients with LAPC. Future studies are needed to widen the therapeutic window by minimizing late GI toxicity.

  5. Reverse-Contrast Imaging and Targeted Radiation Therapy of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Models

    SciTech Connect

    Thorek, Daniel L.J.; Kramer, Robin M.; Chen, Qing; Jeong, Jeho; Lupu, Mihaela E.; Lee, Alycia M.; Moynahan, Mary E.; Lowery, Maeve; Ulmert, David; Zanzonico, Pat; Deasy, Joseph O.; Humm, John L.; Russell, James

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of delivering experimental radiation therapy to tumors in the mouse pancreas. Imaging and treatment were performed using combined CT (computed tomography)/orthovoltage treatment with a rotating gantry. Methods and Materials: After intraperitoneal administration of radiopaque iodinated contrast, abdominal organ delineation was performed by x-ray CT. With this technique we delineated the pancreas and both orthotopic xenografts and genetically engineered disease. Computed tomographic imaging was validated by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging. Therapeutic radiation was delivered via a 1-cm diameter field. Selective x-ray radiation therapy of the noninvasively defined orthotopic mass was confirmed using γH2AX staining. Mice could tolerate a dose of 15 Gy when the field was centered on the pancreas tail, and treatment was delivered as a continuous 360° arc. This strategy was then used for radiation therapy planning for selective delivery of therapeutic x-ray radiation therapy to orthotopic tumors. Results: Tumor growth delay after 15 Gy was monitored, using CT and ultrasound to determine the tumor volume at various times after treatment. Our strategy enables the use of clinical radiation oncology approaches to treat experimental tumors in the pancreas of small animals for the first time. We demonstrate that delivery of 15 Gy from a rotating gantry minimizes background healthy tissue damage and significantly retards tumor growth. Conclusions: This advance permits evaluation of radiation planning and dosing parameters. Accurate noninvasive longitudinal imaging and monitoring of tumor progression and therapeutic response in preclinical models is now possible and can be expected to more effectively evaluate pancreatic cancer disease and therapeutic response.

  6. Efficacy and Safety of FOLFIRINOX in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer. A Single Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Lakatos, G; Petranyi, A; Szűcs, A; Nehéz, L; Harsanyi, L; Hegyi, P; Bodoky, G

    2017-01-06

    The management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is a major challenge. Although new drugs are available for the treatment of metastatic disease, the optimal treatment of non-metastatic cases remains controversial. The role of neoadjuvant therapy is still a question of debate in this setting. The aim of the study was to prospectively collect and analyse data on efficacy and safety of a modified FOLFIRINOX regimen in LAPC patients treated in a single institution. Another major objective was to assess the capability of FOLFIRINOX to render primary non-resectable cancer to resectable. No bolus fluorouracil was given and a 20% dose reduction of oxaliplatin and irinotecan was applied. Primary G-CSF prophylaxis was applied to prevent febrile neutropenia. Thirty-two patients (mean age 60.2 years, range: 40-77 years) have been enrolled into the study. All patients had ECOG performance status of 0 or 1. Best response to therapy was stable disease (SD) or partial regression (PR) in 18 (56.2%) and 6 (18.8%) cases. Two patients (6.3%) underwent surgical resection (100% R0). The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse events were nausea (18.8%), fatigue (12.5%) and diarrhea (12.5%). The incidence of severe neutropenia was 28.1%, with only one documented case of febrile neutropenia. The probability of disease progression was 25% and 50% after 75 and 160 days with 88.4% of possibility of disease progression after 500 days. OS probability was 92.1, 71.5% and 49.5% at 180-, 365 and 540 days. Our data does not support the capability of FOLFIRINOX to render primary non-resectable cancer to resectable. However, due to the high disease control rate observed, FOLFRINOX might be recommended as first line option for the palliative treatment of LAPC. Despite reduced chemotherapy doses significant toxicity has been seen.

  7. A phase II study of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin (Oxigem) in unresectable gall bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Atul; Mohanti, Bidhu; Raina, Vinod; Shukla, Nootan; Pal, Sujoy; Dwary, Amit; Deo, Surya; Sahni, Peush; Garg, Pramod; Thulkar, Sanjay; DattaGupta, Siddhartha; Rath, Goura

    2010-02-01

    There is a need for effective chemotherapy protocols for gall bladder cancer (GBC). Gemcitabine has antitumor activity in pancreatic cancer. Oxaliplatin is effective in GI cancers. Based on evidence of synergy between these two, we designed this study to evaluate efficacy of this combination in unresectable GBC. Unresectable GBC was enrolled for single center phase II study. Drugs gemcitabine 900 mg/m2 and oxaliplatin 80 mg/m2 IV infusion (Oxigem) on days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks for a maximum of six cycles or unacceptable toxicity which ever was earlier. Fifty patients were enrolled and analysis was restricted to 48 who were treated. Median age was 50 years and 31 patients were females. CR 3 (6.2%), PR 7 (15%), SD 17 (35.4%), and PD 18. One had complete pathological response. Median OS and PFS were 7.5 and 3 months, respectively. OS in responders was 10.5 versus 4 months in non-responders (p<0.0000). Eleven patients (23%) survived for a year or more. There was no toxic death and grade III/IV toxicity seen in 10 (22%) patients: diarrhea 3, vomiting 2, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia 5 patients. This combination of Oxigem effective in unresectable GBC. It may even induce complete pathological response. One-year survival was 20%. There is a need for controlled trial to assess efficacy of this combination.

  8. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  9. Gemcitabine versus FOLFIRINOX in patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma hENT1-positive: everything was not too bad back when everything seemed worse.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, A; Calegari, M A; Martini, M; Cocomazzi, A; Bagalà, C; Indellicati, G; Zurlo, V; Basso, M; Cassano, A; Larocca, L M; Barone, C

    2016-10-01

    hENT1 is a transmembrane protein which acts as a nucleoside transporter and is the main mediator of Gemcitabine (GEM) uptake into human cells. In this retrospective study we compared GEM versus FOLFIRINOX in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer in which hENT1 evaluation was available. 149 patients affected by unresectable metastatic pancreatic cancer, treated in our institution from 2009 to 2013, have been screened for inclusion in this retrospective study. Seventy patients, treated with GEM or FOLFIRINOX in first-line therapy, fulfilled clinical inclusion criteria for survival analysis. Thirty-one patients were available and contained sufficient quality/quantity RNA for evaluation of hENT1 expression by RT-PCR. The primary endpoint was OS and the secondary endpoint was PFS. The survival analysis, carried out on 70 patients regardless of hENT1 expression, showed a statistically longer OS and PFS in the group treated with FOLFIRINOX compared to GEM. Within the exploratory analysis, which included 31 patients, no differences were found in hENT1 positive patients treated with FOLFIRINOX compared to GEM in terms of OS (8.5 vs 7 months, HR: 0.89; 95 % CI 0.3-2.5; p = 0.8) and PFS (5.5 vs 5 months, HR: 0.8, 95 % CI 0.2-2.2; p = 0.61). GEM-treated hENT1 positive patients showed a statistically significant improvement both of OS (8 vs 2 months; p = 0.0012) and PFS (5 vs 1 months; p = 0.0004) in comparison to GEM-treated hENT1 negative patients. In our exploratory analysis GEM seems as effective as FOLFIRINOX in terms of survival with a better safety profile in hENT1 positive metastatic pancreatic cancer.

  10. Single high dose intraoperative electrons for advanced stage pancreatic cancer: Phase I pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Goldson, A.L.; Ashaveri, E.; Espinoza, M.C.

    1981-07-01

    Phase I toxicity studies with intraoperative radiotherapy proved to be a feasible adjunct to surgery for unresectable malignancies of the pancreas at Howard University Hospital. There have been minimal side effects or complications related to the combination of limited surgical decompression and intraoperative radiotherapy alone. The toxic effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on normal tissues is being assessed on a dose volume basis. Doses of 2000 to 2500 rad in a single exposure to include the pancreas, regional nodes and duodenum are acceptable if the total treatment volume is less than or equal to 100 cm. The tumoricidal effects on the cancer are demonstratable when one reviews the pathological specimens that illustrate massive tumor necrosis and fibros replacement, but in all cases reviewed, viable cancer was noted. Intraoperative radiotherapy, therefore, represents a significant boost dose for resectable, partially resectable or non-resectable tumors when added to conventional external beam irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Preliminary clinical data and minimal toxicity justifies further investigation.

  11. Assessment of Nutritional Status, Digestion and Absorption, and Quality of Life in Patients with Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lochtenberg-Potjes, C. M.; Wierdsma, N. J.; Scheffer, H. J.; Kazemier, G.; Ottens-Oussoren, K.; Meijerink, M. R.; de van der Schueren, M. A. E.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim To provide a comprehensive quantitative assessment of nutritional status, digestion and absorption, and quality of life (QoL) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Methods Sixteen patients with LAPC were prospectively assessed for weight loss (WL), body mass index (BMI), fat-free mass index (FFMI), handgrip strength (HGS), dietary macronutrient intake, serum vitamin levels, resting and total energy expenditure (REE and TEE, indirect calorimetry), intestinal absorption capacity and fecal losses (bomb calorimetry), exocrine pancreatic function (fecal elastase-1 (FE1)), and gastrointestinal quality of life (GIQLI). Results Two patients had a low BMI, 10 patients had WL > 10%/6 months, 8 patients had a FFMI < P10, and 8 patients had a HGS < P10. Measured REE was 33% higher (P = 0.002) than predicted REE. TEE was significantly higher than daily energy intake (P = 0.047). Malabsorption (<85%) of energy, fat, protein, and carbohydrates was observed in, respectively, 9, 8, 12, and 10 patients. FE1 levels were low (<200 μg/g) in 13 patients. Total QoL scored 71% (ample satisfactory). Conclusion Patients with LAPC have a severely impaired nutritional status, most likely as a result of an increased REE and malabsorption due to exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. The trial is registered with PANFIRE clinicaltrials.gov NCT01939665. PMID:28912804

  12. Use of Respiratory-Correlated Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography to Determine Acceptable Treatment Margins for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Seth D.; Ford, Eric C.; Duhon, Mario; McNutt, Todd; Wong, John; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Respiratory-induced excursions of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma could affect dose delivery. This study quantified tumor motion and evaluated standard treatment margins. Methods and Materials: Respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography images were obtained on 30 patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma; 15 of whom underwent repeat scanning before cone-down treatment. Treatment planning software was used to contour the gross tumor volume (GTV), bilateral kidneys, and biliary stent. Excursions were calculated according to the centroid of the contoured volumes. Results: The mean +- standard deviation GTV excursion in the superoinferior (SI) direction was 0.55 +- 0.23 cm; an expansion of 1.0 cm adequately accounted for the GTV motion in 97% of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients. Motion GTVs were generated and resulted in a 25% average volume increase compared with the static GTV. Of the 30 patients, 17 had biliary stents. The mean SI stent excursion was 0.84 +- 0.32 cm, significantly greater than the GTV motion. The xiphoid process moved an average of 0.35 +- 0.12 cm, significantly less than the GTV. The mean SI motion of the left and right kidneys was 0.65 +- 0.27 cm and 0.77 +- 0.30 cm, respectively. At repeat scanning, no significant changes were seen in the mean GTV size (p = .8) or excursion (p = .3). Conclusion: These data suggest that an asymmetric expansion of 1.0, 0.7, and 0.6 cm along the respective SI, anteroposterior, and medial-lateral directions is recommended if a respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography scan is not available to evaluate the tumor motion during treatment planning. Surrogates of tumor motion, such as biliary stents or external markers, should be used with caution.

  13. American Gastroenterological Association guidelines are inaccurate in detecting pancreatic cysts with advanced neoplasia: a clinicopathologic study of 225 patients with supporting molecular data.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Aatur D; Zeh, Herbert J; Brand, Randall E; Nikiforova, Marina N; Chennat, Jennifer S; Fasanella, Kenneth E; Khalid, Asif; Papachristou, Georgios I; Slivka, Adam; Hogg, Melissa; Lee, Kenneth K; Tsung, Allan; Zureikat, Amer H; McGrath, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) recently reported evidence-based guidelines for the management of asymptomatic neoplastic pancreatic cysts. These guidelines advocate a higher threshold for surgical resection than prior guidelines and imaging surveillance for a considerable number of patients with pancreatic cysts. The aims of this study were to assess the accuracy of the AGA guidelines in detecting advanced neoplasia and present an alternative approach to pancreatic cysts. The study population consisted of 225 patients who underwent EUS-guided FNA for pancreatic cysts between January 2014 and May 2015. For each patient, clinical findings, EUS features, cytopathology results, carcinoembryonic antigen analysis, and molecular testing of pancreatic cyst fluid were reviewed. Molecular testing included the assessment of hotspot mutations and deletions for KRAS, GNAS, VHL, TP53, PIK3CA, and PTEN. Diagnostic pathology results were available for 41 patients (18%), with 13 (6%) harboring advanced neoplasia. Among these cases, the AGA guidelines identified advanced neoplasia with 62% sensitivity, 79% specificity, 57% positive predictive value, and 82% negative predictive value. Moreover, the AGA guidelines missed 45% of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms with adenocarcinoma or high-grade dysplasia. For cases without confirmatory pathology, 27 of 184 patients (15%) with serous cystadenomas (SCAs) based on EUS findings and/or VHL alterations would continue magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) surveillance. In comparison, a novel algorithmic pathway using molecular testing of pancreatic cyst fluid detected advanced neoplasias with 100% sensitivity, 90% specificity, 79% positive predictive value, and 100% negative predictive value. The AGA guidelines were inaccurate in detecting pancreatic cysts with advanced neoplasia. Furthermore, because the AGA guidelines manage all neoplastic cysts similarly, patients with SCAs will continue to undergo unnecessary MRI

  14. Distal Pancreatectomy With En Bloc Celiac Axis Resection for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Haibing; Ma, Ruirui; Gong, Jian; Cai, Chengzong; Song, Zhenshun; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although distal pancreatectomy with en bloc celiac resection (DP-CAR) is used to treat locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the advantages and disadvantages of this surgical procedure remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate its clinical safety and efficacy. Studies regarding DP-CAR were retrieved from the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Chinese electronic databases. Articles were selected according to predesigned inclusion criteria, and data were extracted according to predesigned sheets. Clinical, oncologic, and survival outcomes of DP-CAR were systematically reviewed by hazard ratios (HRs) or odds ratio (OR) using fixed- or random-effects models. Eighteen studies were included. DP-CAR had a longer operating time and greater intraoperative blood loss compared to distal pancreatectomy (DP). A high incidence of vascular reconstruction occurred in DP-CAR: 11.53% (95%CI: 6.88–18.68%) for artery and 33.28% (95%CI: 20.45–49.19%) for vein. The pooled R0 resection rate of DP-CAR was 72.79% (95% CI, 46.19–89.29%). Higher mortality and morbidity rates were seen in DP-CAR, but no significant differences were detected compared to DP; the pooled OR was 1.798 for mortality (95% CI, 0.360–8.989) and 2.106 for morbidity (95% CI, 0.828–5.353). The pooled incidence of postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) was 31.31% (95%CI, 23.69–40.12%) in DP-CAR, similar to that of DP (OR = 1.07; 95%CI, 0.52–2.20). The pooled HR against DP-CAR was 5.67 (95%CI, 1.48–21.75) for delayed gastric emptying. The pooled rate of reoperation was 9.74% (95%CI, 4.56–19.59%) in DP-CAR. The combined 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates in DP-CAR were 65.22% (49.32–78.34%), 30.20% (21.50–40. 60%), and 18.70% (10.89–30.13%), respectively. The estimated means and medians for survival time in DP-CAR patients were 24.12 (95%CI, 18.26–29.98) months and 17.00 (95%CI, 13.52–20.48) months, respectively. There were no

  15. Translation of recent advances and discoveries in molecular biology and immunology in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Albo, Daniel; Farrow, Buckminster; Berger, David H

    2008-04-01

    Recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms of cancer progression have allowed for targeted approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. New biologic markers are emerging that may improve the ability to detect these tumors earlier. Targeted biologic cancer therapies promise more effective and less toxic systemic treatment options. Although a clear "magic bullet" has yet to emerge, this type of targeted approach offers hope in the management of this dreadful disease. This article offers an update on these promising diagnostic and treatment modalities.

  16. Hypertension in pregnancy: An unresectable mediastinal pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Gazala, Sayf; Switzer, Noah; Bédard, Eric L R

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension is a relatively common occurrence during pregnancy, which usually has a benign course with an excellent prognosis. However, physicians caring for pregnant women should have a high index of suspicion for underlying medical conditions that could lead to a more perilous outcome. Herein, we present the case of a pregnant woman who was found to have uncontrollable hypertension late in her pregnancy, secondary to a mediastinal pheochromocytoma, which was deemed unresectable at the time of exploration after her delivery.

  17. Treatment of advanced pancreatic carcinoma with 90Y-Clivatuzumab Tetraxetan: a phase I single-dose escalation trial.

    PubMed

    Gulec, Seza A; Cohen, Steven J; Pennington, Kenneth L; Zuckier, Lionel S; Hauke, Ralph J; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A; Teoh, Nick; Gold, David V; Sharkey, Robert M; Goldenberg, David M

    2011-06-15

    Humanized antibody hPAM4 specifically binds a mucin glycoprotein expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinomas. This phase I study evaluated a single dose of (90)Y-clivatuzumab tetraxetan ((90)Y-labeled hPAM4) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Twenty-one patients (4 stage III; 17 stage IV) received (111)In-hPAM4 for imaging and serum sampling before (90)Y-hPAM4. Study procedures evaluated adverse events, safety laboratories, computed tomography (CT) scans, biomarkers, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry, and immunogenicity (HAHA). (111)In-hPAM4 showed normal biodistribution with radiation dose estimates to red marrow and solid organs acceptable for radioimmunotherapy and with tumor targeting in 12 patients. One patient withdrew before (90)Y-hPAM4; otherwise, 20 patients received (90)Y doses of 15 (n = 7), 20 (n = 9), and 25 mCi/m(2) (n = 4). Treatment was well tolerated; the only significant drug-related toxicities were (NCI CTC v.3) grade 3 to 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia increasing with (90)Y dose. There were no bleeding events or serious infections, and most cytopenias recovered to grade 1 within 12 weeks. Three patients at 25 mCi/m(2) encountered dose-limiting toxicity with grade 4 cytopenias more than 7 days, establishing 20 mCi/m(2) as the maximal tolerated (90)Y dose. Two patients developed HAHA of uncertain clinical significance. Most patients progressed rapidly and with CA19-9 levels increasing within 1 month of therapy, but 7 remained progression-free by CT for 1.5 to 5.6 months, including 3 achieving transient partial responses (32%-52% tumor diameter shrinkage). (90)Y-Clivatuzumab tetraxetan was well tolerated with manageable hematologic toxicity at the maximal tolerated (90)Y dose, and is a potential new therapeutic for advanced pancreatic cancer. ©2011 AACR.

  18. Treatment of Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma with 90Y-Clivatuzumab Tetraxetan: A Phase I Single-Dose Escalation Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gulec, Seza A.; Cohen, Steven J.; Pennington, Kenneth L.; Zuckier, Lionel S.; Hauke, Ralph J.; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A.; Teoh, Nick; Gold, David V.; Sharkey, Robert M.; Goldenberg, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Humanized antibody hPAM4 specifically binds a mucin glycoprotein expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinomas. This phase I study evaluated a single dose of 90Y-clivatuzumab tetraxetan (90Y-labeled hPAM4) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Experimental Design Twenty-one patients (4 stage III; 17 stage IV) received 111In-hPAM4 for imaging and serum sampling before 90Y-hPAM4. Study procedures evaluated adverse events, safety laboratories, computed tomography (CT) scans, biomarkers, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry, and immunogenicity (HAHA). Results 111In-hPAM4 showed normal biodistribution with radiation dose estimates to red marrow and solid organs acceptable for radioimmunotherapy and with tumor targeting in 12 patients. One patient withdrew before 90Y-hPAM4; otherwise, 20 patients received 90Y doses of 15 (n = 7), 20 (n = 9), and 25 mCi/m2 (n = 4). Treatment was well tolerated; the only significant drug-related toxicities were (NCI CTC v.3) grade 3 to 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia increasing with 90Y dose. There were no bleeding events or serious infections, and most cytopenias recovered to grade 1 within 12 weeks. Three patients at 25 mCi/m2 encountered dose-limiting toxicity with grade 4 cytopenias more than 7 days, establishing 20 mCi/m2 as the maximal tolerated 90Y dose. Two patients developed HAHA of uncertain clinical significance. Most patients progressed rapidly and with CA19-9 levels increasing within 1 month of therapy, but 7 remained progression-free by CT for 1.5 to 5.6 months, including 3 achieving transient partial responses (32%–52% tumor diameter shrinkage). Conclusion 90Y-Clivatuzumab tetraxetan was well tolerated with manageable hematologic toxicity at the maximal tolerated 90Y dose, and is a potential new therapeutic for advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:21527562

  19. A phase I pilot trial of MUC1-peptide-pulsed dendritic cells in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Rong, Yefei; Qin, Xia; Jin, Dayong; Lou, Wenhui; Wu, Lili; Wang, Dansong; Wu, Wenchuan; Ni, Xiaolin; Mao, Zhengfa; Kuang, Tiantao; Zang, Ying Qin; Qin, Xinyu

    2012-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the toxicity and immunological response induced by the intra-dermal (i.d.) administration of MUC1-peptide-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Patients with recurrent lesions or metastasis after surgery, and immunohistochemistry positive for MUC1 were treated in cohorts that received 3-6 × 10(6) DCs i.d. for three or four vaccines. Each vaccine was composed of autologus DCs pulsed with MUC1-peptide. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) that harvested 2 weeks after the second immunization were compared with PBMCs obtained before treatment for immunological response. Serial ELISPOT assays of PBMCs for antitumor reactivity were performed. Three patients received all four vaccines, and four patients received three vaccines. These patients were evaluable for toxicity and immunological monitoring. There were no grade 3 or 4 toxicities associated with the vaccines or major evidence of autoimmunity. Interferon-γ and granzyme B ELISPOT assay reactivity increased significantly in 2 of 7 patients (P < 0.05). The administration of MUC1-peptide-pulsed DCs is non-toxic and capable of inducing immunological response to tumor antigen MUC1 in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Additional studies are necessary to improve tumor rejection responses.

  20. Xanthohumol-mediated suppression of Notch1 signaling is associated with antitumor activity in human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kunnimalaiyaan, Selvi; Trevino, Jose; Tsai, Susan; Gamblin, T. Clark; Kunnimalaiyaan, Muthusamy

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a lethal disease with limited treatment options. At the time of diagnosis, approximately 80% of these patients present with unresectable tumors caused by either locally advanced lesions or progressive metastatic growth. Therefore, development of novel treatment strategies and new therapeutics are needed. Xanthohumol (XN) has emerged as a potential compound that inhibits various types of cancer, but the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of XN remain unclear. In the present study, we have assessed the efficacy of XN on pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1, PANC-1, L3.6pl, MiaPaCa-2, 512, and 651) against cell growth in real time and using colony forming assays. Treatment with XN resulted in reduction in cellular proliferation in a dose and time dependent manner. The growth suppression effect of XN in pancreatic cancer cell lines is due to increased apoptosis via the inhibition of the Notch1 signaling pathway, as evidenced by reduction in Notch1, HES-1, and survivin both at mRNA as well as protein levels. Notch1 promoter reporter analysis after XN treatment indicated that XN down regulates Notch promoter activity. Importantly, overexpression of active Notch1 in XN-treated pancreatic cancer cells resulted in negation of growth suppression. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that the growth suppressive effect of XN in pancreatic cancer cells is mainly mediated by Notch1 reduction. PMID:25887885

  1. Xanthohumol-Mediated Suppression of Notch1 Signaling Is Associated with Antitumor Activity in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kunnimalaiyaan, Selvi; Trevino, Jose; Tsai, Susan; Gamblin, T Clark; Kunnimalaiyaan, Muthusamy

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a lethal disease with limited treatment options. At the time of diagnosis, approximately 80% of these patients present with unresectable tumors caused by either locally advanced lesions or progressive metastatic growth. Therefore, development of novel treatment strategies and new therapeutics is needed. Xanthohumol (XN) has emerged as a potential compound that inhibits various types of cancer, but the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of XN remains unclear. In the present study, we have assessed the efficacy of XN on pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1, PANC-1, L3.6pl, MiaPaCa-2, 512, and 651) against cell growth in real time and using colony-forming assays. Treatment with XN resulted in reduction in cellular proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The growth suppression effect of XN in pancreatic cancer cell lines is due to increased apoptosis via the inhibition of the Notch1 signaling pathway, as evidenced by reduction in Notch1, HES-1, and survivin both at mRNA as well as protein levels. Notch1 promoter reporter analysis after XN treatment indicated that XN downregulates Notch promoter activity. Importantly, overexpression of active Notch1 in XN-treated pancreatic cancer cells resulted in negation of growth suppression. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that the growth suppressive effect of XN in pancreatic cancer cells is mainly mediated by Notch1 reduction.

  2. Bevacizumab and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Biliary Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-12

    Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Gastrointestinal Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  3. Cediranib Maleate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-10

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Periampullary Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  4. Efficacy and safety of gemcitabine plus erlotinib for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Hu, Guo-fang; Zhang, Qian-qian; Tang, Ning; Guo, Jun; Liu, Li-yan; Han, Xiao; Wang, Xia; Wang, Zhe-hai

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is considered as a chemoresistant neoplasm with extremely dismal prognosis. Gemcitabine is recommended as the standard agent for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. A series of trials have been conducted to improve the outcome of advanced pancreatic cancer with other anticancer drugs in combination with gemcitabine. Unfortunately, the designers of the clinical trials failed to improve the poor prognosis of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Erlotinib was the first additional drug that improved the overall survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer with gemcitabine. We performed this systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the efficacy and safety of the combination of gemcitabine with erlotinib (GemErlo) for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer using the currently available evidence. Methods PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and relevant abstracts of major conferences were comprehensively searched. Data results on objective response rate, disease control rate, and 1-year survival were pooled by using MetaAnalyst with a random-effects model. Results on progression-free survival and overall survival were only summarized descriptively. Results A total of 24 studies with 1,742 patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer treated with GemErlo were included. Combined objective response rate was 14.4% (95% CI: 11.6%–17.7%), disease control rate was 55.0% (95% CI: 51.5%–58.5%), and 1-year survival rate was 28.5% (95% CI: 24.0%–33.4%). Progression-free survival ranged from 2.63 to 9.6 months, and overall survival varied from 6 to 10 months. As for the toxicity profile, the most common adverse events (AEs) were hematologic reactions, skin rash, and gastrointestinal reactions. Other severe AEs, which had low incidence, included treatment-induced death and interstitial lung disease. Conclusion Our study showed that GemErlo is associated with reasonable activity in treating

  5. Phase II open-label study of erlotinib in combination with gemcitabine in unresectable and/or metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas: relationship between skin rash and survival (Pantar study).

    PubMed

    Aranda, E; Manzano, J L; Rivera, F; Galán, M; Valladares-Ayerbes, M; Pericay, C; Safont, M J; Mendez, M J; Irigoyen, A; Arrivi, A; Sastre, J; Díaz-Rubio, E

    2012-07-01

    Skin rash is an adverse event which might be associated with longer survival in patients treated with epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The aim of this nonrandomised phase II clinical trial is to prospectively evaluate the relationship between skin rash and overall survival (OS) in advanced/metastatic pancreatic cancer treated with erlotinib plus gemcitabine. Patients were given gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2/week, 3 weeks every 4 weeks) plus erlotinib (100 mg/day orally continuously) until disease progression/unacceptable toxicity. The primary end point was OS. A total of 153 eligible patients were enrolled (grade≥2 rash, 25%; grade<2 rash, 75%). OS was longer in patients with grade≥2 rash versus grade<2 (11 versus 5 months; P<0.001). Progression-free survival was longer in patients with grade≥2 rash versus grade<2 (6 versus 3 months; P<0.001) and shorter in those without rash versus grade 1 (2 versus 4 months; P=0.005) or grade≥2 (2 versus 6 months; P<0.001). Patients with grade≥2 rash showed higher rates of overall response (21% versus 7%; P<0.05) and disease control (84% versus 43%; P<0.05) versus grade<2. This study prospectively confirms the relationship between rash and longer OS in unresectable locally advanced/metastatic pancreatic cancer treated with erlotinib plus gemcitabine.

  6. Effect of NF-κB inhibition on chemoresistance in biliary-pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Uwagawa, Tadashi; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Biliary cancer and pancreatic cancer are considered to be difficult diseases to cure. Although complete resection provides the only means of curing these cancers, the rate of resectability is not high. Therefore, chemotherapy is often selected in patients with advanced unresectable biliary-pancreatic cancer. Many combination chemotherapy regimens have been applied in clinical trials. However, the survival time is not satisfactory. On the other hand, most chemotherapeutic agents induce anti-apoptotic transcriptional factor nuclear factor kappa b (NF-κB) activation, and agent-induced NF-κB activation is deeply involved in the onset of chemoresistance. Recently, novel approaches to potentiating chemosensitivity in cases of biliary-pancreatic cancer using NF-κB inhibitors with cytotoxic agents have been reported, most of which comprise translational research, although some clinical trials have also been conducted. Nevertheless, to date, there is no breakthrough chemotherapy regimen for these diseases. As some reports show promising data, combination chemotherapy consisting of a NF-κB inhibitor with chemotherapeutic agents seems to improve chemosensitivity and prolong the survival time of biliary-pancreatic cancer patients.

  7. Iontophoretic device delivery for the localized treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Byrne, James D; Jajja, Mohammad R N; Schorzman, Allison N; Keeler, Amanda W; Luft, J Christopher; Zamboni, William C; DeSimone, Joseph M; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2016-02-23

    Poor delivery and systemic toxicity of many cytotoxic agents, such as the recent promising combination chemotherapy regimen of folinic acid (leucovorin), fluorouracil, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX), restrict their full utility in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Local delivery of chemotherapies has become possible using iontophoretic devices that are implanted directly onto pancreatic tumors. We have fabricated implantable iontophoretic devices and tested the local iontophoretic delivery of FOLFIRINOX for the treatment of pancreatic cancer in an orthotopic patient-derived xenograft model. Iontophoretic delivery of FOLFIRINOX was found to increase tumor exposure by almost an order of magnitude compared with i.v. delivery with substantially lower plasma concentrations. Mice treated for 7 wk with device FOLFIRINOX experienced significantly greater tumor growth inhibition compared with i.v. FOLFIRINOX. A marker of cell proliferation, Ki-67, was stained, showing a significant reduction in tumor cell proliferation. These data capitalize on the unique ability of an implantable iontophoretic device to deliver much higher concentrations of drug to the tumor compared with i.v. delivery. Local iontophoretic delivery of cytotoxic agents should be considered for the treatment of patients with unresectable nonmetastatic disease and for patients with the need for palliation of local symptoms, and may be considered as a neoadjuvant approach to improve resection rates and outcome in patients with localized and locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  8. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... meals throughout the day that are high in carbohydrates and low in protein and fat. Pancreatic enzymes ... the Pancreas NPF Centers Pancreatitis Centers Pancreatitis Center Application Pancreatic Cancer Centers Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer Pancreas ...

  9. Evaluation and proposal of novel resectability criteria for pancreatic cancer established by the Japan Pancreas Society.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Suguru; Fujii, Tsutomu; Takami, Hideki; Hayashi, Masamichi; Iwata, Naoki; Kanda, Mitsuro; Tanaka, Chie; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Goro; Koike, Masahiko; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2017-10-01

    The guidelines for the classification of the resectability of pancreatic cancer established by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network can be difficult to utilize in clinical practice. We evaluated novel criteria proposed by the Japan Pancreas Society. We analyzed 382 patients with pancreatic cancer between 2001 and 2015 for survival differences among subgroups classified according to the Japan Pancreas Society classification. Overall survival and disease-free survival were expressed as median values and compared with data based on the National Comprehensive Cancer Network classification, and differences in initial patterns of recurrence were analyzed. Overall survival times according to the Japan Pancreas Society criteria were 34.2, 29.7, 17.3, 14.3, and 15.8 months for the groups defined as resectable, resectable with portal vein invasion, borderline resectable with portal vein invasion, borderline resectable with arterial invasion, and unresectable by locally advanced disease respectively. The overall survival of the resectable group was better than those of the borderline resectable with portal vein invasion or borderline resectable with arterial invasion groups (P < .0001); however, the borderline resectable with portal vein invasion, borderline resectable with arterial invasion, and unresectable by locally advanced groups showed no differences in overall survival. The resectable group showed a tendency toward better survival than the resectable with portal vein invasion group (P = .058). The median overall survival times according to the classic 2012 National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria were 30.5, 20.5, 15.8, and 13.8 months for the resectable, portal invasion, common hepatic artery and superior mesenteric artery invasion groups, respectively. Each survival curve was clearly separate. The borderline resectable with arterial invasion and unresectable by locally advanced groups exhibited high local recurrence rates (42.0% and 44

  10. Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors: Pancreatic Endocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Metz, David C.

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) have long fascinated clinicians and investigators despite their relative rarity. Their clinical presentation varies depending upon whether the tumor is functional or not and also according to the specific hormonal syndrome produced. Tumors may be sporadic or inherited but little is known about their molecular pathology, especially the sporadic forms. Chromogranin A appears to be the most useful serum marker for diagnosis, staging and monitoring. Initially, therapy should be directed at the hormonal syndrome as this has the major initial impact on the patient's health. Most PETs are relatively indolent but ultimately malignant, except for insulinomas which are predominantly benign. Surgery is the only modality that offers the possibility of cure although it is generally noncurative in patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome or nonfunctional PETs with MEN1. Preoperative staging of disease extent is necessary to determine the likelihood of complete resection though debulking surgery is often felt to be useful in unresectable patients. Once metastatic, biotherapy is usually the first modality employed because it is generally well tolerated. Systemic or regional therapies are generally reserved until symptoms occur or tumor growth is rapid. Recently a number of newer agents, as well as receptor-directed radiotherapy, are being evalulated for patients with advanced disease. This review addresses a number of recent advances regarding the molecular pathology, diagnosis, localization and management of PETs including discussion of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy and other novel antitumor approaches. We conclude with a discussion of future directions and unsettled problems in the field. PMID:18703061

  11. Phase I trial of gefitinib with concurrent radiotherapy and fixed 2-h gemcitabine infusion, in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Maurel, Joan . E-mail: jmaurel@clinic.ub.es; Martin-Richard, Marta; Conill, Carlos; Sanchez, Marcelo; Petriz, Lourdes; Gines, Angels; Miquel, Rosa; Gallego, Rosa; Cajal, Rosana; Ayuso, Carmen; Navarro, Salvador; Marmol, Maribel; Nadal, Cristina; Auge, Josep Maria; Gascon, Pere; Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic cancers are resistant to radiotherapy (RT) and current chemotherapy agents. Epidermal growth factor receptor is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, and in vitro studies have shown that epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors can overcome radio- and chemoresistance. The aim of the study was to determine whether the addition of gefitinib to RT and gemcitabine for patients with locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC) was feasible and safe. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with pathologically proven LAPC, based on major vascular invasion based on helical computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic ultrasound, were entered into the study. The targeted irradiated volume included the tumor and 2-cm margin. Prophylactic irradiation of regional nodes was not allowed. Patients with >500 cm{sup 3} of planning tumor volume were excluded. An initial cohort of 6 patients was treated with RT (45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks) plus concomitant gefitinib (250 mg/day). Successive cohorts of patients received 100, 150, and 200 mg/m{sup 2}/day of gemcitabine in a 2-h infusion over Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 with gefitinib (250 mg/day) and RT. Gefitinib was continued after RT until progression. A pharmacodynamic study of angiogenic markers was also performed to evaluate a possible antiangiogenic effect. Results: There were no dose-limiting toxicities. Common toxicities were mild neutropenia, asthenia, diarrhea, cutaneous rash and nausea/vomiting. The median (95% confidence interval [CI]) progression-free survival was 3.7 (95% CI = 1.9-5.5) months, and the median overall survival was 7.5 (95% CI 5.2-9.9) months. No significant reduction of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-8 was observed after treatment. Conclusion: Our results support that the combination of gefitinib, RT, and gemcitabine has an acceptable toxicity but with modest activity in LAPC.

  12. Randomized phase II/III clinical trial of elpamotide for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: PEGASUS-PC Study.

    PubMed

    Yamaue, Hiroki; Tsunoda, Takuya; Tani, Masaji; Miyazawa, Motoki; Yamao, Kenji; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Okusaka, Takuji; Ueno, Hideki; Boku, Narikazu; Fukutomi, Akira; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Furukawa, Masayuki; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Masafumi; Togashi, Yosuke; Nishio, Kazuto; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    Gemcitabine is a key drug for the treatment of pancreatic cancer; however, with its limitation in clinical benefits, the development of another potent therapeutic is necessary. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 is an essential target for tumor angiogenesis, and we have conducted a phase I clinical trial using gemcitabine and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 peptide (elpamotide). Based on the promising results of this phase I trial, a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase II/III clinical trial has been carried out for pancreatic cancer. The eligibility criteria included locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients were assigned to either the Active group (elpamotide + gemcitabine) or Placebo group (placebo + gemcitabine) in a 2:1 ratio by the dynamic allocation method. The primary endpoint was overall survival. The Harrington-Fleming test was applied to the statistical analysis in this study to evaluate the time-lagged effect of immunotherapy appropriately. A total of 153 patients (Active group, n = 100; Placebo group, n = 53) were included in the analysis. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in the prolongation of overall survival (Harrington-Fleming P-value, 0.918; log-rank P-value, 0.897; hazard ratio, 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.486-1.557). Median survival time was 8.36 months (95% CI, 7.46-10.18) for the Active group and 8.54 months (95% CI, 7.33-10.84) for the Placebo group. The toxicity observed in both groups was manageable. Combination therapy of elpamotide with gemcitabine was well tolerated. Despite the lack of benefit in overall survival, subgroup analysis suggested that the patients who experienced severe injection site reaction, such as ulceration and erosion, might have better survival.

  13. Small bowel metastasis from pancreatic cancer in a long-term survival patient with synchronous advanced malignant pleural mesothelioma: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Morena; Corte, Carminia Maria Della; Vicidomini, Giovanni; Scotti, Valerio; Rambaldi, Pier Francesco; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Accardo, Marina; De Vita, Ferdinando; Santini, Mario; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Morgillo, Floriana

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive tumor that originates from the surface of the pleura. Approximately 70% of cases are associated with chronic asbestos exposure. MPM is regarded as an incurable disease, with a median survival of ~2 years following intensive multimodality treatment. Pancreatic cancer is a malignancy also associated with a poor prognosis, with only 2% of patients surviving for 5 years. The majority of patients with pancreatic cancer are diagnosed with an advanced stage of disease and experience a poor response to therapy. The development of synchronous MPM and other types of cancer is rare. The present study describes a patient with synchronous, biphasic MPM and pancreatic adenocarcinoma, who was treated with a multimodal therapeutic approach with stereotactic body radiation therapy. Due to a suspected diagnosis of ‘acute abdomen’, an emergency small intestine resection was performed and a subsequent diagnosis of moderately-differentiated adenocarcinoma was confirmed. During a further immunohistochemical examination, pathologists determined that the small bowel metastasis descended from pancreatic cancer. The onset of bowel metastasis is an event rarely associated with MPM, and has not been previously described in the literature for cases of pancreatic cancer. Therefore, to the best of our knowledge, the present study describes the first case of intestinal metastasis from pancreatic cancer in a long-term survival patient with biphasic MPM. PMID:28105159

  14. Computed tomographic appearance of resectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y.; Araki, T.; Tasaka, A.; Maruyama, M.

    1982-06-01

    Thirteen patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma were examined by computed tomography (CT). Nine had a mass, 2 had dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, 1 appeared to have ductal dilatation, and 1 had no sign of abnormality. Resectable carcinoma was diagnosed retrospectively in 8 cases, based on the following criteria: a mass with a distinct contour, frequently containing a tiny or irregular low-density area and accompanied by dilatation of the caudal portion of the main pancreatic duct without involvement of the large vessels, liver, or lymph nodes. Including unresectable cancer, chronic pancreatitis, and obstructive jaundice from causes other than cancer, the false-positive rate was less than 6%. However, a small cancer without change in pancreatic contour is difficult to detect with CT.

  15. Recent Advances and Prospects in the Differentiation of Pancreatic Cells From Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mfopou, Josué Kunjom; Chen, Bing; Sui, Lina; Sermon, Karen; Bouwens, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies with human embryonic stem (hES) cells have established new protocols for substantial generation of pancreatic progenitors from definitive endoderm. These findings add to the efficient derivation of definitive endoderm, which is controlled by Wnt and Nodal pathways, and delineate a step forward in the quest for alternative β-cell sources. It also indicates that critical refining of the available strategies might help define a universal protocol for pancreatic differentiation applicable to several cell lines, therefore offering the possibility for transplantation of immune-matched or patient-specific hES–derived β-cells. We appraise here the fundamental role that bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor, and retinoid signaling play during pancreas development, and describe a fundamental emergence of their combination in recent studies that generated pancreatic cells from hES cells. We finally enumerate some prospects that might improve further differentiation of the progenitor cells into functional β-cells needed in diabetes cell therapy. PMID:20805383

  16. Neoadjuvant strategies for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Polistina, Francesco; Di Natale, Giuseppe; Bonciarelli, Giorgio; Ambrosino, Giovanni; Frego, Mauro

    2014-07-28

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth cause of cancer death in Western countries, the only chance for long term survival is an R0 surgical resection that is feasible in about 10%-20% of all cases. Five years cumulative survival is less than 5% and rises to 25% for radically resected patients. About 40% has locally advanced in PC either borderline resectable (BRPC) or unresectable locally advanced (LAPC). Since LAPC and BRPC have been recognized as a particular form of PC neoadjuvant therapy (NT) has increasingly became a valid treatment option. The aim of NT is to reach local control of disease but, also, it is recognized to convert about 40% of LAPC patients to R0 resectability, thus providing a significant improvement of prognosis for responding patients. Once R0 resection is achieved, survival is comparable to that of early stage PCs treated by upfront surgery. Thus it is crucial to look for a proper patient selection. Neoadjuvant strategies are multiples and include neoadjuvant chemotherapy (nCT), and the association of nCT with radiotherapy (nCRT) given as either a combination of a radio sensitizing drug as gemcitabine or capecitabine or and concomitant irradiation or as upfront nCT followed by nRT associated to a radio sensitizing drug. This latter seem to be most promising as it may select patients who do not go on disease progression during initial treatment and seem to have a better prognosis. The clinical relevance of nCRT may be enhanced by the application of higher active protocols as FOLFIRINOX.

  17. Neoadjuvant strategies for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Polistina, Francesco; Di Natale, Giuseppe; Bonciarelli, Giorgio; Ambrosino, Giovanni; Frego, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth cause of cancer death in Western countries, the only chance for long term survival is an R0 surgical resection that is feasible in about 10%-20% of all cases. Five years cumulative survival is less than 5% and rises to 25% for radically resected patients. About 40% has locally advanced in PC either borderline resectable (BRPC) or unresectable locally advanced (LAPC). Since LAPC and BRPC have been recognized as a particular form of PC neoadjuvant therapy (NT) has increasingly became a valid treatment option. The aim of NT is to reach local control of disease but, also, it is recognized to convert about 40% of LAPC patients to R0 resectability, thus providing a significant improvement of prognosis for responding patients. Once R0 resection is achieved, survival is comparable to that of early stage PCs treated by upfront surgery. Thus it is crucial to look for a proper patient selection. Neoadjuvant strategies are multiples and include neoadjuvant chemotherapy (nCT), and the association of nCT with radiotherapy (nCRT) given as either a combination of a radio sensitizing drug as gemcitabine or capecitabine or and concomitant irradiation or as upfront nCT followed by nRT associated to a radio sensitizing drug. This latter seem to be most promising as it may select patients who do not go on disease progression during initial treatment and seem to have a better prognosis. The clinical relevance of nCRT may be enhanced by the application of higher active protocols as FOLFIRINOX. PMID:25071332

  18. Liposomal cisplatin combined with gemcitabine in pretreated advanced pancreatic cancer patients: a phase I-II study.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, George P; Boulikas, Teni; Vougiouka, Maria; Rigatos, Sotirios K; Stathopoulos, John G

    2006-05-01

    The present trial is a phase I-II study based on a new liposomal cisplatin (lipoplatin). Previous preclinical and clinical data (phase I pharmacokinetics) led to the investigation of a combined treatment modality involving lipoplatin and gemcitabine. The gemcitabine dose was kept standard at 1000 mg/m2 and the lipoplatin dose was escalated from 25 mg/m2 to 125 mg/m2. The treatment was administered to advanced pretreated pancreatic cancer patients who were refractory to previous chemotherapy which included gemcitabine. Lipoplatin at 125 mg/m2 was defined as dose limiting toxicity (DLT) and 100 mg/m2 as the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in combination with 1000 mg/m2 of gemcitabine. Preliminary objective response rate data showed a partial response in 2/24 patients (8.3%), disease stability in 14 patients (58.3%) for a median duration of 3 months (range 2-7 months) and clinical benefit in 8 patients (33.3%). Liposomal cisplatin is a non-toxic alternative agent to bare cisplatin. In combination with gemcitabine, it has an MTD of 100 mg/m2 and shows promising efficacy in refractory pancreatic cancer.

  19. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. [Chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, T; Katada, N; Nishimura, D; Hoshino, H; Shimizu, F; Suzuki, R; Sano, H; Kato, K

    1998-11-01

    MRCP has been recognized as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic method. In the present study we evaluated the usefulness of MRCP in diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis. Two-dimensional fast asymmetric spin-echo (FASE) MRCP was performed in 40 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 13 with acute pancreatitis. In 29 patients (72.5%) with chronic pancreatitis and 9 (66.7%) with acute pancreatitis, main pancreatic duct (MPD) was visualized entirely. MRCP could demonstrate the characteristic findings of chronic pancreatitis such as dilatation and irregularity of MPD in most cases. In acute pancreatitis, MRCP indicated that MPD was normal in diameter, but irregular in configuration compared with that of the control group. MRCP may facilitate the diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis.

  1. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Patients With Advanced Breast or Pancreatic Cancer With Metastases to the Liver or Lung

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-28

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Liver Metastases; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  2. miR-21 expression and clinical outcome in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: exploratory analysis of the pancreatic cancer Erbitux, radiotherapy and UFT (PERU) trial

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Khurum; Cunningham, David; Peckitt, Clare; Barton, Sarah; Tait, Diana; Hawkins, Maria; Watkins, David; Starling, Naureen; Rao, Sheela; Begum, Ruwaida; Thomas, Janet; Oates, Jacqui; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Fassan, Matteo; Braconi, Chiara; Chau, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background Locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is associated with high mortality, and biomarker-driven treatment approach is currently lacking. This study evaluated safety and efficacy of a combination approach of chemotherapy followed by chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) +/− cetuximab, and the prognostic role of miR-21 in patients with LAPC treated with a multimodality approach. Patients and Methods This was a randomised phase II trial in which patients with inoperable LAPC were offered gemcitabine and capecitabine (GEM-CAP) for 16 weeks. Patients with stable disease or response after GEM-CAP were randomised to capecitabine or UFT plus radiotherapy (RT) (A), or capecitabine or UFT plus cetuximab plus RT (B). The primary outcome of the study was overall survival (OS). Clinical outcome was compared according to baseline circulating miR-21 levels. Results 17 patients were enrolled and treated with GEM-CAP, with 13 patients achieving disease control and being randomised to arms A (n:7) and B (n:6). After a median follow-up of 61.2 months, median progression free survival (PFS) was 10.4 months and 12.7 months, median OS was 15.8 months and 22.0 months in arms A and B respectively (p > 0.05). Patients with high baseline plasma miR-21 had worse PFS (3.5 vs. 12.7 months; p:0.032) and OS (5.1 vs 15.3 months; p:0.5) compared to patients with low miR-21. Circulating miR-21 levels reflected miR-21 expression within the tissues. Conclusions Addition of Cetuximab to CRT following induction chemotherapy did not improve survival. High miR-21 baseline plasma expression was associated with poor clinical outcome in LAPC patients treated with induction chemotherapy followed by chemo-radiotherapy. PMID:26862857

  3. Intensity-Modulated and Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Patients with Locally Advanced Inoperable Pancreatic Cancer after Preradiation Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, M.; Ganeshan, R.; Graf, R.; Pelzer, U.; Stieler, J. M.; Striefler, J. K.; Bahra, M.; Wust, P.; Riess, H.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy (RT) in patients with pancreatic cancer is still a controversial subject and its benefit in inoperable stages of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), even after induction chemotherapy, remains unclear. Modern radiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may improve effectiveness and reduce radiotherapy-related toxicities. Methods. Patients with LAPC who underwent radiotherapy after chemotherapy between 09/2004 and 05/2013 were retrospectively analyzed with regard to preradiation chemotherapy (PRCT), modalities of radiotherapy, and toxicities. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated by Kaplan-Meier curves. Results. 15 (68%) women and 7 men (median age 64 years; range 40–77) were identified. Median duration of PRCT was 11.1 months (range 4.3–33.0). Six patients (27%) underwent conventional RT and 16 patients (73%) advanced IMRT and IGRT; median dosage was 50.4 (range 9–54) Gray. No grade III or IV toxicities occurred. Median PFS (estimated from the beginning of RT) was 5.8 months, 2.6 months in the conventional RT group (conv-RT), and 7.1 months in the IMRT/IGRT group (P = 0.029); median OS was 11.0 months, 4.2 months (conv-RT), and 14.0 months (IMRT/IGRT); P = 0.141. Median RT-specific PFS for patients with prolonged PRCT > 9 months was 8.5 months compared to 5.6 months for PRCT < 9 months (P = 0.293). This effect was translated into a significantly better median RT-specific overall survival of patients in the PRCT > 9 months group, with 19.0 months compared to 8.5 months in the PRCT  <  9 months group (P = 0.049). Conclusions. IGRT and IMRT after PRCT are feasible and effective options for patients with LAPC after prolonged preradiation chemotherapy. PMID:25401140

  4. Using economic analysis to evaluate the potential of multimodality therapy for elderly patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krzyzanowska, Monika K. . E-mail: monika.krzyzanowska@uhn.on.ca; Earle, Craig C.; Kuntz, Karen M.; Weeks, Jane C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Development of new and expensive drugs with activity against pancreatic cancer has made economic considerations more relevant to treatment decision-making for advanced disease. Economic modeling can be used to explore the potential of such novel therapies and to inform clinical trial design. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of radiation plus fluorouracil (RT-FU) relative to no treatment in elderly patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and to determine the economic potential of radiation plus gemcitabine (RT-GEM), a novel regimen for this disease. We used the SEER-Medicare database to estimate effectiveness and costs supplemented by data from the literature where necessary. Results: Relative to no treatment, RT-FU was associated with a cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $68,724/QALY in the base case analysis. Compared with RT-FU, the ICER for RT-GEM was below $100,000/QALY when the risk of dying with the new regimen was <85% than with the standard regimen. However, >1,000 subjects would be necessary to demonstrate this level of efficacy in a randomized trial. The ICER of RT-GEM was most sensitive to utility values, and, at lower efficacy levels, to costs of gemcitabine and treatment-related toxicity. Conclusions: In elderly patients with LAPC, RT-FU is a cost-effective alternative to no treatment. The novel regimen of RT-GEM is likely to be cost-effective at any clinically meaningful benefit, but quality-of-life issues, drug acquisition, and toxicity-related costs may be relevant, especially at lower efficacy levels.

  5. Single-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Sequential Gemcitabine for the Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, Devin; Kim, Jeff; Christman-Skieller, Claudia; Chun, Carlene L.; Columbo, Laurie Ann; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Kunz, Pamela L.; Van Dam, Jacques; Quon, Andrew; Desser, Terry S.; Norton, Jeffrey; Hsu, Annie; Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Goodman, Karyn A.; Chang, Daniel T.; Koong, Albert C.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: This Phase II trial evaluated the toxicity, local control, and overall survival in patients treated with sequential gemcitabine and linear accelerator-based single-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were enrolled on this prospective single-institution, institutional review board-approved study. Gemcitabine was administered on Days 1, 8, and 15, and SBRT on Day 29. Gemcitabine was restarted on Day 43 and continued for 3-5 cycles. SBRT of 25 Gy in a single fraction was delivered to the internal target volume with a 2- 3-mm margin using a nine-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique. Respiratory gating was used to account for breathing motion. Follow-up evaluations occurred at 4-6 weeks, 10-12 weeks, and every 3 months after SBRT. Results: All patients completed SBRT and a median of five cycles of chemotherapy. Follow-up for the 2 remaining alive patients was 25.1 and 36.4 months. No acute Grade 3 or greater nonhematologic toxicity was observed. Late Grade 3 or greater toxicities occurred in 1 patient (5%) and consisted of a duodenal perforation (G4). Three patients (15%) developed ulcers (G2) that were medically managed. Overall, median survival was 11.8 months, with 1-year survival of 50% and 2-year survival of 20%. Using serial computed tomography, the freedom from local progression was 94% at 1 year. Conclusion: Linear accelerator-delivered SBRT with sequential gemcitabine resulted in excellent local control of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Future studies will address strategies for reducing long-term duodenal toxicity associated with SBRT.

  6. Fractionated Radioimmunotherapy With 90Y-Clivatuzumab Tetraxetan and Low-Dose Gemcitabine Is Active in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ocean, Allyson J.; Pennington, Kenneth L.; Guarino, Michael J.; Sheikh, Arif; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Serafini, Aldo N.; Lee, Daniel; Sung, Max W.; Gulec, Seza A.; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Manzone, Timothy; Holt, Michael; O’Neil, Bert H.; Hall, Nathan; Montero, Alberto J.; Kauh, John; Gold, David V.; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A.; Goldenberg, David M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND It has been demonstrated that the humanized clivatuzumab tetraxetan (hPAM4) antibody targets pancreatic ductal carcinoma selectively. After a trial of radioimmunotherapy that determined the maximum tolerated dose of single-dose yttrium-90-labeled hPAM4 (90Y-hPAM4) and produced objective responses in patients with advanced pancreatic ductal carcinoma, the authors studied fractionated radioimmunotherapy combined with low-dose gemcitabine in this disease. METHODS Thirty-eight previously untreated patients (33 patients with stage IV disease and 5 patients with stage III disease) received gemcitabine 200 mg/m2 weekly for 4 weeks with 90Y-hPAM4 given weekly in Weeks 2, 3, and 4 (cycle 1), and the same cycle was repeated in 13 patients (cycles 2–4). In the first part of the study, 19 patients received escalating weekly 90Y doses of 6.5 mCi/m2, 9.0 mCi/m2, 12.0 mCi/m2, and 15.0 mCi/m2. In the second portion, 19 additional patients received weekly doses of 9.0 mCi/m2 or 12.0 mCi/m2. RESULTS Grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia or neutropenia (according to version 3.0 of the National Cancer Institute’s Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) developed in 28 of 38 patients after cycle 1 and in all retreated patients; no grade >3 nonhematologic toxicities occurred. Fractionated dosing of cycle 1 allowed almost twice the radiation dose compared with single-dose radioimmunotherapy. The maximum tolerated dose of 90Y-hPAM4 was 12.0 mCi/m2 weekly for 3 weeks for cycle 1, with ≤9.0 mCi/m2 weekly for 3 weeks for subsequent cycles, and that dose will be used in future trials. Six patients (16%) had partial responses according to computed tomography-based Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, and 16 patients (42%) had stabilization as their best response (58% disease control). The median overall survival was 7.7 months for all 38 patients, including 11.8 months for those who received repeated cycles (46% [6 of 13 patients] ≥1 year), with improved efficacy at

  7. Anorexia-cachexia syndrome in pancreatic cancer: recent advances and new pharmacological approach.

    PubMed

    Ronga, Ilaria; Gallucci, Fernando; Riccardi, Ferdinando; Uomo, Generoso

    2014-03-01

    About 80% of all pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients suffer from a wasting syndrome referred to as the "cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome" (CACS) characterized by abnormally low weight, weakness and loss of skeletal muscle mass with or without loss of body fat, which directly impacts overall survival, quality of life, and physical activity. The aim of this review was to examine recent findings about CACS' pathophysiology and to describe the current pharmacological approaches. In recent years many efforts were made to improve our knowledge of CACS; currently we know that cachexia arises from a complex and multifactorial interaction between various mechanisms including inflammation, anorexia/malnutrition, alterations of protein and lipid metabolism; consequently its management requires multidisciplinary and multipharmacological approach that should address the different causes underlying this clinical event. On these premises, several drugs have been proposed starting from the first pharmacological treatment based on progestational agents or corticosteroids; most of them are in the preclinical phase, but some have already reached the clinical experimentation stage. In conclusion, to date, there is no standard effective treatment and further studies are needed to unravel the basic mechanisms underlying CACS and to develop newer therapeutic strategies with the hope to improve the quality of life of pancreatic cancer patients. Copyright © 2014 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  8. Gemcitabine mono-therapy versus gemcitabine plus targeted therapy in advanced pancreatic cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized phase III trials.

    PubMed

    Ottaiano, Alessandro; Capozzi, Monica; De Divitiis, Chiara; De Stefano, Alfonso; Botti, Gerardo; Avallone, Antonio; Tafuto, Salvatore

    2017-03-01

    Prognosis of advanced pancreatic cancer is dismal and the novel targeted therapies, albeit successfully used to treat many advanced tumors, have shown modest results. We performed a meta-analysis in order to quantify the effect size on survival of adding targeted therapy to single agent gemcitabine. Randomized phase III trials comparing gemcitabine mono-therapy versus gemcitabine plus a targeted agent in first-line treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer designed on survival as primary outcome were selected. Search was done through Medline and the registry of the NIH. Keywords used for searching were 'pancreas', 'pancreatic', 'gemcitabine'. Study quality was assessed with MERGE criteria. Findings were depicted in classical Forest plots. Publication bias was evaluated by the construction of funnel plot. Nine studies met the meta-analysis inclusion criteria including 4564 patients. The target therapies were: erlotinib, cetuximab, rigosertib, elpamotide, bevacizumab, aflibercept, axitinib, masitinib and ganitumab. There was no statistically significant heterogeneity among the nine trials (p = 0.77). The hazard ratio (HR) of the pooled analysis was 0.998 (CI 95%: 0.932-1.068). Subgroup meta-analysis was also performed in anti-EGFR and anti-angiogenesis trials: the pooled HR were 0.94 (CI 95%: 0.705-1.175) and 1.055 (CI 95%: 0.913-1.197), respectively. The present meta-analysis does not show significant improvements in survival for targeted drugs in advanced pancreatic cancer. The possible reason of these results could be linked to the biology of pancreatic cancer as well as to the absence of predictive factors.

  9. Pembrolizumab and XL888 in Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-05

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Non-Resectable Cholangiocarcinoma; Non-Resectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Carcinoma; Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Small Intestinal Carcinoma; Small Intestinal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Colorectal Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Small Intestinal Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma; Unresectable Small Intestinal Carcinoma

  10. Efficacy of irreversible electroporation in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma: advanced murine model

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Prejesh; Li, Yan; Li, Suping; St Hill, Charles R; Martin, Robert CG

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a promising cell membrane ablative modality for pancreatic cancer. There have been recent concerns regarding local recurrence and the potential use of IRE as a debulking (partial ablation) modality. We hypothesize that incomplete ablation leads to early recurrence and a more aggressive biology. We created the first ever heterotopic murine model by inoculating BALB/c nude mice in the hindlimb with a subcutaneous injection of Panc-1 cells, an immortalized human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line. Tumors were allowed to grow from 0.75 to 1.5 cm and then treated with the goal of complete ablation or partial ablation using standard IRE settings. Animals were recovered and survived for 2 days (n = 6), 7 (n = 6), 14 (n = 6), 21 (n = 6), 30 (n = 8), and 60 (n = 8) days. All 40 animals/tumors underwent successful IRE under general anesthesia with muscle paralysis. The mean tumor volume of the animals undergoing ablation was 1,447.6 mm3 ± 884). Histologically, in the 14-, 21-, 30-, and 60-day survival groups the entire tumor was nonviable, with a persistent tumor nodule completely replaced fibrosis. In the group treated with partial ablation, incomplete electroporation/recurrences (N = 10 animals) were seen, of which 66% had confluent tumors and this was a significant predictor of recurrence (P < 0.001). Recurrent tumors were also significantly larger (mean 4,578 mm3 ± SD 877 versus completed electroporated tumors 925.8 ± 277, P < 0.001). Recurrent tumors had a steeper growth curve (slope = 0.73) compared with primary tumors (0.60, P = 0.02). Recurrent tumors also had a significantly higher percentage of EpCAM expression, suggestive of stem cell activation. Tumors that recur after incomplete electroporation demonstrate a biologically aggressive tumor that could be more resistant to standard of care chemotherapy. Clinical correlation of this data is limited, but should be considered when IRE of pancreatic cancer is being

  11. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube in your vein and nutrition through a feeding tube or IV. ...

  12. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donate E-News Sign-Up Home Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis (HP) is a rare genetic condition characterized ... at least 1,000 individuals are affected with hereditary pancreatitis. HP has also been linked to an ...

  13. [A Long-Surviving Case of Unresectable Gall Bladder Carcinoma Treated with Gemcitabine-Based Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Hiroyoshi; Shiozaki, Shigehiro; Satoh, Daisuke; Araki, Hiroyuki; Mimura, Naoki; Ogawa, Toshihiro; Idani, Hitoshi; Ojima, Yasutomo; Harano, Masao; Kanazawa, Takashi; Choda, Yasuhiro; Sumitani, Daisuke; Ishida, Michihiro; Okajima, Masazumi; Ninomiya, Motoki

    2016-11-01

    We report a 5-year surviving patient with unresectable gall bladder carcinoma treated with gemcitabine(GEM)-based chemotherapy. A 64-year-old man was diagnosed with unresectable gall bladder carcinoma with peritoneal dissemination based on laparotomy findings. Two months later, he started to receive GEM chemotherapy. Twelve months after surgery, the patient chose to suspend GEM treatment. One year and 10 months later, multiple lung metastases appeared and GEM was restarted in combination with UFT. Although the primary lesion and lung metastases gradually progressed, the patient maintained a good quality of life. After 3 years and 2 months, chemotherapy was changed to GEM plus S-1 because of progressive disease. Five years and 2 months after surgery, his condition was complicated by a secondary pneumothorax, and the patient received home oxygen therapy. Five years and 8 months after surgery he died of respiratory distress caused by the progression of lung metastases. Even in the case of unresectable advanced gall bladder carcinoma, effective chemotherapy could improve quality of life and prolong survival.

  14. OEM-TACE: a new therapeutic approach in unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Guido; Amatu, A; Montagna, B; Quaretti, P; Minoia, C; Sottani, C; Villani, L; Tagliaferri, B; Sottotetti, F; Rossi, O; Pozzi, E; Zappoli, F; Riccardi, A; Bernardo, G

    2009-11-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is a rare life-threatening disease, whose only treatment with potential for cure is surgical resection. However, only 27% of patients at most are suitable for surgery when first diagnosed. For patients with unresectable disease, therapeutic options are chemotherapy or chemoradiation. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of oxaliplatin-eluting microspheres transarterial chemoembolization (OEM-TACE) associated with chemotherapy (ChT) in patients affected by unresectable ICC. Between December 2005 and May 2008 we treated nine patients (six female and three male) with unresectable ICC. All patients had undergone OEM-TACE associated with chemotherapy with oxaliplatin and gemcitabine. A retrospective comparison was carried out with a historical group of 11 patients treated with ChT only, estimating the prevalence of adverse effects and the median survival of the two groups. A total of 30 TACEs were performed during the observational time (ranging from one to seven procedures per patient). OEM-TACEs were followed by few adverse effects (AEs), without G4 AEs, according to CTACAE 3.0. According to RECIST criteria, 44% (4/9) of patients achieved partial responses and 56% (5/9) stabilization of disease. Overall survival analysis in the two groups showed a significantly increased survival in patients treated with ChT and OEM-TACE, with respect to those treated with ChT (30 vs. 12.7 months; p=0.004). In conclusion, in our experience OEM-TACE associated with ChT in the treatment of advanced unresectable ICC is a safe and feasible treatment causing no major adverse events. Although RECIST criteria can underestimate the rate of responses in patients treated with locoregional therapies, we achieved very encouraging results. A randomized multicentric trial is warranted to assess the actual superiority of OEM-TACE associated with ChT compared to conventional chemotherapy.

  15. Precision Medicine for Advanced Pancreas Cancer: The Individualized Molecular Pancreatic Cancer Therapy (IMPaCT) Trial.

    PubMed

    Chantrill, Lorraine A; Nagrial, Adnan M; Watson, Clare; Johns, Amber L; Martyn-Smith, Mona; Simpson, Skye; Mead, Scott; Jones, Marc D; Samra, Jaswinder S; Gill, Anthony J; Watson, Nicole; Chin, Venessa T; Humphris, Jeremy L; Chou, Angela; Brown, Belinda; Morey, Adrienne; Pajic, Marina; Grimmond, Sean M; Chang, David K; Thomas, David; Sebastian, Lucille; Sjoquist, Katrin; Yip, Sonia; Pavlakis, Nick; Asghari, Ray; Harvey, Sandra; Grimison, Peter; Simes, John; Biankin, Andrew V

    2015-05-01

    Personalized medicine strategies using genomic profiling are particularly pertinent for pancreas cancer. The Individualized Molecular Pancreatic Cancer Therapy (IMPaCT) trial was initially designed to exploit results from genome sequencing of pancreatic cancer under the auspices of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) in Australia. Sequencing revealed small subsets of patients with aberrations in their tumor genome that could be targeted with currently available therapies. The pilot stage of the IMPaCT trial assessed the feasibility of acquiring suitable tumor specimens for molecular analysis and returning high-quality actionable genomic data within a clinically acceptable timeframe. We screened for three molecular targets: HER2 amplification; KRAS wild-type; and mutations in DNA damage repair pathways (BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, ATM). Tumor biopsy and archived tumor samples were collected from 93 patients and 76 were screened. To date 22 candidate cases have been identified: 14 KRAS wild-type, 5 cases of HER2 amplification, 2 mutations in BRCA2, and 1 ATM mutation. Median time from consent to the return of validated results was 21.5 days. An inability to obtain a biopsy or insufficient tumor content in the available specimen were common reasons for patient exclusion from molecular analysis while deteriorating performance status prohibited a number of patients from proceeding in the study. Documenting the feasibility of acquiring and screening biospecimens for actionable molecular targets in real time will aid other groups embarking on similar trials. Key elements include the need to better prescreen patients, screen more patients, and offer more attractive clinical trial options. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Irinotecan(Campto R): efficacy as third/forth line therapy in advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Klapdor, R; Fenner, C

    2000-01-01

    Following the concept that the actual survival of pancreatic cancer patients can only be significantly improved by sequential poly-chemotherapy (EOSPC) in order to add one or two further progression free-survival times (PFST), in addition to the potential antitumoral effects of a first- or second-line therapy we studied the therapeutic efficacy of a third- or fourth-line chemotherapy with irinotecan alone, or in combination with oxaliplatin and high dose 5-FU/FA respectively, in a pilot study in 17 patients. Follow-up was performed on the basis of clinical investigations, imaging methods and the course of tumor markers, mainly CT and CA 19-9. The overall response rate in these cases of third/fourth-line therapies was 1 PR, 4 MR, 6 SD in the imaging methods compared to 5 PR, 2 MR and 5 SD on the basis of the tumor marker courses in the serum. The median PFST amounted to 4 months. Side effects could be seen as reported in the literature. Only in 1 patient did treatment have to be stopped due to irinotecan-induced gastrointestinal symptoms. Our data might suggest that combinations are more effective than irinotecan alone. However, further studies have to demonstrate whether irinotecan alone or in combination with e.g. oxaliplatin and 5-FU/FA will be more effective. The results suggested that irinotecan alone or in combination might also be used as third- and fourth-line therapeutical trials in exocrine pancreatic cancer in order to improve the survival time of these patients based on efficacy orientated sequential poly-chemotherapy (EOSPC).

  17. Phase II Trial of Cetuximab and Conformal Radiotherapy Only in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer with Concurrent Tissue Sampling Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Rembielak, Agata I; Jain, Pooja; Jackson, Andrew S; Green, Melanie M; Santorelli, Gillian R; Whitfield, Gillian A; Crellin, Adrian; Garcia-Alonso, Angel; Radhakrishna, Ganesh; Cullen, James; Taylor, M Ben; Swindell, Ric; West, Catharine M; Valle, Juan; Saleem, Azeem; Price, Patricia M

    2014-02-01

    Preclinical data have indicated the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) agent cetuximab (Erbitux) as a radiosensitizer in pancreatic cancer, but this has not been specifically addressed in a clinical study. We report the results of an original study initiated in 2007, where cetuximab was tested with radiotherapy (RT) alone in locally advanced pancreatic cancer in a phase II trial (PACER). Patients (n = 21) received cetuximab loading dose (400 mg/m(2)) and weekly dose (250 mg/m(2)) during RT (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). Toxicity and disease response end point data were prospectively assessed. A feasibility study of on-trial patient blood and skin sampling was incorporated. Treatment was well tolerated, and toxicity was low; most patients (71%) experienced acute toxicities of grade 2 or less. Six months posttreatment, stable local disease was achieved in 90% of evaluable patients, but only 33% were free from metastatic progression. Median overall survival was 7.5 months, and actuarial survival was 33% at 1 year and 11% at 3 years, reflecting swift metastatic progression in some patients but good long-term control of localized disease in others. High-grade acneiform rash (P = .0027), posttreatment stable disease (P = .0059), and pretreatment cancer antigen 19.9 (CA19.9) level (P = .0042) associated with extended survival. Patient skin and blood samples yielded sufficient RNA and good quality protein, respectively. The results indicate that cetuximab inhibits EGFR-mediated radioresistance to achieve excellent local control with minimal toxicity but does not sufficiently control metastatic progression in all patients. Translational studies of patient tissue samples may yield molecular information that may enable individual treatment response prediction.

  18. A miRNA Signature of Chemoresistant Mesenchymal Phenotype Identifies Novel Molecular Targets Associated with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Alakesh; VenkataSubbaRao, Kolaparthi; Manoharan, Muthu Saravanan; Hill, Ping; Freeman, James W.

    2014-01-01

    In this study a microRNA (miRNA) signature was identified in a gemcitabine resistant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell line model (BxPC3-GZR) and this signature was further examined in advanced PDAC tumor specimens from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. BxPC3-GZR showed a mesenchymal phenotype, expressed high levels of CD44 and showed a highly significant deregulation of 17 miRNAs. Based on relevance to cancer, a seven-miRNA signature (miR-100, miR-125b, miR-155, miR-21, miR-205, miR-27b and miR-455-3p) was selected for further studies. A strong correlation was observed for six of the seven miRNAs in 43 advanced tumor specimens compared to normal pancreas tissue. To assess the functional relevance we initially focused on miRNA-125b, which is over-expressed in both the BxPC3-GZR model and advanced PDAC tumor specimens. Knockdown of miRNA-125b in BxPC3-GZR and Panc-1 cells caused a partial reversal of the mesenchymal phenotype and enhanced response to gemcitabine. Moreover, RNA-seq data from each of 40 advanced PDAC tumor specimens from the TCGA data base indicate a negative correlation between expression of miRNA-125b and five of six potential target genes (BAP1, BBC3, NEU1, BCL2, STARD13). Thus far, two of these target genes, BBC3 and NEU1, that are tumor suppressor genes but not yet studied in PDAC, appear to be functional targets of miR-125b since knockdown of miR125b caused their up regulation. These miRNAs and their molecular targets may serve as targets to enhance sensitivity to chemotherapy and reduce metastatic spread. PMID:25184537

  19. A miRNA signature of chemoresistant mesenchymal phenotype identifies novel molecular targets associated with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bera, Alakesh; VenkataSubbaRao, Kolaparthi; Manoharan, Muthu Saravanan; Hill, Ping; Freeman, James W

    2014-01-01

    In this study a microRNA (miRNA) signature was identified in a gemcitabine resistant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell line model (BxPC3-GZR) and this signature was further examined in advanced PDAC tumor specimens from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. BxPC3-GZR showed a mesenchymal phenotype, expressed high levels of CD44 and showed a highly significant deregulation of 17 miRNAs. Based on relevance to cancer, a seven-miRNA signature (miR-100, miR-125b, miR-155, miR-21, miR-205, miR-27b and miR-455-3p) was selected for further studies. A strong correlation was observed for six of the seven miRNAs in 43 advanced tumor specimens compared to normal pancreas tissue. To assess the functional relevance we initially focused on miRNA-125b, which is over-expressed in both the BxPC3-GZR model and advanced PDAC tumor specimens. Knockdown of miRNA-125b in BxPC3-GZR and Panc-1 cells caused a partial reversal of the mesenchymal phenotype and enhanced response to gemcitabine. Moreover, RNA-seq data from each of 40 advanced PDAC tumor specimens from the TCGA data base indicate a negative correlation between expression of miRNA-125b and five of six potential target genes (BAP1, BBC3, NEU1, BCL2, STARD13). Thus far, two of these target genes, BBC3 and NEU1, that are tumor suppressor genes but not yet studied in PDAC, appear to be functional targets of miR-125b since knockdown of miR125b caused their up regulation. These miRNAs and their molecular targets may serve as targets to enhance sensitivity to chemotherapy and reduce metastatic spread.

  20. Antiproliferative effect of somatostatin analogs in advanced gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Merola, Elettra; Panzuto, Francesco; Fave, Gianfranco Delle

    2017-01-01

    A meta-analysis has systematically investigated the antineoplastic efficacy and safety of somatostatin analogs (SSAs) in advanced gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting the hazard ratio (HR) for disease progression (DP) were evaluated. Response rate and risk ratio (RR) for adverse events were also analyzed. A total of 289 patients (143 receiving SSAs vs. 146 placebo) were evaluated from two RCTs. A significant benefit from SSAs in terms of disease control was observed (HR 0.41, 95% CI: 0.29 to 0.58, P < 0.01; I20%), response rate being 58.0% vs. 32.2%, respectively. The occurrence of adverse events significantly differed from the placebo arm only in terms of biliary stones (RR 3.79, 95% CI: 1.28 to 11.17, P = 0.02; I20%). In conclusion, SSAs showed an antiproliferative effect in advanced GEP-NETs, with a good safety profile. PMID:28402955

  1. Dietary consumption of advanced glycation end products and pancreatic cancer in the prospective NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study12345

    PubMed Central

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Zimmerman, Thea Palmer; Duan, Zhigang; Chen, Liang; Kahle, Lisa; Risch, Adam; Subar, Amy F; Cross, Amanda J; Hollenbeck, Albert; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary; Sinha, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a heterogeneous group of compounds present in uncooked foods as well as in foods cooked at high temperatures. AGEs have been associated with insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation in patients with diabetes. Dietary AGEs are an important contributor to the AGE pool in the body. Nϵ-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) AGE is one of the major biologically and chemically well-characterized AGE markers. The consumption of red meat, which is CML-AGE rich, has been positively associated with pancreatic cancer in men. Objectives: With the use of a published food CML-AGE database, we estimated the consumption of CML AGE in the prospective NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study and evaluated the association between CML-AGE consumption and pancreatic cancer and the mediating effect of CML AGE on the association between red meat consumption and pancreatic cancer. Design: Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate HRs and 95% CIs for pancreatic cancer. Results: During an average of 10.5 y of follow-up, we identified 2193 pancreatic cancer cases (1407 men and 786 women) from 528,251 subjects. With the comparison of subjects in the fifth and the first quintiles of CML-AGE consumption, we observed increased pancreatic cancer risk in men (HR: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.93, P-trend = 0.003) but not women (HR: 1.14; 95% CI: 0.76, 1.72, P-trend = 0.42). Men in the highest quintile of red meat consumption had higher risk of pancreatic cancer (HR: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.70), which attenuated after adjustment for CML-AGE consumption (HR: 1.20; 95% CI: 0.95, 1.53). Conclusion: Dietary CML-AGE consumption was associated with modestly increased risk of pancreatic cancer in men and may partially explain the positive association between red meat and pancreatic cancer. The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00340015. PMID:25527756

  2. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Unresectable Retroperitoneal Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Serizawa, Itsuko; Kagei, Kenji; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Sugahara, Shinji; Okada, Tohru; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Ito, Hisao; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the applicability of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for unresectable retroperitoneal sarcomas with regard to normal tissue morbidity and local tumor control. Methods and Materials: From May 1997 to February 2006, 24 patients (17 male and 7 female) with unresectable retroperitoneal sarcoma received CIRT. Age ranged from 16 to 77 years (median, 48.6 years). Of the patients, 16 had primary disease and 8 recurrent disease. Histologic diagnoses were as follows: malignant fibrous histiocytoma in 6, liposarcoma in 3, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in 3, Ewing/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) in 2, and miscellaneous in 10 patients. The histologic grades were as follows: Grade 3 in 15, Grade 2-3 in 2, Grade 2 in 3, and unknown in 4. Clinical target volumes ranged between 57 cm{sup 3} and 1,194 cm{sup 3} (median 525 cm{sup 3}). The delivered carbon ion dose ranged from 52.8 to 73.6 GyE in 16 fixed fractions over 4 weeks. Results: The median follow-up was 36 months (range, 6-143 months). The overall survival rates at 2 and 5 years were 75% and 50%, respectively. The local control rates at 2 and 5 years were 77% and 69%. No complications of the gastrointestinal tract were encountered. No other toxicity greater than Grade 2 was observed. Conclusions: Use of CIRT is suggested to be effective and safe for retroperitoneal sarcomas. The results obtained with CIRT were a good overall survival rate and local control, notwithstanding the fact that most patients were not eligible for surgical resection and had high-grade sarcomas.

  3. Phase II trial of dacarbazine (DTIC) in advanced pancreatic islet cell carcinoma. Study of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-E6282.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, R K; Cnaan, A; Hahn, R G; Carbone, P P; Haller, D G

    2001-08-01

    A phase II study of dacarbazine (DTIC), was conducted to determine the response rate, duration of response, toxicity and overall survival of patients with advanced pancreatic islet cell tumors. Fifty patients with advanced pancreatic islet cell tumors, having progressive symptoms or evidence of rapidly advancing disease were entered on this study. DTIC was given by IV infusion at a dose of 850 mg/m2, over 60-90 minutes, repeated every four weeks. The response rate was 33% in 42 patients who had measurable tumor, and 34% in the 50 patients (90% confidence interval (90% CI): 23%-47%). The majority of the responses were seen in patients without prior chemotherapy. Median overall survival was 19.3 months. There were two lethal toxicities on the study, one septic shock and one myocardial infarction. Grade 4 toxicities were, hematological (5 patients), sepsis, neurological (depression and paranoid behavior) and bleeding (1 patient each). The most common toxicity was vomiting, grade 3 in 13% of patients. DTIC has activity in advanced previously untreated pancreatic islet cell tumors.

  4. External beam radiotherapy for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Omar; Elsayed, Zeinab

    2017-03-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common liver neoplasm, the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and the third most common cause of cancer mortality. Moreover, its incidence has increased dramatically in the past decade. While surgical resection and liver transplantation are the main curative treatments, only around 20% of people with early hepatocellular carcinoma may benefit from these therapies. Current treatment options for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma include various ablative and transarterial therapies in addition to the drug sorafenib. To assess the benefits and harms of external beam radiotherapy in the management of localised unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. We searched the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (OvidSP), Embase (OvidSP), Science Citation Index Expanded (Web of Science), and clinicaltrials.gov registry. We also checked reference lists of primary original studies and review articles manually for further related articles (cross-references) up to October 6, 2016. Eligible studies included all randomised clinical trials comparing external beam radiotherapy either as a monotherapy or in combination with other systemic or locoregional therapies versus placebo, no treatment, or other systemic or locoregional therapies for people with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We used a random-effects model as well as a fixed-effect model meta-analysis but in case of discrepancy between the two models (e.g. one giving a significant intervention effect, the other no significant intervention effect), we reported both results; otherwise, we reported only the results from the fixed-effect model meta-analysis. We assessed risk of bias of the included trials using predefined risk of bias domains; assessed risks of random errors with Trial Sequential Analysis; and

  5. Recent advances in the investigation of pancreatic inflammation induced by large doses of basic amino acids in rodents.

    PubMed

    Kui, Balázs; Balla, Zsolt; Végh, Eszter T; Pallagi, Petra; Venglovecz, Viktória; Iványi, Béla; Takács, Tamás; Hegyi, Péter; Rakonczay, Zoltán

    2014-02-01

    It has been known for approximately 30 years that large doses of the semi-essential basic amino acid L-arginine induce severe pancreatic inflammation in rats. Recently, it has been demonstrated that L-arginine can also induce pancreatitis in mice. Moreover, other basic amino acids like L-ornithine and L-lysine can cause exocrine pancreatic damage without affecting the endocrine parenchyma and the ducts in rats. The utilization of these noninvasive severe basic amino acid-induced pancreatitis models is becoming increasingly popular and appreciated as these models nicely reproduce most laboratory and morphological features of human pancreatitis. Consequently, the investigation of basic amino acid-induced pancreatitis may offer us a better understanding of the pathogenesis and possible treatment options of the human disease.

  6. Consuming a Ketogenic Diet while Receiving Radiation and Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Lung Cancer and Pancreatic Cancer: The University of Iowa Experience of Two Phase 1 Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Zahra, Amir; Fath, Melissa A; Opat, Emyleigh; Mapuskar, Kranti A; Bhatia, Sudershan K; Ma, Daniel C; Rodman, Samuel N; Snyders, Travis P; Chenard, Catherine A; Eichenberger-Gilmore, Julie M; Bodeker, Kellie L; Ahmann, Logan; Smith, Brian J; Vollstedt, Sandy A; Brown, Heather A; Hejleh, Taher Abu; Clamon, Gerald H; Berg, Daniel J; Szweda, Luke I; Spitz, Douglas R; Buatti, John M; Allen, Bryan G

    2017-06-01

    Ketogenic diets are low in carbohydrates and high in fat, which forces cells to rely more heavily upon mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids for energy. Relative to normal cells, cancer cells are believed to exist under a condition of chronic mitochondrial oxidative stress that is compensated for by increases in glucose metabolism to generate reducing equivalents. In this study we tested the hypothesis that a ketogenic diet concurrent with radiation and chemotherapy would be clinically tolerable in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and pancreatic cancer and could potentially exploit cancer cell oxidative metabolism to improve therapeutic outcomes. Mice bearing MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer xenografts were fed either a ketogenic diet or standard rodent chow, treated with conventionally fractionated radiation (2 Gy/fraction), and tumor growth rates were assessed daily. Tumors were assessed for immunoreactive 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-(4HNE)-modfied proteins as a marker of oxidative stress. Based on this and another previously published preclinical study, phase 1 clinical trials in locally advanced NSCLC and pancreatic cancer were initiated, combining standard radiation and chemotherapy with a ketogenic diet for six weeks (NSCLC) or five weeks (pancreatic cancer). The xenograft experiments demonstrated prolonged survival and increased 4HNE-modfied proteins in animals consuming a ketogenic diet combined with radiation compared to radiation alone. In the phase 1 clinical trial, over a period of three years, seven NSCLC patients enrolled in the study. Of these, four were unable to comply with the diet and withdrew, two completed the study and one was withdrawn due to a dose-limiting toxicity. Over the same time period, two pancreatic cancer patients enrolled in the trial. Of these, one completed the study and the other was withdrawn due to a dose-limiting toxicity. The preclinical experiments demonstrate that a ketogenic diet increases radiation sensitivity

  7. A dosimetric comparison of proton and photon therapy in unresectable cancers of the head of pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Reid F.; Zhai, Huifang; Both, Stefan; Metz, James M.; Plastaras, John P.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Mayekar, Sonal U.; Apisarnthanarax, Smith

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Uncontrolled local growth is the cause of death in ∼30% of patients with unresectable pancreatic cancers. The addition of standard-dose radiotherapy to gemcitabine has been shown to confer a modest survival benefit in this population. Radiation dose escalation with three-dimensional planning is not feasible, but high-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been shown to improve local control. Still, dose-escalation remains limited by gastrointestinal toxicity. In this study, the authors investigate the potential use of double scattering (DS) and pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy in limiting dose to critical organs at risk. Methods: The authors compared DS, PBS, and IMRT plans in 13 patients with unresectable cancer of the pancreatic head, paying particular attention to duodenum, small intestine, stomach, liver, kidney, and cord constraints in addition to target volume coverage. All plans were calculated to 5500 cGy in 25 fractions with equivalent constraints and normalized to prescription dose. All statistics were by two-tailed paired t-test. Results: Both DS and PBS decreased stomach, duodenum, and small bowel dose in low-dose regions compared to IMRT (p < 0.01). However, protons yielded increased doses in the mid to high dose regions (e.g., 23.6–53.8 and 34.9–52.4 Gy for duodenum using DS and PBS, respectively; p < 0.05). Protons also increased generalized equivalent uniform dose to duodenum and stomach, however these differences were small (<5% and 10%, respectively; p < 0.01). Doses to other organs-at-risk were within institutional constraints and placed no obvious limitations on treatment planning. Conclusions: Proton therapy does not appear to reduce OAR volumes receiving high dose. Protons are able to reduce the treated volume receiving low-intermediate doses, however the clinical significance of this remains to be determined in future investigations.

  8. Phase II study to assess the efficacy of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy followed by a stereotactic radiosurgery boost in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koong, Albert C. . E-mail: akoong@stanford.edu; Christofferson, Erin; Le, Quynh-Thu; Goodman, Karyn A.; Ho, Anthony; Kuo, Timothy; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Greco, Ralph; Norton, Jeffrey; Yang, George P.

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of concurrent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) followed by body stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, all patients (19) had pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma and were uniformly staged. Our treatment protocol consisted of 45 Gy IMRT with concurrent 5-FU followed by a 25 Gy SRS boost to the primary tumor. Results: Sixteen patients completed the planned therapy. Two patients experienced Grade 3 toxicity (none had more than Grade 3 toxicity). Fifteen of these 16 patients were free from local progression until death. Median overall survival was 33 weeks. Conclusions: Concurrent IMRT and 5-FU followed by SRS in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer results in excellent local control, but does not improve overall survival and is associated with more toxicity than SRS, alone.

  9. Patterns of Radiotherapy Practice for Pancreatic Cancer in Japan: Results of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Ito, Yoshinori; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Onishi, Hiroshi; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Shibuya, Keiko; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Okuno, Yoshishige; Nishino, Shigeo; Ogo, Etsuyo; Uchida, Nobue; Karasawa, Kumiko; Nemoto, Kenji; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the patterns of radiotherapy practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire-based national survey of radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer treated between 2000 and 2006 was conducted by the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG). Detailed information on 870 patients from 34 radiation oncology institutions was accumulated. Results: The median age of all patients was 64 years (range, 36-88), and 80.2% of the patients had good performance status. More than 85% of patients had clinical Stage T3-T4 disease, and 68.9% of patients had unresectable disease at diagnosis. Concerning radiotherapy (RT), 49.8% of patients were treated with radical external beam RT (EBRT) (median dose, 50.4 Gy), 44.4% of patients were treated with intraoperative RT (median dose, 25 Gy) with or without EBRT (median dose, 45 Gy), and 5.9% of patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy (median dose, 50 Gy). The treatment field consisted of the primary tumor (bed) only in 55.6% of the patients. Computed tomography-based treatment planning and conformal RT was used in 93.1% and 83.1% of the patients treated with EBRT, respectively. Chemotherapy was used for 691 patients (79.4%; before RT for 66 patients; during RT for 531; and after RT for 364). Gemcitabine was the most frequently used drug, followed by 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: This study describes the general patterns of RT practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Most patients had advanced unresectable disease, and radical EBRT, as well as intraoperative RT with or without EBRT, was frequently used. Chemotherapy with gemcitabine was commonly used in conjunction with RT during the survey period.

  10. A Multicenter Phase II Trial of S-1 With Concurrent Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Masafumi; Ioka, Tatsuya; Ito, Yoshinori; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nagase, Michitaka; Yamao, Kenji; Miyakawa, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Hiroshi; Furuse, Junji; Sato, Keiko; Sato, Tosiya; Okusaka, Takuji

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of S-1 and concurrent radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Locally advanced PC patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma, who had no previous therapy were enrolled. Radiation therapy was delivered through 3 or more fields at a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily on the day of irradiation during radiation therapy. After a 2- to 8-week break, patients received a maintenance dose of S-1 (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day rest period) was then administered until the appearance of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary efficacy endpoint was survival, and the secondary efficacy endpoints were progression-free survival, response rate, and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) response; the safety endpoint was toxicity. Results: Of the 60 evaluable patients, 16 patients achieved a partial response (27%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-40%). The median progression-free survival period, overall survival period, and 1-year survival rate of the evaluable patients were 9.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-11.6 months), 16.2 months (95% CI, 13.5-21.3 months), and 72% (95%CI, 59%-82%), respectively. Of the 42 patients with a pretreatment serum CA19-9 level of {>=}100 U/ml, 34 (81%) patients showed a decrease of greater than 50%. Leukopenia (6 patients, 10%) and anorexia (4 patients, 7%) were the major grade 3-4 toxicities with chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: The effect of S-1 with concurrent radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced PC was found to be very favorable, with only mild toxicity.

  11. The C-reactive protein/albumin ratio predicts overall survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mengwan; Guo, Jing; Guo, Lihong; Zuo, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of the C-reactive protein/albumin (CRP/Alb) ratio in cancer. However, the role of the CRP/Alb ratio in advanced pancreatic cancer (PC) has not been examined. A retrospective study of 233 patients with advanced PC was conducted. We investigated the relationship between the CRP/Alb ratio, clinicopathological variables, and overall survival (OS). The optimal cutoff point of the CRP/Alb ratio was 0.54. A higher CRP/Alb ratio was significantly associated with an elevated neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) (P < 0.001) and higher modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS) (P < 0.001). Using univariate analyses, we found that the age (P = 0.009), disease stage (P < 0.001), NLR (P < 0.001), mGPS (P < 0.001), and CRP/Alb ratio (P < 0.001) were significant predictors of OS. Patients with a higher CRP/Alb ratio had a worse OS than patients with a lower CRP/Alb ratio (hazard ratio (HR) 3.619; 95 % CI 2.681-4.886; P < 0.001). However, the CRP/Alb ratio was identified as the only inflammation-based parameter with an independent prognostic ability in the multivariate analyses (P < 0.001). The pretreatment CRP/Alb ratio is a superior prognostic and therapeutic predictor of OS in advanced PC.

  12. Prevention of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grzeszczuk, Agnieszka; Zwierz, Zbigniew Wojciech; Kołodziejczyk, Paweł; Szczesiul, Jakub; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Ościłowicz, Krystyna; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) accounts for 95% of all pancreatic cancers. About 230,000 PDA cases are diagnosed worldwide each year. PDA has the lowest five-year survival rate as compared to others cancers. PDA in Poland is the fifth leading cause of death after lung, stomach, colon and breast cancer. In our paper we have analysed the newest epidemiological research, some of it controversial, to establish the best practical solution for pancreatic cancer prevention in the healthy population as well as treatment for patients already diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. We found that PDA occurs quite frequently but is usually diagnosed too late, at its advanced stage. Screening for PDA is not very well defined except in subgroups of high-risk individuals with genetic disorders or with chronic pancreatitis. We present convincing, probable, and suggestive risk factors associated with pancreatic cancer, many of which are modifiable and should be introduced and implemented in our society. PMID:28435395

  13. Prevention of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuroczycki-Saniutycz, Stefan; Grzeszczuk, Agnieszka; Zwierz, Zbigniew Wojciech; Kołodziejczyk, Paweł; Szczesiul, Jakub; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Ościłowicz, Krystyna; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) accounts for 95% of all pancreatic cancers. About 230,000 PDA cases are diagnosed worldwide each year. PDA has the lowest five-year survival rate as compared to others cancers. PDA in Poland is the fifth leading cause of death after lung, stomach, colon and breast cancer. In our paper we have analysed the newest epidemiological research, some of it controversial, to establish the best practical solution for pancreatic cancer prevention in the healthy population as well as treatment for patients already diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. We found that PDA occurs quite frequently but is usually diagnosed too late, at its advanced stage. Screening for PDA is not very well defined except in subgroups of high-risk individuals with genetic disorders or with chronic pancreatitis. We present convincing, probable, and suggestive risk factors associated with pancreatic cancer, many of which are modifiable and should be introduced and implemented in our society.

  14. The effect of an oral nutritional supplement enriched with fish oil on weight-loss in patients with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Barber, M D; Ross, J A; Voss, A C; Tisdale, M J; Fearon, K C

    1999-09-01

    Previous studies have suggested that administration of oral eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) will stabilize weight in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine if a combination of EPA with a conventional oral nutritional supplement could produce weight gain in these patients. Twenty patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma were asked to consume two cans of a fish oil-enriched nutritional supplement per day in addition to their normal food intake. Each can contained 310 kcal, 16.1 g protein and 1.09 g EPA. Patients were assessed for weight, body composition, dietary intake, resting energy expenditure (REE) and performance status. Patients consumed a median of 1.9 cans day(-1). All patients were losing weight at baseline at a median rate of 2.9 kg month(-1). After administration of the fish oil-enriched supplement, patients had significant weight-gain at both 3 (median 1 kg, P= 0.024) and 7 weeks (median 2 kg, P = 0.033). Dietary intake increased significantly by almost 400 kcal day(-1) (P = 0.002). REE per kg body weight and per kg lean body mass fell significantly. Performance status and appetite were significantly improved at 3 weeks. In contrast to previous studies of oral conventional nutritional supplements in weight-losing cancer patients, this study suggests that an EPA-enriched supplement may reverse cachexia in advanced pancreatic cancer.

  15. Serum lactate dehydrogenase predicts prognosis and correlates with systemic inflammatory response in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer after gemcitabine-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shu-Lin; Xu, Li-Tao; Qi, Qi; Geng, Ya-Wen; Chen, Hao; Meng, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Peng; Chen, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) concentrations correlate with tumor progression and poor outcome. We evaluated the predictive value of serum LDH level for overall survival (OS) of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer after gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. We retrospectively enrolled 364 patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma who were then allocated to training (n = 139) and validation cohorts (n = 225). We evaluated the association between serum LDH levels and OS as well as with markers of systemic inflammation, including neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and lymphocyte/monocyte ratio (LMR). Kaplan–Meier analyses revealed that low serum LDH levels in the training cohort significantly correlated with longer OS. Multivariate analysis identified the serum LDH levels as an independent prognostic predictor of OS (p = 0.005). Serum LDH levels correlated positively with NLR and PLR and correlated negatively with LMR. Similar results were obtained for the validation cohort, except that multivariate analysis identified the serum LDH level as a significant prognostic predictor and only a statistical trend for OS (p = 0.059). We conclude that serum LDH levels were associated with the systemic inflammatory response and served as a significant prognostic predictor of OS. Serum LDH levels predicted OS in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer after gemcitabine-based palliative chemotherapy. PMID:28345594

  16. Advances in Biomedical Imaging, Bioengineering, and Related Technologies for the Development of Biomarkers of Pancreatic Disease: Summary of a National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Kimberly A.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Brand, Randall E.; Liu, Christina H.; Singh, Vikesh K.; Srivastava, Sudhir; Wasan, Ajay D.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Andersen, Dana K.

    2015-01-01

    A workshop sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering focused on research gaps and opportunities in the development of new biomarkers of pancreatic disease. The session was held on July 22, 2015, and structured into six sessions: 1) introduction and overview, 2) keynote address, 3) new approaches to the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, 4) biomarkers of pain and inflammation, 5) new approaches to the detection of pancreatic cancer, and 6) shed exosomes, shed cells, and shed proteins. Recent advances in the fields of pancreatic imaging, functional markers of pancreatic disease, proteomics, molecular and cellular imaging, and detection of circulating cancer cells and exosomes were reviewed. Knowledge gaps and research needs were highlighted. The development of new methods for the non-invasive determination of pancreatic pathology, the use of cellular markers of pancreatic function, inflammation, pain, and malignancy, and the refinement of methods to identify cells and cellular constituents of pancreatic cancer were discussed. The further refinement of sophisticated technical methods, and the need for clinical studies to validate these new approaches in large-scale studies of patients at risk for the development of pancreatic disease was repeatedly emphasized. PMID:26465948

  17. Advances in Biomedical Imaging, Bioengineering, and Related Technologies for the Development of Biomarkers of Pancreatic Disease: Summary of a National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Workshop.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kimberly A; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Brand, Randall E; Liu, Christina H; Singh, Vikesh K; Srivastava, Sudhir; Wasan, Ajay D; Yadav, Dhiraj; Andersen, Dana K

    2015-11-01

    A workshop sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering focused on research gaps and opportunities in the development of new biomarkers of pancreatic disease. The session was held on July 22, 2015, and structured into 6 sessions: 1) Introduction and Overview; 2) Keynote Address; 3) New Approaches to the Diagnosis of Chronic Pancreatitis; 4) Biomarkers of Pain and Inflammation; 5) New Approaches to the Detection of Pancreatic Cancer; and 6) Shed Exosomes, Shed Cells, and Shed Proteins. Recent advances in the fields of pancreatic imaging, functional markers of pancreatic disease, proteomics, molecular and cellular imaging, and detection of circulating cancer cells and exosomes were reviewed. Knowledge gaps and research needs were highlighted. The development of new methods for the noninvasive determination of pancreatic pathology; the use of cellular markers of pancreatic function, inflammation, pain, and malignancy; and the refinement of methods to identify cells and cellular constituents of pancreatic cancer were discussed. The further refinement of sophisticated technical methods and the need for clinical studies to validate these new approaches in large-scale studies of patients at risk for the development of pancreatic disease were repeatedly emphasized.

  18. Review of idiopathic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason Kihyuk; Enns, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding of pancreatitis and advances in technology have uncovered the veils of idiopathic pancreatitis to a point where a thorough history and judicious use of diagnostic techniques elucidate the cause in over 80% of cases. This review examines the multitude of etiologies of what were once labeled idiopathic pancreatitis and provides the current evidence on each. This review begins with a background review of the current epidemiology of idiopathic pancreatitis prior to discussion of various etiologies. Etiologies of medications, infections, toxins, autoimmune disorders, vascular causes, and anatomic and functional causes are explored in detail. We conclude with management of true idiopathic pancreatitis and a summary of the various etiologic agents. Throughout this review, areas of controversies are highlighted. PMID:18081217

  19. Partially covered self-expanding metal stent for unresectable malignant extrahepatic biliary obstruction: results of a large prospective series.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliva, Cristina; Guarner-Argente, Carlos; Concepción, Mar; Jiménez, Francisco Javier; Rodríguez, Sarbelio; Gonzalez-Huix, Ferran; Mugica, Fernando; Cabriada, José Luis; Rodríguez, Claudio; Aguilar, Carlos Guarner

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic biliary stenting is a well-established palliative treatment in patients with unresectable malignant biliary strictures. Obstruction of uncovered self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) due to tumor ingrowth is the most frequent complication. Partially covered SEMS might increase stent patency but could favor complications related to stent covering, such as pancreatitis, cholecystitis, and migration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of partially covered SEMS in patients with an unresectable malignant biliary stricture. Patients with malignant extrahepatic biliary obstruction treated endoscopically with partially covered SEMS were included in this multicenter, prospective, nonrandomized study. One hundred ninety-nine patients were endoscopically treated with partially covered SEMS in 32 Spanish hospitals. Clinical success after deep cannulation was 96%. Early complications occurred in 4% (3 pancreatitis, 2 cholangitis, 1 hemorrhage, 1 perforation, and 1 cholecystitis). Late complications occurred in 19.5% (18 obstructions, 10 migrations, 6 cholangitis without obstruction, 3 acute cholecystitis, and 2 pancreatitis), with no tumor ingrowth in any case. Median stent patency was 138.9 ± 112.6 days. One-year actuarial probability of stent patency was 70% and that of nonmigration was 86%. Multivariate analysis showed adjuvant radio- or chemotherapy as the only independent predictive factor of stent patency and previous insertion of a biliary stent was the only predictive factor of migration. The partially covered SEMS was easily inserted, had a high clinical success rate, and prevented tumor ingrowth. The incidence of possible complications related to stent coverage, namely, migration, pancreatitis, and cholecystitis, was lower than in previously published series.

  20. Treatment options for unresectable HCC with a focus on SIRT with Yttrium-90 resin microspheres.

    PubMed

    Wang, Eric A; Stein, Jeff P; Bellavia, Ross J; Broadwell, Scott R

    2017-07-30

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the predominant form of primary liver cancer, is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths across the globe. Only a small percentage of HCC patients (~20%-30%) are diagnosed at an early stage when first-line treatment options may be effective. The majority of HCC patients (>70%) are diagnosed with unresectable disease and given a poor overall prognosis. Current treatment guidelines recommend locoregional therapy with transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE) and systemic therapy with sorafenib as first-line treatment for patients with intermediate and advanced stage HCC. However, multiple factors including contraindications, technical considerations and treatment-related toxicities pose significant challenges in achieving favourable treatment outcomes, underscoring the need for a paradigm shift in managing these patients. In 2002, yttrium-90 (Y-90) resin microspheres was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer to the liver with adjuvant floxuridine chemotherapy. However, thousands of patients with unresectable HCC have also been treated with resin Y-90. For over two decades, several small-scale prospective trials and retrospective studies have investigated and reported on the efficacy of locoregional selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) with Y-90 microspheres in treating unresectable HCC. Although it is currently a treatment option for intermediate-stage HCC patients, mainstream clinical application of resin Y-90 has been largely limited because of the lack of sufficient clinical data from a randomised controlled trial. This could change with the imminent announcement of results from the phase 3 Sorafenib vs Radioembolization in Advanced Hepatocellular carcinoma (SARAH) trial. To provide the foundation and context for interpreting results from the SARAH trial, this article provides an overview of treatment modalities and current challenges in

  1. Everolimus in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: latest findings and interpretations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Eric; Marincola, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with various clinical presentations. More than half of patients present with so-called nonfunctioning tumors with no hormone-related symptoms, whereas other tumors produce symptoms like gastric problems, ulcers, hypoglycemia, skin rash and diarrhea related to hormone production. The traditional treatment for pNETs over the last three decades has been cytotoxic agents, mainly streptozotocin plus 5-fluorouracil or doxorubicin. Most recently two new compounds have been registered worldwide for the treatment of pNETs, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib. This paper concentrates on the use of mTOR inhibitors and the mechanisms of action. The mTOR pathway is altered in a number of pNETs. Everolimus (RAD001) is an orally active rapamycin analog and mTOR inhibitor. It blocks activity of the mTOR pathway by binding with high affinity to the cytoplasmic protein FKBP-12. The efficacy of everolimus in pNETs has been demonstrated in two multicenter studies (RADIANT 1 and 3). The RADIANT 3 study was a randomized controlled study in pNETs of everolimus 10 mg/day versus placebo, showing an increased progression-free survival (11.7 months versus 4.6 months) and hazard ratio of 0.35 (p < 0.001). Current studies indicate that there is strong evidence to support the antitumor effect of rapalogs in pNETs. However, significant tumor reduction is very rarely obtained, usually in less than 10% of treated patients. Therefore, these drugs may be more effective in combination with other anticancer agents, including chemotherapy, targeted therapies as well as peptide receptor radiotherapy. PMID:24003341

  2. Metabolomics evaluation of serum markers for cachexia and their intra-day variation in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Takashi; Chayahara, Naoko; Imamura, Yoshinori; Toyoda, Masanori; Kiyota, Naomi; Mukohara, Toru; Nishiumi, Shin; Azuma, Takeshi; Yoshida, Masaru; Minami, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by progressive loss of weight and muscle atrophy. Using metabolomics, we investigated serum markers and their intra-day variation in advanced pancreatic cancer patients with cachexia. Patients were enrolled in two groups: those with or without cachexia. Blood samples collected at 6:30 AM, 11:30 AM, 4:30 PM, and 9:30 PM were analyzed using metabolomics, and serum levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and leptin were measured and compared between the two groups. Intra-day variation was then evaluated. Twenty-one patients were enrolled in total. In the cachexia group (n = 9), median body weight loss rate over 6 months was greater, performance status was poorer, and anorexia was more severe than in the non-cachexia group (n = 12). Each metabolites level showed substantial intra-day variation, and some of them displayed significant differences between the two groups. Levels of paraxanthine remained markedly lower in the cohort with cachexia at all measurement points. Besides, median IL-6 and TNF-α levels appeared higher and leptin concentration appeared lower in the cachexia group, albeit without statistical significance. Some metabolites and some serological marker levels were affected by cancer cachexia. Although paraxanthine levels were consistently lower in patients with cachexia, we identified that many metabolites indicated large intra- and inter-day variation and that it might be necessary to pay attention to intra-day variation in metabolomics research.

  3. Evaluating the impact of a single-day multidisciplinary clinic on the management of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Timothy M; Laheru, Daniel; Hruban, Ralph H; Coleman, Joann; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Campbell, Kurt; Ali, Syed; Fishman, Elliot K; Schulick, Richard D; Herman, Joseph M

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of a multidisciplinary clinic on the clinical care recommendations of patients with pancreatic cancer compared with the recommendations the patients received prior to review by the multidisciplinary tumor board. The records of 203 consecutive patients referred to the Johns Hopkins pancreatic multidisciplinary clinic were prospectively collected from November 2006 to October 2007. Cross-sectional imaging, pathology, and medical history were evaluated by a panel of medical/radiation oncologists, surgical oncologists, pathologists, diagnostic radiologists, and geneticists. Alterations in treatment recommendations between the outside institution and the multidisciplinary clinic were recorded and compared. On presentation, the outside computed tomography (CT) report described locally advanced/unresectable disease (34.9%), metastatic disease (17.7%), and locally advanced disease with metastasis (1.1%). On review of submitted imaging and imaging performed at Hopkins, 38 out of 203 (18.7%) patients had a change in the status of their clinical stage. Review of the histological slides by dedicated pancreatic pathologists resulted in changes in the interpretation for 7 of 203 patients (3.4%). Overall, 48 out of 203 (23.6%) patients had a change in their recommended management based on clinical review of their case by the multidisciplinary tumor board. Enrollment into the National Familial Pancreas Tumor Registry increased from 52 out of 106 (49.2%) patients in 2005 to 158 out of 203 (77.8%) with initiation of the multidisciplinary clinic. The single-day pancreatic multidisciplinary clinic provided a comprehensive and coordinated evaluation of patients that led to changes in therapeutic recommendations in close to one-quarter of patients.

  4. Comparison of CT and angiography in assessing resectability of pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jafri, S.Z.H.; Aisen, A.M.; Glazer, G.M.; Weiss, C.A.

    1984-03-01

    A retrospective study of 27 patients with pancreatic carcinoma compared computed tomography (CT) and angiography in their ability to predict resectability of the neoplasm, using encasement of the splanchnic vessels as the criterion for nonresectability. Five patients had resectable tumor at surgery; the other 22 had unresectable disease. Tumor involvement of the splanchnic vessels was determined in 18 patients by CT examination and in 19 patients by angiography. Several other patients were found to have liver metastases, resulting in a radiologic diagnosis of nonresectability in 20 patients overall. All patients considered to have unresectable disease on the basis of either radiologic method proved to have unresectable tumor at surgery. CT is about as accurate as angiography in assessing resectability of pancreatic carcinoma.

  5. Gemcitabine and ISIS-2503 for patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a North Central Cancer Treatment Group phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Steven R; Schroeder, Mark; Erlichman, Charles; Steen, Preston D; Foster, Nathan R; Moore, Dennis F; Rowland, Kendrith M; Nair, Suresh; Tschetter, Loren K; Fitch, Tom R

    2004-12-15

    Gemcitabine remains the standard therapy for metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (ACA), but has limited activity. ISIS-2503 is an antisense compound directed against H-ras with preclinical activity against pancreatic ACA in tumor models. The combination of ISIS-2503 and gemcitabine has been evaluated in a prior phase I study. Patients with metastatic or locally advanced pancreatic ACA not amenable to surgery or local radiation received gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) intravenously over 30 minutes on days 1 and 8 and ISIS-2503 6 mg/kg/d as a continuous intravenous infusion over 14 days of an every-3-weeks cycle. Responses were monitored by radiologic imaging every 6 weeks. Forty-eight eligible patients were enrolled, 43 with metastatic disease. Median follow-up was 12.6 months (range, 2.2 to 16.8 months) for living patients. A median of four cycles of treatment was given (range, 1 to 18 cycles). All patients were assessable for response and toxicity. The 6-month survival percentage was 57.5% (95% CI, 44.9% to 73.5%) and the median survival was 6.6 months. The response rate was 10.4% (one complete response, four partial responses). Clinically significant toxicity was limited except for one fatal pulmonary embolism. This study shows a promising response rate to the combination of gemcitabine and ISIS-2503 in patients with pancreatic ACA. The observed 6-month survival rate in these patients met our protocol-defined criteria for success. This regimen is tolerable, but is of unclear benefit. Additional studies evaluating the role of gemcitabine and ISIS-2503 in the treatment of pancreatic ACA should be considered.

  6. Screening for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Randall E.

    2007-01-01

    Despite improvements in the clinical and surgical management of pancreatic cancer, limited strides have been made in the early detection of this highly lethal malignancy. The majority of localized pancreatic tumors are asymptomatic, and the recognized presenting symptoms of pancreatic adenocarcinoma are often vague and heterogeneous in nature. These factors, coupled with the lack of a sensitive and noninvasive screening method, have made population-based screening for pancreatic cancer impossible. Nevertheless, at least two large institutions have performed multimodality-screening protocols for individuals with high risk of pancreatic cancer based on genetic predisposition and strong family history. Abnormalities noted during these screening protocols prompted further investigation or surgery that resulted in the discovery of benign, potentially malignant, and malignant pancreatic lesions. In addition to ductal epithelial pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, greater sensitivity has recently been achieved in the identification and characterization of precancerous mucinous pancreatic tumors. Advancements in proteomics and DNA microarray technology may confirm serum-based biomarkers that could be incorporated into future screening algorithms for pancreatic cancer. PMID:21960811

  7. ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN Report on the Assessment of Exocrine Pancreatic Function and Pancreatitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Christopher J; Chen, Kathy; Horvath, Karoly; Hughes, David; Lowe, Mark E; Mehta, Devendra; Orabi, Abrahim I; Screws, Jeremy; Thomson, Mike; Van Biervliet, Stephanie; Verkade, Henkjan J; Husain, Sohail Z; Wilschanski, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this clinical report is to discuss several recent advances in assessing exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) and pancreatitis in children, to review the array of pancreatic function tests, to provide an update on the inherited causes of EPI, with special emphasis on newly available genetic testing, and to review newer methods for evaluating pancreatitis.

  8. Everolimus and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs): Activity, resistance and how to overcome it.

    PubMed

    Capozzi, Monica; Caterina, Ieranò; De Divitiis, Chiara; von Arx, Claudia; Maiolino, Piera; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Cavalcanti, Ernesta; Di Girolamo, Elena; Iaffaioli, Rosario Vincenzo; Scala, Stefania; Tafuto, Salvatore

    2015-09-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are rare malignancies, with the most common site of origin being from the gastrointestinal tract, particularly the pancreas, small bowel and appendix. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) can be functional, hormone secreting tumors, and can have distinctive symptoms leading to the diagnosis. In contrast nonfunctional tumors, the majority of PNETs, usually present later either incidentally or due to tumor bulk symptoms. Currently Everolimus, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is the most promising drug for patients with unresectable, metastatic disease, in progressive well-differentiated PNETs and many studies are ongoing to demonstrate its effects on the other neuroendocrine histotipes. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) registered Everolimus in advanced/metastatic breast cancer, in advanced/metastatic renal cell carcinoma and in well/moderately differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Nevertheless only a subset of patients respond to the therapy due to the development of drug resistance. Thus the powerful Everolimus antitumor activity have prompted extensive efforts to overcome drug resistance and to maximize clinical benefit. In this review we aim to summarize current knowledge on mechanisms of Everolimus and other mTOR inhibitors molecules resistance with the intent to overcome it.

  9. Treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer with the long-acting somatostatin analogue lanreotide: in vitro and in vivo results

    PubMed Central

    Raderer, M; Hamilton, G; Kurtaran, A; Valencak, J; Haberl, I; Hoffmann, O; Kornek, G V; Vorbeck, F; Hejna, M H L; Virgolini, I; Scheithauer, W

    1999-01-01

    Fourteen patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with the long-acting somatostatin (SST) analogue lanreotide. No objective response was obtained, and the median survival was 4 months (range 1.8–7 months). Pancreatic cancer could not be visualized by means of SST-receptor (R) scintigraphy in our patients. In vitro data also demonstrated absence of SSTR2 expression, suggesting pancreatic cancer not to be a potential target for treatment with SST analogues. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10027326

  10. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Acute pancreatitis Chronic pancreatitis Pancreatic abscess Shock Review Date 10/27/2015 Updated by: Subodh K. ... gastroenterologist with Gastrointestinal Specialists of Georgia, Austell, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  11. Pancreatic Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... triggering pancreatitis, you may need to have your gallbladder removed. If your pancreatitis is due to alcohol ... www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/pancreatic-cysts/basics/definition/CON-20024331 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  12. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  13. Retrospective Evaluation of the Clinical and Radiographic Risk Factors Associated With Severe Pulmonary Hemorrhage in First-Line Advanced, Unresectable Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel Plus Bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Alan B.; Schiller, Joan H.; Gray, Robert; Dimery, Isaiah; Brahmer, Julie; Samant, Meghna; Wang, Lisa I.; Johnson, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Severe (grade ≥ 3) pulmonary hemorrhage (PH) in advanced non–small-cell lung cancer was observed in two prospective, randomized, phase II (N = 99) and phase III (N = 878) trials of bevacizumab plus carboplatin and paclitaxel. Retrospective case-control and cohort analyses were conducted to identify associated radiographic and clinical risk factors for PH. Patients and Methods Six patients with PH from the phase II trial, 15 potential PH patients with hemorrhage at any site from the phase III trial, and their matched controls were evaluated with review of baseline and on-treatment radiographs by an independent radiology facility, blinded to patient/control status. Patients with severe (grade ≥ 3) PH from each trial were matched with up to three controls based on sex, age group, histology (phase II), or sex and age group (phase III). Results Seven PH patients in the phase III trial were identified as severe PH. Six of the patients were early onset (occurred < 150 days of initiating bevacizumab) and one was late onset. Baseline tumor cavitation, not tumor location, was identified as the only potential risk factor for patients with early onset. Combined analysis of severe PH patients from the phase II and phase III trials (n = 13), compared with their pooled matched controls (n = 42), did not identify any additional baseline radiographic or clinical variables associated with PH. Conclusion PH was an uncommon event. Based on these analyses, baseline tumor cavitation may be a potential risk factor for PH. No other baseline clinical variables were predictive for PH although the number of events was small. PMID:19224857

  14. Pilot study evaluating broccoli sprouts in advanced pancreatic cancer (POUDER trial) - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is one of the most aggressive malignancies with marked resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. PDA-cancer stem cells (CSCs) are not targeted by current therapies and may be a reason for poor prognosis. Studies indicate that diets rich in cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower offer cancer preventative and therapeutic benefits. Recent experimental studies have confirmed these findings and demonstrated that isothiocyanate, sulforaphane, and the polyphenol, quercetin, effectively reduced tumor growth and enhanced the sensitivity of the cancer cells to current chemotherapeutics. The aim of the present study is to test the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial on the application of freeze-dried broccoli sprouts in patients with advanced PDA. Methods and study design The study is designed as a prospective randomized, double-blinded pilot trial with a treatment and a placebo-controlled arm in a single center setting. A total number of forty patients (18 years or older) in two parallel groups with advanced, surgically non-resectable PDA under palliative chemotherapy are planned for recruitment. Patients in the treatment group will receive fifteen capsules of the study substance per day (90 mg of active sulforaphane) during the chemotherapy treatment course. Patients in the placebo group will receive the same capsule size and portion distribution with inactive substances (mainly methylcellulose). The follow-up duration is one year. Feasibility of the study substance, adverse effects, and patient compliance, as well as levels of serum tumor markers (CEA, CA 19-9), quality of life, and patient overall survival rates will be assessed at defined points of time. Discussion The POUDER trial is expected to transfer promising experimental and epidemiological data into a clinical pilot study to assess the effectiveness of broccoli sprout extracts in the treatment of advanced PDA. The study objectives will provide data on the

  15. Resectable pancreatic small cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Jordan M.; Narang, Amol K.; Mansfield, Aaron S.; Herman, Joseph M.; Cameron, John L.; Laheru, Dan; Eckhauser, Fred E.; Olson, Mathew T.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Miller, Robert C.; Andersen, Dana K.

    2011-01-01

    Primary pancreatic small cell carcinoma (SCC) is rare, with just over 30 cases reported in the literature. Only 7 of these patients underwent surgical resection with a median survival of 6 months. Prognosis of SCC is therefore considered to be poor, and the role of adjuvant therapy is uncertain. Here we report two institutions' experience with resectable pancreatic SCC. Six patients with pancreatic SCC treated at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (4 patients) and the Mayo Clinic (2 patients) were identified from prospectively collected pancreatic cancer databases and re-reviewed by pathology. All six patients underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy. Clinicopathologic data were analyzed, and the literature on pancreatic SCC was reviewed. Median age at diagnosis was 50 years (range 27–60). All six tumors arose in the head of the pancreas. Median tumor size was 3 cm, and all cases had positive lymph nodes except for one patient who only had five nodes sampled. There were no perioperative deaths and three patients had at least one postoperative complication. All six patients received adjuvant therapy, five of whom were given combined modality treatment with radiation, cisplatin, and etoposide. Median survival was 20 months with a range of 9–173 months. The patient who lived for 9 months received chemotherapy only, while the patient who lived for 173 months was given chemoradiation with cisplatin and etoposide and represents the longest reported survival time from pancreatic SCC to date. Pancreatic SCC is an extremely rare form of cancer with a poor prognosis. Patients in this surgical series showed favorable survival rates when compared to prior reports of both resected and unresectable SCC. Cisplatin and etoposide appears to be the preferred chemotherapy regimen, although its efficacy remains uncertain, as does the role of combined modality treatment with radiation. PMID:21464878

  16. Fish oil-enriched nutritional supplement attenuates progression of the acute-phase response in weight-losing patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Barber, M D; Ross, J A; Preston, T; Shenkin, A; Fearon, K C

    1999-06-01

    The presence of an acute-phase protein response (APPR) has been suggested to shorten survival and contribute to weight loss in patients with pancreatic cancer. Fatty acids derived from fish oil have been shown to alter proinflammatory cytokine production and acute-phase protein synthesis in vitro. The present study was designed to determine the effects of a fish oil-enriched nutritional supplement on the concentrations of a range of individual acute-phase proteins (APP) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. In a sequential series, 18 patients with pancreatic cancer received the supplement (providing 2 g eicosapentaenoic acid and 1 g docosahexaenoic acid/d) for 3 wk while another 18 received full supportive care alone. Six healthy subjects served as additional controls. Acute-phase proteins were measured before and after the 3-wk intervention period in cancer patients. At baseline, albumin, transferrin and pre-albumin were significantly reduced and fibrinogen, haptoglobin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, alpha-1-antitrypsin, ceruloplasmin and C-reactive protein (CRP) were significantly elevated in the cancer patients compared with healthy controls, reflecting their roles as negative and positive acute phase proteins, respectively. In the supplemented cancer group, the only significant change in APP concentrations over the 4-wk study period was an increase in transferrin. In the control cancer group there were further significant reductions in albumin, transferrin and pre-albumin, and a significant increase in CRP concentration. These results suggest that many positive and negative APP are altered in advanced pancreatic cancer. The APPR tends to progress in untreated patients but may be stabilized by the administration of a fish oil-enriched nutritional supplement. This may have implications for reducing wasting in such patients.

  17. Phase I study of olaparib plus gemcitabine in patients with advanced solid tumours and comparison with gemcitabine alone in patients with locally advanced/metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bendell, J; O'Reilly, E M; Middleton, M R; Chau, I; Hochster, H; Fielding, A; Burke, W; Burris, H

    2015-04-01

    Olaparib (Lynparza) is an oral poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase inhibitor that induces synthetic lethality in cancers with homologous recombination defects. In this phase I, dose-escalation trial, patients with advanced solid tumours received olaparib (50-200 mg capsules b.i.d.) continuously or intermittently (days 1-14, per 28-day cycle) plus gemcitabine [i.v. 600-800 mg/m(2); days 1, 8, 15, and 22 (cycle 1), days 1, 8, and 15 (subsequent cycles)] to establish the maximum tolerated dose. A separate dose-escalation phase evaluated olaparib in tablet formulation (100 mg o.d./b.i.d.; days 1-14) plus gemcitabine (600 mg/m(2)). In an expansion phase, patients with genetically unselected locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer were randomised 2 : 1 to the tolerated olaparib capsule combination dose or gemcitabine alone (1000 mg/m(2)). Sixty-six patients were treated [dose-escalation phase, n = 44 (tablet cohort, n = 12); dose-expansion phase, n = 22 (olaparib plus gemcitabine, n = 15; gemcitabine alone, n = 7)]. In the dose-escalation phase, four patients (6%) experienced dose-limiting toxicities (raised alanine aminotransferase, n = 2; neutropenia, n = 1; febrile neutropenia, n = 1). Grade ≥3 adverse events were reported in 38/47 patients (81%) treated with olaparib capsules plus gemcitabine; most common were haematological toxicities (55%). Tolerated combinations were olaparib 100 mg b.i.d. capsule (intermittently, days 1-14) plus gemcitabine 600 mg/m(2) and olaparib 100 mg o.d. tablet (intermittently, days 1-14) plus gemcitabine 600 mg/m(2). There were no differences in efficacy observed during the dose-expansion phase. Olaparib 100 mg b.i.d. (intermittent dosing; capsules) plus gemcitabine 600 mg/m(2) is tolerated in advanced solid tumour patients, with no unmanageable/unexpected toxicities. Continuous dosing of olaparib or combination with gemcitabine at doses >600 mg/m(2) was not considered to have an acceptable tolerability profile

  18. Metabolomics Evaluation of Serum Markers for Cachexia and Their Intra-Day Variation in Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Takashi; Chayahara, Naoko; Imamura, Yoshinori; Toyoda, Masanori; Kiyota, Naomi; Mukohara, Toru; Nishiumi, Shin; Azuma, Takeshi; Yoshida, Masaru; Minami, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by progressive loss of weight and muscle atrophy. Using metabolomics, we investigated serum markers and their intra-day variation in advanced pancreatic cancer patients with cachexia. Methods Patients were enrolled in two groups: those with or without cachexia. Blood samples collected at 6:30 AM, 11:30 AM, 4:30 PM, and 9:30 PM were analyzed using metabolomics, and serum levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and leptin were measured and compared between the two groups. Intra-day variation was then evaluated. Results Twenty-one patients were enrolled in total. In the cachexia group (n = 9), median body weight loss rate over 6 months was greater, performance status was poorer, and anorexia was more severe than in the non-cachexia group (n = 12). Each metabolites level showed substantial intra-day variation, and some of them displayed significant differences between the two groups. Levels of paraxanthine remained markedly lower in the cohort with cachexia at all measurement points. Besides, median IL-6 and TNF-α levels appeared higher and leptin concentration appeared lower in the cachexia group, albeit without statistical significance. Conclusion Some metabolites and some serological marker levels were affected by cancer cachexia. Although paraxanthine levels were consistently lower in patients with cachexia, we identified that many metabolites indicated large intra- and inter-day variation and that it might be necessary to pay attention to intra-day variation in metabolomics research. PMID:25411961

  19. Concurrent radiotherapy with oral fluoropyrimidine versus gemcitabine in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Feng; Cao, Xiao-Hui; Bao, Chao-En; Wan, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Gemcitabine (GEM) is the most widely utilized systemic agent in combination with radiation therapy (RT) for treating locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) in the concurrent setting. Despite recent interest in using two novel oral fluoropyrimidines (FUs), capecitabine and S-1, in this setting, there is a lack of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to support this approach. Trials published between 1994 and 2014 were identified by an electronic search of public databases (Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library). All prospective studies were independently identified by two authors for inclusion. Demographic data, treatment response, objective response rate (ORR), progression-free and overall survival (PFS and OS, respectively), and toxicities were extracted and analyzed using comprehensive meta-analysis software (version 2.0). Twenty-three cohorts with 843 patients were included: 497 patients were treated with GEM and 346 patients were treated with oral FU. Pooled OS was significantly higher at 1 and 2 years for S-1 plus RT than for GEM plus RT (relative risk [RR] 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-1.65; P=0.03; and RR 1.75; 95% CI, 1.18-2.60, P=0.002, respectively), while 1-year PFS and ORR were not significantly different between S-1 and GEM-based chemoradiotherapy (P=0.37 and P=0.06, respectively). Additionally, comparable efficacy was found between capecitabine and GEM-based chemoradiotherapy in terms of OS, PFS, and ORR. As for grade 3 and 4 acute toxicity, oral FU plus RT significantly reduced the risk of developing hematologic toxicities, nausea, and vomiting when compared to GEM plus RT (P<0.001). Oral FU plus RT may be a safe and feasible regimen for patients with LAPC, with similar efficacy and low rate of toxicities compared with GEM plus RT. Our findings support the need to compare S-1 with GEM in the concurrent setting in large prospective RCTs due to its potential survival benefits.

  20. Prognostic Factors for Survival and Resection in Patients With Initial Nonresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerregaard, Jon K.; Mortensen, Michael B.; Jensen, Helle A.; Nielsen, Morten; Pfeiffer, Per

    2012-07-01

    Background and Purpose: Controversies regarding the optimal therapy for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) exist. Although the prognosis as a whole remains dismal, subgroups are known to benefit from intensive therapy, including chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We describe the results in 178 patients treated from 2001 to 2010 and have developed a prognostic model for both survival and the possibility of a subsequent resection in these patients. Methods and Materials: From 2001 until 2010, 178 consecutive patients with LAPC were treated and included in the present study, with CRT consisting of 50 Gy in 27 fractions combined with tegafur-uracil(UFT)/folinic acid(FA). Results: The median survival from diagnosis was 11.5 months. Adverse events of Grade 3 or above were seen in 36% of the patients. Ninety-three percent of the patients completed all fractions. A Cox regression model for survival demonstrated resection (hazard ratio [HR] 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1-0.3) and pre-CRT gemcitabine-based therapy (HR 0.57; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9) as being associated with a favorable outcome, increasing gross tumor volume (HR 1.14; 95% CI, 1.0-1.3) was associated with shorter survival. A logistic regression model showed Stage III disease (odds ratio [OR] 0.16; 95% CI, 0.0-1.1) and abnormal hemoglobin (OR 0.26; 95% CI, 0.0-1.2) as being associated with lower odds of resection. Conclusion: This study confirms the favorable prognosis for patients receiving gemcitabine therapy before CRT and the poor prognosis associated with increasing tumor volume. In addition, CRT in patients with abnormal hemoglobin and Stage III disease rarely induced tumor shrinkage allowing subsequent resection.

  1. The impact of body mass index dynamics on survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer receiving chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Younak; Kim, Tae-Yong; Lee, Kyung-hun; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2014-07-01

    High body mass index (BMI) is linked to an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer (PC). However, in patients with advanced PC (APC), especially those receiving palliative chemotherapy, the impact of BMI on survival has not been investigated fully. To assess changes in BMI during the course of APC and their impact on patient survival, specifically for those receiving palliative chemotherapy. Consecutive patients with APC, all of whom were treated with palliative chemotherapy, were enrolled during 2003-2010. Clinical characteristics and prognoses were analyzed. A total of 425 patients participated (median age, 60.1 years). At diagnosis of APC, patients' BMI distribution of patients was as follow: <18.5 (45, 10.6%); 18.5-19.9 (67, 15.8%); 20.0-22.4 (156, 36.7%); 22.5-24.9 (107, 25.2%); 25.0-29.9 (49, 11.5%); and ≥ 30.0 (1, 0.2%). Median overall survival (OS) was 8.1 months (95% confidence interval 7.2, 9.1). Precancer BMI and baseline BMI (at diagnosis) had no impact on OS. Weight loss at diagnosis (precancer weight minus weight at diagnosis) and weight loss during first-line chemotherapy (both stipulated as BMI change ≥ 1) were associated with shortened OS (hazard ratio, 1.300; P = 0.012 and hazard ratio, 1.367; P = 0.010, respectively). In patients with APC undergoing palliative chemotherapy, decreases in BMI at APC diagnosis and during chemotherapy are more hazardous for OS than precancer BMI or baseline BMI (at diagnosis) as absolute values. Further studies are needed to validate this finding and investigate strategies to maintain BMI during chemotherapy in this setting. Copyright © 2014 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Association Between Chemoradiation-related Lymphopenia and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Aaron T.; Ye, Xiaobu; Ellsworth, Susannah G.; Smith, Jessica A.; Narang, Amol K.; Garg, Tanu; Campian, Jian; Laheru, Daniel A.; Zheng, Lei; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Grossman, Stuart A.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Lymphopenia is a common consequence of chemoradiation therapy yet is seldom addressed clinically. This study was conducted to determine if patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with definitive chemoradiation develop significant lymphopenia and if this affects clinical outcomes. Methods A retrospective analysis of patients with LAPC treated with chemoradiation at a single institution from 1997 to 2011 was performed. Total lymphocyte counts (TLCs) were recorded at baseline and then monthly during and after chemoradiation. The correlation between treatment-induced lymphopenia, established prognostic factors, and overall survival was analyzed using univariate Cox regression analysis. Important factors identified by univariate analysis were selected as covariates to construct a multivariate proportional hazards model for survival. Results A total of 101 patients met eligibility criteria. TLCs were normal in 86% before chemoradiation. The mean reduction in TLC per patient was 50.6% (SD, 40.6%) 2 months after starting chemoradiation (P< 0.00001), and 46% had TLC< 500 cells/mm3. Patients with TLC < 500 cells/mm3 2 months after starting chemoradiation had inferior median survival (8.7 vs. 13.3mo, P= 0.03) and PFS (4.9 vs. 9.0mo, P = 0.15). Multivariate analysis revealed TLC< 500 cells/mm3 to be an independent predictor of inferior survival (HR= 2.879, P= 0.001) along with baseline serum albumin (HR= 3.584, P = 0.0002), BUN (HR = 1.060, P= 0.02), platelet count (HR= 1.004, P = 0.005), and radiation planning target volume (HR= 1.003, P= 0.0006). Conclusions Severe treatment-related lymphopenia occurs frequently after chemoradiation for LAPC and is an independent predictor of inferior survival. PMID:23648440

  3. Multicriteria Optimization in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Locally Advanced Cancer of the Pancreatic Head

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S. Craft, David L.; Carlsson, Fredrik; Bortfeld, Thomas R.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) affords the potential to decrease radiation therapy-associated toxicity by creating highly conformal dose distributions. However, the inverse planning process can create a suboptimal plan despite meeting all constraints. Multicriteria optimization (MCO) may reduce the time-consuming iteration loop necessary to develop a satisfactory plan while providing information regarding trade-offs between different treatment planning goals. In this exploratory study, we examine the feasibility and utility of MCO in physician plan selection in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Methods and Materials: The first 10 consecutive patients with LAPC treated with IMRT were evaluated. A database of plans (Pareto surface) was created that met the inverse planning goals. The physician then navigated to an 'optimal' plan from the point on the Pareto surface at which kidney dose was minimized. Results: Pareto surfaces were created for all 10 patients. A physician was able to select a plan from the Pareto surface within 10 minutes for all cases. Compared with the original (treated) IMRT plans, the plan selected from the Pareto surface had a lower stomach mean dose in 9 of 10 patients, although often at the expense of higher kidney dose than with the treated plan. Conclusion: The MCO is feasible in patients with LAPC and allows the physician to choose a satisfactory plan quickly. Generally, when given the opportunity, the physician will choose a plan with a lower stomach dose. The MCO enables a physician to provide greater active clinical input into the IMRT planning process.

  4. Randomised, open-label, phase II study of gemcitabine with and without IMM-101 for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalgleish, Angus G; Stebbing, Justin; Adamson, Douglas Ja; Arif, Seema Safia; Bidoli, Paolo; Chang, David; Cheeseman, Sue; Diaz-Beveridge, Robert; Fernandez-Martos, Carlos; Glynne-Jones, Rob; Granetto, Cristina; Massuti, Bartomeu; McAdam, Karen; McDermott, Raymond; Martín, Andrés J Muñoz; Papamichael, Demetris; Pazo-Cid, Roberto; Vieitez, Jose M; Zaniboni, Alberto; Carroll, Kevin J; Wagle, Shama; Gaya, Andrew; Mudan, Satvinder S

    2016-09-27

    Immune Modulation and Gemcitabine Evaluation-1, a randomised, open-label, phase II, first-line, proof of concept study (NCT01303172), explored safety and tolerability of IMM-101 (heat-killed Mycobacterium obuense; NCTC 13365) with gemcitabine (GEM) in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Patients were randomised (2 : 1) to IMM-101 (10 mg ml(-l) intradermally)+GEM (1000 mg m(-2) intravenously; n=75), or GEM alone (n=35). Safety was assessed on frequency and incidence of adverse events (AEs). Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall response rate (ORR) were collected. IMM-101 was well tolerated with a similar rate of AE and serious adverse event reporting in both groups after allowance for exposure. Median OS in the intent-to-treat population was 6.7 months for IMM-101+GEM v 5.6 months for GEM; while not significant, the hazard ratio (HR) numerically favoured IMM-101+GEM (HR, 0.68 (95% CI, 0.44-1.04, P=0.074). In a pre-defined metastatic subgroup (84%), OS was significantly improved from 4.4 to 7.0 months in favour of IMM-101+GEM (HR, 0.54, 95% CI 0.33-0.87, P=0.01). IMM-101 with GEM was as safe and well tolerated as GEM alone, and there was a suggestion of a beneficial effect on survival in patients with metastatic disease. This warrants further evaluation in an adequately powered confirmatory study.

  5. Focal Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation Improves Overall Survival in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Receiving Induction Chemotherapy and Consolidative Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Sunil; Chadha, Awalpreet S.; Suh, Yelin; Chen, Hsiang-Chun; Rao, Arvind; Das, Prajnan; Minsky, Bruce D.; Mahmood, Usama; Delclos, Marc E.; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O.; Beddar, Sam; Katz, Matthew H.; Fleming, Jason B.; Javle, Milind M.; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Wolff, Robert A.; Crane, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To review outcomes of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) patients treated with dose-escalated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with curative intent. Methods and Materials A total of 200 patients with LAPC were treated with induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation between 2006 and 2014. Of these, 47 (24%) having tumors >1 cm from the luminal organs were selected for dose-escalated IMRT (biologically effective dose [BED] >70 Gy) using a simultaneous integrated boost technique, inspiration breath hold, and computed tomographic image guidance. Fractionation was optimized for coverage of gross tumor and luminal organ sparing. A 2- to 5-mm margin around the gross tumor volume was treated using a simultaneous integrated boost with a microscopic dose. Overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), local-regional and distant RFS, and time to local-regional and distant recurrence, calculated from start of chemoradiation, were the outcomes of interest. Results Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (BED = 59.47 Gy) with a concurrent capecitabine-based (86%) regimen. Patients who received BED >70 Gy had a superior OS (17.8 vs 15.0 months, P = .03), which was preserved throughout the follow-up period, with estimated OS rates at 2 years of 36% versus 19% and at 3 years of 31% versus 9% along with improved local-regional RFS (10.2 vs 6.2 months, P = .05) as compared with those receiving BED ≤70 Gy. Degree of gross tumor volume coverage did not seem to affect outcomes. No additional toxicity was observed in the high-dose group. Higher dose (BED) was the only predictor of improved OS on multivariate analysis. Conclusion Radiation dose escalation during consolidative chemoradiation therapy after induction chemotherapy for LAPC patients improves OS and local-regional RFS. PMID:26972648

  6. CA 19-9 as a Predictor for Response and Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Koom, Woong Sub; Seong, Jinsil Kim, Yong Bae; Pyun, Hae Ok; Song, Si Young

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the significance of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) levels for predicting response and survival in pancreatic cancer (PC) treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed data from 69 patients with PC between 1999 and 2005. All patients had elevated CA 19-9 levels before treatment. CA 19-9 levels (pre- and posttreatment CA 19-9) and their decline were analyzed for radiologic response and overall survival. Results: Seventeen patients (25%) had a 50% or greater reduction in tumor size within 3 months of chemoradiotherapy (1 complete response, 16 partial responses). CA 19-9 decline was significantly correlated with radiologic response (p = 0.03). The median survival time (MST) was 12 months (range, 4-48 months), and 1-year survival rate was 44%. Pretreatment CA 19-9 > 1,200 U/mL (MST, 13 vs. 8 months; p = 0.002), posttreatment CA 19-9 >100 U/mL (MST, 17 vs. 10 months; p = 0.0003), and CA 19-9 decline {<=}40% (MST, 13 vs. 10 months; p = 0.005) were the strongest and most unfavorable prognostic factors. In addition, patients with multiple unfavorable CA 19-9 levels had significantly worse outcomes than those without. Conclusions: CA 19-9 decline shows a correlation with radiologic response. The combination of pretreatment CA 19-9 >1,200 U/mL, posttreatment CA 19-9 >100 U/mL, and CA 19-9 decline {<=}40% may possibly serve as a surrogate marker for poor survival in advanced PC receiving chemoradiotherapy.

  7. Phase II clinical trial of peptide cocktail therapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: VENUS-PC study.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuaki; Hazama, Shoichi; Iguchi, Haruo; Uesugi, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Hirakawa, Kosei; Aruga, Atsushi; Hatori, Takashi; Ishizaki, Hidenobu; Umeda, Yuzo; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Ikemoto, Tetsuya; Shimada, Mitsuo; Yoshimatsu, Kazuhiko; Shimizu, Ryoichi; Hayashi, Hiroto; Sakata, Koichiro; Takenouchi, Hiroko; Matsui, Hiroto; Shindo, Yoshitaro; Iida, Michihisa; Koki, Yasunobu; Arima, Hideki; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Tomio; Yoshino, Shigefumi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Oka, Masaaki; Nagano, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    We previously conducted a phase I clinical trial combining the HLA-A*2402-restricted KIF20A-derived peptide vaccine with gemcitabine for advanced pancreatic cancer (PC) and confirmed its safety and immunogenicity in cancer patients. In this study, we conducted a multicenter, single-armed, phase II trial using two antiangiogenic cancer vaccines targeting VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 in addition to the KIF20A peptide. We attempted to evaluate the clinical benefit of the cancer vaccination in combination with gemcitabine. Chemotherapy naïve PC patients were enrolled to evaluate primarily the 1-year survival rate, and secondarily overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), response rate (RR), disease control rate (DCR) and the peptide-specific immune responses. All enrolled patients received therapy without the HLA-A information, and the HLA genotypes were used for classification of the patients. Between June 2012 and May 2013, a total of 68 patients were enrolled. No severe systemic adverse effects of Grade 3 or higher related to these three peptides were observed. The 1-year survival rates between the HLA-A*2402-matched and -unmatched groups were not significantly different. In the HLA-A*2402 matched group, patients showing peptide-specific CTL induction for KIF20A or VEGFR1 showed a better prognosis compared to those without such induction (P = 0.023, P = 0.009, respectively). In the HLA-A*2402-matched group, the patients who showed a strong injection site reaction had a better survival rate (P = 0.017) compared to those with a weak or no injection site reaction. This phase II study demonstrated that this therapeutic peptide cocktail might be effective in patients who demonstrate peptide-specific immune reactions although predictive biomarkers are needed for patient selection in its further clinical application.

  8. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  9. [Experience with radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of unresectable pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Fehér, István; Péley, Gábor; Rényi Vámos, Ferenc; Farkas, Emil; Sulyok, Zoltán; Kovács, Tibor; Köves, István

    2005-02-01

    More than half of colorectal cancers are located in the rectum, and the number of such cancers is increasing. In Hungary colorectal cancers are diagnosed predominantly in advanced stages. In the last five years 736 patients with colorectal cancer were operated on at our Department, with the following stage distribution: Dukes A 10%, BI 10%, B2 31%, C 36% and D 13%. The local recurrence rate is decreasing since the introduction of total mesorectal excision and preoperative radiation. Effective treatment options are however poor for unresectable pelvic recurrences. Chemo- and radiotherapy have severe limitations in this advanced stage cancer. In recent years there are a few publications on the minimal-invasive radiofrequency tumour ablation (RFTA) technique, which is an effective treatment for primary and metastatic liver carcinomas and is a new palliative for the local treatment of pelvic recurrence. The aim of this study was to assess the response to treatment using ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation in two patients with unresectable pelvic recurrent rectal cancer.

  10. Association of transarterial chemoembolization with survival in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WANG, PENG; SHENG, LILI; WANG, GUOXIANG; WANG, HEPING; HUANG, XINYU; YAN, XIAOXING; YANG, XIAOHUA; PEI, RENGUANG

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common types of cancer worldwide. Only a minority of HCC patients benefit from curative therapies, such as surgical resection, liver transplantation, or percutaneous treatment, since the majority of HCCs are diagnosed at intermediate or advanced stages. To determine whether transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) affects survival in patients with unresectable HCC, we conducted a case-controlled study, investigating 129 patients diagnosed with intermediate- or advanced-stage HCC, classified according to the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer staging system. Of these 129 patients, 102 received TACE and 27 received symptomatic treatment alone. The primary follow-up endpoint was survival. The association of TACE with survival was estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Survival was significantly higher in the chemoembolization group compared to that in the symptomatic treatment group. The estimated 1-, 2- and 3-year survival rates were 61.8, 34.0 and 24.3% for the chemoembolization group and 51.9, 9.9 and 0% for the symptomatic treatment group (P<0.001). TACE was shown to significantly improve survival and is an effective form of treatment for patients with unresectable HCC. PMID:24649333

  11. Outcomes of patients treated with capecitabine and temozolamide for advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) and non-PNETs

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Krista L.; Pavlovich, Peter; Kennecke, Hagen F.; Lim, Howard J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Retrospective studies have demonstrated high response rates among patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) treated with capecitabine and temozolamide (CapTem), while responses are infrequently seen among non-PNETs. The objective of the study was to describe progression free survival (PFS) among neuroendocrine tumor (NET) patients treated with CapTem, and to identify factors associated with better activity. Methods Patients who were referred to one of five provincial cancer treatment centers between 2009 and 2013 for advanced NETs and initiated CapTem were included. Patients received Cap 1,500 mg/m2 on days 1-14 and TMZ 200 mg/m2 on days 10-14 every 28 days. Their characteristics and outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. Results In our cohort, 29 patients (16 males) with a median age of 59 (range 26-76) received palliative CapTem, 15 of them as first-line chemotherapy. Primary tumors included pancreas (48.3%), small bowel (20.7%), lung (10.3%), unknown (10.3%), rectum (6.9%) and appendix (3.4%). Median number of cycles was three. Fifteen patients (51.7%) received CapTem as first-line chemotherapy and 14 (48.3%) as subsequent lines. Median PFS for the entire cohort was 4.7 months. PNETs had a median PFS of 4.9 months compared to 2.8 months for non-PNETs (P=0.178). Patients with PNETs who received CapTem in the first-line setting had a median PFS of 15.9 months as compared to only 3.1 months for the remainder [P=0.047, hazard ratios (HR) 0.342]. Patients with Ki67 above 5% and ≤5% had median PFS of 4.0 and 4.7 months, respectively (P=0.260). Conclusions CapTem showed good activity among PNETs, but its broader role in the treatment of carcinoid tumors remains unclear. PMID:25083296

  12. Outcome of Transplant-fallout Patients With Unresectable Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sio, Terence T.; Haddock, Michael G.; Novotny, Paul J.; Gores, Gregory J.; Alberts, Steven R.; Miller, Robert C.; Heimbach, Julie K.; Rosen, Charles B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this was to determine survival after starting neoadjuvant therapy for patients who became ineligible for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Methods and Materials: Since January 1993, 215 patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma began treatment with planned OLT. Treatment included external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with fluorouracil, bile duct brachytherapy, and postradiotherapy fluorouracil or capecitabine before OLT. Adverse findings at the staging operation, death, and other factors precluded OLT in 63 patients (29%), of whom 61 completed neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Results: By October 2012, 56 (89%) of the 63 patients unable to undergo OLT had died. Twenty-two patients (35%) became ineligible for OLT before the staging operation, 38 (60%) at the staging operation, and 3 (5%) after staging. From the date of diagnosis, median overall survival was 12.3 months. Survival was 17% at 18 months and 7% at 24 months. Median survival after fallout was 6.8 months. Median survival after the staging operation was 6 months. Two patients lived for 3.7 and 8.7 years before dying of cancer or liver failure caused by persistent biliary stricture at the site of the original cancer, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that time from diagnosis to fallout correlated with overall survival (P=0.04). Conclusions: In highly selected patients initially suitable for OLT, the mortality rate for cholangiocarcinoma was high in patients who became ineligible for OLT. Their survival, however, was comparable to expected survival for patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease treated with nontransplant therapies. The most common reason for patient fallout was adverse findings at the staging operation. PMID:24921218

  13. Genotype-guided Dosing of mFOLFIRINOX Chemotherapy in Patients With Previously Untreated Advanced Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of Unknown Primary; Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Newly Diagnosed Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  14. Cost-effectiveness analysis of gemcitabine, S-1 and gemcitabine plus S-1 for treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer based on GEST study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Rongce; Wen, Feng; Zhang, Pengfei; Tang, Ruilei; Du, Zedong; He, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Jian; Li, Qiu

    2015-04-01

    Gemcitabine (GEM) alone, S-1 alone and gemcitabine plus S-1 (GS) have shown a marginal clinical benefit for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. However, there is no clearly defined optimal cost-effectiveness treatment. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of GEM alone, S-1 alone and GS for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer based on GEST study for public payers. A decision model compared GEM alone, S-1 alone and GS. Primary base case data were identified using the GEST study and the literatures. Costs were estimated from West China Hospital, Sichuan University, China, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated. Survival benefits were reported in quality-adjusted life-months (QALMs). Sensitive analyses were performed by varying potentially modifiable parameters of the model. The base case analysis showed that the GEM cost $21,912 and yielded survival of 6.93 QALMs, S-1 cost $19,371 and yielded survival of 7.90 QALMs and GS cost $22,943 and yielded survival of 7.46 QALMs in the entire treatment. The one-way sensitivity analyses showed that the ICER of S-1 was driven mostly by the S-1 group utility score of stable state compared with GEM, and the GEM group utility score of progressed state played a key role on the ICER of GS compared with GEM. S-1 represents an attractive cost-effective treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer, given the favorable cost per QALM and improvement in clinical efficacy, especially the limited available treatment options.

  15. Risk Factors for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma and Prospects for Screening

    PubMed Central

    Batheja, Mashal J.; Collins, Joseph M.; Silva, Alvin C.; Mekeel, Kristin L.; Moss, Adyr A.; Nguyen, Cuong C.; Lake, Douglas F.; Miller, Laurence J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has one of the worst survival rates of any cancer and is the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality. Early detection and surgery are the patient's best chance for cure. However, symptoms are typically vague and occur when the cancer is unresectable. Population-based mass screening is not practical for this rare disease, though screening and early detection in asymptomatic high-risk patient populations may be indicated. PMID:20567579

  16. Distal Pancreatectomy With En Bloc Celiac Axis Resection for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haibing; Ma, Ruirui; Gong, Jian; Cai, Chengzong; Song, Zhenshun; Xu, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Although distal pancreatectomy with en bloc celiac resection (DP-CAR) is used to treat locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the advantages and disadvantages of this surgical procedure remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate its clinical safety and efficacy.Studies regarding DP-CAR were retrieved from the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Chinese electronic databases. Articles were selected according to predesigned inclusion criteria, and data were extracted according to predesigned sheets. Clinical, oncologic, and survival outcomes of DP-CAR were systematically reviewed by hazard ratios (HRs) or odds ratio (OR) using fixed- or random-effects models.Eighteen studies were included. DP-CAR had a longer operating time and greater intraoperative blood loss compared to distal pancreatectomy (DP). A high incidence of vascular reconstruction occurred in DP-CAR: 11.53% (95%CI: 6.88-18.68%) for artery and 33.28% (95%CI: 20.45-49.19%) for vein. The pooled R0 resection rate of DP-CAR was 72.79% (95% CI, 46.19-89.29%). Higher mortality and morbidity rates were seen in DP-CAR, but no significant differences were detected compared to DP; the pooled OR was 1.798 for mortality (95% CI, 0.360-8.989) and 2.106 for morbidity (95% CI, 0.828-5.353). The pooled incidence of postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) was 31.31% (95%CI, 23.69-40.12%) in DP-CAR, similar to that of DP (OR = 1.07; 95%CI, 0.52-2.20). The pooled HR against DP-CAR was 5.67 (95%CI, 1.48-21.75) for delayed gastric emptying. The pooled rate of reoperation was 9.74% (95%CI, 4.56-19.59%) in DP-CAR. The combined 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates in DP-CAR were 65.22% (49.32-78.34%), 30.20% (21.50-40. 60%), and 18.70% (10.89-30.13%), respectively. The estimated means and medians for survival time in DP-CAR patients were 24.12 (95%CI, 18.26-29.98) months and 17.00 (95%CI, 13.52-20.48) months, respectively. There were no significant differences regarding

  17. Determinants of concentrations of Nε-carboxymethyl-lysine and soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products and their associations with risk of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhigang; Chen, Guoqing; Chen, Liang; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Mannisto, Satu; White, Donna L; Albanes, Demetrius; Jiao, Li

    2014-01-01

    The soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products (sRAGE) is shown to mitigate pro-inflammatory effects triggered by ligation of RAGE with Nε-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML)-AGE or other ligands. We examined the associations among host, lifestyle, and genetic determinants of CML-AGE or sRAGE and risk of pancreatic cancer in the prospective ATBC Study. We obtained baseline exposure information, data on serological and genetic biomarkers from 141 patients with pancreatic cancer and 141 subcohort controls. Stepwise linear and logistic regression models were used for data analysis. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that CML-AGE concentrations were independently inversely correlated with the minor allele of rs640742 of DDOST, physical activity, alcohol consumption, diastolic blood pressure (BP), and positively correlated with heart rate, serum sRAGE and HDL concentrations (P < 0.05). sRAGE concentrations were independently inversely correlated with the 82Ser allele of rs2070600 of RAGE, age, body mass index, heart rate, and serum HDL; and positively correlated with serum CML-AGE, sucrose consumption, and diastolic BP (P < 0.05). The minor allele of rs1035786 of RAGE was associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer (any T compared with CC: multivariate OR = 0.61, 95% CI: 0.38-0.98). We identified host metabolic profile, lifestyle and genetic factors that explained approximately 50% of variability of CML-AGE or sRAGE in Finnish men smokers. The association between RAGE SNPs and pancreatic cancer risk warrants further investigation. PMID:25379135

  18. [Pancreatic hyperenzymemia: new advances in the field of clinical-diagnostic approach, with particular attention about Gullo's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, R; Italia, A

    2012-10-01

    An increase in serum levels of pancreatic enzymes is a well-known manifestation of pancreatic disease, especially of inflammatory or neoplastic nature, even if several extrapancreatic diseases can equally cause that increase. In addition to this pathological type of hyperenzymemia, different "non-pathological" forms have also been identified, including macroamylasemia, salivary, and mixed salivary and pancreatic hyperamylasemia, in all of which only amylase elevations are seen. Nevertheless, in 1996 a new syndrome characterized by an abnormal, chronic, benign increase in levels of serum amylase, pancreatic isoamylase, lipase and trypsin, asymptomatic and usually discovered incidentally, was described for the first time by Lucio Gullo et al. Hyperamylasemia/hyperlipasemia's observation is nowadays on the increase because general practitioners tend to include more frequently amylase and lipase in routine blood tests and, moreover, because the constant evaluation of this biochemical alteration in the Emergency Unit: for this reason, this syndrome was clearly identified only recently. Therefore, it's characterized by serum elevation of all pancreatic enzymes in the absence of underlying diseases; it occurs in either sporadic or familial form and it persists over time with considerable fluctuation in serum enzyme concentrations, including frequent normalizations. Proper diagnosis of this form of hyperenzymemia is important because it reassures the subjects having this anomaly that the syndrome is benign, and because it can prevent multiple and expensive diagnostic tests or useless hospitalizations or therapies.

  19. Arsenic-Induced Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Sean; Zancosky, Krysia; Farah, Katie

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide has brought about tremendous advancement in the treatment of acute promyelocytic myelogenous leukemia (APML). In most instances, the benefits of these treatments outweigh the risks associated with their respective safety profiles. Although acute pancreatitis is not commonly associated with arsenic toxicity, it should be considered as a possible side effect. We report a case of arsenic-induced pancreatitis in a patient with APML. PMID:22606427

  20. Pancreatic Cancer: A Review.

    PubMed

    Yabar, Cinthya S; Winter, Jordan M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the third leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States, yet advances in treatment options have been minimal over the past decade. In this review, we summarize the evaluation and treatments for this disease. We highlight molecular advances that hopefully will soon translate into improved outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Male Breast Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Intraductal Carcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  2. Concurrent radiotherapy with oral fluoropyrimidine versus gemcitabine in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong-Feng; Cao, Xiao-Hui; Bao, Chao-En; Wan, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Background Gemcitabine (GEM) is the most widely utilized systemic agent in combination with radiation therapy (RT) for treating locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) in the concurrent setting. Despite recent interest in using two novel oral fluoropyrimidines (FUs), capecitabine and S-1, in this setting, there is a lack of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to support this approach. Methods Trials published between 1994 and 2014 were identified by an electronic search of public databases (Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library). All prospective studies were independently identified by two authors for inclusion. Demographic data, treatment response, objective response rate (ORR), progression-free and overall survival (PFS and OS, respectively), and toxicities were extracted and analyzed using comprehensive meta-analysis software (version 2.0). Results Twenty-three cohorts with 843 patients were included: 497 patients were treated with GEM and 346 patients were treated with oral FU. Pooled OS was significantly higher at 1 and 2 years for S-1 plus RT than for GEM plus RT (relative risk [RR] 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00–1.65; P=0.03; and RR 1.75; 95% CI, 1.18–2.60, P=0.002, respectively), while 1-year PFS and ORR were not significantly different between S-1 and GEM-based chemoradiotherapy (P=0.37 and P=0.06, respectively). Additionally, comparable efficacy was found between capecitabine and GEM-based chemoradiotherapy in terms of OS, PFS, and ORR. As for grade 3 and 4 acute toxicity, oral FU plus RT significantly reduced the risk of developing hematologic toxicities, nausea, and vomiting when compared to GEM plus RT (P<0.001). Conclusions Oral FU plus RT may be a safe and feasible regimen for patients with LAPC, with similar efficacy and low rate of toxicities compared with GEM plus RT. Our findings support the need to compare S-1 with GEM in the concurrent setting in large prospective RCTs due to its potential survival benefits. PMID:26635481

  3. A randomized, placebo-controlled phase III trial of masitinib plus gemcitabine in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deplanque, G.; Demarchi, M.; Hebbar, M.; Flynn, P.; Melichar, B.; Atkins, J.; Nowara, E.; Moyé, L.; Piquemal, D.; Ritter, D.; Dubreuil, P.; Mansfield, C. D.; Acin, Y.; Moussy, A.; Hermine, O.; Hammel, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Masitinib is a selective oral tyrosine–kinase inhibitor. The efficacy and safety of masitinib combined with gemcitabine was compared against single-agent gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Patients and methods Patients with inoperable, chemotherapy-naïve, PDAC were randomized (1 : 1) to receive gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) in combination with either masitinib (9 mg/kg/day) or a placebo. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) in the modified intent-to-treat population. Secondary OS analyses aimed to characterize subgroups with poor survival while receiving single-agent gemcitabine with subsequent evaluation of masitinib therapeutic benefit. These prospectively declared subgroups were based on pharmacogenomic data or a baseline characteristic. Results Three hundred and fifty-three patients were randomly assigned to receive either masitinib plus gemcitabine (N = 175) or placebo plus gemcitabine (N = 178). Median OS was similar between treatment-arms for the overall population, at respectively, 7.7 and 7.1 months, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.89 (95% CI [0.70; 1.13]. Secondary analyses identified two subgroups having a significantly poor survival rate when receiving single-agent gemcitabine; one defined by an overexpression of acyl–CoA oxidase-1 (ACOX1) in blood, and another via a baseline pain intensity threshold (VAS > 20 mm). These subgroups represent a critical unmet medical need as evidenced from median OS of 5.5 months in patients receiving single-agent gemcitabine, and comprise an estimated 63% of patients. A significant treatment effect was observed in these subgroups for masitinib with median OS of 11.7 months in the ‘ACOX1’ subgroup [HR = 0.23 (0.10; 0.51), P = 0.001], and 8.0 months in the ‘pain’ subgroup [HR = 0.62 (0.43; 0.89), P = 0.012]. Despite an increased toxicity of the combination as compared with single-agent gemcitabine, side-effects remained manageable. Conclusions The

  4. Randomized Phase II Trial of Gemcitabine Plus TH-302 Versus Gemcitabine in Patients With Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Borad, Mitesh J.; Reddy, Shantan G.; Bahary, Nathan; Uronis, Hope E.; Sigal, Darren; Cohn, Allen L.; Schelman, William R.; Stephenson, Joe; Chiorean, E. Gabriela; Rosen, Peter J.; Ulrich, Brian; Dragovich, Tomislav; Del Prete, Salvatore A.; Rarick, Mark; Eng, Clarence; Kroll, Stew; Ryan, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose TH-302 is an investigational hypoxia-activated prodrug that releases the DNA alkylator bromo-isophosphoramide mustard in hypoxic settings. This phase II study (NCT01144455) evaluated gemcitabine plus TH-302 in patients with previously untreated, locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients and Methods Patients were randomly assigned 1:1:1 to gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2), gemcitabine plus TH-302 240 mg/m2 (G+T240), or gemcitabine plus TH-302 340 mg/m2 (G+T340). Randomized crossover after progression on gemcitabine was allowed. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), tumor response, CA 19-9 response, and safety. Results Two hundred fourteen patients (77% with metastatic disease) were enrolled between June 2010 and July 2011. PFS was significantly longer with gemcitabine plus TH-302 (pooled combination arms) compared with gemcitabine alone (median PFS, 5.6 v 3.6 months, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.87; P = .005; median PFS for metastatic disease, 5.1 v 3.4 months, respectively). Median PFS times for G+T240 and G+T340 were 5.6 and 6.0 months, respectively. Tumor response was 12%, 17%, and 26% in the gemcitabine, G+T240, and G+T340 arms, respectively (G+T340 v gemcitabine, P = .04). CA 19-9 decrease was greater with G+T340 versus gemcitabine (−5,398 v −549 U/mL, respectively; P = .008). Median OS times for gemcitabine, G+T240, and G+T340 were 6.9, 8.7, and 9.2 months, respectively (P = not significant). The most common adverse events (AEs) were fatigue, nausea, and peripheral edema (frequencies similar across arms). Skin and mucosal toxicities (2% grade 3) and myelosuppression (55% grade 3 or 4) were the most common TH-302–related AEs but were not associated with treatment discontinuation. Conclusion PFS, tumor response, and CA 19-9 response were significantly improved with G+TH-302. G+T340 is being investigated further in the phase III MAESTRO study

  5. Does "OPTINAB" strategy ("stop-and-go") work in treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) with nab-paclitaxel-gemcitabine?

    PubMed

    Relias, Valerie; Maloney, Antonia; Smith, Melissa H; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2017-08-01

    MPACT demonstrated a survival benefit of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine in advanced pancreatic cancer (APC). However, sensory peripheral neuropathy is a dose-limiting toxicity and neuromodulators have shown limited, if any activity in ameliorating neuropathy. In colorectal cancer, the OPTIMOX ("stop-and-go") approach offered a strategy to reduce neuropathy. No data exist to support this strategy for nab-paclitaxel in APC. Retrospective study of APC patients who developed grade 3 neuropathy during nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine was done. Nab-paclitaxel was held and then reinstituted upon radiological or tumor marker progression. Duration of disease control (DCC) was measured. We named this strategy "OPTINAB". Seven patients out of 27 (25%) developed grade 3 neuropathy after an average of 4.2 months; nab-paclitaxel was suspended while gemcitabine was continued. Maintenance gemcitabine continued for a mean of 2.8 months. Upon progression (radiologic or CA19-9) nab-paclitaxel was re-instituted with gemcitabine. One patient could not tolerate nab-paclitaxel due to worsening of neuropathy while other six continued the combo with mean progression-free survival 2 (PFS2) of 2.2 months. The six patients continued nab-paclitaxel for a mean of PFS2 of 2.2 months (range 1-4 months). Nab-paclitaxel resulted in improvement of an average DDC with an average of (7.0 + 2.2 =) 8.2 months (range 8-13 months). Average overall survival for this group was 11.7 months (range 9.5-17 months). Reintroduction of nab-paclitaxel resulted in an average DDC of 9.4 months. Average overall survival (OS) for this group was 11.7 months. "OPTINAB" approach improved PFS2 in these patients and was feasible as majority of the patient tolerated nab-paclitaxel. Although it is a small study, it supports the need for a randomized, prospective study to test the concept of "OPTINAB".

  6. Unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of upper trachea with long-term survival after concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yathiraj, Prahlad H; Ail, Sandeep; Singh, Anshul; Mamidipudi, Vidyasagar

    2017-08-11

    Upper tracheal malignancies are rare, and long-term survival is even rarer, especially among the unresectable malignancies. A 66-year-old chronic smoker was diagnosed as a locally advanced, non-metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the upper trachea. Being unresectable, he was treated with six cycles of concurrent weekly cisplatin and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks. Follow-up imaging at 6 and 12 months revealed no disease. Our patient is presently 36 months post-treatment and is disease free without tracheal necrosis, fistula or radiation pneumonitis but developed hypothyroidism and is presently euthyroid. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy appears safe up to 3 years at least without any necrosis and is effective in controlling local disease. Meticulous planning obviates the need for higher technology like motion management techniques or intensity-modulated radiotherapy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. A phase II study of the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, CV6504, in advanced pancreatic cancer: correlation of clinical data with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic endpoints.

    PubMed

    Ferry, D R; Deakin, M; Baddeley, J; Daryanani, S; Bramhall, S; Anderson, D A; Wakelam, M J; Doran, J; Pemberton, G; Young, A M; Buckels, J; Kerr, D J

    2000-09-01

    Primary objective was to determine response rate of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer to a novel lipoxygenase and thromboxane A2 synthetase inhibitor (CV6504); secondary objectives included estimation of pharmacokinetics of CV6504, target-enzyme inhibition, safety and tolerance, quality of life and survival. Thirty-one patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were planned to receive CV6504, 100 mg TDS, orally for three months, at which point CT scans were performed to assess therapeutic response rates. Steady state concentrations of CV6504 and thromboxane B2 (an indirect measure of thromboxane A2 synthetase (TA2S) inhibition) were made. Of the 31 patients entered into the study, 23 were considered fully evaluable for response. The drug was well tolerated with few side effects; no partial or complete responses were seen, but 10 patients had stable disease at 3 months; quality of life was maintained during therapy; mean CV6504 steady state plasma concentrations of 14 +/- 6 ng/ml resulting in 75 +/- 18% inhibition of TA2S were achieved; median-survival time for all patients considered eligible for assessment of efficacy was 36.6 weeks after the initial dose of study medication. The actuarial one-year survival was approximately 25%. CV6504 inhibits its target enzyme in vivo, maintains stable disease in 32% of evaluable patients and is well tolerated.

  8. Unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: Systemic plus hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy is associated with longer survival in comparison with systemic chemotherapy alone.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, Ioannis T; Groot Koerkamp, Bas; Do, Richard K G; Gönen, Mithat; Fong, Yuman; Allen, Peter J; D'Angelica, Michael I; Kingham, T Peter; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Klimstra, David S; Kemeny, Nancy E; Jarnagin, William R

    2016-03-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is associated with poor survival. This study compared the outcomes of patients with unresectable ICC treated with hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) plus systemic chemotherapy (SYS) with the outcomes of patients treated with SYS alone. Consecutive patients with ICC were retrospectively reviewed. Clinicopathologic data were reviewed. Survival rates were compared by Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank testing. Between January 2000 and August 2012, 525 patients with ICC were evaluated at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and 236 patients with unresectable tumors (locally advanced or metastatic) were analyzed. Disease was confined to the liver in 104 patients, who underwent treatment with combined HAI and SYS (n = 78 or 75%) or SYS alone (n = 26 or 25%). The response rate in the combined group was better than the rate in the group receiving SYS alone, although this did not reach statistical significance (59% vs 39%, P = .11). Overall survival for the combined group was longer than overall survival for the patients who received SYS alone (30.8 vs 18.4 months, P < .001), and this difference was maintained when patients with portal lymph node disease were included in the survival analysis (29.6 months with HAI and SYS [n = 93] vs 15.9 months with SYS [n = 74], P < .001). Eight patients who initially presented with unresectable tumors responded enough to undergo complete resection and had a median overall survival of 37 months (range, 10.4-92.3 months). In patients with unresectable ICC confined to the liver or with limited regional nodal disease, a combination of SYS and HAI chemotherapy is associated with greater survival than SYS alone. Cancer 2016;122:758-765. © 2015 American Cancer Society. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  9. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Staging of Pancreatic Cancer Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Whipple Procedure Complementary Therapies Pancreatic Cancer Support ...

  10. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Staging of Pancreatic Cancer Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Whipple Procedure Complementary Therapies Pancreatic Cancer Support ...

  11. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Staging of Pancreatic Cancer Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Whipple Procedure Complementary Therapies Pancreatic Cancer Support ...

  12. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Patients With Pancreatic or Periampullary Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Dorine S J; Molenaar, I Quintus; Besselink, Marc G; van Eijck, Casper H; Borel Rinkes, Inne H; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with pancreatic or periampullary cancer, both before and after resection. Systematic review according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA guidelines). We included studies reporting on pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with pancreatic or periampullary cancer. Data on patient demographics, type of pancreatic resection, diagnostic test, and occurrence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency were extracted. Prevalence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency was calculated before and after pancreatic resections and in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Nine observational cohort studies with 693 patients were included. Median preoperative prevalence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency was 44% (range, 42%-47%) before pancreatoduodenectomy, 20% (range, 16%-67%) before distal pancreatectomy, 63% before total pancreatectomy, and 25% to 50% in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The median prevalence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency at least 6 months after pancreatoduodenectomy was 74% (range, 36%-100%) and 67% to 80% after distal pancreatectomy. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is diagnosed in approximately half of all patients scheduled to undergo resection for pancreatic or periampullary cancer. The prevalence increases markedly after resection. These data highlight the need of pancreatic enzyme suppletion in these patients.

  13. Potential for dose-escalation and reduction of risk in pancreatic cancer using IMRT optimization with lexicographic ordering and gEUD-based cost functions

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, Aaron C.; Jee, Kyung-Wook; Vineberg, Karen; Jablonowski, Marla; Fraass, Benedick A.; Pan, Charlie C.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2007-02-15

    Radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer is limited by the tolerance of local organs at risk (OARs) and frequent overlap of the planning target volume (PTV) and OAR volumes. Using lexicographic ordering (LO), a hierarchical optimization technique, with generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) cost functions, we studied the potential of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to increase the dose to pancreatic tumors and to areas of vascular involvement that preclude surgical resection [surgical boost volume (SBV)]. We compared 15 forward planned three-dimensional conformal (3DCRT) and IMRT treatment plans for locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. We created IMRT plans optimized using LO with gEUD-based cost functions that account for the contribution of each part of the resulting inhomogeneous dose distribution. LO-IMRT plans allowed substantial PTV dose escalation compared with 3DCRT; median increase from 52 Gy to 66 Gy (a=-5,p<0.005) and median increase from 50 Gy to 59 Gy (a=-15,p<0.005). LO-IMRT also allowed increases to 85 Gy in the SBV, regardless of a value, along with significant dose reductions in OARs. We conclude that LO-IMRT with gEUD cost functions could allow dose escalation in pancreas tumors with concomitant reduction in doses to organs at risk as compared with traditional 3DCRT.

  14. Adjuvant celecoxib and lanreotide following transarterial chemoembolisation for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma: a randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tong, Huan; Wei, Bo; Chen, Shuang; Xie, Yong-Mei; Zhang, Ming-Guang; Zhang, Lin-Hao; Huang, Zhi-Yin; Tang, Cheng-Wei

    2017-07-18

    Recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE) is common due to neoangiogenesis. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors and somatostatin analogues were reported to inhibit tumour angiogenesis. The pilot randomized controlled trial was aimed to prospectively evaluate the protocol of TACE combined with celecoxib and lanreotide (TACE+C+L) in patients with unresectable and advanced HCC. A total of 71 patients with HCC were enrolled and randomly assigned to either TACE (n=35) or TACE+C+L (n=36) group. Overall survival, disease control rate (DCR), and adverse events were assessed during a 3-year follow-up period. The median overall survival of the TACE+C+L group (15.0 months) was doubled compared to that of TACE group (7.5 months), p = 0.012. DCR of the TACE+C+L group was significantly higher than that of the TACE group either at 6 months (72.2% vs 42.9%, p = 0.012) or at 12 months (61.1% vs 28.6%, p = 0.006). The median overall survivals (13 months vs 4.5 months, p = 0.013) and DCR at 12 months (50% vs 13.6%, p = 0.008) of patients with advanced HCC in TACE+C+L groups were significantly higher than those in TACE group. No significant difference of adverse events was observed between the two groups. The occurrence of post-embolisation syndrome in TACE+C+L group was significantly lower than that in TACE group (16.7% vs 60.0%, p = 0.001). In conclusion, the regimen of TACE+C+L prolonged overall survival, enhanced tumour response, reduced post-embolisation syndrome and was well-tolerable in the patients with unresectable HCC. It may be more beneficial for advanced HCC.

  15. PKD signaling and pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. Methods This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Results Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder. PMID:26879861

  16. Metastatic pancreatic cancer: Is there a light at the end of the tunnel?

    PubMed Central

    Vaccaro, Vanja; Sperduti, Isabella; Vari, Sabrina; Bria, Emilio; Melisi, Davide; Garufi, Carlo; Nuzzo, Carmen; Scarpa, Aldo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Cognetti, Francesco; Reni, Michele; Milella, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Due to extremely poor prognosis, pancreatic cancer (PDAC) represents the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in Western countries. For more than a decade, gemcitabine (Gem) has been the mainstay of first-line PDAC treatment. Many efforts aimed at improving single-agent Gem efficacy by either combining it with a second cytotoxic/molecularly targeted agent or pharmacokinetic modulation provided disappointing results. Recently, the field of systemic therapy of advanced PDAC is finally moving forward. Polychemotherapy has shown promise over single-agent Gem: regimens like PEFG-PEXG-PDXG and GTX provide significant potential advantages in terms of survival and/or disease control, although sometimes at the cost of poor tolerability. The PRODIGE 4/ACCORD 11 was the first phase III trial to provide unequivocal benefit using the polychemotherapy regimen FOLFIRINOX; however the less favorable safety profile and the characteristics of the enrolled population, restrict the use of FOLFIRINOX to young and fit PDAC patients. The nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-Paclitaxel) formulation was developed to overcome resistance due to the desmoplastic stroma surrounding pancreatic cancer cells. Regardless of whether or not this is its main mechanisms of action, the combination of nab-Paclitaxel plus Gem showed a statistically and clinically significant survival advantage over single agent Gem and significantly improved all the secondary endpoints. Furthermore, recent findings on maintenance therapy are opening up potential new avenues in the treatment of advanced PDAC, particularly in a new era in which highly effective first-line regimens allow patients to experience prolonged disease control. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances in the systemic treatment of advanced PDAC, mostly focusing on recent findings that have set new standards in metastatic disease. Potential avenues for further development in the metastatic setting and current efforts to integrate

  17. Glucagon-like peptide-1 counteracts the detrimental effects of Advanced Glycation End-Products in the pancreatic beta cell line HIT-T 15

    SciTech Connect

    Puddu, A.; Storace, D.; Durante, A.; Odetti, P.; Viviani, G.L.

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} GLP-1 prevents AGEs-induced cell death. {yields} GLP-1 prevents AGEs-induced oxidative stress. {yields} GLP-1 ameliorated AGEs-induced cell dysfunction. {yields} GLP-1 attenuates AGEs-induced RAGE increment. {yields} GLP-1 counteracts AGEs-induced pancreatic cell death and dysfunction. -- Abstract: Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs), a group of compounds resulting from the non-enzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with the free amino group of proteins, are implicated in diabetic complications. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T 15 to high concentrations of AGEs significantly decreases cell proliferation and insulin secretion, and affects transcription factors regulating insulin gene transcription. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that increases proinsulin biosynthesis, stimulates insulin secretion, and improves pancreatic beta-cell viability. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of GLP-1 on the function and viability of HIT-T 15 cells cultured with AGEs. HIT-T 15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs alone, or supplemented with 10 nmol/l GLP-1. Cell viability, insulin secretion, redox balance, and expression of the AGEs receptor (RAGE) were then determined. The results showed that GLP-1 protected beta cell against AGEs-induced cell death preventing both apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, addition of GLP-1 to the AGEs culture medium restored the redox balance, improved the responsiveness to glucose, and attenuated AGEs-induced RAGE expression. These findings provide evidence that GLP-1 protects beta cells from the dangerous effects of AGEs.

  18. Advanced Glycation End-Products Induce Apoptosis in Pancreatic Islet Endothelial Cells via NF-κB-Activated Cyclooxygenase-2/Prostaglandin E2 Up-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Kuo-Cheng; Chiu, Chen-Yuan; Kao, Chia-Wei; Huang, Kuo-How; Wang, Ching-Chia; Huang, Kuo-Tong; Tsai, Keh-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular complications eventually affect nearly all patients with diabetes. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) resulting from hyperglycemia are a complex and heterogeneous group of compounds that accumulate in the plasma and tissues in diabetic patients. They are responsible for both endothelial dysfunction and diabetic vasculopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of AGEs on pancreatic islet microvascular endothelial cells. The mechanism underlying the apoptotic effect of AGEs in pancreatic islet endothelial cell line MS1 was explored. The results showed that AGEs significantly decreased MS1 cell viability and induced MS1 cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. AGEs dose-dependently increased the expressions of cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase in MS1 cells. Treatment of MS1 cells with AGEs also resulted in increased nuclear factor (NF)-κB-p65 phosphorylation and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression. However, AGEs did not affect the expressions of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related molecules in MS1 cells. Pretreatment with NS398 (a COX-2 inhibitor) to inhibit prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production reversed the induction of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved PARP, and MS1 cell viability. Moreover, AGEs significantly increased the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) protein expression in MS1 cells, which could be reversed by RAGE neutralizing antibody. RAGE Neutralizing antibody could also reverse the induction of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP and decreased cell viability induced by AGEs. These results implicate the involvement of NF-κB-activated COX-2/PGE2 up-regulation in AGEs/RAGE-induced islet endothelial cell apoptosis and cytotoxicity. These findings may provide insight into the pathological processes within the pancreatic islet microvasculature induced by AGEs accumulation. PMID:25898207

  19. A Phase II Study of Fixed-Dose Rate Gemcitabine Plus Low-Dose Cisplatin Followed by Consolidative Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Andrew H.; Venook, Alan P.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: The optimal strategy for treating locally advanced pancreatic cancer remains controversial, including the respective roles and timing of chemotherapy and radiation. We conducted a Phase II nonrandomized trial to evaluate sequential chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Chemotherapy naive patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} at 10 mg/m{sup 2}/min) plus cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. Those without evidence of extrapancreatic metastases after six cycles of chemotherapy received radiation (5,040 cGy over 28 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (800 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily on the day of radiation) as a radiosensitizer. Results: A total of 25 patients were enrolled with a median follow-up time of 656 days. Twelve patients (48%) successfully received all six cycles of chemotherapy plus chemoradiation. Eight patients (32%) progressed during chemotherapy, including 7 with extrapancreatic metastases. Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities were uncommon. Two patients sustained myocardial infarctions during chemotherapy, and 4 were hospitalized for infectious complications, although none in the setting of neutropenia. Median time to progression was 10.5 months and median survival was 13.5 months, with an estimated 1-year survival rate of 62%. Patients receiving all components of therapy had a median survival of 17.0 months. Conclusions: A strategy of initial fixed-dose rate gemcitabine-based chemotherapy, followed by chemoradiation, shows promising efficacy for treatment of locally advanced disease. A substantial proportion of patients will be identified early on as having extrapancreatic disease and spared the potential toxicities associated with radiation.

  20. Post-gemcitabine therapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer - A comparative review of randomized trials evaluating oxaliplatin- and/or irinotecan-containing regimens.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Arndt; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Hubner, Richard A; Blanc, Jean-Frédéric; Carrato, Alfredo; Yang, Yoojung; Patel, Dipen A; Ektare, Varun; de Jong, Floris A; Gill, Sharlene

    2016-11-01

    A systematic review and critical evaluation of randomized trial evidence for oxaliplatin- or irinotecan-containing regimens in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer previously treated with gemcitabine has not yet been published. We conducted a comparative systematic review of randomized trials evaluating oxaliplatin- or irinotecan-based therapies in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer previously treated with gemcitabine to assess trial similarity and the feasibility of performing an indirect treatment comparison (ITC). Studies were identified through PubMed and key oncology conference abstracts. The following trials met our criteria: NAPOLI-1 (nanoliposomal irinotecan [nal-IRI] or nal-IRI+5-fluorouracil [5-FU]/leucovorin [LV] vs 5-FU/LV), CONKO-003 (oxaliplatin+5-FU/LV [OFF] vs 5-FU/LV), PANCREOX (oxaliplatin+5-FU/LV [mFOLFOX6] vs 5-FU/LV), and Yoo et al. (2009) (irinotecan+5-FU/LV [mFOLFIRI3] vs mFOLFOX). Fundamental differences were identified in study design (i.e., number of study sites, number of countries), patient (i.e., locally advanced vs metastatic disease, stratification variables, prior and subsequent treatments) and treatment (i.e., regimens, dose intensity) characteristics, and primary and secondary outcomes (i.e., primary vs secondary outcomes, overall survival [OS], progression-free survival [PFS]) among the 4 included trials. Our comparative review demonstrated significant dissimilarity across trials, which precluded conducting an ITC. In the absence of head-to-head nal-IRI- and/or oxaliplatin-based therapy trials, clinicians are advised to interpret these studies separately within the context of their individual patient population.

  1. Pharmacokinetic study and clinical evaluation of a slow-release 5-fluorouracil implant in pancreatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing Quan; Yang, Jing Chun; Liang, Jie Xiong; Wang, Shi Liang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study the pharmacokinetic characteristics of a slow-release 5-fluorouracil implant as well as to evaluate the clinical drug activity of this preparation in pancreatic cancer patients. Pharmacokinetic characteristics of the slow-release 5-fluorouracil implant were evaluated by examining the half-life time (T1/2) and apparent volume of distribution (Vd) in pancreatic cancer patients; the slow-release 5-fluorouracil implant was administered through interstitial chemotherapy (tumor interstitium implantation). In the drug activity study, 36 locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer patients were divided randomly into an experimental treatment group (n=18) and a standard treatment group (n=18). The experimental treatment group was treated with interstitial chemotherapy of a slow-release 5-fluorouracil implant combined with systemic chemotherapy of gemcitabine; the standard treatment group was treated with systemic chemotherapy of gemcitabine. An internal drainage procedure was used when biliary and/or gastrointestinal tract obstruction occurred in the two groups. Clinical benefit response, including pain (visual analogue scale), analgesic drug use, general conditions (Karnofsky performance score), weight changes, and survival status, was observed. T1/2 of the slow-release 5-fluorouracil implant was 5475.8±136.4 min, whereas Vd was 45275.0±1028.6 l. Clinical benefit response in the experimental treatment group was better than that in the standard treatment group. The experimental treatment group had longer median survival time compared with the standard treatment group. The slow-release 5-fluorouracil implant could deliver drugs mainly in the regional area of the tumor and prolong the drug action time; interstitial chemotherapy of a 5-fluorouracil implant combined with systemic chemotherapy of gemcitabine could improve the quality of life and survival status of pancreatic cancer patients. The method was promising and worthy of

  2. Repeat pancreatectomy for pancreatic ductal cancer recurrence in the remnant pancreas after initial pancreatectomy: is it worthwhile?

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Masaru; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Yoshidome, Hiroyuki; Furukawa, Katsunori; Takayasiki, Tsukasa; Kuboki, Satoshi; Okamura, Daiki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Nakajima, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    The clinical implications of repeat completion pancreatectomy for recurrent pancreatic cancer in the remnant pancreas after initial pancreatectomy have not been clarified. We retrospectively analyzed our patients and evaluated the clinical implications of repeat pancreatectomy for isolated local recurrence in the remnant pancreas after initial resection for pancreatic cancer. One-hundred seventy patients who had recurrence of pancreatic cancer out of 326 patients who had initially undergone resection for pancreatic cancer were included in this study. Sixty-seven of 170 recurrent patients were diagnosed as having isolated local recurrence of pancreatic cancer. Eleven of these 67 patients with isolated local recurrence only in the remnant pancreas underwent repeat pancreatectomy. Characteristics and operative outcomes for these 11 patients with repeat pancreatectomy were analyzed and evaluated in comparison with other recurrent patients. Among 170 patients with recurrence after initial resection for pancreatic cancer, the median survival time was 78.2 and 20.3 months after initial resection, in the repeat pancreatectomy group and the unresectable group, respectively (P < .001), and the 2- and 5-year survival probability rates after initial resection were 91%, and 82% vs 42%, and 13%, respectively. Among 67 patients with isolated local recurrence, the median survival time after repeat resection or diagnosis of recurrence was 25.0 and 9.3 months, and the 2- and 5-year survival probability rates after repeat resection or diagnosis of recurrence were and 61% and 46% vs 19% and 6.2% in the repeat pancreatectomy group and the unresectable group, respectively (P < .01). There was no difference in survivals between the unresectable isolated local recurrence group and the unresectable nonlocal recurrence group. Repeat pancreatectomy might bring about beneficial effects on prognosis in selected patients with isolated local recurrence in the remnant pancreas after initial

  3. Heat, drugs, and radiation given in combination is palliative for unresectable esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kai, H; Matsufuji, H; Okudaira, Y; Sugimachi, K

    1988-06-01

    From April 1966 to April 1986, 101 men and women with unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus were treated in our clinic. Since 1983, 21 were treated with a combination of hyperthermia, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy (group I). Before 1983, for another 80 patients, radiation plus chemotherapy had been prescribed (group II). Nine of 21 patients in group I had an unresectable carcinoma due to an advanced tumor, 9 had an associated severe clinical status, and 3 refused surgery. Out of 80 in group II, 50 had a far advanced tumor, 21 had a poor clinical condition, and 9 refused operation. With regard to staging, for 21 in group I, 6 were classified as Stage I, 5 as Stage II, 7 as Stage III, and 3 as Stage IV. As to the 80 in group II, those in Stage I, II, III, and IV accounted for 8, 22, 39, and 11, respectively. The median doses of each modality, for patients in group I, were 6 times of hyperthermia at 42-45 degrees C for 30 minutes, 40 Gy of X ray and 30 mg of bleomycin. For patients in group II, a median dose of 56 Gy of X ray was given. Response rates determined by esophagograms and endoscopies for the patients in groups I and II were 76.2% (16/21; 4 CRs, 12 PRs) and 39.2% (31/79; 2 Crs, 29 PRs), respectively (p less than 0.001). The effective rates determined by improvement in quality of life (relief of pain and dysphagia) for groups I and II were 61.9% and 37.2%, respectively. A longer survival was obtained for patients in group I (median survival: 9 months vs 6 months). Especially for the patients classified as Stage I, a significantly longer survival was obtained with a combination of hyperthermia, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy (p less than 0.01).

  4. Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

  5. A randomized, multicenter, phase III study of gemcitabine combined with capecitabine versus gemcitabine alone as first-line chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Seung; Chung, Moon Jae; Park, Jeong Youp; Bang, Seungmin; Park, Seung Woo; Kim, Ho Gak; Noh, Myung Hwan; Lee, Sang Hyub; Kim, Yong-Tae; Kim, Hyo Jung; Kim, Chang Duck; Lee, Dong Ki; Cho, Kwang Bum; Cho, Chang Min; Moon, Jong Ho; Kim, Dong Uk; Kang, Dae Hwan; Cheon, Young Koog; Choi, Ho Soon; Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Jae Kwang; Moon, Jieun; Shin, Hye Jung; Song, Si Young

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: This phase III trial compared the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine plus capecitabine (GemCap) versus single-agent gemcitabine (Gem) in advanced pancreatic cancer as first-line chemotherapy. Methods: A total of 214 advanced pancreatic cancer patients were enrolled from 16 hospitals in South Korea between 2007 and 2011. Patients were randomly assigned to receive GemCap (oral capecitabine 1660 mg/m2 plus Gem 1000 mg/m2 by 30-minute intravenous infusion weekly for 3 weeks followed by a 1-week break every 4 weeks) or Gem (by 30-minute intravenous infusion weekly for 3 weeks every 4 weeks). Results: Median overall survival (OS) time, the primary end point, was 10.3 and 7.5 months in the GemCap and Gem arms, respectively (P = 0.06). Progression-free survival was 6.2 and 5.3 months in the GemCap and Gem arms, respectively (P = 0.08). GemCap significantly improved overall response rate compared with Gem alone (43.7% vs 17.6%; P = 0.001). Overall frequency of grade 3 or 4 toxicities was similar in each group. Neutropenia was the most frequent grade 3 or 4 toxicity in both groups. Conclusion: GemCap failed to improve OS at a statistically significant level compared to Gem treatment. This study showed a trend toward improved OS compared to Gem alone. GemCap and Gem both exhibited similar safety profiles. PMID:28072706

  6. A phase II study of antibody-drug conjugate, TAK-264 (MLN0264) in previously treated patients with advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma expressing guanylyl cyclase C.

    PubMed

    Almhanna, Khaldoun; Wright, David; Mercade, Teresa Macarulla; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Gracian, Antonio Cubillo; Guillen-Ponce, Carmen; Faris, Jason; Lopez, Carolina Muriel; Hubner, Richard A; Bendell, Johanna; Bols, Alain; Feliu, Jaime; Starling, Naureen; Enzinger, Peter; Mahalingham, Devalingham; Messersmith, Wells; Yang, Huyuan; Fasanmade, Adedigbo; Danaee, Hadi; Kalebic, Thea

    2017-05-19

    Background This phase II open-label, multicenter study evaluated the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of TAK-264 in previously treated patients with advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma expressing guanylyl cyclase C (GCC). Methods Patients with advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma expressing GCC (H-score ≥ 10) received TAK-264 1.8 mg/kg on day 1 of a 21-day cycle as a 30-min intravenous infusion for up to 1 year or until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary objective was overall response rate (ORR [complete response + partial response (PR)]). Secondary objectives included evaluations of the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of TAK-264 (NCT02202785). Results 43 patients were enrolled and treated with 1.8 mg/kg TAK-264: 11, 15, and 17 patients with low, intermediate, and high GCC expression, respectively. Median number of treatment cycles received was two (range 1-10). The ORR was 3%, including one patient with intermediate GCC expression who achieved a PR. All patients experienced ≥1 adverse events (AE). The majority of patients experienced grade 1/2 AEs affecting the gastrointestinal tract. Fifteen (35%) patients experienced ≥grade 3 drug-related AEs; five (12%) patients had a serious AE. The most common (≥10% of patients) all-grade drug-related AEs were nausea (33%), fatigue (28%), neutropenia (23%), decreased appetite (23%), vomiting (16%), asthenia (16%), and alopecia (14%). Conclusions TAK-264 demonstrated a manageable safety profile; however, the low efficacy of TAK-264 observed in this study did not support further clinical investigation.

  7. Estimating prognosis and palliation based on tumour marker CA 19-9 and quality of life indicators in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer receiving chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, J; Dietrich, D; Glimelius, B; Hess, V; Bodoky, G; Scheithauer, W; Herrmann, R

    2010-01-01

    Background: To investigate the prognostic value of quality of life (QOL) relative to tumour marker carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9, and the role of CA 19-9 in estimating palliation in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer receiving chemotherapy. Methods: CA 19-9 serum concentration was measured at baseline and every 3 weeks in a phase III trial (SAKK 44/00–CECOG/PAN.1.3.001). Patients scored QOL indicators at baseline, and before each administration of chemotherapy (weekly or bi-weekly) for 24 weeks or until progression. Prognostic factors were investigated by Cox models, QOL during chemotherapy by mixed-effect models. Results: Patient-rated pain (P<0.02) and tiredness (P<0.03) were independent predictors for survival, although less prognostic than CA 19-9 (P<0.001). Baseline CA 19-9 did not predict QOL during chemotherapy, except for a marginal effect on pain (P<0.05). Mean changes in physical domains across the whole observation period were marginally correlated with the maximum CA 19-9 decrease. Patients in a better health status reported the most improvement in QOL within 20 days before maximum CA 19-9 decrease. They indicated substantially less pain and better physical well-being, already, early on during chemotherapy with a maximum CA 19-9 decrease of ⩾50% vs <50%. Conclusion: In advanced pancreatic cancer, pain and tiredness are independent prognostic factors for survival, although less prognostic than CA 19-9. Quality of life improves before best CA 19-9 response but the maximum CA 19-9 decrease has no impact on subsequent QOL. To estimate palliation by chemotherapy, patient's perception needs to be taken into account. PMID:20877359

  8. Hypofractionated Image-Guided IMRT in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer With Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Infiltrated Vessels Concomitant With Capecitabine: A Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Passoni, Paolo; Reni, Michele; Cattaneo, Giovanni M.; Slim, Najla; Cereda, Stefano; Balzano, Gianpaolo; Castoldi, Renato; Longobardi, Barbara; Bettinardi, Valentino; Gianolli, Luigi; Gusmini, Simone; Staudacher, Carlo; Calandrino, Riccardo; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose (MTD) of an integrated boost to the tumor subvolume infiltrating vessels, delivered simultaneously with radical dose to the whole tumor and concomitant capecitabine in patients with pretreated advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage III or IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma without progressive disease after induction chemotherapy were eligible. Patients underwent simulated contrast-enhanced four-dimensional computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography. Gross tumor volume 1 (GTV1), the tumor, and GTV2, the tumor subvolume 1 cm around the infiltrated vessels, were contoured. GTVs were fused to generate Internal Target Volume (ITV)1 and ITV2. Biological tumor volume (BTV) was fused with ITV1 to create the BTV+Internal Target Volume (ITV) 1. A margin of 5/5/7 mm (7 mm in cranium-caudal) was added to BTV+ITV1 and to ITV2 to create Planning Target Volume (PTV) 1 and PTV2, respectively. Radiation therapy was delivered with tomotherapy. PTV1 received a fixed dose of 44.25 Gy in 15 fractions, and PTV2 received a dose escalation from 48 to 58 Gy as simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in consecutive groups of at least 3 patients. Concomitant chemotherapy was capecitabine, 1250 mg/m{sup 2} daily. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any treatment-related G3 nonhematological or G4 hematological toxicity occurring during the treatment or within 90 days from its completion. Results: From June 2005 to February 2010, 25 patients were enrolled. The dose escalation on the SIB was stopped at 58 Gy without reaching the MTD. One patient in the 2{sup nd} dose level (50 Gy) had a DLT: G3 acute gastric ulcer. Three patients had G3 late adverse effects associated with gastric and/or duodenal mucosal damage. All patients received the planned dose of radiation. Conclusions: A dose of 44.25 Gy in 15 fractions to the whole tumor with an SIB of 58 Gy to small

  9. Ultrasonography in diagnosing chronic pancreatitis: New aspects

    PubMed Central

    Dimcevski, Georg; Erchinger, Friedemann G; Havre, Roald; Gilja, Odd Helge

    2013-01-01

    The course and outcome is poor for most patients with pancreatic diseases. Advances in pancreatic imaging are important in the detection of pancreatic diseases at early stages. Ultrasonography as a diagnostic tool has made, virtually speaking a technical revolution in medical imaging in the new millennium. It has not only become the preferred method for first line imaging, but also, increasingly to clarify the interpretation of other imaging modalities to obtain efficient clinical decision. We review ultrasonography modalities, focusing on advanced pancreatic imaging and its potential to substantially improve diagnosis of pancreatic diseases at earlier stages. In the first section, we describe scanning techniques and examination protocols. Their consequences for image quality and the ability to obtain complete and detailed visualization of the pancreas are discussed. In the second section we outline ultrasonographic characteristics of pancreatic diseases with emphasis on chronic pancreatitis. Finally, new developments in ultrasonography of the pancreas such as contrast enhanced ultrasound and elastography are enlightened. PMID:24259955

  10. Chemoprevention strategies for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stan, Silvia D.; Singh, Shivendra V.; Brand, Randall E.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis and it is often diagnosed at advanced stages, which makes it very difficult to treat. The low survival rate of patients with pancreatic cancer points toward an increased need for novel therapeutic and chemopreventive strategies and early detection. Increased consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Both synthetic as well as natural, diet-derived bioactive compounds have been evaluated as pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents and have been shown to have various degrees of efficacy in cellular and in vivo animal models. Some chemopreventive agents (for example curcumin, resveratrol, B-DIM) have also been reported to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to standard chemotherapeutic drugs (for example gemcitabine or erlotinib), which suggests the potential use of chemopreventive agents as potentiators of standard chemotherapy. Very few clinical trials with pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents have been completed and some are in early phases. Further development of pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents may prove to be tremendously valuable for individuals at high-risk of developing pancreatic cancer and patients who present with premalignant lesions. This Review discusses the current state of the pancreatic cancer chemoprevention field and highlights the challenges ahead. PMID:20440279

  11. Adenoviral p53 gene transfer and gemcitabine in three patients with liver metastases due to advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Thiede, Christian; Fischer, Rainer; Ehninger, Gerhard; Haag, Cornelie

    2007-01-01

    Background. Current therapies for adenocarcinoma of the pancreas do not improve the life expectancy of patients. Methods. In a non-randomized pilot trail we tested whether a local therapy based upon an adenoviral gene transfer of wild type p53 in combination with gemcitabine administration would be safe in patients with liver metastases due to pancreatic carcinoma. We report on the clinical course of three patients with respect to safety, tolerability and tumor response. Results. Transient grade III toxicities occurred with fever, leucopenia, elevation of AP, ALT, AST, GGT, while grade IV toxicity occurred for bilirubin only. Laboratory tests suggested disseminated intravascular coagulation in all three patients, but fine needle biopsies of liver did not show any histological evidence of thrombus or clot formation. Progression of liver metastases was documented in one and stable disease in another patient two months after treatment. However, a major improvement with regression of the indexed lesion by 80% occurred in a third patient after a single administration of 7.5×1012 viral particles, and time to progression was extended to six months. Conclusion. The combination therapy of viral gene transfer and chemotherapy temporarily controls and diminishes tumor burden. Improvement of the toxicity profile is necessary. Further trials are warranted to improve treatment and life expectancy of patients suffering from fatal diseases such as pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:18333108

  12. Concomitant radiochemotherapy in unresectable carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas: cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Cellini, N; Costamagna, G; Morganti, A G; Valentini, V; Macchia, G; Mutignani, M; Pandolfi, M; Trodella, L

    1999-01-01

    One of the principal therapeutic options in unresectable carcinoma of exocrine pancreas is concomitant radiochemotherapy. However, in current scientific literature cost analyses of this therapeutic modality are lacking. A payer-oriented cost-effectiveness analysis of concomitant radiochemotherapy was carried out. Outcomes and differences in costs relatively to two different therapeutic strategies were compared retrospectively: biliary drainage + observation (group 1); biliary drainage + concomitant radiochemotherapy (group 2). Cost-effectiveness was assessed based on the analysis of incremental cost of benefit in terms of survival in group 2. As incremental cost of group 2 was considered that of radiochemotherapy, costs of diagnosis and staging being similar in the two groups. The unit of measurement used was $/Lys (LYS = years of life saved). For estimates of cost-effectiveness in different clinical situations, a sensitivity analysis was carried out. The incremental cost of standard concomitant radiochemotherapy was shown to be $4,755. Incremental costs relatively to the situations of minimum and maximum treatment were shown to be $4,410 and $8,375, respectively. Median survival was 4.5 and 10 months in group 1 and 2 respectively (logrank: p = 0.0046). The benefit in terms of survival achieved by concomitant radiochemotherapy was shown to be 5.5 months equal to 0.46 years. Therefore, in the standard situation, the treatment cost-effectiveness can be estimated in: $4,755/0.46 years = $10,337/LYS, that is, the cost of a year of life saved was shown to be $10,337. Results of sensitivity analysis showed that cost-effectiveness can be estimated in the range $7,603 and $25,379/LYS. In conclusion, concomitant radiochemotherapy in patients with unresectable pancreatic carcinoma is able to improve the quality of life through the relief of related symptoms as well as median survival (10 vs 4.5 months). Costs of these benefits, even if considering better survival only, based

  13. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  14. Survival after attempted surgical resection and intraoperative radiation therapy for pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, John K.; Sause, William T. . E-mail: ldwsause@ihc.com; Hazard, Lisa J.; Noyes, R. Dirk

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a single institution's experience with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) in combination with attempted surgical resection for pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: From May 1986 until June 2001, 77 patients at LDS Hospital underwent attempted surgical resection and IORT for pancreatic or periampullary adenocarcinoma. A potentially curative resection was defined as surgery with negative or microscopic positive margins. No patients had metastatic disease at the time of surgery and IORT. Forty-four patients with tumors located in the pancreas and 9 patients with periampullary tumors underwent potentially curative surgical resection and IORT. Twenty-four patients had pancreatic tumors deemed unresectable and underwent surgical bypass and IORT. Actuarial survival was calculated from the date of IORT until last follow-up or death by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Patients undergoing a potentially curative resection and IORT for periampullary adenocarcinoma had a median survival of 167 months and a 56% 5-year actuarial survival, compared with a median survival of 16 months and a 19% 5-year actuarial survival for patients undergoing the same treatment for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (p = 0.03). Patients with unresectable disease who underwent bypass and IORT had a median survival of 11 months and a 0% 3-year survival, significantly worse than patients able to undergo surgical resection and IORT (p = 0.0002). The operative mortality for all patients undergoing potentially curative resection and IORT was 3.7%. Conclusions: Intraoperative radiation therapy is well tolerated and does not increase the morbidity or mortality of potentially curative surgical resection for pancreatic or periampullary adenocarcinoma. Patients with periampullary adenocarcinoma have a better prognosis than those with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and patients with unresectable pancreatic disease fared worse.

  15. Potential predictive role of chemotherapy-induced changes of soluble CD40 ligand in untreated advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Azzariti, Amalia; Brunetti, Oronzo; Porcelli, Letizia; Graziano, Giusi; Iacobazzi, Rosa Maria; Signorile, Michele; Scarpa, Aldo; Lorusso, Vito; Silvestris, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma lacks predictive biomarkers. CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. CD40–sCD40L interaction is considered to contribute to the promotion of tumor cell growth and angiogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of serum sCD40L as a predictor in metastatic pancreatic cancer. We evaluated 27 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients treated with FOLFIRINOX (21 patients) or gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel combination (six patients). The sCD40L level was measured in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at baseline, at first evaluation (all patients), and at time to progression (18 patients). The radiological response was evaluated according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, Version 1.1. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare pre–post treatment sCD40L levels with respect to clinical response, while Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used for the correlation between sCD40L and CA19.9 pre- and post-treatment. The Kruskal–Wallis test was also conducted for further comparisons. We observed a statistically significant reduction in the sCD40L level after 3 months of treatment in patients with partial response (11,718.05±7,097.13 pg/mL vs 4,689.42±5,409.96 pg/mL; P<0.01). Conversely, in patients with progressive disease, the biomarker statistically increased in the same time (9,351.51±7,356.91 pg/mL vs 22,282.92±11,629.35 pg/mL; P<0.01). This trend of sCD40L was confirmed in 18 patients at time to progression after the first evaluation. No differences were recorded within the stable disease group. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the sCD40L and CA19.9 pre–post treatment variation percentage (Pearson’s correlation coefficient =0.52; P<0.05). Our data suggest a possible predictive role of sCD40L in pancreatic cancer patients, similar to CA19.9. PMID:27555786

  16. Obesity, pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gumbs, Andrew A

    2008-09-01

    The only universally accepted risk factors for the development of pancreatic cancer are a positive family history or a history of smoking. Although the contribution of pancreatitis to pancreatic carcinogenesis has been debated for decades in the epidemiology literature, the actual mechanism is still unclear. With the rising epidemic of obesity, scientists have begun to focus on the contribution of chronic inflammatory state of morbidly obese patients in an effort to better understand the contribution of inflammation to the comorbidities of obesity. Notably, population studies are beginning to show that one of the most serious potential comorbidities of obesity is an increased lifetime risk of developing cancer. In this article, the current literature that exists supporting this Chronic Inflammatory Hypothesis as it pertains to obesity and pancreatic carcinogenesis is reviewed. To date, studies have focused on interleukin-6, a cytokine known to play a role in obesity, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The anti-inflammatory adipocytokine, adiponectin, has also shown promise as a key player in this mechanism and has recently been found to be more specific than standard tumor markers in differentiating pancreatic cancer from chronic pancreatitis. If the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer is related to hormone levels associated with obesity, such as adipocytokines, and cytokines associated with chronic inflammation, this could potentially lead to the development of new pancreatic cancer tumor markers and ultimately new therapies and methods of prevention.

  17. New developments in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Greer, Julia B; Brand, Randall E

    2011-04-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma presents in an advanced stage and has a dismal prognosis. Extensive recent research efforts have provided us with greater insight into the etiology of pancreatic cancer and have also improved our means of prognostication. Molecular analysis demonstrated that specific pathways involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis are perhaps more valuable to study than single genetic aberrations. Previous risk factors, including family history, body mass index, and current cigarette smoking, were validated and novel risks, such as ABO blood group alleles, were identified. Similar to other illnesses, combinations of healthful habits, such as not smoking, adhering to a Mediterranean dietary pattern, and engaging in physical activity, may decrease pancreatic cancer risk. Finally, CA 19-9 levels, the presence of diabetes mellitus, and a six-gene signature provided critical information regarding survival that could help guide treatment of individuals diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  18. 77 FR 11123 - Scientific Information Request on Local Therapies for Unresectable Colorectal Cancer Metastases...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Therapies for Unresectable Colorectal Cancer Metastases to the Liver AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research... Metastases to the Liver, which is currently being conducted by the Evidence-based Practice Centers for the... unresectable colorectal cancer metastases to the liver. The EHC Program is dedicated to identifying as...

  19. Unresectable Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma of the Neck: Early Tumor Response to Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Laszewski, Pam; Robinette, Natasha; Saleh, Husain; Raza, Naweed; Sukari, Ammar; Kim, Harold

    2015-01-01

    Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) rarely occurs in the head and neck and is generally managed with primary surgery. To our knowledge, no cases of unresectable EMC of the neck have been reported. We present a case of an unresectable EMC treated with chemotherapy and radiation, and highlight the exceptional early response to therapy.  PMID:26848421

  20. Unresectable Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma of the Neck: Early Tumor Response to Chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Mark; Laszewski, Pam; Robinette, Natasha; Saleh, Husain; Raza, Naweed; Sukari, Ammar; Kim, Harold

    2015-12-24

    Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) rarely occurs in the head and neck and is generally managed with primary surgery. To our knowledge, no cases of unresectable EMC of the neck have been reported. We present a case of an unresectable EMC treated with chemotherapy and radiation, and highlight the exceptional early response to therapy.

  1. Baseline Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis Are Associated With Survival Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dholakia, Avani S.; Chaudhry, Muhammad; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Chang, Daniel T.; Raman, Siva P.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Su, Zheng; Pai, Jonathan; Oteiza, Katharine E.; Griffith, Mary E.; Wahl, Richard L.; Tryggestad, Erik; Pawlik, Timothy; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Koong, Albert C.; and others

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in other malignancies, the role of PET in pancreatic cancer has yet to be well established. We analyzed the prognostic utility of PET for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) undergoing fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two patients with LAPC in a prospective clinical trial received up to 3 doses of gemcitabine, followed by 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy, using SBRT. All patients received a baseline PET scan prior to SBRT (pre-SBRT PET). Metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum and peak standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub peak}) on pre-SBRT PET scans were calculated using custom-designed software. Disease was measured at a threshold based on the liver SUV, using the equation Liver{sub mean} + [2 × Liver{sub sd}]. Median values of PET parameters were used as cutoffs when assessing their prognostic potential through Cox regression analyses. Results: Of the 32 patients, the majority were male (n=19, 59%), 65 years or older (n=21, 66%), and had tumors located in the pancreatic head (n=27, 84%). Twenty-seven patients (84%) received induction gemcitabine prior to SBRT. Median overall survival for the entire cohort was 18.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7-22.0). An MTV of 26.8 cm{sup 3} or greater (hazard ratio [HR] 4.46, 95% CI 1.64-5.88, P<.003) and TLG of 70.9 or greater (HR 3.08, 95% CI 1.18-8.02, P<.021) on pre-SBRT PET scan were associated with inferior overall survival on univariate analysis. Both pre-SBRT MTV (HR 5.13, 95% CI 1.19-22.21, P=.029) and TLG (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.07-10.48, P=.038) remained independently associated with overall survival in separate multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Pre-SBRT MTV and TLG are potential predictive factors for overall survival in patients with LAPC and may assist in

  2. Irinotecan plus bolus/infusional 5-Fluorouracil and leucovorin in patients with pretreated advanced pancreatic carcinoma: a multicenter experience of the Gruppo Oncologico Italia Meridionale.

    PubMed

    Gebbia, Vittorio; Maiello, Evaristo; Giuliani, Francesco; Borsellino, Nicolò; Arcara, Carlo; Colucci, Giuseppe

    2010-10-01

    Patients with advanced pancreatic cancer failing gemcitabine-based first-line chemotherapy are still in relatively good clinical conditions and may still require second-line chemotherapy, which is frequently administered in daily clinical practice given to without solid scientific support. A retrospective survey was carried out including 40 patients with stage III or IV gemcitabine-refractory pancreatic carcinoma. Patients received standard FOLFIRI regimen biweekly until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Response evaluation criteria in solid tumors and National Cancer Institute common toxicity criteria were employed respectively for response and toxicity assessment. Six partial responses (15%) and 14 stabilizations of disease (35%) were recorded for a tumor growth control rate of 50%. The median time to progression was 3.7 (range, 1-6.5 months), and median overall survival was 6 months (range, 2-8.2 months). A stabilization of performance status and a subjective improvement of cancer-related symptoms were recorded in 21 patients (52.5%). No correlation has been found between length of time to progression during first-line chemotherapy and length of that reported in the second-line setting or objective response. Grade 3-4 diarrhea and mucositis was observed in 15% and 10% of cases, respectively. Data presented in this article demonstrate that the second-line FOLFIRI regimen are able to induce an objective response in a relatively small fraction of patients with gemcitabine-refractory adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. The use of second-line chemotherapy should be carefully proposed to patients with good performance status or those who had a good response to first-line therapy.

  3. Superior therapeutic efficacy of nab-paclitaxel over cremophor-based paclitaxel in locally advanced and metastatic models of human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Rajeshkumar, N V; Yabuuchi, Shinichi; Pai, Shweta G; Tong, Zeen; Hou, Shihe; Bateman, Scott; Pierce, Daniel W; Heise, Carla; Von Hoff, Daniel D; Maitra, Anirban; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2016-08-09

    Albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel, nab-PTX) plus gemcitabine (GEM) combination has demonstrated efficient antitumour activity and statistically significant overall survival of patients with metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) compared with GEM monotherapy. This regimen is currently approved as a standard of care treatment option for patients with metastatic PDAC. It is unclear whether cremophor-based PTX combined with GEM provide a similar level of therapeutic efficacy in PDAC. We comprehensively explored the antitumour efficacy, effect on metastatic dissemination, tumour stroma and survival advantage following GEM, PTX and nab-PTX as monotherapy or in combination with GEM in a locally advanced, and a highly metastatic orthotopic model of human PDAC. Nab-PTX treatment resulted in significantly higher paclitaxel tumour plasma ratio (1.98-fold), robust stromal depletion, antitumour efficacy (3.79-fold) and survival benefit compared with PTX treatment. PTX plus GEM treatment showed no survival gain over GEM monotherapy. However, nab-PTX in combination with GEM decreased primary tumour burden, metastatic dissemination and significantly increased median survival of animals compared with either agents alone. These therapeutic effects were accompanied by depletion of dense fibrotic tumour stroma and decreased proliferation of carcinoma cells. Notably, nab-PTX monotherapy was equivalent to nab-PTX plus GEM in providing survival advantage to mice in a highly aggressive metastatic PDAC model, indicating that nab-PTX could potentially stop the progression of late-stage pancreatic cancer. Our data confirmed that therapeutic efficacy of PTX and nab-PTX vary widely, and the contention that these agents elicit similar antitumour response was not supported. The addition of PTX to GEM showed no survival advantage, concluding that a clinical combination of PTX and GEM may unlikely to provide significant survival advantage over GEM monotherapy and may not be a

  4. Superior therapeutic efficacy of nab-paclitaxel over cremophor-based paclitaxel in locally advanced and metastatic models of human pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rajeshkumar, N V; Yabuuchi, Shinichi; Pai, Shweta G; Tong, Zeen; Hou, Shihe; Bateman, Scott; Pierce, Daniel W; Heise, Carla; Von Hoff, Daniel D; Maitra, Anirban; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel, nab-PTX) plus gemcitabine (GEM) combination has demonstrated efficient antitumour activity and statistically significant overall survival of patients with metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) compared with GEM monotherapy. This regimen is currently approved as a standard of care treatment option for patients with metastatic PDAC. It is unclear whether cremophor-based PTX combined with GEM provide a similar level of therapeutic efficacy in PDAC. Methods: We comprehensively explored the antitumour efficacy, effect on metastatic dissemination, tumour stroma and survival advantage following GEM, PTX and nab-PTX as monotherapy or in combination with GEM in a locally advanced, and a highly metastatic orthotopic model of human PDAC. Results: Nab-PTX treatment resulted in significantly higher paclitaxel tumour plasma ratio (1.98-fold), robust stromal depletion, antitumour efficacy (3.79-fold) and survival benefit compared with PTX treatment. PTX plus GEM treatment showed no survival gain over GEM monotherapy. However, nab-PTX in combination with GEM decreased primary tumour burden, metastatic dissemination and significantly increased median survival of animals compared with either agents alone. These therapeutic effects were accompanied by depletion of dense fibrotic tumour stroma and decreased proliferation of carcinoma cells. Notably, nab-PTX monotherapy was equivalent to nab-PTX plus GEM in providing survival advantage to mice in a highly aggressive metastatic PDAC model, indicating that nab-PTX could potentially stop the progression of late-stage pancreatic cancer. Conclusions: Our data confirmed that therapeutic efficacy of PTX and nab-PTX vary widely, and the contention that these agents elicit similar antitumour response was not supported. The addition of PTX to GEM showed no survival advantage, concluding that a clinical combination of PTX and GEM may unlikely to provide significant survival

  5. Unresectable Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinuses: Outcomes and Toxicities

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Nelson, Carl J.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Stegman, Lauren D.; Wu, Abraham J.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Pfister, David G.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term outcomes and toxicity in patients with unresectable paranasal sinus carcinoma treated with radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 1990 and December 2006, 39 patients with unresectable Stage IVB paranasal sinus carcinoma were treated definitively with chemotherapy plus radiotherapy (n = 35, 90%) or with radiotherapy alone (n = 4, 10%). Patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (n = 18, 46%), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (n = 12, 31%), or conventional radiotherapy (n = 9, 23%) to a median treatment dose of 70 Gy. Most patients received concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy (n = 32, 82%) and/or concomitant boost radiotherapy (n = 29, 74%). Results: With a median follow-up of 90 months, the 5-year local progression-free survival, regional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 21%, 61%, 51%, 14%, and 15%, respectively. Patients primarily experienced local relapse (n = 25, 64%), mostly within the irradiated field (n = 22). Nine patients developed neck relapses; however none of the 4 patients receiving elective neck irradiation had a nodal relapse. In 13 patients acute Grade 3 mucositis developed. Severe late toxicities occurred in 2 patients with radionecrosis and 1 patient with unilateral blindness 7 years after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (77 Gy to the optic nerve). The only significant factor for improved local progression-free survival and overall survival was a biologically equivalent dose of radiation {>=}65 Gy. Conclusions: Treatment outcomes for unresectable paranasal sinus carcinoma are poor, and combined-modality treatment is needed that is both more effective and associated with less morbidity. The addition of elective neck irradiation may improve regional control.

  6. Outcome in unresectable glioblastoma: MGMT promoter methylation makes the difference.

    PubMed

    Thon, Niklas; Thorsteinsdottir, Jun; Eigenbrod, Sabina; Schüller, Ulrich; Lutz, Jürgen; Kreth, Simone; Belka, Claus; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Niyazi, Maximilian; Kreth, Friedrich Wilhelm

    2017-02-01

    In 2011, we reported a predominant prognostic/predictive role of MGMT promoter methylation status on progression-free survival (PFS) in unresectable glioblastoma patients undergoing upfront radiotherapy plus concomitant and maintenance temozolomide (RTX/TMZ → TMZ). We, here, present the final results of this prospective study focussing on the prognostic/predictive value of MGMT promoter methylation status for death risk stratification. Overall, 56 adult patients with unresectable, biopsy proven glioblastoma were prospectively assigned to upfront RTX/TMZ → TMZ treatment between March 2006 and August 2008. Last follow-up was performed in June 2016. MGMT promoter methylation was determined using methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and sodium bisulfite sequencing. Analyses were done by intention to treat. Prognostic factors were obtained from proportional hazard models. At the time of the final analysis 55 patients showed progressive disease and 53 patients had died. MGMT promoter was methylated (unmethylated) in 30 (26) patients. Methylation of the MGMT promoter was the strongest favorable predictor for overall survival (OS, median: 20.3 vs. 7.3 months, p < 0.001, HR 0.30, 95% CI 0.16-0.55), and PFS (median: 15.0 vs. 6.1 months, p < 0.001, HR 0.31, 95% CI 0.17-0.57) and was also associated with higher frequencies of treatment response and prolonged post-recurrence survival (PRS, median: 4.5 vs. 1.4 months, p < 0.002, HR 0.39, 95% CI 0.21-0.71). Knowledge of MGMT promoter methylation status is essential for patients' counseling, prognostic evaluation, and for the design of future trials dealing with unresectable glioblastomas.

  7. Dabrafenib in the treatment of metastatic or unresectable melanoma.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Leila; Hogg, David

    2015-03-01

    Dabrafenib is a potent inhibitor of mutant BRAF. Trials to date have shown it to be well tolerated, with significant activity in unresectable stage III or IV metastatic melanoma. Overall response rates of approximately 50% were seen in addition to improved progression-free and overall survival of 6 and 18 months, respectively. Preclinical studies suggested that combining BRAF and MEK inhibition would increase response rates and decrease toxicity. Clinical trials with the combination of dabrafenib and trametinib have improved progression-free and overall survival in interim analyses. Future improvements in responses and outcomes will depend on additional combination strategies, possibly employing immunotherapy.

  8. Serum levels of IL-6 and IL-1β can predict the efficacy of gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mitsunaga, S; Ikeda, M; Shimizu, S; Ohno, I; Furuse, J; Inagaki, M; Higashi, S; Kato, H; Terao, K; Ochiai, A

    2013-01-01

    Background: With this study, we sought to characterise the impact of pro-inflammatory cytokines on the outcomes of gemcitabine monotherapy (GEM) in patients with pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods: Treatment-naive patients with advanced PC and no obvious infections were eligible for enrolment. All of the patients were scheduled to undergo systemic chemotherapy. Serum pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured using an electro-chemiluminescence assay method before chemotherapy. High cytokine levels were defined as values greater than the median. Clinical data were collected prospectively. Results: Sixty patients who received GEM were included in the analysis. High IL-6 and IL-1β levels were poor prognostic factors for overall survival in a multivariate analysis (P=0.011 and P=0.048, respectively). Patients with both a high IL-6 level and a high IL-1β level exhibited shortened overall and progression-free survival, a reduction in the tumour control rate, and a high dose intensity of GEM compared with patients with low levels of both IL-6 and IL-1β. Conclusion: The serum levels of IL-6 and IL-1β predict the efficacy of GEM in patients with advanced PC. PMID:23591198

  9. CPI-613 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-14

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  10. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  11. Pancreatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sharf, B.; Bental, E.

    1971-01-01

    A 58 year old woman presenting with abdominal distress and a neuropsychiatric disturbance with evidence of focal neurological deficit is described. A diagnosis of pancreatic encephalopathy was made, and the patient was treated accordingly with pancreatic anti-enzymes. A survey of the literature is presented. Images PMID:5315218

  12. Results of intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy containing multimodality treatment for locally unresectable T4 rectal cancer: a pooled analysis of the Mayo Clinic Rochester and Catharina Hospital Eindhoven.

    PubMed

    Holman, Fabian A; Haddock, Michael G; Gunderson, Leonard L; Kusters, Miranda; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A P; van den Berg, Hetty A; Nelson, Heidi; Rutten, Harm J T

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the pooled results of intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (IOERT) containing multimodality treatment of locally advanced T4 rectal cancer, initially unresectable for cure, from the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA (MCR) and Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven, The Netherlands (CHE), both major referral centers for locally advanced rectal cancer. A rectal tumor is called locally unresectable for cure if after full clinical work-up infiltration into the surrounding structures or organs has been demonstrated, which would result in positive surgical margins if resection was the initial component of treatment. This was the reason to refer these patients to the IOERT program of one of the centers. In the period from 1981 to 2010, 417 patients with locally unresectable T4 rectal carcinomas at initial presentation were treated with multimodality treatment including IOERT at either one of the two centres. The preferred treatment approach was preoperative (chemo) radiation and intended radical surgery combined with IOERT. Risk factors for local recurrence (LR), cancer specific survival, disease free survival and distant metastases (DM) were assessed. A total of 306 patients (73%) underwent a R0 resection. LRs and metastases occurred more frequently after an R1-2 resection (P<0.001 and P<0.001 respectively). Preoperative chemoradiation (preop CRT) was associated with a higher probability of having a R0 resection. Waiting time after preoperative treatment was inversely related with the chance of developing a LR, especially after R+ resection. In 16% of all cases a LR developed. Five-year disease free survival and overall survival (OS) were 55% and 56% respectively. An acceptable survival can be achieved in treatment of patients with initially unresectable T4 rectal cancer with combined modality therapy that includes preop CRT and IOERT. Completeness of the resection is the most important predictive and prognostic factor in the treatment of T4