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Sample records for advanced unresectable pancreatic

  1. Phase I study of oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Taketo . E-mail: yama.take@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Ishihara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Shirai, Yoshihiko; Nakagawa, Akihiko; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Uno, Takashi; Ito, Hisao; Saisho, Hiromitsu

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 at escalating doses from 60 to 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Results: Sixteen patients were enrolled in this study. Three patients received S-1 at 60 mg/m{sup 2}/day, 3 at 70 mg/m{sup 2}/day, and 10 at 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Though 1 patient at the final dose level (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) experienced a dose limiting toxicity (biliary infection with Grade 3 neutropenia), the MTD was not reached in this study. The most common toxicities were anorexia and leukocytopenia, with Grade 3 toxicity occurring in 31% and 6.3% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The recommended dose of S-1 with concurrent radiotherapy was determined to be 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Oral S-1 and radiotherapy is well tolerated and feasible and should be further investigated.

  2. Phase II Study of Oral S-1 and Concurrent Radiotherapy in Patients With Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Ishihara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Hara, Taro; Denda, Tadamichi; Tawada, Katsunobu; Imagumbai, Toshiyuki; Araki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Mitsuhiro; Hatano, Kazuo; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Uno, Takashi; Ito, Hisao; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative that has demonstrated favorable antitumor activity in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate safety and efficacy of S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day from day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35. Two weeks after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, maintenance chemotherapy with S-1 was administered for 28 days every 6 weeks until progression. Results: Thirty-four patients were enrolled in this study. The most common Grade 3 toxicities during chemoradiotherapy were anorexia (24%) and nausea (12%). The overall response rate was 41% (95% confidence interval, 25%-58%) and overall disease control rate (partial response plus stable disease) was 97%. More than 50% decrease in serum CA 19-9 was seen in 27 of 29 evaluable patients (93%). The median progression-free survival was 8.7 months. The median overall survival and 1-year survival rate were 16.8 months and 70.6%, respectively. Conclusions: Oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy exerted a promising antitumor activity with acceptable toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. This combination therapy seems to be an attractive alternative to conventional chemoradiotherapy using 5-fluorouracil infusion.

  3. Prospective small bowel mucosal assessment immediately after chemoradiotherapy of unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer using capsule endoscopy: a case series.

    PubMed

    Yamashina, Takeshi; Takada, Ryoji; Uedo, Noriya; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Hanaoka, Noboru; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Ioka, Tatsuya; Ishihara, Ryu; Teshima, Teruki; Nishiyama, Kinji; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    In this case series, three consecutive patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (ULAPC) underwent capsule endoscopy (CE) before and after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) to evaluate duodenal and jejunal mucosa, and to examine the relationship between CE findings and dose distribution. CE after CRT showed duodenitis and proximal jejunitis in all three patients. The most inflamed region was the third part of the duodenum, and in dose distribution, this was the closest region to the center of irradiation. This case series shows that CE can safely diagnose acute duodenitis and proximal jejunitis caused by CRT for ULAPC, and that dose distribution is possible to predict the degree of duodenal and jejunal mucosal injuries. PMID:27366048

  4. Phase 1 Pharmacogenetic and Pharmacodynamic Study of Sorafenib With Concurrent Radiation Therapy and Gemcitabine in Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chiorean, E. Gabriela; Schneider, Bryan P.; Akisik, Fatih M.; Perkins, Susan M.; Anderson, Stephen; Johnson, Cynthia S.; DeWitt, John; Helft, Paul; Clark, Romnee; Johnston, Erica L.; Spittler, A. John; Deluca, Jill; Bu, Guixue; Shahda, Safi; Loehrer, Patrick J.; Sandrasegaran, Kumar; Cardenes, Higinia R.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To define the safety, efficacy, and pharmacogenetic and pharmacodynamic effects of sorafenib with gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine 1000 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously weekly × 3 every 4 weeks per cycle for 1 cycle before CRT and continued for up to 4 cycles after CRT. Weekly gemcitabine 600 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously was given during concurrent intensity modulated radiation therapy of 50 Gy to gross tumor volume in 25 fractions. Sorafenib was dosed orally 400 mg twice daily until progression, except during CRT when it was escalated from 200 mg to 400 mg daily, and 400 mg twice daily. The maximum tolerated dose cohort was expanded to 15 patients. Correlative studies included dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and angiogenesis genes polymorphisms (VEGF-A and VEGF-R2 single nucleotide polymorphisms). Results: Twenty-seven patients were enrolled. No dose-limiting toxicity occurred during induction gemcitabine/sorafenib followed by concurrent CRT. The most common grade 3/4 toxicities were fatigue, hematologic, and gastrointestinal. The maximum tolerated dose was sorafenib 400 mg twice daily. The median progression-free survival and overall survival for 25 evaluable patients were 10.6 and 12.6 months, respectively. The median overall survival for patients with VEGF-A -2578 AA, -1498 CC, and -1154 AA versus alternate genotypes was 21.6 versus 14.7 months. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI demonstrated higher baseline K{sup trans} in responding patients. Conclusions: Concurrent sorafenib with CRT had modest clinical activity with increased gastrointestinal toxicity in localized unresectable pancreatic cancer. Select VEGF-A/VEGF-R2 genotypes were associated with favorable survival.

  5. Phase 2 Multi-institutional Trial Evaluating Gemcitabine and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Joseph M; Chang, Daniel T; Goodman, Karyn A; Dholakia, Avani S; Raman, Siva P; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Griffith, Mary E; Pawlik, Timothy M; Pai, Jonathan S; O'Reilly, Eileen; Fisher, George A; Wild, Aaron T; Rosati, Lauren M; Zheng, Lei; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Laheru, Daniel A; Columbo, Laurie A; Sugar, Elizabeth A; Koong, Albert C

    2015-01-01

    Background This phase 2 multi-institutional study was designed to determine whether gemcitabine (GEM) with fractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) results in acceptable late grade 2 to 4 gastrointestinal toxicity when compared with a prior trial of GEM with single-fraction SBRT in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Methods A total of 49 patients with LAPC received up to 3 doses of GEM (1000 mg/m2) followed by a 1-week break and SBRT (33.0 gray [Gy] in 5 fractions). After SBRT, patients continued to receive GEM until disease progression or toxicity. Toxicity was assessed using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [version 4.0] and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Patients completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and pancreatic cancer-specific QLQ-PAN26 module before SBRT and at 4 weeks and 4 months after SBRT. Results The median follow-up was 13.9 months (range, 3.9-45.2 months). The median age of the patients was 67 years and 84% had tumors of the pancreatic head. Rates of acute and late (primary endpoint) grade ≥2 gastritis, fistula, enteritis, or ulcer toxicities were 2% and 11%, respectively. QLQ-C30 global quality of life scores remained stable from baseline to after SBRT (67 at baseline, median change of 0 at both follow-ups; P>.05 for both). Patients reported a significant improvement in pancreatic pain (P = .001) 4 weeks after SBRT on the QLQ-PAN26 questionnaire. The median plasma carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) level was reduced after SBRT (median time after SBRT, 4.2 weeks; 220 U/mL vs 62 U/mL [P<.001]). The median overall survival was 13.9 months (95% confidence interval, 10.2 months-16.7 months). Freedom from local disease progression at 1 year was 78%. Four patients (8%) underwent margin-negative and lymph node-negative surgical resections. Conclusions

  6. Phase 2 Trial of Induction Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Cetuximab Followed by Selective Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiation in Patients With Borderline Resectable or Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Esnaola, Nestor F.; Chaudhary, Uzair B.; O'Brien, Paul; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Camp, E. Ramsay; Thomas, Melanie B.; Cole, David J.; Montero, Alberto J.; Hoffman, Brenda J.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Orwat, Kelly P.; Marshall, David T.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 2 study, the safety and efficacy of induction gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab followed by selective capecitabine-based chemoradiation in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (BRPC or LAPC, respectively). Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy repeated every 14 days for 6 cycles, combined with weekly cetuximab. Patients were then restaged; “downstaged” patients with resectable disease underwent attempted resection. Remaining patients were treated with chemoradiation consisting of intensity modulated radiation therapy (54 Gy) and concurrent capecitabine; patients with borderline resectable disease or better at restaging underwent attempted resection. Results: A total of 39 patients were enrolled, of whom 37 were evaluable. Protocol treatment was generally well tolerated. Median follow-up for all patients was 11.9 months. Overall, 29.7% of patients underwent R0 surgical resection (69.2% of patients with BRPC; 8.3% of patients with LAPC). Overall 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 62%, and median PFS was 10.4 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. In patients with LAPC, median OS was 9.3 months; in patients with BRPC, median OS was 24.1 months. In the group of patients who underwent R0 resection (all of which were R0 resections), median survival had not yet been reached at the time of analysis. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated in patients with BRPC or LAPC, and almost one-third of patients underwent R0 resection. Although OS for the entire cohort was comparable to that in historical controls, PFS and OS in patients with BRPC and/or who underwent R0 resection was markedly improved.

  7. Palliative interventional and surgical therapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Assfalg, Volker; Hüser, Norbert; Michalski, Christoph; Gillen, Sonja; Kleeff, Jorg; Friess, Helmut

    2011-02-14

    Palliative treatment concepts are considered in patients with non-curatively resectable and/or metastasized pancreatic cancer. However, patients without metastases, but presented with marginally resectable or locally non-resectable tumors should not be treated by a palliative therapeutic approach. These patients should be enrolled in neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy trials because a potentially curative resection can be achieved in approximately one-third of them after finishing treatment and restaging. Within the scope of best possible palliative care, resection of the primary cancer together with excision of metastases represents a therapeutic option to be contemplated in selected cases. Comprehensive palliative therapy is based on treatment of bile duct or duodenal obstruction for certain locally unresectable or metastasized advanced pancreatic cancer. However, endoscopic or percutaneous stenting procedures and surgical bypass provide safe and highly effective therapeutic alternatives. In case of operative drainage of the biliary tract (biliodigestive anastomosis), the prophylactic creation of a gastro-intestinal bypass (double bypass) is recommended. The decision to perform a surgical versus an endoscopic procedure for palliation depends to a great extent on the tumor stage and the estimated prognosis, and should be determined by an interdisciplinary team for each patient individually.

  8. [Unresectable pancreatic cancer--palliative interventional and surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Hüser, N; Assfalg, V; Michalski, C W; Gillen, S; Kleeff, J; Friess, H

    2010-12-01

    In most cases pancreatic cancer appears in a non-curatively resectable stage at time the diagnosis is made. Thus, palliative treatment concepts come to the fore in these patients. Patients without metastases, but presenting with marginally resectable or locally non-resectable tumours should not be treated in a palliative therapeutic scheme. These patients should be enrolled in neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy trials. After finishing treatment and restaging, a potentially curative resection can be achieved in approximately one-third of these patients. Within the scope of the best possible palliative care, excision of metastases together with resection of the primary cancer represents a therapeutic option to be contemplated in selected cases. For distinct locally unresectable or metastasised advanced pancreatic cancer, treatment of bile duct or duodenal obstruction is an essential part of the comprehensive palliative therapy. However, both endoscopic / percutaneous stenting procedures and surgical bypass makeshifts constitute safe and highly effective therapeutic alternatives in this context. In the case of operative drainage of the biliary tract the prophylactic creation of a gastro-intestinal bypass (double bypass) is recommended. The decision on a surgical versus an endoscopic procedure for palliation depends considerably on the tumour stage and the estimated prognosis and has to be determined interdisciplinary and individually in each case.

  9. Duodenal Toxicity After Fractionated Chemoradiation for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick; Das, Prajnan; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Beddar, Sam; Briere, Tina; Pham, Mary; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Crane, Christopher H.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Improving local control is critical to improving survival and quality of life for patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC). However, previous attempts at radiation dose escalation have been limited by duodenal toxicity. In order to guide future studies, we analyzed the clinical and dosimetric factors associated with duodenal toxicity in patients undergoing fractionated chemoradiation for LAPC. Methods and Materials: Medical records and treatment plans of 106 patients with LAPC who were treated with chemoradiation between July 2005 and June 2010 at our institution were reviewed. All patients received neoadjuvant and concurrent chemotherapy. Seventy-eight patients were treated with conventional radiation to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions; 28 patients received dose-escalated radiation therapy (range, 57.5-75.4 Gy in 28-39 fractions). Treatment-related toxicity was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess prognostic influence of clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related factors by using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. Results: Twenty patients had treatment-related duodenal toxicity events, such as duodenal inflammation, ulceration, and bleeding. Four patients had grade 1 events, 8 had grade 2, 6 had grade 3, 1 had grade 4, and 1 had grade 5. On univariate analysis, a toxicity grade ≥2 was associated with tumor location, low platelet count, an absolute volume (cm{sup 3}) receiving a dose of at least 55 Gy (V{sub 55} {sub Gy} > 1 cm{sup 3}), and a maximum point dose >60 Gy. Of these factors, only V{sub 55} {sub Gy} ≥1 cm{sup 3} was associated with duodenal toxicity on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 6.7; range, 2.0-18.8; P=.002). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a duodenal V{sub 55} {sub Gy} >1 cm{sup 3} is an important dosimetric predictor of grade 2 or greater duodenal toxicity and establishes it as a

  10. Prognostic Significance of Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine: Analysis of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Dose Escalation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Schipper, Matthew; Zalupski, Mark M.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Abrams, Ross; Francis, Isaac R.; Khan, Gazala; Leslie, William; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Although established in the postresection setting, the prognostic value of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is less clear. We examined the prognostic utility of CA19-9 in patients with unresectable LAPC treated on a prospective trial of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with unresectable LAPC were treated at the University of Michigan on a phase 1/2 trial of IMRT dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. CA19-9 was obtained at baseline and during routine follow-up. Cox models were used to assess the effect of baseline factors on freedom from local progression (FFLP), distant progression (FFDP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Stepwise forward regression was used to build multivariate predictive models for each endpoint. Results: Thirty-eight patients were eligible for the present analysis. On univariate analysis, baseline CA19-9 and age predicted OS, CA19-9 at baseline and 3 months predicted PFS, gross tumor volume (GTV) and black race predicted FFLP, and CA19-9 at 3 months predicted FFDP. On stepwise multivariate regression modeling, baseline CA19-9, age, and female sex predicted OS; baseline CA19-9 and female sex predicted both PFS and FFDP; and GTV predicted FFLP. Patients with baseline CA19-9 ≤90 U/mL had improved OS (median 23.0 vs 11.1 months, HR 2.88, P<.01) and PFS (14.4 vs 7.0 months, HR 3.61, P=.001). CA19-9 progression over 90 U/mL was prognostic for both OS (HR 3.65, P=.001) and PFS (HR 3.04, P=.001), and it was a stronger predictor of death than either local progression (HR 1.46, P=.42) or distant progression (HR 3.31, P=.004). Conclusions: In patients with unresectable LAPC undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy, baseline CA19-9 was independently prognostic even after established prognostic factors were controlled for, whereas CA19-9 progression

  11. Advances in cryoablation for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao-Mei; Niu, Li-Zhi; Chen, Ji-Bing; Xu, Ke-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a common cancer of the digestive system with a poor prognosis. It is characterized by insidious onset, rapid progression, a high degree of malignancy and early metastasis. At present, radical surgery is considered the only curative option for treatment, however, the majority of patients with pancreatic cancer are diagnosed too late to undergo surgery. The sensitivity of pancreatic cancer to chemotherapy or radiotherapy is also poor. As a result, there is no standard treatment for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Cryoablation is generally considered to be an effective palliative treatment for pancreatic cancer. It has the advantages of minimal invasion and improved targeting, and is potentially safe with less pain to the patients. It is especially suitable in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. However, our initial findings suggest that cryotherapy combined with 125-iodine seed implantation, immunotherapy or various other treatments for advanced pancreatic cancer can improve survival in patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Although these findings require further in-depth study, the initial results are encouraging. This paper reviews the safety and efficacy of cryoablation, including combined approaches, in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26811625

  12. Outcomes with FOLFIRINOX for Borderline Resectable and Locally Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Brian A.; Steve, Jennifer; Krasinskas, Alyssa M.; Zureikat, Amer H.; Lembersky, Barry C.; Gibson, Michael K.; Stoller, Ronald; Zeh, Herbert J.; Bahary, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Background Trials examining FOLFIRINOX in metastatic pancreatic cancer demonstrate higher response rates compared to gemcitabine-based regimens. There is currently limited experience with neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX in pancreatic cancer. Methods Retrospective review of outcomes of patients with borderline resectable or locally unresectable pancreatic cancer who were recommended to undergo neoadjuvant treatment with FOLFIRINOX. Results FOLFIRINOX was recommended for 25 patients with pancreatic cancer, 13 (52%) unresectable and 12 (48%) borderline resectable. Four patients (16%) refused treatment or were lost to follow up. 21 patients (84%) were treated with a median of 4.7 cycles. 6 patients (29%) required dose reductions secondary to toxicity. 2 patients (9%) were unable to tolerate treatment and 3 patients (14%) had disease progression on treatment. 7 patients (33%) underwent surgical resection following treatment with FOLFIRINOX alone, 2 (10%) of which were initially unresectable. 2 patients underwent resection following FOLFIRINOX + stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The R0 resection rate for patients treated with FOLFIRINOX +/− SBRT was 33% (55% borderline resectable, 10% unresectable). A total of 5 patients (24%) demonstrated a significant pathologic response. Conclusions FOLFIRINOX is a biologically active regimen in borderline resectable and locally unresectable pancreatic cancer with encouraging R0 resection and pathologic response rates. PMID:23955427

  13. Intraoperative radiofrequency ablation combined with 125iodine seed implantation for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yi-Ping; Li, Wei-Min; Zheng, Fang; Li, Fu-Cheng; Huang, Hui; Du, Ji-Dong; Liu, Hao-Run

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility, efficacy and safety of intraoperative radiofrequency ablation (RFA) combined with 125iodine seed implantation for unresectable pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Thirty-two patients (21 males and 11 females) at the age of 68 years (range 48-90 years) with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer admitted to our hospital from January 2006 to May 2008 were enrolled in this study. The tumor, 4-12 cm in diameter, located in pancreatic head of 23 patients and in pancreatic body and tail of 9 patients, was found to be unresectable during operation. Diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was made through intraoperative biopsy. Patients were treated with FRA combined with 125iodine seed implantation. In brief, a RFA needle was placed, which was confirmed by intraoperative ultrasound to decrease the potential injury of surrounding vital structures, a 125iodine seed was implanted near the blood vessels and around the tumor border followed by bypass palliative procedure (cholangio-jejunostomy and/or gastrojejunostomy) in 29 patients. RESULTS: The serum CA 19-9 level was decreased from 512 ± 86 U/mL before operation to 176 ± 64 U/mL, 108 ± 42 U/mL and 114 ± 48 U/mL, respectively, 1, 3 and 6 mo after operation (P < 0.05). The pain score on day 7 after operation, 1 and 3 mo after combined therapy was decreased from 5.86 ± 1.92 before operation to 2.65 ± 1.04, 1.65 ± 0.88 and 2.03 ± 1.16, respectively, after operation (P < 0.05). The rate of complete response (CR), partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), progressive disease (PD) in 32 patients was 21.8% (7/32), 56.3% (18/32), 15.6% (5/32) and 6.3% (2/32), respectively, 6 mo after operation, with a median overall survival time of 17. 5 mo. The median survival time of patients at stage III was longer than that of those at stage IV (19 mo vs 10 mo, P = 0.0026). The median survival time of patients who received and did not receive chemotherapy after operation was 20 mo and 16 mo, respectively (P

  14. Phase I Trial of Consolidative Radiotherapy with Concurrent Bevacizumab, Erlotinib and Capecitabine for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gunther, Jillian R.; Munsell, Mark F.; Das, Prajnan; Minsky, Bruce D.; Delclos, Marc E.; Chatterjee, Deyali; Wang, Huamin; Clemons, Marilyn; George, Geena; Singh, Pankaj K.; Katz, Matthew H.; Fleming, Jason B.; Javle, Milind M.; Wolff, Robert A.; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Crane, Christopher H.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the safety, tolerability and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of addition of erlotinib to bevacizumab and capecitabine-based definitive chemoradiation (CRT) in unresectable pancreatic cancer. Methods Seventeen patients with CT-staged, biopsy-proven unresectable pancreatic cancer were enrolled between 3/2008 and 10/2010. Prior chemotherapy was permitted. Two patients each were enrolled at dose levels (DLs) 1–4 and 9 patients at DL 5. All patients received 50.4 Gy (GTV only) in 28 fractions with concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab and erlotinib. Dose of each drug was escalated in 5 DLs using the continual reassessment method. Bevacizumab was escalated from 5mg/Kg q2weeks (DLs 1–4) to 10mg/Kg q2weeks (DL 5); daily erlotinib from 100mg/day (DLs 1–2) to 150 mg/Kg (DLs 3–5); and capecitabine from 400mg/m2 twice daily on days of radiation (DL 1) to 650mg/m2 (DLs 2–3) to 825 mg/m2 (DLs 4–5). Reassessment for potential resection was performed 6–8 weeks later. Results Sixteen patients received gemcitabine-based chemotherapy prior to CRT. With a median clinical follow-up of 10 months, no grade 3 toxicities were observed in DLs 1–4. Three (33%) patients at DL 5 developed a grade 3 acute toxicity (2 diarrhea, 1 rash). No grade 4 or 5 toxicities were seen. DL 4 was selected as the MTD; therefore, the recommended doses in combination with radiation are: bevacizumab, 5mg/Kg q2weeks; erlotinib, 150 mg/Kg daily; and capecitabine, 825mg/m2 BID. Median survival was 17.4 months. Of the five patients who underwent resection, 4 were originally deemed locally advanced and 1 was borderline resectable. Three patients had excellent pathological response (2 complete response and 20% viable tumor) at surgery, and the 2 patients with complete response are still alive at 61 and 67 months of follow up with no local or distant failures. Conclusions This chemoradiation regimen at the recommended dose levels is safe and tolerable for patients with unresectable

  15. Use of irreversible electroporation in unresectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation is a non-thermal injury ablative modality that has been in clinical use since 2008 in the treatment of locally advanced soft tissue tumors. It has been reported to be utilized intraoperatively, laparoscopically or percutaneously. The method of action of IRE relies on a high voltage (maximum 3,000 volts) small microsecond pulse lengths (70 to 90 microseconds) to induce cell membrane porosity which leads to slow/protracted cell death over time. One of the largest unmet needs in oncology that IRE has been utilized is in locally advanced (stage III) pancreatic cancer. Recent studies have demonstrated the safety and palliation with encouraging improvement in overall survival. Its inherent limitation still remains tissue heterogeneity and the unique settings based on tumor histology and prior induction therapy. There remains a high technical demand of the end-user and the more extensive knowledge transfer which makes the learning curve longer in order to achieve appropriate and safe utilization. PMID:26151062

  16. Computed tomography-based diagnostics might be insufficient in the determination of pancreatic cancer unresectability

    PubMed Central

    Egorov, Vyacheslav I; Petrov, Roman V; Solodinina, Elena N; Karmazanovsky, Gregory G; Starostina, Natalia S; Kuruschkina, Natalia A

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To inquire into a question of an overestimation of arterial involvement in patients with pancreatic cancer (PC). METHODS: Radiology data were compared with the findings from 51 standard, 58 extended and 17 total pancreaticoduodenectomies; 9 distal resections with celiac artery (CA) excision; and 28 palliations for PC. The survival of 11 patients with controversial computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic ultrasound data with regard to arterial invasion, after R0/R1 procedures (false-positive CT results, Group A), was compared to survival after eight R2 resections (false-negative CT results, Group B) and after 12 bypass procedures for locally advanced cancer (true-positive CT results, Group C). RESULTS: In all of the cases in group A, operative exploration revealed no arterial invasion, which was predicted by CT. The one-year survival in Group A was 88.9%, and the two-year survival was 26.7%, with a median follow-up of 22 mo. One-year survival was not attained in groups B and C, with a significant difference in survival (Pa-b = 0.0029, Pb-c = 0.003). CONCLUSION: Arterial encasement on CT does not necessarily indicate arterial invasion. Whenever PC is considered unresectable, endoUS should be used. In patients with controversial CT an EUS data for peripancreatic arteries involvement radical resection might be possible, providing survival benefits as compared to R2- resections or palliative surgery. PMID:23717744

  17. Chemical splanchnicectomy in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. A prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed Central

    Lillemoe, K D; Cameron, J L; Kaufman, H S; Yeo, C J; Pitt, H A; Sauter, P K

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A prospective, randomized, double-blind study was completed comparing intraoperative chemical splanchnicectomy with 50% alcohol versus a placebo injection of saline in patients with histologically proven unresectable pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Standardized assessment of pain, mood, and disability due to pain was completed preoperatively and at 2-month intervals until death. Chemical splanchnicectomy with alcohol was performed in 65 patients, whereas 72 patients received the placebo. The two groups were similar with respect to age, sex, location, and stage of tumor, operation performed, the use of postoperative chemo- and radiation therapy, and initial assessment scores for pain, mood, and disability. RESULTS: No differences in hospital mortality or complications, return to oral intake, or length of hospital stay were observed. Mean pain scores were significantly lower in the alcohol group at 2-, 4-, and 6-month follow-up and at the final assessment (p < 0.05). To further determine the effect of chemical splanchnicectomy, patients were stratified into those with and without preoperative pain. In patients without preoperative pain, alcohol significantly reduced pain scores and delayed or prevented the subsequent onset of pain (p < 0.05). In patients with significant preoperative pain, alcohol significantly reduced existing pain (p < 0.05). Furthermore, patients with preexisting pain who received alcohol showed a significant improvement in survival when compared with controls (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: The results suggest that intraoperative chemical splanchnicectomy with alcohol significantly reduces or prevents pain in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. Images Figure 2. PMID:7683868

  18. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Unresectable Locally Advanced or Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Bile Duct or Gallbladder

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Gastrointestinal Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  19. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary, Pancreatic, Urothelial, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  20. Irreversible electroporation of locally advanced pancreatic neck/body adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Irreversible electroporation (IRE) of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the neck has been used to palliate appropriate stage 3 pancreatic cancers without evidence of metastasis and who have undergone appropriate induction therapy. Currently there has not been a standardized reported technique for pancreatic mid-body tumors for patient selection and intra-operative technique. Patients Subjects are patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body/neck who have undergone appropriate induction chemotherapy for a reasonable duration. Main outcome measures Technique of open IRE of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the neck/body is described, with the emphasis on intra-operative ultrasound and intra-operative electroporation management. Results The technique of open IRE of the pancreatic neck/body with bracketing of the celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery with continuous intraoperative ultrasound imaging and consideration of intraoperative navigational system is described. Conclusions IRE of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body/neck is feasible for appropriate patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:26029461

  1. Palliation of biliary and duodenal obstruction in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer: endoscopy or surgery?

    PubMed

    Maire, F; Sauvanet, A

    2013-06-01

    Patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma often develop biliary and/or duodenal obstruction during the course of their disease. Jaundice, pruritis, nausea and vomiting impact negatively on the quality of life and chemotherapy must often be withheld until these symptoms are resolved. In the past, an open surgical palliative bypass was proposed, but the development of endoprosthetic stents has changed the management of these patients. The success rate for placement of duodenal and biliary stents is greater than 90% with low morbidity. Classical surgical bypass surgery includes biliary-digestive and gastro-jejunal anastomoses. Many studies have compared endoscopic and surgical treatment, and there is a clear advantage to endoscopic treatment in terms of quality of life and cost.

  2. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Retrospective Analysis of 144 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Ito, Yoshinori; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Jingu, Keiichi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shinichi; Wada, Hitoshi; Kokubo, Masaki; Ogo, Etsuyo; Etoh, Hidehiro; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Takayama, Makoto; Nemoto, Kenji; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) + external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for unresectable pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 144 patients treated with IORT, with or without, EBRT were reviewed. One hundred and thirteen patients (78.5%) were treated with IORT + EBRT and 114 patients (79.2%) were treated in conjunction with chemotherapy. The median doses of IORT and EBRT were 25 Gy and 45 Gy, respectively. The median follow-up of all 144 patients was 9.6 months (range, 0.5-69.7 months). Results: At the time of this analysis, 131 of 144 patients (91.0%) had disease recurrences. Local progression was observed in 60 patients (41.7%), and the 2-year local control (LC) rate in all patients was 44.6%. Patients treated with IORT, with or without, EBRT had significantly more favorable LC (2-year LC, 50.9%) than those treated with IORT without EBRT (p = 0.0004). The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate and the median survival time in all 144 patients were 14.7% and 10.5 months, respectively. Patients treated with chemotherapy had a significantly favorable OS than those treated without chemotherapy (p < 0.0001). On univariate analysis, chemotherapy use alone had a significant impact on OS and on multivariate analysis; chemotherapy use was a significant prognostic factor. Late gastrointestinal morbidity of National Cancer Institute-Common Terminology Criteria Grade 3 was observed in 2 patients (1.4%). Conclusion: IORT + EBRT yields a relatively favorable LC rate for unresectable pancreatic cancer with low frequency of severe late toxicity, and IORT combined with chemotherapy conferred a survival benefit compared with IORT without chemotherapy.

  3. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:26520201

  4. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis.

  5. Palliative laparoscopic hepatico- and gastrojejunostomy for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gentileschi, Paolo; Kini, Subhash; Gagner, Michel

    2002-01-01

    Only 10% to 20% of pancreatic tumors are resectable at the time of diagnosis. Patients with advanced disease have a median survival of 4.9 months. Palliation is often required for biliary or duodenal obstruction, or both, and for pain. Optimal palliation should guarantee the shortest possible hospital stay and as long a survival as possible with a good quality of life. In recent years, treatment options for palliation of biliary and duodenal obstruction due to pancreatic cancer have broadened. Endoscopic and percutaneous biliary stenting have been shown to be successful tools for safe palliation of high-risk patients. Nevertheless, fit patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer benefit from surgery, which allows long-lasting biliary and gastric drainage. While laparoscopic cholecystojejunostomy and gastroenterostomy in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer have been widely reported, laparoscopic hepatico-jejunostomy has been rarely described. In this article, we describe our technique of laparoscopic hepatico-jejunostomy and gastrojejunostomy. We also discuss current evidence on the indications for these procedures in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

  6. Radiation Therapy With Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Klaudia U.; Feng, Felix Y.; Griffith, Kent A.; Francis, Isaac R.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Desai, Sameer; Murphy, James D.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: We completed a Phase I trial of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with previously untreated pancreatic cancer. The results of a subset of patients with unresectable disease who went on to receive planned additional therapy are reported here. Methods and Materials: All patients received two 28-day cycles of gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15) and oxaliplatin (40-85 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 15, per a dose-escalation schema). Radiation therapy was delivered concurrently with Cycle 1 (27 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions). At 9 weeks, patients were reassessed for resectability. Those deemed to have unresectable disease were offered a second round of treatment consisting of 2 cycles of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin and 27 Gy of radiation therapy (total, 54 Gy). Radiation was delivered to the gross tumor volume plus 1 cm by use of a three-dimensional conformal technique. We used the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events to assess acute toxicity. Late toxicity was scored per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Computed tomography scans were reviewed to determine pattern of failure, local response, and disease progression. Kaplan-Meier methodology and Cox regression models were used to evaluate survival and freedom from failure. Results: Thirty-two patients from the Phase I dose-escalation study had unresectable disease, three of whom had low-volume metastatic disease. Of this group, 16 patients went on to receive additional therapy to complete a total of 4 cycles of chemotherapy and 54 Gy of concurrent radiation. For this subset, 38% had at least a partial tumor response at a median of 3.2 months. Median survival was 11.8 months (range, 4.4-26.3 months). The 1-year freedom from local progression rate was 93.8% (95% confidence interval, 63.2-99.1). Conclusions: Radiation therapy to 54 Gy with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine and oxaliplatin is well tolerated and results in favorable rates of local tumor

  7. Concurrent Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Unresectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Impact of Adjuvant Chemotherapy on Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Ito, Yoshinori; Hirokawa, Naoki; Shibuya, Keiko; Kokubo, Masaki; Ogo, Etsuyo; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Saito, Tsutomu; Onishi, Hiroshi; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Nemoto, Kenji; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze results of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using gemcitabine (GEM) for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Records of 108 patients treated with concurrent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and GEM were reviewed. The median dose of EBRT in all 108 patients was 50.4 Gy (range, 3.6-60.8 Gy), usually administered in conventional fractionations (1.8-2 Gy/day). During radiotherapy, most patients received GEM at a dosage of 250 to 350 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously weekly for approximately 6 weeks. After CCRT, 59 patients (54.6%) were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy (AC), mainly with GEM. The median follow-up for all 108 patients was 11.0 months (range, 0.4-37.9 months). Results: Initial responses after CCRT for 85 patients were partial response: 26 patients, no change: 51 patients and progressive disease: 8 patients. Local progression was observed in 35 patients (32.4%), and the 2-year local control (LC) rate in all patients was 41.9%. Patients treated with total doses of 50 Gy or more had significantly more favorable LC rates (2-year LC rate, 42.9%) than patients treated with total doses of less than 50 Gy (2-year LC rate, 29.6%). Regional lymph node recurrence was found in only 1 patient, and none of the 57 patients with clinical N0 disease had regional lymph node recurrence. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate and the median survival time in all patients were 23.5% and 11.6 months, respectively. Patients treated with AC had significantly more favorable OS rates (2-year OS, 31.8%) than those treated without AC (2-year OS, 12.4%; p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, AC use and clinical T stage were significant prognostic factors for OS. Conclusions: CCRT using GEM yields a relatively favorable LC rate for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and CCRT with AC conferred a survival benefit compared to CCRT without AC.

  8. Capecitabine, Temozolomide and Bevacizumab for Metastatic or Unresectable Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-21

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  9. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the prediction of the fibrosis degree of the gland, the evaluation of patients with asymptomatic hyperenzimemia, the medical and surgical treatment of abdominal pain and the knowledge of the natural history of the autoimmune pancreatitis. In patients with indetermined EUS findings of chronic pancreatitis, a new endoscopic ultrasound examination in the follow-up is of help to confirm or to exclude the disease. Smoking, number of relapses, results of pancreatic function tests and EUS findings allow predicting the degree of pancreatic fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Antioxidant therapy has shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Development of intestinal bacterial overgrowth is frequent in patients with chronic pancreatitis, but its impact on symptoms is unknown and deserves further investigations. Finally, autoimmune pancreatitis relapses in about half of the patients with either type 1 or type 2 disease; relapses frequently occur within the first two years of follow-up.

  10. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of the disease, the pharmacological treatment of pain, and knowledge of the natural history of autoimmune pancreatitis. New evidence supports the relatively low prevalence of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, and the role of tobacco in triggering the etiopathogenic mechanisms of chronic pancreatitis is better understood. Some studies have identified certain factors that are associated with having a positive genetic test in adults with chronic idiopathic pancreatitis, which should help to select those patients who should undergo genetic studies. Antioxidant therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Finally, the development of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency is a very common finding during the long-term follow-up of patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. Smoking also seems to play a role in this type of pancreatitis.

  11. Direct therapeutic intervention for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Kazuki; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-12-10

    Currently, chemotherapy is an accredited, standard treatment for unresectable, advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). However, it has been still showed treatment-resistance and followed dismal prognosis in many cases. Therefore, some sort of new, additional treatments are needed for the better therapeutic results for advanced PC. According to the previous reports, it is obvious that interventional endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a well-established, helpful and low-risky procedure in general. As the additional treatments of the conventional therapy for advanced PC, many therapeutic strategies, such as immunotherapies, molecular biological therapies, physiochemical therapies, radioactive therapies, using siRNA, using autophagy have been developing in recent years. Moreover, the efficacy of the other potential therapeutic targets for PC using EUS-fine needle injection, for example, intra-tumoral chemotherapeutic agents (paclitaxel, irinotecan), several ablative energies (radiofrequency ablation and cryothermal treatment, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser, high-intensity focused ultrasound), etc., has already been showed in animal models. Delivering these promising treatments reliably inside tumor, interventional EUS may probably be indispensable existence for the treatment of locally advanced PC in near future. PMID:26677434

  12. Direct therapeutic intervention for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takakura, Kazuki; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Currently, chemotherapy is an accredited, standard treatment for unresectable, advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). However, it has been still showed treatment-resistance and followed dismal prognosis in many cases. Therefore, some sort of new, additional treatments are needed for the better therapeutic results for advanced PC. According to the previous reports, it is obvious that interventional endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a well-established, helpful and low-risky procedure in general. As the additional treatments of the conventional therapy for advanced PC, many therapeutic strategies, such as immunotherapies, molecular biological therapies, physiochemical therapies, radioactive therapies, using siRNA, using autophagy have been developing in recent years. Moreover, the efficacy of the other potential therapeutic targets for PC using EUS-fine needle injection, for example, intra-tumoral chemotherapeutic agents (paclitaxel, irinotecan), several ablative energies (radiofrequency ablation and cryothermal treatment, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser, high-intensity focused ultrasound), etc., has already been showed in animal models. Delivering these promising treatments reliably inside tumor, interventional EUS may probably be indispensable existence for the treatment of locally advanced PC in near future. PMID:26677434

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Jain, Sanjay; Goldstein, Michael; Miksad, Rebecca; Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Brennan, Darren M.D.; Callery, Mark; Vollmer, Charles

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis. Conventional concurrent chemoradiotherapy requires 6 weeks of daily treatment and can be arduous. We explored the safety and effectiveness of a 3-day course of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) followed by gemcitabine in this population. Patients and Methods: A total of 36 patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with {>=}12 months of follow-up were included. They received three fractions of 8, 10, or 12 Gy (total dose, 24-36 Gy) of SBRT according to the tumor location in relation to the stomach and duodenum, using fiducial-based respiratory motion tracking on a robotic radiosurgery system. The patients were then offered gemcitabine for 6 months or until tolerance or disease progression. Results: With an overall median follow-up of 24 months (range, 12-33), the local control rate was 78%, the median overall survival time was 14.3 months, the median carbohydrate antigen 19-9-determined progression-free survival time was 7.9 months, and the median computed tomography-determined progression-free survival time was 9.6 months. Of the 36 patients, 28 (78%) eventually developed distant metastases. Six patients (17%) were free of progression at the last follow-up visit (range, 13-30 months) as determined by normalized tumor markers with stable computed tomography findings. Nine Grade 2 (25%) and five Grade 3 (14%) toxicities attributable to SBRT occurred. Conclusion: Hypofractionated SBRT can be delivered quickly and effectively in patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with acceptable side effects and minimal interference with gemcitabine chemotherapy.

  14. Randomised trial of gemcitabine versus flec regimen given intra-arterially for patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Cantore, M; Fiorentini, G; Luppi, G; Rosati, G; Caudana, R; Piazza, E; Comella, G; Ceravolo, C; Miserocchi, L; Mambrini, A; Del Freo, A; Zamagni, D; Aitini, E; Marangolo, M

    2003-12-01

    Gemcitabine is considered the golden standard treatment for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Intra-arte-rial drug administration had shown a deep rationale with some interesting results. In a multicenter phase III trial, we compared gemcitabine given weekly with a combination of 5-fluoruracil, leucovorin, epirubicin, carboplatin (FLEC) administered intra-arteriously as first-line therapy in unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients were randomly assigned to receive gemcitabine at a dose of 1,000 mg/m2 over 30 minutes intravenously weekly for 7 weeks, followed by 1 week of rest, then weekly for 3 weeks every 4 weeks or 5-fluoruracil 1,000 mg/m2, leucovorin 100 mg/m2, epirubicin 60 mg/m2, carboplatin 300 mg/m2 infused bolus intra-arteriously at three-weekly interval for 3 times. The primary end point was overall survival, while time to treatment failure, response rate, clinical benefit response were secondary endpoints. Sixty-seven patients were randomly allocated gemcitabine and 71 were allocated FLEC intra-arterially. Patients treated with FLEC lived for significantly longer than patients on gemcitabine (p=.036). Survival at 1 year was increased from 21% in the gemcitabine group to 35% in the FLEC group. Median survival was 7.9 months in the FLEC group and 5.8 months in the gemcitabine group. Median time to treatment failure was longer with FLEC (5.3 vs 4.2 months for FLEC vs gemcitabine respectively; p=.013). Clinical benefit was similar in both groups (17.9% for gemcitabine and 26.7% for FLEC; p=NS). CT-scan partial response was similar in both group (5.9% for gemcitabine and 14% for FLEC; p=NS). Toxicity profiles were different. Compared with gemcitabine, FLEC regimen given intra-arteriously, improved survival in patient with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:16767907

  15. Randomised trial of gemcitabine versus flec regimen given intra-arterially for patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Cantore, M; Fiorentini, G; Luppi, G; Rosati, G; Caudana, R; Piazza, E; Comella, G; Ceravolo, C; Miserocchi, L; Mambrini, A; Del Freo, A; Zamagni, D; Aitini, E; Marangolo, M

    2003-12-01

    Gemcitabine is considered the golden standard treatment for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Intra-arte-rial drug administration had shown a deep rationale with some interesting results. In a multicenter phase III trial, we compared gemcitabine given weekly with a combination of 5-fluoruracil, leucovorin, epirubicin, carboplatin (FLEC) administered intra-arteriously as first-line therapy in unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients were randomly assigned to receive gemcitabine at a dose of 1,000 mg/m2 over 30 minutes intravenously weekly for 7 weeks, followed by 1 week of rest, then weekly for 3 weeks every 4 weeks or 5-fluoruracil 1,000 mg/m2, leucovorin 100 mg/m2, epirubicin 60 mg/m2, carboplatin 300 mg/m2 infused bolus intra-arteriously at three-weekly interval for 3 times. The primary end point was overall survival, while time to treatment failure, response rate, clinical benefit response were secondary endpoints. Sixty-seven patients were randomly allocated gemcitabine and 71 were allocated FLEC intra-arterially. Patients treated with FLEC lived for significantly longer than patients on gemcitabine (p=.036). Survival at 1 year was increased from 21% in the gemcitabine group to 35% in the FLEC group. Median survival was 7.9 months in the FLEC group and 5.8 months in the gemcitabine group. Median time to treatment failure was longer with FLEC (5.3 vs 4.2 months for FLEC vs gemcitabine respectively; p=.013). Clinical benefit was similar in both groups (17.9% for gemcitabine and 26.7% for FLEC; p=NS). CT-scan partial response was similar in both group (5.9% for gemcitabine and 14% for FLEC; p=NS). Toxicity profiles were different. Compared with gemcitabine, FLEC regimen given intra-arteriously, improved survival in patient with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  16. Adoptive immunotherapy with MUC1-mRNA transfected dendritic cells and cytotoxic lymphocytes plus gemcitabine for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously reported the clinical efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) with dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with mucin 1 (MUC1) peptide and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). We also reported that gemcitabine (GEM) enhances anti-tumor immunity by suppressing regulatory T cells. Therefore, in the present study, we performed combination therapy with AIT and GEM for patients with unresectable or recurrent pancreatic cancer. Patients and methods Forty-two patients with unresectable or recurrent pancreatic cancer were treated. DCs were generated by culture with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4 and then exposed to tumor necrosis factor-α. Mature DCs were transfected with MUC1-mRNA by electroporation (MUC1-DCs). MUC1-CTLs were induced by co-culture with YPK-1, a human pancreatic cancer cell line, and then with interleukin-2. Patients were treated with GEM, while MUC1-DCs were intradermally injected, and MUC1-CTLs were intravenously administered. Results Median survival time (MST) was 13.9 months, and the 1-year survival rate was 51.1%. Of 42 patients, one patient had complete response (2.4%), three patients had partial response (7.1%) and 22 patients had stable disease (52.4%). The disease control ratio was 61.9%. The MST and 1-year survival rate of 35 patients who received more than 1 × 107 MUC1-DCs per injection was 16.1 months and 60.3%, respectively. Liver metastasis occurred in only 5 patients among 35 patients without liver metastasis before treatment. There were no severe toxicities associated with AIT. Conclusion AIT with MUC1-DCs and MUC1-CTLs plus GEM may be a feasible and effective treatment for pancreatic cancer. PMID:24947606

  17. Photodynamic therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandanayake, N. S.; Huggett, M. T.; Bown, S. G.; Pogue, B. W.; Hasan, T.; Pereira, S. P.

    2010-02-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma ranks as the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the USA. Patients usually present late with advanced disease, limiting attempted curative surgery to 10% of cases. Overall prognosis is poor with one-year survival rates of less than 10% with palliative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Given these dismal results, a minimally invasive treatment capable of local destruction of tumor tissue with low morbidity may have a place in the treatment of this disease. In this paper we review the preclinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) studies which have shown that it is possible to achieve a zone of necrosis in normal pancreas and implanted tumour tissue. Side effects of treatment and evidence of a potential survival advantage are discussed. We describe the only published clinical study of pancreatic interstitial PDT, which was carried out by our group (Bown et al Gut 2002), in 16 patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. All patients had evidence of tumor necrosis on follow-up imaging, with a median survival from diagnosis of 12.5 months. Finally, we outline a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin single fibre PDT followed by standard gemcitabine chemotherapy which our group is currently undertaking in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Randomized controlled studies are also planned.

  18. Preoperative treatment with radiochemotherapy for locally advanced gastroesophageal junction cancer and unresectable locally advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ratosa, Ivica; Oblak, Irena; Anderluh, Franc; Velenik, Vaneja; But-Hadzic, Jasna; Ermenc, Ajra Secerov; Jeromen, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background. To purpose of the study was to analyze the results of preoperative radiochemotherapy in patients with unresectable gastric or locoregionally advanced gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer treated at a single institution. Patients and methods. Between 1/2004 and 6/2012, 90 patients with locoregionally advanced GEJ or unresectable gastric cancer were treated with preoperative radiochemotherapy at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana. Planned treatment schedule consisted of induction chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin, followed by concomitant radiochemotherapy four weeks later. Three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy was delivered by dual energy (6 and 15 MV) linear accelerator in 25 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy in 5 weeks with two additional cycles of chemotherapy repeated every 28 days. Surgery was performed 4–6 weeks after completing radiochemotherapy. Following the surgery, multidisciplinary advisory team reassessed patients for the need of adjuvant chemotherapy. The primary endpoints were histopathological R0 resection rate and pathological response rate. The secondary endpoints were toxicity of preoperative radiochemotherapy and survival. Results. Treatment with preoperative radiochemotherapy was completed according to the protocol in 84 of 90 patients (93.3%). Twenty patients (22.2%) did not undergo the surgery because of the disease progression, serious comorbidity, poor performance status or still unresectable tumour. In 13 patients (14.4%) only exploration was performed because the tumour was assessed as unresectable or diffuse peritoneal carcinomatosis was established. Fifty-seven patients (63.4%) underwent surgery with the aim of complete removal of the tumour. Radical resection was achieved in 50 (55.6%) patients and the remaining seven (7.8%) patients underwent non-radical surgery (R1 in five and R2 in two patients). In this group of patients (n = 57), pathological complete response of tumour was achieved in five

  19. Arterial complication of irreversible electroporation procedure for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Yahya; Tezcaner, Tugan; Aydın, Hüseyin Onur; Boyvat, Fatih; Moray, Gökhan

    2016-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a non-thermal ablation technique used especially in locally advanced pancreatic carcinomas that are considered surgically unresectable. We present the first case of acute superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion secondary to pancreatic IRE procedure that has not been reported before in the literature. A 66-year-old man underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. IRE procedure was applied to the patient during laparotomy under general anesthesia. After finishing the procedure, an acute intestinal ischemia was detected. A conventional vascular angiography was performed and a metallic stent was successfully placed to the SMA and blood flow was maintained. It is important to be careful in such cases of tumor involvement of SMA when evaluating for IRE procedure of pancreatic tumor. PMID:27795815

  20. Pembrolizumab for Treatment of Patients with Advanced or Unresectable Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Ryan J; Flaherty, Keith T

    2015-07-01

    From Coley's toxin to combination immune checkpoint inhibition, strategies to activate the immune system and generate anticancer immunity have been ongoing for well over a century. Over the past decade, the so-called immune checkpoint inhibitors, generally monoclonal antibodies that target key regulators of T-cell activation, emerged as the most effective immune-targeted agents. Pembrolizumab is the first anti-programmed death 1 (PD-1) antibody approved by the FDA for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. With responses seen in 25% to 40% of patients, depending on dose and setting (i.e., before or after ipilimumab), pembrolizumab specifically and anti-PD-1 antibodies generally are revolutionizing the treatment of melanoma. However, in the setting of other recent advances in the field, a number of practical issues are emerging that need to be addressed to optimize the care of patients with melanoma. First, the optimal sequencing of therapy (first-line immunotherapy over molecular targeted therapy, ipilimumab versus pembrolizumab as initial immune checkpoint inhibitor) is unknown and must be evaluated through randomized trials. Second, there is a strong rationale to combine immune checkpoint inhibitors (i.e., anti-PD-1 with ipilimumab) and to combine immune therapies with targeted therapy agents, so determining whether combination therapy is better than direct sequencing is another critical issue that needs to be addressed in carefully carried out studies.

  1. Phase I Study of Conformal Radiotherapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine With Erlotinib for Unresected Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, John M.; Margolis, Jeffrey; Jury, Robert P.; Balaraman, Savitha; Cotant, Matthew B.; Ballouz, Samer; Boxwala, Iqbal G.; Jaiyesimi, Ishmael A.; Nadeau, Laura; Hardy-Carlson, Maria; Marvin, Kimberly S.; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the recommended dose of radiotherapy when combined with full-dose gemcitabine and erlotinib for unresected pancreas cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresected pancreatic cancer (Zubrod performance status 0-2) were eligible for the present study. Gemcitabine was given weekly for 7 weeks (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) with erlotinib daily for 8 weeks (100 mg). A final toxicity assessment was performed in Week 9. Radiotherapy (starting at 30 Gy in 2-Gy fractions, 5 d/wk) was given to the gross tumor plus a 1-cm margin starting with the first dose of gemcitabine. A standard 3 plus 3 dose escalation (an additional 4 Gy within 2 days for each dose level) was used, except for the starting dose level, which was scheduled to contain 6 patients. In general, Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal toxicity was considered a dose-limiting toxicity, except for Grade 3 anorexia or Grade 3 fatigue alone. Results: A total of 20 patients were treated (10 men and 10 women). Nausea, vomiting, and infection were significantly associated with the radiation dose (p = .01, p = .03, and p = .03, respectively). Of the 20 patients, 5 did not complete treatment and were not evaluable for dose-escalation purposes (3 who developed progressive disease during treatment and 2 who electively discontinued it). Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in none of 6 patients at 30 Gy, 2 of 6 at 34 Gy, and 1 of 3 patients at 38 Gy. Conclusion: The results of the present study have indicated that the recommended Phase II dose is 30 Gy in 15 fractions.

  2. Identifying the optimal criteria of radiotherapeutic parameters for patients with unresectable locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Son, Seok Hyun; Jang, Hong Seok; Sung, Soo Yoon; Kang, Hye Jin; Lee, Sojung; Kay, Chul Seung

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the optimal criteria of the radiotherapeutic parameters in patients with unresectable locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). 103 patients were enrolled in this study. All patients received RT delivered using the TomoTherapy Hi-Art system between March 2006 and February 2012. We evaluated the planning target volume (PTV), total dose (Gy10), and NTNL-V(BED20) (non-target normal liver volume receiving more than a biologically effective dose of 20 Gy8) as significant radiotherapeutic parameters associated with hepatic function deterioration and local progression-free survival (PFS). A PTV of 279 cm3 or 304 cm3, a total dose of 60 Gy10, and a NTNL-V(BED20) of 40.8% were identified as the optimal cut-off values of radiotherapeutic parameters to prevent hepatic function deterioration and prolong local PFS. Based on these findings, patients were divided in a favorable and an unfavorable prognosis group. The differences in median local PFS, overall survival, and incidence of deteriorated hepatic function between the two groups were 11.2 months, 11.1 months, and 71.7%, respectively (p < 0.001 in each case). In conclusion, we suggest that the optimal criteria of the radiotherapeutic parameters for patients with unresectable locally advanced HCC are: PTV ≤ 279 cm3, total dose > 60 Gy10, and NTNL-V(BED20) ≤ 40.8%. PMID:26510905

  3. Lymphocyte-Sparing Effect of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Aaron T.; Herman, Joseph M.; Dholakia, Avani S.; Moningi, Shalini; Lu, Yao; Rosati, Lauren M.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Assadi, Ryan K.; Saeed, Ali M.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Weiss, Matthew J.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Ford, Eric; Grossman, Stuart A.; Ye, Xiaobu; Ellsworth, Susannah G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced lymphopenia (RIL) is associated with inferior survival in patients with glioblastoma, lung cancer, and pancreatic cancer. We asked whether stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) decreases severity of RIL compared to conventional chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Methods and Materials Serial total lymphocyte counts (TLCs) from patients enrolled in a prospective trial of SBRT for LAPC were compared to TLCs from an existing database of LAPC patients undergoing definitive CRT. SBRT patients received 33 Gy (6.6 × Gy 5 fractions). CRT patients received a median dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy × 28 fractions) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil (77%) or gemcitabine (23%) therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses (MVA) were used to identify associations between clinical factors and post-treatment TLC and between TLC and survival. Results Thirty-two patients received SBRT and 101 received CRT. Median planning target volume (PTV) was smaller in SBRT (88.7 cm3) than in CRT (344.6 cm3; P<.001); median tumor diameter was larger for SBRT (4.6 cm) than for CRT (3.6 cm; P=.01). SBRT and CRT groups had similar median baseline TLCs. One month after starting radiation, 71.7% of CRT patients had severe lymphopenia (ie, TLC <500 cells/mm3 vs 13.8% of SBRT patients; P<.001). At 2 months, 46.0% of CRT patients remained severely lymphopenic compared with 13.6% of SBRT patients (P=.007). MVA demonstrated that treatment technique and baseline TLCs were significantly associated with post-treatment TLC at 1 but not 2 months after treatment. Higher post-treatment TLC was associated with improved survival regardless of treatment technique (hazard ratio [HR] for death: 2.059; 95% confidence interval: 1.310–3.237; P=.002). Conclusions SBRT is associated with significantly less severe RIL than CRT at 1 month in LAPC, suggesting that radiation technique affects RIL and supporting previous modeling studies. Given the association of

  4. Estimating Optimal Dose of Twice-Weekly Gemcitabine for Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma: Mature Results of GEMRT-01 Phase I Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Girard, Nicolas; Mornex, Francoise; Bossard, Nadine; Ychou, Marc; Chauffert, Bruno; Wautot, Virginie

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To accurately determine the maximal tolerated dose, feasibility, and antitumor activity of concurrent chemoradiotherapy including twice-weekly gemcitabine in patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with histologically proven adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were included in this Phase I trial. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 50 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy with twice-weekly gemcitabine was administered during the 5 weeks of radiotherapy, from an initial dose of 30 mg/m{sup 2}. The gemcitabine doses were escalated in 10-mg/m{sup 2} increments in a three-plus-three design, until dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Results: A total of 35 patients were included in the trial. The feasibility of chemoradiotherapy was high, because all the patients received the planned total radiation dose, and 26 patients (74%) received {>=}70% of the planned chemotherapy dose. The mean total delivered dose of gemcitabine was 417 mg/m{sup 2} (i.e., 77% of the prescribed dose). The maximal tolerated dose of twice-weekly gemcitabine was 70 mg/m{sup 2}. Of the 35 patients, 13 had a partial response (37%) and 21 had stable disease (60%). Overall, the median survival and the 6-, 12-, and 18-month survival rates were 10.6 months and 82%, 31%, and 11%, respectively. Survival was significantly longer in patients with an initial performance status of 0 or 1 (p = .004). Conclusion: Our mature data have indicated that gemcitabine doses can be increased {<=}70 mg/m{sup 2}, when delivered twice-weekly with concurrent radiotherapy. This combination shows promises to achieve better recurrence-free and overall survival. These results will serve as a basis for further implementation of the multimodal treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

  5. Evaluation of S100A4 mRNA in EUS-FNA specimens for the assessment of chemosensitivity to gemcitabine from patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Guifeng; Sun, Yan; Fu, Shiwen

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Gemcitabine (GEM) is the first-line chemotherapy in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. However, the clinical outcomes of this regimen are still unsatisfactory in prolonging survival. Resistant to GEM is one of the reasons for poor prognosis. Therefore, looking for molecular biomarkers to predict chemosensitivity to GEM is important for treatment in unresectable pancreatic cancer patients. The aim of this study was to analyze S100A4 mRNA in tissues of unresectable pancreatic cancer obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA), and to determine the relation between S100A4 mRNA level and chemosensitivity to GEM. Methods: The analysis was performed on samples from 36 patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer who were treated with gemcitabine alone. The patients were assigned to receive GEM at 1,000 mg/m2/wk for weeks 1 to 6, followed by 1 week rest, then for 4 weeks. mRNA was extracted for S100A4 mRNA assay from patients above by EUS-FNA before GEM-treatment. The 36 patients were divided into the following two groups. Patients with partial response and those with stable disease whose tumor markers decreased by 50% or more were classified as the effective group. The rest of patients were classified as the non effective group. The relationship between GEM efficacy and S100A4 mRNA expression was then examined by chi-squared test. Results: S100A4 mRNA showed a significant correlation with GEM efficacy. Patients in the effective group had low S100A4 mRNA expression, whereas patients in non-effective group had high S100A4 mRNA expressions (P = 0.0059). Conclusion: S100A4 mRNA level analyzed in EUS-FNA samples is an important molecular biomarker for prediction of chemosensitivity to GEM in unresectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:26722531

  6. Pancreatic endocrine tumors: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Jensen, R T

    1999-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET's) can be divided on a clinical and pathologic basis into ten classes [insulinomas, gastrinomas (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome), VIPomas (Verner-Morrison syndrome, WDHA, pancreatic cholera), glucagonomas, somatostatinomas, ACTH-releasing tumors (ACTHomas), growth hormone-releasing factor secreting tumors (GRFomas), nonfunctioning or pancreatic polypeptide secreting tumors (non-functioning PET), PET's causing carcinoid syndrome and PET's causing hypercalcemia)]. Recent reports suggest calcitonin-secreting PET's also rarely occur but whether they cause a distinct clinical syndrome is unclear. PET's resemble carcinoid tumors histologically; in their ability to synthesize and frequently secrete multiple peptides such as neuroendocrine cell markers (chromogranins); their biologic behavior and their tumor growth patterns. Both groups of tumors are highly vascular, have high densities of somatostatin receptors and similar tumor localization studies including somatostatin receptor scintigraphy are used for both. PET's, similar to carcinoids causing the carcinoid syndrome, require two separate treatment options be considered: treatment directed against the hormone-excess state and treatment directed against the tumor per se because of their malignant nature. In the last few years there have been advances in tumor diagnosis, localization methods, treatment approaches particularly related to the use of synthetic somatostatin analogues, and the definition of the role of surgical procedures in these diseases. Important other advances include insights into the long-term natural history of PET's particularly from studies of gastrinomas, which allow prognostic factors to be identified and the timing of treatment options to better planned, as well as insights into the molecular basis of these disorders. The latter includes both a description of the molecular basis of the genetic inherited syndromes associated with PET's or carcinoid tumors, as well as

  7. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Crane, Christopher H

    2016-08-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3-5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15-28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection.

  8. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3–5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15–28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection. PMID:27029741

  9. Treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer with opioid growth factor: phase I.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jill P; Conter, Robert L; Bingaman, Sandra I; Harvey, Harold A; Mauger, David T; Ahmad, Mejdi; Demers, Lawrence M; Stanley, Wayne B; McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S

    2004-03-01

    Opioid growth factor (OGF) is an endogenous pentapeptide that inhibits growth of human pancreatic cancer cells in culture, as well as xenografts in nude mice. To establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), and determine safety and toxicity of OGF, a phase I trial was performed in patients with advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with escalating doses of OGF for 30 min i.v. to determine the MTD. The s.c. route of administration also was evaluated. Once the MTD was established, a group of patients was treated chronically, and monitored for safety and toxicity. Hypotension was the dose-limiting toxicity, resulting in a MTD of 250 microg/kg i.v. Due to limited solubility of OGF in small volumes, a maximum dose of 50 microg/kg twice daily was determined by the s.c. route of administration. No adverse events were reported for oxygen saturation, cardiac rhythm, laboratory values or neurological status in either the acute or chronic parts of the study with the i.v. or s.c. routes. During the chronic i.v. phase, two subjects had resolution of liver metastases and one showed regression of the pancreatic tumor. Mean survival from the time of diagnosis was 8.7 months (range 2-23 months) in the i.v. group and 9.5 months (range 1-18 months) in the s.c. group. We conclude that OGF can be safely administered to patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Further studies are needed to determine the efficacy of OGF alone or in combination with present modes of therapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Pretreatment Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 Level Indicates Tumor Response, Early Distant Metastasis, Overall Survival, and Therapeutic Selection in Localized and Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Tae; Lee, Woo Jin; Woo, Sang Myung; Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae; Moon, Sung Ho; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Sang Soo; Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Joong-Won

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The use of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer has been disputed because of high probability of distant metastasis. Thus, we analyzed the effect of clinical parameters on tumor response, early distant metastasis within 3 months (DM{sup 3m}), and overall survival to identify an indicator for selecting patients who would benefit from CRT. Methods and Materials: This study retrospectively analyzed the data from 84 patients with localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer who underwent CRT between August 2002 and October 2009. Sex, age, tumor size, histological differentiation, N classification, pre- and post-treatment carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 level, and CA 19-9 percent decrease were analyzed to identify risk factors associated with tumor response, DM{sup 3m}, and overall survival. Results: For all 84 patients, the median survival time was 12.5 months (range, 2-31.9 months), objective response (complete response or partial response) to CRT was observed in 28 patients (33.3%), and DM{sup 3m} occurred in 24 patients (28.6%). Multivariate analysis showed that pretreatment CA 19-9 level ({<=}400 vs. >400 U/ml) was significantly associated with tumor response (45.1% vs. 15.2%), DM{sup 3m} (19.6% vs. 42.4%), and median overall survival time (15.1 vs. 9.7 months) (p < 0.05 for all three parameters). Conclusion: For patients with localized and unresectable pancreatic cancer, pretreatment CA 19-9 level could be helpful in predicting tumor response, DM{sup 3m}, and overall survival and identifying patients who will benefit from CRT.

  11. Novel agents for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akinleye, Akintunde; Iragavarapu, Chaitanya; Furqan, Muhammad; Cang, Shundong; Liu, Delong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is relatively insensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Therefore, novel agents targeting dysregulated pathways (MAPK/ERK, EGFR, TGF-β, HEDGEHOG, NOTCH, IGF, PARP, PI3K/AKT, RAS, and Src) are being explored in clinical trials as monotherapy or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. This review summarizes the most recent advances with the targeted therapies in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26369833

  12. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition.

  13. Advances in Management of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Janisch, Nigeen H; Gardner, Timothy B

    2016-03-01

    This article reviews advances in the management of acute pancreatitis. Medical treatment has been primarily supportive for this diagnosis, and despite extensive research efforts, there are no pharmacologic therapies that improve prognosis. The current mainstay of management, notwithstanding the ongoing debate regarding the volume, fluid type, and rate of administration, is aggressive intravenous fluid resuscitation. Although antibiotics were used consistently for prophylaxis in severe acute pancreatitis to prevent infection, they are no longer used unless infection is documented. Enteral nutrition, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis, is considered a cornerstone in management of this disease.

  14. Dose escalation for unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: end of the line?

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Julian C.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0617 was a randomized trial that investigated both the impact of radiation dose-escalation and the addition of cetuximab on the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The results of RTOG 0617 were surprising, with the dose escalation randomization being closed prematurely due to futility stopping rules, and cetuximab ultimately showing no overall survival benefit. Locally advanced unresectable NSCLC has conventionally been treated with concurrent chemoradiation. Though advances in treatment technology have improved the ability to deliver adequate treatment dose, the foundation for radiotherapy (RT) has remained the same since the 1980s. Since then, progressive studies have sought to establish the safety and efficacy of escalating radiation dose to loco-regional disease. Though RTOG 0617 did not produce the anticipated result, much interest remains in dose escalation and establishing an explanation for the findings of this study. Cetuximab was also not found to provide a survival benefit when applied to an unselected population. However, planned retrospective analysis suggests that those patients with high epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression may benefit, suggesting that cetuximab should be applied in a targeted fashion. We discuss the results of RTOG 0617 and additional findings from post-hoc analysis that suggest that dose escalation may be limited by normal tissue toxicity. We also present ongoing studies that aim to address potential causes for mortality in the dose escalation arm through adaptive or proton therapy, and are also leveraging additional concurrent systemic agents such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for EGFR-activating mutations or EML4-ALK rearrangements, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. PMID:26958507

  15. Dose escalation for unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: end of the line?

    PubMed

    Hong, Julian C; Salama, Joseph K

    2016-02-01

    Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0617 was a randomized trial that investigated both the impact of radiation dose-escalation and the addition of cetuximab on the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The results of RTOG 0617 were surprising, with the dose escalation randomization being closed prematurely due to futility stopping rules, and cetuximab ultimately showing no overall survival benefit. Locally advanced unresectable NSCLC has conventionally been treated with concurrent chemoradiation. Though advances in treatment technology have improved the ability to deliver adequate treatment dose, the foundation for radiotherapy (RT) has remained the same since the 1980s. Since then, progressive studies have sought to establish the safety and efficacy of escalating radiation dose to loco-regional disease. Though RTOG 0617 did not produce the anticipated result, much interest remains in dose escalation and establishing an explanation for the findings of this study. Cetuximab was also not found to provide a survival benefit when applied to an unselected population. However, planned retrospective analysis suggests that those patients with high epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression may benefit, suggesting that cetuximab should be applied in a targeted fashion. We discuss the results of RTOG 0617 and additional findings from post-hoc analysis that suggest that dose escalation may be limited by normal tissue toxicity. We also present ongoing studies that aim to address potential causes for mortality in the dose escalation arm through adaptive or proton therapy, and are also leveraging additional concurrent systemic agents such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for EGFR-activating mutations or EML4-ALK rearrangements, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors.

  16. Lethal post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis following fully covered metal stent placement in distal biliary obstruction due to unresectable cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Itoi, Takao; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Tanaka, Reina; Ikeuchi, Nobuhito; Sofuni, Atsushi

    2013-05-01

    Biliary self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) is the preferred and first-line therapy for unresectable malignant biliary obstruction. To date, several reports have revealed the relatively high incidence of acute complications such as pancreatitis and cholecystitis due to mechanical stent compression. In the present case, we encountered fatal pancreatitis following fully covered metal stent placement. An 85-year-old man had middle bile duct strictures due to cholangiocarcinoma. A 10-mm diameter fully covered SEMS was placed across the papilla for biliary decompression. Laboratory data and physical evidence the following day revealed acute pancreatitis. Therefore, antibiotics and protein degeneration enzyme inhibitors were given. However, his condition did not improve. Two days after the procedure, we removed the stent and returned him to his original hospital. Serum amylase level decreased below 400 mg/dL 6 h after the procedure. However, the acute pancreatitis worsened. Although we treated the patient in the intensive care unit, he died 32 days after the second admission.

  17. Emerging therapies and latest development in the treatment of unresectable pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: an update for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Jaya; Duque, Marvin

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) differ in their clinical behavior, presentation and prognosis based on their initial histological features and disease stage. While small resectable tumors can be treated surgically, metastatic and locally advanced disease carries a significant mortality and treatment options have been limited in terms of their efficacy. Streptozocin-based regimens were the only agents available before but recent advances have improved the armamentarium to treat pNETs. Newer chemotherapeutic agents such as temozolomide, somatostatin analogs and targeted therapies including everolimus and sunitinib are now available to treat these tumors. Several combination regimens with targeted therapies and newer agents such as pazopanib are being developed and tested in ongoing trials. PMID:24179483

  18. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hart, Phil A; Zen, Yoh; Chari, Suresh T

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a form of chronic pancreatitis that is characterized clinically by frequent presentation with obstructive jaundice, histologically by a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with fibrosis, and therapeutically by a dramatic response to corticosteroid therapy. Two distinct diseases, type 1 and type 2 AIP, share these features. However, these 2 diseases have unique pancreatic histopathologic patterns and differ significantly in their demographic profiles, clinical presentation, and natural history. Recognizing the popular and long-standing association of the term "AIP" with what is now called "type 1 AIP," we suggest using "AIP" solely for type 1 AIP and to acknowledge its own distinct disease status by using "idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis" (IDCP) for type 2 AIP. AIP is the pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). The etiopathogenesis of AIP and IgG4-RD is largely unknown. However, the remarkable effectiveness of B-cell depletion therapy with rituximab in patients with AIP and IgG4-RD highlights the crucial role of B cells in its pathogenesis. IDCP is less commonly recognized, and little is known about its pathogenesis. IDCP has no biomarker but is associated with inflammatory bowel disease in ~25% of patients. Recently, the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP identified combinations of features that are diagnostic of both diseases. Both AIP and IDCP are corticosteroid responsive; however, relapses are common in AIP and rare in IDCP. Therefore, maintenance therapy with either an immunomodulator (eg, azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, or mycophenolate mofetil) or rituximab is often necessary for patients with AIP. Long-term survival is excellent for both patients with AIP and patients with IDCP. PMID:25770706

  19. Autoimmune pancreatitis--recent advances.

    PubMed

    Novotný, I; Díte, P; Lata, J; Nechutová, H; Kianicka, B

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is recognized as a distinct clinical entity, identified as a chronic inflammatory process of the pancreas in which the autoimmune mechanism is involved. Clinically and histologically, AIP has two subsets: type 1--lymphoplasmatic sclerosing pancreatitis with abundant infiltration of the pancreas and other affected organs with immunoglobulin G4-positive plasma cells, and type 2--duct centric fibrosis, characterized by granulocyte epithelial lesions in the pancreas without systemic involvement. In the diagnosis of AIP, two diagnostic criterions are used--the HISORt criteria and Asian Diagnostic Criteria. In the differential diagnosis, the pancreatic cancer must be excluded by endosonographically guided pancreatic biopsy. Typical signs of AIP are concomitant disorders in other organs (kidney, liver, biliary tract, salivary glands, colon, retroperitoneum, prostate). Novel clinicopathological entity was proposed as an 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' (IgG4-RSC). Extensive IgG4-positive plasma cells and T lymphocyte infiltration is a common characteristics of this disease. Recently, IgG4-RSC syndrome was extended to a new entity, characterized by IgG4 hypergammaglobulinemia and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration, this being considered an expression of a lymphoproliferative disease, 'IgG4-positive multiorgan lymphoproliferative syndrome'. This syndrome includes Mikulicz's disease, mediastinal fibrosis, autoimmune hypophysitis, and inflammatory pseudotumor--lung, liver, breast. In the therapy of AIP, steroids constitute first-choice treatment. High response to the corticosteroid therapy is an important diagnostic criterion. In the literature, there are no case-control studies that determine if AIP predisposes to pancreatic cancer. Undoubtedly, AIP is currently a hot topic in pancreatology.

  20. Recent advances in autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Tabata, Taku; Hara, Seiichi; Kuruma, Sawako; Chiba, Kazuro; Kanno, Atsushi; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-01-01

    It is now clear that are two histological types (Type-1 and Type-2) of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). The histological pattern of Type-1 AIP, or traditional AIP, is called lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). The histological pattern of Type-2 AIP is characterized by neutrophilic infiltration in the epithelium of the pancreatic duct. In general, Type-2 AIP patients are younger, may not have a male preponderance, and rarely show elevation of serum IgG4 compared with Type-1 AIP patients. Unlike Type-1 AIP patients, Type-2 AIP patients rarely have associated sclerosing diseases, but they are more likely to have acute pancreatitis and ulcerative colitis. Although Type-2 AIP is sometimes observed in the USA and Europe, most AIP cases in Japan and Korea are Type-1. The international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP comprise 5 cardinal features, and combinations of one or more of these features provide the basis for diagnoses of both Type-1 and Type-2 AIP. Due to the fact that steroid therapy is clinically, morphologically, and serologically effective in AIP patients, it is the standard therapy for AIP. The indications for steroid therapy in AIP include symptoms such as obstructive jaundice and the presence of symptomatic extrapancreatic lesions. Oral prednisolone (0.6 mg/kg/day) is administered for 2–4 weeks and gradually tapered to a maintenance dose of 2.5–5 mg/day over a period of 2–3 months. Maintenance therapy by low-dose prednisolone is usually performed for 1–3 years to prevent relapse of AIP. PMID:23060806

  1. Sorafenib Tosylate and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Unresectable, or Metastatic Gallbladder Cancer or Cholangiocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Extrahepatic Bile Duct Adenocarcinoma; Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma; Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma With Squamous Metaplasia; Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Gallbladder Carcinoma; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma

  2. Surgical palliation of advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bahra, M; Jacob, D

    2008-01-01

    in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma cannot be recommended at this time.

  3. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2013-10-01

    The present article analyzes the main presentations on acute pancreatitis (AP) in Digestive Disease Week 2013. Perfusion computed tomography allows early diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin predicts the development of acute renal failure, severe AP and death. Factors associated with greater fluid sequestration in AP are alcoholic etiology, an elevated hematocrit, and the presence of criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome; fluid sequestration is associated with a worse outcome. True pseudocysts (fluid collections without necrosis for more than 4 weeks) are a highly infrequent complication in AP. Patients with necrotic collections have a poor prognosis, especially if associated with infection. A meta-analysis on fluid therapy suggests that early aggressive fluid administration is associated with higher mortality and more frequent respiratory complications. According to a meta-analysis, enteral nutrition initiated within 24 hours of admission improves the outcome of AP compared with later initiation of enteral nutrition. Pentoxifylline could be a promising alternative in AP; a double-blind randomized study showed that this drug reduced the length of hospital and intensive care unit stay, as well as the need for intensive care unit admission. The association of octreotide and celecoxib seems to reduce the frequency of organ damage compared with octreotide alone. Mild AP can be managed in the ambulatory setting through hospital-at-home units after a short, 24-hour admission.

  4. Evaluation of a trastuzumab-containing treatment regimen for patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    NAMIKAWA, TSUTOMU; MUNEKAGE, ERI; MUNEKAGE, MASAYA; MAEDA, HIROMICHI; YATABE, TOMOAKI; KITAGAWA, HIROYUKI; SAKAMOTO, KOUICHI; OBATAKE, MASAYUKI; KOBAYASHI, MICHIYA; HANAZAKI, KAZUHIRO

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of trastuzumab plus chemotherapy for patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent gastric cancer. A retrospective analysis of 213 patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent gastric cancer who received systemic chemotherapy, including 15 patients who were also administered trastuzumab, at Kochi Medical School between 2007 and 2013 was performed. The overall survival was compared between patients who received trastuzumab plus chemotherapy and patients who received chemotherapy alone, and the safety and efficacy of the trastuzumab-containing regimen was evaluated. Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)2 status was examined in 86 patients, of whom 15 (17.4%) exhibited strong positive HER2 expression. The rate of strong positive HER2 expression was significantly higher for intestinal type tumors compared with diffuse type tumors [23.6 (13/55) vs. 6.5% (2/31); P=0.044]. The median overall survival of the patients treated with trastuzumab was significantly longer compared with that for patients who were not treated with trastuzumab (22.9 vs. 11.6 months; P=0.014). The objective response rate and disease control rate for trastuzumab plus chemotherapy were 46.7 and 86.7%, respectively. Frequently encountered grade 3–4 toxicities included neutropenia (26.7%; 4/15), anemia (13.3%; 2/15) and fatigue (13.3%; 2/15). Trastuzumab plus chemotherapy is effective for patients with HER2-positive advanced or recurrent gastric cancer, and the frequencies of hematological and non-hematological toxicities experienced by patients in the present study indicated that it can be safely administered clinically. PMID:27330770

  5. Advances in biomarker research for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Kruttika; Wang, Fengfei; Ma, Qingyong; Li, Qinyu; Mallik, Sanku; Hsieh, Tze-Chen; Wu, Erxi

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a leading cause of cancer related deaths in United States. The lack of early symptoms results in latestage detection and a high mortality rate. Currently, the only potentially curative approach for PC is surgical resection, which is often unsuccessful because the invasive and metastatic nature of the tumor masses makes their complete removal difficult. Consequently, patients suffer relapses from remaining cancer stem cells or drug resistance that eventually lead to death. To improve the survival rate, the early detection of PC is critical. Current biomarker research in PC indicates that a serum carbohydrate antigen, CA 19-9, is the only available biomarker with approximately 90% specificity to PC. However, the efficacy of CA 19-9 for assessing prognosis and monitoring patients with PC remains contentious. Thus, advances in technology and the detection of new biomarkers with high specificity to PC are needed to reduce the mortality rate of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Radiotherapy technical considerations in the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer: American-French consensus recommendations.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Florence; Goodman, Karyn A; Azria, David; Racadot, Severine; Abrams, Ross A

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose intensity

  7. Radiotherapy Technical Considerations in the Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: American-French Consensus Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Huguet, Florence; Goodman, Karyn A.; Azria, David; Racadot, Severine; Abrams, Ross A.

    2012-08-01

    Summary: Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose

  8. Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Unresectable Liver or Biliary Tract Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-08

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  9. [Utility of the WallFlexTM duodenal stent for unresectable advanced gastric cancer related to gastric outlet obstruction].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Taro; Hyuga, Satoshi; Kato, Aya; Chono, Teruhiro; Watanabe, Risa; Komori, Takamichi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takachi, Kou; Nishioka, Kiyonori; Uemura, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Kenji

    2012-11-01

    Duodenal stenting for malignant disease related to gastric outlet obstruction(GOO) has been covered by health insurance in Japan since April 2010. We inserted WallFlexTM duodenal stents(WDS) in 4 patients with GOO caused by unresectable gastric cancer. WDS insertion was successful in all 4 cases. Duodenal perforation occurred in 1 case. One case each of stent obstruction and stent migration occurred. All patients could eat a soft-food diet for 3-6 months (median, 5.3 months). Survival time ranged between 5 and 14 months (median, 6 months). Three patients underwent S-1 combination chemotherapy. Duodenal stenting is expected to be effective for advanced gastric cancer related to GOO.

  10. Concomitant Statin Use Has a Favorable Effect on Gemcitabine-Erlotinib Combination Chemotherapy for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Do Chang; Lee, Hee Seung; Lee, Yong Il; Chung, Moon Jae; Park, Jeong Youp; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Chung, Jae Bock

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Erlotinib-gemcitabine combined chemotherapy is considered as the standard treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancer. This study aimed to determine the clinical factors associated with response to this treatment. Materials and Methods This retrospective study included 180 patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer who received ≥2 cycles of gemcitabine-erlotinib combination therapy as first-line palliative chemotherapy between 2006 and 2014. "Long-term response" was defined as tumor stabilization after >6 chemotherapy cycles. Results The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 3.9 and 8.1 months, respectively. On univariate analysis, liver metastasis (p=0.023) was negatively correlated with long-term response. Locally advanced stage (p=0.017), a history of statin treatment (p=0.01), and carcinoembryonic antigen levels <4.5 (p=0.029) had a favorable effect on long-term response. On multivariate analysis, a history of statin treatment was the only independent favorable factor for long-term response (p=0.017). Prognostic factors for OS and PFS were significantly correlated with liver metastasis (p=0.031 and 0.013, respectively). A history of statin treatment was also significantly associated with OS after adjusting for all potential confounders (hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.26–0.92; p=0.026). Conclusion These results suggest that statins have a favorable effect on "long-term response" to gemcitabine-erlotinib chemotherapy in unresectable pancreatic cancer patients. Statins may have a chemoadjuvant role in stabilizing long-term tumor growth. PMID:27401642

  11. Comparison of CT and PET-CT based planning of radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Topkan, Erkan; Yavuz, Ali A; Aydin, Mehmet; Onal, Cem; Yapar, Fuat; Yavuz, Melek N

    2008-01-01

    Background To compare computed tomography (CT) with co-registered positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) as the basis for delineating gross tumor volume (GTV) in unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). Methods Fourteen patients with unresectable LAPC had both CT and PET images acquired. For each patient, two three-dimensional conformal plans were made using the CT and PET-CT fusion data sets. We analyzed differences in treatment plans and doses of radiation to primary tumors and critical organs. Results Changes in GTV delineation were necessary in 5 patients based on PET-CT information. In these patients, the average increase in GTV was 29.7%, due to the incorporation of additional lymph node metastases and extension of the primary tumor beyond that defined by CT. For all patients, the GTVCT versus GTVPET-CT was 92.5 ± 32.3 cm3 versus 104.5 ± 32.6 cm3 (p = 0.009). Toxicity analysis revealed no clinically significant differences between two plans with regard to doses to critical organs. Conclusion Co-registration of PET and CT information in unresectable LAPC may improve the delineation of GTV and theoretically reduce the likelihood of geographic misses. PMID:18808725

  12. Biologic therapies for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Aiwu Ruth; Lindenberg, Andreas Peter; Marshall, John Lindsay

    2008-08-01

    Patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer have poor prognosis and short survival due to lack of effective therapy and aggressiveness of the disease. Pancreatic cancer has widespread chromosomal instability, including a high rate of translocations and deletions. Upregulated EGF signaling and mutation of K-RAS are found in most pancreatic cancers. Therefore, inhibitors that target EGF receptor, K-RAS, RAF, MEK, mTOR, VEGF and PDGF, for example, have been evaluated in patients with pancreatic cancer. Although significant activities of these inhibitors have not been observed in the majority of pancreatic cancer patients, an enormous amount of experience and knowledge has been obtained from recent clinical trials. With a better inhibitor or combination of inhibitors, and improvement in the selection of patients for available inhibitors, better therapy for pancreatic cancer is on the horizon.

  13. Dabrafenib for Treating Unresectable, Advanced or Metastatic BRAF V600 Mutation-Positive Melanoma: An Evidence Review Group Perspective.

    PubMed

    Fleeman, Nigel; Bagust, Adrian; Beale, Sophie; Boland, Angela; Dickson, Rumona; Dwan, Kerry; Richardson, Marty; Dundar, Yenal; Davis, Helen; Banks, Lindsay

    2015-09-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited GlaxoSmithKline, the manufacturer of dabrafenib, to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of dabrafenib for the treatment of unresectable, advanced or metastatic BRAF V600 mutation-positive melanoma in accordance with the Institute's Single Technology Appraisal (STA) process. The Liverpool Reviews and Implementation Group (LRiG) at the University of Liverpool was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). This article summarizes the ERG's review of the evidence submitted by the company and provides a summary of the Appraisal Committee's (AC) final decision in October 2014. The clinical evidence for dabrafenib was derived from an ongoing phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, international, multicentre clinical trial (BREAK-3) involving 230 patients randomized 2:1 to receive either dabrafenib or dacarbazine. A significant improvement in median progression-free survival (PFS) but not overall survival (OS) was reported in the dabrafenib arm compared with dacarbazine. Vemurafenib is considered a more appropriate comparator than is dacarbazine. The clinical evidence for vemurafenib was derived from a completed phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, international, multicentre clinical trial (BRIM-3) involving 675 patients randomized 1:1 to receive either vemurafenib or dacarbazine. A significant improvement in median PFS and OS was reported in the vemurafenib arm compared with dacarbazine. As there is no direct evidence comparing dabrafenib versus vemurafenib, the company presented an indirect treatment comparison (ITC) that demonstrated no statistical differences between dabrafenib and vemurafenib for PFS or OS. The ERG expressed concerns with the ITC, mainly in relation to the validity of the assumptions underpinning the methodology; the ERG concluded this resulted in findings that are unlikely to be robust or reliable. Dabrafenib and

  14. FOLFIRINOX in Locally Advanced and Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer: A Single Centre Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, SJ; Mungroop, TH; Heilmann, MN; van Laarhoven, HW; Busch, OR; Molenaar, IQ; Besselink, MG; Wilmink, JW

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: FOLFIRINOX is emerging as new standard of care for fit patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC). However, some of the physicians are reluctant to use FOLFIRINOX due to high toxicity rates reported in earlier studies. We reviewed our experience with FOLFIRINOX in LAPC and MPC, focussing on dose adjustments, toxicity and efficacy. Methods: We reviewed all patients with LAPC or MPC treated with FOLFIRINOX in our institution between April 2011 and December 2015. Unresectability (stage III and IV) was determined by the institution's multidisciplinary team for pancreatic cancer. Results: Fifty patients (18 LAPC and 32 MPC) were enrolled, with a median age of 55 years (IQR 49-66) and WHO performance status of 0/1. FOLFIRINOX was given as first-line treatment in 82% of patients. Dose modifications were applied in 90% of patients. The median number of completed cycles was 8 (IQR 5-9). Grade 3-4 toxicity occurred in 52% and grade 5 toxicity in 2%. The response rate was 25% (12% in LAPC, 32% in MPC). Median overall survival and progression-free survival were 14.8 and 10.3 months in LAPC, and 9.0 and 5.9 months in MPC, respectively. Overall 1- and 2-year survival was 65% and 10% in LAPC and 40% and 5% in MPC. Within the LAPC group, 6 patients (33%) underwent local ablative therapy and 1 patient (6%) a resection, leading to a median survival of 21.8 months. Conclusion: FOLFIRINOX treatment with nearly routine dose modification was associated with acceptable toxicity rates, relatively high response rates and an encouraging overall survival.

  15. [A Case of Radical Resection for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer with Positive Peritoneal Cytology Treated with Chemoradiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Sato, Ryohei; Takizawa, Kazuyasu; Yuza, Kizuki; Soma, Daiki; Hirose, Yuki; Morimoto, Yuta; Miura, Kohei; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Takano, Kabuto; Sakata, Jun; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Minagawa, Masahiro; Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2015-11-01

    A 54-year-old female patient was admitted with obstructive jaundice. The patient was diagnosed with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer of the head with invasion to the super mesenteric artery and the third portion of the duodenum. A biliary- and gastric-enteric bypass surgery was performed, and peritoneal lavage cytology was positive during surgery. After 6 courses of gemcitabine and S-1 combination chemotherapy, the CA19-9 level was normalized and the primary tumor shrank to 79% of its original size. Diagnostic laparoscopy revealed that distant metastasis was not detected and the peritoneal lavage cytology was negative. After additional chemoradiation therapy, a pancreaticoduodenectomy was perfomed. Microscopic investigation revealed that about 60% of the cancer tissue had been replaced by fibrosis and no cancer cells were found at the surgical margin. The patient was alive with no evidence of recurrence 17 months after radical surgery. PMID:26805372

  16. Advances in diagnosis, treatment and palliation of pancreatic carcinoma: 1990-2010

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Chakshu; Eltawil, Karim M; Renfrew, Paul D; Walsh, Mark J; Molinari, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Several advances in genetics, diagnosis and palliation of pancreatic cancer (PC) have occurred in the last decades. A multidisciplinary approach to this disease is therefore recommended. PC is relatively common as it is the fourth leading cause of cancer related mortality. Most patients present with obstructive jaundice, epigastric or back pain, weight loss and anorexia. Despite improvements in diagnostic modalities, the majority of cases are still detected in advanced stages. The only curative treatment for PC remains surgical resection. No more than 20% of patients are candidates for surgery at the time of diagnosis and survival remains quite poor as adjuvant therapies are not very effective. A small percentage of patients with borderline non-resectable PC might benefit from neo-adjuvant chemoradiation therapy enabling them to undergo resection; however, randomized controlled studies are needed to prove the benefits of this strategy. Patients with unresectable PC benefit from palliative interventions such as biliary decompression and celiac plexus block. Further clinical trials to evaluate new chemo and radiation protocols as well as identification of genetic markers for PC are needed to improve the overall survival of patients affected by PC, as the current overall 5-year survival rate of patients affected by PC is still less than 5%. The aim of this article is to review the most recent high quality literature on this topic. PMID:21412497

  17. Phase 2, multicenter, open-label study of tigatuzumab (CS-1008), a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting death receptor 5, in combination with gemcitabine in chemotherapy-naive patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Forero-Torres, Andres; Infante, Jeffrey R; Waterhouse, David; Wong, Lucas; Vickers, Selwyn; Arrowsmith, Edward; He, Aiwu Ruth; Hart, Lowell; Trent, David; Wade, James; Jin, Xiaoping; Wang, Qiang; Austin, TaShara; Rosen, Michael; Beckman, Robert; von Roemeling, Reinhard; Greenberg, Jonathan; Saleh, Mansoor

    2013-01-01

    Tigatuzumab is the humanized version of the agonistic murine monoclonal antibody TRA-8 that binds to the death receptor 5 and induces apoptosis of human cancer cell lines via the caspase cascade. The combination of tigatuzumab and gemcitabine inhibits tumor growth in murine pancreatic xenografts. This phase 2 trial evaluated the efficacy of tigatuzumab combined with gemcitabine in 62 chemotherapy-naive patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients received intravenous tigatuzumab (8 mg/kg loading dose followed by 3 mg/kg weekly) and gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2 once weekly for 3 weeks followed by 1 week of rest) until progressive disease (PD) or unacceptable toxicity occurred. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) at 16 weeks. Secondary end points included objective response rate (ORR) (complete responses plus partial responses), duration of response, and overall survival (OS). Safety of the combination was also evaluated. Mean duration of treatment was 18.48 weeks for tigatuzumab and 17.73 weeks for gemcitabine. The PFS rate at 16 weeks was 52.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 39.3–64.1%). The ORR was 13.1%; 28 (45.9%) patients had stable disease and 14 (23%) patients had PD. Median PFS was 3.9 months (95% CI, 2.2–5.4 months). Median OS was 8.2 months (95% CI, 5.1–9.6 months). The most common adverse events related to tigatuzumab were nausea (35.5%), fatigue (32.3%), and peripheral edema (19.4%). Tigatuzumab combined with gemcitabine was well tolerated and may be clinically active for the treatment of chemotherapy-naive patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. PMID:24403266

  18. Advances in the etiology of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Aghdassi, Ali A; Budde, Christoph; Nitsche, Claudia; Sauter, Gabriele; Persike, Maria; Günther, Annett; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    In the past, chronic pancreatitis has been regarded as a fairly uniform and largely untreatable disorder that most commonly affects patients who both lack gainful employment or adequate insurance coverage and have a tendency to smoke and drink. Large clinical trials suggest that this perception is not only misguided and discriminatory but also not based on facts. We forgot that the perception of chronic liver disease was similar before World War II, and just like liver cirrhosis the fibrosis and cirrhosis of the pancreas--i.e. chronic pancreatitis--is the end result of a range of environmental, inflammatory, infectious and genetic disorders. A growing number of these have only recently been recognized as a distinct entity and several of which are becoming truly treatable. A large proportion of the risk for developing pancreatitis is conveyed by genetic risk factors, and we estimate that less than half of those have been identified so far. The same holds true for protective factors that can prevent pancreatitis, even in the face of excessive alcohol abuse. Various gene mutations and polymorphisms appear to determine an individual's susceptibility for developing pancreatic disease, for the severity of the disease, and for the disease progression. The spectrum of genotype/phenotype associations ranges from straightforward autosomal dominant traits with near-complete penetrance, as for the most common mutations in the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1), to moderate risks factors without mendelian inheritance patterns, as for SPINK1 and CFTR mutations, to very subtle risk associations and disease modifiers that can only be identified in large cohort studies, as for the chymotrypsin C, calcium-sensing receptor and the anionic trypsin (PRSS2) mutations. Only a better understanding of the disease mechanisms that underlie these changes will make an individualized therapy of pancreatic disorders a realistic option.

  19. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Outstanding problems

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Olga P; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Egorov, Viacheslav I

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and is one of the most aggressive malignant tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment but is only possible for 15%-20% of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. About 40% of patients have locally advanced nonresectable disease. In the past, determination of pancreatic cancer resectability was made at surgical exploration. The development of modern imaging techniques has allowed preoperative staging of patients. Institutions disagree about the criteria used to classify patients. Vascular invasion in pancreatic cancers plays a very important role in determining treatment and prognosis. There is no evidence-based consensus on the optimal preoperative imaging assessment of patients with suspected pancreatic cancer and a unified definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is also lacking. Thus, there is much room for improvement in all aspects of treatment for pancreatic cancer. Multi-detector computed tomography has been widely accepted as the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing and staging pancreatic cancer. With improved surgical techniques and advanced perioperative management, vascular resection and reconstruction are performed more frequently; patients thought once to be unresectable are undergoing radical surgery. However, when attempting heroic surgery, a realistic approach concerning the patient’s age and health status, probability of recovery after surgery, perioperative morbidity and mortality and life quality after tumor resection is necessary. PMID:22655124

  20. A Phase II Trial of Cetuximab, Gemcitabine, 5-Fluorouracil, and Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Nonmetastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Piperdi, Bilal; Bathini, Venu; Walsh, William V.; Yunus, Shakeeb; Tseng, Jennifer F.; Whalen, Giles F.; Wassef, Wahid Y.; Kadish, Sidney P.; FitzGerald, Thomas J.; Mikule, Christine; Wang, Yuxia; Grossman, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. A minority of patients present with localized disease and surgical resection still offers patients the only hope for long-term survival. Locally advanced pancreatic cancer is defined as surgically unresectable, but has no evidence of distant metastases. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cetuximab in combination with gemcitabine and 5-FU along with radiation therapy in locally advanced non-resectable, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, using progression free survival as the primary end point. METHODS: This was a prospective, single arm, open label pilot phase II study to evaluate the anti-tumor activity of gemcitabine (200 mg/m2 per week) and cetuximab (250 mg/m2 per week after an initial 400 mg/m2 loading dose) with continuous infusion 5-FU (800 mg/m2 over 96 hours) and daily concurrent external beam radiation therapy (50.4 Gy total dose) for six weeks (cycle 1) in patients with non-metastatic, locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Following neoadjuvant treatment, subjects were re-evaluated for response and surgical candidacy with restaging scans. After resection, or also if not resected; subjects received further therapy with four 28-day cycles (cycles 2-5) of weekly gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) and cetuximab (250 mg/m2) on days 1, 8, and 15. RESULTS: Between 2006 and 2011, twenty-six patients were screened and eleven of them were enrolled in the study. Most common reasons for screen failures were having resectable disease, metastatic disease or co-morbidity. Ten patients were able to tolerate and complete cycle 1 of chemoradiotherapy. One patient stopped the study prematurely due to grade III diarrhea. All except this one patient received planned radiation therapy. The response evaluation after cycle 1 showed one Partial Response, eight Stable Disease and two Progressive Disease. Four patients subsequently underwent surgical

  1. A double-blind placebo-controlled, randomised study comparing gemcitabine and marimastat with gemcitabine and placebo as first line therapy in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bramhall, S R; Schulz, J; Nemunaitis, J; Brown, P D; Baillet, M; Buckels, J A C

    2002-07-15

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer death in the western world and the prognosis for unresectable disease remains poor. Recent advances in conventional chemotherapy and the development of novel 'molecular' treatment strategies with different toxicity profiles warrant investigation as combination treatment strategies. This randomised study in pancreatic cancer compares marimastat (orally administered matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor) in combination with gemcitabine to gemcitabine alone. Two hundred and thirty-nine patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer were randomised to receive gemcitabine (1000 mg m(-2)) in combination with either marimastat or placebo. The primary end-point was survival. Objective tumour response and duration of response, time to treatment failure and disease progression, quality of life and safety were also assessed. There was no significant difference in survival between gemcitabine and marimastat and gemcitabine and placebo (P=0.95 log-rank test). Median survival times were 165.5 and 164 days and 1-year survival was 18% and 17% respectively. There were no significant differences in overall response rates (11 and 16% respectively), progression-free survival (P=0.68 log-rank test) or time to treatment failure (P=0.70 log-rank test) between the treatment arms. The gemcitabine and marimastat combination was well tolerated with only 2.5% of patients withdrawn due to presumed marimastat toxicity. Grade 3 or 4 musculoskeletal toxicities were reported in only 4% of the marimastat treated patients, although 59% of marimastat treated patients reported some musculoskeletal events. The results of this study provide no evidence to support a combination of marimastat with gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The combination of marimastat with gemcitabine was well tolerated. Further studies of marimastat as a maintenance treatment following a response or stable disease on gemcitabine may be justified. PMID

  2. Localized Pancreatic Cancer: Multidisciplinary Management.

    PubMed

    Coveler, Andrew L; Herman, Joseph M; Simeone, Diane M; Chiorean, E Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive cancer that continues to have single-digit 5-year mortality rates despite advancements in the field. Surgery remains the only curative treatment; however, most patients present with late-stage disease deemed unresectable, either due to extensive local vascular involvement or the presence of distant metastasis. Resection guidelines that include a borderline resectable group, as well as advancements in neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation that improve resectability of locally advanced disease, may improve outcomes for patients with more invasive disease. Multi-agent chemotherapy regimens fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) and nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine improved response rates and survival in metastatic pancreatic cancer and are now being used in earlier stages for patients with localized potentially resectable and unresectable disease, with goals of downstaging tumors to allow margin-negative resection and reducing systemic recurrence. Chemoradiotherapy, although still controversial for both resectable and unresectable pancreatic cancer, is being used in the context of contemporary chemotherapy backbone regimens, and novel radiation techniques such as stereotactic body frame radiation therapy (SBRT) are studied on the premise of maintaining or improving efficacy and reducing treatment duration. Patient selection for optimal treatment designation is currently provided by multidisciplinary tumor boards, but biomarker discovery, in blood, tumors, or through novel imaging, is an area of intense research. Results to date suggest that some patients with unresectable disease at the outset have survival rates as good as those with initially resectable disease if able to undergo surgical resection. Long-term follow-up and improved clinical trials options are needed to determine optimal treatment modalities for patients with localized pancreatic cancer. PMID:27249726

  3. Recent Advances and Prospects for Multimodality Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Awalpreet S; Khoo, Allison; Aliru, Maureen L; Arora, Harpreet K; Gunther, Jillian R; Krishnan, Sunil

    2016-10-01

    The outcomes for treatment of pancreatic cancer have not improved dramatically in many decades. However, the recent promising results with combination chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease increase optimism for future treatments. With greater control of overt or occult metastatic disease, there will likely be an expanding role for local treatment modalities, especially given that nearly a third of pancreatic cancer patients have locally destructive disease without distant metastatic disease at the time of death. Technical advances have allowed for the safe delivery of dose-escalated radiation therapy, which can then be combined with chemotherapy, targeted agents, immunotherapy, and nanoparticulate drug delivery techniques to produce novel and improved synergistic effects. Here we discuss recent advances and future directions for multimodality therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27619253

  4. Recent Advances and Prospects for Multimodality Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Awalpreet S; Khoo, Allison; Aliru, Maureen L; Arora, Harpreet K; Gunther, Jillian R; Krishnan, Sunil

    2016-10-01

    The outcomes for treatment of pancreatic cancer have not improved dramatically in many decades. However, the recent promising results with combination chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease increase optimism for future treatments. With greater control of overt or occult metastatic disease, there will likely be an expanding role for local treatment modalities, especially given that nearly a third of pancreatic cancer patients have locally destructive disease without distant metastatic disease at the time of death. Technical advances have allowed for the safe delivery of dose-escalated radiation therapy, which can then be combined with chemotherapy, targeted agents, immunotherapy, and nanoparticulate drug delivery techniques to produce novel and improved synergistic effects. Here we discuss recent advances and future directions for multimodality therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  5. Feasibility, tolerability, and efficacy of the concurrent addition of erlotinib to thoracic radiotherapy in locally advanced unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer: a Phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Enrique; Martínez, Maite; Rico, Mikel; Hernández, Berta; Casas, Francesc; Viñolas, Nuria; Pérez-Casas, Ana; Dómine, Manuel; Mínguez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although many studies have confirmed the synergic effects of combining chemotherapy (CT) and radiotherapy (RT), clinical data evaluating safety and efficacy of erlotinib in combination with RT in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are limited. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility, tolerability, and efficacy of the concurrent addition of erlotinib to the standard three-dimensional conformal thoracic RT in patients with unresectable or locally advanced NSCLC who are not candidates for receiving standard CT. Patients and methods Feasibility and tolerability, assessed by evaluating adverse events (AEs), and effectiveness, by calculating progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and objective response rate (ORR), were analyzed in 30 patients receiving RT alone and 60 receiving RT and erlotinib. Results Erlotinib with RT showed an extended CSS and a higher rate of complete responses compared with RT alone. No differences between groups were found regarding OS, PFS, and ORR. AEs were significantly higher in the combined treatment, which mainly included cutaneous toxicity, dyspnea, fatigue, hyporexia, diarrhea, and infection. Erlotinib did not increase the toxicity produced by RT. Conclusion The combination of erlotinib with RT produced, in our study, a scarce clinical benefit in the treatment of unresectable or locally advanced NSCLC, limited to complete responses and longer CSS rate compared with RT alone. Increased toxicity events were associated with combined therapy, which mainly included cutaneous toxicity. In our opinion, further studies in molecularly unselected lung cancer patients treated with EGFR TKIs and RT are not indicated. The use of biomarkers for the identification of patients that are most likely to benefit from this treatment is an essential next step in the research of this condition. PMID:27042098

  6. ADH-1, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic Pancreatic or Biliary Tract Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Periampullary Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Gallbladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer

  7. A Phase I/II Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation (IMRT) Dose Escalation With Concurrent Fixed-dose Rate Gemcitabine (FDR-G) in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Josef, Edgar; Schipper, Mathew; Francis, Isaac R.; Hadley, Scott; Ten-Haken, Randall; Lawrence, Theodore; Normolle, Daniel; Simeone, Diane M.; Sonnenday, Christopher; Abrams, Ross; Leslie, William; Khan, Gazala; Zalupski, Mark M.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Local failure in unresectable pancreatic cancer may contribute to death. We hypothesized that intensification of local therapy would improve local control and survival. The objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose delivered by intensity modulated radiation with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (FDR-G), freedom from local progression (FFLP), and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of adenocarcinoma, radiographically unresectable, performance status of 0-2, absolute neutrophil count of {>=}1500/mm{sup 3}, platelets {>=}100,000/mm{sup 3}, creatinine <2 mg/dL, bilirubin <3 mg/dL, and alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase {<=}2.5 Multiplication-Sign upper limit of normal. FDR-G (1000 mg/m{sup 2}/100 min intravenously) was given on days -22 and -15, 1, 8, 22, and 29. Intensity modulated radiation started on day 1. Dose levels were escalated from 50-60 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as gastrointestinal toxicity grade (G) {>=}3, neutropenic fever, or deterioration in performance status to {>=}3 between day 1 and 126. Dose level was assigned using TITE-CRM (Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method) with the target dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) rate set to 0.25. Results: Fifty patients were accrued. DLTs were observed in 11 patients: G3/4 anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and/or dehydration (7); duodenal bleed (3); duodenal perforation (1). The recommended dose is 55 Gy, producing a probability of DLT of 0.24. The 2-year FFLP is 59% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32-79). Median and 2-year overall survival are 14.8 months (95% CI: 12.6-22.2) and 30% (95% CI 17-45). Twelve patients underwent resection (10 R0, 2 R1) and survived a median of 32 months. Conclusions: High-dose radiation therapy with concurrent FDR-G can be delivered safely. The encouraging efficacy data suggest that outcome may be improved in unresectable patients through intensification of local

  8. Advancement in treatment and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer with radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a major health problem. Conventional imaging modalities show limited accuracy for reliable assessment of the tumor. Recent researches suggest that molecular imaging techniques with tracers provide more biologically relevant information and are benefit for the diagnosis of the cancer. In addition, radiopharmaceuticals also play more important roles in treatment of the disease. This review summaries the advancement of the radiolabeled compounds in the theranostics of PC. PMID:26909131

  9. Erlotinib in Treating Patients With Unresectable Liver, Bile Duct, or Gallbladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  10. Current therapeutic strategies for advanced pancreatic cancer: A review for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Spadi, Rosella; Brusa, Federica; Ponzetti, Agostino; Chiappino, Isabella; Birocco, Nadia; Ciuffreda, Libero; Satolli, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) would become the second leading cause of cancer death in the near future, despite representing only 3% of new cancer diagnosis. Survival improvement will come from a better knowledge of risk factors, earlier diagnosis, better integration of locoregional and systemic therapies, as well as the development of more efficacious drugs rising from a deeper understanding of disease biology. For patients with unresectable, non-metastatic disease, combined strategies encompassing primary chemotherapy and radiation seems to be promising. In fit patients, new polychemotherapy regimens can lead to better outcomes in terms of slight but significant survival improvement associated with a positive impact on quality of life. The upfront use of these regimes can also increase the rate of radical resections in borderline resectable and locally advanced PC. Second line treatments showed to positively affect both overall survival and quality of life in fit patients affected by metastatic disease. At present, oxaliplatin-based regimens are the most extensively studied. Nonetheless, other promising drugs are currently under evaluation. Presently, in addition to surgery and conventional radiation therapy, new locoregional treatment techniques are emerging as alternative options in the multimodal approach to patients or diseases not suitable for radical surgery. As of today, in contrast with other types of cancer, targeted therapies failed to show relevant activity either alone or in combination with chemotherapy and, thus, current clinical practice does not include them. Up to now, despite the fact of extremely promising results in different tumors, also immunotherapy is not in the actual therapeutic armamentarium for PC. In the present paper, we provide a comprehensive review of the current state of the art of clinical practice and research in PC aiming to offer a guide for clinicians on the most relevant topics in the management of this disease. PMID:26862489

  11. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered. PMID:25053938

  12. Weekly paclitaxel, gemcitabine, and external irradiation followed by randomized farnesyl transferase inhibitor R115777 for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Tyvin A; Winter, Kathryn; Safran, Howard; Hoffman, John P; Erickson, Beth; Anne, Pramila R; Myerson, Robert J; Cline-Burkhardt, Vivian JM; Perez, Kimberly; Willett, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) multi-institutional Phase II study 98-12, evaluating paclitaxel and concurrent radiation (RT) for locally advanced pancreatic cancer, demonstrated a median survival of 11.3 months and a 1-year survival of 43%. The purpose of the randomized Phase II study by RTOG 0020 was to evaluate the addition of weekly low- dose gemcitabine with concurrent paclitaxel/RT and to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the farnesyl transferase inhibitor R115777 following chemoradiation. Patients and methods Patients with unresectable, nonmetastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were eligible. Patients in Arm 1 received gemcitabine, 75 mg/m2/week, and paclitaxel, 40 mg/m2/week, for 6 weeks, with 50.4 Gy radiation (CXRT). Patients in Arm 2 received an identical chemoradiation regimen but then received maintenance R115777, 300 mg twice a day for 21 days every 28 days (CXRT+R115777), until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Results One hundred ninety-five patients were entered into this study, and 184 were analyzable. Grade 4 nonhematologic toxicities occurred in less than 5% of CXRT patients. The most common grade 3/4 toxicity from R115777 was myelosuppression; however, grade 3/4 hepatic, metabolic, musculoskeletal, and neurologic toxicities were also reported. The median survival time was 11.5 months and 8.9 months for the CXRT and CXRT+R115777 arms, respectively. Conclusions The CXRT arm achieved a median survival of almost 1-year, supporting chemoradiation as an important therapeutic modality for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Maintenance R115777 is not effective and is associated with a broad range of toxicities. These findings provide clinical evidence that inhibition of farnesylation affects many metabolic pathways, underscoring the challenge of developing an effective K-ras inhibitor. PMID:22977306

  13. Pharmacogenetics in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tourkantonis, Ioannis S; Peponi, Evangelia; Syrigos, Konstantinos N; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor overall survival rate. Given advances in pharmacogenomics, numerous gene mutations have been identified that could be potential targets for drug development. Therefore, future research strategies may identify prognostic and predictive markers aiming to improve outcome by maximizing efficacy whilst lowering toxicity. In this commentary, we summarize several interesting results regarding pancreatic cancer pharmacogenetics that have been presented in the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting. In particular, we focus on Abstract #4124, which investigated the potential predictive role of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) in patients treated with adjuvant gemcitabine for pancreatic cancer, on Abstract #4125, which examined the tolerability of a modified FOLFORINOX study based on UGT1A1*28 genotype guided dosing of IRI in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, and on Abstract #4130, which confirmed the predictive role of circulating tumor and invasive cells (CTICs) from patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer in second-line chemotherapy treatment setting. PMID:25076337

  14. [A Case of an Unresectable Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer with Surrounding Organ Invasion Successfully Resected after Chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 plus Cetuximab].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hironori; Ariake, Kyohei; Takemura, Shinichi; Doi, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    A 63-year-old man visited our hospital with pain on micturition and was found to have a large rectal tumor with urinary bladder invasion on enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT). The tumor appeared to be unresectable at presentation; thus, sigmoid colostomy was performed and chemotherapy was initiated. The tumor was found to be EGFR-positive and contained a wild-type KRAS. The mFOLFOX6 plus cetuximab (c-mab) regimen was initiated. The follow-up CT scan showed good tumor shrinkage after 4 courses of chemotherapy; 4 additional courses were administered. The tumor eventually regressed by more than 60% and was judged to be resectable. High anterior resection of the rectum with partial resection of the bladder was performed. Abdominal wall metastasis was detected 8 months after surgery, and additional resection was performed. The patient remained well with no other recurrence 8 months after the high anterior resection. Although chemoradiotherapy is the standard preoperative treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer, systemic therapy is effective in certain cases such as substantial tumor invasion of adjacent organs or metastasis. Here, we present a case of rectal cancer that became curatively resectable after preoperative chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 plus c-mab.

  15. Phase I dose-finding study of sorafenib with FOLFOX4 as first-line treatment in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yihebali; Yang, Jianliang; Yang, Sheng; Sun, Yongkun; Jia, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and efficacy of sorafenib in combination with FOLFOX4 (oxaliplatin/leucovorin (LV)/5-fluorouracil) as first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer, we performed a phase I dose-finding study in nine evaluable patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Methods According to modified Fibonacci method, the design of this study was to guide elevation of the sorafenib dosage to the next level (from 200 mg twice daily to 400 mg twice daily and then, if tolerated, 600 mg twice daily). If the patient achieved complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD) after eight cycles of treatment, combination chemotherapy was scheduled to be discontinued and sorafenib monotherapy continued at the original dose until either disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Results In sorafenib 200 mg twice daily group, DLT was observed in 1 of 6 patients, and in 400 mg twice daily group, it was observed in 2 of 3 patients. Seven of 9 (77.8%) evaluable patients achieved PR, with a median overall survival (OS) of 11.8 [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.9-14.7] months. Common adverse effects include hand-foot syndrome, leukopenia, neutropenia, anorexia, and nausea. Conclusions Twice-daily dosing of sorafenib 200 mg in combination with FOLFOX4 was proven effective and safe for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer, and could be an appropriate dosage for subsequent phase II clinical studies. PMID:26157320

  16. Icotinib plus gemcitabine for metastatic pancreatic cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Shen, Hong; Hu, Han-Guang; Huang, Jian-Jin

    2015-01-01

    A large majority of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer have advanced metastatic disease with unresectable malignancies. Despite treatment advances, the survival benefit from chemotherapeutic regimens and targeted drugs is limited. Moreover, their application is limited in China because of high toxicity and cost. Recently, inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor activity have shown promise for the treatment of solid cancers when used in combination with standard therapy. However, these drugs have not been evaluated extensively for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we report the treatment of a 64-year-old male with metastatic pancreatic cancer using a novel regimen of icotinib with gemcitabine. Marked shrinkage of the mass was observed after two treatment cycles, and partial remission was achieved. The abdominal pain was relieved. The adverse effects were tolerable and treatment cost was acceptable. This is the first reported case for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer with icotinib plus gemcitabine and demonstrates a promising therapeutic alternative. PMID:25805958

  17. Venous thromboembolism and pancreatic cancer: incidence, pathogenesis and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Mandalà, Mario; Moro, Cecilia; Labianca, Roberto

    2008-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is still a major clinical challenge. Recent efforts to improve survival in locally advanced and metastatic disease have focused on combining cytotoxic drugs with targeted therapies. One of the major complications of pancreatic cancer is venous thromboembolism (VTE). Despite the general perception that patients with mucinous carcinoma of the pancreas and gastrointestinal tract present a high incidence of thromboembolic complications, there is little data regarding the incidence and pathogenesis of VTE in pancreatic cancer patients. Clinical data suggest that, among patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer, the occurrence of VTE may be associated with reduced overall survival. Furthermore emerging clinical data strongly suggest that anticoagulant treatments may improve cancer patient survival by decreasing thromboembolic complications as well as by anticancer effects. Given the lack of extensive data and the clinical relevance of this topic for both physicians and basic research scientists, this overview focuses attention on the incidence, pathogenesis and clinical implications of VTE in pancreatic cancer patients.

  18. Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy With Mitomycin C and Cisplatin in Advanced Unresectable Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Phase I-II Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Strojan, Primoz Karner, Katarina; Smid, Lojze; Soba, Erika; Fajdiga, Igor; Jancar, Boris; Anicin, Aleksandar; Budihna, Marjan; Zakotnik, Branko

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of concomitant chemoradiotherapy with mitomycin C and cisplatin in the treatment of advanced unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: Treatment consisted of conventional radiotherapy (70 Gy in 35 fractions), mitomycin C 15 mg/m{sup 2} IV, applied after the delivery of 10 Gy, and cisplatin at an initial dose of 10 mg/m{sup 2}/d IV, applied during the last 10 fractions of irradiation ('chemoboost'). The cisplatin dose was escalated with respect to the toxic side effects by 2 mg/m{sup 2}/d up to the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or at the most 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d (Phase I study), which was tested in the subsequent Phase II study. Results: All 36 patients had Stage T4 and/or N3 disease, and the majority had oropharyngeal (50%) or hypopharyngeal (39%) primary tumors. Six patients were treated at each of the three cisplatin dose levels tested (Phase I study). Dose-limiting toxicity was not reached even at 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d of cisplatin, which was determined as the MTD and tested in an additional 18 patients (Phase II study). After a median follow-up time of 48 months, 4-year locoregional control, failure-free, and overall survival rates were 30%, 14%, and 20%, respectively. In 24 patients treated at the cisplatin dose level of 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d, the corresponding rates were 40%, 20%, and 22%, respectively. Conclusion: Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with mitomycin C and cisplatin 'chemoboost' at 14 mg/m{sup 2}/d is feasible, with encouraging survival results if the extremely poor disease profile of the treated patients is considered.

  19. Phase II Study of Cetuximab in Combination with Cisplatin and Radiation in Unresectable, Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Trial E3303

    PubMed Central

    Egloff, Ann Marie; Lee, Ju-Whei; Langer, Corey J.; Quon, Harry; Vaezi, Alec; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Seethala, Raja R.; Wang, Lin; Shin, Dong M.; Argiris, Athanassios; Yang, Donghua; Mehra, Ranee; Ridge, John Andrew; Patel, Urjeet A.; Burtness, Barbara A.; Forastiere, Arlene A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Cisplatin or cetuximab combined with radiotherapy (RT) each yield superior survival in locally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer (LA-SCCHN) compared to RT alone. E3303 evaluated the triple combination. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN Patients with stage IV unresectable LA-SCCHN received a loading dose of cetuximab (400mg/m2) followed by 250mg/m2/week and cisplatin 75mg/m2 q 3 weeks x3 cycles concurrent with standard fractionated RT. In the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity, patients continued maintenance cetuximab for 6–12 months. Primary endpoint was 2-year progression-free survival (PFS). Patient tumor and blood correlates, including tumor human papillomavirus (HPV) status, were evaluated for association with survival. RESULTS Sixty-nine patients were enrolled; 60 proved eligible and received protocol treatment. Oropharyngeal (OP) primaries constituted the majority (66.7%), stage T4 48.3% and N2–3 91.7%. Median RT dose delivered was 70 Gy, 71.6% received all 3 cycles of cisplatin and 74.6% received maintenance cetuximab. Median PFS was 19.4 months, 2-year PFS 47% (95%CI: 33–61%). 2-year overall survival (OS) was 66% (95%CI: 53–77%); median OS was not reached. Response rate was 66.7%. Most common grade ≥3 toxicities included mucositis (55%), dysphagia (46%) and neutropenia (26%); one attributable grade 5 toxicity occurred. Only tumor HPV status was significantly associated with survival. HPV was evaluable in 29 tumors; 10 (all OP) were HPV+. HPV+ patients had significantly longer OS and PFS (p=0.004 and p=0.036, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Concurrent cetuximab, cisplatin and RT were well-tolerated and yielded promising 2-year PFS and OS in LA-SCCHN with improved survival for patients with HPV+ tumors. PMID:25107914

  20. Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R M S; Byrne, M F; Baillie, J

    2003-04-26

    In the past decade, our understanding of the genetic basis, pathogenesis, and natural history of pancreatitis has grown strikingly. In severe acute pancreatitis, intensive medical support and non-surgical intervention for complications keeps patients alive; surgical drainage (necrosectomy) is reserved for patients with infected necrosis for whom supportive measures have failed. Enteral feeding has largely replaced the parenteral route; controversy remains with respect to use of prophylactic antibiotics. Although gene therapy for chronic pancreatitis is years away, our understanding of the roles of gene mutations in hereditary and sporadic pancreatitis offers tantalising clues about the disorder's pathogenesis. The division between acute and chronic pancreatitis has always been blurred: now, genetics of the disorder suggest a continuous range of disease rather than two separate entities. With recognition of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, we see that chronic pancreatitis is a premalignant disorder in some patients. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound are destined to replace endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for many diagnostic indications in pancreatic disease.

  1. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  2. Erlotinib and Cetuximab With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Kidney, Colorectal, Head and Neck, Pancreatic, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-10

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx

  3. Modeling Combined Chemotherapy and Particle Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Durante, Marco; Tommasino, Francesco; Yamada, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the only cancer for which deaths are predicted to increase in 2014 and beyond. Combined radiochemotherapy protocols using gemcitabine and hypofractionated X-rays are ongoing in several clinical trials. Recent results indicate that charged particle therapy substantially increases local control of resectable and unresectable pancreas cancer, as predicted from previous radiobiology studies considering the high tumor hypoxia. Combination with chemotherapy improves the overall survival (OS). We compared published data on X-ray and charged particle clinical results with or without adjuvant chemotherapy calculating the biological effective dose. We show that chemoradiotherapy with protons or carbon ions results in 1 year OS significantly higher than those obtained with other treatment schedules. Further hypofractionation using charged particles may result in improved local control and survival. A comparative clinical trial using the standard X-ray scheme vs. the best current standard with carbon ions is crucial and may open new opportunities for this deadly disease. PMID:26217585

  4. Challenges and advances in mouse modeling for human pancreatic tumorigenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wanglong

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is critical for developed countries, where its rate of diagnosis has been increasing steadily annually. In the past decade, the advances of pancreatic cancer research have not contributed to the decline in mortality rates from pancreatic cancer—the overall 5-year survival rate remains about 5% low. This number only underscores an obvious urgency for us to better understand the biological features of pancreatic carcinogenesis, to develop early detection methods, and to improve novel therapeutic treatments. To achieve these goals, animal modeling that faithfully recapitulates the whole process of human pancreatic cancer is central to making the advancements. In this review, we summarize the currently available animal models for pancreatic cancer and the advances in pancreatic cancer animal modeling. We compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of three major categories of these models: (1) carcinogen-induced; (2) xenograft and allograft; and (3) genetically engineered mouse models. We focus more on the genetically engineered mouse models, a category which has been rapidly expanded recently for their capacities to mimic human pancreatic cancer and metastasis, and highlight the combinations of these models with various newly developed strategies and cell-lineage labeling systems. PMID:23114842

  5. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: clinical features, diagnosis and medical treatment: advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Jensen, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) comprise with gastrointestinal carcinoids, the main groups of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). Although these two groups of GI-NETs share many features including histological aspects; over-/ectopic expression of somatostatin receptors; the ability to ectopically secrete hormones/peptides/amines which can result in distinct functional syndromes; similar approaches used for tumor localization and some aspects of treatment, it is now generally agreed they should be considered separate. They differ in their pathogenesis, hormonal syndromes produced, many aspects of biological behavior and most important, in their response to certain anti-tumor treatment (chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapies). In this chapter the clinical features of the different types of pNETs will be considered as well as aspects of their diagnosis and medical treatment of the hormone-excess state. Emphasis will be on controversial areas or recent advances. The other aspects of the management of these tumors (surgery, treatment of advanced disease, tumor localization) are not dealt with here, because they are covered in other chapters in this volume. PMID:23582916

  6. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Karyn A

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of pancreatic cancer represents an area of some controversy. However, local disease progression remains a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality for patients with this disease. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an emerging treatment option for pancreatic cancer, primarily for locally advanced (unresectable) disease as it can provide a therapeutic benefit with significant advantages for patients' quality of life over standard conventional chemoradiation. There may also be a role for SBRT as neoadjuvant therapy for patients with borderline resectable disease to allow conversion to resectability. The objective of this review is to present the data supporting SBRT in pancreatic cancer as well as the potential limitations and caveats of current studies.

  7. Feasibility of Electromagnetic Transponder Use to Monitor Inter- and Intrafractional Motion in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Eric T.; Kassaee, Alireza; Mitra, Nandita; Vapiwala, Neha; Plastaras, John P.; Drebin, Jeff; Wan, Fei; Metz, James M.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of electromagnetic transponder implantation in patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Secondarily, the use of transponders to monitor inter- and intrafractional motion, and the efficacy of breath holding for limiting target motion, were examined. Methods and Materials: During routine screening laparoscopy, 5 patients without metastatic disease were implanted with transponders peri-tumorally. The Calypso System's localization and tracking modes were used to monitor inter- and intrafractional motion, respectively. Intrafractional motion, with and without breath holding, was also examined using Calypso tracking mode. Results: Transponder implantation was well tolerated in all patients, with minimal migration, aside from 1 patient who expulsed a single transponder. Interfractional motion based on mean shifts from setup using tattoos/orthogonal imaging to transponder based localization from 164 treatments was significant in all dimensions. Mean shift (in millimeters), followed by the standard deviation and p value, were as follows: X-axis: 4.5 mm (1.0, p = 0.01); Y axis: 6.4 mm (1.9, p = 0.03); and Z-axis 3.9 mm (0.6, p = 0.002). Mean intrafractional motion was also found to be significant in all directions: superior, 7.2 mm (0.9, p = 0.01); inferior, 11.9 mm (0.9, p < 0.01); anterior: 4.9 mm (0.5, p = 0.01); posterior, 2.9 mm (0.5, p = 0.02); left, 2.2 mm (0.4, p = 0.02); and right, 3.1 mm (0.6, p = 0.04). Breath holding during treatment significantly decreased tumor motion in all directions. Conclusions: Electromagnetic transponder implantation appears to be safe and effective for monitoring inter- and intrafractional motion. Based on these results a larger clinical trial is underway.

  8. Advances and challenges in the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Abdelalim, Essam M; Emara, Mohamed M

    2015-01-26

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are able to differentiate into several cell types, including pancreatic β cells. Differentiation of pancreatic β cells depends on certain transcription factors, which function in a coordinated way during pancreas development. The existing protocols for in vitro differentiation produce pancreatic β cells, which are not highly responsive to glucose stimulation except after their transplantation into immune-compromised mice and allowing several weeks for further differentiation to ensure the maturation of these cells in vivo. Thus, although the substantial improvement that has been made for the differentiation of induced PSCs and embryonic stem cells toward pancreatic β cells, several challenges still hindering their full generation. Here, we summarize recent advances in the differentiation of PSCs into pancreatic β cells and discuss the challenges facing their differentiation as well as the different applications of these potential PSC-derived β cells.

  9. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  10. Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Johung, Kimberly; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Chang, Bryan W.

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative, but the majority of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment for patients with locally advanced disease is controversial. Therapeutic options include systemic therapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. We review the evidence to date regarding the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), as well as evolving strategies including the emerging role of targeted therapies. We propose that if radiation is used for patients with LAPC, it should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy and following a period of induction chemotherapy.

  11. Advances in the endoscopic management of pancreatic collections

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Clavijo, David; de la Higuera, Belen González; Vila, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of pancreatic collections has experienced great progress in recent years with the emergence of alternative minimally invasive techniques comparing to the classic surgical treatment. Such techniques have been shown to improve outcomes of morbidity vs surgical treatment. The recent emergence of endoscopic drainage is noteworthy. The advent of endoscopic ultrasonography has been crucial for treatment of these specific lesions. They can be characterized, their relationships with neighboring structures can be evaluated and the drainage guided by this technique has been clearly improved compared with the conventional endoscopic drainage. Computed tomography is the technique of choice to characterize the recently published new classification of pancreatic collections. For this reason, the radiologist’s role establishing and classifying in a rigorously manner the collections according to the new nomenclature is essential to making therapeutic decisions. Ideal scenario for comprehensive treatment of these collections would be those centers with endoscopic ultrasound and interventional radiology expertise together with hepatobiliopancreatic surgery. This review describes the different types of pancreatic collections: acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pancreatic pseudocysts, acute necrotic collection and walled-off necrosis; the indications and the contraindications for endoscopic drainage, the drainage technique and their outcomes. The integrated management of pancreatic collections according to their type and evolution time is discussed. PMID:25901217

  12. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma Using the Dorsal Approach: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffer, Hester J. Melenhorst, Marleen C. A. M.; Vogel, Jantien A.; Tilborg, Aukje A. J. M. van; Nielsen, Karin Kazemier, Geert; Meijerink, Martijn R.

    2015-06-15

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel image-guided ablation technique that is increasingly used to treat locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). We describe a 67-year-old male patient with a 5 cm stage III pancreatic tumor who was referred for IRE. Because the ventral approach for electrode placement was considered dangerous due to vicinity of the tumor to collateral vessels and duodenum, the dorsal approach was chosen. Under CT-guidance, six electrodes were advanced in the tumor, approaching paravertebrally alongside the aorta and inferior vena cava. Ablation was performed without complications. This case describes that when ventral electrode placement for pancreatic IRE is impaired, the dorsal approach could be considered alternatively.

  13. Randomised Phase I/II trial assessing the safety and efficacy of radiolabelled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen I131 KAb201 antibodies given intra-arterially or intravenously in patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Advanced pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis, and the current standard of care (gemcitabine based chemotherapy) provides a small survival advantage. However the drawback is the accompanying systemic toxicity, which targeted treatments may overcome. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and tolerability of KAb201, an anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody, labelled with I131 in pancreatic cancer (ISRCTN 16857581). Methods Patients with histological/cytological proven inoperable adenocarcinoma of the head of pancreas were randomised to receive KAb 201 via either the intra-arterial or intravenous delivery route. The dose limiting toxicities within each group were determined. Patients were assessed for safety and efficacy and followed up until death. Results Between February 2003 and July 2005, 25 patients were enrolled. Nineteen patients were randomised, 9 to the intravenous and 10 to the intra-arterial arms. In the intra-arterial arm, dose limiting toxicity was seen in 2/6 (33%) patients at 50 mCi whereas in the intravenous arm, dose limiting toxicity was noted in 1/6 patients at 50 mCi, but did not occur at 75 mCi (0/3). The overall response rate was 6% (1/18). Median overall survival was 5.2 months (95% confidence interval = 3.3 to 9 months), with no significant difference between the intravenous and intra-arterial arms (log rank test p = 0.79). One patient was still alive at the time of this analysis. Conclusion Dose limiting toxicity for KAb201 with I131 by the intra-arterial route was 50 mCi, while dose limiting toxicity was not reached in the intravenous arm. PMID:19243606

  14. Update on phase I studies in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Hunting in darkness?

    PubMed

    Strimpakos, Alexios S; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2013-07-10

    Over the last twenty years, there is a limited number of effective cytotoxic or biological agents that managed to get approval in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Despite numerous trials, investments in translational research and generally in health care, the survival of pancreatic cancer patients has improved by a few only months. This disappointing reality necessitates a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease and the identification of targetable alterations which might lead to development of more effective drugs or better combinations. At the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, few novel agents and new therapeutic concepts, tested in phase I studies in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, were presented. The first notable phase I study referred to the combination of chemotherapy with local delivery of silencing RNA against the K-ras mutation G12D, in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, which was well tolerated and promising (Abstract #4037). The second one referred to a combination of gemcitabine with pegylated recombinant human hyaluronidase (PEGPH20), an inhibitor of hyaluronan which as a matrix glycosaminoglycan is believed to play role in the reduced drug delivery to cancer (Abstract #4010). The other notable abstract was related to an early phase study which tested the safety and toxicity of arctigenin, a traditional herbal agent found in Arctium lappa Linné, administered as an oral formulation (GMS-01) in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patient resistant to standard chemotherapy (Abstract #2559). The aforementioned early phase studies open new therapeutic approaches which deserve further testing in advanced pancreatic cancer.

  15. Update on phase I studies in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Hunting in darkness?

    PubMed

    Strimpakos, Alexios S; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2013-07-01

    Over the last twenty years, there is a limited number of effective cytotoxic or biological agents that managed to get approval in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Despite numerous trials, investments in translational research and generally in health care, the survival of pancreatic cancer patients has improved by a few only months. This disappointing reality necessitates a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease and the identification of targetable alterations which might lead to development of more effective drugs or better combinations. At the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, few novel agents and new therapeutic concepts, tested in phase I studies in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, were presented. The first notable phase I study referred to the combination of chemotherapy with local delivery of silencing RNA against the K-ras mutation G12D, in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, which was well tolerated and promising (Abstract #4037). The second one referred to a combination of gemcitabine with pegylated recombinant human hyaluronidase (PEGPH20), an inhibitor of hyaluronan which as a matrix glycosaminoglycan is believed to play role in the reduced drug delivery to cancer (Abstract #4010). The other notable abstract was related to an early phase study which tested the safety and toxicity of arctigenin, a traditional herbal agent found in Arctium lappa Linné, administered as an oral formulation (GMS-01) in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patient resistant to standard chemotherapy (Abstract #2559). The aforementioned early phase studies open new therapeutic approaches which deserve further testing in advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:23846926

  16. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen. In 1 out of 4 childhood cases, a cause is never found. What are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Inflammation of the pancreas is often associated with pain in the upper abdomen and/or the back which may develop slowly, ...

  17. Advanced pancreatic cancer - how to choose an adequate treatment option

    PubMed Central

    Korkeila, Eija A

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is poor, making it one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. The 5-year overall survival rate remains below 5% and little progress is made during the past decade. Only about 10%-20% of patients are eligible for curative-intent surgery and the majority end up having recurring disease even after radical surgery and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Chemotherapy in metastatic disease is palliative at best, aiming at disease and symptom control and prolongation of life. Treatment always causes side effects, the degree of which varies from patient to patient, depending on the patient’s general condition, concomitant morbidities as well as on the chosen treatment modality. Why is pancreatic cancer so resistant to treatment? How to best help the patient to reach the set treatment goals? PMID:26478662

  18. Randomized Phase II Study of Pemetrexed, Carboplatin, and Thoracic Radiation With or Without Cetuximab in Patients With Locally Advanced Unresectable Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Cancer and Leukemia Group B Trial 30407

    PubMed Central

    Govindan, Ramaswamy; Bogart, Jeffrey; Stinchcombe, Thomas; Wang, Xiaofei; Hodgson, Lydia; Kratzke, Robert; Garst, Jennifer; Brotherton, Timothy; Vokes, Everett E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Cancer and Leukemia Group B conducted a randomized phase II trial to investigate two novel chemotherapy regimens in combination with concurrent thoracic radiation therapy (TRT). Patients and Methods Patients with unresectable stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were randomly assigned to carboplatin (area under the curve, 5) and pemetrexed (500 mg/m2) every 21 days for four cycles and TRT (70 Gy; arm A) or the same treatment with cetuximab administered concurrent only with TRT (arm B). Patients in both arms received up to four cycles of pemetrexed as consolidation therapy. The primary end point was the 18-month overall survival (OS) rate; if the 18-month OS rate was ≥ 55%, the regimen(s) would be considered for further study. Results Of the 101 eligible patients enrolled (48 in arm A and 53 in arm B), 60% were male; the median age was 66 years (range, 32 to 81 years); 44% and 35% had adenocarcinoma and squamous carcinoma, respectively; and more patients enrolled onto arm A compared with arm B had a performance status of 0 (58% v 34%, respectively; P = .04). The 18-month OS rate was 58% (95% CI, 46% to 74%) in arm A and 54% (95% CI, 42% to 70%) in arm B. No significant difference in OS between patients with squamous and nonsquamous NSCLC was observed (P = .667). The toxicities observed were consistent with toxicities associated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Conclusion The combination of pemetrexed, carboplatin, and TRT met the prespecified criteria for further evaluation. This regimen should be studied further in patients with locally advanced unresectable nonsquamous NSCLC. PMID:21747084

  19. Nanovectors for anti-cancer drug delivery in the treatment of advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Chung-Tzu; Selim, Julie H; Tsai, James Y; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-08-21

    Liposome, albumin and polymer polyethylene glycol are nanovector formulations successfully developed for anti-cancer drug delivery. There are significant differences in pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicity between pre- and post-nanovector modification. The alteration in clinical pharmacology is instrumental for the future development of nanovector-based anticancer therapeutics. We have reviewed the results of clinical studies and translational research in nanovector-based anti-cancer therapeutics in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, including nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel and nanoliposomal irinotecan. Furthermore, we have appraised the ongoing studies incorporating novel agents with nanomedicines in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27610018

  20. Nanovectors for anti-cancer drug delivery in the treatment of advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Chung-Tzu; Selim, Julie H; Tsai, James Y; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    Liposome, albumin and polymer polyethylene glycol are nanovector formulations successfully developed for anti-cancer drug delivery. There are significant differences in pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicity between pre- and post-nanovector modification. The alteration in clinical pharmacology is instrumental for the future development of nanovector-based anticancer therapeutics. We have reviewed the results of clinical studies and translational research in nanovector-based anti-cancer therapeutics in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, including nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel and nanoliposomal irinotecan. Furthermore, we have appraised the ongoing studies incorporating novel agents with nanomedicines in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27610018

  1. Nanovectors for anti-cancer drug delivery in the treatment of advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Chung-Tzu; Selim, Julie H; Tsai, James Y; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    Liposome, albumin and polymer polyethylene glycol are nanovector formulations successfully developed for anti-cancer drug delivery. There are significant differences in pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicity between pre- and post-nanovector modification. The alteration in clinical pharmacology is instrumental for the future development of nanovector-based anticancer therapeutics. We have reviewed the results of clinical studies and translational research in nanovector-based anti-cancer therapeutics in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, including nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel and nanoliposomal irinotecan. Furthermore, we have appraised the ongoing studies incorporating novel agents with nanomedicines in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  2. High intensity focused ultrasound: A noninvasive therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The noninvasive ablation of pancreatic cancer with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) energy is received increasingly widespread interest. With rapidly temperature rise to cytotoxic levels within the focal volume of ultrasound beams, HIFU can selectively ablate a targeted lesion of the pancreas without any damage to surrounding or overlying tissues. Preliminary studies suggest that this approach is technical safe and feasible, and can be used alone or in combination with systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. It can effectively alleviate cancer-related abdominal pain, and may confer an additional survival benefit with few significant complications. This review provides a brief overview of HIFU, describes current clinical applications, summarizes characteristics of continuous and pulsed HIFU, and discusses future applications and challenges in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25469016

  3. Review of experimental animal models of biliary acute pancreatitis and recent advances in basic research.

    PubMed

    Wan, Mei H; Huang, Wei; Latawiec, Diane; Jiang, Kun; Booth, David M; Elliott, Victoria; Mukherjee, Rajarshi; Xia, Qing

    2012-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a formidable disease, which, in severe forms, causes significant mortality. Biliary AP, or gallstone obstruction-associated AP, accounts for 30-50% of all clinical cases of AP. In biliary AP, pancreatic acinar cell (PAC) death (the initiating event in the disease) is believed to occur as acinar cells make contact with bile salts when bile refluxes into the pancreatic duct. Recent advances have unveiled an important receptor responsible for the major function of bile acids on acinar cells, namely, the cell surface G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor-1 (Gpbar1), located in the apical pole of the PAC. High concentrations of bile acids induce cytosolic Ca(2+) overload and inhibit mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, resulting in cell injury to both PACs and pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Various bile salts are employed to induce experimental AP, most commonly sodium taurocholate. Recent characterization of taurolithocholic acid 3-sulphate on PACs has led researchers to focus on this bile salt because of its potency in causing acinar cell injury at relatively low, sub-detergent concentrations, which strongly implicates action via the receptor Gpbar1. Improved surgical techniques have enabled the infusion of bile salts into the pancreatic duct to induce experimental biliary AP in mice, which allows the use of these transgenic animals as powerful tools. This review summarizes recent findings using transgenic mice in experimental biliary AP. PMID:22221567

  4. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Biliary Tract or Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  5. Pancreatic cancer and SBRT: A new potential option?

    PubMed Central

    Hajj, Carla; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Local control remains a major issue for patients with unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). The role of radiation therapy in the management of LAPC represents an area of some controversy. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is an emerging treatment option for LAPC as it can provide a therapeutic benefit with significant advantages for patients’ quality of life over standard conventional chemoradiation. The objective of this review is to present the rationale for stereotactic body radiotherapy in LAPC, as well as to discuss the potential limitations and caveats of the currently available studies. PMID:26549996

  6. The European Medicines Agency review of ipilimumab (Yervoy) for the treatment of advanced (unresectable or metastatic) melanoma in adults who have received prior therapy: summary of the scientific assessment of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use.

    PubMed

    Hanaizi, Zahra; van Zwieten-Boot, Barbara; Calvo, Gonzalo; Lopez, Arantxa Sancho; van Dartel, Maaike; Camarero, Jorge; Abadie, Eric; Pignatti, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    On 13 July 2011 the European Commission issued a marketing authorisation valid throughout the European Union (EU) for ipilimumab for the treatment of advanced (unresectable or metastatic) melanoma in adults who have received prior therapy. Ipilimumab is a monoclonal antibody that specifically blocks the inhibitory signal of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4), resulting in T cell activation, proliferation and lymphocyte infiltration into tumours, leading to tumour cell death. The recommended induction regimen of ipilimumab is 3mg/kg administered intravenously over a 90 min period every 3 weeks for a total of four doses. In a phase 3 trial in patients with advanced melanoma, median overall survival for ipilimumab was 10 months versus 6 months for gp100, an experimental melanoma vaccine (Hazard ratio (HR) 0.66; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.51, 0.87; p = 0.0026). Ipilimumab was most commonly associated with adverse reactions resulting from increased or excessive immune activity. Most of these, including severe reactions, resolved following initiation of appropriate medical therapy or withdrawal of ipilimumab. The most common side-effects (affecting more than 10% of patients) were diarrhoea, rash, pruritus, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, decreased appetite and abdominal pain. The objective of this paper is to summarise the scientific review of the application leading to approval in the EU. The detailed scientific assessment report and product information, including the summary of product characteristics (SmPC), are available on the European Medicines Agency (EMA) website (www.ema.europa.eu).

  7. Phase I dose-escalation study of cabazitaxel administered in combination with gemcitabine in patients with metastatic or unresectable advanced solid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Puzanov, Igor; LoRusso, Patricia M.; Cohen, Roger B.; Morris, John C.; Olowokure, Olugbenga O.; Yin, Jian Y.; Doroumian, Séverine; Shen, Liji; Olszanski, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Taxane–gemcitabine combinations have demonstrated antitumor activity. This phase I study (NCT01001221) aimed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of cabazitaxel plus gemcitabine and to assess the preliminary efficacy of this combination. The patients included had metastatic or unresectable solid tumors and had exhausted standard treatment. Cohorts of three to six patients received cabazitaxel (15–20 mg/m2) before (part 1a) or after (part 1b) gemcitabine (700–1000 mg/m2) on Day 1 and gemcitabine alone on Day 8. Prophylactic growth factors were not allowed in cycle 1. In part 1a (n=12), five patients received 20 mg/m2 cabazitaxel plus 1000 mg/m2 gemcitabine (20/1000), five received 15/900, two received 15/700. In part 1b, all six patients received the lowest dose (700/15). At all doses, two or more patients experienced a DLT, regardless of administration sequence, including febrile neutropenia (n=4), grade 4 neutropenia (n=2), grade 4 thrombocytopenia (n=2), and grade 3 aspartate transaminase increase (n=1). The MTD was not established as all cohorts exceeded the MTD by definition. All patients experienced an adverse event; the most frequent all-grade nonhematologic events were fatigue (66.7%), decreased appetite (50.0%), and diarrhea (44.4%). The most frequent grade 3–4 hematologic abnormalities were neutropenia (83.3%), leukopenia (77.8%), and lymphopenia (72.2%). Toxicity was sequence-independent but appeared worse with gemcitabine followed by cabazitaxel. Durable partial responses were observed in three patients (prostate cancer, appendiceal cancer, and melanoma). The unacceptable DLTs with cabazitaxel plus gemcitabine, at doses reduced more than 25% from single-agent doses, preclude further investigation. PMID:26020806

  8. Everolimus in advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: the clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Yao, James C; Phan, Alexandria T; Jehl, Valentine; Shah, Gaurav; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2013-03-01

    The incidence of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) has increased dramatically in the past 30 years. This information has revitalized basic and clinical research into the molecular biology of NET and has resulted in the recent approval of new therapies for pancreatic NET (pNET), including the oral inhibitor of the mTOR everolimus. Everolimus significantly improved progression-free survival among patients with pNET in the phase III RADIANT-3 study. Here, we review the clinical studies showing the efficacy of everolimus in pNET and summarize the translational science from these studies. To understand the mechanisms of resistance and cause of treatment failure, we compared the type of progression events observed in the everolimus and placebo arms of the RADIANT-3 study. Comparison of the everolimus arm to the placebo arm indicated the fractions of progression events due to new metastasis only (21% vs. 22%), growth of preexisting lesions only (54% vs. 49%), and new metastasis along with growth of preexisting lesions (24% vs. 27%) were similar. These results suggest that although everolimus delays disease progression in patients with pNET, patients who experience disease progression while on everolimus do not appear to have a more aggressive metastatic phenotype than those whose disease progresses while on placebo.

  9. The effects of curcumin (diferuloylmethane) on body composition of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Henrique A.; Baracos, Vickie E.; Hong, David S.; Abbruzzese, James; Bruera, Eduardo; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-01-01

    Background Curcumin is a natural product that is often explored by patients with cancer. Weight loss due to fat and muscle depletion is a hallmark of pancreatic cancer and is associated with worse outcomes. Studies of curcumin's effects on muscularity show conflicting results in animal models. Methods and results Retrospective matched 1:2 case-control study to evaluate the effects of curcumin on body composition (determined by computerized tomography) of 66 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (22 treated,44 controls). Average age (SEM) was 63(1.8) years, 30/66(45%) women, median number of prior therapies was 2, median (IQR) time from advanced pancreatic cancer diagnosis to baseline image was 7(2-13.5) months (p>0.2, all variables). All patients lost weight (3.3% and 1.3%, treated vs. control, p=0.13). Treated patients lost more muscle (median [IQR] percent change −4.8[−9.1,-0.1] vs. −0.05%[−4.2, 2.6] in controls,p<0.001) and fat (median [IQR] percent change −6.8%[−15,-0.6] vs. −4.0%[−7.6, 1.3] in controls,p=0.04). Subcutaneous fat was more affected in the treated patients. Sarcopenic patients treated with curcumin(n=15) had survival of 169(115-223) days vs. 299(229-369) sarcopenic controls(p=0.024). No survival difference was found amongst non-sarcopenic patients. Conclusions Patients with advanced pancreatic cancer treated with curcumin showed significantly greater loss of subcutaneous fat and muscle than matched untreated controls. PMID:26934122

  10. L-Carnitine-supplementation in advanced pancreatic cancer (CARPAN) - a randomized multicentre trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cachexia, a >10% loss of body-weight, is one factor determining the poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer. Deficiency of L-Carnitine has been proposed to cause cancer cachexia. Findings We screened 152 and enrolled 72 patients suffering from advanced pancreatic cancer in a prospective, multi-centre, placebo-controlled, randomized and double-blinded trial to receive oral L-Carnitine (4 g) or placebo for 12 weeks. At entry patients reported a mean weight loss of 12 ± 2,5 (SEM) kg. During treatment body-mass-index increased by 3,4 ± 1,4% under L-Carnitine and decreased (−1,5 ± 1,4%) in controls (p < 0,05). Moreover, nutritional status (body cell mass, body fat) and quality-of-life parameters improved under L-Carnitine. There was a trend towards an increased overall survival in the L-Carnitine group (median 519 ± 50 d versus 399 ± 43 d, not significant) and towards a reduced hospital-stay (36 ± 4d versus 41 ± 9d,n.s.). Conclusion While these data are preliminary and need confirmation they indicate that patients with pancreatic cancer may have a clinically relevant benefit from the inexpensive and well tolerated oral supplementation of L-Carnitine. PMID:22824168

  11. Efficacy and Factors Affecting Outcome of Gemcitabine Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, P.-I.; Chao, Yee; Li, C.-P.; Lee, R.-C.; Chi, K.-H.; Shiau, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-W.; Yen, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and prognostic factors of gemcitabine (GEM) concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2005, 55 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with GEM (400 mg/m{sup 2}/wk) concurrently with radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 26-61.2) at Taipei Veterans General Hospital were enrolled. GEM (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) was continued after CCRT as maintenance therapy once weekly for 3 weeks and repeated every 4 weeks. The response, survival, toxicity, and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.8 months, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 52% and 19%, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) and median time to progression (TTP) was 12.4 and 5.9 months, respectively. The response rate was 42% (2 complete responses and 21 partial responses). The major Grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (22%) and anorexia (19%). The median OS and TTP was 15.8 and 9.5 months in the GEM CCRT responders compared with 7.5 and 3.5 months in the nonresponders, respectively (both p < 0.001). The responders had a better Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (86 {+-} 2 vs. 77 {+-} 2, p = 0.002) and had received a greater GEM dose intensity (347 {+-} 13 mg/m{sup 2}/wk vs. 296 {+-} 15 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, p = 0.02) than the nonresponders. KPS and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were the most significant prognostic factors of OS and TTP. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that GEM CCRT is effective and tolerable for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The KPS and GEM dose correlated with response. Also, the KPS and CA 19-9 level were the most important factors affecting OS and TTP.

  12. Phase I Results of Vinorelbine With Concurrent Radiotherapy in Elderly Patients With Unresectable, Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: West Japan Thoracic Oncology Group (WJTOG3005-DI)

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Hideyuki; Seto, Takashi; Igawa, Satoshi; Tsuya, Asuka; Wada, Mayuko; Kaira, Kyoichi; Naito, Tateaki; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Masuda, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of concurrent vinorelbine and thoracic radiotherapy in elderly patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients were 71 years of age or older with unresectable Stage III NSCLC. Patients were treated with thoracic radiotherapy (60 Gy) and concurrent vinorelbine (20 mg/m{sup 2} in Level 1 and 25 mg/m{sup 2} in Level 2) on Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks for two cycles, followed by adjuvant vinorelbine (25 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks for two cycles. Results: Four patients were enrolled at Level 1. One patient experienced Grade 3 febrile neutropenia at Level 1 and the dose was escalated to Level 2. At Level 2, 2 of 6 patients experienced dose-limiting toxicities (Grade 4 neutropenia in 1 patient and Grade 3 infection in another). Three of 6 patients developed late Grade 2 or 3 pneumonitis. Therefore, the dose was de-escalated to Level 1. An additional 6 patients were enrolled at Level 1, 4 of whom experienced dose-limiting toxicities (incomplete radiotherapy because of Grade 2 pneumonitis in 1 patient and Grade 3 infection in 1, Grade 3 febrile neutropenia in 1, and Grade 3 esophagitis in 1). Moreover, late Grade 3 pneumothorax and Grade 5 pneumonitis occurred in 1 and 1 patient, respectively. Overall, Grade 2, 3 and 5 pneumonitis occurred in 3, 3, and 1 among 16 patients, respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent vinorelbine and thoracic radiotherapy resulted in a high incidence of severe pneumonitis when the standard dose of this agent was used for elderly patients. We therefore recommend caution in the use of this regimen and schedule for elderly patients.

  13. Proteomic strategies in the search for novel pancreatic cancer biomarkers and drug targets: recent advances and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Orla; Henry, Michael; McVey, Gerard; Clynes, Martin; Moriarty, Michael; Meleady, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the deadliest cancers; despite a low incidence rate it is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Improvement of the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment remains the main focus of pancreatic cancer research. Rapid developments in proteomic technologies has improved our understanding of the pancreatic cancer proteome. Here, the authors summarise the recent proteomic strategies undertaken in the search for: novel biomarkers for early diagnosis, pancreatic cancer-specific proteins which may be used for novel targeted therapies and proteins which may be useful for monitoring disease progression post-therapy. Recent advances and findings discussed here provide great promise of having a significant clinical impact and improving the outcome of patients with this malignancy. PMID:26985644

  14. Treatment-related gastrointestinal toxicities and advanced colorectal or pancreatic cancer: A critical update

    PubMed Central

    Aprile, Giuseppe; Rihawi, Karim; De Carlo, Elisa; Sonis, Stephen T

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicities (GIT), including oral mucositis, nausea and vomiting, and diarrhea, are common side effects of chemotherapy and targeted agents in patients with advanced colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer. Being often underreported, it is still difficult to precisely establish their burden in terms of both patient’s quality of life and cancer care costs. Moreover, with the use of more intensive upfront combination regimens, the frequency of these toxicities is rapidly growing with a potential negative effect also on patient’s outcome, as a result of dose reductions, delays or even discontinuation of active treatments. Thus, identifying patients at higher risk of developing GIT as well as an optimal management are paramount in order to improve patient’s compliance and outcome. After the description of the main treatment-induced GIT, we discuss the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of these side effects and comment the scales commonly used to assess and grade them. We then provide a critical update on GIT incidence based on the results of key randomized trials conducted in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26557003

  15. Phase I Study of Daily Irinotecan as a Radiation Sensitizer for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fouchardiere, Christelle de la; Negrier, Sylvie; Labrosse, Hugues; Martel Lafay, Isabelle; Desseigne, Francoise; Meeus, Pierre; Tavan, David; Petit-Laurent, Fabien; Rivoire, Michel; Perol, David; Carrie, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The study aimed to determine the maximum tolerated dose of daily irinotecan given with concomitant radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and March 2008, 36 patients with histologically proven unresectable pancreas adenocarcinoma were studied prospectively. Irinotecan was administered daily, 1 to 2 h before irradiation. Doses were started at 6 mg/m{sup 2} per day and then escalated by increments of 2 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 patients. Radiotherapy was administered in 2-Gy fractions, 5 fractions per week, up to a total dose of 50 Gy to the tumor volume. Inoperability was confirmed by a surgeon involved in a multidisciplinary team. All images and responses were centrally reviewed by radiologists. Results: Thirty-six patients were enrolled over a period of 8 years through eight dose levels (6 mg/m{sup 2} to 20 mg/m{sup 2} per day). The maximum tolerated dose was determined to be 18 mg/m{sup 2} per day. The dose-limiting toxicities were nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, dehydration, and hypokalemia. The median survival time was 12.6 months with a median follow-up of 53.8 months. The median progression-free survival time was 6.5 months, and 4 patients (11.4%) with very good responses could undergo surgery. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose of irinotecan is 18 mg/m{sup 2} per day for 5 weeks. Dose-limiting toxicities are mainly gastrointestinal. Even though efficacy was not the aim of this study, the results are very promising, with a median survival time of 12.6 months.

  16. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer.

  17. Recombinant EphB4-HSA Fusion Protein With Standard Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Non-Resectable Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma; Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

  18. [Surgical treatment for pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasmas].

    PubMed

    Wu, Junli; Guo, Feng; Wei, Jishu; Lu, Zipeng; Chen, Jianmin; Gao, Wentao; Li, Qiang; Jiang, Kuirong; Dai, Cuncai; Miao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasmas (PNENs) are classified into functioning & non-functioning tumors. The radical surgery is the only effective way for the cure & long-term survival. For the locoregional resectable tumors, the surgical resection is the first choice of treatment; the surgical procedures include local resection (enucleation) and standard resection. For the insulinomas and non-functioning tumors less than 2 cm, local resection (enucleation),distal pancreatectomy with spleen-preservation or segmental pancreatectomy are the commonly selected procedures. The radical resections with regional lymph nodes dissection, including pancreaticoduodenectomy, distal pancreatectomy and middle segmental pancreatectomy, should be applied for tumors more than 2 cm or malignant ones. For the locoregional advanced or unresectable functioning tumors, debulking surgery should be performed and more than 90% of the lesions including primary and metastatic tumors should be removed; for the non-functioning tumors, if complicated with biliary & digestive tract obstruction or hemorrhage, the primary tumors should be resected. The liver is the most frequent site of metastases for PNENs and three types of metastases are defined. For typeⅠmetastasis, patients are recommended for surgery if there are no contraindications; For type II metastasis, debulking surgery should be applied and at least 90% of metastatic lesions should be resected, and for patients with primary tumors removed and no extrahepatic metastases, or for patients with well-differentiated (G1/G2) tumors, liver transplantation may be indicated. For the unresectable type Ⅲ metastasis, multiple adjuvant therapies should be chosen. PMID:27045238

  19. Therapy of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs): recent insights and advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) [carcinoids, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs)] are becoming an increasing clinical problem because not only are they increasing in frequency, but they can frequently present with advanced disease that requires diagnostic and treatment approaches different from those used in the neoplasms that most physicians are used to seeing and treating. In the past few years there have been numerous advances in all aspects of NETs including: an understanding of their unique pathogenesis; specific classification systems developed which have prognostic value; novel methods of tumor localization developed; and novel treatment approaches described. In patients with advanced metastatic disease these include the use of newer chemotherapeutic approaches, an increased understanding of the role of surgery and cytoreductive methods, the development of methods for targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents, and the development of targeted medical therapies (everolimus, sunitinib) based on an increased understanding of the disease biology. Although pNETs and gastrointestinal NETs share many features, recent studies show they differ in pathogenesis and in many aspects of diagnosis and treatment, including their responsiveness to different therapies. Because of limited space, this review will be limited to the advances made in the management and treatment of patients with advanced metastatic pNETs over the past 5 years. PMID:22886480

  20. Photodynamic therapy of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (VERTPAC study): final clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggett, M. T.; Jermyn, M.; Gillams, A.; Mosse, S.; Kent, E.; Bown, S. G.; Hasan, T.; Pogue, B. W.; Pereira, S. P.

    2013-03-01

    We undertook a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) in 15 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Needle placement and laser delivery were technically successful in all patients. Thirteen patients were treated with a single laser fibre. Three treatments were carried out each at 5, 10 and 20 J/cm2; and 5 treatments (4 patients) at 40 J/cm2. A further 2 patients were treated with 2 or 3 laser fibres at 40 J/cm2. Tumour necrosis was measured on CT (computed tomography) by two radiologists 5 days after treatment. There was a clear dosedependent increase in necrosis with a median area of 20 x 16 mm (range 18 x 16 to 35 x 30 mm) at 40 J/cm2. In the 2 patients treated with multiple fibres, necrosis was 40 x 36 mm and 30 x 28 mm, respectively. There were no early complications in patients treated with a single fibre. Both patients treated with multiple fibres had evidence on CT of inflammatory change occurring anterior to the pancreas but without clinical deterioration. These results suggest that single fibre verteporfin PDT is safe in a clinical setting up to 40J/cm2 and produces a dose-dependent area of pancreatic necrosis.

  1. CT Findings of Patients Treated with Irreversible Electroporation for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akinwande, Olaguoke; Ahmad, Shakeeb S.; Van Meter, Tracy; Schulz, Brittany; Martin, Robert C. G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), IRE has been shown to be safe for local disease control and palliation. As IRE continues to gain acceptance it is important to characterize the expected imaging findings. Materials and Methods. A review of our prospective soft tissue ablation registry from July 2010 to June 2013 was performed on patients who had undergone IRE for LAPC. Five masses treated with intraoperative IRE ablation for pancreatic tumors that underwent CT imaging before and after ablation were reviewed. Results and Discussion. Following IRE, the postablation bed is larger than the original ablated tumor. This ablation zone may get smaller in size (due to decreased edema and hyperemia) in the following months and more importantly remains stable provided there is no recurrence. In cases of recurrent disease there is increased size of the ablation bed, mass effect, and new or worsening vascular encasement or occlusion. Conclusion. CT imaging remains the best current imaging modality to assess post-IRE ablation changes. Serial imaging over at least 2–6 months must be employed to detect recurrence by comparing with prior studies in conjunction with clinical and serum studies. Larger imaging studies are underway to evaluate a more ideal imaging modality for this unique patient population. PMID:26649039

  2. Predictors for resectability and survival in locally advanced pancreatic cancer after gemcitabine-based neoadjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate the predictors for resectability and survival of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with gemcitabine-based neoadjuvant therapy (GBNAT). Methods Between May 2003 and Dec 2009, 41 tissue-proved LAPC were treated with GBNAT. The location of pancreatic cancer in the head, body and tail was 17, 18 and 6 patients respectively. The treatment response was evaluated by RECIST criteria. Surgical exploration was based on the response and the clear plan between tumor and celiac artery/superior mesentery artery. Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox Model were used to calculate the resectability and survival rates. Results Finally, 25 patients received chemotherapy (CT) and 16 patients received concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT). The response rate was 51% (21 patients), 2 CR (1 in CT and 1 in CRT) and 19 PR (10 in CT and 9 in CRT). 20 patients (48.8%) were assessed as surgically resectable, in which 17 (41.5%) underwent successful resection with a 17.6% positive-margin rate and 3 failed explorations were pancreatic head cancer for dense adhesion. Two pancreatic neck cancer turned fibrosis only. Patients with surgical intervention had significant actuarial overall survival. Tumor location and post-GBNAT CA199 < 152 were predictors for resectability. Post-GBNAT CA-199 < 152 and post-GBNAT CA-125 < 32.8 were predictors for longer disease progression-free survival. Pre-GBNAT CA-199 < 294, post-GBNAT CA-125 < 32.8, and post-op CEA < 6 were predictors for longer overall survival. Conclusion Tumor location and post-GBNAT CA199 < 152 are predictors for resectability while pre-GBNAT CA-199 < 294, post-GBNAT CA-125 < 32.8, post-GBNAT CA-199 < 152 and post-op CEA < 6 are survival predictors in LAPC patients with GBNAT. PMID:25258022

  3. Recent advances in 3D computed tomography techniques for simulation and navigation in hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masafumi

    2014-04-01

    A few years ago it could take several hours to complete a 3D image using a 3D workstation. Thanks to advances in computer science, obtaining results of interest now requires only a few minutes. Many recent 3D workstations or multimedia computers are equipped with onboard 3D virtual patient modeling software, which enables patient-specific preoperative assessment and virtual planning, navigation, and tool positioning. Although medical 3D imaging can now be conducted using various modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasonography (US) among others, the highest quality images are obtained using CT data, and CT images are now the most commonly used source of data for 3D simulation and navigation image. If the 2D source image is bad, no amount of 3D image manipulation in software will provide a quality 3D image. In this exhibition, the recent advances in CT imaging technique and 3D visualization of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic abnormalities are featured, including scan and image reconstruction technique, contrast-enhanced techniques, new application of advanced CT scan techniques, and new virtual reality simulation and navigation imaging.

  4. First-line erlotinib and fixed dose-rate gemcitabine for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vaccaro, Vanja; Bria, Emilio; Sperduti, Isabella; Gelibter, Alain; Moscetti, Luca; Mansueto, Giovanni; Ruggeri, Enzo Maria; Gamucci, Teresa; Cognetti, Francesco; Milella, Michele

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate activity, toxicity, and prognostic factors for survival of erlotinib and fixed dose-rate gemcitabine (FDR-Gem) in advanced pancreatic cancer. METHODS: We designed a single-arm prospective, multicentre, open-label phase II study to evaluate the combination of erlotinib (100 mg/d, orally) and weekly FDR-Gem (1000 mg/m2, infused at 10 mg/m2 per minute) in a population of previously untreated patients with locally advanced, inoperable, or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Primary endpoint was the rate of progression-free survival at 6 mo (PFS-6); secondary endpoints were overall response rate (ORR), response duration, tolerability, overall survival (OS), and clinical benefit. Treatment was not considered to be of further interest if the PFS-6 was < 20% (p0 = 20%), while a PFS-6 > 40% would be of considerable interest (p1 = 40%); with a 5% rejection error (α = 5%) and a power of 80%, 35 fully evaluable patients with metastatic disease were required to be enrolled in order to complete the study. Analysis of prognostic factors for survival was also carried out. RESULTS: From May 2007 to September 2009, 46 patients were enrolled (male/female: 25/21; median age: 64 years; median baseline carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9): 897 U/mL; locally advanced/metastatic disease: 5/41). PFS-6 and median PFS were 30.4% and 14 wk (95%CI: 10-19), respectively; 1-year and median OS were 20.2% and 26 wk (95%CI: 8-43). Five patients achieved an objective response (ORR: 10.9%, 95%CI: 1.9-19.9); disease control rate was 56.5% (95%CI: 42.2-70.8); clinical benefit rate was 43.5% (95%CI: 29.1-57.8). CA 19-9 serum levels were decreased by > 25% as compared to baseline in 14/23 evaluable patients (63.6%). Treatment was well-tolerated, with skin rash being the most powerful predictor of both longer PFS (P < 0.0001) and OS (P = 0.01) at multivariate analysis (median OS for patients with or without rash: 42 wk vs 15 wk, respectively, Log-rank P = 0.03). Additional predictors of

  5. The pancreatic beta cell as a paradigm for advances in inositide research.

    PubMed

    Barker, Christopher J; Berggren, Per-Olof

    2012-09-01

    In a previous review for Advances in Enzyme Research (Berggren and Barker, 2008) we outlined the history of our involvement in discovering important roles for inositides in the insulin secreting pancreatic beta cell. In this current appraisal we bring the work up to date and project how we believe this field will continue to develop in the future. Recently, we have seen an important synergism between the growth in our understanding of inositide function and our knowledge of beta cell stimulus-secretion coupling in both physiological and pathophysiological contexts. Important advances have been made in three areas. 1. The classic regulation of cytoplasmic free Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)](i) by Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P(3)) and its receptor, 2. A novel role of the inositol pyrophosphates, especially 5-diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate (5-PP-InsP(5)), in exocytosis, and 3. The unique signaling roles of PI3K pathways instituted by the engagement of the insulin receptor in an autocrine, positive feed-back loop. We examine each of these in turn and close with an assessment of the likely future directions the research will take.

  6. Comparison of Intrahepatic and Pancreatic Perfusion on Fusion Images Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Assessment of Efficacy of Combined Continuous Arterial Infusion and Systemic Chemotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osama Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Takamori, Hiroshi; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro; Baba, Hideo

    2007-09-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images using a combined single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT system and to evaluate the efficacy of combined continuous transcatheter arterial infusion (CTAI) and systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Materials and Methods. CTAI was performed in 33 patients (22 men, 11 women; age range, 35-77 years; mean age, 60 years) with stage IV pancreatic cancer with liver metastasis. The reservoir was transcutaneously implanted with the help of angiography. The systemic administration of gemcitabine was combined with the infusion of 5-fluorouracil via the reservoir. In all patients we obtained fusion images using a combined SPECT/CT system. Pancreatic perfusion on fusion images was classified as perfusion presence or as perfusion absent in the pancreatic cancer. Using WHO criteria we recorded the tumor response after 3 months on multislice helical CT scans. Treatment effects were evaluated based on the pancreatic cancer, liver metastasis, and factors such as intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images. For statistical analysis we used the chi-square test; survival was evaluated by the Kaplan Meier method (log-rank test). Results. On fusion images, pancreatic and intrahepatic perfusion was recorded as hot spot and as homogeneous distribution, respectively, in 18 patients (55%) and as cold spot and heterogeneous distribution, respectively, in 15 (45%). Patients with hot spot in the pancreatic tumor and homogeneous distribution in the liver manifested better treatment results (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Patients with hot spot both in the pancreatic cancer and in the liver survived longer than those with cold spot in the pancreatic cancer and heterogeneous distribution in the liver (median {+-} SD, 16.0 {+-} 3.7 vs. 8.0 {+-} 1.4 months; p < 0.05). Conclusions. We conclude that in patients with advanced

  7. A dosimetric analysis of dose escalation using two intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques in locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Michael W.; Ning, Holly; Arora, Barbara; Albert, Paul S.; Poggi, Matthew; Camphausen, Kevin; Citrin, Deborah . E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To perform an analysis of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), sequential boost intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRTs), and integrated boost IMRT (IMRTi) for dose escalation in unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography images from 15 patients were used. Treatment plans were generated using 3D-CRT, IMRTs, and IMRTi for dose levels of 54, 59.4, and 64.8 Gy. Plans were analyzed for target coverage, doses to liver, kidneys, small bowel, and spinal cord. Results: Three-dimensional-CRT exceeded tolerance to small bowel in 1 of 15 (6.67%) patients at 54 Gy, and 4 of 15 (26.7%) patients at 59.4 and 64.8 Gy. 3D-CRT exceeded spinal cord tolerance in 1 of 15 patients (6.67%) at 59.4 Gy and liver constraints in 1 of 15 patients (6.67%) at 64.8 Gy; no IMRT plans exceeded tissue tolerance. Both IMRT techniques reduced the percentage of total kidney volume receiving 20 Gy (V20), the percentage of small bowel receiving 45 Gy (V45), and the percentage of liver receiving 35 Gy (V35). IMRTi appeared superior to IMRTs in reducing the total kidney V20 (p < 0.0001), right kidney V20 (p < 0.0001), and small bowel V45 (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Sequential boost IMRT and IMRTi improved the ability to achieve normal tissue dose goals compared with 3D-CRT. IMRTi allowed dose escalation to 64.8 Gy with acceptable normal tissue doses and superior dosimetry compared with 3D-CRT and IMRTs.

  8. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin With or Without Veliparib or Veliparib Alone in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; PALB2 Gene Mutation; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  9. Inaugural Meeting of North American Pancreatic Cancer Organizations: Advancing Collaboration and Communication.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Barbara J; Fleshman, Julie M; Goldberg, Ann E; Rothschild, Laura J

    2015-11-01

    A meeting of North American Pancreatic Cancer Organizations planned by Kenner Family Research Fund and Pancreatic Cancer Action Network was held on July 15-16, 2015, in New York City. The meeting was attended by 32 individuals from 20 nonprofit groups from the United States and Canada. The objectives of this inaugural convening were to share mission goals and initiatives, engage as leaders, cultivate potential partnerships, and increase participation in World Pancreatic Cancer Day. The program was designed to provide opportunities for informal conversations, as well as facilitated discussions to meet the stated objectives. At the conclusion of the meeting, the group agreed that enhancing collaboration and communication will result in a more unified approach within the field and will benefit individuals diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. As a first step, the group will actively collaborate to participate in World Pancreatic Cancer Day, which is planned for November 13, 2015, and seeks to raise the level of visibility about the disease globally.

  10. Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: Flourishing Novel Approaches in the Era of Biological Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Joanne W.; Wong, Hilda; Leung, Roland; Pang, Roberta; Cheung, Tan-To; Fan, Sheung-Tat; Poon, Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    The progress in the development of systemic treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) has been slow. The mainstream treatment remains using chemotherapy including gemcitabine, FOLFIRINOX, and nab-paclitaxel. Erlotinib is the only approved biological therapy with marginal benefit. Studies of agents targeting epidermal growth factor receptor, angiogenesis, and RAS signaling have not been satisfying, and the usefulness of targeted therapy in APC is uncertain. Understanding in molecular processes and tumor biology has opened the door for new treatment strategies such as targeting insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, transforming growth factor β, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, and Notch pathway. New directions also include the upcoming immunotherapy and many novel agents that act on the microenvironment. The practice of personalized medicine using predictive biomarkers and pharmacogenomics signatures may also enhance the effectiveness of existing treatment. Future treatment approaches may involve comprehensive genomic assessment of tumor and integrated combinations of multiple agents to overcome treatment resistance. PMID:25117068

  11. Advanced pancreatic cancer: flourishing novel approaches in the era of biological therapy.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Joanne W; Wong, Hilda; Leung, Roland; Pang, Roberta; Cheung, Tan-To; Fan, Sheung-Tat; Poon, Ronnie; Yau, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The progress in the development of systemic treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) has been slow. The mainstream treatment remains using chemotherapy including gemcitabine, FOLFIRINOX, and nab-paclitaxel. Erlotinib is the only approved biological therapy with marginal benefit. Studies of agents targeting epidermal growth factor receptor, angiogenesis, and RAS signaling have not been satisfying, and the usefulness of targeted therapy in APC is uncertain. Understanding in molecular processes and tumor biology has opened the door for new treatment strategies such as targeting insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, transforming growth factor β, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, and Notch pathway. New directions also include the upcoming immunotherapy and many novel agents that act on the microenvironment. The practice of personalized medicine using predictive biomarkers and pharmacogenomics signatures may also enhance the effectiveness of existing treatment. Future treatment approaches may involve comprehensive genomic assessment of tumor and integrated combinations of multiple agents to overcome treatment resistance. PMID:25117068

  12. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-14

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  13. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  14. Inherited pancreatic endocrine tumor syndromes: advances in molecular pathogenesis, diagnosis, management and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Robert T.; Berna, Marc J.; Bingham, David B; Norton, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) can occur in as part of four inherited disorders including: Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL), neurofibromatosis 1(NF-1) [von Recklinghausen’s disease] and the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). The relative frequency with which patients with these disorders develop PETs is MEN1>VHL>NF-1>TSC. Over the last few years there have been major advances in the understanding of the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of these disorders as well in the localization, medical and surgical treatment of the PETs in these patients. The study of the PETs in these disorders has not only provided insights into the possible pathogenesis of sporadic PETs, but have also presented a number of unique management and treatment issues, some of which are applicable to patients with sporadic PETs. Therefore the study of PETs in these uncommon disorders has provided valuable insights that in many cases are applicable to the general group of patients with sporadic PETs. In this article these areas are briefly reviewed as well as the current state of knowledge of the PETs in these disorders and the controversies that exist in their management are briefly summarized and discussed. PMID:18798544

  15. Update on the Management of Pancreatic Cancer in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shin Yin; Sissoko, Moussa; Hartshorn, Kevan L

    2016-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer is more common in older adults, who are underrepresented in clinical trials and frequently under treated. Chronological age alone should not deter clinicians from offering treatment to geriatric patients, as they are a heterogeneous population. Geriatric assessment, frailty assessment tools, and toxicity risk scores help clinicians select appropriate patients for therapy. For resectable disease, surgery can be safe but should be done at a high-volume center. Adjuvant therapy is important; though there remains controversy on the role of radiation, chemotherapy is well studied and efficacious. In locally advanced unresectable disease, chemoradiation or chemotherapy alone is an option. Neoadjuvant therapy improves the chances of resectability in borderline resectable disease. Chemotherapy extends survival in metastatic disease, but treatment goals and risk-benefit ratios have to be clarified. Adequate symptom management and supportive care are important. There are now many new treatment strategies and novel therapies for this disease. PMID:27492426

  16. Endoscopic and operative palliation strategies for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alexander; Hines, O Joe

    2015-02-01

    Malignant biliary obstruction, duodenal, and gastric outlet obstruction, and tumor-related pain are the complications of unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma that most frequently require palliative intervention. Surgery involving biliary bypass with or without gastrojejunostomy was once the mainstay of treatment in these patients. However, advances in non-operative techniques-most notably the widespread availability of endoscopic biliary and duodenal stents-have shifted the paradigm of treatment away from traditional surgical management. Questions regarding the efficacy and durability of endoscopic stents for biliary and gastric outlet obstruction are reviewed and demonstrate high rates of therapeutic success, low rates of morbidity, and decreased cost. Surgery remains an effective treatment modality, and still produces the most durable relief in appropriately selected patients.

  17. Salvage chemoradiotherapy after primary chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a single-institution retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is no consensus on the indication for salvage chemoradiotherapy (CRT) after failure of primary chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Here we report on the retrospective analysis of patients who received salvage CRT after primary chemotherapy for LAPC. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of salvage CRT after primary chemotherapy for LAPC. Methods Thirty patients who underwent salvage CRT, after the failure of primary chemotherapy for LAPC, were retrospectively enrolled from 2004 to 2011 at the authors’ institution. All the patients had histologically confirmed pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Results Primary chemotherapy was continued until progression or emergence of unacceptable toxicity. Eventually, 26 patients (87%) discontinued primary chemotherapy because of local tumor progression, whereas four patients (13%) discontinued chemotherapy because of interstitial pneumonitis caused by gemcitabine. After a median period of 7.9 months from starting chemotherapy, 30 patients underwent salvage CRT combined with either S-1 or 5-FU. Toxicities were generally mild and self-limiting. Median survival time (MST) from the start of salvage CRT was 8.8 months. The 6 month, 1-year and 2-year survival rates from the start of CRT were 77%, 33% and 26%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that a lower pre-CRT serum CA 19–9 level (≤ 1000 U/ml; p = 0.009) and a single regimen of primary chemotherapy (p = 0.004) were independent prognostic factors for survival after salvage CRT. The MST for the entire patient population from the start of primary chemotherapy was 17.8 months, with 2- and 3-year overall survival rates of 39% and 22%, respectively. Conclusions CRT had moderate anti-tumor activity and an acceptable toxicity profile in patients with LAPC, even after failure of gemcitabine-based primary chemotherapy. If there are any signs of failure of primary chemotherapy without distant metastasis

  18. The value of lactate dehydrogenase serum levels as a prognostic and predictive factor for advanced pancreatic cancer patients receiving sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Giampieri, Riccardo; Sobrero, Alberto; Labianca, Roberto; Ferrari, Daris; Barni, Sandro; Aitini, Enrico; Zaniboni, Alberto; Boni, Corrado; Caprioni, Francesco; Mosconi, Stefania; Fanello, Silvia; Berardi, Rossana; Bittoni, Alessandro; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Cinquini, Michela; Torri, Valter; Scartozzi, Mario; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Although lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) serum levels, indirect markers of angiogenesis, are associated with a worse outcome in several tumours, their prognostic value is not defined in pancreatic cancer. Moreover, high levels are associated even with a lack of efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, contributing to explain negative results in clinical trials. We assessed the role of LDH in advanced pancreatic cancer receiving sorafenib. Seventy-one of 114 patients included in the randomised phase II trial MAPS (chemotherapy plus or not sorafenib) and with available serum LDH levels, were included in this analysis. Patients were categorized according to serum LDH levels (LDH ≤vs.> upper normal rate). A significant difference was found in progression free survival (PFS) and in overall survival (OS) between patients with LDH values under or above the cut-off (PFS: 5.2 vs. 2.7 months, p = 0.0287; OS: 10.7 vs. 5.9 months, p = 0.0021). After stratification according to LDH serum levels and sorafenib treatment, patients with low LDH serum levels treated with sorafenib showed an advantage in PFS (p = 0.05) and OS (p = 0.0012). LDH appears to be a reliable parameter to assess the prognosis of advanced pancreatic cancer patients, and it may be a predictive parameter to select patients candidate to receive sorafenib. PMID:26397228

  19. The value of lactate dehydrogenase serum levels as a prognostic and predictive factor for advanced pancreatic cancer patients receiving sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Giampieri, Riccardo; Sobrero, Alberto; Labianca, Roberto; Ferrari, Daris; Barni, Sandro; Aitini, Enrico; Zaniboni, Alberto; Boni, Corrado; Caprioni, Francesco; Mosconi, Stefania; Fanello, Silvia; Berardi, Rossana; Bittoni, Alessandro; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Cinquini, Michela; Torri, Valter; Scartozzi, Mario; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-10-27

    Although lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) serum levels, indirect markers of angiogenesis, are associated with a worse outcome in several tumours, their prognostic value is not defined in pancreatic cancer. Moreover, high levels are associated even with a lack of efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, contributing to explain negative results in clinical trials. We assessed the role of LDH in advanced pancreatic cancer receiving sorafenib. Seventy-one of 114 patients included in the randomised phase II trial MAPS (chemotherapy plus or not sorafenib) and with available serum LDH levels, were included in this analysis. Patients were categorized according to serum LDH levels (LDH ≤ vs.> upper normal rate). A significant difference was found in progression free survival (PFS) and in overall survival (OS) between patients with LDH values under or above the cut-off (PFS: 5.2 vs. 2.7 months, p = 0.0287; OS: 10.7 vs. 5.9 months, p = 0.0021). After stratification according to LDH serum levels and sorafenib treatment, patients with low LDH serum levels treated with sorafenib showed an advantage in PFS (p = 0.05) and OS (p = 0.0012). LDH appears to be a reliable parameter to assess the prognosis of advanced pancreatic cancer patients, and it may be a predictive parameter to select patients candidate to receive sorafenib. PMID:26397228

  20. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  1. Chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients: is it still an open question?

    PubMed Central

    Sawicka, Emilia; Mirończuk, Anna; Wojtukiewicz, Marek Z.

    2016-01-01

    Operable pancreatic cancer is characterized by a high risk of recurrence. Efforts are made to incorporate new therapies. Throughout the world there is a lack of uniform recommendations concerning the adjuvant treatment of pancreatic cancer patients, due to confusing evidence-based data. The patients recruited to clinical trials differ from the population of patients treated in everyday practice. These differences have an influence on tolerance of treatment, toxicity and results of therapy. The decision on administration of adjuvant treatment is made individually and differs from center to center. A review of the literature concerning both results and tolerance of postoperative chemoradiotherapy of pancreatic cancer patients is presented. PMID:27358587

  2. PIM kinases: an overview in tumors and recent advances in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianwei; Zhang, Taiping; Wang, Tianxiao; You, Lei; Zhao, Yupei

    2014-04-01

    The PIM kinases represent a family of serine/threonine kinases, which is composed of three different members (PIM1, PIM2 and PIM3). Aberrant expression of PIM kinases is observed in variety of tumors, including pancreatic cancer. The PIM kinases play pivotal roles in the regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, properties of stem cells, metabolism, autophagy, drug resistance and targeted therapy. The roles of PIM kinases in pancreatic cancer include the regulation of proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, formation, angiogenesis and prediction prognosis. Blocking the activities of PIM kinases could prevent pancreatic cancer development. PIM kinases may be a novel target for cancer therapy. PMID:24799066

  3. [Two-year survivor in response to gemcitabine-based chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer with multiple lung metastases].

    PubMed

    Takeyama, Osamu; Usui, Yuji

    2005-02-01

    A 65-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for appetite loss and jaundice. Abdominal CT scan and ultrasonography both revealed a tumor in the head of the pancreas. Chest CT scan showed multiple nodules in both lungs. The patient was diagnosed as having advanced pancreatic cancer with multiple lung metastases. The primary tumor showed a partial response to the administration of gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m2 on days 1, 8 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. Concurrent treatment with 5-fluorouracil (200 mg/day) was efficacious against the lung metastases. One year later the pancreatic and lung tumors had enlarged, and cisplatin (20 mg/body) was added to the protocol. For 20 months the patient was treated as an outpatient, maintaining good quality of life. The patient died of progressive disease 25 months after her first hospital admission.

  4. Therapeutic strategy in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer: an updated review

    PubMed Central

    Tournigand, Christophe; Bonnetain, Franck; Richa, Hubert; Benetkiewicz, Magdalena; André, Thierry; de Gramont, Aimery

    2015-01-01

    Systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with unresectable advanced colorectal cancer (CRC), but salvage surgery of metastatic disease should be considered in the case of adequate tumor shrinkage. Several drugs and combinations are now available for use in treating patients with advanced CRC, but the optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Moreover, the administration of antitumor therapy can be modulated by periods of maintenance or treatment breaks rather than delivered as full therapy until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity, followed by reintroduction of prior full therapy when required, before switching to other drugs. Consequently, randomized strategy trials are needed to define the optimal treatment sequences. Molecular testing for Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS) is mandatory but not sufficient to select appropriate patients for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (MoAb) therapy. PMID:26673925

  5. Therapeutic strategy in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Chibaudel, Benoist; Tournigand, Christophe; Bonnetain, Franck; Richa, Hubert; Benetkiewicz, Magdalena; André, Thierry; de Gramont, Aimery

    2015-05-01

    Systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with unresectable advanced colorectal cancer (CRC), but salvage surgery of metastatic disease should be considered in the case of adequate tumor shrinkage. Several drugs and combinations are now available for use in treating patients with advanced CRC, but the optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Moreover, the administration of antitumor therapy can be modulated by periods of maintenance or treatment breaks rather than delivered as full therapy until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity, followed by reintroduction of prior full therapy when required, before switching to other drugs. Consequently, randomized strategy trials are needed to define the optimal treatment sequences. Molecular testing for Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS) is mandatory but not sufficient to select appropriate patients for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (MoAb) therapy. PMID:26673925

  6. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  7. Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy through a Port-Catheter System as Preoperative Initial Therapy in Patients with Advanced Liver Dysfunction due to Synchronous and Unresectable Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Iguchi, Toshihiro; Arai, Yasuaki; Inaba, Yoshitaka Yamaura, Hidekazu; Sato, Yozo; Miyazaki, Masaya; Shimamoto, Hiroshi

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. We retrospectively evaluated the safety and efficacy of preoperative initial hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) through a port-catheter system in patients with liver dysfunction due to synchronous and unresectable liver metastases. The aim of HAIC was to improve patients' clinical condition for later surgical removal of primary colorectal cancer. Methods. Port-catheter systems were placed radiologically in 21 patients (mean age 58.6 {+-} 8.1 years) with liver dysfunction due to synchronous liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Initial HAIC of 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil was administered weekly as a 5 hr continuous infusion through this system. Surgical removal of the primary lesion was planned after HAIC improved the liver function. Results. Port-catheter system placement was successful in all patients without severe complications. Patients were followed up for a median of 309 days (range 51-998 days). After starting HAIC, no severe adverse events that caused drug loss and treatment postponement or suspension were observed in any of the patients. HAIC was performed a mean of 4.5 {+-} 3.0 times and the liver function improved in all patients. Curative (n = 18) or palliative (n = 1) surgical removal of the primary lesion was performed. The remaining 2 patients died because extrahepatic metastases developed and their performance status worsened; thus, surgery could not be performed. The median survival times of all patients and the operated patients were 309 and 386 days, respectively. Conclusion. Initial HAIC administration is a safe and efficacious method for improving liver function prior to operative resection of primary colorectal cancer in patients with liver dysfunction due to synchronous and unresectable liver metastases.

  8. Hematogenous Gastric Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sasajima, Junpei; Okamoto, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While the gastric involvement of pancreatic cancer is occasionally observed as the result of direct invasion, hematogenous gastric metastasis is rare. A 72-year-old Japanese male presented with general fatigue, pollakiuria, and thirst. Computed tomography revealed a 4.6-cm solid mass in the pancreatic tail and a 4.2-cm multilocular cystic mass in the pancreatic head with multiple liver and lymphatic metastasis. Notably, two solid masses were detected in the gastric wall of the upper body and the antrum; both were separated from the primary pancreatic cancer and seemed to be located in the submucosal layer. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor with a normal mucosa in the posterior wall of the upper body of the stomach, suggesting the gastric hematogenous metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The suspected diagnosis was unresectable pancreatic cancer with multiple metastases that was concomitant with the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. PMID:27403106

  9. Hematogenous Gastric Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sasajima, Junpei; Okamoto, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While the gastric involvement of pancreatic cancer is occasionally observed as the result of direct invasion, hematogenous gastric metastasis is rare. A 72-year-old Japanese male presented with general fatigue, pollakiuria, and thirst. Computed tomography revealed a 4.6-cm solid mass in the pancreatic tail and a 4.2-cm multilocular cystic mass in the pancreatic head with multiple liver and lymphatic metastasis. Notably, two solid masses were detected in the gastric wall of the upper body and the antrum; both were separated from the primary pancreatic cancer and seemed to be located in the submucosal layer. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor with a normal mucosa in the posterior wall of the upper body of the stomach, suggesting the gastric hematogenous metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The suspected diagnosis was unresectable pancreatic cancer with multiple metastases that was concomitant with the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. PMID:27403106

  10. Reverse-Contrast Imaging and Targeted Radiation Therapy of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Models

    SciTech Connect

    Thorek, Daniel L.J.; Kramer, Robin M.; Chen, Qing; Jeong, Jeho; Lupu, Mihaela E.; Lee, Alycia M.; Moynahan, Mary E.; Lowery, Maeve; Ulmert, David; Zanzonico, Pat; Deasy, Joseph O.; Humm, John L.; Russell, James

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of delivering experimental radiation therapy to tumors in the mouse pancreas. Imaging and treatment were performed using combined CT (computed tomography)/orthovoltage treatment with a rotating gantry. Methods and Materials: After intraperitoneal administration of radiopaque iodinated contrast, abdominal organ delineation was performed by x-ray CT. With this technique we delineated the pancreas and both orthotopic xenografts and genetically engineered disease. Computed tomographic imaging was validated by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging. Therapeutic radiation was delivered via a 1-cm diameter field. Selective x-ray radiation therapy of the noninvasively defined orthotopic mass was confirmed using γH2AX staining. Mice could tolerate a dose of 15 Gy when the field was centered on the pancreas tail, and treatment was delivered as a continuous 360° arc. This strategy was then used for radiation therapy planning for selective delivery of therapeutic x-ray radiation therapy to orthotopic tumors. Results: Tumor growth delay after 15 Gy was monitored, using CT and ultrasound to determine the tumor volume at various times after treatment. Our strategy enables the use of clinical radiation oncology approaches to treat experimental tumors in the pancreas of small animals for the first time. We demonstrate that delivery of 15 Gy from a rotating gantry minimizes background healthy tissue damage and significantly retards tumor growth. Conclusions: This advance permits evaluation of radiation planning and dosing parameters. Accurate noninvasive longitudinal imaging and monitoring of tumor progression and therapeutic response in preclinical models is now possible and can be expected to more effectively evaluate pancreatic cancer disease and therapeutic response.

  11. Role of methylphenidate in the treatment of fatigue in advanced pancreatic cancer population

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhenyang; Butler-Bowen, Harriet; Rodriguez, Teresa; Garcon, Marie C.; Smith, Melissa Hennessey; Relias, Valerie; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Background Fatigue is a common but devastating symptom for advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) patients. To date, no proven treatment exists. Methylphenidate (MPH) showed inconsistent results in treating other cancer related fatigue. We performed a retrospective study to assess MPH in ameliorating fatigue in APC patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed our clinic APC patients’ records who visited from 06/2011 - 11/2014. Fatigue was assessed by Visual Analog Fatigue Scale (VAFS) and classified as grade 1 (VAFS 1-3), grade 2 (VAFS 4-6) and grade 3 (VAFS 7-10) to correspond with CTCAE V4.0. MPH was dosed at 5 mg daily in the morning and was escalated to 10 mg after 2 weeks if needed. The primary endpoint was to assess the change of fatigue grade after 4 weeks of MPH. Secondary outcomes included MPH’s effect on depression, anorexia, maintenance chemotherapy intensity and adverse effects. Results A total of 71 APC patients on concomitant chemotherapy were included, of whom 67% received doublet, 13% triplet, and 20% single-agent chemotherapy. Mean baseline VAFS was 7, which dropped to 4 after 4 weeks of MPH, 55% patients’ fatigue score improved by 1 grade, 8% by 2 grades, 23% had fatigue resolved, 14% without benefit. 72% patients maintained chemotherapy intensity, 39% felt less depression and 52% had improved appetite. 13% stopped MPH due to side effects. Rare Grade 3 or 4 adverse events included insomnia, restlessness, palpitations and anorexia. Conclusions Our findings support low-dose MPH benefits APC patients with improved fatigue, depression and anorexia. A large randomized clinical trial is needed to confirm its usage and safety.

  12. Long-term results of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy for nonmetastatic locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingtai; Che, Xu; Zhang, Jianwei; Huang, Huang; Zhao, Dongbing; Tian, Yantao; Li, Yexiong; Feng, Qinfu; Zhang, Zhihui; Jiang, Qinglong; Zhang, Shuisheng; Tang, Xiaolong; Huang, Xianghui; Chu, Yunmian; Zhang, Jianghu; Sun, Yuemin; Zhang, Yawei; Wang, Chengfeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To assess prognostic benefits of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy (IOERT) in patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and evaluate optimal adjuvant treatment after IOERT. A retrospective cohort study using prospectively collected data was conducted at the Cancer Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, China National Cancer Center. Two hundred forty-seven consecutive patients with nonmetastatic LAPC who underwent IOERT between January 2008 and May 2015 were identified and included in the study. Overall survival (OS) was calculated from the day of IOERT. Prognostic factors were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year actuarial survival rates were 40%, 14%, and 7.2%, respectively, with a median OS of 9.0 months. On multivariate analysis, an IOERT applicator diameter < 6 cm (hazards ratio [HR], 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47–0.97), no intraoperative interstitial sustained-release 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.32–0.66), and receipt of postoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy (HR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.04–0.25) were significantly associated with improved OS. Pain relief after IOERT was achieved in 111 of the 117 patients, with complete remission in 74 and partial remission in 37. Postoperative complications rate and mortality were 14.0% and 0.4%, respectively. Nonmetastatic LAPC patients with smaller size tumors could achieve positive long-term survival outcomes with a treatment strategy incorporating IOERT and postoperative adjuvant treatment. Chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy might be a recommended adjuvant treatment strategy for well-selected cases. Intraoperative interstitial sustained-release 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy should not be recommended for patients with nonmetastatic LAPC. PMID:27661028

  13. Reverse-contrast imaging and targeted radiation therapy of advanced pancreatic cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Thorek, Daniel L.J.; Kramer, Robin M.; Chen, Qing; Jeong, Jeho; Lupu, Mihaela E.; Lee, Alycia M.; Moynahan, Mary E.; Lowery, Maeve; Ulmert, H. David; Zanzonico, Pat; Deasy, Joseph O.; Humm, John L.; Russell, James

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of delivering experimental radiotherapy to tumors in the mouse pancreas. Imaging and treatment were performed using combined CT (computed tomography)/orthovoltage treatment with a rotating gantry. Methods and Materials After intraperitoneal administration of radiopaque iodinated contrast, abdominal organ delineation was performed by X-ray CT. With this technique we delineated the pancreas, and both orthotopic xenografts and genetically engineered disease. CT imaging was validated by comparison with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Therapeutic radiation was delivered via a 1 cm diameter field. Selective X-ray radiation therapy (XRT) of the non-invasively defined orthotopic mass was confirmed using γH2AX staining. Mice could tolerate a dose of 15 Gy when the field was centered on the pancreas tail, and treatment was delivered as a continuous 360-degree arc. This strategy was then used for radiation therapy planning for selective delivery of therapeutic XRT to orthotopic tumors. Results Tumor growth delay after 15 Gy was monitored, using CT and ultrasound to determine the tumor volume at various times post-treatment. Our strategy enables the use of clinical radiation oncology approaches to treat experimental tumors in the pancreas of small animals for the first time. We demonstrate that delivery of 15 Gy from a rotating gantry minimizes background healthy tissue damage and significantly retards tumor growth. Conclusions This advance permits evaluation of radiation planning and dosing parameters. Accurate non-invasive longitudinal imaging and monitoring of tumor progression and therapeutic response in pre-clinical models is now possible, and can be expected to more effectively evaluate pancreatic cancer disease and therapeutic response. PMID:26238952

  14. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  15. Single high dose intraoperative electrons for advanced stage pancreatic cancer: Phase I pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Goldson, A.L.; Ashaveri, E.; Espinoza, M.C.

    1981-07-01

    Phase I toxicity studies with intraoperative radiotherapy proved to be a feasible adjunct to surgery for unresectable malignancies of the pancreas at Howard University Hospital. There have been minimal side effects or complications related to the combination of limited surgical decompression and intraoperative radiotherapy alone. The toxic effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on normal tissues is being assessed on a dose volume basis. Doses of 2000 to 2500 rad in a single exposure to include the pancreas, regional nodes and duodenum are acceptable if the total treatment volume is less than or equal to 100 cm. The tumoricidal effects on the cancer are demonstratable when one reviews the pathological specimens that illustrate massive tumor necrosis and fibros replacement, but in all cases reviewed, viable cancer was noted. Intraoperative radiotherapy, therefore, represents a significant boost dose for resectable, partially resectable or non-resectable tumors when added to conventional external beam irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Preliminary clinical data and minimal toxicity justifies further investigation.

  16. Wilms Tumor Gene (WT1) Peptide–based Cancer Vaccine Combined With Gemcitabine for Patients With Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Sumiyuki; Koido, Shigeo; Takeda, Yutaka; Homma, Sadamu; Komita, Hideo; Takahara, Akitaka; Morita, Satoshi; Ito, Toshinori; Morimoto, Soyoko; Hara, Kazuma; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Oka, Yoshihiro; Yanagisawa, Satoru; Toyama, Yoichi; Ikegami, Masahiro; Kitagawa, Toru; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Wada, Hiroshi; Nagano, Hiroaki; Nakata, Jun; Nakae, Yoshiki; Hosen, Naoki; Oji, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshio; Kawase, Ichiro; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Junichi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Tajiri, Hisao

    2014-01-01

    Wilms tumor gene (WT1) protein is an attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. We aimed to investigate the feasibility of a combination therapy consisting of gemcitabine and WT1 peptide–based vaccine for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer and to make initial assessments of its clinical efficacy and immunologic response. Thirty-two HLA-A*24:02+ patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were enrolled. Patients received HLA-A*24:02-restricted, modified 9-mer WT1 peptide (3 mg/body) emulsified with Montanide ISA51 adjuvant (WT1 vaccine) intradermally biweekly and gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle. This combination therapy was well tolerated. The frequencies of grade 3–4 adverse events for this combination therapy were similar to those for gemcitabine alone. Objective response rate was 20.0% (6/30 evaluable patients). Median survival time and 1-year survival rate were 8.1 months and 29%, respectively. The association between longer survival and positive delayed-type hypersensitivity to WT1 peptide was statistically significant, and longer survivors featured a higher frequency of memory-phenotype WT1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes both before and after treatment. WT1 vaccine in combination with gemcitabine was well tolerated for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Delayed-type hypersensitivity-positivity to WT1 peptide and a higher frequency of memory-phenotype WT1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes could be useful prognostic markers for survival in the combination therapy with gemcitabine and WT1 vaccine. Further clinical investigation is warranted to determine the effectiveness of this combination therapy. PMID:24509173

  17. Use of Respiratory-Correlated Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography to Determine Acceptable Treatment Margins for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Seth D.; Ford, Eric C.; Duhon, Mario; McNutt, Todd; Wong, John; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Respiratory-induced excursions of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma could affect dose delivery. This study quantified tumor motion and evaluated standard treatment margins. Methods and Materials: Respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography images were obtained on 30 patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma; 15 of whom underwent repeat scanning before cone-down treatment. Treatment planning software was used to contour the gross tumor volume (GTV), bilateral kidneys, and biliary stent. Excursions were calculated according to the centroid of the contoured volumes. Results: The mean +- standard deviation GTV excursion in the superoinferior (SI) direction was 0.55 +- 0.23 cm; an expansion of 1.0 cm adequately accounted for the GTV motion in 97% of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients. Motion GTVs were generated and resulted in a 25% average volume increase compared with the static GTV. Of the 30 patients, 17 had biliary stents. The mean SI stent excursion was 0.84 +- 0.32 cm, significantly greater than the GTV motion. The xiphoid process moved an average of 0.35 +- 0.12 cm, significantly less than the GTV. The mean SI motion of the left and right kidneys was 0.65 +- 0.27 cm and 0.77 +- 0.30 cm, respectively. At repeat scanning, no significant changes were seen in the mean GTV size (p = .8) or excursion (p = .3). Conclusion: These data suggest that an asymmetric expansion of 1.0, 0.7, and 0.6 cm along the respective SI, anteroposterior, and medial-lateral directions is recommended if a respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography scan is not available to evaluate the tumor motion during treatment planning. Surrogates of tumor motion, such as biliary stents or external markers, should be used with caution.

  18. Pathologic response with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and stereotactic body radiotherapy for borderline resectable and locally-advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has potential applicability in the management of borderline resectable and locally-advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In this series, we report the pathologic outcomes in the subset of patients who underwent surgery after neoadjuvant SBRT. Methods Patients with borderline resectable or locally-advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma who were treated with SBRT followed by resection were included. Chemotherapy was to the discretion of the medical oncologist and preceded SBRT for most patients. Results Twelve patients met inclusion criteria. Most (92%) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and gemcitabine/capecitabine was most frequently utilized (n = 7). Most were treated with fractionated SBRT to 36 Gy/3 fractions (n = 7) and the remainder with single fraction to 24 Gy (n = 5). No grade 3+ acute toxicities attributable to SBRT were found. Two patients developed post-surgical vascular complications and one died secondary to this. The mean time to surgery after SBRT was 3.3 months. An R0 resection was performed in 92% of patients (n = 11/12). In 25% (n = 3/12) of patients, a complete pathologic response was achieved, and an additional 16.7% (n = 2/12) demonstrated <10% viable tumor cells. Kaplan-Meier estimated median progression free survival is 27.4 months. Overall survival is 92%, 64% and 51% at 1-, 2-, and 3-years. Conclusions This study reports the pathologic response in patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and SBRT for borderline resectable and locally-advanced pancreatic cancer. In our experience, 92% achieved an R0 resection and 41.7% of patients demonstrated either complete or extensive pathologic response to treatment. The results of a phase II study of this novel approach will be forthcoming. PMID:24175982

  19. Distal Pancreatectomy With En Bloc Celiac Axis Resection for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Haibing; Ma, Ruirui; Gong, Jian; Cai, Chengzong; Song, Zhenshun; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although distal pancreatectomy with en bloc celiac resection (DP-CAR) is used to treat locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the advantages and disadvantages of this surgical procedure remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate its clinical safety and efficacy. Studies regarding DP-CAR were retrieved from the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Chinese electronic databases. Articles were selected according to predesigned inclusion criteria, and data were extracted according to predesigned sheets. Clinical, oncologic, and survival outcomes of DP-CAR were systematically reviewed by hazard ratios (HRs) or odds ratio (OR) using fixed- or random-effects models. Eighteen studies were included. DP-CAR had a longer operating time and greater intraoperative blood loss compared to distal pancreatectomy (DP). A high incidence of vascular reconstruction occurred in DP-CAR: 11.53% (95%CI: 6.88–18.68%) for artery and 33.28% (95%CI: 20.45–49.19%) for vein. The pooled R0 resection rate of DP-CAR was 72.79% (95% CI, 46.19–89.29%). Higher mortality and morbidity rates were seen in DP-CAR, but no significant differences were detected compared to DP; the pooled OR was 1.798 for mortality (95% CI, 0.360–8.989) and 2.106 for morbidity (95% CI, 0.828–5.353). The pooled incidence of postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) was 31.31% (95%CI, 23.69–40.12%) in DP-CAR, similar to that of DP (OR = 1.07; 95%CI, 0.52–2.20). The pooled HR against DP-CAR was 5.67 (95%CI, 1.48–21.75) for delayed gastric emptying. The pooled rate of reoperation was 9.74% (95%CI, 4.56–19.59%) in DP-CAR. The combined 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates in DP-CAR were 65.22% (49.32–78.34%), 30.20% (21.50–40. 60%), and 18.70% (10.89–30.13%), respectively. The estimated means and medians for survival time in DP-CAR patients were 24.12 (95%CI, 18.26–29.98) months and 17.00 (95%CI, 13.52–20.48) months, respectively. There were no

  20. Translation of recent advances and discoveries in molecular biology and immunology in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Albo, Daniel; Farrow, Buckminster; Berger, David H

    2008-04-01

    Recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms of cancer progression have allowed for targeted approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. New biologic markers are emerging that may improve the ability to detect these tumors earlier. Targeted biologic cancer therapies promise more effective and less toxic systemic treatment options. Although a clear "magic bullet" has yet to emerge, this type of targeted approach offers hope in the management of this dreadful disease. This article offers an update on these promising diagnostic and treatment modalities.

  1. Gastrojejunal Anastomosis Perforation after Gastric Bypass on a Patient with Underlying Pancreatic Cancer: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bellorin, Omar; Kundel, Anna; Ramirez-Valderrama, Alexander; Castro, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. We describe a case of gastrojejunal anastomosis perforation after gastric bypass on a patient with underlying pancreatic cancer. Case Description. A 54-year-old female with past surgical history of gastric bypass for morbid obesity and recent diagnosis of unresectable pancreatic cancer presents with abdominal pain, peritonitis, and sepsis. Computerized axial tomography scan shows large amount of intraperitoneal free air. The gastric remnant is markedly distended and a large pancreatic head mass is seen. Intraoperative findings were consistent with a perforated ulcer located at the gastrojejunal anastomosis and a distended gastric remnant caused by a pancreatic mass invading and obstructing the second portion of the duodenum. The gastrojejunal perforation was repaired using an omental patch. A gastrostomy for decompression of the remnant was also performed. The patient had a satisfactory postoperative period and was discharged on day 7. Discussion. Perforation of the gastrojejunal anastomosis after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is an unusual complication. There is no correlation between the perforation and the presence of pancreatic cancer. They represent two different conditions that coexisted. The presence of a gastrojejunal perforation made the surgeon aware of the advanced stage of the pancreatic cancer. PMID:26543659

  2. Gastrojejunal Anastomosis Perforation after Gastric Bypass on a Patient with Underlying Pancreatic Cancer: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Bellorin, Omar; Kundel, Anna; Ramirez-Valderrama, Alexander; Castro, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. We describe a case of gastrojejunal anastomosis perforation after gastric bypass on a patient with underlying pancreatic cancer. Case Description. A 54-year-old female with past surgical history of gastric bypass for morbid obesity and recent diagnosis of unresectable pancreatic cancer presents with abdominal pain, peritonitis, and sepsis. Computerized axial tomography scan shows large amount of intraperitoneal free air. The gastric remnant is markedly distended and a large pancreatic head mass is seen. Intraoperative findings were consistent with a perforated ulcer located at the gastrojejunal anastomosis and a distended gastric remnant caused by a pancreatic mass invading and obstructing the second portion of the duodenum. The gastrojejunal perforation was repaired using an omental patch. A gastrostomy for decompression of the remnant was also performed. The patient had a satisfactory postoperative period and was discharged on day 7. Discussion. Perforation of the gastrojejunal anastomosis after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is an unusual complication. There is no correlation between the perforation and the presence of pancreatic cancer. They represent two different conditions that coexisted. The presence of a gastrojejunal perforation made the surgeon aware of the advanced stage of the pancreatic cancer.

  3. 77 FR 24959 - Scientific Information Request on Local Therapies for Unresectable Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... Therapies for Unresectable Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and... local, minimally invasive, medical devices for unresectable primary hepatocellular carcinoma (e.g... Comparative Effectiveness Review of Local Therapies for Unresectable Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma,...

  4. Erlotinib-associated interstitial lung disease in advanced pancreatic carcinoma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Macerelli, Marianna; Mazzer, Micol; Foltran, Luisa; Cardellino, Giovanni Gerardo; Aprile, Giuseppe

    2015-07-24

    The combination of erlotinib and gemcitabine is a recognized option for patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer whose common adverse events such as skin rash, diarrhea, or fatigue are usually easily manageable. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a life-threatening toxicity reported in patients with non-small-cell lung cancers treated with epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors or gemcitabine. This side effect is extremely rare in patients with pancreatic cancer. We report fatal treatment-related ILD that occurred in a 67-year-old patient with metastatic pancreatic cancer. Risk factors and pathophysiology of ILD need further investigation but caution is highly recommended for patients with an underlying pulmonary disease when using erlotinib in monotherapy or combination therapy.

  5. Iontophoretic device delivery for the localized treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, James D.; Jajja, Mohammad R. N.; Schorzman, Allison N.; Keeler, Amanda W.; Luft, J. Christopher; Zamboni, William C.; DeSimone, Joseph M.; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2016-01-01

    Poor delivery and systemic toxicity of many cytotoxic agents, such as the recent promising combination chemotherapy regimen of folinic acid (leucovorin), fluorouracil, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX), restrict their full utility in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Local delivery of chemotherapies has become possible using iontophoretic devices that are implanted directly onto pancreatic tumors. We have fabricated implantable iontophoretic devices and tested the local iontophoretic delivery of FOLFIRINOX for the treatment of pancreatic cancer in an orthotopic patient-derived xenograft model. Iontophoretic delivery of FOLFIRINOX was found to increase tumor exposure by almost an order of magnitude compared with i.v. delivery with substantially lower plasma concentrations. Mice treated for 7 wk with device FOLFIRINOX experienced significantly greater tumor growth inhibition compared with i.v. FOLFIRINOX. A marker of cell proliferation, Ki-67, was stained, showing a significant reduction in tumor cell proliferation. These data capitalize on the unique ability of an implantable iontophoretic device to deliver much higher concentrations of drug to the tumor compared with i.v. delivery. Local iontophoretic delivery of cytotoxic agents should be considered for the treatment of patients with unresectable nonmetastatic disease and for patients with the need for palliation of local symptoms, and may be considered as a neoadjuvant approach to improve resection rates and outcome in patients with localized and locally advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26858448

  6. Iontophoretic device delivery for the localized treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Byrne, James D; Jajja, Mohammad R N; Schorzman, Allison N; Keeler, Amanda W; Luft, J Christopher; Zamboni, William C; DeSimone, Joseph M; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2016-02-23

    Poor delivery and systemic toxicity of many cytotoxic agents, such as the recent promising combination chemotherapy regimen of folinic acid (leucovorin), fluorouracil, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX), restrict their full utility in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Local delivery of chemotherapies has become possible using iontophoretic devices that are implanted directly onto pancreatic tumors. We have fabricated implantable iontophoretic devices and tested the local iontophoretic delivery of FOLFIRINOX for the treatment of pancreatic cancer in an orthotopic patient-derived xenograft model. Iontophoretic delivery of FOLFIRINOX was found to increase tumor exposure by almost an order of magnitude compared with i.v. delivery with substantially lower plasma concentrations. Mice treated for 7 wk with device FOLFIRINOX experienced significantly greater tumor growth inhibition compared with i.v. FOLFIRINOX. A marker of cell proliferation, Ki-67, was stained, showing a significant reduction in tumor cell proliferation. These data capitalize on the unique ability of an implantable iontophoretic device to deliver much higher concentrations of drug to the tumor compared with i.v. delivery. Local iontophoretic delivery of cytotoxic agents should be considered for the treatment of patients with unresectable nonmetastatic disease and for patients with the need for palliation of local symptoms, and may be considered as a neoadjuvant approach to improve resection rates and outcome in patients with localized and locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  7. Feasibility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with gemcitabine and S-1 for patients with pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    KENNOKI, NORIFUMI; NAKAYAMA, HIDETSUGU; NAGAKAWA, YUICHI; HOSOKAWA, YUICHI; ITONAGA, TOMOHIRO; TAJIMA, YU; SHIRAISHI, SACHICA; MIKAMI, RYUJI; TSUCHIDA, AKIHIKO; TOKUUYE, KOICHI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent gemcitabine and S-1 is a feasible treatment option for patients with locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma were prospectively enrolled. An IMRT dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions with concurrent gemcitabine at a dose of 600 mg/m2 and S-1 at a dose of 60 mg were administrated. Adverse events and associated dosimetric factors were assessed. Between February 2012 and January 2014, 17 patients with borderline resectable and 4 with unresectable pancreatic cancer were enrolled. None of the patients experienced grade 3 or worse nausea and vomiting. The planning target volume (≥200 vs. <200 ml) was a statistically significant predictive factor for neutrocytopenia (≥500 vs. 500/µl, P=0.02). Concurrent IMRT with gemcitabine and S-1 for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer is feasible, with tolerable hematological toxicities and low gastrointestinal toxicities. PMID:26870355

  8. Computed tomographic appearance of resectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y.; Araki, T.; Tasaka, A.; Maruyama, M.

    1982-06-01

    Thirteen patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma were examined by computed tomography (CT). Nine had a mass, 2 had dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, 1 appeared to have ductal dilatation, and 1 had no sign of abnormality. Resectable carcinoma was diagnosed retrospectively in 8 cases, based on the following criteria: a mass with a distinct contour, frequently containing a tiny or irregular low-density area and accompanied by dilatation of the caudal portion of the main pancreatic duct without involvement of the large vessels, liver, or lymph nodes. Including unresectable cancer, chronic pancreatitis, and obstructive jaundice from causes other than cancer, the false-positive rate was less than 6%. However, a small cancer without change in pancreatic contour is difficult to detect with CT.

  9. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%.

  10. Refining the care of patients with pancreatic cancer: the AGITG Pancreatic Cancer Workshop consensus.

    PubMed

    Gandy, Robert C; Barbour, Andrew P; Samra, Jaswinder; Nikfarjam, Mehrdad; Haghighi, Koroush; Kench, James G; Saxena, Payal; Goldstein, David

    2016-06-20

    A meeting of the Australasian Gastro-Intestinal Trials Group (AGITG) was held to develop a consensus statement defining when a patient with pancreatic cancer has disease that is clearly operable, is borderline, or is locally advanced/inoperable. Key issues included the need for multidisciplinary team consensus for all patients considered for surgical resection. Staging investigations, to be completed within 4 weeks of presentation, should include pancreatic protocol computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasound, and, when possible, biopsy. Given marked differences in outcomes, the operability of tumours should be clearly identified by categories: those clearly resectable by standard means (group 1a), those requiring vascular resection but which are clearly operable (group 1b), and those of borderline operability requiring vascular resection (groups 2a and 2b). Patients who may require vascular reconstruction should be referred, before exploration, to a specialist unit. All patients should have a structured pathology report with standardised reporting of all seven surgical margins, which identifies an R0 (no tumour cells within a defined distance of the margin) if all surgical margins are clear from 1 mm. Neo-adjuvant therapy is increasingly recommended for borderline operable disease, while chemotherapy is recommended as initial therapy for patients with unresectable loco-regional pancreatic cancer. The value of adding radiation after initial chemotherapy remains uncertain. A small number of patients may be downstaged by chemoradiation, and trimodality therapy should only be considered as part of a clinical trial. Instituting these recommendations nationally will be an integral part of the process of improving quality of care and reducing geographic variation between centres in outcomes for patients. PMID:27318402

  11. Ablation of the locally advanced pancreatic cancer: An introduction and brief summary of techniques.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Athanasios; Moris, Demetrios; Paul Tabet, Patrick; David Wensley Richards, Brian; Kourounis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a lethal and late presenting malignancy with dismal survival rates. An estimated total of 330,000 people died from this malignancy in 2012. Although there have been improvements in diagnostic and treatment methods, the survival of late stage pancreatic cancer has not shown significant improvement in the past 4 decades. Multiple treatment approaches are available including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy, but to this day surgical resection remains the only curative treatment option. Ablative techniques use various forms of energy to cause local tissue destruction through necrosis or apoptosis. They are relevant in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as they are a treatment option in non-resectable tumors where their use ranges from symptom control to reducing tumor size for resection. In this narrative review we have grouped and outlined the various ablative methods, classifying them into thermal (Radiofrequency ablation, Microwave ablation, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound ablation, Cryoablation), and non-thermal ablative methods (Irreversible Electroporation (NanoKnife®), Photodynamic Therapy). This is followed by a description and review of the available evidence on survival and complications for each of these ablative methods. According to the literature, thermal ablative methods appear to be more accessible but are implicated with more complications than non thermal ablative methods which show the most promise. PMID:27569086

  12. Combined liver transplantation plus imatinib for unresectable metastases of gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Serralta, Alfonso S; Sanjuan, Fernando R; Moya, Angel H; Orbis, Francisco C; López-Andújar, Rafael; Pareja, Eugenia I; Vila, Juan C; Rayón, Miguel; Juan, Manuel B; Mir, José P

    2004-11-01

    Therapeutic options for treating unresectable hepatic metastases of leiomyosarcomas were scarce until a few years ago. Recent advances in the study of the biology of intestinal tumours have radically changed our knowledge of their pathogenesis. Many of the tumours previously considered as leiomyosarcomas are now identified as gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). The introduction of imatinib (an antineoplasic drug that specifically acts on the pathogenesis of these tumours) has shown promising results in patients with advanced GISTs. We present three patients with the initial diagnosis of unresectable hepatic metastases of leiomyosarcomas. They received liver transplants. All three had tumour recurrences after transplantation. Histological re-evaluation identified a stromal origin of the tumours, and the patients were treated with imatinib therapy (400 mg/day). Recurrence occurred in all patients after a mean of 38.3 months, but imatinib treatment achieved control of the tumours. The current survival times with the combination of transplantation and imatinib are 92, 48 and 46 months for the three patients. This series is small and inconclusive, but imatinib treatment showed promising results. The treatment options for patients with unresectable metastases of GISTs must be defined, as in these three patients liver transplantation achieved a disease-free status but all had tumour recurrences before starting the imatinib treatment.

  13. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Patients With Advanced Breast or Pancreatic Cancer With Metastases to the Liver or Lung

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-28

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Liver Metastases; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  14. Single-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Sequential Gemcitabine for the Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, Devin; Kim, Jeff; Christman-Skieller, Claudia; Chun, Carlene L.; Columbo, Laurie Ann; Ford, James M.; Fisher, George A.; Kunz, Pamela L.; Van Dam, Jacques; Quon, Andrew; Desser, Terry S.; Norton, Jeffrey; Hsu, Annie; Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Goodman, Karyn A.; Chang, Daniel T.; Koong, Albert C.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: This Phase II trial evaluated the toxicity, local control, and overall survival in patients treated with sequential gemcitabine and linear accelerator-based single-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were enrolled on this prospective single-institution, institutional review board-approved study. Gemcitabine was administered on Days 1, 8, and 15, and SBRT on Day 29. Gemcitabine was restarted on Day 43 and continued for 3-5 cycles. SBRT of 25 Gy in a single fraction was delivered to the internal target volume with a 2- 3-mm margin using a nine-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique. Respiratory gating was used to account for breathing motion. Follow-up evaluations occurred at 4-6 weeks, 10-12 weeks, and every 3 months after SBRT. Results: All patients completed SBRT and a median of five cycles of chemotherapy. Follow-up for the 2 remaining alive patients was 25.1 and 36.4 months. No acute Grade 3 or greater nonhematologic toxicity was observed. Late Grade 3 or greater toxicities occurred in 1 patient (5%) and consisted of a duodenal perforation (G4). Three patients (15%) developed ulcers (G2) that were medically managed. Overall, median survival was 11.8 months, with 1-year survival of 50% and 2-year survival of 20%. Using serial computed tomography, the freedom from local progression was 94% at 1 year. Conclusion: Linear accelerator-delivered SBRT with sequential gemcitabine resulted in excellent local control of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Future studies will address strategies for reducing long-term duodenal toxicity associated with SBRT.

  15. Using economic analysis to evaluate the potential of multimodality therapy for elderly patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krzyzanowska, Monika K. . E-mail: monika.krzyzanowska@uhn.on.ca; Earle, Craig C.; Kuntz, Karen M.; Weeks, Jane C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Development of new and expensive drugs with activity against pancreatic cancer has made economic considerations more relevant to treatment decision-making for advanced disease. Economic modeling can be used to explore the potential of such novel therapies and to inform clinical trial design. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of radiation plus fluorouracil (RT-FU) relative to no treatment in elderly patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and to determine the economic potential of radiation plus gemcitabine (RT-GEM), a novel regimen for this disease. We used the SEER-Medicare database to estimate effectiveness and costs supplemented by data from the literature where necessary. Results: Relative to no treatment, RT-FU was associated with a cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $68,724/QALY in the base case analysis. Compared with RT-FU, the ICER for RT-GEM was below $100,000/QALY when the risk of dying with the new regimen was <85% than with the standard regimen. However, >1,000 subjects would be necessary to demonstrate this level of efficacy in a randomized trial. The ICER of RT-GEM was most sensitive to utility values, and, at lower efficacy levels, to costs of gemcitabine and treatment-related toxicity. Conclusions: In elderly patients with LAPC, RT-FU is a cost-effective alternative to no treatment. The novel regimen of RT-GEM is likely to be cost-effective at any clinically meaningful benefit, but quality-of-life issues, drug acquisition, and toxicity-related costs may be relevant, especially at lower efficacy levels.

  16. Intensity-Modulated and Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Patients with Locally Advanced Inoperable Pancreatic Cancer after Preradiation Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, M.; Ganeshan, R.; Graf, R.; Pelzer, U.; Stieler, J. M.; Striefler, J. K.; Bahra, M.; Wust, P.; Riess, H.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy (RT) in patients with pancreatic cancer is still a controversial subject and its benefit in inoperable stages of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), even after induction chemotherapy, remains unclear. Modern radiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may improve effectiveness and reduce radiotherapy-related toxicities. Methods. Patients with LAPC who underwent radiotherapy after chemotherapy between 09/2004 and 05/2013 were retrospectively analyzed with regard to preradiation chemotherapy (PRCT), modalities of radiotherapy, and toxicities. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated by Kaplan-Meier curves. Results. 15 (68%) women and 7 men (median age 64 years; range 40–77) were identified. Median duration of PRCT was 11.1 months (range 4.3–33.0). Six patients (27%) underwent conventional RT and 16 patients (73%) advanced IMRT and IGRT; median dosage was 50.4 (range 9–54) Gray. No grade III or IV toxicities occurred. Median PFS (estimated from the beginning of RT) was 5.8 months, 2.6 months in the conventional RT group (conv-RT), and 7.1 months in the IMRT/IGRT group (P = 0.029); median OS was 11.0 months, 4.2 months (conv-RT), and 14.0 months (IMRT/IGRT); P = 0.141. Median RT-specific PFS for patients with prolonged PRCT > 9 months was 8.5 months compared to 5.6 months for PRCT < 9 months (P = 0.293). This effect was translated into a significantly better median RT-specific overall survival of patients in the PRCT > 9 months group, with 19.0 months compared to 8.5 months in the PRCT  <  9 months group (P = 0.049). Conclusions. IGRT and IMRT after PRCT are feasible and effective options for patients with LAPC after prolonged preradiation chemotherapy. PMID:25401140

  17. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube in your vein and nutrition through a feeding tube or IV. ...

  18. Anorexia-cachexia syndrome in pancreatic cancer: recent advances and new pharmacological approach.

    PubMed

    Ronga, Ilaria; Gallucci, Fernando; Riccardi, Ferdinando; Uomo, Generoso

    2014-03-01

    About 80% of all pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients suffer from a wasting syndrome referred to as the "cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome" (CACS) characterized by abnormally low weight, weakness and loss of skeletal muscle mass with or without loss of body fat, which directly impacts overall survival, quality of life, and physical activity. The aim of this review was to examine recent findings about CACS' pathophysiology and to describe the current pharmacological approaches. In recent years many efforts were made to improve our knowledge of CACS; currently we know that cachexia arises from a complex and multifactorial interaction between various mechanisms including inflammation, anorexia/malnutrition, alterations of protein and lipid metabolism; consequently its management requires multidisciplinary and multipharmacological approach that should address the different causes underlying this clinical event. On these premises, several drugs have been proposed starting from the first pharmacological treatment based on progestational agents or corticosteroids; most of them are in the preclinical phase, but some have already reached the clinical experimentation stage. In conclusion, to date, there is no standard effective treatment and further studies are needed to unravel the basic mechanisms underlying CACS and to develop newer therapeutic strategies with the hope to improve the quality of life of pancreatic cancer patients.

  19. [Radiofrequency ablation of an unresectable abdominal tumor].

    PubMed

    Sézeur, Alain; Fritsch, Sylvie; Louvet, Christophe; Kujas, Albert; Mosnier, Henri; Talbot, Jean-Noël; Grimberg, Sylvie

    2003-02-01

    Remnant malignant tissue is left behind after conventional surgery for an unresectable intraperitoneal malignant tumor. Standard radiotherapy or chemotherapy rarely enables good tumor control. We report the case of a 74-year-old man who developed a local recurrence of a sigmoid tumor located 5 to 6 cm from the anus. The tumor was fixed to the pelvic wall and could not be totally eradicated with conventional surgery. Preoperative peroperative assessment confirmed the absence of metastatic spread. Radiotherapy could not be performed due to risk of bowel injury. Peroperative radiofrequency ablation was followed by surgical colorectal resection without restoration of intestinal continuity, leaving only tumor tissue destroyed by radiofrequency. No adjuvant treatment was proposed because of intolerance to chemotherapy. Clinical assessment and thoracic and abdominal CT scan confirmed the absence of recurrence 26 months after radiofrequency ablation. Serum markers remained normal.

  20. Using 18F Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG PET) to Monitor Clinical Outcomes in Patients Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemo-Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Minsig; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Venkatramanamoorthy, Raghu; Lawhorn-Crews, Jawana M.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Shields, Anthony F.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pancreatic cancer ranks as the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with five year survival ranging from 1-5%. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a metabolic imaging system that is widely used for the initial staging of cancer and detecting residual disease after treatment. There are limited data, however, on the use of this molecular imaging technique to assess early tumor response after treatment in pancreatic cancer. METHODS The objective of the study was to explore the relationship of early treatment response using the 18 F- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET with surgical outcome and overall survival in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. FDG-PET measurements of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) and kinetic parameters were compared to the clinical outcome. RESULTS Twenty patients were enrolled in the study evaluating neoadjuvant induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (chemo-RT) for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. All twenty patients had pre-study PET scans and a total of fifty PET scans were performed. Among patients who were PET responders (≥50% decrease in SUV after cycle 1), 100% (2/2) had complete surgical resection. Only 6% (1/16) had surgical resection in the PET non-responders (<50% decrease). Two patients did not have the second PET scan due to clinical progression or treatment toxicity. Mean survival was 23.2 months for PET responders and 11.3 months for non-responders (p=0.234). Similar differences in survival were also noted when response was measured using Patlak analysis. CONCLUSION FDG-PET can aid in monitoring the clinical outcome of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemo-RT. FDG-PET may be used to aid patients who could have complete surgical resection as well as prognosticate patients’ survival. PMID:19806035

  1. Dietary consumption of advanced glycation end products and pancreatic cancer in the prospective NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study12345

    PubMed Central

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Zimmerman, Thea Palmer; Duan, Zhigang; Chen, Liang; Kahle, Lisa; Risch, Adam; Subar, Amy F; Cross, Amanda J; Hollenbeck, Albert; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary; Sinha, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a heterogeneous group of compounds present in uncooked foods as well as in foods cooked at high temperatures. AGEs have been associated with insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation in patients with diabetes. Dietary AGEs are an important contributor to the AGE pool in the body. Nϵ-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) AGE is one of the major biologically and chemically well-characterized AGE markers. The consumption of red meat, which is CML-AGE rich, has been positively associated with pancreatic cancer in men. Objectives: With the use of a published food CML-AGE database, we estimated the consumption of CML AGE in the prospective NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study and evaluated the association between CML-AGE consumption and pancreatic cancer and the mediating effect of CML AGE on the association between red meat consumption and pancreatic cancer. Design: Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate HRs and 95% CIs for pancreatic cancer. Results: During an average of 10.5 y of follow-up, we identified 2193 pancreatic cancer cases (1407 men and 786 women) from 528,251 subjects. With the comparison of subjects in the fifth and the first quintiles of CML-AGE consumption, we observed increased pancreatic cancer risk in men (HR: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.93, P-trend = 0.003) but not women (HR: 1.14; 95% CI: 0.76, 1.72, P-trend = 0.42). Men in the highest quintile of red meat consumption had higher risk of pancreatic cancer (HR: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.70), which attenuated after adjustment for CML-AGE consumption (HR: 1.20; 95% CI: 0.95, 1.53). Conclusion: Dietary CML-AGE consumption was associated with modestly increased risk of pancreatic cancer in men and may partially explain the positive association between red meat and pancreatic cancer. The NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00340015. PMID:25527756

  2. A dosimetric comparison of proton and photon therapy in unresectable cancers of the head of pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Reid F.; Zhai, Huifang; Both, Stefan; Metz, James M.; Plastaras, John P.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Mayekar, Sonal U.; Apisarnthanarax, Smith

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Uncontrolled local growth is the cause of death in ∼30% of patients with unresectable pancreatic cancers. The addition of standard-dose radiotherapy to gemcitabine has been shown to confer a modest survival benefit in this population. Radiation dose escalation with three-dimensional planning is not feasible, but high-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been shown to improve local control. Still, dose-escalation remains limited by gastrointestinal toxicity. In this study, the authors investigate the potential use of double scattering (DS) and pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy in limiting dose to critical organs at risk. Methods: The authors compared DS, PBS, and IMRT plans in 13 patients with unresectable cancer of the pancreatic head, paying particular attention to duodenum, small intestine, stomach, liver, kidney, and cord constraints in addition to target volume coverage. All plans were calculated to 5500 cGy in 25 fractions with equivalent constraints and normalized to prescription dose. All statistics were by two-tailed paired t-test. Results: Both DS and PBS decreased stomach, duodenum, and small bowel dose in low-dose regions compared to IMRT (p < 0.01). However, protons yielded increased doses in the mid to high dose regions (e.g., 23.6–53.8 and 34.9–52.4 Gy for duodenum using DS and PBS, respectively; p < 0.05). Protons also increased generalized equivalent uniform dose to duodenum and stomach, however these differences were small (<5% and 10%, respectively; p < 0.01). Doses to other organs-at-risk were within institutional constraints and placed no obvious limitations on treatment planning. Conclusions: Proton therapy does not appear to reduce OAR volumes receiving high dose. Protons are able to reduce the treated volume receiving low-intermediate doses, however the clinical significance of this remains to be determined in future investigations.

  3. A miRNA Signature of Chemoresistant Mesenchymal Phenotype Identifies Novel Molecular Targets Associated with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Alakesh; VenkataSubbaRao, Kolaparthi; Manoharan, Muthu Saravanan; Hill, Ping; Freeman, James W.

    2014-01-01

    In this study a microRNA (miRNA) signature was identified in a gemcitabine resistant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell line model (BxPC3-GZR) and this signature was further examined in advanced PDAC tumor specimens from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. BxPC3-GZR showed a mesenchymal phenotype, expressed high levels of CD44 and showed a highly significant deregulation of 17 miRNAs. Based on relevance to cancer, a seven-miRNA signature (miR-100, miR-125b, miR-155, miR-21, miR-205, miR-27b and miR-455-3p) was selected for further studies. A strong correlation was observed for six of the seven miRNAs in 43 advanced tumor specimens compared to normal pancreas tissue. To assess the functional relevance we initially focused on miRNA-125b, which is over-expressed in both the BxPC3-GZR model and advanced PDAC tumor specimens. Knockdown of miRNA-125b in BxPC3-GZR and Panc-1 cells caused a partial reversal of the mesenchymal phenotype and enhanced response to gemcitabine. Moreover, RNA-seq data from each of 40 advanced PDAC tumor specimens from the TCGA data base indicate a negative correlation between expression of miRNA-125b and five of six potential target genes (BAP1, BBC3, NEU1, BCL2, STARD13). Thus far, two of these target genes, BBC3 and NEU1, that are tumor suppressor genes but not yet studied in PDAC, appear to be functional targets of miR-125b since knockdown of miR125b caused their up regulation. These miRNAs and their molecular targets may serve as targets to enhance sensitivity to chemotherapy and reduce metastatic spread. PMID:25184537

  4. Tolerance and efficacy of palliative radiotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer: A retrospective analysis of single-institutional experiences

    PubMed Central

    WOLNY-ROKICKA, EDYTA; SUTKOWSKI, KRZYSZTOF; GRZĄDZIEL, ALEKSANDRA; DORSZ, ŻANETA; TUKIENDORF, ANDRZEJ; LIPIŃSKI, JAKUB; WYDMAŃSKI, JERZY

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) in patients with locally advanced or metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. A total of 31 patients were enrolled in this study, 26 of whom had locally advanced (M0) pancreatic cancer and 5 had metastatic (M1) disease. The patients were treated with palliative RT (6–30 Gy in 1–10 fractions over a period of 1 day-2 weeks). Treatment-related toxicity was classified according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Early mild toxicity was observed. A total of 17 patients (55%) achieved good pain control without pharmacological therapy, and 12 patients (39%) reduced their use of analgesics; in the remaining 2 patients (6%), there was no change in analgesic use. Late high-grade (>3) toxicity was not observed. The average survival time for the 31 patients was 9 months. The 1-year overall survival rate was 16%. Palliative RT was well-tolerated and was able to prolong the survival time. The majority of the patients achieved better pain control with palliative RT. PMID:27284450

  5. Review of idiopathic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason Kihyuk; Enns, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding of pancreatitis and advances in technology have uncovered the veils of idiopathic pancreatitis to a point where a thorough history and judicious use of diagnostic techniques elucidate the cause in over 80% of cases. This review examines the multitude of etiologies of what were once labeled idiopathic pancreatitis and provides the current evidence on each. This review begins with a background review of the current epidemiology of idiopathic pancreatitis prior to discussion of various etiologies. Etiologies of medications, infections, toxins, autoimmune disorders, vascular causes, and anatomic and functional causes are explored in detail. We conclude with management of true idiopathic pancreatitis and a summary of the various etiologic agents. Throughout this review, areas of controversies are highlighted. PMID:18081217

  6. Proton therapy for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Romaine C; Huh, Soon; Li, Zuofeng; Rutenberg, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is commonly offered to patients with pancreatic malignancies although its ultimate utility is compromised since the pancreas is surrounded by exquisitely radiosensitive normal tissues, such as the duodenum, stomach, jejunum, liver, and kidneys. Proton radiotherapy can be used to create dose distributions that conform to tumor targets with significant normal tissue sparing. Because of this, protons appear to represent a superior modality for radiotherapy delivery to patients with unresectable tumors and those receiving postoperative radiotherapy. A particularly exciting opportunity for protons also exists for patients with resectable and marginally resectable disease. In this paper, we review the current literature on proton therapy for pancreatic cancer and discuss scenarios wherein the improvement in the therapeutic index with protons may have the potential to change the management paradigm for this malignancy. PMID:26380057

  7. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor accompanied with multiple liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Tomohide; Takaori, Kyoichi; Uemoto, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (P-NET) is rare and slow-growing. Current classifications predict its prognosis and postoperative recurrence. Curative resection is ideal, although often difficult, because over 80% of patients have unresectable multiple liver metastases and extrahepatic metastasis. Aggressive surgery for liver metastases is important to improve survival. Aggressive or cytoreductive surgery for liver metastases is indicated to reduce hormone levels and improve symptoms and prognosis. Liver transplantation was originally conceived as an ideal therapy for unresectable liver metastases. Unfortunately, there is no clear consensus on the role and timing of surgery for primary tumor and liver metastases. Surgeons still face questions in deciding the best surgical scenario in patients with P-NET with unresectable liver metastases. PMID:25232452

  8. A Multicenter Phase II Trial of S-1 With Concurrent Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Masafumi; Ioka, Tatsuya; Ito, Yoshinori; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nagase, Michitaka; Yamao, Kenji; Miyakawa, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Hiroshi; Furuse, Junji; Sato, Keiko; Sato, Tosiya; Okusaka, Takuji

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of S-1 and concurrent radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Locally advanced PC patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma, who had no previous therapy were enrolled. Radiation therapy was delivered through 3 or more fields at a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily on the day of irradiation during radiation therapy. After a 2- to 8-week break, patients received a maintenance dose of S-1 (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day rest period) was then administered until the appearance of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary efficacy endpoint was survival, and the secondary efficacy endpoints were progression-free survival, response rate, and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) response; the safety endpoint was toxicity. Results: Of the 60 evaluable patients, 16 patients achieved a partial response (27%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-40%). The median progression-free survival period, overall survival period, and 1-year survival rate of the evaluable patients were 9.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-11.6 months), 16.2 months (95% CI, 13.5-21.3 months), and 72% (95%CI, 59%-82%), respectively. Of the 42 patients with a pretreatment serum CA19-9 level of {>=}100 U/ml, 34 (81%) patients showed a decrease of greater than 50%. Leukopenia (6 patients, 10%) and anorexia (4 patients, 7%) were the major grade 3-4 toxicities with chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: The effect of S-1 with concurrent radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced PC was found to be very favorable, with only mild toxicity.

  9. ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN Report on the Assessment of Exocrine Pancreatic Function and Pancreatitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Christopher J; Chen, Kathy; Horvath, Karoly; Hughes, David; Lowe, Mark E; Mehta, Devendra; Orabi, Abrahim I; Screws, Jeremy; Thomson, Mike; Van Biervliet, Stephanie; Verkade, Henkjan J; Husain, Sohail Z; Wilschanski, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this clinical report is to discuss several recent advances in assessing exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) and pancreatitis in children, to review the array of pancreatic function tests, to provide an update on the inherited causes of EPI, with special emphasis on newly available genetic testing, and to review newer methods for evaluating pancreatitis.

  10. Having Your Cake and Eating It Too: Combining SBRT and Multi-agent Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kishan, Amar; Lee, Percy

    2016-01-01

    We read with great interest the results of the LAP07 study comparing capecitabine-based chemoradiation with gemcitabine-based therapy for non-progressive locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), following four months of gemcitabine-based therapy. The results, consistent with previous data, showed that standard chemoradiation improves local control (LC) but not overall survival. In this brief editorial, we emphasize that LC may still be very important in LAPC, as up to 30% of patients with LAPC may die from locally progressive disease. This is particularly likely to be true as systemic therapies continue to improve in efficacy. We very briefly review the data in support of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for LAPC, which has been shown to offer excellent LC with minimal late grade ≥ 2 toxicity rate in a recent multi-institutional phase II study. We underscore that  a short course of SBRT offers an expeditious alternative to a long course of chemoradiation, allowing the use of fully-intensive systemic therapy. PMID:27555984

  11. Having Your Cake and Eating It Too: Combining SBRT and Multi-agent Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kishan, Amar; Lee, Percy

    2016-01-01

    We read with great interest the results of the LAP07 study comparing capecitabine-based chemoradiation with gemcitabine-based therapy for non-progressive locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), following four months of gemcitabine-based therapy. The results, consistent with previous data, showed that standard chemoradiation improves local control (LC) but not overall survival. In this brief editorial, we emphasize that LC may still be very important in LAPC, as up to 30% of patients with LAPC may die from locally progressive disease. This is particularly likely to be true as systemic therapies continue to improve in efficacy. We very briefly review the data in support of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for LAPC, which has been shown to offer excellent LC with minimal late grade ≥ 2 toxicity rate in a recent multi-institutional phase II study. We underscore that  a short course of SBRT offers an expeditious alternative to a long course of chemoradiation, allowing the use of fully-intensive systemic therapy.

  12. Having Your Cake and Eating It Too: Combining SBRT and Multi-agent Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Percy

    2016-01-01

    We read with great interest the results of the LAP07 study comparing capecitabine-based chemoradiation with gemcitabine-based therapy for non-progressive locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), following four months of gemcitabine-based therapy. The results, consistent with previous data, showed that standard chemoradiation improves local control (LC) but not overall survival. In this brief editorial, we emphasize that LC may still be very important in LAPC, as up to 30% of patients with LAPC may die from locally progressive disease. This is particularly likely to be true as systemic therapies continue to improve in efficacy. We very briefly review the data in support of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for LAPC, which has been shown to offer excellent LC with minimal late grade ≥ 2 toxicity rate in a recent multi-institutional phase II study. We underscore that  a short course of SBRT offers an expeditious alternative to a long course of chemoradiation, allowing the use of fully-intensive systemic therapy.  PMID:27555984

  13. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  14. Pancreatic cancer: chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Andrén-Sandberg, Åke

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer in many cases appears in a non-curatively resectable stage when the diagnosis is made. Palliative treatment become an option in the patients with advanced stage. The present article reviewed chemotherapy and radiotherapy in various advanced stage of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22540056

  15. Therapeutic strategy in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tournigand, Christophe; André, Thierry; de Gramont, Aimery

    2012-01-01

    While surgery is the cornerstone treatment for early-stage colorectal cancer, chemotherapy is the first treatment option for metastatic disease when tumor lesions are frequently not fully resectable at presentation. Mortality from colon cancer has decreased over the past 30 years, but there is still a huge heterogeneity in survival rates that can be mainly explained by patient and tumor characteristics, host response factors, and treatment modalities. The management of unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer is a global treatment strategy, which applies several lines of therapy, salvage surgery, maintenance, and treatment-free intervals. The individualization of cancer treatment is based on the evaluation of prognostic factors for survival (serum lactate dehydrogenase level, performance status), and predictive factors for treatment efficacy [Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutation status]. The available treatment modalities for metastatic colorectal cancer are chemotherapy (fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, irinotecan), anti-angiogenic agents (e.g. bevacizumab), and anti-epidermal growth factor agents (cetuximab, panitumumab). The increasing number of active compounds dictates the strategy of trials evaluating these treatments either in combination or sequentially. Alternative outcomes that can be measured earlier than overall survival are needed to shorten the duration and reduce the size and cost of clinical trials. PMID:22423266

  16. Hereditary pancreatitis and secondary screening for early pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Vitone, L J; Greenhalf, W; Howes, N R; Neoptolemos, J P

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant disease with incomplete penetrance (80%), accounting for approximately 1% of all cases of pancreatitis. It is characterized by the onset of recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis in childhood and frequent progression to chronic pancreatitis. Whitcomb et al. identified the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1) on chromosome 7q35 as the site of the mutation that causes hereditary pancreatitis. The European registry of hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer (EUROPAC) aims to identify and make provisions for those affected by hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer. The most common mutations in hereditary pancreatitis are R122H, N29I and A16V but many families have been described with clinically defined hereditary pancreatitis where there is no PRSS1 mutation. It is known that the cumulative lifetime risk (to age 70 years) of pancreatic cancer is 40% in individuals with hereditary pancreatitis. This subset of individuals form an ideal group for the development of a screening programme aimed at detecting pancreatic cancer at an early stage in an attempt to improve the presently poor long-term survival. Current screening strategies involve multimodality imaging (computed tomography, endoluminal ultrasound) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for pancreatic juice collection followed by molecular analysis of the DNA extracted from the juice. The potential benefit of screening (curative resection) must be balanced against the associated morbidity and mortality of surgery. Philosophically, the individual's best interest must be sought in light of the latest advances in medicine and science following discussions with a multidisciplinary team in specialist pancreatic centres.

  17. 77 FR 11123 - Scientific Information Request on Local Therapies for Unresectable Colorectal Cancer Metastases...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Therapies for Unresectable Colorectal Cancer Metastases to the Liver AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research... unresectable colorectal cancer metastases to the liver. The EHC Program is dedicated to identifying as many... manufacturers of unresectable colorectal cancer medical devices. Scientific information is being solicited...

  18. Effective Treatment of Multiple Unresectable Skin Melanoma Metastases by Electrochemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Snoj, Marko; Cemazar, Maja; Slekovec Kolar, Breda; Sersa, Gregor

    2007-01-01

    Multiple unresectable melanoma skin metastases pose a treatment problem, especially in centers where isolated limb perfusion is not available. We report the case of a 59-year-old woman who developed multiple small unresectable cutaneous melanoma metastases on the thigh after her lower limb was amputated. Electrochemotherapy with bleomycin resulted in good local control of the disease, with a complete response of the treated melanoma nodules (224 tumor nodules) after 4 treatment sessions. Comparison between electrochemotherapy using repetition frequency of the applied electric pulses of 1 Hz and 5 kHz demonstrated equal antitumor effectiveness. Electrochemotherapy with intravenous bleomycin can also be used as a treatment of choice for local control of multiple unresectable cutaneous melanoma skin metastases. PMID:17589984

  19. The Association Between Chemoradiation-related Lymphopenia and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Aaron T.; Ye, Xiaobu; Ellsworth, Susannah G.; Smith, Jessica A.; Narang, Amol K.; Garg, Tanu; Campian, Jian; Laheru, Daniel A.; Zheng, Lei; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Grossman, Stuart A.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Lymphopenia is a common consequence of chemoradiation therapy yet is seldom addressed clinically. This study was conducted to determine if patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with definitive chemoradiation develop significant lymphopenia and if this affects clinical outcomes. Methods A retrospective analysis of patients with LAPC treated with chemoradiation at a single institution from 1997 to 2011 was performed. Total lymphocyte counts (TLCs) were recorded at baseline and then monthly during and after chemoradiation. The correlation between treatment-induced lymphopenia, established prognostic factors, and overall survival was analyzed using univariate Cox regression analysis. Important factors identified by univariate analysis were selected as covariates to construct a multivariate proportional hazards model for survival. Results A total of 101 patients met eligibility criteria. TLCs were normal in 86% before chemoradiation. The mean reduction in TLC per patient was 50.6% (SD, 40.6%) 2 months after starting chemoradiation (P< 0.00001), and 46% had TLC< 500 cells/mm3. Patients with TLC < 500 cells/mm3 2 months after starting chemoradiation had inferior median survival (8.7 vs. 13.3mo, P= 0.03) and PFS (4.9 vs. 9.0mo, P = 0.15). Multivariate analysis revealed TLC< 500 cells/mm3 to be an independent predictor of inferior survival (HR= 2.879, P= 0.001) along with baseline serum albumin (HR= 3.584, P = 0.0002), BUN (HR = 1.060, P= 0.02), platelet count (HR= 1.004, P = 0.005), and radiation planning target volume (HR= 1.003, P= 0.0006). Conclusions Severe treatment-related lymphopenia occurs frequently after chemoradiation for LAPC and is an independent predictor of inferior survival. PMID:23648440

  20. Multicriteria Optimization in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Locally Advanced Cancer of the Pancreatic Head

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S. Craft, David L.; Carlsson, Fredrik; Bortfeld, Thomas R.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) affords the potential to decrease radiation therapy-associated toxicity by creating highly conformal dose distributions. However, the inverse planning process can create a suboptimal plan despite meeting all constraints. Multicriteria optimization (MCO) may reduce the time-consuming iteration loop necessary to develop a satisfactory plan while providing information regarding trade-offs between different treatment planning goals. In this exploratory study, we examine the feasibility and utility of MCO in physician plan selection in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Methods and Materials: The first 10 consecutive patients with LAPC treated with IMRT were evaluated. A database of plans (Pareto surface) was created that met the inverse planning goals. The physician then navigated to an 'optimal' plan from the point on the Pareto surface at which kidney dose was minimized. Results: Pareto surfaces were created for all 10 patients. A physician was able to select a plan from the Pareto surface within 10 minutes for all cases. Compared with the original (treated) IMRT plans, the plan selected from the Pareto surface had a lower stomach mean dose in 9 of 10 patients, although often at the expense of higher kidney dose than with the treated plan. Conclusion: The MCO is feasible in patients with LAPC and allows the physician to choose a satisfactory plan quickly. Generally, when given the opportunity, the physician will choose a plan with a lower stomach dose. The MCO enables a physician to provide greater active clinical input into the IMRT planning process.

  1. Randomised, open-label, phase II study of gemcitabine with and without IMM-101 for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dalgleish, Angus G; Stebbing, Justin; Adamson, Douglas JA; Arif, Seema Safia; Bidoli, Paolo; Chang, David; Cheeseman, Sue; Diaz-Beveridge, Robert; Fernandez-Martos, Carlos; Glynne-Jones, Rob; Granetto, Cristina; Massuti, Bartomeu; McAdam, Karen; McDermott, Raymond; Martín, Andrés J Muñoz; Papamichael, Demetris; Pazo-Cid, Roberto; Vieitez, Jose M; Zaniboni, Alberto; Carroll, Kevin J; Wagle, Shama; Gaya, Andrew; Mudan, Satvinder S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Immune Modulation and Gemcitabine Evaluation-1, a randomised, open-label, phase II, first-line, proof of concept study (NCT01303172), explored safety and tolerability of IMM-101 (heat-killed Mycobacterium obuense; NCTC 13365) with gemcitabine (GEM) in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Methods: Patients were randomised (2 : 1) to IMM-101 (10 mg ml−l intradermally)+GEM (1000 mg m−2 intravenously; n=75), or GEM alone (n=35). Safety was assessed on frequency and incidence of adverse events (AEs). Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall response rate (ORR) were collected. Results: IMM-101 was well tolerated with a similar rate of AE and serious adverse event reporting in both groups after allowance for exposure. Median OS in the intent-to-treat population was 6.7 months for IMM-101+GEM v 5.6 months for GEM; while not significant, the hazard ratio (HR) numerically favoured IMM-101+GEM (HR, 0.68 (95% CI, 0.44–1.04, P=0.074). In a pre-defined metastatic subgroup (84%), OS was significantly improved from 4.4 to 7.0 months in favour of IMM-101+GEM (HR, 0.54, 95% CI 0.33–0.87, P=0.01). Conclusions: IMM-101 with GEM was as safe and well tolerated as GEM alone, and there was a suggestion of a beneficial effect on survival in patients with metastatic disease. This warrants further evaluation in an adequately powered confirmatory study. PMID:27599039

  2. Prognostic Factors for Survival and Resection in Patients With Initial Nonresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerregaard, Jon K.; Mortensen, Michael B.; Jensen, Helle A.; Nielsen, Morten; Pfeiffer, Per

    2012-07-01

    Background and Purpose: Controversies regarding the optimal therapy for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) exist. Although the prognosis as a whole remains dismal, subgroups are known to benefit from intensive therapy, including chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We describe the results in 178 patients treated from 2001 to 2010 and have developed a prognostic model for both survival and the possibility of a subsequent resection in these patients. Methods and Materials: From 2001 until 2010, 178 consecutive patients with LAPC were treated and included in the present study, with CRT consisting of 50 Gy in 27 fractions combined with tegafur-uracil(UFT)/folinic acid(FA). Results: The median survival from diagnosis was 11.5 months. Adverse events of Grade 3 or above were seen in 36% of the patients. Ninety-three percent of the patients completed all fractions. A Cox regression model for survival demonstrated resection (hazard ratio [HR] 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1-0.3) and pre-CRT gemcitabine-based therapy (HR 0.57; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9) as being associated with a favorable outcome, increasing gross tumor volume (HR 1.14; 95% CI, 1.0-1.3) was associated with shorter survival. A logistic regression model showed Stage III disease (odds ratio [OR] 0.16; 95% CI, 0.0-1.1) and abnormal hemoglobin (OR 0.26; 95% CI, 0.0-1.2) as being associated with lower odds of resection. Conclusion: This study confirms the favorable prognosis for patients receiving gemcitabine therapy before CRT and the poor prognosis associated with increasing tumor volume. In addition, CRT in patients with abnormal hemoglobin and Stage III disease rarely induced tumor shrinkage allowing subsequent resection.

  3. Outcome of Transplant-fallout Patients With Unresectable Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sio, Terence T.; Haddock, Michael G.; Novotny, Paul J.; Gores, Gregory J.; Alberts, Steven R.; Miller, Robert C.; Heimbach, Julie K.; Rosen, Charles B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this was to determine survival after starting neoadjuvant therapy for patients who became ineligible for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Methods and Materials: Since January 1993, 215 patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma began treatment with planned OLT. Treatment included external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with fluorouracil, bile duct brachytherapy, and postradiotherapy fluorouracil or capecitabine before OLT. Adverse findings at the staging operation, death, and other factors precluded OLT in 63 patients (29%), of whom 61 completed neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Results: By October 2012, 56 (89%) of the 63 patients unable to undergo OLT had died. Twenty-two patients (35%) became ineligible for OLT before the staging operation, 38 (60%) at the staging operation, and 3 (5%) after staging. From the date of diagnosis, median overall survival was 12.3 months. Survival was 17% at 18 months and 7% at 24 months. Median survival after fallout was 6.8 months. Median survival after the staging operation was 6 months. Two patients lived for 3.7 and 8.7 years before dying of cancer or liver failure caused by persistent biliary stricture at the site of the original cancer, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that time from diagnosis to fallout correlated with overall survival (P=0.04). Conclusions: In highly selected patients initially suitable for OLT, the mortality rate for cholangiocarcinoma was high in patients who became ineligible for OLT. Their survival, however, was comparable to expected survival for patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease treated with nontransplant therapies. The most common reason for patient fallout was adverse findings at the staging operation. PMID:24921218

  4. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chari, S T; DiMagno, E P

    2000-09-01

    In the past year, there has been at least one important clinical paper that sheds light on the character and natural history of painful chronic pancreatitis, which has important clinical implications. In addition, several novel mutations have been described in the cationic trypsinogen gene in patients with hereditary pancreatitis. The mechanism by which these mutations cause pancreatic disease remains speculative. The diagnosis of early chronic pancreatitis is controversial. A novel noninvasive pancreatic function test (measurement of postprandial APOB-48) was reported but is unlikely to be a sensitive test of pancreatic function. Pancreatic fibrosis is frequently seen in alcoholics without chronic pancreatitis, and this makes it difficult to interpret the findings on endoscopic ultrasonogram. Recent studies highlight the difficulty in abolishing pancreatic steatorrhea. Recently fibrosing colonopathy in adult patients has been reported. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy combined with endoscopic therapy failed to benefit patients with calcific chronic pancreatitis.

  5. Genotype-guided Dosing of mFOLFIRINOX Chemotherapy in Patients With Previously Untreated Advanced Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of Unknown Primary; Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Newly Diagnosed Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  6. Cost-effectiveness analysis of gemcitabine, S-1 and gemcitabine plus S-1 for treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer based on GEST study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Rongce; Wen, Feng; Zhang, Pengfei; Tang, Ruilei; Du, Zedong; He, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Jian; Li, Qiu

    2015-04-01

    Gemcitabine (GEM) alone, S-1 alone and gemcitabine plus S-1 (GS) have shown a marginal clinical benefit for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. However, there is no clearly defined optimal cost-effectiveness treatment. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of GEM alone, S-1 alone and GS for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer based on GEST study for public payers. A decision model compared GEM alone, S-1 alone and GS. Primary base case data were identified using the GEST study and the literatures. Costs were estimated from West China Hospital, Sichuan University, China, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated. Survival benefits were reported in quality-adjusted life-months (QALMs). Sensitive analyses were performed by varying potentially modifiable parameters of the model. The base case analysis showed that the GEM cost $21,912 and yielded survival of 6.93 QALMs, S-1 cost $19,371 and yielded survival of 7.90 QALMs and GS cost $22,943 and yielded survival of 7.46 QALMs in the entire treatment. The one-way sensitivity analyses showed that the ICER of S-1 was driven mostly by the S-1 group utility score of stable state compared with GEM, and the GEM group utility score of progressed state played a key role on the ICER of GS compared with GEM. S-1 represents an attractive cost-effective treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer, given the favorable cost per QALM and improvement in clinical efficacy, especially the limited available treatment options.

  7. Pancreatic Cancer: A Review.

    PubMed

    Yabar, Cinthya S; Winter, Jordan M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the third leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States, yet advances in treatment options have been minimal over the past decade. In this review, we summarize the evaluation and treatments for this disease. We highlight molecular advances that hopefully will soon translate into improved outcomes. PMID:27546841

  8. Endoscopic palliation for pancreatic cancer with expandable metal stents.

    PubMed

    Spitz, J D; Arregui, M E

    2000-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer is generally not amenable to curative resection. Consequently, therapeutic efforts for these patients are most commonly directed at palliation of symptoms. Historically, surgery has been considered the most effective method of providing relief for biliary and/or enteric obstruction. However, less invasive methods have become available that can provide effective relief of jaundice and duodenal obstruction. Surgeons should still play an integral role in the management of these patients. We present a case report in which self-expanding metallic stents were used to relieve obstruction of the bile duct and duodenum in a patient with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

  9. Distal Pancreatectomy With En Bloc Celiac Axis Resection for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haibing; Ma, Ruirui; Gong, Jian; Cai, Chengzong; Song, Zhenshun; Xu, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Although distal pancreatectomy with en bloc celiac resection (DP-CAR) is used to treat locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the advantages and disadvantages of this surgical procedure remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate its clinical safety and efficacy.Studies regarding DP-CAR were retrieved from the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Chinese electronic databases. Articles were selected according to predesigned inclusion criteria, and data were extracted according to predesigned sheets. Clinical, oncologic, and survival outcomes of DP-CAR were systematically reviewed by hazard ratios (HRs) or odds ratio (OR) using fixed- or random-effects models.Eighteen studies were included. DP-CAR had a longer operating time and greater intraoperative blood loss compared to distal pancreatectomy (DP). A high incidence of vascular reconstruction occurred in DP-CAR: 11.53% (95%CI: 6.88-18.68%) for artery and 33.28% (95%CI: 20.45-49.19%) for vein. The pooled R0 resection rate of DP-CAR was 72.79% (95% CI, 46.19-89.29%). Higher mortality and morbidity rates were seen in DP-CAR, but no significant differences were detected compared to DP; the pooled OR was 1.798 for mortality (95% CI, 0.360-8.989) and 2.106 for morbidity (95% CI, 0.828-5.353). The pooled incidence of postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) was 31.31% (95%CI, 23.69-40.12%) in DP-CAR, similar to that of DP (OR = 1.07; 95%CI, 0.52-2.20). The pooled HR against DP-CAR was 5.67 (95%CI, 1.48-21.75) for delayed gastric emptying. The pooled rate of reoperation was 9.74% (95%CI, 4.56-19.59%) in DP-CAR. The combined 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates in DP-CAR were 65.22% (49.32-78.34%), 30.20% (21.50-40. 60%), and 18.70% (10.89-30.13%), respectively. The estimated means and medians for survival time in DP-CAR patients were 24.12 (95%CI, 18.26-29.98) months and 17.00 (95%CI, 13.52-20.48) months, respectively. There were no significant differences regarding

  10. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Male Breast Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Intraductal Carcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  11. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    PubMed

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  12. A randomized, placebo-controlled phase III trial of masitinib plus gemcitabine in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deplanque, G.; Demarchi, M.; Hebbar, M.; Flynn, P.; Melichar, B.; Atkins, J.; Nowara, E.; Moyé, L.; Piquemal, D.; Ritter, D.; Dubreuil, P.; Mansfield, C. D.; Acin, Y.; Moussy, A.; Hermine, O.; Hammel, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Masitinib is a selective oral tyrosine–kinase inhibitor. The efficacy and safety of masitinib combined with gemcitabine was compared against single-agent gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Patients and methods Patients with inoperable, chemotherapy-naïve, PDAC were randomized (1 : 1) to receive gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) in combination with either masitinib (9 mg/kg/day) or a placebo. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) in the modified intent-to-treat population. Secondary OS analyses aimed to characterize subgroups with poor survival while receiving single-agent gemcitabine with subsequent evaluation of masitinib therapeutic benefit. These prospectively declared subgroups were based on pharmacogenomic data or a baseline characteristic. Results Three hundred and fifty-three patients were randomly assigned to receive either masitinib plus gemcitabine (N = 175) or placebo plus gemcitabine (N = 178). Median OS was similar between treatment-arms for the overall population, at respectively, 7.7 and 7.1 months, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.89 (95% CI [0.70; 1.13]. Secondary analyses identified two subgroups having a significantly poor survival rate when receiving single-agent gemcitabine; one defined by an overexpression of acyl–CoA oxidase-1 (ACOX1) in blood, and another via a baseline pain intensity threshold (VAS > 20 mm). These subgroups represent a critical unmet medical need as evidenced from median OS of 5.5 months in patients receiving single-agent gemcitabine, and comprise an estimated 63% of patients. A significant treatment effect was observed in these subgroups for masitinib with median OS of 11.7 months in the ‘ACOX1’ subgroup [HR = 0.23 (0.10; 0.51), P = 0.001], and 8.0 months in the ‘pain’ subgroup [HR = 0.62 (0.43; 0.89), P = 0.012]. Despite an increased toxicity of the combination as compared with single-agent gemcitabine, side-effects remained manageable. Conclusions The

  13. The impact of thromboprophylaxis on cancer survival: focus on pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mandalà, Mario; Tondini, Carlo

    2011-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is still a clinical challenge due to its predominantly late diagnosis and the chemoresistance to cytotoxic and target drugs. One of the major complications of pancreatic cancer is venous thromboembolism (VTE). Both ambulatory and hospitalized pancreatic cancer patients are at higher risk of developing VTE. Among patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer, the occurrence of VTE may be associated with a poor prognosis. Furthermore, emerging clinical data strongly suggest that anticoagulant treatment may improve patient survival by decreasing thromboembolic complications as well as by anticancer activity. Given the clinical relevance for both physicians and basic scientists, this article focuses on the experimental and clinical evidence supporting the relation between the coagulation cascade and the invasive and metastatic potential of pancreatic cancer, and suggests that anticoagulant therapy may represent a useful strategy to improve the prognosis of pancreatic cancer patients.

  14. [A 5-year survival case of locally advanced cancer of the pancreatic body treated by distal pancreatectomy with en bloc celiac axis resection after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Iseki, Masahiro; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Mizuma, Masamichi; Hayashi, Hiroki; Nakagawa, Kei; Okada, Takaho; Otsuka, Hideo; Ottomo, Shigeru; Sakata, Naoaki; Fukase, Koji; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Onogawa, Tohru; Naito, Takeshi; Katayose, Yu; Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki

    2012-11-01

    A 59-year-old man was diagnosed with locally advanced cancer of the pancreatic body, involving the nerve plexus around the celiac axis, the common hepatic artery, and the splenic artery. He was treated with a combination of irradiation (2 Gy/day, total 24 Gy) and 600 mg/m2 of gemcitabine(GEM)biweekly. The tumor size and the involved plexus area were not diminished, but CA19-9 was reduced by half. Distal pancreatectomy with en bloc celiac axis resection(DP-CAR)was performed. The histological findings indicated extensive invasion into the nerve plexus, including that adjacent to the stump of the pancreas, and thus the R classification was R1. After surgery, 1,000 mg/m2 of GEM was administered biweekly. The chemotherapy has been performed for 5 years to prevent local and systemic recurrence. No recurrence has been found 5 years after surgery. Multidisciplinary treatment, combined with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, curative-intent resection, and postoperative chemotherapy is important for effective treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:23267939

  15. Treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer with 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid and interferon alpha-2A: results of a phase II trial.

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, H.; Jäger-Arand, E.; Bernhard, G.; Heike, M.; Klein, O.; Riemann, J. F.; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K. H.; Dippold, W.; Knuth, A.

    1995-01-01

    Interferon alpha-2a (IFN-alpha) and folinic acid (FA) have been shown to modulate the cytotoxic effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in the treatment of cancer. A phase II study was initiated to evaluate the effect of a combination of 5-FU/FA/IFN-alpha in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Sixty previously untreated patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were treated with 500 mg m-2 FU via an intravenous bolus 1 h after the initiation of a 2 h infusion of 500 mg m-2 FA. Before starting the FA infusion, 6 million units (MU) of IFN-alpha was administered subcutaneously. The treatment was repeated once a week. Of 57 evaluable patients, eight (14%) had a partial response (PR), eight (14%) a minor response (MR) and 28 (49%) no change of disease (NC). Thirteen patients (23%) had progressive disease (PD). The median survival time was 10 months for all patients, 22 months for patients with partial remission and 5 months for patients with progressive disease. Many patients with tumour-related pain whose tumours were affected in terms of PR, MR, NC were free of pain during treatment with this regimen (22/36 patients). The common toxicities observed were fever (56%), nausea (37%) and diarrhoea (33%). These data suggest that biochemical modulation of 5-FU with FA and IFN-alpha has some positive effects in the treatment of pancreatic cancer of moderate toxicity. PMID:7819023

  16. Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Autoimmune Pancreatitis: Similarities and Differences in Japan and Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Myung Hwan; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Chung, Jae Bock

    2013-01-01

    Two subtypes (types 1 and 2) of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) are currently recognized. Type 1 AIP is related to immunoglobulin G4 (lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis), and type 2 AIP is characterized by neutrophilic infiltration into the epithelium of the pancreatic duct (idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis). Although type 2 AIP is sometimes observed in the United States and Europe, most cases of AIP in Japan and Korea are type 1. The international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP were created to be applicable worldwide and to distinguish between the two types of AIP. AIP is diagnosed based on the presence of at least one of the five cardinal features (i.e., imaging, serology, other organ involvement, histology, and response to steroid therapy). Oral steroids are the standard therapy for AIP, but immunomodulatory drugs or rituximab have been successfully used for patients with relapsed AIP in the United States and Europe. Generally, the clinical manifestations and demography of AIP are similar between Japan and Korea. However, there are differences in some aspects of the disease, including the proportion of other organ involvement, the prevalence of type 2 AIP, diagnostic criteria and maintenance therapy between the two countries. PMID:23898377

  17. Diagnostic Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dabizzi, Emanuele; Assef, Mauricio Saab; Raimondo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly solid tumors, with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Due to a non-specific clinical presentation, it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and is rarely amenable for curative treatment. Therefore early diagnosis and appropriate staging are still essential to define the best care and to improve patient survival. Several imaging modalities are currently available for the evaluation of pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on different techniques and discusses the diagnostic management of patients with pancreatic cancer. This review was conducted utilizing Pubmed and was limited to papers published within the last 5 years. The search key words pancreatic cancer, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, pancreatic tumors, diagnosis, radiology, imaging, nuclear imaging, endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and biochemical markers were used. PMID:24212626

  18. Metastatic pancreatic cancer: Is there a light at the end of the tunnel?

    PubMed Central

    Vaccaro, Vanja; Sperduti, Isabella; Vari, Sabrina; Bria, Emilio; Melisi, Davide; Garufi, Carlo; Nuzzo, Carmen; Scarpa, Aldo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Cognetti, Francesco; Reni, Michele; Milella, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Due to extremely poor prognosis, pancreatic cancer (PDAC) represents the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in Western countries. For more than a decade, gemcitabine (Gem) has been the mainstay of first-line PDAC treatment. Many efforts aimed at improving single-agent Gem efficacy by either combining it with a second cytotoxic/molecularly targeted agent or pharmacokinetic modulation provided disappointing results. Recently, the field of systemic therapy of advanced PDAC is finally moving forward. Polychemotherapy has shown promise over single-agent Gem: regimens like PEFG-PEXG-PDXG and GTX provide significant potential advantages in terms of survival and/or disease control, although sometimes at the cost of poor tolerability. The PRODIGE 4/ACCORD 11 was the first phase III trial to provide unequivocal benefit using the polychemotherapy regimen FOLFIRINOX; however the less favorable safety profile and the characteristics of the enrolled population, restrict the use of FOLFIRINOX to young and fit PDAC patients. The nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-Paclitaxel) formulation was developed to overcome resistance due to the desmoplastic stroma surrounding pancreatic cancer cells. Regardless of whether or not this is its main mechanisms of action, the combination of nab-Paclitaxel plus Gem showed a statistically and clinically significant survival advantage over single agent Gem and significantly improved all the secondary endpoints. Furthermore, recent findings on maintenance therapy are opening up potential new avenues in the treatment of advanced PDAC, particularly in a new era in which highly effective first-line regimens allow patients to experience prolonged disease control. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances in the systemic treatment of advanced PDAC, mostly focusing on recent findings that have set new standards in metastatic disease. Potential avenues for further development in the metastatic setting and current efforts to integrate

  19. Childhood pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Uretsky, G; Goldschmiedt, M; James, K

    1999-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare finding in childhood but probably more common than is generally realized. This condition should be considered in the evaluation of children with vomiting and abdominal pain, because it can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Clinical suspicion is required to make the diagnosis, especially when the serum amylase concentration is normal. Recurrent pancreatitis may be familial as a result of inherited biochemical or anatomic abnormalities. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis are at high risk for pancreatic cancer.

  20. [Autoimmune pancreatitis as an element of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome].

    PubMed

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis constantly belongs to diseases which often causes significant diagnostic problem and often runs out with surgical intervention as considered to be a pancreatic cancer. Important although usually underestimated problems are polyglandular syndromes, which may consist of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) problem as well. This case report is an example of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS), which was connected with the surgical treatment with biliary bypass anastomosis because of the unresectable lesion in the head of pancreas. The definite remission of the pancreatic lesion finally came after a steroid therapy. Differentiation between neoplastic and inflammatory pancreatic tumors very often remains a serious clinical problem. On grounds of imaging and cytopathology exams it is often difficult to decide about the nature of a lesion. The negative result of cytopathological biopsy examination does not finally settle straightforward diagnosis. Diagnostic problems affect also autoimmune pancreatitis. It is worth to undertake attempts to differentiate pancreatic lesions especially in cases of concomitance with other autoimmune polyglandular syndromes. That is because it is connected with completely different treatment and outcome. We should remember about diagnostic criteria of autoimmune pancreatitis. Appropriate diagnosis for patients with AIP gives them a chance to avoid serious surgical resection and possible complications.

  1. A Phase II Study of Fixed-Dose Rate Gemcitabine Plus Low-Dose Cisplatin Followed by Consolidative Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Andrew H.; Venook, Alan P.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: The optimal strategy for treating locally advanced pancreatic cancer remains controversial, including the respective roles and timing of chemotherapy and radiation. We conducted a Phase II nonrandomized trial to evaluate sequential chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Chemotherapy naive patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} at 10 mg/m{sup 2}/min) plus cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. Those without evidence of extrapancreatic metastases after six cycles of chemotherapy received radiation (5,040 cGy over 28 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (800 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily on the day of radiation) as a radiosensitizer. Results: A total of 25 patients were enrolled with a median follow-up time of 656 days. Twelve patients (48%) successfully received all six cycles of chemotherapy plus chemoradiation. Eight patients (32%) progressed during chemotherapy, including 7 with extrapancreatic metastases. Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities were uncommon. Two patients sustained myocardial infarctions during chemotherapy, and 4 were hospitalized for infectious complications, although none in the setting of neutropenia. Median time to progression was 10.5 months and median survival was 13.5 months, with an estimated 1-year survival rate of 62%. Patients receiving all components of therapy had a median survival of 17.0 months. Conclusions: A strategy of initial fixed-dose rate gemcitabine-based chemotherapy, followed by chemoradiation, shows promising efficacy for treatment of locally advanced disease. A substantial proportion of patients will be identified early on as having extrapancreatic disease and spared the potential toxicities associated with radiation.

  2. Treatment of choice for unresectable small liver cancer: percutaneous ethanol injection therapy or transarterial chemoembolization therapy.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Y; Sekoguchi, B; Imai, H; Suzuki, T; Kubo, H; Itoh, H; Itoh, M

    1994-01-01

    Early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has become easier with recent advances in imaging diagnosis, but the tumor is frequently unresectable due to underlying advanced liver cirrhosis. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of percutaneous ethanol injection therapy (PEIT) and transarterial chemoembolization therapy (TACE) for small liver cancers measuring 3 cm or less in diameter and discussed the treatment of choice for unresectable cases. The tumors were divided into two groups on the basis of size: 1.5 cm or less (group A) and 1.6-3 cm in diameter (group B). In group A, the estimated 1- and 3-year survival rates were both 82% for a total of 19 cases. The survival value determined for 10 patients treated with PEIT was slightly higher than that found for 9 patients treated with TACE. In group B, the overall 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival values for a total of 56 patients were estimated at 83%, 60%, and 35%, respectively. The survival rates for 41 patients treated with TACE were 82%, 53%, and 28% at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. PEIT was performed on only 6 patients, whose survival rate was equivalent to that of a surgical resection group. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates for 9 patients who underwent surgical resection were estimated to be 100%, 85%, and 68%, respectively. Based on these results, PEIT seems to be the treatment of first choice for patients with small liver cancers measuring less than 1.5 cm in diameter if the tumor is thought to be unresectable because of associated severe liver cirrhosis. On the other hand, tumors measuring 1.6-3 cm in diameter must first be treated with TACE using a long-acting Lipiodol-carcinostatic suspension, even if resectable. In addition to the tumor size, dynamic CT is also useful for prospective decision of the therapeutic strategy. If the mass is demonstrated to be a hypervascular lesion by dynamic CT, TACE must be selected as the treatment of first choice, even for small lesions measuring 1

  3. PEDIATRIC PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, John F.; Uc, Aliye

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments in pediatric pancreatitis and to discuss etiologies and current management. Recent Findings Although recent studies have estimated the annual incidence of pediatric acute pancreatitis approaching that of adults, there are no established guidelines about its diagnosis and treatment in children. Genetic and structural/congenital abnormalities are emerging as the primary risk factors for pediatric acute recurrent and chronic pancreatitis. Specifically, chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significant socioeconomic burden in children. Both medical and surgical therapies are proposed for pediatric chronic pancreatitis, but there is little evidence that they are beneficial. Summary Acute, acute recurrent and chronic pancreatitis create significant health issues in the pediatric population. Medical and surgical therapies exist to potentially treat these conditions, but the pediatric data is limited and the cohorts are small. A multidisciplinary and multicenter approach is necessary to better determine pancreatic disease processes and treatment options in children. PMID:26181572

  4. Palliative therapy for pancreatic/biliary cancer.

    PubMed

    House, Michael G; Choti, Michael A

    2005-04-01

    Palliative treatment for unresectable periampullary cancer is directed at three major symptoms: obstructive jaundice, duodenal obstruction, and cancer-related pain. In most cases, the pattern of symptoms at the time of diagnosis in the context of the patient's medical condition and projected survival influence the decision to perform an operative versus a non operative palliative procedure. Despite improvements in preoperative imaging and laparoscopic staging of patients with periampullary cancer and hilar cholangiocarcinoma, surgical exploration is the only modality that can definitively rule out resectability and the potential for curative resection in some patients with nonmetastatic cancer. Furthermore, only surgical management achieves successful palliation of obstructive symptoms and cancer-related pain as a single procedure during exploration. To take advantage of the long-term advantages afforded by surgical palliation,operative procedures must be performed with acceptable morbidity. The average postoperative length of hospital stay for patients who undergo surgical palliation is less than 15 days, even in those who develop minor complications. The average survival of patients who receive surgical palliation alone for nonmetastatic, unresectable pancreatic cancer is approximately 8 months. As with all treatment planning, palliative therapy for pancreatic and biliary cancer should be planned using a multidisciplinary approach, including input from the surgeon, gastroenterologist, radiologist,and medical and radiation oncologist. In this way, quality of life can be optimized in most patients with these diseases.

  5. Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

  6. Gemcitabine alone versus combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin for the treatment of patients with locally advanced and/or metastatic pancreatic carcinoma: a retrospective analysis of multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Inal, A; Kos, F T; Algin, E; Yildiz, R; Dikiltas, M; Unek, I T; Colak, D; Elkiran, E T; Helvaci, K; Geredeli, C; Dane, F; Balakan, O; Kaplan, M A; Durnali, A G; Harputoglu, H; Goksel, G; Ozdemir, N; Buyukberber, S; Gumus, M; Kucukoner, M; Ozkan, M; Uncu, D; Benekli, M; Isikdogan, A

    2012-01-01

    The majority of patients with pancreatic cancer is of advanced disease. Several randomized Phase II and III trials suggest that the combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin (GemCis) response rates were higher than Gemcitabine (Gem) alone, however the trials were not enough powered to indicate a statistically significant prolongation of survival in patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The aim of this retrospective multicenter study is to evaluated the efficiency of Gem alone versus GemCis in patients with locally advanced and/or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma .A total of 406 patients, from fourteen centers were evaluated retrospectively. All patients received Gem or GemCis as first-line treatment between September 2005 to March 2011. Primary end of this study were to evaluate the toxicity, clinical response rate, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) between the arms. There were 156 patients (M: 98, F: 58) in Gem arm and 250 patients (M: 175, F: 75) in the combination arm. Gemcitabin arm patients older than the combination arm ( median 63 vs 57.5, p=0.001). In patients with the combination arm had a higher dose reduction (25.2% vs 11.3%, p=0.001) and dose delay (34% vs 16.8%, p=0.001). Among patients with the combination and Gemcitabin arm gender, diabetes mellitus, performance status, cholestasis, grade, stage did not have a statistically difference (p>0.05). Clinical response rate to the combination arm was higher than the Gem arm (69.0% vs 49.7%, p=0.001). PFS was more favorable in the GemCis arm than Gem alone, but the difference did not attain statistical significance (8.9 vs 6.0, p=0.08). OS was not significantly superior in the GemCis arm (12.0 vs 10.2, p>0.05). Grade III-IV hematologic and nonhematologic toxicity were higher in the combination arm. PFS was more favorable in the GemCis arm than Gem alone, but the difference did not attain statistical significance. OS was not significantly superior in the GemCis arm.

  7. CA19-9-related tumor kinetics after first-line chemotherapy of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: a monoinstitutional experience.

    PubMed

    Colloca, Giuseppe; Venturino, Antonella; Guarneri, Domenico

    2016-09-01

    The absolute value of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) pretreatment and its reduction after chemotherapy are established prognostic variables for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The present study is a retrospective monoinstitutional evaluation of the prognostic role of the CA19-9 reduction and some CA19-9-related tumor kinetics parameters, such as tumor growth rate constant (G), kinetic tumor response and log ratio. Forty-one cases met the selection criteria. After 8 weeks only G reported an inverse relationship with OS (r = -0.494) that was confirmed by regression analysis (R (2) = 0.192). G after 8 weeks of chemotherapy appears as a possible surrogate end point of overall survival. PMID:27522503

  8. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  9. Hypofractionated Image-Guided IMRT in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer With Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Infiltrated Vessels Concomitant With Capecitabine: A Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Passoni, Paolo; Reni, Michele; Cattaneo, Giovanni M.; Slim, Najla; Cereda, Stefano; Balzano, Gianpaolo; Castoldi, Renato; Longobardi, Barbara; Bettinardi, Valentino; Gianolli, Luigi; Gusmini, Simone; Staudacher, Carlo; Calandrino, Riccardo; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose (MTD) of an integrated boost to the tumor subvolume infiltrating vessels, delivered simultaneously with radical dose to the whole tumor and concomitant capecitabine in patients with pretreated advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage III or IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma without progressive disease after induction chemotherapy were eligible. Patients underwent simulated contrast-enhanced four-dimensional computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography. Gross tumor volume 1 (GTV1), the tumor, and GTV2, the tumor subvolume 1 cm around the infiltrated vessels, were contoured. GTVs were fused to generate Internal Target Volume (ITV)1 and ITV2. Biological tumor volume (BTV) was fused with ITV1 to create the BTV+Internal Target Volume (ITV) 1. A margin of 5/5/7 mm (7 mm in cranium-caudal) was added to BTV+ITV1 and to ITV2 to create Planning Target Volume (PTV) 1 and PTV2, respectively. Radiation therapy was delivered with tomotherapy. PTV1 received a fixed dose of 44.25 Gy in 15 fractions, and PTV2 received a dose escalation from 48 to 58 Gy as simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in consecutive groups of at least 3 patients. Concomitant chemotherapy was capecitabine, 1250 mg/m{sup 2} daily. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any treatment-related G3 nonhematological or G4 hematological toxicity occurring during the treatment or within 90 days from its completion. Results: From June 2005 to February 2010, 25 patients were enrolled. The dose escalation on the SIB was stopped at 58 Gy without reaching the MTD. One patient in the 2{sup nd} dose level (50 Gy) had a DLT: G3 acute gastric ulcer. Three patients had G3 late adverse effects associated with gastric and/or duodenal mucosal damage. All patients received the planned dose of radiation. Conclusions: A dose of 44.25 Gy in 15 fractions to the whole tumor with an SIB of 58 Gy to small

  10. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Shounak; Chari, Suresh T

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis describes a wide spectrum of fibro-inflammatory disorders of the exocrine pancreas that includes calcifying, obstructive, and steroid-responsive forms. Use of the term chronic pancreatitis without qualification generally refers to calcifying chronic pancreatitis. Epidemiology is poorly defined, but incidence worldwide seems to be on the rise. Smoking, drinking alcohol, and genetic predisposition are the major risk factors for chronic calcifying pancreatitis. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of chronic calcifying pancreatitis, focusing on pain management, the role of endoscopic and surgical intervention, and the use of pancreatic enzyme-replacement therapy. Management of patients is often challenging and necessitates a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26948434

  11. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chari, S T; DiMagno, E P

    2001-09-01

    An increasing number of novel mutations are associated with chronic pancreatitis. Some cause a high-penetrance, autosomal dominant type of clinical picture (eg, mutations at codons 29 and 122 of the cationic trypsinogen gene), whereas others have a low penetrance or are frequent in the general population (eg, mutations in Kazal type 1 [SPINK1] and in codons 16, 22, and 23 of the cationic trypsinogen gene) and act as disease modifiers. The results of recent studies indicate that smoking adversely affects the course and complications of chronic pancreatitis (more frequent and faster rate of calcification and higher risk of development of pancreatic cancer). Thus, regardless of the cause of chronic pancreatis, patients with this condition should not smoke. Using current diagnostic criteria, the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is not good. For example, 39% of dyspeptic persons without any other evidence of chronic pancreatitis fulfilled the endoscopic ultrasound criteria for chronic pancreatitis. Diabetes frequently occurs in chronic pancreatitis, but it is not prevented or increased by pancreatic surgery. Islet cell autotransplantation holds promise for the prevention of diabetes in patients requiring total pancreatectomy if the pancreas is not extensively fibrotic. Splenic vein occlusion is present in 7% of patients undergoing surgery for chronic pancreatitis, but fewer than one fifth of these patients have variceal bleeding before or after surgery.

  12. A Double-Layered Covered Biliary Metal Stent for the Management of Unresectable Malignant Biliary Obstruction: A Multicenter Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Seok; Jeong, Seok; Lee, Don Haeng; Moon, Jong Ho; Lee, Kyu Taek; Dong, Seok Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The covered self-expandable metal stent (CMS) was developed to prevent tumor ingrowth-induced stent occlusion during the treatment of malignant biliary obstruction. However, complications such as cholecystitis, pancreatitis, and stent migration can occur after the endoscopic insertion of CMSs. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy and safety of a double-layered CMS (DCMS) for the management of malignant bile duct obstruction. Methods DCMSs were endoscopically introduced into 59 patients with unresectable malignant extrahepatic biliary obstruction at four tertiary referral centers, and the patient medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Results Both the technical and functional success rates were 100%. Procedure-related complications including pancreatitis, cholangitis, stent migration, and liver abscess occurred in five patients (8.5%). The median follow-up period was 265 days (range, 31 to 752 days). Cumulative stent patency rates were 68.2% and 40.8% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. At the final follow-up, the rate of stent occlusion was 33.9% (20/59), and the median stent patency period was 276 days (range, 2 to 706 days). Conclusions The clinical outcomes of DCMSs were comparable to the outcomes previously reported for CMSs with respect to stent patency period and complication rates. PMID:27172927

  13. Chronic inflammation and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    McKay, Colin J; Glen, Paul; McMillan, Donald C

    2008-01-01

    There is a proven association between carcinoma of the pancreas and both the sporadic and hereditary forms of chronic pancreatitis. In chronic pancreatitis the standardised incidence ratio for development of pancreatic cancer is 14-18 and is further increased by cigarette smoking. Underlying mechanisms are unclear but current theories point to the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations as a consequence of repeated DNA damage and cell regeneration in an environment favouring proliferation and neovascularisation. In patients who develop pancreatic cancer, there is interest in the role of the inflammatory response in the development of cancer cachexia and in determining prognosis. Furthermore, markers of a systemic inflammatory response have prognostic significance in both advanced, inoperable pancreatic cancer and in patients undergoing resection. Further understanding of the details of the relationship between inflammation, carcinogenesis and cancer prognosis may lead to new therapeutic possibilities as part of multi-modality management of this difficult disease.

  14. S0514 Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Gallbladder Cancer or Cholangiocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma With Squamous Metaplasia of the Gallbladder; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Gallbladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  15. [Treatment Strategy for Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (P-NETs) at Kurume University Hospital].

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Hisaka, Toru; Okuda, Kouji; Akagi, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (P-NETs) are relatively rare. Approximately 50-90% of non-functioning P-NETs are malignant, and the only curative treatment is surgical resection. Liver and lymph node metastases often occur. In Japan, the mTOR inhibitor everolimus is now covered by the national health insurance for treatment of P-NETs, including advanced and unresectable tumors. We present a case of P-NETs with liver metastases seen at our hospital and discuss our treatment strategy for this disease. Patients with tumors≤1 cm receive follow-up observation. For G1 and G2 (other than G3) tumors, if their size is >1 cm when first discovered, resection of the primary lesion along with lymph node dissection (as for pancreatic cancer) is performed. In G1 and G2 tumors with synchronous distant metastases, the primary lesion is first resected, and depending on the pathological findings, chemotherapy (LAR plus everolimus) may be administered. After 4 courses of chemotherapy, the response is assessed, and if further resection is possible, resection is performed. When there are synchronous liver metastases, if partial resection and local treatment (such as RFA) are possible, the primary lesion and synchronous lesions are resected. If a major hepatic resection procedure such as a segmentectomy or lobectomy is possible, the primary lesion is resected, followed by chemotherapy. After 4 courses of chemotherapy, the response is assessed, and if further resection is possible, hepatic resection is performed. G3 tumors are usually highly malignant, advanced, and often associated with metastases at the time of diagnosis. Chemotherapy may be an option for treating patients with G3 tumors. PMID:26809536

  16. Potential predictive role of chemotherapy-induced changes of soluble CD40 ligand in untreated advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Azzariti, Amalia; Brunetti, Oronzo; Porcelli, Letizia; Graziano, Giusi; Iacobazzi, Rosa Maria; Signorile, Michele; Scarpa, Aldo; Lorusso, Vito; Silvestris, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma lacks predictive biomarkers. CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. CD40-sCD40L interaction is considered to contribute to the promotion of tumor cell growth and angiogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of serum sCD40L as a predictor in metastatic pancreatic cancer. We evaluated 27 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients treated with FOLFIRINOX (21 patients) or gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel combination (six patients). The sCD40L level was measured in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at baseline, at first evaluation (all patients), and at time to progression (18 patients). The radiological response was evaluated according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, Version 1.1. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare pre-post treatment sCD40L levels with respect to clinical response, while Pearson's correlation coefficient was used for the correlation between sCD40L and CA19.9 pre- and post-treatment. The Kruskal-Wallis test was also conducted for further comparisons. We observed a statistically significant reduction in the sCD40L level after 3 months of treatment in patients with partial response (11,718.05±7,097.13 pg/mL vs 4,689.42±5,409.96 pg/mL; P<0.01). Conversely, in patients with progressive disease, the biomarker statistically increased in the same time (9,351.51±7,356.91 pg/mL vs 22,282.92±11,629.35 pg/mL; P<0.01). This trend of sCD40L was confirmed in 18 patients at time to progression after the first evaluation. No differences were recorded within the stable disease group. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the sCD40L and CA19.9 pre-post treatment variation percentage (Pearson's correlation coefficient =0.52; P<0.05). Our data suggest a possible predictive role of sCD40L in pancreatic cancer patients, similar to CA19.9. PMID:27555786

  17. Potential predictive role of chemotherapy-induced changes of soluble CD40 ligand in untreated advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Azzariti, Amalia; Brunetti, Oronzo; Porcelli, Letizia; Graziano, Giusi; Iacobazzi, Rosa Maria; Signorile, Michele; Scarpa, Aldo; Lorusso, Vito; Silvestris, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma lacks predictive biomarkers. CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. CD40–sCD40L interaction is considered to contribute to the promotion of tumor cell growth and angiogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of serum sCD40L as a predictor in metastatic pancreatic cancer. We evaluated 27 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients treated with FOLFIRINOX (21 patients) or gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel combination (six patients). The sCD40L level was measured in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at baseline, at first evaluation (all patients), and at time to progression (18 patients). The radiological response was evaluated according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, Version 1.1. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare pre–post treatment sCD40L levels with respect to clinical response, while Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used for the correlation between sCD40L and CA19.9 pre- and post-treatment. The Kruskal–Wallis test was also conducted for further comparisons. We observed a statistically significant reduction in the sCD40L level after 3 months of treatment in patients with partial response (11,718.05±7,097.13 pg/mL vs 4,689.42±5,409.96 pg/mL; P<0.01). Conversely, in patients with progressive disease, the biomarker statistically increased in the same time (9,351.51±7,356.91 pg/mL vs 22,282.92±11,629.35 pg/mL; P<0.01). This trend of sCD40L was confirmed in 18 patients at time to progression after the first evaluation. No differences were recorded within the stable disease group. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the sCD40L and CA19.9 pre–post treatment variation percentage (Pearson’s correlation coefficient =0.52; P<0.05). Our data suggest a possible predictive role of sCD40L in pancreatic cancer patients, similar to CA19.9. PMID:27555786

  18. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hackert, Thilo; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W

    2016-06-01

    Surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy remains the only treatment option for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) with the chance of long-term survival. If a radical tumor resection is possible, 5-year survival rates of 20-25% can be achieved. Pancreatic surgery has significantly changed during the past years and resection approaches have been extended beyond standard procedures, including vascular and multivisceral resections. Consequently, borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BR-PDAC), which has recently been defined by the International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS), has become a controversial issue with regard to its management in terms of upfront resection vs. neoadjuvant treatment and sequential resection. Preoperative diagnostic accuracy to define resectability of PDAC is a keypoint in this context as well as the surgical and interdisciplinary expertise to perform advanced pancreatic surgery and manage complications. The present mini-review summarizes the current state of definition, management and outcome of BR-PDAC. Furthermore, the topic of ongoing and future studies on neoadjuvant treatment which is closely related to borderline resectability in PDAC is discussed. PMID:26970276

  19. Radiofrequency Ablation of Unresectable Primary and Metastatic Hepatic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Curley, Steven A.; Izzo, Francesco; Delrio, Paolo; Ellis, Lee M.; Granchi, Jennifer; Vallone, Paolo; Fiore, Francesco; Pignata, Sandro; Daniele, Bruno; Cremona, Francesco

    1999-01-01

    Objective To describe the safety and efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) to treat unresectable malignant hepatic tumors in 123 patients. Background The majority of patients with primary or metastatic malignancies confined to the liver are not candidates for resection because of tumor size, location, or multifocality or inadequate functional hepatic reserve. Local application of heat is tumoricidal; therefore, the authors investigated a novel RFA system to treat patients with unresectable hepatic cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with hepatic malignancies were entered into a prospective, nonrandomized trial. The liver tumors were treated percutaneously or during surgery under ultrasound guidance using a novel LeVeen monopolar array needle electrode and an RF 2000 generator. All patients were followed to assess complications, treatment response, and recurrence of malignant disease. Results RFA was used to treat 169 tumors (median diameter 3.4 cm, range 0.5 to 12 cm) in 123 patients. Primary liver cancer was treated in 48 patients (39.1%), and metastatic liver tumors were treated in 75 patients (60.9%). Percutaneous and intraoperative RFA was performed in 31 patients (35.2%) and 92 patients (74.8%), respectively. There were no treatment-related deaths, and the complication rate after RFA was 2.4%. All treated tumors were completely necrotic on imaging studies after completion of RFA treatments. With a median follow-up of 15 months, tumor has recurred in 3 of 169 treated lesions (1.8%), but metastatic disease has developed at other sites in 34 patients (27.6%). Conclusions RFA is a safe, well-tolerated, and effective treatment to achieve tumor destruction in patients with unresectable hepatic malignancies. Because patients are at risk for the development of new metastatic disease after RFA, multimodality treatment approaches that include RFA should be investigated. PMID:10400029

  20. Unresectable Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinuses: Outcomes and Toxicities

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Nelson, Carl J.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Stegman, Lauren D.; Wu, Abraham J.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Pfister, David G.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term outcomes and toxicity in patients with unresectable paranasal sinus carcinoma treated with radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 1990 and December 2006, 39 patients with unresectable Stage IVB paranasal sinus carcinoma were treated definitively with chemotherapy plus radiotherapy (n = 35, 90%) or with radiotherapy alone (n = 4, 10%). Patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (n = 18, 46%), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (n = 12, 31%), or conventional radiotherapy (n = 9, 23%) to a median treatment dose of 70 Gy. Most patients received concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy (n = 32, 82%) and/or concomitant boost radiotherapy (n = 29, 74%). Results: With a median follow-up of 90 months, the 5-year local progression-free survival, regional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 21%, 61%, 51%, 14%, and 15%, respectively. Patients primarily experienced local relapse (n = 25, 64%), mostly within the irradiated field (n = 22). Nine patients developed neck relapses; however none of the 4 patients receiving elective neck irradiation had a nodal relapse. In 13 patients acute Grade 3 mucositis developed. Severe late toxicities occurred in 2 patients with radionecrosis and 1 patient with unilateral blindness 7 years after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (77 Gy to the optic nerve). The only significant factor for improved local progression-free survival and overall survival was a biologically equivalent dose of radiation {>=}65 Gy. Conclusions: Treatment outcomes for unresectable paranasal sinus carcinoma are poor, and combined-modality treatment is needed that is both more effective and associated with less morbidity. The addition of elective neck irradiation may improve regional control.

  1. Lesser sac endoscopy and laparoscopy in pancreatic carcinoma definitive diagnosis, staging and palliation.

    PubMed

    Charukhchyan, S A; Lucas, G W

    1998-09-01

    Laparoscopy with lesser sac endoscopy (LSE) were used in combination from 1987 to 1992 in 103 patients for differentiation between pancreatic carcinoma and other peripancreatic pathology, staging, and palliation. LSE identified pancreatic carcinoma in 38 patients; pancreatic cystadenocarcinoma in 2 patients; pancreatic cystadenoma in 3 patients; pancreatic adenoma in 1 patient; pancreatic metastases from liver in 2 patients; and pancreatic cysts in 5 patients. False negative diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma occurred in two cases. Nontumor pancreatic pathology was revealed in 10 patients. Specifically, acute pancreatitis was found in four patients, and chronic pancreatitis was found in six patients. Extrapancreatic cancers were identified in 15 patients: retroperitoneal extraorgan tumors were found in 2 patients; extrahepatic biliary tract cancer in 6 patients; gallbladder cancer in 1 patient; liver cancer in 3 patients; and stomach cancer in 1 patient. In five cases no pathology was found. Overall correct definitive diagnosis was established in 101 patients. Sensitivity of laparoscopy with LSE for pancreatic carcinoma diagnosis proved to be 95 per cent (38 of 40 patients), for pancreatic tumors diagnosis 96.22 per cent (51 of 53 patients); specificity of the method 100 per cent; and accuracy of diagnosis 98 per cent (101 of 103 patients). Thus, the accuracy of the method was as high as the accuracy of combination of all known modalities. Criteria of unresectability were revealed with the combination of LSE and laparoscopy in 75 per cent (30 of 40 cases) of pancreatic carcinoma. Moreover, laparoscopy allowed palliation of pancreatic carcinoma. Laparoscopic cholecystostomy was performed in 10 patients, and laparoscopic cholecystojejunostomy with enteroenterostomy was performed in 6 patients.

  2. Baseline Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis Are Associated With Survival Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dholakia, Avani S.; Chaudhry, Muhammad; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Chang, Daniel T.; Raman, Siva P.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Su, Zheng; Pai, Jonathan; Oteiza, Katharine E.; Griffith, Mary E.; Wahl, Richard L.; Tryggestad, Erik; Pawlik, Timothy; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Koong, Albert C.; and others

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in other malignancies, the role of PET in pancreatic cancer has yet to be well established. We analyzed the prognostic utility of PET for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) undergoing fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two patients with LAPC in a prospective clinical trial received up to 3 doses of gemcitabine, followed by 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy, using SBRT. All patients received a baseline PET scan prior to SBRT (pre-SBRT PET). Metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum and peak standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub peak}) on pre-SBRT PET scans were calculated using custom-designed software. Disease was measured at a threshold based on the liver SUV, using the equation Liver{sub mean} + [2 × Liver{sub sd}]. Median values of PET parameters were used as cutoffs when assessing their prognostic potential through Cox regression analyses. Results: Of the 32 patients, the majority were male (n=19, 59%), 65 years or older (n=21, 66%), and had tumors located in the pancreatic head (n=27, 84%). Twenty-seven patients (84%) received induction gemcitabine prior to SBRT. Median overall survival for the entire cohort was 18.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7-22.0). An MTV of 26.8 cm{sup 3} or greater (hazard ratio [HR] 4.46, 95% CI 1.64-5.88, P<.003) and TLG of 70.9 or greater (HR 3.08, 95% CI 1.18-8.02, P<.021) on pre-SBRT PET scan were associated with inferior overall survival on univariate analysis. Both pre-SBRT MTV (HR 5.13, 95% CI 1.19-22.21, P=.029) and TLG (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.07-10.48, P=.038) remained independently associated with overall survival in separate multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Pre-SBRT MTV and TLG are potential predictive factors for overall survival in patients with LAPC and may assist in

  3. Dabrafenib in the treatment of metastatic or unresectable melanoma.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Leila; Hogg, David

    2015-03-01

    Dabrafenib is a potent inhibitor of mutant BRAF. Trials to date have shown it to be well tolerated, with significant activity in unresectable stage III or IV metastatic melanoma. Overall response rates of approximately 50% were seen in addition to improved progression-free and overall survival of 6 and 18 months, respectively. Preclinical studies suggested that combining BRAF and MEK inhibition would increase response rates and decrease toxicity. Clinical trials with the combination of dabrafenib and trametinib have improved progression-free and overall survival in interim analyses. Future improvements in responses and outcomes will depend on additional combination strategies, possibly employing immunotherapy. PMID:25711514

  4. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  5. [Hereditary pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare, heterogeneous familial disease and should be suspected in any patient who has suffered at least two attacks of acute pancreatitis for which there is no underlying cause and unexplained chronic pancreatitis with a family history in a first- or second degree relative. with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Genetic factors have been implied in cases of familial chronic pancreatitis. The most common are mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). The inflammation results in repeated DNA damage, error-prone repair mechanisms and the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations. Risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a major concern of many patients with hereditary chronic pancreatitis, but the individual risk is poorly defined. Better risk models of pancreatic cancer in individual patients based on etiology of pancreatitis, family history, genetics, smoking, alcohol, diabetes and the patient's age are needed. PMID:27000817

  6. Phase II Trial of Cetuximab and Conformal Radiotherapy Only in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer with Concurrent Tissue Sampling Feasibility Study1

    PubMed Central

    Rembielak, Agata I; Jain, Pooja; Jackson, Andrew S; Green, Melanie M; Santorelli, Gillian R; Whitfield, Gillian A; Crellin, Adrian; Garcia-Alonso, Angel; Radhakrishna, Ganesh; Cullen, James; Taylor, M Ben; Swindell, Ric; West, Catharine M; Valle, Juan; Saleem, Azeem; Price, Patricia M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preclinical data have indicated the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) agent cetuximab (Erbitux) as a radiosensitizer in pancreatic cancer, but this has not been specifically addressed in a clinical study. We report the results of an original study initiated in 2007, where cetuximab was tested with radiotherapy (RT) alone in locally advanced pancreatic cancer in a phase II trial (PACER). METHODS: Patients (n = 21) received cetuximab loading dose (400 mg/m2) and weekly dose (250 mg/m2) during RT (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). Toxicity and disease response end point data were prospectively assessed. A feasibility study of on-trial patient blood and skin sampling was incorporated. RESULTS: Treatment was well tolerated, and toxicity was low; most patients (71%) experienced acute toxicities of grade 2 or less. Six months posttreatment, stable local disease was achieved in 90% of evaluable patients, but only 33% were free from metastatic progression. Median overall survival was 7.5 months, and actuarial survival was 33% at 1 year and 11% at 3 years, reflecting swift metastatic progression in some patients but good long-term control of localized disease in others. High-grade acneiform rash (P = .0027), posttreatment stable disease (P = .0059), and pretreatment cancer antigen 19.9 (CA19.9) level (P = .0042) associated with extended survival. Patient skin and blood samples yielded sufficient RNA and good quality protein, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that cetuximab inhibits EGFR-mediated radioresistance to achieve excellent local control with minimal toxicity but does not sufficiently control metastatic progression in all patients. Translational studies of patient tissue samples may yield molecular information that may enable individual treatment response prediction. PMID:24772208

  7. How Grim is Pancreatic Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Weledji, Elroy Patrick; Enoworock, George; Mokake, Martin; Sinju, Motaze

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal carcinoma continues to be the most lethal malignancy with rising incidence. It is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the western world due to its low treatment success rate. In addition, because of its rapid growth and silent course, diagnosis is often only established in the advanced stages. As one of the most aggressive malignancies, the treatment of this disease is a great challenge to clinicians. This paper reviewed the natural history of pancreatic cancer, the current clinical practice and the future in pancreatic cancer management. PMID:27471581

  8. How Grim is Pancreatic Cancer?

    PubMed

    Weledji, Elroy Patrick; Enoworock, George; Mokake, Martin; Sinju, Motaze

    2016-04-15

    Pancreatic ductal carcinoma continues to be the most lethal malignancy with rising incidence. It is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the western world due to its low treatment success rate. In addition, because of its rapid growth and silent course, diagnosis is often only established in the advanced stages. As one of the most aggressive malignancies, the treatment of this disease is a great challenge to clinicians. This paper reviewed the natural history of pancreatic cancer, the current clinical practice and the future in pancreatic cancer management. PMID:27471581

  9. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality.

  10. CPI-613 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  11. Minimally invasive pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulou, E

    2015-12-01

    Minimally invasive pancreatic surgery is feasible and safe. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy should be widely adopted for benign lesions of the pancreas. Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy, although technically demanding, in the setting of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a number of advantages including shorter hospital stay, faster recovery, allowing patients to recover in a timelier manner and pursue adjuvant treatment options. Furthermore, it seems that progression-free survival is longer in patients undergoing laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy in comparison with those undergoing open pancreaticoduodenectomy. Minimally invasive middle pancreatectomy seems appropriate for benign or borderline tumors of the neck of the pancreas. Technological advances including intraoperative ultrasound and intraoperative fluorescence imaging systems are expected to facilitate the wide adoption of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. Although, the oncological outcome seems similar with that of open surgery, there are still concerns, as the majority of relevant evidence comes from retrospective studies. Large multicenter randomized studies comparing laparoscopic with open pancreatectomy as well as robotic assisted with both open and laparoscopic approaches are needed. Robotic approach could be possibly shown to be less invasive than conventional laparoscopic approach through the less traumatic intra-abdominal handling of tissues. In addition, robotic approach could enable the wide adoption of the technique by surgeon who is not that trained in advanced laparoscopic surgery. A putative clinical benefit of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery could be the attenuated surgical stress response leading to reduced morbidity and mortality as well as lack of the detrimental immunosuppressive effect especially for the oncological patients. PMID:26530291

  12. Pain in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Fasanella, Kenneth E; Davis, Brian; Lyons, John; Chen, Zongfu; Lee, Kenneth K; Slivka, Adam; Whitcomb, David C

    2007-06-01

    Chronic, debilitating abdominal pain is arguably the most important component of chronic pancreatitis, leading to significant morbidity and disability. Attempting to treat this pain, which is too often unsuccessful, is a frustrating experience for physician and patient. Multiple studies to improve understanding of the pathophysiology that causes pain in some patients but not in others have been performed since the most recent reviews on this topic. In addition, new treatment modalities have been developed and evaluated in this population. This review discusses new advances in neuroscience and the study of visceral pain mechanisms, as well as genetic factors that may play a role. Updates of established therapies, as well as new techniques used in addressing pain from chronic pancreatitis, are reviewed. Lastly, outcome measures, which have been highly variable in this field over the years, are addressed. PMID:17533083

  13. Osteogenic Sarcoma of the Maxilla: Neutron Therapy for Unresectable Disease

    DOE PAGES

    Smoron, Geoffrey L.; Lennox, Arlene J.; Mcgee, James L.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose. To present a case study involving the use of fast neutron therapy to treat an extensive unresectable osteogenic sarcoma arising from the left maxilla. Patient. A 14-year-old male presented with a massive tumor producing severe distortion of his facial structures. He had already received six courses of chemotherapy, which had reduced his pain, but had not measurably reduced the tumor. Methods. The patient was treated with 66 MeV fast neutrons to a dose of 20.4 Gy in 13 fractions over 35 days. Results. CT assessments indicate gradually increasing calcification and noticeable reduction of soft-tissue disease in the frontalmore » sinus, orbit and maxillary antrum.There has been some recontouring of the facial structures.The boy conducts an active life, has no pain, and feels well. He was 17 years old at the last follow-up. Discussion. Fast neutrons have a greater biological effectiveness than conventional photon beams. Their use has been associated with improved chance for local control of unresectable disease.This case illustrates their effectiveness in controlling an unusual and aggressive osteogenic sarcoma of the facial bone and sinuses.« less

  14. Liver transplantation in the management of unresectable hepatoblastoma in children.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Rebecka L; Tiao, Greg M; Dunn, Stephen P; Langham, Max R

    2012-01-01

    Complete surgical resection is essential to long-term survival in children with hepatoblastoma. We present the guidelines from the Children's Oncology Group (COG), liver tumor study group of the Societe Internationale Oncologie Pediatrique (SIOPEL), and German Pediatric Oncology Group (GPOH) for early referral of children with potentially unresectable hepatoblastoma to a specialty center with expertise in extreme resection and liver transplantation. Patients who will become candidates for liver transplantation should receive chemotherapy following the same protocols as for children undergoing a partial hepatectomy. The Pediatric Liver Unresectable Tumor Observatory (PLUTO) is an international prospective database established to collect data and make future recommendations on controversial issues regarding the use of transplant in hepatoblastoma including: 1) What is the optimal treatment of multifocal tumors. 2) What is the role of extreme resection vs. liver transplant in patients with major venous involvement. 3) What is the role of transplant in patients who present with lung metastasis. 3) Should patients with tumor relapse be offered a rescue transplant. 4) What is the role of pre- and post- transplant chemotherapy. PMID:22201955

  15. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma pathology: changing “landscape”

    PubMed Central

    Brosens, Lodewijk A. A.; Hackeng, Wenzel M.; Offerhaus, G. Johan; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. At time of diagnosis the disease is usually advanced and only a minority of patients are eligible for surgical resection. The overall 5-year survival is 6%. However, survival of patients with early stage pancreatic cancer is significantly better. To improve the prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer, it is essential to diagnose and treat pancreatic cancer in the earliest stage. Prevention of pancreatic cancer by treating noninvasive precursor lesions just before they invade tissues can potentially lead to even better outcomes. Pancreatic carcinogenesis results from a stepwise progression in which accumulating genetic alterations drive neoplastic progression in well-defined precursor lesions, ultimately giving rise to an invasive adenocarcinoma. A thorough understanding of the genetic changes that drive pancreatic carcinogenesis can lead to identification of biomarkers for early detection and targets for therapy. Recent next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies have shed new light on our understanding of the natural history of pancreatic cancer and the precursor lesions that give rise to these cancers. Importantly, there is a significant window of opportunity for early detection and treatment between the first genetic alteration in a cell in the pancreas and development of full-blown pancreatic cancer. The current views on the pathology and genetics of pancreatic carcinogenesis that evolved from studies of pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions are discussed in this review. PMID:26261723

  16. Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts signaling cascades are activated in pancreatic fibroblasts, but not in the INS1E insulinoma cell line: Are mesenchymal cells major players in chronic inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    Tago, Kazuma; Inoue, Ken-ichi; Ouchi, Motoshi; Miura, Yoshikazu; Kubota, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is a pattern recognition receptor that plays an important role in natural immunity. It is suggested that mesenchymal cells are the major players during inflammation. Previously, we reported that advanced glycation end products (AGE), known to be one of the ligands of RAGE, inhibited glucose-induced insulin secretion from ex vivo pancreatic islets, although the mechanism responsible remains largely unknown. In the present study, we examined the cascades operating downstream from RAGE using the insulinoma cell line INS1E and primary-cultured pancreatic fibroblasts as in vitro models for parenchymal (β) cells and mesenchymal cells, respectively. Phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase, inhibitor of nuclear factor κB kinase, and nuclear factor κB was stimulated by AGE or high mobility group binding 1 (HMGB1) in pancreatic fibroblasts, whereas no such effect was observed in INS1E cells. Expression of the Ccl5, Il-6, and Il-1b genes was increased by AGE/HMGB1 in fibroblasts, but not in INS1E cells. On the other hand, AGE inhibited the secretion of insulin from ex vivo pancreatic islets, and this effect was ameliorated by MK615, a Japanese apricot extract used as an anti-inflammatory agent. Glucose-induced insulin secretion from INS1E cells was not affected by direct administration of AGE/HMGB1, but was inhibited by fibroblast-conditioned medium. These results suggest that AGE suppresses glucose-induced insulin secretion from pancreatic islets through indirect mesenchymal RAGE signaling. PMID:27415824

  17. Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts signaling cascades are activated in pancreatic fibroblasts, but not in the INS1E insulinoma cell line: Are mesenchymal cells major players in chronic inflammation?

    PubMed

    Tago, Kazuma; Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Ouchi, Motoshi; Miura, Yoshikazu; Kubota, Keiichi

    2016-09-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is a pattern recognition receptor that plays an important role in natural immunity. It is suggested that mesenchymal cells are the major players during inflammation. Previously, we reported that advanced glycation end products (AGE), known to be one of the ligands of RAGE, inhibited glucose-induced insulin secretion from ex vivo pancreatic islets, although the mechanism responsible remains largely unknown. In the present study, we examined the cascades operating downstream from RAGE using the insulinoma cell line INS1E and primary-cultured pancreatic fibroblasts as in vitro models for parenchymal (β) cells and mesenchymal cells, respectively. Phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase, inhibitor of nuclear factor κB kinase, and nuclear factor κB was stimulated by AGE or high mobility group binding 1 (HMGB1) in pancreatic fibroblasts, whereas no such effect was observed in INS1E cells. Expression of the Ccl5, Il-6, and Il-1b genes was increased by AGE/HMGB1 in fibroblasts, but not in INS1E cells. On the other hand, AGE inhibited the secretion of insulin from ex vivo pancreatic islets, and this effect was ameliorated by MK615, a Japanese apricot extract used as an anti-inflammatory agent. Glucose-induced insulin secretion from INS1E cells was not affected by direct administration of AGE/HMGB1, but was inhibited by fibroblast-conditioned medium. These results suggest that AGE suppresses glucose-induced insulin secretion from pancreatic islets through indirect mesenchymal RAGE signaling. PMID:27415824

  18. A Phase II Study of BEZ235 in Patients with Everolimus-resistant, Advanced Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    FAZIO, NICOLA; BUZZONI, ROBERTO; BAUDIN, ERIC; ANTONUZZO, LORENZO; HUBNER, RICHARD A.; LAHNER, HARALD; DE HERDER, WOUTER W.; RADERER, MARKUS; TEULÉ, ALEXANDRE; CAPDEVILA, JAUME; LIBUTTI, STEVEN K.; KULKE, MATTHEW H.; SHAH, MANISHA; DEY, DEBARSHI; TURRI, SABINE; AIMONE, PAOLA; MASSACESI, CRISTIAN; VERSLYPE, CHRIS

    2016-01-01

    Background This was a two-stage, phase II trial of the dual phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor BEZ235 in patients with everolimus-resistant pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (pNETs) (NCT01658436). Patients and Methods In stage 1, 11 patients received 400 mg BEZ235 orally twice daily (bid). Due to tolerability concerns, a further 20 patients received BEZ235 300 mg bid. Stage 2 would be triggered by a 16-week progression-free survival (PFS) rate of ≥60% in stage 1. Results As of 30 June, 2014, 29/31 patients had discontinued treatment. Treatment-related grade 3/4 adverse events were reported in eight (72.7%) patients at 400 mg and eight (40.0%) patients at 300 mg, including hyperglycaemia, diarrhoea, nausea, and vomiting. The estimated 16-week PFS rate was 51.6% (90% confidence interval=35.7–67.3%). Conclusion BEZ235 was poorly tolerated by patients with everolimus-resistant pNETs at 400 and 300 mg bid doses. Although evidence of disease stability was observed, the study did not proceed to stage 2. PMID:26851029

  19. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes will be done. These include: Increased blood amylase level Increased serum blood lipase level Increased urine amylase ... swelling of the pancreas include: CT scan of the abdomen MRI of ...

  20. Pancreatitis - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... perform lab tests to check the release of pancreatic enzymes. These include tests to check the: Blood amylase level Blood lipase level Urine amylase level Other blood tests ... the pancreas include: Ultrasound of the abdomen (most common) CT ...

  1. Pancreatic abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Gartell, P C

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of pancreatic abscess are described to show the difficulties in diagnosis and that inadequate treatment is invariably fatal. Early recognition and prompt surgical drainage, together with biliary decompression if indicated, are advised. PMID:7069670

  2. Hereditary Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rivera Rivera, Edgardo D; Chugh, Ankur; Cordova, Jonathon; Young, Sona

    2016-02-01

    A 13-year-old boy with a strong family history of hereditary pancreatitis was found to have a PRSS1 mutation after being tested at age 5 years during his first documented incident of pancreatitis. Since then, a multidisciplinary team has been treating him for the diagnosis of hereditary pancreatitis. His pain episodes increased in severity over the past several months such that the pain began to severely interfere with his daily life. After extensive discussion, a total pancreatectomy with auto islet cell transplant was performed. He is now pain free and does not require any insulin. This leads us to the questions of what is hereditary pancreatitis and how is it diagnosed? What are the management and follow-up strategies needed for these patients? This article addresses these questions and informs the reader about this diagnosis and the importance of having a high index of clinical suspicion. PMID:26878183

  3. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Zavoral, Miroslav; Minarikova, Petra; Zavada, Filip; Salek, Cyril; Minarik, Marek

    2011-06-28

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma, and Peutz-Jeghers and Lynch syndromes. Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  4. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, Patrick; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the USA in both sexes. Early diagnosis is difficult and the overall mortality rate is high. Individuals at high risk for pancreatic cancer include smokers, and persons with all forms of chronic alcoholic, metabolic, tropical or hereditary pancreatitis. The duration of exposure to inflammation seems to be the major factor involved in the transition from benign to malignant condition. Smoking, which appears to further accelerate the carcinogenic transformation, remains the strongest risk factor amenable to preventive intervention.

  5. Pancreatic cancer: does octreotide offer any promise?

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, L

    2001-01-01

    The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the pancreas has risen steadily over the past 4 decades. Since pancreatic cancer is diagnosed at an advanced stage, and because of the lack of effective therapies the prognosis of such patients is extremely poor. Despite advances in our understanding of the molecular biology of pancreatic cancer, the systemic treatment of this disease remains unsatisfactory. Systemic chemotherapy and the administration of biologically active molecules such as tumor necrosis factor or interferons have not resulted in significant improvements in response rates or patient survival. New treatment strategies are obviously needed. This paper will discuss current advances in the use of somatostatin analogs in the management of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Genetically defined subsets of human pancreatic cancer demonstrate unique in vitro chemosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yunfeng; Brosnan, Jacqueline A.; Blackford, Amanda; Sur, Surojit; Hruban, Ralph H.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Maitra, Anirban; Diaz, Luis A.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Eshleman, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth cause of death from cancer in the western world. Majority of patients present with advanced unresectable disease responding poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Chemotherapy for PC might be improved by adjusting it to individual genetic profiles. We attempt to identify genetic predictors of chemosensitivity to broad classes of anticancer drugs. Experimental Design Using a panel of genetically defined human PC cell lines, we tested gemcitabine (anti-metabolite), docetaxel (anti-microtubule), mitomycin C (alkylating), irinotecan (topoisomerase I inhibitor), cisplatin (crosslinking), KU0058948 (Parp1 inhibitor), triptolide (terpenoid drug) and artemisinin (control). Results All PC cell lines were sensitive to triptolide and docetaxel. Most PC cells were also sensitive to gemcitabine and MMC. The vast majority of PC cell lines were insensitive to cisplatin, irinotecan, and a Parp1 inhibitor. However, individual cell lines were often sensitive to these compounds in unique ways. We found that DPC4/SMAD4 inactivation sensitized PC cells to cisplatin and irinotecan by 2–4 fold, but they were modestly less sensitive to gemcitabine. PC cells were all sensitive to triptolide and 18% were sensitive to the Parp1 inhibitor. P16/CDKN2A inactivated PC cells were 3–4 fold less sensitive to gemcitabine and MMC. Conclusions Chemosensitivity of PC cells correlated with some specific genetic profiles. These results support the hypothesis that genetic subsets of pancreatic cancer exist, and these genetic backgrounds may permit one to personalize the chemotherapy of PC in the future. Further work will need to confirm these responses and determine their magnitude in vivo. PMID:22753594

  7. Classifying pancreatic cancer using gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Ayars, Michael; Goggins, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Despite some advances in our understanding of the molecular characteristics of pancreatic cancer, much more progress is needed. In a new study, RNA profiling of pancreatic cancers was used to identify gene signatures of tumour cells and stromal cells to help predict patient outcomes. PMID:26484444

  8. Autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Omiyale, Ayodeji Oluwarotimi

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  9. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  10. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  11. Clinical approach to incidental pancreatic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Austin L; Lee, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    The approach to incidentally noted pancreatic cysts is constantly evolving. While surgical resection is indicated for malignant or higher risk cysts, correctly identifying these highest risk pancreatic cystic lesions remains difficult. Using parameters including cyst size, presence of solid components, and pancreatic duct involvement, the 2012 International Association of Pancreatology (IAP) and the 2015 American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) guidelines have sought to identify the higher risk patients who would benefit from further evaluation using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Not only can EUS help further assess the presence of solid component and nodules, but also fine needle aspiration of cyst fluid aids in diagnosis by obtaining cellular, molecular, and genetic data. The impact of new endoscopic innovations with novel methods of direct visualization including confocal endomicroscopy require further validation. This review also highlights the differences between the 2012 IAP and 2015 AGA guidelines, which include the thresholds for sending patients for EUS and surgery and methods, interval, and duration of surveillance for unresected cysts. PMID:26811661

  12. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Triple Negative Breast Cancer (Currently Accruing Only Triple-negative Breast Cancer Patients Since 6/8/2007)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  13. Analysis of Dosimetric Parameters Associated With Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Gemcitabine-Based Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Akira; Shibuya, Keiko; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To identify the dosimetric parameters associated with gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The data from 40 patients were analyzed retrospectively. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of conventional fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy and weekly gemcitabine. Treatment-related acute GI toxicity and upper GI bleeding (UGB) were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 4.0. The dosimetric parameters (mean dose, maximal absolute dose which covers 2 cm{sup 3} of the organ, and absolute volume receiving 10-50 Gy [V{sub 10-50}]) of the stomach, duodenum, small intestine, and a composite structure of the stomach and duodenum (StoDuo) were obtained. The planning target volume was also obtained. Univariate analyses were performed to identify the predictive factors for the risk of grade 2 or greater acute GI toxicity and grade 3 or greater UGB, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 15.7 months (range, 4-37). The actual incidence of acute GI toxicity was 33%. The estimated incidence of UGB at 1 year was 20%. Regarding acute GI toxicity, a V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach was the best predictor, and the actual incidence in patients with V{sub 50} <16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach vs. those with V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} was 9% vs. 61%, respectively (p = 0.001). Regarding UGB, V{sub 50} of {>=}33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo was the best predictor, and the estimated incidence at 1 year in patients with V{sub 50} <33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo vs. those with V{sub 50} {>=}33 cm{sup 3} was 0% vs. 44%, respectively (p = 0.002). The dosimetric parameters correlated highly with one another. Conclusion: The irradiated absolute volume of the stomach and duodenum are important for the risk of acute GI toxicity and UGB. These results could be helpful in escalating the radiation doses using novel

  14. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Recurrent or Unresectable Pilocytic Astrocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hallemeier, Christopher L.; Pollock, Bruce E.; Schomberg, Paula J.; Link, Michael J.; Brown, Paul D.; Stafford, Scott L.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes in patients with recurrent or unresectable pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) treated with Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 18 patients (20 lesions) with biopsy-confirmed PA having SRS at our institution from 1992 through 2005. Results: The median patient age at SRS was 23 years (range, 4-56). Thirteen patients (72%) had undergone one or more previous surgical resections, and 10 (56%) had previously received external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The median SRS treatment volume was 9.1 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.7-26.7). The median tumor margin dose was 15 Gy (range, 12-20). The median follow-up was 8.0 years (range, 0.5-15). Overall survival at 1, 5, and 10 years after SRS was 94%, 71%, and 71%, respectively. Tumor progression (local solid progression, n = 4; local solid progression + distant, n = 1; distant, n = 2; cyst development/progression, n = 4) was noted in 11 patients (61%). Progression-free survival at 1, 5, and 10 years was 65%, 41%, and 17%, respectively. Prior EBRT was associated with inferior overall survival (5-year risk, 100% vs. 50%, p = 0.03) and progression-free survival (5-year risk, 71% vs. 20%, p = 0.008). Nine of 11 patients with tumor-related symptoms improved after SRS. Symptomatic edema after SRS occurred in 8 patients (44%), which resolved with short-term corticosteroid therapy in the majority of those without early disease progression. Conclusions: SRS has low permanent radiation-related morbidity and durable local tumor control, making it a meaningful treatment option for patients with recurrent or unresectable PA in whom surgery and/or EBRT has failed.

  15. [Current strategy to cure pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masao

    2002-03-01

    For more than a decade extensive retroperitoneal dissection, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy has not prolonged the survival of patients with pancreatic cancer. Two prospective randomized studies addressing the clinical significance of extensive dissection or pancreatic resection for advanced cancer are now in progress. Nonetheless, at present, resection offers the patient the only possibility of cure. Although the diagnosis of curable pancreatic cancer is difficult, recent evidences have given a few hints. The first is pancreatic duct dilatation caused by cancerous stricture. The second is diabetes as a sign of pancreatic cancer. Our prospective pancreatographic screening of diabetic patients selected by our criteria(Table 1) revealed 7 cancers in 98 patients(7.1%). Within 3 years from diagnosis, the prevalence was 15%. Although the 7 cancers were advanced, this suggests that earlier examinations in diabetic patients may possibly lead to earlier diagnosis. The third is a small cystic lesion as a sentinel of pancreatic cancer. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with cytology of the pancreatic juice may show the presence of in situ cancer in patients with a pancreatic cyst. At the moment, careful checks for the presence of these hints seem to be the only strategy to offer a chance for cure to patients with pancreatic cancer.

  16. Progression of alcoholic acute to chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ammann, R W; Muellhaupt, B

    1994-01-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis usually progresses from acute attacks to chronic pancreatitis within one to 19 years. The factors responsible for the appreciable variability in progression are unclear. In this study the relation between progression and the incidence and severity of acute episodes in a large cohort of patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis was analysed. All patients with at least one documented episode of acute pancreatitis have been studied prospectively over the past 30 years according to our protocol. Patients were classified according to their long term course into (a) calcific (n = 185), (b) non-calcific (n = 30), and (c) non-progressive (n = 39) chronic pancreatitis groups. The yearly incidence of acute attacks of pancreatitis was significantly higher in groups (a) and (b) than in group (c). Furthermore, the progression rate to advanced chronic pancreatitis (groups (a) and (b)) correlated with the incidence of severe pancreatitis (associated with pseudocysts in more than 55%). Pseudocysts were located primarily in the cephalic pancreas in groups (a) and (b) (58-71%) and in the pancreatic tail in group (c) (61%). In conclusion, these data suggest that the progression of acute to chronic pancreatitis is closely related to the incidence and severity of acute attacks. This finding and the primary location of pseudocysts in the cephalic pancreas (groups (a) plus (b)) are compatible with the 'necrosis-fibrosis' pathogenetic hypothesis. PMID:8174996

  17. Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The etiology of acute pancreatitis in children is often drugs, infections, trauma, or anatomic abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms (such as abdominal pain and vomiting), serum pancreatic enzyme levels, and imaging studies. Several scoring systems have been proposed for the assessment of severity, which is useful for selecting treatments and predicting prognosis. The basic pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis does not greatly differ between adults and children, and the treatments for adults and children are similar. In large part, our understanding of the pathology, optimal treatment, assessment of severity, and outcome of acute pancreatitis in children is taken from the adult literature. However, we often find that the common management of adult pancreatitis is difficult to apply to children. With advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment methods, severe acute pancreatitis in children is becoming better understood and more controllable. PMID:25400985

  18. Chemotherapy for the conversion of unresectable colorectal cancer liver metastases to resection.

    PubMed

    Power, Derek G; Kemeny, Nancy E

    2011-09-01

    Resection of colorectal liver metastases (CLM) is the ultimate aim of treatment strategies in most patients with liver-confined metastatic colorectal cancer. Long-term survival is possible in selected patients with initially resectable or unresectable CLM. As a majority of patients have unresectable liver disease at the outset, there is a clear role for chemotherapy to downstage liver disease making resection possible. Studies of systemic chemotherapy with or without biologic therapy in patients with unresectable CLM have resulted in increased response rates, liver resection rates and survival. A sound physiologic rationale exists for the use of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) therapy. Studies have shown that HAI with floxuridine combined with systemic chemotherapy increases response rates and liver resection rates in those patients with initially unresectable CLM. Toxicity from preoperative chemotherapy, biologic therapy and HAI therapy may adversely affect hepatic resection but can be kept minimal with appropriate monitoring. All conversion strategies should be decided by a multidisciplinary team.

  19. Image-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of a Pancreatic Tumor with a New Triple Spiral-Shaped Electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, Loukas; Poulou, Loukia S.; Mailli, Lito; Pomoni, Maria; Kelekis, Dimitrios A.

    2010-02-15

    Image-guided, minimally invasive treatment modalities have become an area of considerable interest and research during the last few years for the treatment of primary and secondary liver tumors. We report our experience with an unresectable pancreatic tumor, treated with application of radiofrequency ablation under CT guidance that even though a complication occurred during the procedure, had excellent results on follow-up CT scans.

  20. Laparoscopic pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Mori, Toshiyuki; Abe, Nobutsugu; Sugiyama, Masanori; Atomi, Yutaka

    2005-01-01

    In the past, in the pancreas, a minimally invasive technique was only used for diagnostic laparoscopy in evaluating periampullary malignancy. Recent advances in operative techniques and instrumentation have empowered surgeons to perform virtually all procedures in the pancreas, including the Whipple procedure. Some of these procedures represent the most sophisticated application of minimally invasive surgery, and their outcomes are reportedly better than those of conventional open approaches. In addition to the evaluation of resectability in periampullary malignancy, palliative procedures, including biliary bypasses and gastrojejunostomy, can be performed laparoscopically. Although it is reportedly feasible to perform a Whipple procedure laparescopically, no benefit of the laparoscopic approach over the conventional open approach has been documented. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy, with or without preserving the spleen, is technically easier than the Whipple procedure, and is more widely accepted. Indications for laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy include cystic neoplasms and islet-cell tumors located in the pancreatic body or tail. Complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis may be treated with the use of surgical laparoscopy. When infected necrotizing pancreatitis is identified, surgical intervention for drainage and debridement is required. According to the type and location of infected necrotizing pancreatitis, three laparoscopic operative approaches have been reported: infracolic debridement, retroperitoneal debridement, and laparoscopic transgastric pancreatic necrosectomy. When internal drainage is indicated for a pseudocyst, a minimally invasive technique is a promising option. Laparoscopic pseudocyst gastrostomy, cyst jejunostomy, or cyst duodenostomy can be performed, depending on the size and location of the pseudocyst. Especially when a pseudocyst is located in close contact with the posterior wall of the stomach, it is best drained by a

  1. Assessing novel prognostic serum biomarkers in advanced pancreatic cancer: the role of CYFRA 21-1, serum amyloid A, haptoglobin, and 25-OH vitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Haas, Michael; Kern, Christoph; Kruger, Stephan; Michl, Marlies; Modest, Dominik P; Giessen, Clemens; Schulz, Christoph; von Einem, Jobst C; Ormanns, Steffen; Laubender, Rüdiger P; Holdenrieder, Stefan; Heinemann, Volker; Boeck, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The present prospective single-center study investigated the prognostic role of novel serum biomarkers in advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). Patients (pts) with locally advanced or metastatic PC treated with first-line palliative chemotherapy were included. Among others, the serum markers CYFRA 21-1, haptoglobin, serum-amyloid A (SAA), and 25-OH vitamin D3 were determined at baseline and categorized by pre-defined cut-offs [median values (MV), upper limits of normal (ULN), lower limits of normal (LLN), or the natural logarithm (ln)] and correlated with overall survival (OS). Among the 59 pts included, pre-treatment CYFRA 21-1 levels showed a strong correlation with OS independent of the applied cut-off (MV 4.9 ng/ml-14.2 vs. 4.2 months, HR 0.18, p = 0.001; ULN 3.3 ng/ml-14.2 vs. 4.4 months, HR 0.28, p = 0.003; [ln] CYFRA 21-1-HR 0.77, p = 0.013). Lower values of haptoglobin were additionally associated with an improvement in OS (categorized by LLN of 2.05 g/l-10.4 vs. 5.5 months, HR 0.46, p = 0.023; [ln] haptoglobin-HR 0.51, p = 0.036). Pts with baseline SAA values below the MV of 22 mg/l also had a prolonged OS (10.4 vs. 5.0 months, HR 0.47, p = 0.036). For 25-OH vitamin D3 levels, no significant correlation with OS was found. In multivariate analyses, pre-treatment CYFRA 21-1 levels (categorized by MV-HR 0.15, p = 0.032) as well as [ln] haptoglobin (HR 0.30, p = 0.006) retained their independent prognostic significance for OS. CYFRA 21-1, haptoglobin, and SAA might provide useful prognostic information in advanced PC. An external multicenter validation of these results is necessary. PMID:25472579

  2. [Pancreatic pseudocysts].

    PubMed

    Stăncescu, M; Ciurea, S

    1989-01-01

    Clinical, evolutive and therapeutical aspects were studied, of 66 cases of patients with pancreatic pseudocysts hospitalized in the clinic over a period of 27 years. Particular modalities of onset were, those of patients with duodenal stenosis, mechanical jaundice, ascites and pleurisy, those in whom symptomatology suggested kidney or cholecystic disease. The intraoperative diagnosis raises the problem of differentiating a retroperitoneal tumor, identifying the possible association with a pancreatic cancer, and the condition when the pseudocysts are found at a certain distance from the pancreas itself. The therapeutical methods are codified, but recidives are possible. Cholecystectomy removes the biliary cause of pancreatitis which can determine the development of pseudocysts. The death rate of these cases was 6.3%.

  3. Tumor Biology: Is It Time to Redefine Unresectability? An Extraordinary Case of Gastroesophageal Junctional Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Giakoustidis, Alex; Winslet, Mark; Mudan, Satvinder

    2015-01-01

    Background: Disease assessment based on measurements of size and anatomic involvement have historically been central to surgical strategy. We propose this to be an outdated concept, which should be replaced by a deeper understanding of tumor biology and careful treatment planning. Report of case: A 34-year-old male was diagnosed with a Siewert Type 3 locally advanced cancer of the gastroesophageal junction, involving the coeliac axis and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). He was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by chemoradiation, and then proceeded to surgery, at which time the tumor was judged unresectable. After extensive planning, a further surgery was attempted - an extended gastrectomy with distal esophagectomy, left hepatectomy, and splenectomy were performed. Additionally, the coeliac axis and the SMA were excised, followed by reconstruction of the hepatic artery and the SMA with grafts. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered, and the patient is recurrence-free after five years follow-up. Conclusion: This case highlights the importance of the distinction between resectability and operability, and that patient treatment should be tailored and individualised based on the response to treatment, comorbidities, and underlying tumor biology. PMID:26835191

  4. Pancreatic carcinoma: results with fast neutron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, R.; Cohen, L.; Hendrickson, F.; Awschalom, M.; Hrejsa, A.F.; Rosenberg, I.

    1981-02-01

    Results of therapy in 31 of 50 patients who were treated for advanced pancreatic carcinoma at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are presented here. To date, six patients are alive and four are free of disease. Since the main reason for failure was lack of control of primary tumor, the tumor dose has been increased by 15%. Based on our results, a nationwide study has been launched to assess the effectiveness of neutrons vs photons in the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

  5. Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future. PMID:15084979

  6. A randomized phase II study of S-1 plus oral leucovorin versus S-1 monotherapy in patients with gemcitabine-refractory advanced pancreatic cancer†

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, M.; Okusaka, T.; Omuro, Y.; Isayama, H.; Fukutomi, A.; Ikeda, M.; Mizuno, N.; Fukuzawa, K.; Furukawa, M.; Iguchi, H.; Sugimori, K.; Furuse, J.; Shimada, K.; Ioka, T.; Nakamori, S.; Baba, H.; Komatsu, Y.; Takeuchi, M.; Hyodo, I.; Boku, N.

    2016-01-01

    Background We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of adding oral leucovorin (LV) to S-1 when compared with S-1 monotherapy in patients with gemcitabine-refractory pancreatic cancer (PC). Patients and methods Gemcitabine-refractory PC patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive S-1 at 40, 50, or 60 mg according to body surface area plus LV 25 mg, both given orally twice daily for 1 week, repeated every 2 weeks (SL group), or S-1 monotherapy at the same dose as the SL group for 4 weeks, repeated every 6 weeks (S-1 group). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Results Among 142 patients enrolled, 140 were eligible for efficacy assessment (SL: n = 69 and S-1: n = 71). PFS was significantly longer in the SL group than in the S-1 group [median PFS, 3.8 versus 2.7 months; hazard ratio (HR), 0.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.37–0.85; P = 0.003]). The disease control rate was significantly higher in the SL group than in the S-1 group (91% versus 72%; P = 0.004). Overall survival (OS) was similar in both groups (median OS, 6.3 versus 6.1 months; HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.54–1.22; P = 0.463). After adjusting for patient background factors in a multivariate analysis, OS tended to be better in the SL group (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.47–1.07; P = 0.099). Both treatments were well tolerated, although gastrointestinal toxicities were slightly more severe in the SL group. Conclusion The addition of LV to S-1 significantly improved PFS in patients with gemcitabine-refractory advanced PC, and a phase III trial has been initiated in a similar setting. Clinical trials number Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center: JapicCTI-111554. PMID:26681680

  7. Clinical Usefulness of {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Planned to Undergo Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jee Suk; Choi, Seo Hee; Lee, Youngin; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Park, Jeong Youp; Song, Si Young; Cho, Arthur; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Seong, Jinsil

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of coregistered {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in detecting radiographically occult distant metastasis (DM) at staging in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and to study whether FDG-PET parameters can predict relatively long-term survival in patients who are more likely to benefit from chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: From our institutional database, we identified 388 LAPC patients with M0 on conventional computed tomography (CT) who were planned to undergo CRT. Coregistered FDG-PET staging was offered to all patients, and follow-up FDG-PET was used at the clinical discretion of the physician. Results: FDG-PET detected unsuspected CT-occult DM in 33% of all 388 patients and allowed them to receive systemic therapy immediately. The remaining 260 patients (PET-M0) underwent CRT selectively as an initial treatment. Early DM arose in 13.1% of 260 patients, and the 1-year estimated locoregional recurrence rate was 5.4%. Median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 14.6 and 9.3 months, respectively, at a median follow-up time of 32.3 months (range, 10-99.1 months). Patients with a baseline standardized uptake value (SUV) <3.5 and/or SUV decline ≥60% had significantly better OS and PFS than those having none, even after adjustment for all potential confounding variables (all P<.001). Conclusions: FDG-PET can detect radiographically occult DM at staging in one-third of patients and spare them from the potentially toxic therapy. Additionally, FDG-PET parameters including baseline SUV and SUV changes may serve as useful clinical markers for predicting the prognosis in LAPC patients.

  8. Serum amylase isozymes in patients with chronic pancreatitis with hyperamylasemia.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, A; Saeki, M; Mori, R; Oshiba, S

    1977-01-01

    In order to clarify the relationship between hyperamylasemia and clinical states in chronic pancreatitis, serum amylase isozymes were studied in 39 cases of chronic pancreatitis including 13 cases of alcoholic pancreatitis. Hyperamylasemia in chronic pancreatitis is generally due to high pancreatic type isoamylase (P-amylase) activity in acute exacerbation, sometimes accompanied by a transient elevation in salivary type isoamylase (S-amylase). On remission, however, hyperamylasemia due to high S-amylase activity has been found. These were cases of advanced alcoholic pancreatitis, which exhibited a characteristic pattern of low serum P-amylase and high serum S-amylase activities while the clearance ratio (Cam/Ccr) was normal despite high S-amylase activity. It should be noted that hyperamylasemia in chronic pancreatitis may be caused by high S-amylase activity in addition to high P-amylase activity, especially in alcoholic pancreatitis.

  9. Carcinoma of the pancreatic head and periampullary region. Tumor staging with laparoscopy and laparoscopic ultrasonography.

    PubMed Central

    John, T G; Greig, J D; Carter, D C; Garden, O J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors performed a prospective evaluation of staging laparoscopy with laparoscopic ultrasonography in predicting surgical resectability in patients with carcinomas of the pancreatic head and periampullary region. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Pancreatic resection with curative intent is possible in a select minority of patients who have carcinomas of the pancreatic head and periampullary region. Patient selection is important to plan appropriate therapy and avoid unnecessary laparotomy in patients with unresectable disease. Laparoscopic ultrasonography is a novel technique that combines the proven benefits of staging laparoscopy with high resolution intraoperative ultrasound of the liver and pancreas, but which has yet to be evaluated critically in the staging of pancreatic malignancy. METHODS: A cohort of 40 consecutive patients referred to a tertiary referral center and with a diagnosis of potentially resectable pancreatic or periampullary cancer underwent staging laparoscopy with laparoscopic ultrasonography. The diagnostic accuracy of staging laparoscopy alone and in conjunction with laparoscopic ultrasonography was evaluated in predicting tumor resectability (absence of peritoneal or liver metastases; absence of malignant regional lymphadenopathy; tumor confined to pancreatic head or periampullary region). RESULTS: "Occult" metastatic lesions were demonstrated by staging laparoscopy in 14 patients (35%). Laparoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated factors confirming unresectable tumor in 23 patients (59%), provided staging information in addition to that of laparoscopy alone in 20 patients (53%), and changed the decision regarding tumor resectability in 10 patients (25%). Staging laparoscopy with laparoscopic ultrasonography was more specific and accurate in predicting tumor resectability than laparoscopy alone (88% and 89% versus 50% and 65%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Staging laparoscopy is indispensable in the detection of "occult" intra

  10. [Significance of precision medicine in pancreatic cancer prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Wang, C F

    2016-03-23

    The morbidity and mortality of pancreatic cancer has been increasing year by year, however, the treatment progress and prevention effect were minimal. With the development of basic research, especially the advances of gene sequencing technology, it was possible to clarify the etiology and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer, and achieve the first stage prevention. The discovery of pancreatic cancer exosomes of high sensitivity and specificity made early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (the second stage prevention) no longer a worldwide problem. The build of pancreatic cancer genotyping with clinical applicability made the precision treatment of pancreatic cancer (the third stage prevention) possible. Thus, the precision medicine which is based on advances of gene sequencing, popularity of the Internet and the big data technology has brought a ray of hope for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26988819

  11. Cutaneous pancreatic metastasis: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hafez, H Z Abdel

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most dangerous human cancers and will continue to be a major unsolved health problem as we enter the 21(st) century. This is the case despite advances in imaging technology and surgical management. Indeed, 80% to 90% of pancreatic cancers are diagnosed either at the locally advanced or metastatic stage. Cutaneous metastases originating from pancreatic cancer are relatively rare. The most common site of cutaneous metastasis is the umbilicus, and this is known as the Sister Joseph's nodule. Very few patients have been reported with cutaneous lesions disclosing a pancreatic carcinoma at sites other than the umbilical area. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no previous reports on cutaneous pancreatic metastasis in Egypt. This is a report on a patient with cutaneous pancreatic metastases at the neck and review of reported non-umbilical cutaneous metastases from pancreatic carcinoma in the literatures.

  12. Cutaneous pancreatic metastasis: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Hza

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human cancers and continues to be a major unsolved health problem as we enter the 21st century. This is the case despite advances in imaging technology and surgical management. Indeed, 80-90% of pancreatic cancers are diagnosed either at the locally advanced stage or metastatic stage. Cutaneous metastases originating from pancreatic cancer are relatively rare. The most common site of cutaneous metastasis is the umbilicus, and it is known as the Sister Joseph's nodule. Very few patients have been reported with cutaneous lesions disclosing pancreatic carcinoma at sites other than the umbilical area. To our knowledge, there were no previous reports on cutaneous pancreatic metastasis in Egypt. This is a report of a patient with cutaneous pancreatic metastases at the neck, followed by a review of reported non-umbilical cutaneous metastases from pancreatic carcinoma in the literature.

  13. Recent Advances in the Concept and Pathogenesis of IgG4-Related Disease in the Hepato-Bilio-Pancreatic System

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Kazuichi; Yanagawa, Masahito; Mitsuyama, Toshiyuki; Uchida, Kazushige

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed nomenclatures of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) (IgG4-related pancreatitis), IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC), IgG4-related cholecystitis, and IgG4-related hepatopathy as IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) in the hepato-bilio-pancreatic system. In IgG4-related hepatopathy, a novel concept of IgG4-related autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) with the same histopathological features as AIH has been proposed. Among organs involved in IgG4-RD, associations with pancreatic and biliary lesions are most frequently observed, supporting the novel concept of “biliary diseases with pancreatic counterparts.” Targets of type 1 AIP and IgG4-SC may be periductal glands around the bile and pancreatic ducts. Based on genetic backgrounds, innate and acquired immunity, Th2-dominant immune status, regulatory T (Treg) or B cells, and complement activation via a classical pathway may be involved in the development of IgG4-RD. Although the role of IgG4 remains unclear in IgG4-RD, IgG4-production is upregulated by interleukin 10 from Treg cells and by B cell activating factor from monocytes/basophils with stimulation of toll-like receptors/nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors. Based on these findings, we have proposed a hypothesis for the development of IgG4-RD in the hepato-bilio-pancreatic system. Further studies are necessary to clarify the pathogenic mechanism of IgG4-RD. PMID:25228969

  14. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer ...

  15. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy during pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Berry, Amy J

    2014-06-01

    Pancreatic stimulation and therefore digestion is a tightly controlled and hormonally mediated process. Any alterations affecting any of the systematic steps for successful digestion and absorption to occur will impair appropriate pancreatic enzymatic secretion, entry into the bowel lumen, functionality once inside the lumen, and thus appropriate mixing with foods and nutrients. Many causes of pancreatic insufficiency may require the initiation of pancreatic enzyme therapy, including but not limited to cystic fibrosis, pancreatic cancer, acute and chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic surgery. This purpose of this article is to help clarify the conditions that cause pancreatic insufficiency, how to determine if the patient is malabsorbing, and the best use of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy for treatment in these conditions. The first step in determining if pancreatic enzyme therapy is appropriate is to determine if the patient is malabsorbing specifically due to pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. An overview of the methods used to determine pancreatic insufficiency is provided, as well as appropriate treatment methods. Recent Food and Drug Administration regulations require a more thorough process, including randomized controlled trials to prove the safety and efficacy of pancreatic enzymes, to approve them for use. The studies used to verify efficacy also are examined. Last, dosing guidelines and some unconventional ways to administer pancreatic enzymes, such as during enteral feedings, are reviewed.

  16. Update on pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Logan R.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are relatively rare tumors comprising 1-2% of all pancreas neoplasms. In the last 10 years our understanding of this disease has increased dramatically allowing for advancements in the treatment of pNETs. Surgical excision remains the primary therapy for localized tumors and only potential for cure. New surgical techniques using laparoscopic approaches to complex pancreatic resections are a major advancement in surgical therapy and increasingly possible. With early detection being less common, most patients present with metastatic disease. Management of these patients requires multidisciplinary care combining the best of surgery, chemotherapy and other targeted therapies. In addition to surgical advances, recently, there have been significant advances in systemic therapy and targeted molecular therapy. PMID:25493258

  17. An unresectable retroperitoneal malignant fibrous histiocytoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HSIAO, PO-JEN; CHEN, GUANG-HENG; CHANG, YI-HUEI; CHANG, CHAO-HSIANG; CHANG, HAN; BAI, LI-YUAN

    2016-01-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is most commonly observed in the extremities and the trunk but rarely in retroperitoneum. The present case report documents a 64-year-old man who was admitted with an abdominal palpable mass for 6 months. After a thorough investigation, a tumor of the retroperitoneum was identified adhered to adjacent organs and vessels. The patient experienced mild hydronephrosis and hydroureter as a result of the tumor compression. A number of previous surgeons considered the tumor unresectable and suggested palliative treatment. En bloc resection of the tumor was attempted but incomplete surgery was performed initially as the tumor was friable and prone to bleeding. Therefore, a biopsy of the tumor was performed and a double J ureteral stent was set for hydronephrosis. Histopathological examination confirmed the tumor was an MFH. The patient received neo-adjuvant chemotherapy with 4 cycles of mesna, doxorubicin, ifosfamide, and dacarbazine (MAID). A computed tomography scan demonstrated that the tumor had reduced in size following chemotherapy. En bloc resection of the tumor was arranged again 6 months later. The tumor exhibited a complete response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy after the formal pathological evaluation. The patient survives without tumor recurrence >5 years without recurrence. PMID:27073487

  18. Molecular profiling of a case of advanced pancreatic cancer identifies an active and tolerable combination of targeted therapy with backbone chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vanderwalde, Ari; Javadi, Nader; Feldman, Rebecca; Reddy, Sandeep Bobby

    2016-01-01

    Typical survival with common 1st-line regimens for pancreatic cancer range from 6-11 months. We report a case of a patient with stage IVB pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with gemcitabine and erlotinib who stopped therapy after 3 months without achieving a response due to intolerance. To decide upon additional treatment options, molecular analysis was performed on liver metastasis which revealed KRAS, FBXW7, APC, and ATM mutations, with thymidylate synthase (TS) negativity and PD-1 positivity. Based on this profile of TS negativity and ATM mutation, a combination strategy was devised consisting of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, bevacizumab and vorinostat. The patient had a near complete response to therapy with this regimen. In refractory metastatic pancreatic cancer, responses of this magnitude are rarely seen. To our knowledge, this represents the first demonstrated activity of this combination in the metastatic setting which could prompt further investigation of its use in large scale clinical trials. PMID:27034805

  19. Photodynamic therapy for pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Stephen P.

    2009-02-01

    Patients with non-resectable pancreatic and biliary tract cancer (cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer) have a dismal outlook with conventional palliative therapies, with a median survival of 3-9 months and a 5 year survival of less than 3%. Surgery is the only curative treatment but is appropriate in less than 20% of cases, and even then is associated with a 5-year survival of less than 30%. Although most applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in gastroenterology have been on lesions of the luminal gut, there is increasing experimental and clinical evidence for its efficacy in cancers of the pancreas and biliary tract. Our group has carried out the only clinical study of PDT in pancreatic carcinoma reported to date, and showed that PDT is feasible for local debulking of pancreatic cancer. PDT has also been used with palliative intent in patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma, with patients treated with stenting plus PDT reporting improvements in cholestasis, quality of life and survival compared with historical or randomized controls treated with stenting alone. Further controlled studies are needed to establish the influence of PDT and chemotherapy on the survival and quality of life of patients with pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma.

  20. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Tryggestad, Erik; Ford, Eric; Herman, Joseph M.

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at

  1. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a dosimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T; Ziegler, Mark A; Hooker, Ted K; Dah, Samson D; Tran, Phuoc T; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing; Pawlik, Timothy M; Tryggestad, Erik; Ford, Eric; Herman, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non-duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal Dmax of<30Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal Dmean, Dmax, D1cc, D4%, and V20Gy compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V95% (p = 0.01) and Dmean (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at risk, whereas for IMRT it is compromised target coverage

  2. Dose-Volume Analysis of Predictors for Gastrointestinal Toxicity After Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jiayi; Robertson, John M.; Ye Hong; Margolis, Jeffrey; Nadeau, Laura; Yan Di

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric predictors for the development of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma (LAPC) treated with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine and radiotherapy (GemRT). Methods and Materials: From June 2002 to June 2009, 46 LAPC patients treated with definitive GemRT were retrospectively analyzed. The stomach and duodenum were retrospectively contoured separately to determine their dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. GI toxicity was defined as Grade 3 or higher GI toxicity. The follow-up time was calculated from the start of RT to the date of death or last contact. Univariate analysis (UVA) and multivariate analysis (MVA) using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression models were performed to identify risk factors associated with GI toxicity. The receiver operating characteristic curve and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were used to determine the best DVH parameter to predict for GI toxicity. Results: Of the patients, 28 (61%) received concurrent gemcitabine alone, and 18 (39%) had concurrent gemcitabine with daily erlotinib. On UVA, only the V{sub 20Gy} to V{sub 35Gy} of duodenum were significantly associated with GI toxicity (all p {<=} 0.05). On MVA, the V{sub 25Gy} of duodenum and the use of erlotinib were independent risk factors for GI toxicity (p = 0.006 and 0.02, respectively). For the entire cohort, the V{sub 25Gy} of duodenum is the best predictor for GI toxicity (AUC = 0.717), and the 12-month GI toxicity rate was 8% vs. 48% for V{sub 25Gy} {<=} 45% and V{sub 25Gy} > 45%, respectively (p = 0.03). However, excluding the erlotinib group, the V{sub 35Gy} is the best predictor (AUC = 0.725), and the 12-month GI toxicity rate was 0% vs. 41% for V{sub 35Gy} {<=} 20% and V{sub 35Gy} > 20%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusions: DVH parameters of duodenum may predict Grade 3 GI toxicity after GemRT for LAPC. Concurrent use of erlotinib during GemRT may increase GI

  3. Unresectable Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung: An Outcomes Study

    SciTech Connect

    Newlin, Heather E.; Iyengar, Meera; Morris, Christopher G.; Olivier, Kenneth

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To report survival and control rates in patients with inoperable squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: Two hundred seventy-five patients with inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of the lung (Stages I-IIIB) who received radiotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy given with curative intent at University of Florida between 1963 and 2006 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Overall survival (OS) at 5 years for Stages I, II, and III was 10%, 14%, and 7% (p = 0.0034); local-regional control at 5 years was 51%, 38%, and 29% (p = 0.0003); and freedom from metastases at 5 years was 81%, 60%, and 65% (p = 0.0689), respectively. Patients who received doses {>=} 65 Gy had improved cause-specific survival (CSS), OS, and metastasis-free survival at 5 years compared with those who received doses < 65 Gy. Five-year regional control was significantly improved with twice-daily vs. once-daily treatment (37% vs. 14%, p = 0.02). Chemotherapy significantly improved 5-year regional control (36% for patients who received chemotherapy vs. 13% for those who did not; p = 0.01). Conclusions: Dose escalation, accelerated fractionation, and combined modality therapies improve outcomes in SCC of the lung. Our review of the literature highlights the different natural history for SCC vs. other non-small cell lung cancers and emphasizes the importance of tailoring treatment strategies to individual patients. At University of Florida, we have begun treating unresectable Stage III patients with SCC of the lung using 69.6 Gy twice daily with concurrent chemotherapy.

  4. Preparing the anatomical model for ablation of unresectable liver tumor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nowadays the best treatment of the primary and secondary hepatic tumor is surgical resection, but only 5–15% of all patient with hepatocellular carcinoma and 20–25% of all patients with liver metastases are indicated for resection. In these cases some kind of ablation and other technique could be used. Aim To present the methodology of preparing the anatomical model for ablation of unresectable liver tumor. Material and methods The presented method is based on abdomen computed tomography (CT) dynamic examination. Three methods of segmentation are used: rolling vector for liver volume, modified Frangi filter for liver vessels, and fuzzy expert system with initial region-of-interest anisotropic filtration for liver metastases. Segmentation results are the input data for creating 3D anatomical models in the form of B-spline curves and surfaces performing the surface global interpolation algorithm. A graphical user interface for presentation and evaluation of models, presented in color against DICOM images in grayscale, is designed and implemented. Results The proposed approach was tested on 20 abdominal CT obtained from the Department of Clinical Radiology of Silesian Medical University. The lack of a “gold standard” provides for the correction of the results. Conclusions Preparation of the anatomical model is one of the important early stages of the use of image-based navigation systems. This process could not take place in a fully automatic manner and verification of the results obtained is performed by the radiologist. Using the above anatomical model in surgical workflow is presented. PMID:25097694

  5. Management of blunt pancreatic trauma: what's new?

    PubMed

    Potoka, D A; Gaines, B A; Leppäniemi, A; Peitzman, A B

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic injuries are relatively uncommon but present a major challenge to the surgeon in terms of both diagnosis and management. Pancreatic injuries are associated with significant mortality, primarily due to associated injuries, and pancreas-specific morbidity, especially in cases of delayed diagnosis. Early diagnosis of pancreatic trauma is a key for optimal management, but remains a challenge even with more advanced imaging modalities. For both penetrating and blunt pancreatic injuries, the presence of main pancreatic ductal injury is the major determinant of morbidity and the major factor guiding management decisions. For main pancreatic ductal injury, surgery remains the preferred approach with distal pancreatectomy for most injuries and more conservative surgical management for proximal ductal injuries involving the head of the pancreas. More recently, nonoperative management has been utilized, especially in the pediatric population, with the potential for increased rates of pseudocyst and pancreatic fistulae and the potential for the need for further intervention and increased hospital stay. This review presents recent data focusing on the diagnosis, management, and outcomes of blunt pancreatic injury.

  6. Animal models for investigating chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous or recurrent inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive and irreversible morphological changes. It typically causes pain and permanent impairment of pancreatic function. In chronic pancreatitis areas of focal necrosis are followed by perilobular and intralobular fibrosis of the parenchyma, by stone formation in the pancreatic duct, calcifications in the parenchyma as well as the formation of pseudocysts. Late in the course of the disease a progressive loss of endocrine and exocrine function occurs. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis no causal treatment for chronic pancreatitis is presently available. Thus, there is a need for well characterized animal models for further investigations that allow translation to the human situation. This review summarizes existing experimental models and distinguishes them according to the type of pathological stimulus used for induction of pancreatitis. There is a special focus on pancreatic duct ligation, repetitive overstimulation with caerulein and chronic alcohol feeding. Secondly, attention is drawn to genetic models that have recently been generated and which mimic features of chronic pancreatitis in man. Each technique will be supplemented with data on the pathophysiological background of the model and their limitations will be discussed. PMID:22133269

  7. Current management of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Lillemoe, K D

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The author seeks to provide an update on the current management of pancreatic carcinoma, including diagnosis and staging, surgical resection and adjuvant therapy for curative intent, and palliation. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: During the 1960s and 1970s, the operative mortality and long-term survival after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic carcinoma was so poor that some authors advocated abandoning the procedure. Several recent series have reported a marked improvement in perioperative results with 5-year survival in excess of 20%. Significant advances also have been made in areas of preoperative evaluation and palliation for advanced disease. CONCLUSION: Although carcinoma of the pancreas remains a disease with a poor prognosis, advances in the last decade have led to improvements in the overall management of this disease. Resection for curative intent currently should be accomplished with minimal perioperative mortality. Surgical palliation also may provide the optimal management of selected patients. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 7. PMID:7531966

  8. The Epidemiology of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes for hospital admission in the US. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients’ quality of life. Pancreatic cancer has high mortality and is 1 of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect Blacks more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:23622135

  9. MRI with hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate detects advanced pancreatic preneoplasia prior to invasive disease in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Eva M; Kettunen, Mikko I; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Dzien, Piotr; Wright, Alan J; Gopinathan, Aarthi; Gallagher, Ferdia A; Lewis, David Y; Frese, Kristopher K; Almeida, Jaime; Howat, William J; Tuveson, David A; Brindle, Kevin M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pancreatic cancer (PCa) is treatable by surgery when detected at an early stage. Non-invasive imaging methods able to detect both established tumours and their precursor lesions are needed to select patients for surgery. We investigated here whether pancreatic preneoplasia could be detected prior to the development of invasive cancers in genetically engineered mouse models of PCa using metabolic imaging. Design The concentrations of alanine and lactate and the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were measured in extracts prepared from the pancreas of animals at different stages of disease progression; from pancreatitis, through tissue with predominantly low-grade and then high-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and then tumour. 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (13C-MRSI) was used to measure non-invasively changes in 13C labelling of alanine and lactate with disease progression, following injection of hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate. Results Progressive decreases in the alanine/lactate concentration ratio and ALT/LDH activity ratio with disease progression were accompanied by a corresponding decrease in the [1-13C]alanine/[1-13C]lactate signal ratio observed in 13C-MRSI images of the pancreas. Conclusions Metabolic imaging with hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate enables detection and monitoring of the progression of PCa precursor lesions. Translation of this MRI technique to the clinic has the potential to improve the management of patients at high risk of developing PCa. PMID:26347531

  10. Irreversible electroporation for the treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Papamichail, Michail; Ali, Amir; Pizanias, Michail; Peddu, Praveen; Karani, John

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Resection or enucleation is currently the treatment of choice for small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Irreversible electroporation is a novel ablative method that is used for locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but little data exists for its use for pancreatic NETs. We report an early experience of IRE for early pancreatic NETs. Methods Between April 2014 and March 2015, 3 patients with small (<2 cm) pancreatic NETs were treated with percutaneous IRE. Results There were no adverse effects during the procedure. Mean hospital stay was 2.6 days. All patients remained disease free on 12-19 months follow up. One patient developed recurrent pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation. Conclusions IRE for small tumors of the pancreas is practical and may offer advantages over other thermal ablative techniques, since it preserves vital structures such as blood vessels, bile and pancreatic ducts. Further data regarding the long term disease free interval is required to establish efficacy.

  11. Irreversible electroporation for the treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Papamichail, Michail; Ali, Amir; Pizanias, Michail; Peddu, Praveen; Karani, John

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Resection or enucleation is currently the treatment of choice for small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Irreversible electroporation is a novel ablative method that is used for locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but little data exists for its use for pancreatic NETs. We report an early experience of IRE for early pancreatic NETs. Methods Between April 2014 and March 2015, 3 patients with small (<2 cm) pancreatic NETs were treated with percutaneous IRE. Results There were no adverse effects during the procedure. Mean hospital stay was 2.6 days. All patients remained disease free on 12-19 months follow up. One patient developed recurrent pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation. Conclusions IRE for small tumors of the pancreas is practical and may offer advantages over other thermal ablative techniques, since it preserves vital structures such as blood vessels, bile and pancreatic ducts. Further data regarding the long term disease free interval is required to establish efficacy. PMID:27621748

  12. Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Complicated by Sinistral Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kaley, Kristin; Lamb, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is known for vague symptoms that lead to a delay in diagnosis, and hence most cases are found at an advanced stage. Many complications can happen secondary to pancreatic cancer including diabetes, malabsorption, and deep venous thrombosis. Sinistral (segmental or left-sided) portal hypertension (SPH) refers to portal hypertension confined to the left-sided segment of the portal venous system namely the splenic side, and the most common etiology is splenic vein thrombosis (SVT). We present here a case of a 66-year-old male with advanced pancreatic cancer who died due to bleeding secondary to SVT. We advise physicians caring for these patients to be aware of this complication, which may also be the manifestation of an undiagnosed pancreatic cancer. PMID:27555987

  13. Demographics and epidemiology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Theresa Pluth; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer affects 44,000 Americans and at least 250,000 individuals worldwide annually. The incidence is slowly increasing after a recent period of decline. Cases are predicted to increase globally because of increased longevity and the widespread adoption of cancer-causing behaviors, such as cigarette smoking, dietary indiscretion, and a global increase in diabetes. Well-known risk factors for pancreatic cancer are advancing age, tobacco smoking, obesity, certain inherited familial disorders, second-hand smoke exposure, chronic pancreatitis, and diabetes. Associations with human immunodeficiency virus, ABO blood group, hepatitis B virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and Helicobacter pylori have also been identified.

  14. Carboplatin and paclitaxel as first-line treatment of unresectable or metastatic esophageal or gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Prithviraj, G K; Baksh, K; Fulp, W; Meredith, K; Hoffe, S; Shridhar, R; Almhanna, K

    2015-01-01

    Survival in patients with metastatic esophageal and gastric cancer is dismal. No standard treatment has been established. Carboplatin/paclitaxel is active in both advanced gastric and esophageal cancer. Here we retrospectively present our single center experience. Between 1998 and 2013, a total of 134 patients with metastatic esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma treated with carboplatin/paclitaxel (carboplatin predominantly area under the curve 5 and paclitaxel predominantly 175 mg/m(2)) every 3 weeks as first-line therapy were identified. Baseline characteristics, response to therapy, toxicities, and survival in this patient population were evaluated. Overall survival was defined as date from diagnosis to death or last follow up, and progression-free survival was defined at time from cycle 1 to, progression or last follow up. Kaplan-Meier curves were fit to estimate overall and progression-free survival. Of the 134 patients evaluated, the median age at diagnosis was 65 years. Disease control rate was 62.6% (complete response: 11%, partial response: 28%, stable disease: 33%). Median overall survival from date of initial diagnosis was 15.5 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06-1.5). Median progression-free survival from date of initiation of carboplatin and paclitaxel was 5.3 months (95% CI 0.34-0.5). Grade III or greater toxicity occurred in 26.1% of patients. The most common grade III toxicities were neutropenia and neuropathy, present in 14.2% and 3.7% of the total study population, respectively. In patients with metastatic or unresectable esophageal or gastric cancer, the combination of carboplatin and paclitaxel is well tolerated with comparable overall survival and progression-free survival to existing regimens in this population.

  15. BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS FOR MULTIMODAL TREATMENT OF COLORECTAL LIVER METASTASES. MODULE 3: CONTROVERSIES AND UNRESECTABLE METASTASES

    PubMed Central

    TORRES, Orlando Jorge Martins; MARQUES, Márcio Carmona; SANTOS, Fabio Nasser; de FARIAS, Igor Correia; COUTINHO, Anelisa Kruschewsky; de OLIVEIRA, Cássio Virgílio Cavalcante; KALIL, Antonio Nocchi; de MELLO, Celso Abdon Lopes; KRUGER, Jaime Arthur Pirola; FERNANDES, Gustavo dos Santos; QUIREZE JR, Claudemiro; MURAD, André M.; SILVA, Milton José de BARROS E; ZURSTRASSEN, Charles Edouard; FREITAS, Helano Carioca; CRUZ, Marcelo Rocha; WESCHENFELDER, Rui; LINHARES, Marcelo Moura; CASTRO, Leonaldson dos Santos; VOLLMER, Charles; DIXON, Elijah; RIBEIRO, Héber Salvador de Castro; COIMBRA, Felipe José Fernandez

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the last module of this consensus, controversial topics were discussed. Management of the disease after progression during first line chemotherapy was the first discussion. Next, the benefits of liver resection in the presence of extra-hepatic disease were debated, as soon as, the best sequence of treatment. Conversion chemotherapy in the presence of unresectable liver disease was also discussed in this module. Lastly, the approach to the unresectable disease was also discussed, focusing in the best chemotherapy regimens and hole of chemo-embolization. PMID:27759781

  16. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guannan; Cao, Zhe; Yang, Gang; Wu, Wenming; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication of pancreatic cancer, most often accompanying rare acinar cell carcinoma. We herein report a case of pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with pancreatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. Patient information: A 57-year-old male was referred to our hospital for weight loss. A physical examination revealed subcutaneous nodules on his lower extremities. The blood test showed abnormal increases in amylase, lipase, and carbohydrate antigen 19–9 levels. A computed tomography scan detected a hypodense 2 × 1.5 cm solid mass with an unclear margin in the head of the pancreas. The biopsy of subcutaneous nodules on the lower extremities was conducted and revealed lobular panniculitis. Pancreatic cancer and pancreatic panniculitis were strongly suspected. After the administration of octreotide acetate and the Whipple procedure, the serous amylase and lipase levels returned to normal, and the pancreatic panniculitis had almost resolved by 4 weeks later. Conclusion: Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare complication of pancreatic cancer. However, in the presence of a pancreatic mass, as in this case, clinicians should be aware that panniculitis may be the sentinel of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27495045

  17. Conversion Chemotherapy for Technically Unresectable Colorectal Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Michele; Dadduzio, Vincenzo; Ardito, Francesco; Lombardi, Pasquale; Strippoli, Antonia; Vellone, Maria; Orlandi, Armando; Rossi, Sabrina; Cerchiaro, Eleonora; Cassano, Alessandra; Giuliante, Felice; Barone, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The response rate of patients with unresectable liver-limited metastases of colorectal cancer can be improved by converting inoperable disease to operable disease. However, the benefits of conversion chemotherapy for survival are still controversial. Patients considered to have technically inoperable disease by a multidisciplinary team were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were stratified based on the treatment they received, into the chemotherapy only (G1), chemotherapy plus bevacizumab (G2), or chemotherapy plus cetuximab (G3) groups. The primary endpoint was the resection rate. The secondary endpoint was the overall survival (OS), according to both the treatment received and liver surgery status. In total, 104 patients were included: 30 in the G1, 39 in the G2, and 35 in the G3 groups. All G3 patients had the wild-type KRAS exon 2. The surgical resection rates for patients in the G1, G2, and G3 groups were 43.3% (13/30), 30.7% (12/39), and 51.4% (18/35), respectively. Disease-free survival did not show significant differences among the 3 groups. The median OS was 35.2 months in the G1, 28.8 months in the G2, and 42.1 months in the G3 (P = 0.25) groups. The OS was significantly higher in patients who underwent surgical resection than those who did not. The median OS was 28.4 months in patients who did not undergo resection, whereas it had not been reached after a median follow-up period of 37.5 months for patients who underwent surgical resection (events: 21/43). Our data confirmed that the conversion of initially inoperable disease to operable disease conferred a survival benefit, even in patients who relapsed after surgery. The addition of cetuximab to chemotherapy improved the objective response and resection rates, conferring a potential survival benefit even in patients whose diseases were not converted to operable disease, compared to chemotherapy alone or in combination with bevacizumab. PMID:27196492

  18. Ricolinostat, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-02

    Non-Resectable Cholangiocarcinoma; Recurrent Cholangiocarcinoma; Stage III Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage III Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma; Stage IVA Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage IVA Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma; Stage IVA Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma; Stage IVB Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage IVB Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma; Stage IVB Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma

  19. Baiting for Cancer: Using the Zebrafish as a Model in Liver and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Katie L; Goessling, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Liver and pancreatic cancers are amongst the leading causes of cancer death. In recent years, genetic and chemical approaches in zebrafish have elucidated cellular and molecular mechanisms of liver and pancreatic cancer formation and progression. In this chapter, we review the recent approaches and advances in the field to study both hepatocellular carcinomas and pancreatic cancer. PMID:27165363

  20. Advanced Glycation End Products Impair Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion of a Pancreatic β-Cell Line INS-1-3 by Disturbance of Microtubule Cytoskeleton via p38/MAPK Activation.

    PubMed

    You, Jia; Wang, Zai; Xu, Shiqing; Zhang, Wenjian; Fang, Qing; Liu, Honglin; Peng, Liang; Deng, Tingting; Lou, Jinning

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are believed to be involved in diverse complications of diabetes mellitus. Overexposure to AGEs of pancreatic β-cells leads to decreased insulin secretion and cell apoptosis. Here, to understand the cytotoxicity of AGEs to pancreatic β-cells, we used INS-1-3 cells as a β-cell model to address this question, which was a subclone of INS-1 cells and exhibited high level of insulin expression and high sensitivity to glucose stimulation. Exposed to large dose of AGEs, even though more insulin was synthesized, its secretion was significantly reduced from INS-1-3 cells. Further, AGEs treatment led to a time-dependent increase of depolymerized microtubules, which was accompanied by an increase of activated p38/MAPK in INS-1-3 cells. Pharmacological inhibition of p38/MAPK by SB202190 reversed microtubule depolymerization to a stabilized polymerization status but could not rescue the reduction of insulin release caused by AGEs. Taken together, these results suggest a novel role of AGEs-induced impairment of insulin secretion, which is partially due to a disturbance of microtubule dynamics that resulted from an activation of the p38/MAPK pathway. PMID:27635403

  1. Advanced Glycation End Products Impair Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion of a Pancreatic β-Cell Line INS-1-3 by Disturbance of Microtubule Cytoskeleton via p38/MAPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    You, Jia; Xu, Shiqing; Zhang, Wenjian; Fang, Qing; Liu, Honglin; Peng, Liang; Deng, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are believed to be involved in diverse complications of diabetes mellitus. Overexposure to AGEs of pancreatic β-cells leads to decreased insulin secretion and cell apoptosis. Here, to understand the cytotoxicity of AGEs to pancreatic β-cells, we used INS-1-3 cells as a β-cell model to address this question, which was a subclone of INS-1 cells and exhibited high level of insulin expression and high sensitivity to glucose stimulation. Exposed to large dose of AGEs, even though more insulin was synthesized, its secretion was significantly reduced from INS-1-3 cells. Further, AGEs treatment led to a time-dependent increase of depolymerized microtubules, which was accompanied by an increase of activated p38/MAPK in INS-1-3 cells. Pharmacological inhibition of p38/MAPK by SB202190 reversed microtubule depolymerization to a stabilized polymerization status but could not rescue the reduction of insulin release caused by AGEs. Taken together, these results suggest a novel role of AGEs-induced impairment of insulin secretion, which is partially due to a disturbance of microtubule dynamics that resulted from an activation of the p38/MAPK pathway.

  2. Advanced Glycation End Products Impair Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion of a Pancreatic β-Cell Line INS-1-3 by Disturbance of Microtubule Cytoskeleton via p38/MAPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    You, Jia; Xu, Shiqing; Zhang, Wenjian; Fang, Qing; Liu, Honglin; Peng, Liang; Deng, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are believed to be involved in diverse complications of diabetes mellitus. Overexposure to AGEs of pancreatic β-cells leads to decreased insulin secretion and cell apoptosis. Here, to understand the cytotoxicity of AGEs to pancreatic β-cells, we used INS-1-3 cells as a β-cell model to address this question, which was a subclone of INS-1 cells and exhibited high level of insulin expression and high sensitivity to glucose stimulation. Exposed to large dose of AGEs, even though more insulin was synthesized, its secretion was significantly reduced from INS-1-3 cells. Further, AGEs treatment led to a time-dependent increase of depolymerized microtubules, which was accompanied by an increase of activated p38/MAPK in INS-1-3 cells. Pharmacological inhibition of p38/MAPK by SB202190 reversed microtubule depolymerization to a stabilized polymerization status but could not rescue the reduction of insulin release caused by AGEs. Taken together, these results suggest a novel role of AGEs-induced impairment of insulin secretion, which is partially due to a disturbance of microtubule dynamics that resulted from an activation of the p38/MAPK pathway. PMID:27635403

  3. Pathogenesis of pain in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Di Sebastiano, Pierluigi; di Mola, Fabio F; Buchler, Markus W; Friess, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    The pathophysiology of pain in chronic pancreatitis (CP) is incompletely understood. Several hypotheses have been advanced, including pancreatic and extrapancreatic causes. The existence of different hypotheses to explain the genesis of pain in CP also reflects the different therapeutic approaches to pain in these patients. Increased intraductal pressure as a result of single or multiple strictures and/or calculi is believed to be a common cause of pain in CP patients with a dilated main pancreatic duct. Other suggested causes include pancreatic fibrosis, interstitial hypertension and pancreatic ischemia. Additionally, extrapancreatic causes like duodenal and common bile duct stenosis with scarring due to pancreatic inflammation are suggested as factors causing pain in CP. The 'neurogenic inflammation' hypothesis is a fascinating theory which is supported by different studies. Immunohistological reports have shown that the amount of neurotransmitters, such as substance P and its receptor, calcitonin gene-related peptide and other neurotransmitters, are increased in afferent pancreatic nerves and a correlation between pain and immune cell infiltration of the nerves has been reported in CP. In this review we will discuss the different pain hypotheses and will present the perspective that neuroimmune interaction is an important factor for pain generation in CP.

  4. Radiotherapy Improves Survival in Unresected Stage I-III Bronchoalveolar Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Damien; Mishra, Mark; Onn, Amir; Dicker, Adam P.; Symon, Zvi; Pfeffer, M. Raphael; Lawrence, Yaacov Richard

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that radiotherapy (RT) improves the outcome of patients with unresected, nonmetastatic bronchoalveolar carcinoma (BAC) by performing a population-based analysis within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. Methods and Materials: Inclusion criteria were as follows: patients diagnosed with BAC, Stage I-III, between 2001 and 2007. Exclusion criteria included unknown stage, unknown primary treatment modality, Stage IV disease, and those diagnosed at autopsy. Demographic data, treatment details, and overall survival were retrieved from the SEER database. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. Results: A total of 6933 patients with Stage I-III BAC were included in the analysis. The median age at diagnosis was 70 years (range, 10-101 years). The majority of patients were diagnosed with Stage I (74.4%); 968 patients (14%) did not undergo surgical resection. Unresected patients were more likely to be older (p < 0.0001), male (p = 0.001), black (p < 0.0001), and Stage III (p < 0.0001). Within the cohort of unresected patients, 300 (31%) were treated with RT. The estimated 2-year overall survival for patients with unresected, nonmetastatic BAC was 58%, 44%, and 27% in Stage I, II, and III, respectively. Factors associated with improved survival included female sex, earlier stage at diagnosis, and use of RT. Median survival in those not receiving RT vs. receiving RT was as follows: Stage I, 28 months vs. 33 months (n = 364, p = 0.06); Stage II, 18 months vs. not reached (n = 31, nonsignificant); Stage III, 10 months vs. 17 months (n = 517, p < 0.003). Conclusions: The use of RT is associated with improved prognosis in unresected Stage I-III BAC. Less than a third of patients who could have potentially benefited from RT received it, suggesting that the medical specialists involved in the care of these patients underappreciate the importance of RT.

  5. Chemosaturation with Percutaneous Hepatic Perfusion for Unresectable Isolated Hepatic Metastases from Sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Deneve, Jeremiah L.; Choi, Junsung; Gonzalez, Ricardo J.; Conley, Anthony P.; Stewart, Steven; Han, Dale; Werner, Philip; Chaudhry, Tariq A.; Zager, Jonathan S.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Treatment of patients with unresectable liver metastases is challenging. Regional therapies to the liver have been developed that maximize treatment of the localized disease process without systemic toxic adverse effects. We discuss the procedural aspects of liver chemosaturation with percutaneous hepatic perfusion (CS-PHP). Methods: We present as an illustration of this technique a case report of the treatment of unresectable metastatic leiomyosarcoma of the liver. Results: A randomized phase III trial for unresectable liver metastases from melanoma was recently completed comparing CS-PHP with melphalan vs. best alternative care (BAC). When compared with BAC, CS-PHP was associated with a significant improvement in hepatic progression-free survival (8.0 months CS-PHP vs. 1.6 months BAC, p < 0.0001) and overall progression-free survival (6.7 months CS-PHP vs. 1.6 months BAC, p < 0.0001), respectively. On the basis of these results, and given our experience as one of the treating institutions for this phase III trial, we appealed for compassionate use of CS-PHP in a patient with isolated bilobar unresectable hepatic metastases from leiomyosarcoma. Four target lesions were identified and monitored to assess treatment response. A total of 4 CS-PHP procedures were performed, with a 25 % reduction in size of the largest lesion observed and 16 month hepatic progression-free survival. Toxicity was mild (neutropenia) and manageable on an outpatient basis. Conclusion: CS-PHP offers several advantages for unresectable hepatic sarcoma metastases. CS-PHP is minimally invasive and repeatable, and it has a predictable and manageable systemic toxicity profile. For appropriately selected patients, CS-PHP can delay tumor progression and could potentially improve survival.

  6. Comparison of external beam radiation and brachytherapy to external beam radiation alone for unresectable extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Boothe, Dustin; Hopkins, Zachary; Frandsen, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Background Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (EHC) is a rare malignancy with a relatively poor prognosis. There are no randomized, prospective data to help define the optimal method of radiation delivery for unresectable EHC. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the benefit of adding brachytherapy to external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for unresectable EHC. Methods A retrospective review of 1,326 patients with unresectable EHC using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was completed. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to analyze the primary endpoint, overall survival. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed to identify and control for potential confounding variables, including age at diagnosis, sex, stage, grade, histology, race, year of diagnosis, and reason for no surgery. Results Of the 1,326 patients with unresectable EHC, 1,188 (92.9%) received EBRT only, while 91 (7.1%) received both EBRT and brachytherapy. Patients receiving combined modality radiation therapy were more likely to be treated prior to the year 2000. Median overall survival for patients receiving EBRT and EBRT plus brachytherapy was 9 and 11 months, respectively (P=0.04). Cause specific survival was 12 months for those receiving EBRT only, and 15 months for those who received EBRT + brachytherapy (P=0.10). Survival analysis performed on patients with locoregional disease only revealed a trend towards prolonged overall survival with those receiving EBRT + brachytherapy (P=0.08). Multivariate analysis revealed grade and stage of disease were correlated with both overall survival and cause specific survival (P≤0.05). Conclusions Among patients with unresectable EHC, the addition of brachytherapy to EBRT is associated with a prolonged median overall survival. However, the use of brachytherapy boost decreased in the last decade of the study. PMID:27563448

  7. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist.

  8. Pancreatic cancer: does octreotide offer any promise?

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, L

    2001-01-01

    The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the pancreas has risen steadily over the past 4 decades. Since pancreatic cancer is diagnosed at an advanced stage, and because of the lack of effective therapies the prognosis of such patients is extremely poor. Despite advances in our understanding of the molecular biology of pancreatic cancer, the systemic treatment of this disease remains unsatisfactory. Systemic chemotherapy and the administration of biologically active molecules such as tumor necrosis factor or interferons have not resulted in significant improvements in response rates or patient survival. New treatment strategies are obviously needed. This paper will discuss current advances in the use of somatostatin analogs in the management of pancreatic cancer. PMID:11275707

  9. Quantitative proteomics investigation of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sheng; Chen, Ru; Reimel, Beth Ann; Crispin, David A.; Mirzaei, Hamid; Cooke, Kelly; Coleman, Joshua F.; Lane, Zhaoli; Bronner, Mary P.; Goodlett, David R.; McIntosh, Martin; Traverso, William; Aebersold, Ruedi; Brentnall, Teresa A.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic cancer are usually diagnosed at late stages, when the disease is incurable. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) 3, is believed to be the immediate precursor lesion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and would be an ideal stage to diagnose patients, when intervention and cure are possible and patients are curable. In this study, we used quantitative proteomics to identify dysregulated proteins in PanIN 3 lesions. Altogether, over 200 dysregulated proteins were identified in the PanIN 3 tissues, with a minimum of a 1.75 fold change compared to the proteins in normal pancreas. These dysregulated PanIN 3 proteins play roles in cell motility, the inflammatory response, the blood clotting cascade, the cell cycle and its regulation, and protein degradation. Further network analysis of the proteins identified c-MYC as an important regulatory protein in PanIN 3 lesions. Finally, three of the overexpressed proteins, laminin beta-1, galectin-1, and actinin-4 were validated by IHC analysis. All three of these proteins were overexpressed in the stroma or ductal epithelial cells of advanced PanIN lesions, as well as in pancreatic cancer tissue. Our findings suggest that these three proteins may be useful as biomarkers for advanced PanIN and pancreatic cancer if further validated. The dysregulated proteins identified in this study may assist in the selection of candidates for future development of biomarkers for detecting early and curable pancreatic neoplasia. PMID:19373808

  10. Pancreatic-pleural fistula in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Elkaoui, Hakim; Atoini, Fouad; Bouchentouf, Sidi Mohamed; El Omari, Fatima; Mahi, Mohamed; Ait Ali, Abdelmounaim; Bounaim, Ahmed; Sair, Khalid; Zentar, Aziz

    2012-03-01

    Pancreatic-pleural fistula is a rare condition and few data related to its diagnosis and treatment are available. A fistulous connection linking the pancreas with the pleura via the diaphragm or mediastinum through the retroperitoneal area is formed. We report on a case with pancreatic-pleural fistula at its early stages in an alcoholic male patient aged 45 years with known chronic pancreatitis. The operation by Roux-en-Y jejuno-pseudocystostomy was followed by chest tube drainage. PMID:22560825

  11. Hedgehog Signaling in Pancreatic Fibrosis and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yongyu; Bai, Yongheng; Dong, Jiaojiao; Li, Qiang; Jin, Yuepeng; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The hedgehog signaling pathway was first discovered in the 1980s. It is a stem cell-related pathway that plays a crucial role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and organogenesis. Aberrant activation of hedgehog signaling leads to pathological consequences, including a variety of human tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that blockade of this pathway with several small-molecule inhibitors can inhibit the development of pancreatic neoplasm. In addition, activated hedgehog signaling has been reported to be involved in fibrogenesis in many tissues, including the pancreas. Therefore, new therapeutic targets based on hedgehog signaling have attracted a great deal of attention to alleviate pancreatic diseases. In this review, we briefly discuss the recent advances in hedgehog signaling in pancreatic fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis and highlight new insights on their potential relationship with respect to the development of novel targeted therapies. PMID:26962810

  12. Hedgehog Signaling in Pancreatic Fibrosis and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yongyu; Bai, Yongheng; Dong, Jiaojiao; Li, Qiang; Jin, Yuepeng; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-03-01

    The hedgehog signaling pathway was first discovered in the 1980s. It is a stem cell-related pathway that plays a crucial role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and organogenesis. Aberrant activation of hedgehog signaling leads to pathological consequences, including a variety of human tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that blockade of this pathway with several small-molecule inhibitors can inhibit the development of pancreatic neoplasm. In addition, activated hedgehog signaling has been reported to be involved in fibrogenesis in many tissues, including the pancreas. Therefore, new therapeutic targets based on hedgehog signaling have attracted a great deal of attention to alleviate pancreatic diseases. In this review, we briefly discuss the recent advances in hedgehog signaling in pancreatic fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis and highlight new insights on their potential relationship with respect to the development of novel targeted therapies. PMID:26962810

  13. Role of endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo-Marin, Juana; Vila, Juan Jose; Perez-Miranda, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) with or without fine needle aspiration has become the main technique for evaluating pancreatobiliary disorders and has proved to have a higher diagnostic yield than positron emission tomography, computed tomography (CT) and transabdominal ultrasound for recognising early pancreatic tumors. As a diagnostic modality for pancreatic cancer, EUS has proved rates higher than 90%, especially for lesions less than 2-3 cm in size in which it reaches a sensitivity rate of 99% vs 55% for CT. Besides, EUS has a very high negative predictive value and thus EUS can reliably exclude pancreatic cancer. The complication rate of EUS is as low as 1.1%-3.0%. New technical developments such as elastography and the use of contrast agents have recently been applied to EUS, improving its diagnostic capability. EUS has been found to be superior to the recent multidetector CT for T staging with less risk of overstaying in comparison to both CT and magnetic resonance imaging, so that patients are not being ruled out of a potentially beneficial resection. The accuracy for N staging with EUS is 64%-82%. In unresectable cancers, EUS also plays a therapeutic role by means of treating oncological pain through celiac plexus block, biliary drainage in obstructive jaundice in patients where endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is not affordable and aiding radiotherapy and chemotherapy. PMID:25232461

  14. Pancreatic Cancer from Molecular Pathways to Treatment Opinion

    PubMed Central

    Karanikas, Michail; Esempidis, Agis; Chasan, Zeinep Tzoutze Memet; Deftereou, Theodora; Antonopoulou, Maria; Bozali, Ferdi; Amarantidis, Kyriakos; Man, Yan-Gao

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is considered one of the most lethal malignances. It has been observed that the five year survival rate is less than 5%. Early diagnosis, understanding the risk factors and investigation of the molecular pathways with targeted therapy are the keys for efficient treatment. Moreover; there are several local treatments for patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. There are several combined therapies with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, however; a local therapy approach for many patients with poor performance status are in need. For those patients with good performance status new polychemotherapy regimens are used with success and increased survival improvement. Polychemotherapy has been observed to increase the rate of radical resections in some cases. Second line therapy is used for patients with good performance status and metastatic disease. Oxaliplatin-based regimens are mostly used, however; there are several other drugs that are being developed. Unfortunately, targeted therapy has not presented the expected efficiency. Moreover; immunotherapy; another treatment approach for several cancers types has again failed to present positive results for pancreatic cancer. In the current mini review, we will present information from the diagnosis to molecular pathways and targeted treatment. PMID:27390608

  15. Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic calculi.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Jang, Sung Ill; Rhee, Kwangwon; Lee, Dong Ki

    2014-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease that destroys pancreatic parenchyma and alters ductal stricture, leading to ductal destruction and abdominal pain. Pancreatic duct stones (PDSs) are a common complication of chronic pancreatitis that requires treatment to relieve abdominal pain and improve pancreas function. Endoscopic therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and surgery are treatment modalities of PDSs, although lingering controversies have hindered a consensus recommendation. Many comparative studies have reported that surgery is the superior treatment because of reduced duration and frequency of hospitalization, cost, pain relief, and reintervention, while endoscopic therapy is effective and less invasive but cannot be used in all patients. Surgery is the treatment of choice when endoscopic therapy has failed, malignancy is suspected, or duodenal stricture is present. However, in patients with the appropriate indications or at high-risk for surgery, endoscopic therapy in combination with ESWL can be considered a first-line treatment. We expect that the development of advanced endoscopic techniques and equipment will expand the role of endoscopic treatment in PDS removal.

  16. [Hepatic and pancreatic laparoscopic surgery].

    PubMed

    Pardo, F; Rotellar, F; Valentí, V; Pastor, C; Poveda, I; Martí-Cruchaga, P; Zozaya, G

    2005-01-01

    The development of laparoscopic surgery also includes the more complex procedures of abdominal surgery such as those that affect the liver and the pancreas. From diagnostic laparoscopy, accompanied by laparoscopic echography, to major hepatic or pancreatic resections, the laparoscopic approach has spread and today encompasses practically all of the surgical procedures in hepatopancreatic pathology. Without forgetting that the aim of minimally invasive surgery is not a better aesthetic result but the reduction of postoperative complications, it is undeniable that the laparoscopic approach has brought great benefits for the patient in every type of surgery except, for the time being, in the case of big resections such as left or right hepatectomy or resections of segments VII and VIII. Pancreatic surgery has undergone a great development with laparoscopy, especially in the field of distal pancreatectomy due to cystic and neuroendocrine tumours where the approach of choice is laparoscopic. Laparoscopy similarly plays an important role, together with echolaparoscopy, in staging pancreatic tumours, prior to open surgery or for indicating suitable treatment. In coming years, it is to be hoped that it will continue to undergo an exponential development and, together with the advances in robotics, it will be possible to witness a greater impact of the laparoscopic approach on the field of hepatic and pancreatic surgery. PMID:16511579

  17. Pancreatic blood flow in experimental acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, A.R.; Millar, A.M.; Taylor, T.V.

    1982-05-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of acute necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis remain controversial. Recent work has suggested that an early fall in pancreatic blood flow, causing ischemia, may be the initiating factor. Using an established rat model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the fractional indicator distribution technique with /sup 86/RbCl, pancreatic blood flow and tissue perfusion have been measured at various times in the condition. Six groups of ten rats were studied: control sham operation and pancreatitis groups were sacrificed at 1, 6, and 24 hr. Pancreatic blood flow (% of cardiac output) and perfusion (blood flow/g tissue) were measured. Blood flow was increased by a maximum of 53% at 1 hr (P less than 0.001) and remained elevated for 24 hr, and perfusion was increased by a maximum of 70% (P less than 0.001) at 1 hr and remained elevated at 6 hr. Pancreatic perfusion declines after 6 hr due to increasing gland edema. The results demonstrate a significant increase in pancreatic blood flow and perfusion in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis, suggesting a primary inflammatory response, and refute the ischemic etiological theory.

  18. Anti-angiogenic activity of VXM01, an oral T-cell vaccine against VEGF receptor 2, in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: A randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 1 trial

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz-Winnenthal, Friedrich H; Hohmann, Nicolas; Niethammer, Andreas G; Friedrich, Tobias; Lubenau, Heinz; Springer, Marco; Breiner, Klaus M; Mikus, Gerd; Weitz, Jürgen; Ulrich, Alexis; Buechler, Markus W; Pianka, Frank; Klaiber, Ulla; Diener, Markus; Leowardi, Christine; Schimmack, Simon; Sisic, Leila; Keller, Anne-Valerie; Koc, Ruhan; Springfeld, Christoph; Knebel, Philipp; Schmidt, Thomas; Ge, Yingzi; Bucur, Mariana; Stamova, Slava; Podola, Lilli; Haefeli, Walter E; Grenacher, Lars; Beckhove, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    VEGFR-2 is expressed on tumor vasculature and a target for anti-angiogenic intervention. VXM01 is a first in kind orally applied tumor vaccine based on live, attenuated Salmonella bacteria carrying an expression plasmid, encoding VEGFR-2. We here studied the safety, tolerability, T effector (Teff), T regulatory (Treg) and humoral responses to VEGFR2 and anti-angiogenic effects in advanced pancreatic cancer patients in a randomized, dose escalation phase I clinical trial. Results of the first 3 mo observation period are reported. Locally advanced or metastatic, pancreatic cancer patients were enrolled. In five escalating dose groups, 30 patients received VXM01 and 15 placebo on days 1, 3, 5, and 7. Treatment was well tolerated at all dose levels. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Salmonella excretion and salmonella-specific humoral immune responses occurred in the two highest dose groups. VEGFR2 specific Teff, but not Treg responses were overall increased in vaccinated patients. We furthermore observed a significant reduction of tumor perfusion after 38 d in vaccinated patients together with increased levels of serum biomarkers indicative of anti-angiogenic activity, VEGF-A, and collagen IV. Vaccine specific Teff responses significantly correlated with reductions of tumor perfusion and high levels of preexisting VEGFR2-specific Teff while those showing no antiangiogenic activity had low levels of preexisting VEGFR2 specific Teff, showed a transient early increase of VEGFR2-specific Treg and reduced levels of VEGFR2-specific Teff at later time points – pointing to the possibility that early anti-angiogenic activity might be based at least in part on specific reactivation of preexisting memory T cells. PMID:26137397

  19. Pancreatitis - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... common bile duct and block the flow of pancreatic enzymes out of the pancreas into the intestine. Pancreatitis ... three to five days, to prevent secretion of enzymes by the pancreas. He will also receive pain medication to control ...

  20. Preoperative Folfirinox for Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma - A Phase II Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Poorly Differentiated Malignant Neoplasm; Resectable Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Undifferentiated Pancreatic Carcinoma

  1. Partial response to imatinib treatment in a patient with unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumor: A case report and mini literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolong; Feng, Libo; Liu, Qing; Xia, Dong; Xu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of imatinib mesylate in unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and to discuss its therapeutic regimen. A patient with unresectable GIST is described, and several key clinical studies are reviewed, including the clinical trials B2222 and S0033, which contain recently reported results of the long-term clinical outcome of imatinib in patients with unresectable or metastatic GIST. The recent results of the two studies demonstrate the long-term efficacy and safety of imatinib for unresectable or metastatic GIST. A positive response to imatinib treatment was observed in the present patient, which is consistent with the data of the B2222 and S0033 trials. However, further long-term, large-scale, multicenter and controlled trials are required to determine the relative efficacy of combining imatinib agents with surgical procedures or administering imatinib alone.

  2. Partial response to imatinib treatment in a patient with unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumor: A case report and mini literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolong; Feng, Libo; Liu, Qing; Xia, Dong; Xu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of imatinib mesylate in unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and to discuss its therapeutic regimen. A patient with unresectable GIST is described, and several key clinical studies are reviewed, including the clinical trials B2222 and S0033, which contain recently reported results of the long-term clinical outcome of imatinib in patients with unresectable or metastatic GIST. The recent results of the two studies demonstrate the long-term efficacy and safety of imatinib for unresectable or metastatic GIST. A positive response to imatinib treatment was observed in the present patient, which is consistent with the data of the B2222 and S0033 trials. However, further long-term, large-scale, multicenter and controlled trials are required to determine the relative efficacy of combining imatinib agents with surgical procedures or administering imatinib alone. PMID:27698727

  3. A Dosimetric Model of Duodenal Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, James D.; Christman-Skieller, Claudia; Kim, Jeff; Dieterich, Sonja; Chang, Daniel T.; Koong, Albert C.

    2010-12-01

    Introduction: Dose escalation for pancreas cancer is limited by the tolerance of adjacent normal tissues, especially with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The duodenum is generally considered to be the organ at greatest risk. This study reports on the dosimetric determinants of duodenal toxicity with single-fraction SBRT. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma received 25 Gy in a single fraction. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) endpoints evaluated include V{sub 5} (volume of duodenum that received 5 Gy), V{sub 10}, V{sub 15}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 25}, and D{sub max} (maximum dose to 1 cm{sup 3}). Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was evaluated with a Lyman model. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted with Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression models. Results: The median time to Grade 2-4 duodenal toxicity was 6.3 months (range, 1.6-11.8 months). The 6- and 12-month actuarial rates of toxicity were 11% and 29%, respectively. V{sub 10}-V{sub 25} and D{sub max} all correlated significantly with duodenal toxicity (p < 0.05). In particular, V{sub 15} {>=} 9.1 cm{sup 3} and V{sub 15} < 9.1 cm{sup 3} yielded duodenal toxicity rates of 52% and 11%, respectively (p = 0.002); V{sub 20} {>=} 3.3 cm{sup 3} and V{sub 20} < 3.3 cm{sup 3} gave toxicity rates of 52% and 11%, respectively (p = 0.002); and D{sub max} {>=} 23 Gy and D{sub max} < 23 Gy gave toxicity rates of 49% and 12%, respectively (p = 0.004). Lyman NTCP model optimization generated the coefficients m = 0.23, n = 0.12, and TD{sub 50} = 24.6 Gy. Only the Lyman NTCP model remained significant in multivariate analysis (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Multiple DVH endpoints and a Lyman NTCP model are strongly predictive of duodenal toxicity after SBRT for pancreatic cancer. These dose constraints will be valuable in future abdominal SBRT studies.

  4. Phase I Trial of a Pathotropic Retroviral Vector Expressing a Cytocidal Cyclin G1 Construct (Rexin-G) in Patients With Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Galanis, Evanthia; Carlson, Stephanie K; Foster, Nathan R; Lowe, Val; Quevedo, Fernando; McWilliams, Robert R; Grothey, Axel; Jatoi, Aminah; Alberts, Steven R; Rubin, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Rexin-G is a pathotropic retroviral vector displaying a von Willebrand factor–targeting motif and expressing a dominant negative cyclin G1 gene. We undertook a phase I trial of intravenous (IV) administration of Rexin-G in patients with gemcitabine refractory, metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Twelve patients were treated. Dose escalation was performed from a dose of 1 × 1011 colony forming units (CFU) per cycle to 6 × 1011 CFU per cycle. The treatment was well tolerated. One dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) at dose level 2 (1.5 × 1011 CFU per cycle) was observed, consisting of grade 3 transaminitis. There was no detection of replication-competent virus in patients’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or viral integration in DNA obtained from PBMCs, and no development of neutralizing antibodies. No evidence of antitumor activity was observed. The best objective response was progressive disease in 11 of the 12 study patients, while 1 patient showed radiographically stable disease with clinical deterioration and increase in the CA19.9 tumor marker. Median time to progression was 32 days. The median duration of survival of the study patients was 3.5 months from treatment initiation. Rexin-G is well tolerated in doses up to 6 × 1011 CFU in patients with recurrent pancreatic cancer, but there was no evidence of clinical antitumor activity. PMID:18388964

  5. Quantitative characterization of the protein contents of the exocrine pancreatic acinar cell by soft x-ray microscopy and advanced digital imaging methods

    SciTech Connect

    Loo Jr., Billy W.

    2000-06-09

    The study of the exocrine pancreatic acinar cell has been central to the development of models of many cellular processes, especially of protein transport and secretion. Traditional methods used to examine this system have provided a wealth of qualitative information from which mechanistic models have been inferred. However they have lacked the ability to make quantitative measurements, particularly of the distribution of protein in the cell, information critical for grounding of models in terms of magnitude and relative significance. This dissertation describes the development and application of new tools that were used to measure the protein content of the major intracellular compartments in the acinar cell, particularly the zymogen granule. Soft x-ray microscopy permits image formation with high resolution and contrast determined by the underlying protein content of tissue rather than staining avidity. A sample preparation method compatible with x-ray microscopy was developed and its properties evaluated. Automatic computerized methods were developed to acquire, calibrate, and analyze large volumes of x-ray microscopic images of exocrine pancreatic tissue sections. Statistics were compiled on the protein density of several organelles, and on the protein density, size, and spatial distribution of tens of thousands of zymogen granules. The results of these measurements, and how they compare to predictions of different models of protein transport, are discussed.

  6. Current and Future Trends in Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer: Molecular Targets and PET Probes.

    PubMed

    Alauddin, Mian M; De Palatis, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of pancreatic cancer has been a long-standing challenge in determining prognosis and management of the deadly disease. Although the incidence of pancreatic cancer is low (2% of all malignancies), it is the fourth leading cause of deaths attributable to cancer in the U.S. A major cause for the high mortality rate, which exceeds 85%, is the difficulty in diagnosing the disease early in its development. The relative lack of reliable diagnostic tools to screen patients who are asymptomatic prior to the aggressive progression of disease has been the primary contributing factor in the high mortality rate in this patient population. Indeed, 80-90% of patients with pancreatic cancer have relatively small unresectable tumors at the time of diagnosis. Therefore, there is an unmet need for a highly sensitive diagnostic imaging modality to detect early-stage pancreatic cancer, as this may save the lives of many thousands of patients. Many literature reviews have been published on various aspects of pancreatic cancer, including biology, screening, and therapy; however, limited information is available on early detection, especially the use of highly sensitive modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET). Current [(18)F]FDG/PET imaging combined with CT (PET/CT) lacks the necessary sensitivity and specificity for detection of small lesions (~2-3 mm) of pancreatic cancer that may be resectable and curable. Furthermore, accumulation of [(18)F]FDG in inflammatory tissue is a major problem; therefore, an appropriate PET tracer that is both highly sensitive and specific for carcinoma is necessary for PET imaging of early stage pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on early detection of pancreatic cancer by PET, including new targets and the development and application of new PET tracers. PMID:26295468

  7. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). PMID:26929738

  8. Pancreatitis in children.

    PubMed

    Winchester, M

    1992-12-01

    The pathophysiology of pancreatic autodigestion is poorly understood. Pancreatitis affects all age groups, and the diagnosis is sometimes missed when serum amylase and lipase activities are not measured in the child with abdominal pain. Acute pancreatitis in children has become a more commonly seen condition and the causes have varied. Laboratory and radiological studies play an important role in determining the diagnosis and prognosis. Family history is important in the diagnosis of idiopathic hereditary pancreatitis. Most acute episodes resolve with supportive care, but the mortality in acute pancreatitis is currently about 15% (Hadorn et al., 1980). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or an endoscopic retrograde pancreatogram may be necessary to investigate relapses of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis can be a life-threatening condition requiring lifetime medical management.

  9. Molecular and genetic bases of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Vanja; Gelibter, Alain; Bria, Emilio; Iapicca, Pierluigi; Cappello, Paola; Di Modugno, Francesca; Pino, Maria Simona; Nuzzo, Carmen; Cognetti, Francesco; Novelli, Francesco; Nistico, Paola; Milella, Michele

    2012-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a formidable challenge for oncologists and patients alike. Despite intensive efforts, attempts at improving survival in the past 15 years, particularly in advanced disease, have failed. This is true even with the introduction of molecularly targeted agents, chosen on the basis of their action on pathways that were supposedly important in pancreatic cancer development and progression: indeed, with the notable exception of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor erlotinib, that has provided a minimal survival improvement when added to gemcitabine, other agents targeting EGFR, matrix metallo-proteases, farnesyl transferase, or vascular endothelial growth factor have not succeeded in improving outcomes over standard gemcitabine monotherapy for a variety of different reasons. However, recent developments in the molecular epidemiology of pancreatic cancer and an ever evolving understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic cancer initiation and progression raise renewed hope to find novel, relevant therapeutic targets that could be pursued in the clinical setting. In this review we focus on molecular epidemiology of pancreatic cancer, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and its influence on sensitivity to EGFR-targeted approaches, apoptotic pathways, hypoxia-related pathways, developmental pathways (such as the hedgehog and Notch pathways), and proteomic analysis as keys to a better understanding of pancreatic cancer biology and, most importantly, as a source of novel molecular targets to be exploited therapeutically.

  10. Efficacy of surgical treatment using microwave coagulo-necrotic therapy for unresectable multiple colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Yoshiyuki; Takami, Yuko; Tateishi, Masaki; Ryu, Tomoki; Mikagi, Kazuhiro; Saitsu, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Background Five or more colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) are considered marginally resectable and cannot be treated solely by hepatic resection (Hr). This study investigated the long-term effectiveness of surgical treatment using microwave coagulo-necrotic therapy (MCN) and/or Hr for marginally resectable or unresectable multiple CRLM. Methods This study retrospectively analyzed 82 consecutive CRLM patients with ≥5 CRLM who underwent MCN, Hr, or both, at our institution from 1994 to 2012. Presuming all CRLM were resected curatively, virtual remnant liver volume was calculated using preoperative computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Virtual remnant liver volume <30% was defined as unresectable. Patients were divided into marginally resectable (Group Y; n=29) and unresectable (Group N; n=53). Overall and recurrence-free survival were assessed. Results Mean maximum tumor diameter and tumor number were 3.1 and 6.0 cm in Group Y and 3.3 and 11.3 cm in Group N. Surgical methods included MCN (n=16), MCN+Hr (n=9), and Hr (n=4) in Group Y, and MCN (n=28) and MCN+Hr (n=25) in Group N. One- and 2-year recurrence-free survival rates were 38.0% and 22.8% in Group Y, and 18.9% and 3.8% in Group N (P=0.01). However, 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates of Group N (86.8%, 44.6%, and 33.7%, respectively) were similar to those of Group Y (82.8%, 51.4%, and 33.3%, respectively; P= not significant each). Conclusion MCN may improve survival for patients with unresectable multiple CRLM, similar to that in patients with marginally resectable multiple CRLM. PMID:26955286

  11. Proton Beam Therapy for Unresectable Malignancies of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses

    SciTech Connect

    Zenda, Sadamoto; Kohno, Ryosuke; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Arahira, Satoko; Nishio, Teiji; Tahara, Makoto; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Kishimoto, Seiji; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The cure rate for unresectable malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is low. Because irradiation with proton beams, which are characterized by their rapid fall-off at the distal end of the Bragg peak and sharp lateral penumbra, depending on energy, depth, and delivery, provide better dose distribution than X-ray irradiation, proton beam therapy (PBT) might improve treatment outcomes for conditions located in proximity to risk organs. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical profile of PBT for unresectable malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 39 patients in our database fulfilling the following criteria: unresectable malignant tumors of the nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses or skull base; N0M0 disease; and treatment with PBT (>60 GyE) from January 1999 to December 2006. Results: Median patient age was 57 years (range, 22-84 years); 22 of the patients were men and 17 were women. The most frequent primary site was the nasal cavity (n = 26, 67%). The local control rates at 6 months and 1 year were 84.6% and 77.0%, respectively. With a median active follow-up of 45.4 months, 3-year progression-free and overall survival were 49.1% and 59.3%, respectively. The most common acute toxicities were mild dermatitis (Grade 2, 33.3%), but no severe toxicity was observed (Grade 3 or greater, 0%). Five patients (12.8%) experienced Grade 3 to 5 late toxicities, and one treatment-related death was reported, caused by cerebrospinal fluid leakage Grade 5 (2.6%). Conclusion: These findings suggest that the clinical profile of PBT for unresectable malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses make it is a promising treatment option.

  12. A Comparison of Helical Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, and 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Poppe, Matthew M.; Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning J.; Zhou Jinghao; Nelson, Carl; Jabbour, Salma K.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed dosimetric differences in pancreatic cancer radiotherapy via helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (HIMRT), linac-based IMRT, and 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) with regard to successful plan acceptance and dose to critical organs. Dosimetric analysis was performed in 16 pancreatic cases that were planned to 54 Gy; both post-pancreaticoduodenectomy (n = 8) and unresected (n = 8) cases were compared. Without volume modification, plans met constraints 75% of the time with HIMRT and IMRT and 13% with 3D-CRT. There was no statistically significantly improvement with HIMRT over conventional IMRT in reducing liver V35, stomach V45, or bowel V45. HIMRT offers improved planning target volume (PTV) dose homogeneity compared with IMRT, averaging a lower maximum dose and higher volume receiving the prescription dose (D100). HIMRT showed an increased mean dose over IMRT to bowel and liver. Both HIMRT and IMRT offer a statistically significant improvement over 3D-CRT in lowering dose to liver, stomach, and bowel. The results were similar for both unresected and resected patients. In pancreatic cancer, HIMRT offers improved dose homogeneity over conventional IMRT and several significant benefits to 3D-CRT. Factors to consider before incorporating IMRT into pancreatic cancer therapy are respiratory motion, dose inhomogeneity, and mean dose.

  13. Translating discovery in zebrafish pancreatic development to human pancreatic cancer: biomarkers, targets, pathogenesis, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yee, Nelson S; Kazi, Abid A; Yee, Rosemary K

    2013-06-01

    Abstract Experimental studies in the zebrafish have greatly facilitated understanding of genetic regulation of the early developmental events in the pancreas. Various approaches using forward and reverse genetics, chemical genetics, and transgenesis in zebrafish have demonstrated generally conserved regulatory roles of mammalian genes and discovered novel genetic pathways in exocrine pancreatic development. Accumulating evidence has supported the use of zebrafish as a model of human malignant diseases, including pancreatic cancer. Studies have shown that the genetic regulators of exocrine pancreatic development in zebrafish can be translated into potential clinical biomarkers and therapeutic targets in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Transgenic zebrafish expressing oncogenic K-ras and zebrafish tumor xenograft model have emerged as valuable tools for dissecting the pathogenetic mechanisms of pancreatic cancer and for drug discovery and toxicology. Future analysis of the pancreas in zebrafish will continue to advance understanding of the genetic regulation and biological mechanisms during organogenesis. Results of those studies are expected to provide new insights into how aberrant developmental pathways contribute to formation and growth of pancreatic neoplasia, and hopefully generate valid biomarkers and targets as well as effective and safe therapeutics in pancreatic cancer.

  14. Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) as Conversion Therapy for Unresectable Primary Liver Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Cucchetti, Alessandro; Cappelli, Alberta; Ercolani, Giorgio; Mosconi, Cristina; Cescon, Matteo; Golfieri, Rita; Pinna, Antonio Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Background Many patients with primary liver cancers are not candidates for surgery, and systemic therapies are seldom effective. Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) has been shown to obtain partial and even complete response in unresectable primary tumors. As a “side effect”, SIRT can induce contra-lateral liver hypertrophy. Tumor response to SIRT can be sufficient to allow disengagement from normal vital structures whose involvement is the cause of the initial unresectability. The contra-lateral hypertrophy can thereby increase the future liver remnant (FLR) volume to over the safe threshold so that extended hepatectomy can be performed. Summary A review of the available literature was performed to assess the tumor response and liver hypertrophy that can be expected after SIRT, in order to delineate whether SIRTcan play a role in conversion therapy for resectability of primary liver malignancies. Key Message Available data suggest that SIRT in unresectable hepatocellular and cholangiocellular carcinomas can provide a considerable down-sizing of the tumors to possibly allow resection. Hypertrophy of the contra-lateral lobe represents a favorable collateral effect that can help in achieving safer subsequent major hepatectomy. In patients whose FLR volume represents the only surgical concern, portal vein embolization remains the treatment of choice. PMID:27781202

  15. Effect of Radiotherapy Planning Complexity on Survival of Elderly Patients With Unresected Localized Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chang H.; Bonomi, Marcelo; Cesaretti, Jamie; Neugut, Alfred I.; Wisnivesky, Juan P.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether complex radiotherapy (RT) planning was associated with improved outcomes in a cohort of elderly patients with unresected Stage I-II non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry linked to Medicare claims, we identified 1998 patients aged >65 years with histologically confirmed, unresected stage I-II NSCLC. Patients were classified into an intermediate or complex RT planning group using Medicare physician codes. To address potential selection bias, we used propensity score modeling. Survival of patients who received intermediate and complex simulation was compared using Cox regression models adjusting for propensity scores and in a stratified and matched analysis according to propensity scores. Results: Overall, 25% of patients received complex RT planning. Complex RT planning was associated with better overall (hazard ratio 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.95) and lung cancer-specific (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.93) survival after controlling for propensity scores. Similarly, stratified and matched analyses showed better overall and lung cancer-specific survival of patients treated with complex RT planning. Conclusions: The use of complex RT planning is associated with improved survival among elderly patients with unresected Stage I-II NSCLC. These findings should be validated in prospective randomized controlled trials.

  16. Residual, unresectable, or recurrent colorectal cancer: external beam irradiation and intraoperative electron beam boost +- resection

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, L.L.; Cohen, A.C.; Dosoretz, D.D.; Shipley, W.U.; Hedberg, S.E.; Wood, W.C.; Rodkey, G.V.; Suit, H.D.

    1983-11-01

    While combinations of external beam radiation (XRT) and surgery decrease pelvic recurrence and improve survival in the subgroups with residual disease (postop XRT) or initially unresectable disease (preop XRT), local recurrence is still unacceptably high, and survival could be improved. In view of this, pilot studies were instituted at Massachusetts General Hospital in which 32 patients received the standard previous treatment of external beam irradiation and surgery but in addition had an intraoperative electron beam boost of 1000 to 1500 rad to the remaining tumor or tumor bed. For the 16 patients who presented with unresectable primary lesions, the addition of intraoperative radiotherapy has resulted in a total absence of local recurrence with a minimum 20 month follow-up, and survival rates are statistically better than for the previous group treated with only external beam irradiation and surgical resection. In the group with residual disease, again there have not been any local recurrences in the 7 patients who received all treatment modalities versus 54% and 26% for the group with gross and microscopic residual treated with only external beam techniques. The remaining 9 patients presented with recurrent unresectable lesions - 3 are alive (2 NED) at greater than or equal to 3 years.

  17. Aspirin in combination with TACE in treatment of unresectable HCC: a matched-pairs analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Huan; Wang, Yan; Xie, Xiao-Ying; Yin, Xin; Zhang, Lan; Chen, Rong-Xin; Ren, Zheng-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the principal therapy for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, its efficacy is currently limited owing to tumor progression or treatment failure. It has been shown that aspirin reduces the incidence of multiple malignant tumors including HCC and plays a synergistic role with chemotherapy in the treatment of colon cancer. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the adjuvant effect of aspirin on patients with unresectable HCC who underwent TACE therapy. A retrospective matched-pairs analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy of aspirin in combination with TACE therapy. A total of 120 patients with HCC, including 60 patients treated with aspirin for treatment of cardiovascular disease, transient ischemic attack, and arthritis, and 60 paired matching HCC patients without aspirin treatment in the same period, were enrolled. Compared with non-aspirin users, patients treated with aspirin showed improved OS (P = 0.050). Specifically, patients treated with a full dose of aspirin showed prolonged OS (P = 0.027), which was an independent factor associated with OS in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 0.498, 95% confidence interval 0.280-0.888, P = 0.018). Aspirin in combination with TACE might improve OS in patients with unresectable HCC. Thus, the impact of aspirin on patients with HCC warrants further investigation prospectively. PMID:27725915

  18. Treatment of unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with yttrium-90 radioembolization: a systematic review and pooled analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Adra, D P; Gill, R S; Axford, S J; Shi, X; Kneteman, N; Liau, S-S

    2015-01-01

    Radioembolization with yttrium-90 microspheres offers an alternative treatment option for patients with unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). However, the rarity and heterogeneity of ICC makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions about treatment efficacy. Therefore, the goal of the current study is to systematically review the existing literature surrounding treatment of unresectable ICCs with yttrium-90 microspheres and provide a comprehensive review of the current experience and clinical outcome of this treatment modality. We performed a comprehensive search of electronic databases for ICC treatment and identified 12 studies with relevant data regarding radioembolization therapy with yttrium-90 microspheres. Based on pooled analysis, the overall weighted median survival was 15.5 months. Tumour response based on radiological studies demonstrated a partial response in 28% and stable disease in 54% of patients at three months. Seven patients were able to be downstaged to surgical resection. The complication profile of radioembolization is similar to that of other intra-arterial treatment modalities. Overall survival of patients with ICC after treatment with yttrium-90 microspheres is higher than historical survival rates and shows similar survival to those patients treated with systemic chemotherapy and/or trans-arterial chemoembolization therapy. Therefore, the use of yttrium-90 microspheres should be considered in the list of available treatment options for ICC. However, future randomized trials comparing systemic chemotherapy, TACE and local radiation will be required to identify the optimal treatment modality for unresectable ICC.

  19. An Open-Label Study of a Novel JAK-inhibitor, INCB047986, Given in Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-03

    Advanced Solid Tumors; Advanced Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Advanced Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Advanced Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Advanced Triple-Negative Breast Cancer; Advanced Urothelial Carcinoma

  20. Imaging of the pancreas: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2011-01-01

    A wide spectrum of anomalies of pancreas and the pancreatic duct system are commonly encountered at radiological evaluation. Diagnosing pancreatic lesions generally requires a multimodality approach. This review highlights the new advances in pancreatic imaging and their applications in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic pathologies. The mainstay techniques include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), radionuclide imaging (RNI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). PMID:21847450

  1. Minimally invasive surgical approach to pancreatic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Bencini, Lapo; Annecchiarico, Mario; Farsi, Marco; Bartolini, Ilenia; Mirasolo, Vita; Guerra, Francesco; Coratti, Andrea

    2015-12-15

    Pancreatic surgery for malignancy is recognized as challenging for the surgeons and risky for the patients due to consistent perioperative morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, the oncological long-term results are largely disappointing, even for those patients who experience an uneventfully hospital stay. Nevertheless, surgery still remains the cornerstone of a multidisciplinary treatment for pancreatic cancer. In order to maximize the benefits of surgery, the advent of both laparoscopy and robotics has led many surgeons to treat pancreatic cancers with these new methodologies. The reduction of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay and pain, together with a shorter interval between surgery and the beginning of adjuvant chemotherapy, represent the potential advantages over conventional surgery. Lastly, a better cosmetic result, although not crucial in any cancerous patient, could also play a role by improving overall well-being and patient self-perception. The laparoscopic approach to pancreatic surgery is, however, difficult in inexperienced hands and requires a dedicated training in both advanced laparoscopy and pancreatic surgery. The recent large diffusion of the da Vinci(®) robotic platform seems to facilitate many of the technical maneuvers, such as anastomotic biliary and pancreatic reconstructions, accurate lymphadenectomy, and vascular sutures. The two main pancreatic operations, distal pancreatectomy and pancreaticoduodenectomy, are approachable by a minimally invasive path, but more limited interventions such as enucleation are also feasible. Nevertheless, a word of caution should be taken into account when considering the increasing costs of these newest technologies because the main concerns regarding these are the maintenance of all oncological standards and the lack of long-term follow-up. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence for the use of minimally invasive surgery in pancreatic cancer (and less aggressive tumors

  2. Selumetinib and Akt Inhibitor MK-2206 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Advanced Gallbladder or Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-08

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma With Squamous Metaplasia of the Gallbladder; Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage II Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  3. Current and emerging therapies in unresectable and recurrent gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jou, Erin; Rajdev, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide despite many advances and options in therapy. As it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage, prognosis is poor with a median overall survival of less than twelve months. Chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for these patients but it confers only a moderate survival advantage. There remains a need for new targeted treatment options and a way to better define patient populations who will benefit from these agents. In the past few years, there has been a better understanding of the biology, molecular profiling, and heterogeneity of gastric cancer. Our increased knowledge has led to the identification of gastric cancer subtypes and to the development of new targeted therapeutic agents. There are now two new targeted agents, trastuzumab and ramucirumab, that have recently been approved for the treatment of advanced and metastatic gastric cancer. There are also many other actively investigated targets, including epidermal growth factor receptor, the phosphatadylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, c-Met, poly ADP-ribose polymerase, and immune checkpoint inhibition. In this review, we discuss the current management of advanced gastric cancer as well as emerging targeted therapies and immunotherapy. PMID:27239108

  4. Ipilimumab for Previously Untreated Unresectable Malignant Melanoma: A Critique of the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulou, Christina; Sideris, Eleftherios; Wade, Ros; Moe-Byrne, Thirimon; Eastwood, Alison; McKenna, Claire

    2015-12-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of ipilimumab (Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceuticals Limited) to submit clinical and cost-effectiveness evidence for previously untreated advanced (unresectable or metastatic) melanoma as part of the Institute's Single Technology Appraisal process. The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and Centre for Health Economics at the University of York were commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). This article presents a summary of the manufacturer's submission of ipilimumab, the ERG review and the resulting NICE guidance TA319, issued in July 2014. Ipilimumab at a recommended dose of 3 mg/kg monotherapy was previously granted marketing authorisation by the European Medicines Agency in adult patients who had received prior therapy and was recommended by NICE in guidance TA268. In October 2013, the EMA approved the extension of this indication to previously untreated advanced melanoma patients. NICE decisions are bound by the marketing authorisation; therefore, the decision problem faced by the NICE Appraisal Committee was whether ipilimumab at a recommended dose of 3 mg/kg monotherapy was effective and cost effective compared with first-line standard of care involving dacarbazine (DTIC) and vemurafenib (for BRAF V600 mutation-positive patients). The CA184-024 trial was the primary source of clinical evidence for ipilimumab. However, this was based on a dose of 10 mg/kg with concomitant DTIC. The results over a 5-year period indicated that ipilimumab 10 mg/kg plus DTIC demonstrated a significant increase in median overall survival (OS) of 2.1 months compared with DTIC plus placebo (11.2 vs. 9.1 months). The BRIM-3 trial, which was an open-label randomised controlled trial (RCT) in BRAF V600 mutation-positive patients, was the primary source of evidence for an indirect comparison with vemurafenib. The results showed that vemurafenib increased median OS by 3

  5. Overall survival in response to sorafenib versus radiotherapy in unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma with major portal vein tumor thrombosis: propensity score analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study investigated the survival benefits of sorafenib vs. radiotherapy (RT) in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) in the main trunk or the first branch. Methods Ninety-seven patients were retrospectively reviewed. Forty patients were enrolled by the Kanagawa Liver Study Group and received sorafenib, and 57 consecutive patients received RT in our hospital. Overall survival was compared between the two groups with PVTT by propensity score (PS) analysis. Factors associated with survival were evaluated by multivariate analysis. Results The median treatment period with sorafenib was 45 days, while the median total radiation dose was 50 Gy. The Child-Pugh class and the level of invasion into hepatic large vessels were significantly more advanced in the RT group than in the sorafenib group. Median survival did not differ significantly between the sorafenib group (4.3 months) and the RT group (5.9 months; P = 0.115). After PS matching (n = 28 per group), better survival was noted in the RT group than in the sorafenib group (median survival, 10.9 vs. 4.8 months; P = 0.025). A Cox model showed that des-γ-carboxy prothrombin <1000 mAU/mL at enrollment and RT were significant independent predictors of survival in the PS model (P = 0.024, HR, 0.508; 95% CI, 0.282 to 0.915; and P = 0.007, HR, 0.434; 95% CI, 0.235 to 0.779; respectively). Conclusions RT is a better first-line therapy than sorafenib in patients who have advanced unresectable HCC with PVTT. PMID:24886354

  6. Therapeutic options for the management of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Maria L; Rehman, Azeem A; Gondi, Christopher S

    2014-01-01

    Since its initial characterization, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has remained one of the most devastating and difficult cancers to treat. Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, resulting in an estimated 38460 deaths annually. With few screening tools available to detect this disease at an early stage, 94% of patients will die within five years of diagnosis. Despite decades of research that have led to a better understanding of the molecular and cellular signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer cells, few effective therapies have been developed to target these pathways. Other treatment options have included more sophisticated pancreatic cancer surgeries and combination therapies. While outcomes have improved modestly for these patients, more effective treatments are desperately needed. One of the greatest challenges in the future of treating this malignancy will be to develop therapies that target the tumor microenvironment and surrounding pancreatic cancer stem cells in addition to pancreatic cancer cells. Recent advances in targeting pancreatic stellate cells and the stroma have encouraged researchers to shift their focus to the role of desmoplasia in pancreatic cancer pathobiology in the hopes of developing newer-generation therapies. By combining novel agents with current cytotoxic chemotherapies and radiation therapy and personalizing them to each patient based on specific biomarkers, the goal of prolonging a patient’s life could be achieved. Here we review the most effective therapies that have been used for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and discuss the future potential of therapeutic options. PMID:25170201

  7. Adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, ranking 4th among causes for cancer-related death in the Western world including the United States. Surgical resection offers the only chance of cure, but only 15 to 20 percent of cases are potentially resectable at presentation. Different studies demonstrate and confirm that advanced pancreatic cancer is among the most complex cancers to treat and that these tumors are relatively resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Currently there is no consensus around the world on what constitutes “standard” adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer. This controversy derives from several studies, each fraught with its own limitations. Standards of care also vary somewhat with regard to geography and economy, for instance chemo-radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy or vice versa is considered the optimal therapy in North America while chemotherapy alone is the current standard in Europe. Regardless of the efforts in adjuvant and neoadjuvant improved therapy, the major goal to combat pancreatic cancer is to find diagnostic markers, identifying the disease in a pre-metastatic stage and making a curative treatment accessible to more patients. In this review, authors examined the different therapy options for advanced pancreatic patients in recent years and the future directions in adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatments for these patients. PMID:22529684

  8. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goundan, Poorani; Junqueira, Ana; Kelleher-Yassen, Donna; Steenkamp, Devin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature related to the epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, clinical features and treatment of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD). We review the English-language literature on this topic published between 1956 and 2014. FCPD is a form of diabetes usually associated with chronic calcific pancreatitis. It has been predominantly, though not exclusively, described in lean, young adults living in tropical developing countries. Historically linked to malnutrition, the etiology of this phenotype has not been clearly elucidated, nor has there been a clear consensus on specific diagnostic criteria or clinical features. Affected individuals usually present with a long-standing history of abdominal pain, which may begin as early as childhood. Progressive pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunction, consistent with chronic pancreatitis is expected. Common causes of chronic pancreatitis, such as alcohol abuse, are usually absent. Typical radiographic and pathological features include coarse pancreatic calcifications, main pancreatic duct dilation, pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy. Progressive microvascular complications are common, but diabetic ketoacidosis is remarkably unusual. Pancreatic carcinoma is an infrequently described long term complication. FCPD is an uncommon diabetes phenotype characterized by early onset non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency and a striking resistance to ketosis. PMID:26472503

  9. Combined modality preoperative therapy for unresectable rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Percarpio, B; Bitterman, J; Sabbath, K; Alfano, F; Ruszkowski, R; Bowen, J

    1992-01-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer has been a surgical challenge because of fixation of the primary tumor to the boney pelvis or to other pelvic soft tissues. During a 12-month period seven patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum were treated preoperatively with simultaneous pelvic irradiation (4500-5040 cGy) and infusion chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil 1000 mg per m2 per day over 96 hours and mitomycin 10 mg per m2. Tolerance was reasonable and all patients underwent successful resection of the primary lesion. Two patients had a complete response to preoperative combined modality therapy with no cancer found in the surgical specimen. With a short follow-up period, all patients have experienced satisfactory healing and none have suffered local or distant recurrence. The results of this limited series are encouraging for future clinical trials.

  10. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer This page lists cancer ... in pancreatic cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized ...

  11. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  12. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and duodenum. The bile duct and pancreatic duct are also shown. Stage IIA pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby tissue and organs ...

  13. Molecular targets for the treatment of pancreatic cancer: Clinical and experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Tasuku; Yashiro, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Although recent therapeutic developments for patients with pancreatic cancer have provided survival benefits, the outcomes for patients with pancreatic cancer remain unsatisfactory. Molecularly targeted cancer therapy has advanced in the past decade with the use of a number of pathways as candidates of therapeutic targets. This review summarizes the molecular features of this refractory disease while focusing on the recent clinical and experimental findings on pancreatic cancer. It also discusses the data supporting current standard clinical outcomes, and offers conclusions that may improve the management of pancreatic cancer in the future. PMID:26811624

  14. Nutrition in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nompleggi, D J

    1999-08-01

    Pancreatitis is a common disorder. Numerous factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic pancreatitis, but the exact mechanisms of these conditions are still poorly understood. Depending on the cause of the disorder, patients who have pancreatitis are usually not malnourished and are able to eat within 5 to 7 days of disease onset. In these patients, nutritional support is unnecessary. However, severe disease induces a catabolic state similar to that seen in trauma and sepsis, resulting in rapid weight loss and increased morbidity and mortality. Thus, vigorous nutritional support may be useful in the treatment of severe pancreatitis. Studies have shown that parenteral and enteral nutritional support are well tolerated and can maintain or improve nutritional status in patients with pancreatitis. This article reviews nutritional assessment and therapy in pancreatitis.

  15. Optimizing initial chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mantripragada, Kalyan C; Safran, Howard

    2016-05-01

    The two combination chemotherapy regimens FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel represent major breakthroughs in the management of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Both regimens showed unprecedented survival advantage in the setting of front-line therapy. However, their application for treatment of patients in the community is challenging because of significant toxicities, thus limiting potential benefits to a narrow population of patients. Modifications to the dose intensity or schedule of those regimens improve their tolerability, while likely retaining survival advantage over single-agent chemotherapy. Newer strategies to optimize these two active regimens in advanced pancreatic cancer are being explored that can help personalize treatment to individual patients.

  16. Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Patients With Unresectable Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ghafoori, A. Paiman; Nelson, John W.; Willett, Christopher G.; Chino, Junzo; Tyler, Douglas S.; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Uronis, Hope E.; Morse, Michael A.; Clough, Robert W.; Czito, Brian G.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is an uncommon but lethal malignancy. We analyzed the role of definitive chemoradiotherapy for patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma treated at a single institution. Methods and Materials: This retrospective analysis included 37 patients who underwent external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with concurrent chemotherapy and/or brachytherapy (BT) for locally advanced extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) were assessed, and univariate regression analysis was used to evaluate the effects of patient- and treatment-related factors on clinical outcomes. Results: Twenty-three patients received EBRT alone, 8 patients received EBRT plus BT, and 6 patients received BT alone (median follow-up of 14 months). Two patients were alive without evidence of recurrence at the time of analysis. Actuarial OS and LC rates at 1 year were 59% and 90%, respectively, and 22% and 71%, respectively, at 2 years. Two patients lived beyond 5 years without evidence of recurrence. On univariate analysis, EBRT with or without BT improved LC compared to BT alone (97% vs. 56% at 1 year; 75% vs. 56% at 2 years; p = 0.096). Patients who received EBRT alone vs. BT alone also had improved LC (96% vs. 56% at 1 year; 80% vs. 56% at 2 years; p = 0.113). Age, gender, tumor location (proximal vs. distal), histologic differentiation, EBRT dose ({<=} or >50 Gy), EBRT planning method (two-dimensional vs. three-dimensional), and chemotherapy were not associated with patient outcomes. Conclusions: Patients with locally advanced extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma have poor survival. Long-term survival is rare. The majority of patients treated with EBRT had local control at the time of death, suggesting that symptoms due to the local tumor effect might be effectively controlled with radiation therapy, and EBRT is an important element of treatment. Novel treatment approaches are indicated in the therapy

  17. Smoking and Pancreatic Disease.

    PubMed

    Edderkaoui, Mouad; Thrower, Edwin

    2013-11-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the mechanisms through which it causes the diseases remain unknown. In the present manuscript we reviewed the latest knowledge gained on the effect of cigarette smoke and smoking compounds on cell signaling pathways mediating both diseases. We also reviewed the effect of smoking on the pancreatic cell microenvironment including inflammatory cells and stellate cells.

  18. Autoimmune pancreatitis: pathogenesis, latest developments and clinical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Kazushige; Sumimoto, Kimi; Mitsuyama, Toshiyuki; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Takaoka, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Recently, autoimmune pancreatitis has been classified into two subtypes. Type 1 is related to immunoglobulin G4 and type 2 is related to granulocytic epithelial lesions, but pathogenetic mechanisms in both still remain unclear. Apart from type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis, the pathological features of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis with increased serum immunoglobulin G4/immunoglobulin E levels, abundant infiltration of immunoglobulin G4+plasmacytes and lymphocytes, fibrosis, and steroid responsiveness are suggestive of abnormal immunity such as allergy or autoimmunity. Although pathophysiological conditions seem to be different in each, both respond well to steroid drugs. After remission, the patients with type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis show high relapse rates (30–50% within 6–12 months), whereas those with type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis seldom relapse. After remission, the steroid maintenance therapy and therapeutic strategy for relapsing patients with type 1 is different among local expertise. In this paper, recent advances in pathogenesis and clinical guidance for therapy are discussed. PMID:24790726

  19. Genetic factors affecting patient responses to pancreatic cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fotopoulos, George; Syrigos, Konstantinos; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the exocrine pancreas is a malignancy with a high lethal rate. Surgical resection is the only possible curative mode of treatment. Metastatic pancreatic cancer is incurable with modest results from the current treatment options. New genomic information could prove treatment efficacy. An independent review of PubMed and ScienceDirect databases was performed up to March 2016, using combinations of terms such pancreatic exocrine cancer, chemotherapy, genomic profile, pancreatic cancer pharmacogenomics, genomics, molecular pancreatic pathogenesis, and targeted therapy. Recent genetic studies have identified new markers and therapeutic targets. Our current knowledge of pancreatic cancer genetics must be further advanced to elucidate the molecular basis and pathogenesis of the disease, improve the accuracy of diagnosis, and guide tailor-made therapies. PMID:27708512

  20. Role of Vitamin D in the Prevention of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bulathsinghala, Pubudu; Syrigos, Kostas N.; Saif, Muhammad W.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a malignancy of poor prognosis which is mostly diagnosed at advanced stages. Current treatment modalities are very limited creating great interest for novel preventive and therapeutic options. Vitamin D seems to have a protective effect against pancreatic cancer by participating in numerous proapoptotic, antiangiogenic, anti-inflammatory, prodifferentiating, and immunomodulating mechanisms. 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] serum concentrations are currently the best indicator of vitamin D status. There are three main sources of vitamin D: sun exposure, diet,and dietary supplements. Sun exposure has been associated with lower incidence of pancreatic cancer in ecological studies. Increased vitamin D levels seem to protect against pancreatic cancer, but caution is needed as excessive dietary intake may have opposite results. Future studies will verify the role of vitamin D in the prevention and therapy of pancreatic cancer and will lead to guidelines on adequate sun exposure and vitamin D dietary intake. PMID:21274445

  1. Advances of Targeted Therapy in Treatment of Unresectable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suk-young; Oh, Sang Cheul

    2016-01-01

    Despite being one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers worldwide, prognosis of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) was poor. Development and introduction of biologic agents in treatment of patients with metastatic CRC have brought improved outcomes. Monoclonal antibodies directing epidermal growth factor receptors and vascular endothelial growth factor are main biologic agents currently used in treatment of metastatic CRC. Encouraged by results from many clinical trials demonstrating efficacy of those monoclonal antibodies, the combination therapy with those targeted agents and conventional chemotherapeutic agents has been established as the standard therapy for patients with metastatic CRC. However, emergency of resistance to those target agents has limited the efficacy of treatment, and strategies to overcome the resistance are now being investigated by newly developed biological techniques clarifying how to acquire resistance. Here, we introduce mechanisms of action of the biologic agents currently used for treatment of metastatic CRC and several landmark historical clinical studies which have changed the main stream of treatment. The mechanism of resistance to those agents, one of serious problems in treatment metastatic CRC, and ongoing clinical trials to overcome the limitations and improve treatment outcomes will also be presented in this review. PMID:27127793

  2. Ziv-aflibercept in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Unresectable, or Metastatic Gynecologic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Uterine Carcinosarcoma; Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

  3. Cixutumumab and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Unresectable, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Adult Undifferentiated High Grade Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone; Childhood Angiosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Childhood Epithelioid Sarcoma; Childhood Fibrosarcoma; Childhood Leiomyosarcoma; Childhood Liposarcoma; Childhood Malignant Mesenchymoma; Childhood Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Childhood Pleomorphic Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma With Mixed Embryonal and Alveolar Features; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Malignant Adult Hemangiopericytoma; Malignant Childhood Hemangiopericytoma; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma

  4. Novel Therapeutics for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Maeve A; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2015-08-01

    The last decade has seen significant developments in the use of combination systemic therapy for advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), with median survival approaching 1 year for select patients treated with FOLFIRINOX in the metastatic setting. However, it is sobering that these developments have been achieved with the use of traditional cytotoxics rather than from successes in the more modern fields of molecularly targeted therapies or immunotherapy. This article highlights several promising therapeutic approaches to PDAC currently under clinical evaluation, including immune therapies, molecularly targeted therapies, strategies for stromal depletion, and targeted therapy for genetically selected patients.

  5. Intracellular hyperthermia mediated by nanoparticles in radiofrequency fields in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, Evan Scott

    Intracellular hyperthermic therapy may prove to be a unique and novel approach to the management of pancreatic cancer. Utilizing the principle of photothermal destruction, selective killing of cancer cells with minimal injury to normal tissues may be possible. This dissertation investigated the role of antibody targeted metal nanoparticles and the cytotoxic effects of nonionizing radiofrequency fields in pancreatic cancer. Cancer cell death was induced by heat release from intracellular metal nanoparticles after radiofrequency field exposure. Fluorescent and gold nanoparticles were delivered with two antibodies, cetuximab and PAM-4, to pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and mouse xenografts in vivo. Selective delivery of these nanoparticles induced cell death in vitro and decreased tumor burden in vivo after whole animal RF field exposure. This occurred through both apoptosis and necrosis. In addition, activated caspase-3 was increased after antibody treatment and RF field exposure. Furthermore, although there was non-specific uptake by the liver and spleen in vivo, there was no evidence of acute or chronic toxicity in the animals. These results are in agreement with the principle that malignant cells are more thermally sensitive than normal cells or tissues. Selective intracellular delivery of metal nanoparticles coupled with whole body RF field exposure may be a beneficial therapy against micrometastases and unresectable pancreatic cancer in the future. Further studies are planned with more specific antibodies, other nanoparticles, and other cancer targets.

  6. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer: A Disappointing Therapeutic Approach?

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Carolin; Folprecht, Gunnar; Zips, Daniel; Pilarsky, Christian; Saeger, Hans Detlev; Grutzmann, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in Germany. The incidence in 2003/2004 was 16 cases per 100.000 inhabitants. Of all carcinomas, pancreatic cancer has the highest mortality rate, with one- and five-year survival rates of 25% and less than 5%, respectively, regardless of the stage at diagnosis. These low survival rates demonstrate the poor prognosis of this carcinoma. Previous therapeutic approaches including surgical resection combined with adjuvant therapy or palliative chemoradiation have not achieved satisfactory results with respect to overall survival. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate new therapeutic approaches. Neoadjuvant therapy is an interesting therapeutic option for patients with pancreatic cancer. For selected patients with borderline or unresectable disease, neoadjuvant therapy offers the potential for tumor downstaging, increasing the probability of a margin-negative resection and decreasing the occurrence of lymph node metastasis. Currently, there is no universally accepted approach for treating patients with pancreatic cancer in the neoadjuvant setting. In this review, the most common neoadjuvant strategies will be described, compared and discussed. PMID:24212810

  7. Type 1 Autoimmune Pancreatitis Can Transform into Chronic Pancreatitis: A Long-Term Follow-Up Study of 73 Japanese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Arakura, Norikazu; Ozaki, Yayoi; Watanabe, Takayuki; Ito, Tetsuya; Yoneda, Suguru; Maruyama, Masafumi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2013-01-01

    Some patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) form pancreatic stones suggestive of transformation into chronic pancreatitis (CP). The present study examined the underlying risk factors and mechanism of AIP progression to confirmed CP. We compared the clinical and laboratory parameters of subjects who progressed to confirmed CP with those of the subjucts who did not in a cohort of 73 type 1 AIP patients. A total of 16 (22%) AIP patients progressed to CP. Univariate analysis revealed that relapse was significantly more frequent in the progression group, and multivariate analysis indicated that pancreatic head swelling (OR 12.7, P = 0.023) and nonnarrowing of the main pancreatic duct in the pancreatic body (OR 12.6, P = 0.001) were significant independent risk factors for progression to CP. Kaplan-Meier testing showed that the progression rate to CP was approximately 10% at 3 years and 30% at 10 years in total AIP patients and 30% at 3 years and 60% at 10 years in subjects with both risk factors. AIP with pancreatic head swelling and a history of relapse may cause pancreatic juice stagnation and nonnarrowing of the main pancreatic duct in the pancreatic body, which can progress to advanced stage chronic pancreatitis. PMID:23762066

  8. Pathological and Molecular Evaluation of Pancreatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Rishi, Arvind; Goggins, Michael; Wood, Laura D.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neoplasms are morphologically and genetically heterogeneous and include wide variety of neoplasms ranging from benign to malignant with an extremely poor clinical outcome. Our understanding of these pancreatic neoplasms has improved significantly with recent advances in cancer sequencing. Awareness of molecular pathogenesis brings in new opportunities for early detection, improved prognostication, and personalized gene-specific therapies. Here we review the pathological classification of pancreatic neoplasms from their molecular and genetic perspective. All of the major tumor types that arise in the pancreas have been sequenced, and a new classification that incorporates molecular findings together with pathological findings is now possible (Table 1). This classification has significant implications for our understanding of why tumors aggregate in some families, for the development of early detection tests, and for the development of personalized therapies for patients with established cancers. Here we describe this new classification using the framework of the standard histological classification. PMID:25726050

  9. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist.

    PubMed

    Patel, Milan R; Eppolito, Amanda L; Willingham, Field F

    2013-03-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68-81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are also associated with hereditary pancreatitis. While chronic alcoholic pancreatitis may develop in the fourth or fifth decades, patients with hereditary pancreatitis may develop symptoms in the first or second decades of life. Hereditary pancreatitis is diagnosed either by detecting a causative gene mutation or by the presence of chronic pancreatitis in two first-degree or three second-degree relatives, in two or more generations, without precipitating factors and with a negative workup for known causes. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis may have recurrent acute pancreatitis and may develop pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Hereditary pancreatitis may involve premature trypsinogen activation or decreased control of trypsin. Recurrent inflammation can lead to acute pancreatitis and subsequently to chronic pancreatitis with parenchymal calcification. There is a markedly increased risk of pancreatic carcinoma compared with the general population. Patients are often referred for evaluation of pancreatitis, biliary or pancreatic ductal dilatation, jaundice, biliary obstruction, pancreatic duct stone or stricture, pancreatic pseudocysts, and for evaluation for malignancy. Medical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme supplementation, nutritional supplementation, diabetes management, and palliation of pain. Patients should avoid tobacco use and alcohol exposure. Hereditary pancreatitis is reviewed and recommendations for

  10. Dosimetric Analysis of Organs at Risk During Expiratory Gating in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Cullen M.; Murphy, James D.; Eclov, Neville; Atwood, Todd F.; Kielar, Kayla N.; Christman-Skieller, Claudia; Mok, Ed; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To determine how the respiratory phase impacts dose to normal organs during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Eighteen consecutive patients with locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with SBRT were included in this study. On the treatment planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (CT) scan, the planning target volume (PTV), defined as the gross tumor volume plus 3-mm margin, the duodenum, and the stomach were contoured on the end-expiration (CT{sub exp}) and end-inspiration (CT{sub insp}) phases for each patient. A separate treatment plan was constructed for both phases with the dose prescription of 33 Gy in 5 fractions with 95% coverage of the PTV by the 100% isodose line. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) endpoints, volume of duodenum that received 20 Gy (V{sub 20}), V{sub 25}, and V{sub 30} and maximum dose to 5 cc of contoured organ (D{sub 5cc}), D{sub 1cc}, and D{sub 0.1cc}, were evaluated. Results: Dosimetric parameters for the duodenum, including V{sub 25}, V{sub 30}, D{sub 1cc}, and D{sub 0.1cc} improved by planning on the CT{sub exp} compared to those on the CT{sub insp}. There was a statistically significant overlap of the PTV with the duodenum but not the stomach during the CT{sub insp} compared to the CT{sub exp} (0.38 ± 0.17 cc vs 0.01 ± 0.01 cc, P=.048). A larger expansion of the PTV, in accordance with a Danish phase 2 trial, showed even more overlapping volume of duodenum on the CT{sub insp} compared to that on the CT{sub exp} (5.5 ± 0.9 cc vs 3.0 ± 0.8 cc, P=.0003) but no statistical difference for any stomach dosimetric DVH parameter. Conclusions: Dose to the duodenum was higher when treating on the inspiratory than on the expiratory phase. These data suggest that expiratory gating may be preferable to inspiratory breath-hold and free breathing strategies for minimizing risk of toxicity.

  11. Improving Survival of Pancreatic Cancer. What Have We Learnt?

    PubMed

    Singh, Tanveer; Chaudhary, Adarsh

    2015-10-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma still ranks high among cancer-related deaths worldwide. In spite of substantial strides in preoperative staging, surgery, perioperative care, and adjuvant treatment, the survival still remains dismal. A number of patient-, disease-, and surgeon-related factors play a role in deciding the eventual outcome of the patient. The aim of this commentary is to review the current knowledge of various factors and the recent advances that impact the survival of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. A search of scientific literature using Embase and MEDLINE, for the years 1985-2015, was carried out for search terms "pancreatic cancer" and "survival." Further search was based on the various specific prognostic factors that contribute towards survival of patients with pancreatic cancer found in the literature. Most of the studies used for this review include those that deal with pancreatic head cancers, some include patients with pancreatic cancers in all locations while very few included patients with tumors of body and tail only. In spite of significant developments in pre- and perioperative management, increased rates of margin-negative resections, and use of adjuvant treatment, the survival rates of pancreatic cancer patients remains poor. A paradigm shift with more effective adjuvant regimen and genetic interventions may help change the outcomes of patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:26722209

  12. Yttrium-90 Radioembolization for Unresectable Standard-chemorefractory Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Survival, Efficacy, and Safety Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rafi, Shoaib; Piduru, Sarat M.; El-Rayes, Bassel; Kauh, John S.; Kooby, David A.; Sarmiento, Juan M.; Kim, Hyun S.

    2013-04-15

    To assess the overall survival, efficacy, and safety of radioembolization with yttrium-90 (Y90) for unresectable standard-chemorefractory intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). Patients with unresectable standard-chemorefractory ICC treated with Y90 were studied. Survival was calculated from the date of first Y90 procedure. Tumor response was assessed with the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria on follow-up computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scans. National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria (NCI CTCAE), version 3, were used for complications. Statistical analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier estimator by the log rank test. Nineteen patients underwent a total of 24 resin-based Y90 treatments. Median survival from the time of diagnosis and first Y90 procedure was 752 {+-} 193 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 374-1130] and 345 {+-} 128 (95 % CI 95-595) days, respectively. Median survival with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 1 (n = 15) and ECOG performance status 2 (n = 4) was 450 {+-} 190 (95 % CI 78-822) and 345 {+-} 227 (95 % CI 0-790) days, respectively (p = .214). Patients with extrahepatic metastasis (n = 11) had a median survival of 404 {+-} 309 (95 % CI 0-1010) days versus 345 {+-} 117 (95 % CI 115-575) days for patients without metastasis (n = 8) (p = .491). No mortality was reported within 30 days from first Y90 radioembolization. One patient developed grade 3 thrombocytopenia as assessed by NCI CTCAE. Fatigue and transient abdominal pain were observed in 4 (21 %) and 6 (32 %) patients, respectively. Y90 radioembolization is effective for unresectable standard-chemorefractory ICC.

  13. Sorafenib in combination with transarterial chemoembolization and radiofrequency ablation in the treatment for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Zheng, You-Bing; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Bing; Hu, Bao-Shan; He, Xu; Huang, Jian-Wen; Lu, Li-Gong

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess clinical efficacy and safety of sorafenib combined with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Efficacy and safety profiles of sorafenib in combination with TACE and RFA were evaluated based on retrospective data for thirty patients with unresectable HCC. Patients were treated with TACE initially when admitted to hospital, followed by RFA 3 days after TACE. All TACE and RFA were performed by the same team of doctors. Seven days after the first TACE, patients started taking continuous sorafenib 400 mg bid without breaks until unacceptable toxicities or disease progression. The response to treatment, overall survival (OS), time to progression (TTP), and adverse effects were evaluated. The disease control rate was 33.3% by RECIST criteria. The median TTP was 15.3 months (95% CI 4.8-23.5). The median OS was 28.8 months (95% CI 12.8-39.6). At the time of data record, 13 patients (43.3%) were dead. Median OS in patients with or without portal vein thrombosis was 12.3 months (95% CI 7.6-14.5) and 30.2 months (95% CI 24.2-34.5), respectively, P = 0.018. The most common adverse events related to sorafenib were hand-foot skin reaction (53.3%) and diarrhea (33.3%). The combination of sorafenib, TACE, and RFA proved both safe and effective in the treatment for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma patients. PMID:24048774

  14. Sorafenib continuation or discontinuation in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma after a complete response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingqiang; Fan, Wenzhe; Zhu, Kangshun; Lu, Ligong; Fu, Sirui; Huang, Jinhua; Wang, Yu; Yang, Jianyong; Huang, Yonghui; Yao, Wang; Li, Jiaping

    2015-01-01

    Aims To assess the efficacy of continued administration of sorafenib for patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with local regional therapy (LRT) after a complete response (CR), also, the adverse events of sorafenib after discontinuation of administration were observed. Methods Between April 2008 and May 2012, 956 consecutive patients with unresectable HCC treated with LRT (transarterial chemoembolization, radiofrequency ablation) combined with sorafenib were retrospectively investigated. Of these, 157 patients with a CR were enrolled: 102 of them continued to receive sorafenib (test group) and the other 55 stopped receiving sorafenib (control group). Results The median recurrence-free survival (RFS), post-complete response overall survival (pOS) and overall survival (OS) in the test and control groups were 11 months (95% CI: 6.1, 15.9), 25 months (95% CI: 20.7, 29.3) and 33 months (95% CI: 29.2, 36.8) and 12 months (95% CI: 10.4, 13.6), 28 months (95% CI 24.2, 31.8) and 34 months (95% CI: 30.8, 37.2) respectively. The differences in RFS, pOS and OS between the groups were not significant (P = 0.768, 0.797 and 0.730, respectively). The adverse events related to sorafenib resolved after discontinuation of administration and the quality of life (QoL) scores improved. Conclusions Patients with unresectable HCC who achieved a CR did not benefit from continued sorafenib in terms of RFS, pOS or OS. The adverse events of sorafenib were reversible, and discontinuation of sorafenib may improve the QoL of patients who have achieved a CR. PMID:26093084

  15. Phase II Trial of Upfront Bevacizumab, Irinotecan, and Temozolomide for Unresectable Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Emil; Desjardins, Annick; Reardon, David A.; Lipp, Eric S.; Miller, Elizabeth; Herndon, James E.; McSherry, Frances; Friedman, Henry S.; Vredenburgh, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Lessons Learned Trials focusing on unresectable multifocal glioblastoma are needed because of the extremely poor prognosis and challenges in receiving standard therapy, such as concurrent radiation and chemotherapy. Developing a strategy to chemically debulk tumors before radiation and/or surgery is warranted. Background. Extent of resection remains a key prognostic factor in glioblastoma (GBM), with gross total resection providing a better prognosis than biopsy or subtotal resection. We conducted a phase II trial of upfront therapy with bevacizumab (BV), irinotecan (CPT-11), and temozolomide (TMZ) prior to chemoradiation in patients with unresectable, subtotally resected, and/or multifocal GBM. Methods. Patients received up to 4 cycles of TMZ at 200 mg/m2 per day on days 1–5 (standard dosing) and BV at 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks on a 28-day cycle. CPT-11 was given every 2 weeks on a 28-day cycle at 125 mg/m2 or 340 mg/m2 depending on antiepileptic drugs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was done every 4 weeks, and treatment continued as long as there was no tumor progression or unmanageable toxicity. The primary endpoint was tumor response rate, with a goal of 26% or greater. Results. Forty-one patients were enrolled from December 2009 to November 2010. Radiographic responses were as follows: 9 patients (22.0%) had partial respons!e, 25 (61.0%) had stable disease, and 2 (4.9%) had progression; 5 patients were not assessed. Cumulative response rate was 22%. Median overall survival was 12 months (95% confidence interval: 7.2–13.5 months). Conclusion. Upfront treatment with BV, TMZ, and CPT-11 is tolerable and can lead to radiographic response in unresectable and/or subtotally resected GBM. PMID:26025933

  16. [Conversion Therapy of Initially Unresectable Rectal Cancer with Perforation via FOLFOX4 Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Chizu; Ishikawa, Fumihiko; Nitta, Hiroshi; Fujita, Yoshihisa; Omoto, Hideyuki; Kamata, Shigeyuki; Ito, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    We describe a case of perforated rectal cancer that became curatively resectable after FOLFOX4 chemotherapy. An 81- year-old woman was transferred to our hospital with a diagnosis of bowel perforation. She underwent emergency transverse colostomy, peritoneal lavage, and the insertion of indwelling drainage tubes, because the perforated rectal cancer was considered unresectable. After recuperation, she received chemotherapy consisting of FOLFOX4 and bevacizumab. Owing to a good response to the treatment after 4 months, rectal resection was achieved curatively. Wound dehiscence occurred as a postoperative complication. The patient chose not to receive adjuvant chemotherapy. Currently, she has been alive for more than 1 year 3 months after resection without recurrence.

  17. Combination Therapy of Radiofrequency Ablation and Transarterial Chemoembolization for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chengwu; Shen, Jian; Feng, Wenming; Bao, Ying; Dong, Xiaogang; Dai, Yi; Zheng, Yinyuan; Zhang, Jianping

    2016-05-01

    The treatment efficacy of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is still not promising. This study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) combined with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) for unresectable HCC with a single treatment.Between June 2009 and June 2012, 132 patients who were diagnosed with unresectable HCC and accepted nonsurgical treatments in our center were enrolled in this retrospective study. On the basis of treatment modality, they were allocated to 3 groups: 49 patients accepted RFA (RFA group); 43 patients accepted TACE (TACE group); and 40 patients accepted RFA following TACE (combination group). Clinical data including complications, treatment success rate, hospitalization costs, intrahepatic recurrence-free survival, overall survival, and factors influencing survival were retrospectively analyzed.Patient characteristics between these groups showed no significant difference. Treatment success was achieved in all patients of 3 groups. The combination group had a significantly higher total hospitalization cost to treatment than the TACE group (63,708.14 ± 9193.81 Chinese yuan vs 37,534.88 ± 6802.84 Chinese yuan; P = 0.0000). All complications were controllable and no permanent adverse sequelae or procedure-related deaths were observed. The 3-year intrahepatic recurrence-free survival probability was significantly better in the combination group than in the TACE group (42.50% vs 20.93%; hazard ratio [HR], 0.5105; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3022-0.8625; P = 0.0094) or the RFA group (42.50% vs 22.45%; HR, 0.5233; 95% CI, 0.3149-0.8697; P = 0.0111).The 3-year overall survival probability was significantly better in the combination group than in the TACE group (45.00% vs 26.53%; HR, 0.5069; 95% CI, 0.2936-0.8752; P = 0.0100) or the RFA group (45.00% vs 27.91%; HR, 0.4913; 95% CI, 0.2928-0.8246; P = 0.0054). Main tumor size, number of tumors, and treatment modality were

  18. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation of Unresectable Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma (Klatskin Tumor): A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Melenhorst, Marleen C A M; Scheffer, Hester J; Vroomen, Laurien G P H; Kazemier, Geert; van den Tol, M Petrousjka; Meijerink, Martijn R

    2016-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel image-guided ablation technique that is rapidly gaining popularity in the treatment of malignant tumors located near large vessels or bile ducts. The presence of metal objects in the ablation zone, such as Wallstents, is generally considered a contraindication for IRE, because tissue heating due to power conduction may lead to thermal complications. This report describes a 66-year-old female with a Bismuth-Corlette stage IV unresectable cholangiocarcinoma with a metallic Wallstent in the common bile duct, who was safely treated with percutaneous IRE with no signs for relapse 1 year after the procedure.

  19. Current treatment options for patients with initially unresectable isolated colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Kanat, Ozkan

    2016-01-01

    The development of liver metastases is a common clinical entity in the clinical course of colorectal cancer. For patients with isolated liver involvement, surgical resection is the only treatment that can provide a chance of prolonged survival and cure. However, most of these patients are not initially eligible for the surgery. Selected patients with initially considered to have unresectable disease may become resectable after systemic (chemotherapy ± biological therapy) and loco-regional treatment modalities including hepatic arterial infusion. Patients who have colorectal liver metastases ideally should be referred to a multidisciplinary cancer care team in order to identify the most optimal management approach. PMID:26862487

  20. Palliation in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kruse, E James

    2010-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is rarely curable, and because of its location causes significant symptoms for patients in need of palliation. The common problems of incurable pancreatic cancer are biliary obstruction, duodenal obstruction, and pain. Approaches include surgical, endoscopic and radiologic interventions. This article discusses the palliative options and controversies related to these symptoms.

  1. Pancreatitis in cats.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, P Jane; Williams, David A

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatitis was considered a rare disease in the cat until a couple of decades ago when several retrospective studies of severe acute pancreatitis were published. It was apparent that few of the diagnostic tests of value in the dog were helpful in cats. With increasing clinical suspicion, availability of abdominal ultrasonography, and introduction of pancreas-specific blood tests of increasing utility, it is now accepted that acute pancreatitis is probably almost as common in cats as it is in dogs, although the etiology(s) remain more obscure. Pancreatitis in cats often co-exists with inflammatory bowel disease, less commonly with cholangitis, and sometimes with both. Additionally, pancreatitis may trigger hepatic lipidosis, while other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, may be complicated by pancreatitis. Therapy is similar to that used in dogs, with added emphasis on early nutritional support to prevent hepatic lipidosis. Less is known about chronic pancreatitis than the acute form, but chronic pancreatitis is more common in cats than it is in dogs and may respond positively to treatment with corticosteroids.

  2. CFTR: A New Horizon in the Pathomechanism and Treatment of Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Péter; Wilschanski, Michael; Muallem, Shmuel; Lukacs, Gergely L; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Uc, Aliye; Gray, Michael A; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Maléth, József

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ion channel that conducts chloride and bicarbonate ions across epithelial cell membranes. Mutations in the CFTR gene diminish the ion channel function and lead to impaired epithelial fluid transport in multiple organs such as the lung and the pancreas resulting in cystic fibrosis. Heterozygous carriers of CFTR mutations do not develop cystic fibrosis but exhibit increased risk for pancreatitis and associated pancreatic damage characterized by elevated mucus levels, fibrosis, and cyst formation. Importantly, recent studies demonstrated that pancreatitis causing insults, such as alcohol, smoking, or bile acids, strongly inhibit CFTR function. Furthermore, human studies showed reduced levels of CFTR expression and function in all forms of pancreatitis. These findings indicate that impairment of CFTR is critical in the development of pancreatitis; therefore, correcting CFTR function could be the first specific therapy in pancreatitis. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the field and discuss new possibilities for the treatment of pancreatitis. PMID:26856995

  3. Phase II Trial of Cetuximab, Gemcitabine, and Oxaliplatin Followed by Chemoradiation With Cetuximab for Locally Advanced (T4) Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Correlation of Smad4(Dpc4) Immunostaining With Pattern of Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Christopher H.; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Yordy, John S.; Staerkel, Gregg A.; Javle, Milind M.; Safran, Howard; Haque, Waqar; Hobbs, Bridgett D.; Krishnan, Sunil; Fleming, Jason B.; Das, Prajnan; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Wolff, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This phase II trial was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of cetuximab, gemcitabine, and oxaliplatin followed by cetuximab, capecitabine, and radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Patients and Methods Treatment-naive eligible patients (n = 69) received intravenous gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2) and oxaliplatin (100 mg/m2) every 2 weeks for four doses, followed by radiation (50.4 Gy to the gross tumor only) with concurrent capecitabine (825 mg/m2 twice daily on radiation treatment days). Cetuximab (500 mg/m2) was started on day 1 of chemotherapy and was continued every 2 weeks during chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Diagnostic cytology specimens were immunostained for Smad4(Dpc4) expression. Results Median overall survival time was 19.2 months (95% CI, 14.2 to 24.2 months), and 1-year, 2-year, and 4-year actuarial overall survival rates were 66.0%, 25.02%, and 11.3%, respectively. Acneiform rash correlated with improved survival (P = .001), but initial CA19-9, borderline resectable initial stage, and surgical resection (n = 7) did not. The 1-year and 2-year radiographic local progression rates were 22.8% and 61.0%, respectively. The worst acute toxic effects were GI toxicity (32% and 10% for grades 2 and 3, respectively); fatigue (26% and 6% for grades 2 and 3, respectively); sensory neuropathy (9% and 1% for grades 2 and 3, respectively); and acneiform rash (54% and 3% for grades 2 and 3, respectively). Smad4(Dpc4) expression correlated with a local rather than a distant dominant pattern of disease progression (P = .016). Conclusion This regimen appears effective and has acceptable toxicity. The primary end point (1-year overall survival rate > 45%) was met, with encouraging survival duration. Smad4(Dpc4) immunostaining correlated with the pattern of disease progression. Prospective validation of Smad4(Dpc4) expression in cytology specimens as a predictive biomarker is warranted and may lead to personalized treatment

  4. Natural course of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Beger, H G; Rau, B; Mayer, J; Pralle, U

    1997-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis comprises, in terms of clinical, pathologic, biochemical, and bacteriologic data, four entities. Interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis are the most frequent clinical manifestations; pancreatic pseudocyst and pancreatic abscess are late complications after necrotizing pancreatitis, developing after 3 to 5 weeks. Determinants of the natural course of acute pancreatitis are pancreatic parenchymal necrosis, extrapancreatic retroperitoneal fatty tissue necrosis, biologically active compounds in pancreatic ascites, and infection of necrosis. Early in the course of acute pancreatitis multiple organ failure is the consequence of various inflammatory mediators that are released from the inflammatory process and from activated leukocytes attracted by pancreatic injury. During the late course, starting the second week, local and systemic septic complications are dominant. Around 80% of deaths in acute pancreatitis are caused by septic complications. The infection of pancreatic necrosis occurs in 8% to 12% of acute pancreatitis and in 30% to 40% of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. Bacteriologic analysis of intraoperative smears and aspirates reveals predominantly gram-negative germs deriving from the intestine, most frequently Escherichia coli. It has been confirmed that after necrotizing pancreatitis a considerable large group of patients suffer long-lasting exocrine and endocrine insufficiency.

  5. Clinical nutrition in pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    McClave, S A; Snider, H; Owens, N; Sexton, L K

    1997-10-01

    In patients with acute pancreatitis or an acute flare of chronic pancreatitis, a discrepancy exists between increased protein/calorie requirements induced by a hypermetabolic stress state and reduced ingestion/assimilation of exogenous nutrients, which promotes progressive nutritional deterioration. Patients with severe pancreatitis (defined by > or =3 Ranson criteria, an APACHE II score of > or =10, development of major organ failure, and/or presence of pancreatic necrosis) are more likely to require aggressive nutritional support than patients with mild disease. The type of formula and level of the gastrointestinal tract into which nutrients are infused determine the degree to which pancreatic exocrine secretion is stimulated. Animal studies and early prospective randomized controlled trials in humans suggest that total enteral nutrition via jejunal feeding may be the preferred route to parenteral alimentation in this disease setting.

  6. Acute Obstructive Suppurative Pancreatic Ductitis

    PubMed Central

    Palakodeti, Sandeep; Munroe, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Acute obstructive suppurative pancreatic ductitis (AOSPD) is a rare clinical entity defined as suppuration from the pancreatic duct without concomitant pancreatic cyst, abscess, or necrosis. We describe a case of AOSPD in a woman with a past medical history of type 2 diabetes and chronic pancreatitis who presented with abdominal sepsis, which resolved only after therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Our case highlights the importance of considering AOSPD as a cause of abdominal sepsis particularly in patients with chronic pancreatitis or any recent pancreatic duct instrumentation and demonstrates that treatment requires prompt drainage and decompression of the pancreatic duct.

  7. Percutaneous ablation therapies of inoperable pancreatic cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Lucchina, Natalie; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Marco, De Chiara; Bracchi, Elena; Cocozza, Eugenio; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Floridi, Chiara; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2015-01-01

    Initial studies about ablation therapies of the pancreas were associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which limited widespread adoption. Development of techniques with high quality imaging used as guidance improve outcomes reducing complications. Moreover, only few experiences of percutaneous pancreatic ablations are reported. They are performed by very skilled operators in highly specialized centers. This review presents the current status of percutaneous local ablative therapies in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26424487

  8. [Etiological factors of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Spicák, J

    2002-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis develops immediately after the causative impulse, while chronic pancreatitis develops after the long-term action of the noxious agent. A typical representative of acute pancreatitis is biliary pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis develops in alcoholism and has a long latency. As alcoholic pancreatitis is manifested at first as a rule by a potent attack, it is classified in this stage as acute pancreatitis. The most frequent etiological factors in our civilization are thus cholelithiasis and alcoholism (both account for 20-50% in different studies). The assumed pathogenetic principles in acute biliary pancreatitis are the common canal of both efferent ducts above the obturated papilla, duodenopancreatic reflux and intrapancreatic hypertension. A detailed interpretation is however lacking. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is more complicated. Among others some part is played by changes in the calcium concentration and fusion of cellular membranes. Idiopathic pancreatitis occurs in up to 10%, part of the are due to undiagnosed alcoholism and cholelithiasis. Other etiologies are exceptional. Similarly as in cholelithiasis pancreatitis develops also during other pathological processes in the area of the papilla of Vater such as dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi, ampulloma and juxtapapillary diverticulum, it is however usually mild. The incidence of postoperative pancreatitis is declining. Its lethality is 30% and the diagnosis is difficult. In the pathogenesis changes of the ion concentration are involved, hypoxia and mechanical disorders of the integrity of the gland. Pancreatitis develops in association with other infections--frequently in mumps, rarely in hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and mycoses. Viral pancreatitis is usually mild. In parasitoses pancreatitis develops due to a block of the papilla Vateri. In hyperparathyroidism chronic pancreatitis is more likely to develop, recent data are lacking. As to dyslipoproteinaemias

  9. The role of S100 proteins and their receptor RAGE in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Estelle; Vetter, Stefan W

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a devastating disease with low survival rates. Current therapeutic treatments have very poor response rates due to the high inherent chemoresistance of the pancreatic-cancer cells. Recent studies have suggested that the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and its S100 protein ligands play important roles in the progression of PDAC. We will discuss the potential role of S100 proteins and their receptor, RAGE, in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26435083

  10. Theranostic Nanoseeds for Efficacious Internal Radiation Therapy of Unresectable Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Moeendarbari, Sina; Tekade, Rakesh; Mulgaonkar, Aditi; Christensen, Preston; Ramezani, Saleh; Hassan, Gedaa; Jiang, Ruiqian; Öz, Orhan K.; Hao, Yaowu; Sun, Xiankai

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumors are considered “unresectable” if they are adhere to vital structures or the surgery would cause irreversible damages to the patients. Though a variety of cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapies are currently available in clinical practice to treat such tumor masses, these therapeutic modalities are always associated with substantial side effects. Here, we report an injectable nanoparticle-based internal radiation source that potentially offers more efficacious treatment of unresectable solid tumors without significant adverse side effects. Using a highly efficient incorporation procedure, palladium-103, a brachytherapy radioisotope in clinical practice, was coated to monodispersed hollow gold nanoparticles with a diameter about 120 nm, to form 103Pd@Au nanoseeds. The therapeutic efficacy of 103Pd@Au nanoseeds were assessed when intratumorally injected into a prostate cancer xenograft model. Five weeks after a single-dose treatment, a significant tumor burden reduction (>80%) was observed without noticeable side effects on the liver, spleen and other organs. Impressively, >95% nanoseeds were retained inside the tumors as monitored by Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) with the gamma emissions of 103Pd. These findings show that this nanoseed-based brachytherapy has the potential to provide a theranostic solution to unresectable solid tumors. PMID:26852805

  11. Theranostic Nanoseeds for Efficacious Internal Radiation Therapy of Unresectable Solid Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeendarbari, Sina; Tekade, Rakesh; Mulgaonkar, Aditi; Christensen, Preston; Ramezani, Saleh; Hassan, Gedaa; Jiang, Ruiqian; Öz, Orhan K.; Hao, Yaowu; Sun, Xiankai

    2016-02-01

    Malignant tumors are considered “unresectable” if they are adhere to vital structures or the surgery would cause irreversible damages to the patients. Though a variety of cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapies are currently available in clinical practice to treat such tumor masses, these therapeutic modalities are always associated with substantial side effects. Here, we report an injectable nanoparticle-based internal radiation source that potentially offers more efficacious treatment of unresectable solid tumors without significant adverse side effects. Using a highly efficient incorporation procedure, palladium-103, a brachytherapy radioisotope in clinical practice, was coated to monodispersed hollow gold nanoparticles with a diameter about 120 nm, to form 103Pd@Au nanoseeds. The therapeutic efficacy of 103Pd@Au nanoseeds were assessed when intratumorally injected into a prostate cancer xenograft model. Five weeks after a single-dose treatment, a significant tumor burden reduction (>80%) was observed without noticeable side effects on the liver, spleen and other organs. Impressively, >95% nanoseeds were retained inside the tumors as monitored by Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) with the gamma emissions of 103Pd. These findings show that this nanoseed-based brachytherapy has the potential to provide a theranostic solution to unresectable solid tumors.

  12. Metabolic response to feeding in weight-losing pancreatic cancer patients and its modulation by a fish-oil-enriched nutritional supplement.

    PubMed

    Barber, M D; McMillan, D C; Preston, T; Ross, J A; Fearon, K C

    2000-04-01

    Weight-losing patients with advanced cancer often fail to gain weight with conventional nutritional support. This suboptimal response might be explained, in part, by an increased metabolic response to feeding. It has been suggested that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) can modify beneficially the metabolic response to cancer. The aim of the present study was to examine the metabolic response to feeding in cancer and the effects of an EPA-enriched oral food supplement on this response. A total of 16 weight-losing, non-diabetic patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma and six healthy, weight-stable controls were studied by indirect calorimetry in the fasting and fed states. Body composition was estimated by bioimpedence analysis. Cancer patients were then given a fish-oil-enriched nutritional supplement providing 2 g of EPA and 2550 kJ daily, and underwent repeat metabolic study after 3 weeks of such supplementation. At baseline, resting energy expenditure whether expressed per kg body weight, lean body mass or body cell mass was significantly greater in the cancer patients compared with controls. Fat oxidation was significantly higher in the fasting state in cancer patients [median 1.26 g.kg(-1).min(-1) (interquartile range 0.95-1.38)] than in controls [0.76 g.kg(-1). min(-1) (0.62-0.92); P<0.05]. Over the 4 h feeding period, changes in insulin and glucose concentrations in cancer patients suggested relative glucose intolerance. In response to oral meal feeding, the percentage change in the area under the curve of energy expenditure was significantly lower in the cancer patients [median 7.9% (interquartile range 3.4-9.0)] than in controls [12.6% (9.9-15.1); P<0.01]. After 3 weeks of the EPA-enriched supplement, the body weight of the cancer patients had increased and the energy expenditure in response to feeding had risen significantly [9.6% (6. 3-12.4)], such that it was no different from baseline healthy control values. Similarly, fasting fat oxidation fell

  13. Overcoming chemo/radio-resistance of pancreatic cancer by inhibiting STAT3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoqing; Tang, Wenhua; Marquez, Rebecca T.; Li, Ke; Highfill, Chad A.; He, Fengtian; Lian, Jiqin; Lin, Jiayuh; Fuchs, James R.; Ji, Min; Li, Ling; Xu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Chemo/radio-therapy resistance to the deadly pancreatic cancer is mainly due to the failure to kill pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs). Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is activated in pancreatic CSCs and, therefore, may be a valid target for overcoming therapeutic resistance. Here we investigated the potential of STAT3 inhibition in sensitizing pancreatic cancer to chemo/radio-therapy. We found that the levels of nuclear pSTAT3 in pancreatic cancer correlated with advanced tumor grade and poor patient outcome. Liposomal delivery of a STAT3 inhibitor FLLL32 (Lip-FLLL32) inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and STAT3 target genes in pancreatic cancer cells and tumors. Consequently, Lip-FLLL32 suppressed pancreatic cancer cell growth, and exhibited synergetic effects with gemcitabine and radiation treatment in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, Lip-FLLL32 reduced ALDH1-positive CSC population and modulated several potential stem cell markers. These results demonstrate that Lip-FLLL32 suppresses pancreatic tumor growth and sensitizes pancreatic cancer cells to radiotherapy through inhibition of CSCs in a STAT3-dependent manner. By targeting pancreatic CSCs, Lip-FLLL32 provides a novel strategy for pancreatic cancer therapy via overcoming radioresistance. PMID:26887043

  14. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kakushima, Naomi; Takizawa, Kohei; Tanaka, Masaki; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis that is increasingly being reported. The presentation and clinical image findings of AIP sometimes resemble those of several pancreatic malignancies, but the therapeutic strategy differs appreciably. Therefore, accurate diagnosis is necessary for cases of AIP. To date, AIP is classified into two distinct subtypes from the viewpoints of etiology, serum markers, histology, other organ involvements, and frequency of relapse: type 1 is related to IgG4 (lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis) and type 2 is related to a granulocytic epithelial lesion (idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis). Both types of AIP are characterized by focal or diffuse pancreatic enlargement accompanied with a narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, and both show dramatic responses to corticosteroid. Unlike type 2, type 1 is characteristically associated with increasing levels of serum IgG4 and positive serum autoantibodies, abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasmacytes, frequent extrapancreatic lesions, and relapse. These findings have led several countries to propose diagnostic criteria for AIP, which consist of essentially similar diagnostic items; however, several differences exist for each country, mainly due to differences in the definition of AIP and the modalities used to diagnose this disease. An attempt to unite the diagnostic criteria worldwide was made with the publication in 2011 of the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP, established at the 2010 Congress of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP). PMID:25469024

  15. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  16. Autoimmune pancreatitis and cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Niraj; Buxbaum, James

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is part of a systemic fibrosclerotic process characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with immunoglobulin G subtype-4 (IgG4) positive cells. It characteristically presents with biliary obstruction due to mass-like swelling of the pancreas. Frequently AIP is accompanied by extra-pancreatic manifestations including retroperitoneal fibrosis, thyroid disease, and salivary gland involvement. Auto-antibodies, hypergammaglobulemia, and prompt resolution of pancreatic and extrapancreatic findings with steroids signify its autoimmune nature. Refractory cases are responsive to immunomodulators and rituximab. Involvement of the biliary tree, termed IgG4 associated cholangiopathy, mimics primary sclerosing cholangitis and is challenging to manage. High IgG4 levels and swelling of the pancreas with a diminutive pancreatic duct are suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. Given similarities in presentation but radical differences in management and outcome, differentiation from pancreatic malignancy is of paramount importance. There is controversy regarding the optimal diagnostic criterion and steroid trials to make the diagnosis. Additionally, the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas and requirement for histologic sampling, makes tissue acquisition challenging. Recently, a second type of autoimmune pancreatitis has been recognized with similar clinical presentation and steroid response though different histology, serologic, and extrapancreatic findings. PMID:26558153

  17. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  18. Revised Atlanta Classification for Acute Pancreatitis: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Foster, Bryan R; Jensen, Kyle K; Bakis, Gene; Shaaban, Akram M; Coakley, Fergus V

    2016-01-01

    The 2012 revised Atlanta classification is an update of the original 1992 Atlanta classification, a standardized clinical and radiologic nomenclature for acute pancreatitis and associated complications based on research advances made over the past 2 decades. Acute pancreatitis is now divided into two distinct subtypes, necrotizing pancreatitis and interstitial edematous pancreatitis (IEP), based on the presence or absence of necrosis, respectively. The revised classification system also updates confusing and sometimes inaccurate terminology that was previously used to describe pancreatic and peripancreatic collections. As such, use of the terms acute pseudocyst and pancreatic abscess is now discouraged. Instead, four distinct collection subtypes are identified on the basis of the presence of pancreatic necrosis and time elapsed since the onset of pancreatitis. Acute peripancreatic fluid collections (APFCs) and pseudocysts occur in IEP and contain fluid only. Acute necrotic collections (ANCs) and walled-off necrosis (WON) occur only in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis and contain variable amounts of fluid and necrotic debris. APFCs and ANCs occur within 4 weeks of disease onset. After this time, APFCs or ANCs may either resolve or persist, developing a mature wall to become a pseudocyst or a WON, respectively. Any collection subtype may become infected and manifest as internal gas, though this occurs most commonly in necrotic collections. In this review, the authors present a practical image-rich guide to the revised Atlanta classification system, with the goal of fostering implementation of the revised system into radiology practice, thereby facilitating accurate communication among clinicians and reinforcing the radiologist's role as a key member of a multidisciplinary team in treating patients with acute pancreatitis. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  19. Fatal Pancreatic Panniculitis Associated with Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Sun; Kim, Mi Yeon; Kim, Sang Woo; Paik, Chang Nyol; Kim, Hyung Ok

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare disease in which necrosis of fat in the panniculus and other distant foci occurs in the setting of pancreatic diseases; these diseases include acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, pseudocyst, and other pancreatic diseases. This malady is manifested as tender erythematous nodules on the legs, buttock, or trunk. Histopathologically, it shows the pathognomonic findings of focal subcutaneous fat necrosis and ghost-like anucleated cells with a thick shadowy wall. We herein report a case of fatal pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with acute pancreatitis in a 50-yr-old man. He presented with a 3-week history of multiple tender skin nodules, abdominal pain and distension. Laboratory and radiologic findings revealed acute pancreatitis, and skin biopsy showed pancreatic panniculitis. Despite intensive medical care, he died of multi-organ failure 3 weeks after presentation. PMID:17982246

  20. Familial pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Klein, A P; Hruban, R H; Brune, K A; Petersen, G M; Goggins, M

    2001-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States and will be responsible for an estimated 28,900 deaths in 2001. Relatively little is known of its etiology, and the only well-established risk factor is cigarette smoking. Studies over the past 3 decades have shown that 4%-16% of patients with pancreatic cancer have a family history of the disease. A small fraction of this aggregation can be accounted for in inherited cancer syndromes, including familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, hereditary breast-ovarian cancer, hereditary pancreatitis, and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. These syndromes arise as a result of germline mutations in the BRCA2, pl6 (familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma), mismatch repair (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer), and STK11 (Peutz-Jeghers syndrome) genes. In addition, hereditary plays a role in predisposing certain patients with apparently sporadic pancreatic cancer. Many patients with pancreatic cancers caused by a germline mutation in a cancer-causing gene do not have a pedigree that is suggestive of a familial cancer syndrome. A recent prospective analysis of the pedigrees in the National Familial Pancreatic Tumor Registry found that individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer in multiple first-degree relatives have a high risk of pancreatic cancer themselves. The identification of such high-risk individuals will help clinicians target screening programs and develop preventive interventions with the hope of reducing the mortality of pancreatic cancer in these families.

  1. [Primary pancreatic plasmacytoma].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Acevedo, Z; Pomares Rey, B; Alpera Tenza, M R; Andrada Becerra, E

    2014-01-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytomas are uncommon malignant plasma cell tumors that present outside the bone marrow; 80% of extramedullary plasmacytomas are located in the upper respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal plasmacytomas are rare. We present the case of an asymptomatic 65-year-old man in whom a pancreatic mass was found incidentally. The lesion was determined to be a pancreatic plasmacytoma after fine-needle aspiration cytology and surgical resection. No clinical, laboratory, or imaging findings indicative of multiple myeloma or association with other plasmacytomas were found, so the tumor was considered to be a primary pancreatic plasmacytoma. PMID:22738942

  2. Surgical Approaches to Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Daniel; Friess, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease resulting in permanent structural damage of the pancreas. It is mainly characterized by recurring epigastric pain and pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, progression of the disease might lead to additional complications, such as pseudocyst formation or development of pancreatic cancer. The medical and surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis has changed significantly in the past decades. With regard to surgical management, pancreatic head resection has been shown to be a mainstay in the treatment of severe chronic pancreatitis because the pancreatic head mass is known to trigger the chronic inflammatory process. Over the years, organ-preserving procedures, such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection and the pylorus-preserving Whipple, have become the surgical standard and have led to major improvements in pain relief, preservation of pancreatic function, and quality of life of patients. PMID:26681935

  3. Long-term results of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy for nonmetastatic locally advanced pancreatic cancer: Retrospective cohort study, 7-year experience with 247 patients at the National Cancer Center in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingtai; Che, Xu; Zhang, Jianwei; Huang, Huang; Zhao, Dongbing; Tian, Yantao; Li, Yexiong; Feng, Qinfu; Zhang, Zhihui; Jiang, Qinglong; Zhang, Shuisheng; Tang, Xiaolong; Huang, Xianghui; Chu, Yunmian; Zhang, Jianghu; Sun, Yuemin; Zhang, Yawei; Wang, Chengfeng

    2016-09-01

    To assess prognostic benefits of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy (IOERT) in patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and evaluate optimal adjuvant treatment after IOERT.A retrospective cohort study using prospectively collected data was conducted at the Cancer Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, China National Cancer Center.Two hundred forty-seven consecutive patients with nonmetastatic LAPC who underwent IOERT between January 2008 and May 2015 were identified and included in the study. Overall survival (OS) was calculated from the day of IOERT. Prognostic factors were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year actuarial survival rates were 40%, 14%, and 7.2%, respectively, with a median OS of 9.0 months. On multivariate analysis, an IOERT applicator diameter < 6 cm (hazards ratio [HR], 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47-0.97), no intraoperative interstitial sustained-release 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.32-0.66), and receipt of postoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy (HR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.04-0.25) were significantly associated with improved OS. Pain relief after IOERT was achieved in 111 of the 117 patients, with complete remission in 74 and partial remission in 37. Postoperative complications rate and mortality were 14.0% and 0.4%, respectively. Nonmetastatic LAPC patients with smaller size tumors could achieve positive long-term survival outcomes with a treatment strategy incorporating IOERT and postoperative adjuvant treatment.Chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy might be a recommended adjuvant treatment strategy for well-selected cases. Intraoperative interstitial sustained-release 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy should not be recommended for patients with nonmetastatic LAPC. PMID:27661028

  4. Pancreatic cancer surgery: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Griffin, James F; Poruk, Katherine E; Wolfgang, Christopher L

    2015-08-01

    The history of pancreatic cancer surgery, though fraught with failure and setbacks, is punctuated by periods of incremental progress dependent upon the state of the art and the mettle of the surgeons daring enough to attempt it. Surgical anesthesia and the aseptic techniques developed during the latter half of the 19(th) century were instrumental in establishing a viable setting for pancreatic surgery to develop. Together, they allowed for bolder interventions and improved survival through the post-operative period. Surgical management began with palliative procedures to address biliary obstruction in advanced disease. By the turn of the century, surgical pioneers such as Alessandro Codivilla and Walther Kausch were demonstrating the technical feasibility of pancreatic head resections and applying principles learned from palliation to perform complicated anatomical reconstructions. Allen O. Whipple, the namesake of the pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), was the first to take a systematic approach to refining the procedure. Perhaps his greatest contribution was sparking a renewed interest in the surgical management of periampullary cancers and engendering a community of surgeons who advanced the field through their collective efforts. Though the work of Whipple and his contemporaries legitimized PD as an accepted surgical option, it was the establishment of high-volume centers of excellence and a multidisciplinary approach in the later decades of the 20(th) century that made it a viable surgical option. Today, pancreatic surgeons are experimenting with minimally invasive surgical techniques, expanding indications for resection, and investigating new methods for screening and early detection. In the future, the effective management of pancreatic cancer will depend upon our ability to reliably detect the earliest cancers and precursor lesions to allow for truly curative resections. PMID:26361403

  5. Pancreatic cancer surgery: past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Poruk, Katherine E.

    2015-01-01

    The history of pancreatic cancer surgery, though fraught with failure and setbacks, is punctuated by periods of incremental progress dependent upon the state of the art and the mettle of the surgeons daring enough to attempt it. Surgical anesthesia and the aseptic techniques developed during the latter half of the 19th century were instrumental in establishing a viable setting for pancreatic surgery to develop. Together, they allowed for bolder interventions and improved survival through the post-operative period. Surgical management began with palliative procedures to address biliary obstruction in advanced disease. By the turn of the century, surgical pioneers such as Alessandro Codivilla and Walther Kausch were demonstrating the technical feasibility of pancreatic head resections and applying principles learned from palliation to perform complicated anatomical reconstructions. Allen O. Whipple, the namesake of the pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), was the first to take a systematic approach to refining the procedure. Perhaps his greatest contribution was sparking a renewed interest in the surgical management of periampullary cancers and engendering a community of surgeons who advanced the field through their collective efforts. Though the work of Whipple and his contemporaries legitimized PD as an accepted surgical option, it was the establishment of high-volume centers of excellence and a multidisciplinary approach in the later decades of the 20th century that made it a viable surgical option. Today, pancreatic surgeons are experimenting with minimally invasive surgical techniques, expanding indications for resection, and investigating new methods for screening and early detection. In the future, the effective management of pancreatic cancer will depend upon our ability to reliably detect the earliest cancers and precursor lesions to allow for truly curative resections. PMID:26361403

  6. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... age at the time of diagnosis is 71. Gender Men are slightly more likely to develop pancreatic ... of these syndromes can be found by genetic testing. For more information on genetic testing, see Can ...

  7. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden inflammation of the pancreas manifested clinically by abdominal pain, nausea and dehydration that is usually self-limiting ... room for evaluation should they develop any abnormal abdominal pain symptoms. Conclusions While a rare event, acute pancreatitis ...

  8. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Common symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. However, not every patient with ... help the pancreas to recover. Patients who have abdominal pain can be treated with pain medications. Some patients ...

  9. What Is Pancreatic Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... very important to distinguish between exocrine and endocrine cancers of the pancreas. They have distinct risk factors and causes, have ... are by far the most common type of pancreas cancer. If you are told you have pancreatic cancer, ...

  10. Nutrition support in pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Marulendra, S; Kirby, D F

    1995-04-01

    Nutrition support in patients with pancreatitis has created a challenge for clinicians. Because the pancreas is normally stimulated by the ingestion of food, particularly fat, patients are often denied oral nutrition. This reduction in the ingestion of food, together with the increased metabolic demands of this disease, often results in a negative energy balance and occasionally undernutrition or malnutrition. This review summarizes the etiologies and methods for staging pancreatitis, the physiology of pancreatic exocrine secretion and the response of the pancreas to different methods of nutrition support. The results of clinical trials, which examine both parenteral and enteral nutrition in animals and humans with this disease, are reviewed. Recommendations for nutrition management of patients with acute and chronic pancreatitis and areas for future research are discussed.

  11. Management of necrotizing pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Slavin, John; Ghaneh, Paula; Sutton, Robert; Hartley, Mark; Rowlands, Peter; Garvey, Conall; Hughes, Mark; Neoptolemos, John

    2001-01-01

    Infection complicating pancreatic necrosis leads to persisting sepsis, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and accounts for about half the deaths that occur following acute pancreatitis. Severe cases due to gallstones require urgent endoscopic sphincterotomy. Patients with pancreatic necrosis should be followed with serial contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) and if infection is suspected fine needle aspiration of the necrotic area for bacteriology (FNAB) should be undertaken. Treatment of sterile necrosis should initially be non-operative. In the presence of infection necrosectomy is indicated. Although traditionally this has been by open surgery, minimally invasive procedures are a promising new alternative. There are many unresolved issues in the management of pancreatic necrosis. These include, the use of antibiotic prophylaxis, the precise indications for and frequency of repeat CE-CT and FNAB, and the role of enteral feeding. PMID:11819813

  12. Surgery for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the abdomen. The surgeon can look at the pancreas and other organs for tumors and take biopsy ... pancreatic cancers appear to be confined to the pancreas at the time they are found. Even then, ...

  13. Pancreatic enzyme pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ferrone, Marcus; Raimondo, Massimo; Scolapio, James S

    2007-06-01

    Supplemental pancreatic enzyme preparations are provided to patients with conditions of pancreatic exocrine deficiency such as chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis. These patients frequently experience steatorrhea, which occurs from inadequate fat absorption. The delivery of sufficient enzyme concentrations into the duodenal lumen simultaneously with meals can reduce nutrient malabsorption, improve the symptoms of steatorrhea, and in some cases alleviate the pain associated with chronic pancreatitis. Current clinical practices dictate administration of lipase 25,000-40,000 units/meal by using pH-sensitive pancrelipase microspheres, along with dosage increases, compliance checks, and differential diagnosis in cases of treatment failure. Despite the large number of specialty enzyme replacements available commercially, many patients remain dissatisfied with standard therapy, and future developments are needed to optimize treatment in these individuals.

  14. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... allo-transplantation?" For each pancreatic islet allo-transplant infusion, researchers use specialized enzymes to remove islets from ... in a lab. Transplant patients typically receive two infusions with an average of 400,000 to 500, ...

  15. Cytokines and acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Brady, M; Christmas, S; Sutton, R; Neoptolemos, J; Slavin, J

    1999-07-01

    Cytokines have been shown to play a pivotal role in multiple organ dysfunction, a major cause of death in severe acute pancreatitis. Moreover, the two-hit hypothesis of the cytokine-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome explains the variable individual response to severe acute pancreatitis and the impact of secondary events such as sepsis or therapeutic intervention. Many experimental anti-cytokine therapies have been administered following induction of experimental pancreatitis, and have proved to be therapeutic. Patients with severe pancreatitis present early because of pain. Clearly then a window for therapeutic intervention is available between onset of symptoms and peak pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. It is this fundamental observation that convinces many in the field that the treatment of AP will be one of the first clinical successes for novel drugs or therapy that seek to modulate the inflammatory response.

  16. Perspectives in Pancreatic Pain

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    This review describes some of the mechanisms which are thought to be important in the causation of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Both medical and surgical techniques for treating this pain are described. PMID:9298380

  17. [Hereditary aspects of pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Bak, Daniel; Sobczyńska-Tomaszewska, Agnieszka; Bal, Jerzy

    2003-01-01

    Pancreatitis presents clinically as acute and chronic form. A common characteristic of these two forms is enzymatic autodigestion of pancreas in the course of the disease. It results from premature activation of pancreatic digestive enzymes and disturbance of subtle balance between proteolytic enzymes and their inhibitors. The way to understand the character of mechanisms leading to development of pancreatitis has been simplified by discovery of genetic factors, which are able to initiate pathological changes at tissue level. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene (first of all R122H and N29I mutations), which encodes for cationic trypsin, cause trypsin to be protected from autodegradation. These mutations also cause precursor of trypsin - trypsinogen, to be activated easier. On the other hand mutations in the SPINK1 gene have been identified. SPINK1 gene encodes for the most important protease inhibitor of the pancreatic fluid. The most frequent mutation, namely N34S, decrease SPINK1 protein in its activity. The link between the genotype and phenotype is not clear in every case. It is probable that pancreatitis will be recognized as poligenic with many genes engaged in the disease development. Pancreatic cancer is a frequent consequence of pancreatitis. It is a very invasive cancer with high mortality. In the course of pancreatic inflammation intensive cell proliferation takes place for regeneration of pancreas damage. It is the chance for amplification of pathological changes in DNA, which have arisen as a ROS's (Reactive Oxygen Species) and RNOS's (Reactive Nitrogen Oxide Species) action effect. ROS and RNOS are generated in the course of pancreas inflammation.

  18. Pancreatic cancer: systemic combination therapies for a heterogeneous disease.

    PubMed

    Melisi, Davide; Calvetti, Lorenzo; Frizziero, Melissa; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the only human malignancy for which patients' survival has not improved substantially during the past 30 years. Despite advances in the comprehension of the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic carcinogenesis, current systemic treatments offer only a modest benefit in tumor-related symptoms and survival. Over the past decades, gemcitabine and its combination with other standard cytotoxic agents have been the reference treatments for advanced pancreatic cancer patients. The recent introduction of the three-drug combination regimen FOLFIRINOX or the new taxane nab-paclitaxel represent key advances for a better control of the disease. Novel agents targeting molecular mechanisms involved in cancer development and maintenance are currently under clinical investigation. This review describes the most important findings in the field of systemic combination therapies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. We discuss the emerging evidences for the clinical activity of combination treatments with standard chemotherapy plus novel agents targeting tumor cell-autonomous and tumor microenvironment signaling pathways. We present some of the most important advances in the comprehension of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer and the emerging therapeutic targets to overcome this resistance.

  19. KISS1 over-expression suppresses metastasis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in a xenograft mouse model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identifying molecular targets for treatment of pancreatic cancer metastasis is critical due to the high frequency of dissemination prior to diagnosis of this lethal disease. Because the KISS1 metastasis suppressor is expressed at reduced levels in advanced pancreatic cancer, we hypothesized that re-...

  20. Tropical chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Barman, K; Premalatha, G; Mohan, V

    2003-01-01

    Tropical chronic pancreatitis (TCP) is a juvenile form of chronic calcific non-alcoholic pancreatitis, seen almost exclusively in the developing countries of the tropical world. The classical triad of TCP consists of abdominal pain, steatorrhoea, and diabetes. When diabetes is present, the condition is called fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) which is thus a later stage of TCP. Some of the distinctive features of TCP are younger age at onset, presence of large intraductal calculi, more aggressive course of the disease, and a high susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic calculi are the hallmark for the diagnosis of TCP and in non-calcific cases ductal dilation on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, computed tomography, or ultrasound helps to identify the disease. Diabetes is usually quite severe and of the insulin requiring type, but ketosis is rare. Microvascular complications of diabetes occur as frequently as in type 2 diabetes but macrovascular complications are uncommon. Pancreatic enzyme supplements are used for relief of abdominal pain and reducing the symptoms related to steatorrhoea. Early diagnosis and better control of the endocrine and exocrine dysfunction could help to ensure better survival and improve the prognosis and quality of life of TCP patients. PMID:14654569

  1. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Kara L; Willingham, Field F

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life) and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. PMID:27555793

  2. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Kara L; Willingham, Field F

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life) and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. PMID:27555793

  3. Nutrition in pancreatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Meier, Rémy F; Beglinger, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    The pancreas plays a major role in nutrient digestion. Therefore, in both acute and chronic pancreatitis, exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency can develop, impairing digestive and absorptive processes. These changes can lead to malnutrition over time. In parallel to these changes, decreased caloric intake and increased metabolic activity are often present. Nutritional deficiencies negatively affect outcome if they are not treated. Nutritional assessment and the clinical severity of the disease are important for planning any nutritional intervention. In severe acute pancreatitis, enteral nutrition with a naso-jejunal feeding tube and a low molecular diet displays clear advantages compared to parenteral nutrition. Infectious complications, length of hospital stay and the need for surgery are reduced. Furthermore, enteral nutrition is less costly than parenteral nutrition. Parenteral nutrition is reserved for patients who do not tolerate enteral nutrition. Abstinence from alcohol, dietary modifications and pancreatic enzyme supplementation is sufficient in over 80% of patients with chronic pancreatitis. In addition, oral supplements are helpful. Enteral nutrition can be necessary if weight loss continues. Parenteral nutrition is very seldom used in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  4. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Kara L; Willingham, Field F

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life) and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy.

  5. TARGETED THERAPIES FOR PANCREATIC CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Danovi, S A; Wong, H H; Lemoine, N R

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic cancer is a devastating malignancy and a leading cause of cancer mortality. Furthermore, early diagnosis represents a serious hurdle for clinicians as symptoms are non-specific and usually manifest in advanced, treatment-resistant stages of the disease. Sources of data Here, we review the rationale and progress of targeted therapies currently under investigation. Areas of agreement At present, chemoradiation regimes are administered palliatively, and produce only marginal survival benefits, underscoring a desperate need for more effective treatment modalities. Areas of controversy Questions have been raised as to whether erlotinib, the only targeted therapy to attain a statistically significant increase in median survival, is cost-effective. Growing points The last decade of research has provided us with a wealth of information regarding the molecular nature of pancreatic cancer, leading to the identification of signalling pathways and their respective components which are critical for the maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Areas timely for developing research These proteins thus represent ideal targets for novel molecular therapies which embody an urgently needed novel treatment strategy. PMID:18753179

  6. Acute pancreatitis at the beginning of the 21st century: The state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Tonsi, Alfredo F; Bacchion, Matilde; Crippa, Stefano; Malleo, Giuseppe; Bassi, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas which can lead to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome with significant morbidity and mortality in 20% of patients. Gallstones and alcohol consumption are the most frequent causes of pancreatitis in adults. The treatment of mild acute pancreatitis is conservative and supportive; however severe episodes characterized by necrosis of the pancreatic tissue may require surgical intervention. Advanced understanding of the pathology, and increased interest in assessment of disease severity are the cornerstones of future management strategies of this complex and heterogeneous disease in the 21st century. PMID:19554647

  7. Early Detection of Sporadic Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kenner, Barbara J.; Chari, Suresh T.; Cleeter, Deborah F.; Go, Vay Liang W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Innovation leading to significant advances in research and subsequent translation to clinical practice is urgently necessary in early detection of sporadic pancreatic cancer. Addressing this need, the Early Detection of Sporadic Pancreatic Cancer Summit Conference was conducted by Kenner Family Research Fund in conjunction with the 2014 American Pancreatic Association and Japan Pancreas Society Meeting. International interdisciplinary scientific representatives engaged in strategic facilitated conversations based on distinct areas of inquiry: Case for Early Detection: Definitions, Detection, Survival, and Challenges; Biomarkers for Early Detection; Imaging; and Collaborative Studies. Ideas generated from the summit have led to the development of a Strategic Map for Innovation built upon 3 components: formation of an international collaborative effort, design of an actionable strategic plan, and implementation of operational standards, research priorities, and first-phase initiatives. Through invested and committed efforts of leading researchers and institutions, philanthropic partners, government agencies, and supportive business entities, this endeavor will change the future of the field and consequently the survival rate of those diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. PMID:25938853

  8. Pharmacological pain management in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Olesen, Søren S; Juel, Jacob; Graversen, Carina; Kolesnikov, Yuri; Wilder-Smith, Oliver HG; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2013-01-01

    Intense abdominal pain is a prominent feature of chronic pancreatitis and its treatment remains a major clinical challenge. Basic studies of pancreatic nerves and experimental human pain research have provided evidence that pain processing is abnormal in these patients and in many cases resembles that seen in neuropathic and chronic pain disorders. An important ultimate outcome of such aberrant pain processing is that once the disease has advanced and the pathophysiological processes are firmly established, the generation of pain can become self-perpetuating and independent of the initial peripheral nociceptive drive. Consequently, the management of pain by traditional methods based on nociceptive deafferentation (e.g., surgery and visceral nerve blockade) becomes difficult and often ineffective. This novel and improved understanding of pain aetiology requires a paradigm shift in pain management of chronic pancreatitis. Modern mechanism based pain treatments taking into account altered pain processing are likely to increasingly replace invasive therapies targeting the nociceptive source, which should be reserved for special and carefully selected cases. In this review, we offer an overview of the current available pharmacological options for pain management in chronic pancreatitis. In addition, future options for pain management are discussed with special emphasis on personalized pain medicine and multidisciplinarity. PMID:24259960

  9. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  10. "CAMP" combination chemotherapy for unresectable non-oat cell bronchogenic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lad, T; Sarma, P R; Diekamp, U; Tichler, T; Chawla, M; Krauss, S; Zawila, P; Nelson, R

    1979-01-01

    Experience with camp chemotherapy of 84 unresectable non-oat cell lung cancer patients is described. Fourteen (27%) of 51 patients with measurable lesions responded (3 CR, 11 PR) for a median response duration of 5 months with a range of 1 to 19+ months. Median survival of responders was 370 days, but response was not independent of performance status. Survival of patients without measurable lesions was less favorable than that of even nonresponders, suggesting prediction of response to CAMP by site of metastasis. Preliminary results of a randomized prospective trial of the CAMP combination versus CCNU as a single agent for patients with good performance status fail to show a difference in survival.

  11. Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Survival in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yixiang; Tao, Min; Jia, Xiaoyan; Xu, Hong; Chen, Kai; Tang, Hongwei; Li, Donghui

    2015-01-01

    Concurrent diabetes has been linked with an increased risk of death in many cancers, but findings in pancreatic cancer have been inconsistent. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effect of diabetes on survival in patients with pancreatic cancer. Of 4, 463 original articles, 41 were included in the review; 29 studies with 33 risk estimates were included in the meta-analysis. In the overall comparison of patients with pancreatic cancer and diabetes with their nondiabetic counterparts, the former had significantly higher all-cause mortality (pooled HR: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.04–1.22). Subgroup analyses showed that diabetes was associated with poor survival in patients with resectable disease (HR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.15–1.63) but not in those with unresectable disease (HR: 1.07; 95% CI: 0.89–1.29). The HR (95% CI) was 1.52 (1.20–1.93) for patients with new-onset diabetes (≤2 years of diabetes duration) and 1.22 (0.83–1.80) for those with longstanding diabetes (>2 years). Diabetes was associated with higher mortality overall in patients with pancreatic cancer. The effect of diabetes on overall survival was associated with the stages of tumor and the duration of diabetes. PMID:26598798

  12. [The epidemiology of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2010-10-31

    Pancreatic cancer is a relatively uncommon tumor, but even with early diagnosis, mortality rates are high, explaining why this form of cancer has now become a common cause of cancer mortality. There are no screening tests for early detection of pancreatic cancer. It is more common in men than women and is predominantly a disease of elderly people. There is wide variation in the incidence of pancreatic cancer around the world, suggesting that environmental factors are important in the pathogenesis. Smoking is the major known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, while dietary factors seem to be less important. Other possible risk factors include chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Numerous inherited germ line mutations are associated with pancreatic cancer. Of these, hereditary pancreatitis confers the greatest risk, while BRCA2 mutations are the commonest inherited disorder. Polymorphisms in genes that control detoxification of environmental carcinogens and metabolic pathways may alter the risk of pancreatic cancer.

  13. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  14. Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Krishna, S.V.S.; Lakhtakia, Sandeep; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis). Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson's disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis. PMID:24083160

  15. Pancreatic trauma: A concise review

    PubMed Central

    Debi, Uma; Kaur, Ravinder; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Sinha, Anindita; Singh, Kartar

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the pancreas is rare and difficult to diagnose. In contrast, traumatic injuries to the liver, spleen and kidney are common and are usually identified with ease by imaging modalities. Pancreatic injuries are usually subtle to identify by different diagnostic imaging modalities, and these injuries are often overlooked in cases with extensive multiorgan trauma. The most evident findings of pancreatic injury are post-traumatic pancreatitis with blood, edema, and soft tissue infiltration of the anterior pararenal space. The alterations of post-traumatic pancreatitis may not be visualized within several hours following trauma as they are time dependent. Delayed diagnoses of traumatic pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of pancreatic injuries because early recognition of the disruption of the main pancreatic duct is important. We reviewed our experience with the use of various imaging modalities for diagnosis of blunt pancreatic trauma. PMID:24379625

  16. Percutaneous Hepatic Perfusion (PHP) with Melphalan as a Treatment for Unresectable Metastases Confined to the Liver.

    PubMed

    de Leede, Eleonora M; Burgmans, Mark C; Martini, Christian H; Tijl, Fred G J; van Erkel, Arian R; Vuyk, Jaap; Kapiteijn, Ellen; Verhoef, Cornelis; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L

    2016-01-01

    Unresectable liver metastases of colorectal cancer can be treated with systemic chemotherapy, aiming to limit the disease, extend survival or turn unresectable metastases into resectable ones. Some patients however, suffer from side effects or progression under systemic treatment. For patients with metastasized uveal melanoma there are no standard systemic therapy options. For patients without extrahepatic disease, isolated liver perfusion (IHP) may enable local disease control with limited systemic side effects. Previously, this was performed during open surgery with satisfying results, but morbidity and mortality related to the open procedure, prohibited a widespread application. Therefore, percutaneous hepatic perfusion (PHP) with simultaneous chemofiltration was developed. Besides decreasing morbidity and mortality, this procedure can be repeated, hopefully leading to a higher response rate and improved survival (by local control of disease). During PHP, catheters are placed in the proper hepatic artery, to infuse the chemotherapeutic agent, and in the inferior caval vein to aspirate the chemosaturated blood returning through the hepatic veins. The caval vein catheter is a double balloon catheter that prohibits leakage into the systemic circulation. The blood returning from the hepatic veins is aspirated through the catheter fenestrations and then perfused through an extra-corporeal filtration system. After filtration, the blood is returned to the patient by a third catheter in the right internal jugular vein. During PHP a high dose of melphalan is infused into the liver, which is toxic and would lead to life threatening complications when administered systemically. Because of the significant hemodynamic instability resulting from the combination of caval vein occlusion and chemofiltration, hemodynamic monitoring and hemodynamic support is of paramount importance during this complex procedure. PMID:27501370

  17. Percutaneous Hepatic Perfusion (PHP) with Melphalan as a Treatment for Unresectable Metastases Confined to the Liver.

    PubMed

    de Leede, Eleonora M; Burgmans, Mark C; Martini, Christian H; Tijl, Fred G J; van Erkel, Arian R; Vuyk, Jaap; Kapiteijn, Ellen; Verhoef, Cornelis; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L

    2016-07-31

    Unresectable liver metastases of colorectal cancer can be treated with systemic chemotherapy, aiming to limit the disease, extend survival or turn unresectable metastases into resectable ones. Some patients however, suffer from side effects or progression under systemic treatment. For patients with metastasized uveal melanoma there are no standard systemic therapy options. For patients without extrahepatic disease, isolated liver perfusion (IHP) may enable local disease control with limited systemic side effects. Previously, this was performed during open surgery with satisfying results, but morbidity and mortality related to the open procedure, prohibited a widespread application. Therefore, percutaneous hepatic perfusion (PHP) with simultaneous chemofiltration was developed. Besides decreasing morbidity and mortality, this procedure can be repeated, hopefully leading to a higher response rate and improved survival (by local control of disease). During PHP, catheters are placed in the proper hepatic artery, to infuse the chemotherapeutic agent, and in the inferior caval vein to aspirate the chemosaturated blood returning through the hepatic veins. The caval vein catheter is a double balloon catheter that prohibits leakage into the systemic circulation. The blood returning from the hepatic veins is aspirated through the catheter fenestrations and then perfused through an extra-corporeal filtration system. After filtration, the blood is returned to the patient by a third catheter in the right internal jugular vein. During PHP a high dose of melphalan is infused into the liver, which is toxic and would lead to life threatening complications when administered systemically. Because of the significant hemodynamic instability resulting from the combination of caval vein occlusion and chemofiltration, hemodynamic monitoring and hemodynamic support is of paramount importance during this complex procedure.

  18. FOLFOX-4 Chemotherapy for Patients With Unresectable or Relapsed Peritoneal Pseudomyxoma

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Claudia; Fanetti, Giuseppe; Iacovelli, Roberto; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Ricchini, Francesca; Deraco, Marcello; Perrone, Federica; Baratti, Dario; Kusamura, Shigeki; Tamborini, Elena; Castano, Alessandra; Consonni, Paola Valentina; Bossi, Ilaria; Gavazzi, Cecilia; Milione, Massimo; Pelosi, Giuseppe; de Braud, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The standard treatment of peritoneal pseudomyxoma is based on cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). The establishment of newer systemic treatments is an unmet clinical need for unresectable or relapsed peritoneal pseudomyxoma. The aim of our study was to assess the activity of chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX-4 regimen) in terms of response rate in this subset of patients. Materials and Methods. Patients were included in a single-center, observational study and treated with FOLFOX-4 administered every 2 weeks for up to 12 cycles or until progressive disease or unacceptable toxicity. Results. Twenty consecutive patients were reviewed from July 2011 to September 2013. Only partial responses were observed, with an objective response rate of 20%. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 8 months and 26 months, respectively. Two patients were able to undergo laparotomy with complete cytoreduction and HIPEC in one case. Safety data for FOLFOX-4 were consistent with the literature. By means of a mutant enriched polymerase chain reaction, KRAS mutation was found in 16 of 19 cases (84%), and MGMT promoter methylation was found in 8 (42%, all KRAS mutant). Conclusion. FOLFOX-4 chemotherapy is tolerable and active in patients with peritoneal pseudomyxoma when disease is deemed unresectable or relapsed after peritonectomy and HIPEC. The identification of predictive biomarkers, such as KRAS for resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies and MGMT for response to temozolomide, is a priority for the development of evidence-based treatment strategies for peritoneal pseudomyxoma. PMID:24951608

  19. Transarterial Infusion Chemotherapy Using Cisplatin-Lipiodol Suspension With or Without Embolization for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Aikata, Hiroshi Takaki, Shintaro; Katamura, Yoshio; Hiramatsu, Akira; Waki, Koji; Takahashi, Shoichi; Hieda, Masashi; Toyota, Naoyuki; Ito, Katsuhide; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2009-07-15

    We evaluate the long-term prognosis and prognostic factors in patients treated with transarterial infusion chemotherapy using cisplatin-lipiodol (CDDP/LPD) suspension with or without embolization for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Study subjects were 107 patients with HCC treated with repeated transarterial infusion chemotherapy alone using CDDP/LPD (adjusted as CDDP 10mg/LPD 1ml). The median number of transarterial infusion procedures was two (range, one to nine), the mean dose of CDDP per transarterial infusion chemotherapy session was 30 mg (range, 5.0-67.5 mg), and the median total dose of transarterial infusion chemotherapy per patient was 60 mg (range, 10-390 mg). Survival rates were 86% at 1 year, 40% at 3 years, 20% at 5 years, and 16% at 7 years. For patients with >90% LPD accumulation after the first transarterial infusion chemotherapy, rates were 98% at 1 year, 60% at 3 years, and 22% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis identified >90% LPD accumulation after the first transarterial infusion chemotherapy (p = 0.001), absence of portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT; p < 0.001), and Child-Pugh class A (p = 0.012) as independent determinants of survival. Anaphylactic shock was observed in two patients, at the fifth transarterial infusion chemotherapy session in one and the ninth in the other. In conclusion, transarterial infusion chemotherapy with CDDP/LPD appears to be a useful treatment option for patients with unresectable HCC without PVTT and in Child-Pugh class A. LPD accumulation after the first transarterial infusion chemotherapy is an important prognostic factor. Careful consideration should be given to the possibility of anaphylactic shock upon repeat infusion with CDDP/LPD.

  20. Pathophysiology of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Pagano, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a recently discovered form of pancreatitis and represents one of the diseases of the pancreas which can be cured and healed medically. International consensus diagnostic criteria have been developed, and the clinical phenotypes associated with the histopathologic patterns of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis and idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis should be referred to as type 1 and type 2 AIP, respectively. Most importantly, in type 1 AIP, the pancreatic manifestations are associated with other extrapancreatic disorders, resembling an immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease. In addition, the pancreas of a patient with AIP is often infiltrated by various types of immune cells; the cluster of differentiation (CD) 4 or CD8 T lymphocytes and IgG4-bearing plasma cells have been found in the pancreatic parenchyma and other involved organs in AIP and factors regulating T-cell function may influence the development of AIP. From a genetic point of view, it has also been reported that DRB1*0405 and DQB1*0401 mutations are significantly more frequent in patients with AIP when compared to those with chronic calcifying pancreatitis, and that only DQB1*0302 had a significant association with the relapse of AIP. Finally, it has been found that the polymorphic genes encoding cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, a key negative regulator of the T-cell immune response, are associated with AIP in a Chinese population. Even if these data are not concordant, it is possible that physiological IgG4 responses are induced by prolonged antigen exposure and controlled by type 2 helper T cells. We reviewed the current concepts regarding the pathophysiology of this intriguing disease, focusing on the importance of the humoral and cellular immune responses. PMID:24891971

  1. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  2. [Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Huguet, F; Mornex, F; Orthuon, A

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the use of radiation therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer is subject to discussion. In adjuvant setting, the standard treatment is 6 months of chemotherapy with gemcitabine and capecitabine. Chemoradiation (CRT) may improve the survival of patients with incompletely resected tumors (R1). This should be confirmed by a prospective trial. Neoadjuvant CRT is a promising treatment especially for patients with borderline resectable tumors. For patients with locally advanced tumors, there is no a standard. An induction chemotherapy followed by CRT for non-progressive patients reduces the rate of local relapse. Whereas in the first trials of CRT large fields were used, the treated volumes have been reduced to improve tolerance. Tumor movements induced by breathing should be taken in account. Intensity modulated radiation therapy allows a reduction of doses to the organs at risk. Whereas widely used, this technique is not recommended. PMID:27523418

  3. [Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Huguet, F; Mornex, F; Orthuon, A

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the use of radiation therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer is subject to discussion. In adjuvant setting, the standard treatment is 6 months of chemotherapy with gemcitabine and capecitabine. Chemoradiation (CRT) may improve the survival of patients with incompletely resected tumors (R1). This should be confirmed by a prospective trial. Neoadjuvant CRT is a promising treatment especially for patients with borderline resectable tumors. For patients with locally advanced tumors, there is no a standard. An induction chemotherapy followed by CRT for non-progressive patients reduces the rate of local relapse. Whereas in the first trials of CRT large fields were used, the treated volumes have been reduced to improve tolerance. Tumor movements induced by breathing should be taken in account. Intensity modulated radiation therapy allows a reduction of doses to the organs at risk. Whereas widely used, this technique is not recommended.

  4. Clinical pancreatic disorder I: Acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Andrén-Sandberg, Ake

    2011-07-01

    The Annual American Pancreas Club is an important event for communicating around clinical pancreatic disorders, just as the European, Japanese, Indian, and the International Pancreatic association. Even though the meeting is only 1½ day there were 169 different abstracts and a "How do I do it session." Among all these abstracts on the pancreas there are some real pearls, but they are almost always well hidden, never highlighted - all abstracts are similarly presented - and will too soon be forgotten. The present filing of the abstracts is one way (not the way) to get the pancreatic abstracts a little more read and a little more remembered - and perhaps a little more cited. It should also be understood that most of the abstracts are short summaries of hundreds of working hours (evenings, nights, weekends, holidays, you name them …) in the laboratory or in the clinic, often combined with blood, sweat and tears. The authors should be shown at least some respect, and their abstracts should not only be thought of as "just another little abstract" - and the best respect they can be shown are that they will be remembered to be another brick in our scientific wall.Now the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011 are gathered and filed with the aim to give them a larger audience than they have had in their original abstract book. However, it is obvious that most of clinical fellows do not have time to read all the abstracts. For them I have made a "clinical highlight section" of 10 percent of all the pancreatic abstracts. If someone else should have done some collection of abstract, there should probably have been other selections, but as this is not the case, the editor's choices are the highlighted ones.The article as series I of clinical highlight section is present, and more series will be present in the following issues. If readers will remember some of the abstracts better after reading this "abstract of abstracts", it was worth the efforts - and without

  5. SU-E-J-07: A Functional MR Protocol for the Pancreatic Tumor Delineation

    SciTech Connect

    Andreychenko, A; Heerkens, H; Meijer, G; Vulpen, M van; Lagendijk, J; Berg, C van den

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic cancer is one of the cancers with the poorest survival prognosis. At the time of diagnosis most of pancreatic cancers are unresectable and those patients can be treated by radiotherapy. Radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer is limited due to uncertainties in CT-based delineations. MRI provides an excellent soft tissue contrast. Here, an MR protocol is developed to improve delineations for radiotherapy treatment of pancreatic cancer. In a later stage this protocol can also be used for on-line visualization of the pancreas during MRI guided treatments. Methods: Nine pancreatic cancer patients were included. The MR protocol included T2 weighted(T2w), T1 weighted(T1w), diffusion weighted(DWI) and dynamic contrast enhanced(DCE) techniques. The tumor was delineated on T2w and T1w MRI by an experienced radiation oncologist. Healthy pancreas or pancreatitis (assigned by the oncologist based on T2w) areas were also delineated. Apparent diffusion coefficient(ADC), and area under the curve(AUC)/time to peak(TTP) maps were obtained from DWI and DCE scans, respectively. Results: A clear demarcation of tumor area was visible on b800 DWI images in 5 patients. ADC maps of those patients characterized tumor as an area with restricted water diffusion. Tumor delineations based on solely DCE were possible in 7 patients. In 6 of those patients AUC maps demonstrated tumor heterogeneity: a hypointense area with a hyperintense ring. TTP values clearly discriminated the tumor and the healthy pancreas but could not distinguish tumor and the pancreatitis accurately. Conclusion: MR imaging results in a more pronounced tumor contrast than contrast enhanced CT. The addition of quantitative, functional MRI provides valuable, additional information to the radiation oncologist on the spatial tumor extent by discriminating tumor from the healthy pancreas(TTP, DWI) and characterizing the tumor(ADC). Our findings indicate that tumor delineation in pancreatic cancer can greatly

  6. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis

    PubMed Central

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-01-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis (HPA) was described as a clinical entity from Kashmir, India in 1985. HPA is caused by invasion and migration of nematode, Ascaris lumbricoides, in to the biliary tract and pancreatic duct. Patients present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholecystitis, hepatic abscesses and acute pancreatitis. Ascarides traverse the ducts repeatedly, get trapped and die, leading to formation of hepatolithiasis. HPA is ubiquitous in endemic regions and in Kashmir, one such region, HPA is the etiological factor for 36.7%, 23%, 14.5% and 12.5% of all biliary diseases, acute pancreatitis, liver abscesses and biliary lithiasis respectively. Ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic tool in visualizing worms in gut lumen and ductal system. The rational treatment for HPA is to give appropriate treatment for clinical syndromes along with effective anthelmintic therapy. Endotherapy in HPA is indicated if patients continue to have symptoms on medical therapy or when worms do not move out of ductal lumen by 3 wk or die within the ducts. The worms can be removed from the ductal system in most of the patients and such patients get regression of symptoms of hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease. PMID:27672273

  7. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis.

    PubMed

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-09-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis (HPA) was described as a clinical entity from Kashmir, India in 1985. HPA is caused by invasion and migration of nematode, Ascaris lumbricoides, in to the biliary tract and pancreatic duct. Patients present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholecystitis, hepatic abscesses and acute pancreatitis. Ascarides traverse the ducts repeatedly, get trapped and die, leading to formation of hepatolithiasis. HPA is ubiquitous in endemic regions and in Kashmir, one such region, HPA is the etiological factor for 36.7%, 23%, 14.5% and 12.5% of all biliary diseases, acute pancreatitis, liver abscesses and biliary lithiasis respectively. Ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic tool in visualizing worms in gut lumen and ductal system. The rational treatment for HPA is to give appropriate treatment for clinical syndromes along with effective anthelmintic therapy. Endotherapy in HPA is indicated if patients continue to have symptoms on medical therapy or when worms do not move out of ductal lumen by 3 wk or die within the ducts. The worms can be removed from the ductal system in most of the patients and such patients get regression of symptoms of hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease. PMID:27672273

  8. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis

    PubMed Central

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-01-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis (HPA) was described as a clinical entity from Kashmir, India in 1985. HPA is caused by invasion and migration of nematode, Ascaris lumbricoides, in to the biliary tract and pancreatic duct. Patients present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholecystitis, hepatic abscesses and acute pancreatitis. Ascarides traverse the ducts repeatedly, get trapped and die, leading to formation of hepatolithiasis. HPA is ubiquitous in endemic regions and in Kashmir, one such region, HPA is the etiological factor for 36.7%, 23%, 14.5% and 12.5% of all biliary diseases, acute pancreatitis, liver abscesses and biliary lithiasis respectively. Ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic tool in visualizing worms in gut lumen and ductal system. The rational treatment for HPA is to give appropriate treatment for clinical syndromes along with effective anthelmintic therapy. Endotherapy in HPA is indicated if patients continue to have symptoms on medical therapy or when worms do not move out of ductal lumen by 3 wk or die within the ducts. The worms can be removed from the ductal system in most of the patients and such patients get regression of symptoms of hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease.

  9. The Different Faces of the Pancreatic Islet.

    PubMed

    Abdulreda, Midhat H; Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Cabrera, Over; Caicedo, Alejandro; Berggren, Per-Olof

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients who receive pancreatic islet transplant experience significant improvement in their quality-of-life. This comes primarily through improved control of blood sugar levels, restored awareness of hypoglycemia, and prevention of serious and potentially life-threatening diabetes-associated complications, such as kidney failure, heart and vascular disease, stroke, nerve damage, and blindness. Therefore, beta cell replacement through transplantation of isolated islets is an important option in the treatment of T1D. However, lasting success of this promising therapy depends on durable survival and efficacy of the transplanted islets, which are directly influenced by the islet isolation procedures. Thus, isolating pancreatic islets with consistent and reliable quality is critical in the clinical application of islet transplantation.Quality of isolated islets is important in pre-clinical studies as well, as efforts to advance and improve clinical outcomes of islet transplant therapy have relied heavily on animal models ranging from rodents, to pigs, to nonhuman primates. As a result, pancreatic islets have been isolated from these and other species and used in a variety of in vitro or in vivo applications for this and other research purposes. Protocols for islet isolation have been somewhat similar across species, especially, in mammals. However, given the increasing evidence about the distinct structural and functional features of human and mouse islets, using similar methods of islet isolation may contribute to inconsistencies in the islet quality, immunogenicity, and experimental outcomes. This may also contribute to the discrepancies commonly observed between pre-clinical findings and clinical outcomes. Therefore, it is prudent to consider the particular features of pancreatic islets from different species when optimizing islet isolation protocols.In this chapter, we explore the structural and functional features of pancreatic islets from

  10. Ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging improves the staging of pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Trede, M; Rumstadt, B; Wendl, K; Gaa, J; Tesdal, K; Lehmann, K J; Meier-Willersen, H J; Pescatore, P; Schmoll, J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This prospective study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of a noninvasive "all-in-one" staging method in predicting surgical resectability in patients with pancreatic or periampullary tumors. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Despite progress in imaging techniques, accurate staging and correct prediction of resectability remains one of the chief problems in the management of pancreatic tumors. Staging algorithms designed to separate operable from inoperable patients to save the latter an unnecessary laparotomy are becoming increasingly complex, expensive, time-consuming, invasive, and not without risks for the patient. METHODS: Between August 1996 and February 1997, 58 consecutive patients referred for operation of a pancreatic or periampullary tumor were examined clinically and by 5 staging methods: 1) percutaneous ultrasonography (US); 2) ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging (UMRI); 3) dual-phase helical computed tomography (CT); 4) selective visceral angiography; and 5) endoscopic cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). The assessment of resectability by each procedure was verified by surgical exploration and histologic examination. RESULTS: The study comprised 40 male and 18 female patients with a median age of 63 years. Thirty-five lesions were located in the pancreatic head (60%), 11 in the body (19%), and 1 in the tail of the gland (2%); there were 9 tumors of the ampulla (16%) and 2 of the distal common duct (3%). All five staging methods were completed in 36 patients. For reasons ranging from metallic implants to contrast medium allergy or because investigations already had been performed elsewhere, US was completed in 57 (98%), UMRI in 54 (93%), CT in 49 (84%), angiography in 48 (83%), and ERCP in 49 (84%) of these 58 patients. Signs of unresectability found were vascular involvement in 22 (38%), extrapancreatic tumor spread in 16 (26%), liver metastases in 10 (17%), lymph node involvement in 6 (10%), and peritoneal nodules in only 2 patients (3%). These

  11. Dosimetric and clinical toxicity comparison of critical organ preservation with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and RapidArc for the treatment of locally advanced cancer of the pancreatic head

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Wang, R.; Jiang, S.; Yue, J.; Liu, T.; Dou, X.; Zhu, K.; Feng, R.; Xu, X.; Chen, D.; Yin, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compared dosimetry and clinical toxicity for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-crt), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (imrt), and RapidArc (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, U.S.A.) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (lapcc). We hypothesized that the technique with better sparing of organs at risk (oars) and better target dose distributions could lead to decreased clinical toxicity. Methods The study analyzed 280 patients with lapcc who had undergone radiotherapy. The dosimetry comparison was performed using 20 of those patients. Dose–volume histograms for the target volume and the oars were compared. The clinical toxicity comparison used the 280 patients who received radiation with 3D-crt, imrt, or RapidArc. Results Compared with 3D-crt, RapidArc and imrt both achieved a better conformal index, homogeneity index, V95%, and V110%. Compared with 3D-crt or imrt, RapidArc reduced the V10, V20, and mean dose to duodenum, the V20 of the right kidney, and the liver mean dose. Compared with 3D-crt, RapidArc reduced the V35, and V45 of duodenum, the mean dose to small bowel, and the V15 of right kidney. The incidences of grades 3 and 4 diarrhea (p = 0.037) and anorexia (p = 0.042) were lower