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Sample records for advanced uracil-excision dna

  1. Chimeras between single-stranded DNA-binding proteins from Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveal that their C-terminal domains interact with uracil DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Handa, P; Acharya, N; Varshney, U

    2001-05-18

    Uracil, a promutagenic base in DNA can arise by spontaneous deamination of cytosine or incorporation of dUMP by DNA polymerase. Uracil is removed from DNA by uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG), the first enzyme in the uracil excision repair pathway. We recently reported that the Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) facilitated uracil excision from certain structured substrates by E. coli UDG (EcoUDG) and suggested the existence of interaction between SSB and UDG. In this study, we have made use of the chimeric proteins obtained by fusion of N- and C-terminal domains of SSBs from E. coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis to investigate interactions between SSBs and UDGs. The EcoSSB or a chimera containing its C-terminal domain interacts with EcoUDG in a binary (SSB-UDG) or a ternary (DNA-SSB-UDG) complex. However, the chimera containing the N-terminal domain from EcoSSB showed no interactions with EcoUDG. Thus, the C-terminal domain (48 amino acids) of EcoSSB is necessary and sufficient for interaction with EcoUDG. The data also suggest that the C-terminal domain (34 amino acids) of MtuSSB is a predominant determinant for mediating its interaction with MtuUDG. The mechanism of how the interactions between SSB and UDG could be important in uracil excision repair pathway has been discussed.

  2. Analysis of the impact of a uracil DNA glycosylase attenuated in AP-DNA binding in maintenance of the genomic integrity in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Varshney, Umesh

    2010-01-01

    Uracil DNA glycosylase (Ung) initiates the uracil excision repair pathway. We have earlier characterized the Y66W and Y66H mutants of Ung and shown that they are compromised by ∼7- and ∼170-fold, respectively in their uracil excision activities. In this study, fluorescence anisotropy measurements show that compared with the wild-type, the Y66W protein is moderately compromised and attenuated in binding to AP-DNA. Allelic exchange of ung in Escherichia coli with ung::kan, ungY66H:amp or ungY66W:amp alleles showed ∼5-, ∼3.0- and ∼2.0-fold, respectively increase in mutation frequencies. Analysis of mutations in the rifampicin resistance determining region of rpoB revealed that the Y66W allele resulted in an increase in A to G (or T to C) mutations. However, the increase in A to G mutations was mitigated upon expression of wild-type Ung from a plasmid borne gene. Biochemical and computational analyses showed that the Y66W mutant maintains strict specificity for uracil excision from DNA. Interestingly, a strain deficient in AP-endonucleases also showed an increase in A to G mutations. We discuss these findings in the context of a proposal that the residency of DNA glycosylase(s) onto the AP-sites they generate shields them until recruitment of AP-endonucleases for further repair. PMID:20056657

  3. A unique uracil-DNA binding protein of the uracil DNA glycosylase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Pau Biak; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan; Patil, Aravind Goud; Woo, Eui-Jeon; Varshney, Umesh

    2015-01-01

    Uracil DNA glycosylases (UDGs) are an important group of DNA repair enzymes, which pioneer the base excision repair pathway by recognizing and excising uracil from DNA. Based on two short conserved sequences (motifs A and B), UDGs have been classified into six families. Here we report a novel UDG, UdgX, from Mycobacterium smegmatis and other organisms. UdgX specifically recognizes uracil in DNA, forms a tight complex stable to sodium dodecyl sulphate, 2-mercaptoethanol, urea and heat treatment, and shows no detectable uracil excision. UdgX shares highest homology to family 4 UDGs possessing Fe-S cluster. UdgX possesses a conserved sequence, KRRIH, which forms a flexible loop playing an important role in its activity. Mutations of H in the KRRIH sequence to S, G, A or Q lead to gain of uracil excision activity in MsmUdgX, establishing it as a novel member of the UDG superfamily. Our observations suggest that UdgX marks the uracil-DNA for its repair by a RecA dependent process. Finally, we observed that the tight binding activity of UdgX is useful in detecting uracils in the genomes. PMID:26304551

  4. DNA Methyltransferase Activity Assays: Advances and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Poh, Wan Jun; Wee, Cayden Pang Pee; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases), a family of enzymes that catalyse the methylation of DNA, have a profound effect on gene regulation. A large body of evidence has indicated that DNA MTase is potentially a predictive biomarker closely associated with genetic disorders and genetic diseases like cancer. Given the attention bestowed onto DNA MTases in molecular biology and medicine, highly sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity is essential in determining gene regulation, epigenetic modification, clinical diagnosis and therapeutics. Conventional techniques such as isotope labelling are effective, but they often require laborious sample preparation, isotope labelling, sophisticated equipment and large amounts of DNA, rendering them unsuitable for uses at point-of-care. Simple, portable, highly sensitive and low-cost assays are urgently needed for DNA MTase activity screening. In most recent technological advances, many alternative DNA MTase activity assays such as fluorescent, electrochemical, colorimetric and chemiluminescent assays have been proposed. In addition, many of them are coupled with nanomaterials and/or enzymes to significantly enhance their sensitivity. Herein we review the progress in the development of DNA MTase activity assays with an emphasis on assay mechanism and performance with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. It is hoped that this article will provide a broad coverage of DNA MTase activity assays and their latest developments and open new perspectives toward the development of DNA MTase activity assays with much improved performance for uses in molecular biology and clinical practice.

  5. DNA Methyltransferase Activity Assays: Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Wan Jun; Wee, Cayden Pang Pee; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases), a family of enzymes that catalyse the methylation of DNA, have a profound effect on gene regulation. A large body of evidence has indicated that DNA MTase is potentially a predictive biomarker closely associated with genetic disorders and genetic diseases like cancer. Given the attention bestowed onto DNA MTases in molecular biology and medicine, highly sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity is essential in determining gene regulation, epigenetic modification, clinical diagnosis and therapeutics. Conventional techniques such as isotope labelling are effective, but they often require laborious sample preparation, isotope labelling, sophisticated equipment and large amounts of DNA, rendering them unsuitable for uses at point-of-care. Simple, portable, highly sensitive and low-cost assays are urgently needed for DNA MTase activity screening. In most recent technological advances, many alternative DNA MTase activity assays such as fluorescent, electrochemical, colorimetric and chemiluminescent assays have been proposed. In addition, many of them are coupled with nanomaterials and/or enzymes to significantly enhance their sensitivity. Herein we review the progress in the development of DNA MTase activity assays with an emphasis on assay mechanism and performance with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. It is hoped that this article will provide a broad coverage of DNA MTase activity assays and their latest developments and open new perspectives toward the development of DNA MTase activity assays with much improved performance for uses in molecular biology and clinical practice. PMID:26909112

  6. Advances in forensic DNA quantification: a review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Steven B; McCord, Bruce; Buel, Eric

    2014-11-01

    This review focuses upon a critical step in forensic biology: detection and quantification of human DNA from biological samples. Determination of the quantity and quality of human DNA extracted from biological evidence is important for several reasons. Firstly, depending on the source and extraction method, the quality (purity and length), and quantity of the resultant DNA extract can vary greatly. This affects the downstream method as the quantity of input DNA and its relative length can determine which genotyping procedure to use-standard short-tandem repeat (STR) typing, mini-STR typing or mitochondrial DNA sequencing. Secondly, because it is important in forensic analysis to preserve as much of the evidence as possible for retesting, it is important to determine the total DNA amount available prior to utilizing any destructive analytical method. Lastly, results from initial quantitative and qualitative evaluations permit a more informed interpretation of downstream analytical results. Newer quantitative techniques involving real-time PCR can reveal the presence of degraded DNA and PCR inhibitors, that provide potential reasons for poor genotyping results and may indicate methods to use for downstream typing success. In general, the more information available, the easier it is to interpret and process the sample resulting in a higher likelihood of successful DNA typing. The history of the development of quantitative methods has involved two main goals-improving precision of the analysis and increasing the information content of the result. This review covers advances in forensic DNA quantification methods and recent developments in RNA quantification.

  7. Advanced DNA assembly technologies in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Tsvetanova, Billyana; Peng, Lansha; Liang, Xiquan; Li, Ke; Hammond, Linda; Peterson, Todd C; Katzen, Federico

    2012-05-01

    Recombinant DNA technologies have had a fundamental impact on drug discovery. The continuous emergence of unique gene assembly techniques resulted in the generation of a variety of therapeutic reagents such as vaccines, cancer treatment molecules and regenerative medicine precursors. With the advent of synthetic biology there is a growing need for precise and concerted assembly of multiple DNA fragments of various sizes, including chromosomes. In this article, we summarize the highlights of the recombinant DNA technology since its inception in the early 1970s, emphasizing on the most recent advances, and underscoring their principles, advantages and shortcomings. Current and prior cloning trends are discussed in the context of sequence requirements and scars left behind. Our opinion is that despite the remarkable progress that has enabled the generation and manipulation of very large DNA sequences, a better understanding of the cell's natural circuits is needed in order to fully exploit the current state-of-the-art gene assembly technologies.

  8. DNA sequencing by nanopores: advances and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agah, Shaghayegh; Zheng, Ming; Pasquali, Matteo; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2016-10-01

    Developing inexpensive and simple DNA sequencing methods capable of detecting entire genomes in short periods of time could revolutionize the world of medicine and technology. It will also lead to major advances in our understanding of fundamental biological processes. It has been shown that nanopores have the ability of single-molecule sensing of various biological molecules rapidly and at a low cost. This has stimulated significant experimental efforts in developing DNA sequencing techniques by utilizing biological and artificial nanopores. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the nanopore sequencing field with a focus on the nature of nanopores and on sensing mechanisms during the translocation. Current challenges and alternative methods are also discussed.

  9. What Advances Are Being Made in DNA Sequencing?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of DNA building blocks (nucleotides) in an individual's genetic code, called DNA sequencing, has advanced the study of ... a breakthrough that helped scientists determine the human genetic code, but it is time-consuming and expensive. The ...

  10. Advancing taxonomy and bioinventories with DNA barcodes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Scott E; Hausmann, Axel; Hallwachs, Winnie; Janzen, Daniel H

    2016-09-05

    We use three examples-field and ecology-based inventories in Costa Rica and Papua New Guinea and a museum and taxonomic-based inventory of the moth family Geometridae-to demonstrate the use of DNA barcoding (a short sequence of the mitochondrial COI gene) in biodiversity inventories, from facilitating workflows of identification of freshly collected specimens from the field, to describing the overall diversity of megadiverse taxa from museum collections, and most importantly linking the fresh specimens, the general museum collections and historic type specimens. The process also flushes out unexpected sibling species hiding under long-applied scientific names, thereby clarifying and parsing previously mixed collateral data. The Barcode of Life Database has matured to an essential interactive platform for the multi-authored and multi-process collaboration. The BIN system of creating and tracking DNA sequence-based clusters as proxies for species has become a powerful way around some parts of the 'taxonomic impediment', especially in entomology, by providing fast but testable and tractable species hypotheses, tools for visualizing the distribution of those in time and space and an interim naming system for communication.This article is part of the themed issue 'From DNA barcodes to biomes'.

  11. Advancing taxonomy and bioinventories with DNA barcodes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We use three examples—field and ecology-based inventories in Costa Rica and Papua New Guinea and a museum and taxonomic-based inventory of the moth family Geometridae—to demonstrate the use of DNA barcoding (a short sequence of the mitochondrial COI gene) in biodiversity inventories, from facilitating workflows of identification of freshly collected specimens from the field, to describing the overall diversity of megadiverse taxa from museum collections, and most importantly linking the fresh specimens, the general museum collections and historic type specimens. The process also flushes out unexpected sibling species hiding under long-applied scientific names, thereby clarifying and parsing previously mixed collateral data. The Barcode of Life Database has matured to an essential interactive platform for the multi-authored and multi-process collaboration. The BIN system of creating and tracking DNA sequence-based clusters as proxies for species has become a powerful way around some parts of the ‘taxonomic impediment’, especially in entomology, by providing fast but testable and tractable species hypotheses, tools for visualizing the distribution of those in time and space and an interim naming system for communication. This article is part of the themed issue ‘From DNA barcodes to biomes’. PMID:27481791

  12. Recent advances in DNA sequencing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rama Shankar

    2013-06-01

    Successful mapping of the draft human genome in 2001 and more recent mapping of the human microbiome genome in 2012 have relied heavily on the parallel processing of the second generation/Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) DNA machines at a cost of several millions dollars and long computer processing times. These have been mainly biochemical approaches. Here a system analysis approach is used to review these techniques by identifying the requirements, specifications, test methods, error estimates, repeatability, reliability and trends in the cost reduction. The first generation, NGS and the Third Generation Single Molecule Real Time (SMART) detection sequencing methods are reviewed. Based on the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) data, the achieved cost reduction of 1.5 times per yr. from Sep. 2001 to July 2007; 7 times per yr., from Oct. 2007 to Apr. 2010; and 2.5 times per yr. from July 2010 to Jan 2012 are discussed.

  13. Recent Advances in the Structural Mechanisms of DNA Glycosylases

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Sonja C.; Adhikary, Suraj; Rubinson, Emily H.; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2012-01-01

    DNA glycosylases safeguard the genome by locating and excising a diverse array of aberrant nucleobases created from oxidation, alkylation, and deamination of DNA. Since the discovery 28 years ago that these enzymes employ a base flipping mechanism to trap their substrates, six different protein architectures have been identified to perform the same basic task. Work over the past several years has unraveled details for how the various DNA glycosylases survey DNA, detect damage within the duplex, select for the correct modification, and catalyze base excision. Here, we provide a broad overview of these latest advances in glycosylase mechanisms gleaned from structural enzymology, highlighting features common to all glycosylases as well as key differences that define their particular substrate specificities. PMID:23076011

  14. Advances in high throughput DNA sequence data compression.

    PubMed

    Sardaraz, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad; Ikram, Ataul Aziz

    2016-06-01

    Advances in high throughput sequencing technologies and reduction in cost of sequencing have led to exponential growth in high throughput DNA sequence data. This growth has posed challenges such as storage, retrieval, and transmission of sequencing data. Data compression is used to cope with these challenges. Various methods have been developed to compress genomic and sequencing data. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of compression methods for genome and reads compression. Algorithms are categorized as referential or reference free. Experimental results and comparative analysis of various methods for data compression are presented. Finally, key challenges and research directions in DNA sequence data compression are highlighted.

  15. Plasmid DNA gene therapy by electroporation: principles and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsufumi; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2011-12-01

    Simple plasmid DNA injection is a safe and feasible gene transfer method, but it confers low transfection efficiency and transgene expression. This non-viral gene transfer method is enhanced by physical delivery methods, such as electroporation and the use of a gene gun. In vivo electroporation has been rapidly developed over the last two decades to deliver DNA to various tissues or organs. It is generally considered that membrane permeabilization and DNA electrophoresis play important roles in electro-gene transfer. Skeletal muscle is a well characterized target tissue for electroporation, because it is accessible and allows for long-lasting gene expression ( > one year). Skin is also a target tissue because of its accessibility and immunogenicity. Numerous studies have been performed using in vivo electroporation in animal models of disease. Clinical trials of DNA vaccines and immunotherapy for cancer treatment using in vivo electroporation have been initiated in patients with melanoma and prostate cancer. Furthermore, electroporation has been applied to DNA vaccines for infectious diseases to enhance immunogenicity, and the relevant clinical trials have been initiated. The gene gun approach is also being applied for the delivery of DNA vaccines against infectious diseases to the skin. Here, we review recent advances in the mechanism of in vivo electroporation, and summarize the findings of recent preclinical and clinical studies using this technology.

  16. DNA base excision repair of uracil residues in reconstituted nucleosome core particles

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, Hilde; Lindahl, Tomas; Verreault, Alain

    2002-01-01

    The human base excision repair machinery must locate and repair DNA base damage present in chromatin, of which the nucleosome core particle is the basic repeating unit. Here, we have utilized fragments of the Lytechinus variegatus 5S rRNA gene containing site-specific U:A base pairs to investigate the base excision repair pathway in reconstituted nucleosome core particles in vitro. The human uracil-DNA glycosylases, UNG2 and SMUG1, were able to remove uracil from nucleosomes. Efficiency of uracil excision from nucleosomes was reduced 3- to 9-fold when compared with naked DNA, and was essentially uniform along the length of the DNA substrate irrespective of rotational position on the core particle. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the excision repair pathway of an abasic site can be reconstituted on core particles using the known repair enzymes, AP-endonuclease 1, DNA polymerase β and DNA ligase III. Thus, base excision repair can proceed in nucleosome core particles in vitro, but the repair efficiency is limited by the reduced activity of the uracil-DNA glycosylases and DNA polymerase β on nucleosome cores. PMID:12411511

  17. High copy number of mitochondrial DNA predicts poor prognosis in patients with advanced stage colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; He, Shuixiang; Zhu, Xingmei; Qiao, Wei; Zhang, Juan

    2016-12-23

    The aim of this investigation was to determine whether alterations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in colon cancer were associated with clinicopathological parameters and postsurgical outcome. By quantitative real-time PCR assay, the mtDNA copy number was detected in a cohort of colon cancer and matched adjacent colon tissues (n = 162). The majority of patients had higher mtDNA content in colon cancer tissues than matched adjacent colon tissues. Moreover, high mtDNA content in tumor tissues was associated with larger tumor size, higher serum CEA level, advanced TNM stage, vascular emboli, and liver metastases. Further survival curve analysis showed that high mtDNA content was related to the worst survival in patients with colon cancer at advanced TNM stage. High mtDNA content is a potential effective factor of poor prognosis in patients with advanced stage colon cancer.

  18. Recent advances in yeast molecular biology: recombinant DNA. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 25 papers presented at a workshop focusing on chromosomal structure, gene regulation, recombination, DNA repair, and cell type control, that have been obtained by experimental approaches incorporating the new technologies of yeast DNA transformation, molecular cloning, and DNA sequence analysis. (KRM)

  19. Phosphorylated 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine for advanced DNA labeling.

    PubMed

    Seo, Siyoong; Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Nishioka, Chieko; Takahashi, Eiki; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Abe, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2015-04-21

    The representative DNA-labeling agent 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) was chemically modified to improve its function. Chemical monophosphorylation was expected to enhance the efficiency of the substrate in DNA polymerization by circumventing the enzymatic monophosphorylation step that consumes energy. In addition, to enhance cell permeability, the phosphates were protected with bis-pivaloyloxymethyl that is stable in buffer and plasma, and degradable inside various cell types. The phosphorylated EdU (PEdU) was less toxic than EdU, and had the same or a slightly higher DNA-labeling ability in vitro. PEdU was also successfully applied to DNA labeling in vivo. In conclusion, PEdU can be used as a less toxic DNA-labeling agent for studies that require long-term cell survival or very sensitive cell lines.

  20. Integration of DNA and graphene oxide for the construction of various advanced logic circuits.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunyang; Liu, Dali; Wu, Changtong; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Erkang

    2016-10-14

    Multiple advanced logic circuits including the full-adder, full-subtract and majority logic gate have been successfully realized on a DNA/GO platform for the first time. All the logic gates were implemented in an enzyme-free condition. The investigation provides a wider field of vision towards prototypical DNA-based algebra logical operations and promotes the development of advanced logic circuits.

  1. Current advances in DNA repair: regulation of enzymes and pathways involved in maintaining genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Neher, Tracy M; Turchi, John J

    2011-06-15

    Novel discoveries in the DNA repair field have lead to continuous and rapid advancement of our understanding of not only DNA repair but also DNA replication and recombination. Research in the field transcends numerous areas of biology, biochemistry, physiology, and medicine, making significant connections across these broad areas of study. From early studies conducted in bacterial systems to current analyses in eukaryotic systems and human disease, the innovative research into the mechanisms of repair machines and the consequences of ineffective DNA repair has impacted a wide scientific community. This Forum contains a select mix of primary research articles in addition to a number of timely reviews covering a subset of DNA repair pathways where recent advances and novel discoveries are improving our understanding of DNA repair, its regulation, and implications to human disease.

  2. Advances of Community-Level Plant DNA Barcoding in China.

    PubMed

    Pei, Nancai; Chen, Bufeng; Kress, W J

    2017-01-01

    DNA barcoding is a commonly used bio-technology in multiple disciplines including biology, environmental science, forensics and inspection, etc. Forest dynamic plots provide a unique opportunity to carry out large-scale, comparative, and multidisciplinary research for plant DNA barcoding. The paper concisely reviewed four previous progresses in China; specifically, species discrimination, community phylogenetic reconstruction, phylogenetic community structure exploration, and biodiversity index evaluation. Further, we demonstrated three major challenges; specifically, building the impetus to generate DNA barcodes using multiple plant DNA markers for all woody species at forest community levels, analyzing massive DNA barcoding sequence data, and promoting theoretical innovation. Lastly, we raised five possible directions; specifically, proposing a "purpose-driven barcode" fit for multi-level applications, developing new integrative sequencing strategies, pushing DNA barcoding beyond terrestrial ecosystem, constructing national-level DNA barcode sequence libraries for special plant groups, and establishing intelligent identification systems or online server platforms. These efforts will be potentially valuable to explore large-scale biodiversity patterns, the origin and evolution of life, and will also facilitate preservation and utilization of biodiversity resources.

  3. Advances of Community-Level Plant DNA Barcoding in China

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Nancai; Chen, Bufeng; Kress, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    DNA barcoding is a commonly used bio-technology in multiple disciplines including biology, environmental science, forensics and inspection, etc. Forest dynamic plots provide a unique opportunity to carry out large-scale, comparative, and multidisciplinary research for plant DNA barcoding. The paper concisely reviewed four previous progresses in China; specifically, species discrimination, community phylogenetic reconstruction, phylogenetic community structure exploration, and biodiversity index evaluation. Further, we demonstrated three major challenges; specifically, building the impetus to generate DNA barcodes using multiple plant DNA markers for all woody species at forest community levels, analyzing massive DNA barcoding sequence data, and promoting theoretical innovation. Lastly, we raised five possible directions; specifically, proposing a “purpose-driven barcode” fit for multi-level applications, developing new integrative sequencing strategies, pushing DNA barcoding beyond terrestrial ecosystem, constructing national-level DNA barcode sequence libraries for special plant groups, and establishing intelligent identification systems or online server platforms. These efforts will be potentially valuable to explore large-scale biodiversity patterns, the origin and evolution of life, and will also facilitate preservation and utilization of biodiversity resources. PMID:28270824

  4. Advanced Molecular Probes for Sequence-Specific DNA Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertucci, Alessandro; Manicardi, Alex; Corradini, Roberto

    DNA detection can be achieved using the Watson-Crick base pairing with oligonucleotides or oligonucleotide analogs, followed by generation of a physical or chemical signal coupled with a transducer device. The nature of the probe is an essential feature which determines the performances of the sensing device. Many synthetic processes are presently available for "molecular engineering" of DNA probes, enabling label-free and PCR-free detection to be performed. Furthermore, many DNA analogs with improved performances are available and are under development; locked nucleic acids (LNA), peptide nucleic acids (PNA) and their analogs, morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) and other modified probes have shown improved properties of affinity and selectivity in target recognition compared to those of simple DNA probes. The performances of these probes in sensing devices, and the requirements for detection of unamplified DNA will be discussed in this chapter. Chemistry and architectures for conjugation of probes to reporter units, surfaces and nanostructures will also be discussed. Examples of probes used in ultrasensitive detection of unamplified DNA are listed.

  5. Optimization of DNA extraction for advancing coral microbiota investigations.

    PubMed

    Weber, Laura; DeForce, Emelia; Apprill, Amy

    2017-02-08

    DNA-based sequencing approaches are commonly used to identify microorganisms and their genes and document trends in microbial community diversity in environmental samples. However, extraction of microbial DNA from complex environmental samples like corals can be technically challenging, and extraction methods may impart biases on microbial community structure. We designed a two-phase study in order to propose a comprehensive and efficient method for DNA extraction from microbial cells present in corals and investigate if extraction method influences microbial community composition. During phase I, total DNA was extracted from seven coral species in a replicated experimental design using four different MO BIO Laboratories, Inc., DNA Isolation kits: PowerSoil®, PowerPlant® Pro, PowerBiofilm®, and UltraClean® Tissue & Cells (with three homogenization permutations). Technical performance of the treatments was evaluated using DNA yield and amplification efficiency of small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU ribosomal RNA (rRNA)) genes. During phase II, potential extraction biases were examined via microbial community analysis of SSU rRNA gene sequences amplified from the most successful DNA extraction treatments. In phase I of the study, the PowerSoil® and PowerPlant® Pro extracts contained low DNA concentrations, amplified poorly, and were not investigated further. Extracts from PowerBiofilm® and UltraClean® Tissue and Cells permutations were further investigated in phase II, and analysis of sequences demonstrated that overall microbial community composition was dictated by coral species and not extraction treatment. Finer pairwise comparisons of sequences obtained from Orbicella faveolata, Orbicella annularis, and Acropora humilis corals revealed subtle differences in community composition between the treatments; PowerBiofilm®-associated sequences generally had higher microbial richness and the highest coverage of dominant microbial groups in comparison to the Ultra

  6. Recent Advancements in DNA Damage-Transcription Crosstalk and High-Resolution Mapping of DNA Breaks.

    PubMed

    Vitelli, Valerio; Galbiati, Alessandro; Iannelli, Fabio; Pessina, Fabio; Sharma, Sheetal; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2017-08-31

    Until recently, DNA damage arising from physiological DNA metabolism was considered a detrimental by-product for cells. However, an increasing amount of evidence has shown that DNA damage could have a positive role in transcription activation. In particular, DNA damage has been detected in transcriptional elements following different stimuli. These physiological DNA breaks are thought to be instrumental for the correct expression of genomic loci through different mechanisms. In this regard, although a plethora of methods are available to precisely map transcribed regions and transcription start sites, commonly used techniques for mapping DNA breaks lack sufficient resolution and sensitivity to draw a robust correlation between DNA damage generation and transcription. Recently, however, several methods have been developed to map DNA damage at single-nucleotide resolution, thus providing a new set of tools to correlate DNA damage and transcription. Here, we review how DNA damage can positively regulate transcription initiation, the current techniques for mapping DNA breaks at high resolution, and how these techniques can benefit future studies of DNA damage and transcription.

  7. Advancing DNA-based Nanotechnology Capabilities and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, Alexandria N.

    Biological systems have inspired interest in developing artificial molecular self-assembly techniques that imitate nature's ability to harness chemical forces to specifically position atoms within intricate assemblies. Of the biomolecules used to mimic nature's abilities, nucleic acids have gained special attention. Specifically, deoxyribonucleic acid is a stable molecule with a readily accessible code that exhibits predictable and programmable intermolecular interactions. These properties are exploited in the revolutionary structural DNA nanotechnology method known as scaffolded DNA origami. For DNA origami to establish itself as a widely used method for creating self-assembling, complex, functional materials, current limitations need to be overcome and new methods need to be established to move forward with developing structures for diverse applications in many fields. The limitations discussed in this dissertation include 1) pushing the scale of well-formed, fully-addressable origami to two and seven times the size of conventional origami, 2) testing cost-effective staple strand synthesis methods for producing pools of oligos for a specified origami, and 3) engineering mechanical properties using non-natural nucleotides in DNA assemblies. After accomplishing the above, we're able to design complex DNA origami structures that incorporate many of the current developments in the field into a useful material with applicability in wide-ranging fields, namely cell biology and photonics.

  8. Blocking DNA Repair in Advanced BRCA-Mutated Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with relapsed or refractory advanced cancer and confirmed BRCA mutations who have not previously been treated with a PARP inhibitor will be given BMN 673 by mouth once a day in 28-day cycles.

  9. Advanced microinstrumentation for rapid DNA sequencing and large DNA fragment separation

    SciTech Connect

    Balch, J.; Davidson, J.; Brewer, L.; Gingrich, J.; Koo, J.; Mariella, R.; Carrano, A.

    1995-01-25

    Our efforts to develop novel technology for a rapid DNA sequencer and large fragment analysis system based upon gel electrophoresis are described. We are using microfabrication technology to build dense arrays of high speed micro electrophoresis lanes that will ultimately increase the sequencing rate of DNA by at least 100 times the rate of current sequencers. We have demonstrated high resolution DNA fragment separation needed for sequencing in polyacrylamide microgels formed in glass microchannels. We have built prototype arrays of microchannels having up to 48 channels. Significant progress has also been made in developing a sensitive fluorescence detection system based upon a confocal microscope design that will enable the diagnostics and detection of DNA fragments in ultrathin microchannel gels. Development of a rapid DNA sequencer and fragment analysis system will have a major impact on future DNA instrumentation used in clinical, molecular and forensic analysis of DNA fragments.

  10. Advances in Non-Viral DNA Vectors for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hardee, Cinnamon L.; Arévalo-Soliz, Lirio Milenka; Hornstein, Benjamin D.; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Uses of viral vectors have thus far eclipsed uses of non-viral vectors for gene therapy delivery in the clinic. Viral vectors, however, have certain issues involving genome integration, the inability to be delivered repeatedly, and possible host rejection. Fortunately, development of non-viral DNA vectors has progressed steadily, especially in plasmid vector length reduction, now allowing these tools to fill in specifically where viral or other non-viral vectors may not be the best options. In this review, we examine the improvements made to non-viral DNA gene therapy vectors, highlight opportunities for their further development, address therapeutic needs for which their use is the logical choice, and discuss their future expansion into the clinic. PMID:28208635

  11. Reproducibility of Digital PCR Assays for Circulating Tumor DNA Analysis in Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hrebien, Sarah; O’Leary, Ben; Beaney, Matthew; Schiavon, Gaia; Fribbens, Charlotte; Bhambra, Amarjit; Johnson, Richard; Turner, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) analysis has the potential to allow non-invasive analysis of tumor mutations in advanced cancer. In this study we assessed the reproducibility of digital PCR (dPCR) assays of circulating tumor DNA in a cohort of patients with advanced breast cancer and assessed delayed plasma processing using cell free DNA preservative tubes. We recruited a cohort of 96 paired samples from 71 women with advanced breast cancer who had paired blood samples processed either immediately or delayed in preservative tubes with processing 48–72 hours after collection. Plasma DNA was analysed with multiplex digital PCR (mdPCR) assays for hotspot mutations in PIK3CA, ESR1 and ERBB2, and for AKT1 E17K. There was 94.8% (91/96) agreement in mutation calling between immediate and delayed processed tubes, kappa 0.88 95% CI 0.77–0.98). Discordance in mutation calling resulted from low allele frequency and likely stochastic effects. In concordant samples there was high correlation in mutant copies per ml plasma (r2 = 0.98; p<0.0001). There was elevation of total cell free plasma DNA concentrations in 10.3% of delayed processed tubes, although overall quantification of total cell free plasma DNA had similar prognostic effects in immediate (HR 3.6) and delayed (HR 3.0) tubes. There was moderate agreement in changes in allele fraction between sequential samples in quantitative mutation tracking (r = 0.84, p = 0.0002). Delayed processing of samples using preservative tubes allows for centralized ctDNA digital PCR mutation screening in advanced breast cancer. The potential of preservative tubes in quantitative mutation tracking requires further research. PMID:27760227

  12. Recent advances on the encoding and selection methods of DNA-encoded chemical library.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bingbing; Zhou, Yu; Huang, Yiran; Zhang, Jianfu; Li, Xiaoyu

    2017-02-01

    DNA-encoded chemical library (DEL) has emerged as a powerful and versatile tool for ligand discovery in chemical biology research and in drug discovery. Encoding and selection methods are two of the most important technological aspects of DEL that can dictate the performance and utilities of DELs. In this digest, we have summarized recent advances on the encoding and selection strategies of DEL and also discussed the latest developments on DNA-encoded dynamic library, a new frontier in DEL research.

  13. Advances in DNA metabarcoding for food and wildlife forensic species identification.

    PubMed

    Staats, Martijn; Arulandhu, Alfred J; Gravendeel, Barbara; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Scholtens, Ingrid; Peelen, Tamara; Prins, Theo W; Kok, Esther

    2016-07-01

    Species identification using DNA barcodes has been widely adopted by forensic scientists as an effective molecular tool for tracking adulterations in food and for analysing samples from alleged wildlife crime incidents. DNA barcoding is an approach that involves sequencing of short DNA sequences from standardized regions and comparison to a reference database as a molecular diagnostic tool in species identification. In recent years, remarkable progress has been made towards developing DNA metabarcoding strategies, which involves next-generation sequencing of DNA barcodes for the simultaneous detection of multiple species in complex samples. Metabarcoding strategies can be used in processed materials containing highly degraded DNA e.g. for the identification of endangered and hazardous species in traditional medicine. This review aims to provide insight into advances of plant and animal DNA barcoding and highlights current practices and recent developments for DNA metabarcoding of food and wildlife forensic samples from a practical point of view. Special emphasis is placed on new developments for identifying species listed in the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES) appendices for which reliable methods for species identification may signal and/or prevent illegal trade. Current technological developments and challenges of DNA metabarcoding for forensic scientists will be assessed in the light of stakeholders' needs.

  14. Advances in radiation biology: Radiosensitization in DNA and living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, S.; Sech, C. Le

    2009-06-01

    One fundamental goal of radiation biology is the evolution of concepts and methods for the elaboration of new approaches and protocols for the treatment of cancers. In this context, the use of fast ions as ionizing particles offers the advantage of optimizing cell killing inside the tumor whilst preserving the surrounding healthy tissues. One extremely promising strategy investigated recently is the addition of radiosensitizers in the targeted tissue. The optimization of radiotherapy with fast ions implies a multidisciplinary approach to ionizing radiation effects on complex living systems, ranging from studies on single molecules to investigations of entire organisms. In this article we review recent studies on ion induced damages in simple and complex biological systems, from DNA to living cells. The specific aspect of radiosensitization induced by metallic atoms is described. As a fundamental result, the addition of sensitizing compounds with ion irradiation may improve therapeutic index in cancer therapy. In conclusion, new perspectives are proposed based on the experience and contribution of different communities including Surface Sciences, to improve the development of radiation biology.

  15. DNA deaminases induce break-associated mutation showers with implication of APOBEC3B and 3A in breast cancer kataegis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Benjamin JM; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Wu, Yee Ling; Stebbings, Lucy A; Raine, Keiran; Campbell, Peter J; Rada, Cristina; Stratton, Michael R; Neuberger, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer genomes have revealed a novel form of mutation showers (kataegis) in which multiple same-strand substitutions at C:G pairs spaced one to several hundred nucleotides apart are clustered over kilobase-sized regions, often associated with sites of DNA rearrangement. We show kataegis can result from AID/APOBEC-catalysed cytidine deamination in the vicinity of DNA breaks, likely through action on single-stranded DNA exposed during resection. Cancer-like kataegis can be recapitulated by expression of AID/APOBEC family deaminases in yeast where it largely depends on uracil excision, which generates an abasic site for strand breakage. Localized kataegis can also be nucleated by an I-SceI-induced break. Genome-wide patterns of APOBEC3-catalyzed deamination in yeast reveal APOBEC3B and 3A as the deaminases whose mutational signatures are most similar to those of breast cancer kataegic mutations. Together with expression and functional assays, the results implicate APOBEC3B/A in breast cancer hypermutation and give insight into the mechanism of kataegis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00534.001 PMID:23599896

  16. Advances in SCA and RF-DNA Fingerprinting Through Enhanced Linear Regression Attacks and Application of Random Forest Classifiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-18

    ADVANCES IN SCA AND RF- DNA FINGERPRINTING THROUGH ENHANCED LINEAR REGRESSION ATTACKS AND APPLICATION OF RANDOM FOREST CLASSIFIERS DISSERTATION Hiren...SCA AND RF- DNA FINGERPRINTING THROUGH ENHANCED LINEAR REGRESSION ATTACKS AND APPLICATION OF RANDOM FOREST CLASSIFIERS DISSERTATION Presented to the...APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED AFIT-ENG-DS-14-S-03 ADVANCES IN SCA AND RF- DNA FINGERPRINTING THROUGH ENHANCED LINEAR REGRESSION ATTACKS

  17. Advances in understanding the complex mechanisms of DNA interstrand cross-link repair.

    PubMed

    Clauson, Cheryl; Schärer, Orlando D; Niedernhofer, Laura

    2013-10-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) are lesions caused by a variety of endogenous metabolites, environmental exposures, and cancer chemotherapeutic agents that have two reactive groups. The common feature of these diverse lesions is that two nucleotides on opposite strands are covalently joined. ICLs prevent the separation of two DNA strands and therefore essential cellular processes including DNA replication and transcription. ICLs are mainly detected in S phase when a replication fork stalls at an ICL. Damage signaling and repair of ICLs are promoted by the Fanconi anemia pathway and numerous posttranslational modifications of DNA repair and chromatin structural proteins. ICLs are also detected and repaired in nonreplicating cells, although the mechanism is less clear. A unique feature of ICL repair is that both strands of DNA must be incised to completely remove the lesion. This is accomplished in sequential steps to prevent creating multiple double-strand breaks. Unhooking of an ICL from one strand is followed by translesion synthesis to fill the gap and create an intact duplex DNA, harboring a remnant of the ICL. Removal of the lesion from the second strand is likely accomplished by nucleotide excision repair. Inadequate repair of ICLs is particularly detrimental to rapidly dividing cells, explaining the bone marrow failure characteristic of Fanconi anemia and why cross-linking agents are efficacious in cancer therapy. Herein, recent advances in our understanding of ICLs and the biological responses they trigger are discussed.

  18. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Sensors for DNA Detection at the Point of Care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Kuangwen

    In the post-genomic era, ever-advancing capabilities in DNA detection and analysis have become vital to the detection of infectious diseases and the diagnosis of genetic abnormalities and inheritable diseases. The benefit of such capabilities, however, has yet to reach patients outside of centralized facilities. There thus exists an increasing need to decentralize DNA detection methods and to administer such diagnostics at the "point of care." Electrochemical-based DNA sensors present a compelling approach, but have yet to deliver satisfactory sensitivity, specificity, miniaturization, and real-time monitoring capability to meet the demand of point-of-care diagnostics. Motivated by their potential and their current limitations, in this dissertation, we present a series of strategies that we have undertaken in order to address the key shortcomings of electrochemical DNA sensors and advance them toward point-of-care applications. First, we report a single-step, single reagent, label-free, isothermal electrochemical DNA sensor based on the phenomenon of enzyme catalyzed target recycling amplification. Using this technique, we achieve improved detection limit in comparison to hybridization-based sensors without amplification. We also demonstrate greater than 16-fold amplification of signal at low target concentrations. Next, we present a novel electrochemical DNA sensor that detects single-nucleotide mismatched targets with unprecedented "polarity-switching" responses. This "bipolar" sensor employs a surface-bound and redox-modified (methylene blue) DNA probe architecture, and outputs a decreased Faradaic current when hybridized to a perfectly matched (PM) target, but conversely reports an increased Faradaic current when hybridized to a single-base mismatched (SM) target. Third, we describe the microfluidic electrochemical dynamic allele specific hybridization (microE-DASH) platform for versatile and rapid detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Implementing

  19. Assessing macroinvertebrate biodiversity in freshwater ecosystems: Advances and challenges in dna-based approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pfrender, M.E.; Ferrington, L.C.; Hawkins, C.P.; Hartzell, P.L.; Bagley, M.; Jackson, S.; Courtney, G.W.; Larsen, D.P.; Creutzburg, B.R.; Levesque, C.A.; Epler, J.H.; Morse, J.C.; Fend, S.; Petersen, M.J.; Ruiter, D.; Schindel, D.; Whiting, M.

    2010-01-01

    Assessing the biodiversity of macroinvertebrate fauna in freshwater ecosystems is an essential component of both basic ecological inquiry and applied ecological assessments. Aspects of taxonomic diversity and composition in freshwater communities are widely used to quantify water quality and measure the efficacy of remediation and restoration efforts. The accuracy and precision of biodiversity assessments based on standard morphological identifications are often limited by taxonomic resolution and sample size. Morphologically based identifications are laborious and costly, significantly constraining the sample sizes that can be processed. We suggest that the development of an assay platform based on DNA signatures will increase the precision and ease of quantifying biodiversity in freshwater ecosystems. Advances in this area will be particularly relevant for benthic and planktonic invertebrates, which are often monitored by regulatory agencies. Adopting a genetic assessment platform will alleviate some of the current limitations to biodiversity assessment strategies. We discuss the benefits and challenges associated with DNA-based assessments and the methods that are currently available. As recent advances in microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies will facilitate a transition to DNA-based assessment approaches, future research efforts should focus on methods for data collection, assay platform development, establishing linkages between DNA signatures and well-resolved taxonomies, and bioinformatics. ?? 2010 by The University of Chicago Press.

  20. Distortion of DNA Origami on Graphene Imaged with Advanced TEM Techniques.

    PubMed

    Kabiri, Yoones; Ananth, Adithya N; van der Torre, Jaco; Katan, Allard; Hong, Jin-Yong; Malladi, Sairam; Kong, Jing; Zandbergen, Henny; Dekker, Cees

    2017-08-01

    While graphene may appear to be the ultimate support membrane for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging of DNA nanostructures, very little is known if it poses an advantage over conventional carbon supports in terms of resolution and contrast. Microscopic investigations are carried out on DNA origami nanoplates that are supported onto freestanding graphene, using advanced TEM techniques, including a new dark-field technique that is recently developed in our lab. TEM images of stained and unstained DNA origami are presented with high contrast on both graphene and amorphous carbon membranes. On graphene, the images of the origami plates show severe unwanted distortions, where the rectangular shape of the nanoplates is significantly distorted. From a number of comparative control experiments, it is demonstrated that neither staining agents, nor screening ions, nor the level of electron-beam irradiation cause this distortion. Instead, it is suggested that origami nanoplates are distorted due to hydrophobic interaction of the DNA bases with graphene upon adsorption of the DNA origami nanoplates. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. DNA methylation errors in cloned mice disappear with advancement of aging.

    PubMed

    Senda, Sho; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Arai, Yoshikazu; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Ohgane, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Hattori, Naka; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; Shiota, Kunio

    2007-01-01

    Cloned animals have various health problems. Aberrant DNA methylation is a possible cause of the problems. Restriction landmark genomic scanning (RLGS) that enabled us to analyze more than 1,000 CpG islands simultaneously demonstrated that all cloned newborns had aberrant DNA methylation. To study whether this aberration persists throughout the life of cloned individuals, we examined genome-wide DNA methylation status of newborn (19.5 dpc, n=2), adult (8-11 months old, n=3), and aged (23-27 months old, n=4) cloned mice using kidney cells as representatives. In the adult and aged groups, cloning was repeated using cumulus cells of the adult founder clone of each group as nucleus donor. Two newborn clones had three with aberrantly methylated loci, which is consistent with previous reports that all cloned newborns had DNA methylation aberrations. Interestingly, we could detect only one aberrantly methylated locus in two of the three adult clones in mid-age and none of four senescent clones, indicating that errors in DNA methylation disappear with advancement of animals' aging.

  2. Unique DNA repair gene variations and potential associations with the primary antibody deficiency syndromes IgAD and CVID.

    PubMed

    Offer, Steven M; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; Hammarström, Lennart; Harris, Reuben S

    2010-08-18

    Despite considerable effort, the genetic factors responsible for >90% of the antibody deficiency syndromes IgAD and CVID remain elusive. To produce a functionally diverse antibody repertoire B lymphocytes undergo class switch recombination. This process is initiated by AID-catalyzed deamination of cytidine to uridine in switch region DNA. Subsequently, these residues are recognized by the uracil excision enzyme UNG2 or the mismatch repair proteins MutSalpha (MSH2/MSH6) and MutLalpha (PMS2/MLH1). Further processing by ubiquitous DNA repair factors is thought to introduce DNA breaks, ultimately leading to class switch recombination and expression of a different antibody isotype. Defects in AID and UNG2 have been shown to result in the primary immunodeficiency hyper-IgM syndrome, leading us to hypothesize that additional, potentially more subtle, DNA repair gene variations may underlie the clinically related antibody deficiencies syndromes IgAD and CVID. In a survey of twenty-seven candidate DNA metabolism genes, markers in MSH2, RAD50, and RAD52 were associated with IgAD/CVID, prompting further investigation into these pathways. Resequencing identified four rare, non-synonymous alleles associated with IgAD/CVID, two in MLH1, one in RAD50, and one in NBS1. One IgAD patient carried heterozygous non-synonymous mutations in MLH1, MSH2, and NBS1. Functional studies revealed that one of the identified mutations, a premature RAD50 stop codon (Q372X), confers increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Our results are consistent with a class switch recombination model in which AID-catalyzed uridines are processed by multiple DNA repair pathways. Genetic defects in these DNA repair pathways may contribute to IgAD and CVID.

  3. The Extraction and Partial Purification of Bacterial DNA as a Practical Exercise for GCE Advanced Level Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, A. C.; Hayes, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a relatively simple method of extraction and purification of bacterial DNA. This technique permits advanced secondary-level science students to obtain adequate amounts of DNA from very small pellets of bacteria and to observe some of its polymer properties. (ML)

  4. The Extraction and Partial Purification of Bacterial DNA as a Practical Exercise for GCE Advanced Level Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, A. C.; Hayes, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a relatively simple method of extraction and purification of bacterial DNA. This technique permits advanced secondary-level science students to obtain adequate amounts of DNA from very small pellets of bacteria and to observe some of its polymer properties. (ML)

  5. Recent advances in the genome-wide study of DNA replication origins in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chong; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Xi; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication, one of the central events in the cell cycle, is the basis of biological inheritance. In order to be duplicated, a DNA double helix must be opened at defined sites, which are called DNA replication origins (ORIs). Unlike in bacteria, where replication initiates from a single replication origin, multiple origins are utilized in the eukaryotic genomes. Among them, the ORIs in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe have been best characterized. In recent years, advances in DNA microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies have increased the number of yeast species involved in ORIs research dramatically. The ORIs in some non-conventional yeast species such as Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris have also been genome-widely identified. Relevant databases of replication origins in yeast were constructed, then the comparative genomic analysis can be carried out. Here, we review several experimental approaches that have been used to map replication origins in yeast and some of the available web resources related to yeast ORIs. We also discuss the sequence characteristics and chromosome structures of ORIs in the four yeast species, which can be utilized to improve yeast replication origins prediction. PMID:25745419

  6. Protein science by DNA sequencing: how advances in molecular biology are accelerating biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Sean Andrew; Savage, David F

    2017-10-09

    A fundamental goal of protein biochemistry is to determine the sequence-function relationship, but the vastness of sequence space makes comprehensive evaluation of this landscape difficult. However, advances in DNA synthesis and sequencing now allow researchers to assess the functional impact of every single mutation in many proteins, but challenges remain in library construction and the development of general assays applicable to a diverse range of protein functions. This perspective briefly outlines the technical innovations in DNA manipulation which allow massively parallel protein biochemistry, then summarizes the methods currently available for library construction and the functional assays of protein variants. Areas in need of future innovation are highlighted with a particular focus on assay development and the use of computational analysis with machine learning to effectively traverse the sequence-function landscape. Finally, applications in the fundamentals of protein biochemistry, disease prediction, and protein engineering are presented.

  7. Recent advances in DNA-based electrochemical biosensors for heavy metal ion detection: A review.

    PubMed

    Saidur, M R; Aziz, A R Abdul; Basirun, W J

    2017-04-15

    The presence of heavy metal in food chains due to the rapid industrialization poses a serious threat on the environment. Therefore, detection and monitoring of heavy metals contamination are gaining more attention nowadays. However, the current analytical methods (based on spectroscopy) for the detection of heavy metal contamination are often very expensive, tedious and can only be handled by trained personnel. DNA biosensors, which are based on electrochemical transduction, is a sensitive but inexpensive method of detection. The principles, sensitivity, selectivity and challenges of electrochemical biosensors are discussed in this review. This review also highlights the major advances of DNA-based electrochemical biosensors for the detection of heavy metal ions such as Hg(2+), Ag(+), Cu(2+) and Pb(2+).

  8. Functional changes in a novel uracil-DNA glycosylase determined by mutational analyses.

    PubMed

    Im, E K; Han, Y S; Chung, J H

    2008-01-01

    Uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) is a ubiquitous enzyme found in bacteria and eukaryotes, which removes uracil residues from DNA strands. Methanococcus jannaschii UDG (MjUDG), a novel monofunctional glycosylase, contains a helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) motif and Gly/Pro rich loop (GPD region), which is important for catalytic activity; it shares these features with other glycosylases such as endonuclease III. First, to examine the role of two conserved amino acid residues (Asp150 and Tyr152) in the HhH-GPD region of MjUDG, mutant MjUDG proteins were constructed, in which Asp 150 was replaced with either Glu or Trp (D150E and D150W), Tyr152 was replaced with either Glu or Asn (Y152E and Y152N). Mutant D150W completely lacked DNA glycosylase activity, whereas D150E displayed reduced activity of about 70% of the wild type value. However, the mutants Y152E and Y152N retained unchanged levels of UDG activity. We also replaced Glu132 in the HhH motif with a lysine residue equivalent to Lys120 in endonuclease III. This mutation converted the enzyme into a bifunctional glycosylase/AP lyase capable of both removing uracil at a glycosylic bond and cleaving the phosphodiester backbone at an AP site. Mutant E132K catalyzes a beta-elimination reaction at the AP site via uracil excision and forms a Schiff base intermediate in the form of a protein-DNA complex.

  9. DNA-encoded chemical libraries: advancing beyond conventional small-molecule libraries.

    PubMed

    Franzini, Raphael M; Neri, Dario; Scheuermann, Jörg

    2014-04-15

    DNA-encoded chemical libraries (DECLs) represent a promising tool in drug discovery. DECL technology allows the synthesis and screening of chemical libraries of unprecedented size at moderate costs. In analogy to phage-display technology, where large antibody libraries are displayed on the surface of filamentous phage and are genetically encoded in the phage genome, DECLs feature the display of individual small organic chemical moieties on DNA fragments serving as amplifiable identification barcodes. The DNA-tag facilitates the synthesis and allows the simultaneous screening of very large sets of compounds (up to billions of molecules), because the hit compounds can easily be identified and quantified by PCR-amplification of the DNA-barcode followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing. Several approaches have been used to generate DECLs, differing both in the methods used for library encoding and for the combinatorial assembly of chemical moieties. For example, DECLs can be used for fragment-based drug discovery, displaying a single molecule on DNA or two chemical moieties at the extremities of complementary DNA strands. DECLs can vary substantially in the chemical structures and the library size. While ultralarge libraries containing billions of compounds have been reported containing four or more sets of building blocks, also smaller libraries have been shown to be efficient for ligand discovery. In general, it has been found that the overall library size is a poor predictor for library performance and that the number and diversity of the building blocks are rather important indicators. Smaller libraries consisting of two to three sets of building blocks better fulfill the criteria of drug-likeness and often have higher quality. In this Account, we present advances in the DECL field from proof-of-principle studies to practical applications for drug discovery, both in industry and in academia. DECL technology can yield specific binders to a variety of target

  10. Copy number variations in urine cell free DNA as biomarkers in advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yun; Huang, Chiang-Ching; Dittmar, Rachel; Du, Meijun; Wang, Yuan; Liu, Hongyan; Shenoy, Niraj; Wang, Liang; Kohli, Manish

    2016-06-14

    Genetic profiling of urine cell free DNA (cfDNA) has not been evaluated in advanced prostate cancer. We performed whole genome sequencing of urine cfDNAs to identify tumor-associated copy number variations in urine before and after initiating androgen deprivation therapy in HSPC stage and docetaxel chemotherapy in CRPC stage. A log2 ratio-based copy number analysis detected common genomic abnormalities in prostate cancer including AR amplification in 5/10 CRPC patients. Other abnormalities identified included TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, PTEN gene deletion, NOTCH1 locus amplification along with genomic amplifications at 8q24.3, 9q34.3, 11p15.5 and 14q11.2, and deletions at 4q35.2, 5q31.3, 7q36.3, 12q24.33, and 16p11.2. By comparing copy number between pre- and post-treatment, we found significant copy number changes in 34 genomic loci. To estimate the somatic tumor DNA fraction in urine cfDNAs, we developed a Urine Genomic Abnormality (UGA) score algorithm that summed the top ten most significant segments with copy number changes. The UGA scores correlated with tumor burden and the change in UGA score after stage-specific therapies reflected disease progression status and overall survival. The study demonstrates the potential clinical utility of urine cfDNAs in predicting treatment response and monitoring disease progression.

  11. Vaccination with human tyrosinase DNA induces antibody responses in dogs with advanced melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jack C. F.; Gregor, Polly; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Orlandi, Francesca; Craft, Diane; Leung, Carrie; Houghton, Alan N.; Bergman, Philip J.

    2007-01-01

    Antitumor immune responses can be elicited in preclinical mouse melanoma models using plasmid DNA vaccines encoding xenogeneic melanosomal differentiation antigens. We previously reported on a phase I clinical trial of human tyrosinase (huTyr) DNA vaccination of 9 dogs with advanced malignant melanoma (World Health Organization stages II-IV), in which we demonstrated the safety of the treatment and the prolongation of the expected survival time (ST) of subjects as compared to historical, stage-matched controls. As a secondary goal of the same study, we report here on the induction of tyrosinase-specific antibody responses in three of the nine dogs vaccinated with huTyr DNA. The antibodies in two of the three responders cross-react with syngeneic canine tyrosinase, demonstrating the ability of this vaccine to overcome host immune tolerance and/or ignorance to or of “self” antigens. Most interestingly, the onset of antibody induction in these three dogs coincides with observed clinical responses and may suggest a means to account for their long-term tumor control and survival. PMID:16626110

  12. Bacterial ghosts as a novel advanced targeting system for drug and DNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Paukner, Susanne; Stiedl, Thomas; Kudela, Pavol; Bizik, Jozef; Al Laham, Firas; Lubitz, Werner

    2006-01-01

    Although there are powerful drugs against infectious diseases and cancer on the market, delivery systems are needed to decrease serious toxic and noncurative side effects. In order to enhance compliance, several delivery systems such as polymeric micro- and nanoparticles, liposomal systems and erythrocyte ghosts have been developed. Bacterial ghosts representing novel advanced delivery and targeting vehicles suitable for the delivery of hydrophobic or water-soluble drugs, are the main focus of this review. They are useful nonliving carriers, as they can carry different active substances in more than one cellular location separately and simultaneously. Bacterial ghosts combine excellent natural or engineered adhesion properties with versatile carrier functions for drugs, proteins and DNA plasmids or DNA minicircles. The simplicity of both bacterial ghost production and packaging of drugs and/or DNA makes them particularly suitable for the use as a delivery system. Further advantages of bacterial ghost delivery vehicles include high bioavailability and a long shelf life without the need of cold-chain storage due to the possibility to freeze-dry the material.

  13. Cytosine-to-uracil deamination by SssI DNA methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Stier, Ildikó; Kiss, Antal

    2013-01-01

    The prokaryotic DNA(cytosine-5)methyltransferase M.SssI shares the specificity of eukaryotic DNA methyltransferases (CG) and is an important model and experimental tool in the study of eukaryotic DNA methylation. Previously, M.SssI was shown to be able to catalyze deamination of the target cytosine to uracil if the methyl donor S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM) was missing from the reaction. To test whether this side-activity of the enzyme can be used to distinguish between unmethylated and C5-methylated cytosines in CG dinucleotides, we re-investigated, using a sensitive genetic reversion assay, the cytosine deaminase activity of M.SssI. Confirming previous results we showed that M.SssI can deaminate cytosine to uracil in a slow reaction in the absence of SAM and that the rate of this reaction can be increased by the SAM analogue 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine. We could not detect M.SssI-catalyzed deamination of C5-methylcytosine ((m5)C). We found conditions where the rate of M.SssI mediated C-to-U deamination was at least 100-fold higher than the rate of (m5)C-to-T conversion. Although this difference in reactivities suggests that the enzyme could be used to identify C5-methylated cytosines in the epigenetically important CG dinucleotides, the rate of M.SssI mediated cytosine deamination is too low to become an enzymatic alternative to the bisulfite reaction. Amino acid replacements in the presumed SAM binding pocket of M.SssI (F17S and G19D) resulted in greatly reduced methyltransferase activity. The G19D variant showed cytosine deaminase activity in E. coli, at physiological SAM concentrations. Interestingly, the C-to-U deaminase activity was also detectable in an E. coli ung (+) host proficient in uracil excision repair.

  14. Increased receptor for advanced glycation end products in spermatozoa of diabetic men and its association with sperm nuclear DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Karimi, J; Goodarzi, M T; Tavilani, H; Khodadadi, I; Amiri, I

    2012-05-01

    Although the majority of patients with diabetes have disorders in sexual function, associations between diabetes mellitus and sperm function at the molecular level are largely unknown. As receptor for advanced glycation end products plays a key role in many diabetic complications, we hypothesised that it may be involved in sperm nuclear DNA fragmentation. RAGE levels were determined using ELISA and western blot analysis in sperm samples from 32 diabetic and 35 nondiabetic men. Sperm DNA fragmentation was assessed using TUNEL assay. Diabetic men had significantly higher mean levels of RAGE protein (P < 0.001) and DNA fragmentation (P < 0.001) in spermatozoa. Sperm RAGE was directly correlated to sperm DNA fragmentation in diabetic men (r = 0.81, P < 0.001). The high positive correlation between RAGE levels and nuclear DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa of diabetic men suggests a central role of RAGE in disturbances in sexual function of diabetic men. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Recent advances and considerations for the future in forensic analysis of degraded DNA by autosomic miniSTR multiplex genotyping.

    PubMed

    Odriozola, A; Aznar, J M; Celorrio, D; De Pancorbo, M M

    2011-08-01

    STR genotyping from degraded DNA samples requires genetic profiles to be obtained from DNA fragments no bigger than 200-300 bp. It requires the use of miniSTRs, which are smaller than the STRs used in standard typing. This paper reviews recent advances in miniSTR genotyping, beginning with a brief introduction to the processes involved in DNA fragmentation and how it hinders standard STR genotyping before proceeding further to the loci included in the main DNA databases and finishing with the International Workgroups' recommended design strategies for developing miniSTR reactions. The results of the efforts of many laboratories achieving different STR multiplexes and patents are also described and compared. Finally, a consideration of the perspectives for the future in this area is presented.

  16. Advances in the analysis of isothermal titration calorimetry data for ligand-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Buurma, Niklaas J; Haq, Ihtshamul

    2007-06-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a well established technique for the study of biological interactions. The strength of ITC is that it directly measures enthalpy changes associated with interactions. Experiments can also yield binding isotherms allowing quantification of equilibrium binding constants, hence an almost complete thermodynamic profile can be established. Principles and application of ITC have been well documented over recent years, experimentally the technique is simple to use and in ideal scenarios data analysis is trivial. However, ITC experiments can be designed such that previously inaccessible parameters can be evaluated. We outline some of these advances, including (1) exploiting different experimental conditions; (2) low affinity systems; (3) high affinity systems and displacement assays. In addition we ask the question: What if data cannot be fit using the fitting functions incorporated in the data-analysis software that came with your ITC? Examples where such data might be generated include systems following non 1:n binding patterns and systems where binding is coupled to other events such as ligand dissociation. Models dealing with such data are now appearing in literature and we summarise examples relevant for the study of ligand-DNA interactions.

  17. Recent advances in small organic molecules as DNA intercalating agents: synthesis, activity, and modeling.

    PubMed

    Rescifina, Antonio; Zagni, Chiara; Varrica, Maria Giulia; Pistarà, Venerando; Corsaro, Antonino

    2014-03-03

    The interaction of small molecules with DNA plays an essential role in many biological processes. As DNA is often the target for majority of anticancer and antibiotic drugs, study about the interaction of drug and DNA has a key role in pharmacology. Moreover, understanding the interactions of small molecules with DNA is of prime significance in the rational design of more powerful and selective anticancer agents. Two of the most important and promising targets in cancer chemotherapy include DNA alkylating agents and DNA intercalators. For these last the DNA recognition is a critical step in their anti-tumor action and the intercalation is not only one kind of the interactions in DNA recognition but also a pivotal step of several clinically used anti-tumor drugs such as anthracyclines, acridines and anthraquinones. To push clinical cancer therapy, the discovery of new DNA intercalators has been considered a practical approach and a number of intercalators have been recently reported. The intercalative binding properties of such molecules can also be harnessed as diagnostic probes for DNA structure in addition to DNA-directed therapeutics. Moreover, the problem of intercalation site formation in the undistorted B-DNA of different length and sequence is matter of tremendous importance in molecular modeling studies and, nowadays, three models of DNA intercalation targets have been proposed that account for the binding features of intercalators. Finally, despite DNA being an important target for several drugs, most of the docking programs are validated only for proteins and their ligands. Therefore, a default protocol to identify DNA binding modes which uses a modified canonical DNA as receptor is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Genotoxicity and immunogenicity of DNA-advanced glycation end products formed by methylglyoxal and lysine in presence of Cu2+.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saheem; Moinuddin; Dixit, Kiran; Shahab, Uzma; Alam, Khursheed; Ali, Asif

    2011-04-15

    The highly reactive electrophile, methylglyoxal (MG), a break down product of carbohydrates, is a major environmental mutagen having potential genotoxic effects. Previous studies have suggested the reaction of MG with free amino groups of proteins forming advanced glycation end products (AGEs). This results in the generation of free radicals which play an important role in pathophysiology of aging and diabetic complications. MG also reacts with free amino group of nucleic acids resulting in the formation of DNA-AGEs. While the formation of nucleoside AGEs has been demonstrated previously, no extensive studies have been performed to assess the genotoxicity and immunogenicity of DNA-AGEs. In this study we report both the genotoxicity and immunogenicity of AGEs formed by MG-Lys-Cu(2+) system. Genotoxicity of the experimentally generated AGEs was confirmed by comet-assay. Spectroscopical analysis and melting temperature studies suggest structural perturbations in the DNA as a result of modification. This might be due to generation of single-stranded regions and destabilization of hydrogen bonds. Immunogenicity of native and MG-Lys-Cu(2+)-DNA was probed in female rabbits. The modified DNA was highly immunogenic eliciting high titre immunogen specific antibodies, while the unmodified form was almost non-immunogenic. The results show structural perturbations in MG-Lys-Cu(2+)-DNA generating new epitopes that render the molecule immunogenic.

  19. Advances in the understanding of mitochondrial DNA as a pathogenic factor in inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boyapati, Ray K.; Tamborska, Arina; Dorward, David A.; Ho, Gwo-Tzer

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has many similarities with bacterial DNA because of their shared common ancestry. Increasing evidence demonstrates mtDNA to be a potent danger signal that is recognised by the innate immune system and can directly modulate the inflammatory response. In humans, elevated circulating mtDNA is found in conditions with significant tissue injury such as trauma and sepsis and increasingly in chronic organ-specific and systemic illnesses such as steatohepatitis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In this review, we examine our current understanding of mtDNA-mediated inflammation and how the mechanisms regulating mitochondrial homeostasis and mtDNA release represent exciting and previously under-recognised important factors in many human inflammatory diseases, offering many new translational opportunities. PMID:28299196

  20. ctDNA Determination of EGFR Mutation Status in European and Japanese Patients with Advanced NSCLC: The ASSESS Study.

    PubMed

    Reck, Martin; Hagiwara, Koichi; Han, Baohui; Tjulandin, Sergei; Grohé, Christian; Yokoi, Takashi; Morabito, Alessandro; Novello, Silvia; Arriola, Edurne; Molinier, Olivier; McCormack, Rose; Ratcliffe, Marianne; Normanno, Nicola

    2016-10-01

    To offer patients with EGFR mutation-positive advanced NSCLC appropriate EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment, mutation testing of tumor samples is required. However, tissue/cytologic samples are not always available or evaluable. The large, noninterventional diagnostic ASSESS study (NCT01785888) evaluated the utility of circulating free tumor-derived DNA (ctDNA) from plasma for EGFR mutation testing. ASSESS was conducted in 56 centers (in Europe and Japan). Eligible patients (with newly diagnosed locally advanced/metastatic treatment-naive advanced NSCLC) provided diagnostic tissue/cytologic and plasma samples. DNA extracted from tissue/cytologic samples was subjected to EGFR mutation testing using local practices; designated laboratories performed DNA extraction/mutation testing of blood samples. The primary end point was level of concordance of EGFR mutation status between matched tissue/cytologic and plasma samples. Of 1311 patients enrolled, 1288 were eligible. Concordance of mutation status in 1162 matched samples was 89% (sensitivity 46%, specificity 97%, positive predictive value 78%, and negative predictive value 90%). A group of 25 patients with apparent false-positive plasma results was overrepresented for cytologic samples, use of less sensitive tissue testing methodologies, and smoking habits associated with high EGFR mutation frequency, indicative of false-negative tumor results. In cases in which plasma and tumor samples were tested with identical highly sensitive methods, positive predictive value/sensitivity were generally improved. These real-world data suggest that ctDNA is a feasible sample for EGFR mutation analysis. It is important to conduct mutation testing of both tumor and plasma samples in specialized laboratories, using robust/sensitive methods to ensure that patients receive appropriate treatments that target the molecular features of their disease. Copyright © 2016 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

  1. Circulating DNA in diagnosis and monitoring EGFR gene mutations in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Del Re, Marzia; Danesi, Romano; Tiseo, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) are current treatments for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring activating EGFR gene mutations. Histological or cytological samples are the standard tumor materials for EGFR mutation analysis. However, the accessibility of tumor samples is not always possible and satisfactory in advanced NSCLC patients. Moreover, totality of EGFR mutated NSCLC patients will develop resistance to EGFR-TKIs. Repeat biopsies to study genetic evolution as a result of therapy are difficult, invasive and may be confounded by intra-tumor heterogeneity. Thus, exploring accurate and less invasive techniques to (I) diagnosis EGFR mutation if tissue is not available or not appropriate for molecular analysis and to (II) monitor EGFR-TKI treatment are needed. Circulating DNA fragments carrying tumor specific sequence alterations [circulating cell-free tumor DNA (cftDNA)] are found in the cell-free fraction of blood, representing a variable and generally small fraction of the total circulating DNA. cftDNA has a high degree of specificity to detect EGFR gene mutations in NSCLC. Studies have shown the feasibility of using cftDNA to diagnosis of EGFR activating gene mutations and also to monitor tumor dynamics in NSCLC patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. These evidences suggested that non-invasive techniques based on blood samples had a great potential in EGFR mutated NSCLC patients. In this review, we summarized these non-invasive approaches and relative scientific data now available, considering their possible applications in clinical practice of NSCLC treatment. PMID:26629427

  2. [Research advances on DNA extraction methods from peripheral blood mononuclear cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ying; Yu, Chen-Xi

    2014-10-01

    DNA extraction is a basic technology of molecular biology. The purity and the integrality of DNA structure are necessary for different experiments of gene engineering. As commonly used materials in the clinical detection, the fast, efficient isolation and extraction of genomic DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells is very important for the inspection and analysis of clinical blood. At present, there are many methods for extracting DNA, such as phenol-chloroform method, salting out method, centrifugal adsorption column chromatography method (artificial methods), magnetic beads (semi-automatic method) and DNA extraction kit. In this article, a brief review of the principle for existing DNA blood extraction method, the specific steps and the assessment of the specific methods briefly are summarized.

  3. Predicting response to radical (chemo)radiotherapy with circulating HPV DNA in locally advanced head and neck squamous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jen Y; Garcia-Murillas, Isaac; Cutts, Rosalind J; De Castro, David Gonzalez; Grove, Lorna; Hurley, Tara; Wang, Fuqiang; Nutting, Christopher; Newbold, Katie; Harrington, Kevin; Turner, Nicholas; Bhide, Shreerang

    2017-09-05

    Following chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) for human papilloma virus positive (HPV+) locally advanced head and neck cancer, patients frequently undergo unnecessary neck dissection (ND) and/or repeated biopsies for abnormal PET-CT, which causes significant morbidity. We assessed the role of circulating HPV DNA in identifying 'true' residual disease. We prospectively recruited test (n=55) and validation (n=33) cohorts. HPV status was confirmed by E7 RT-PCR. We developed a novel amplicon-based next generation sequencing assay (HPV16-detect) to detect circulating HPV DNA. Circulating HPV DNA levels post-CCRT were correlated to disease response (PET-CT). In pre-CCRT plasma, HPV-detect demonstrated 100% sensitivity and 93% specificity, and 90% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the test (27 HPV+) and validation (20 HPV+) cohorts, respectively. Thirty-six out of 37 patients (test and validation cohort) with complete samples-set had negative HPV-detect at end of treatment. Six patients underwent ND (3) and repeat primary site biopsies (3) for positive PET-CT but had no viable tumour. One patient had positive HPV-detect and positive PET-CT and liver biopsy, indicating 100% agreement for HPV-detect and residual cancer. We demonstrate that HPV16-detect is a highly sensitive and specific test for identification of HPV DNA in plasma at diagnosis. HPV DNA post-treatment correlates with clinical response.

  4. An Advanced Model to Precisely Estimate the Cell-Free Fetal DNA Concentration in Maternal Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huixin; Jiang, Haojun; Xie, Weiwei; Chen, Fang; Zeng, Peng; Li, Xuchao; Xie, Yifan; Liu, Hongtai; Huang, Guodong; Chen, Dayang; Liu, Ping; Jiang, Hui; Zhang, Xiuqing

    2016-01-01

    Background With the speedy development of sequencing technologies, noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) has been widely applied in clinical practice for testing for fetal aneuploidy. The cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) concentration in maternal plasma is the most critical parameter for this technology because it affects the accuracy of NIPT-based sequencing for fetal trisomies 21, 18 and 13. Several approaches have been developed to calculate the cffDNA fraction of the total cell-free DNA in the maternal plasma. However, most approaches depend on specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele information or are restricted to male fetuses. Methods In this study, we present an innovative method to accurately deduce the concentration of the cffDNA fraction using only maternal plasma DNA. SNPs were classified into four maternal-fetal genotype combinations and three boundaries were added to capture effective SNP loci in which the mother was homozygous and the fetus was heterozygous. The median value of the concentration of the fetal DNA fraction was estimated using the effective SNPs. A depth-bias correction was performed using simulated data and corresponding regression equations for adjustments when the depth of the sequencing data was below 100-fold or the cffDNA fraction is less than 10%. Results Using our approach, the median of the relative bias was 0.4% in 18 maternal plasma samples with a median sequencing depth of 125-fold. There was a significant association (r = 0.935) between our estimations and the estimations inferred from the Y chromosome. Furthermore, this approach could precisely estimate a cffDNA fraction as low as 3%, using only maternal plasma DNA at the targeted region with a sequencing depth of 65-fold. We also used PCR instead of parallel sequencing to calculate the cffDNA fraction. There was a significant association (r = 98.2%) between our estimations and those inferred from the Y chromosome. PMID:27662469

  5. SERS as an advanced tool for investigating chloroethyl nitrosourea derivatives complexation with DNA.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shweta; Ray, Bhumika; Mehrotra, Ranjana

    2015-11-01

    We report surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic (SERS) studies on free calf thymus DNA and its complexes with anti-tumor chloroethyl nitrosourea derivatives; semustine and nimustine. Since, first incident of SERS in 1974, it has rapidly established into an analytical tool, which can be used for the trace detection and characterization of analytes. Here, we depict yet another application of SERS in the field of drug-DNA interaction and thereby, its promising role in rational designing of new chemotherapeutic agents. Vibrational spectral analysis has been performed in an attempt to delineate the anti-cancer action mechanism of above mentioned nitrosourea derivatives. Strong SERS bands associated with the complexation of DNA with semustine and nimustine have been observed, which reveal binding of nitrosourea derivatives with heterocyclic nitrogenous base pair of DNA duplex. Formation of dG-dC interstrand cross-link in DNA double helices is also suggested by the SERS spectral outcomes of CENUs-DNA adduct. Results, demonstrated here, reflect recent progress in the newly developing field of drug-DNA interaction analysis via SERS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  7. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  8. DNA cleavage enzymes for treatment of persistent viral infections: Recent advances and the pathway forward

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Nicholas D.; Aubert, Martine; Dang, Chung H.; Stone, Daniel; Jerome, Keith R.

    2014-04-15

    Treatment for most persistent viral infections consists of palliative drug options rather than curative approaches. This is often because long-lasting viral DNA in infected cells is not affected by current antivirals, providing a source for viral persistence and reactivation. Targeting latent viral DNA itself could therefore provide a basis for novel curative strategies. DNA cleavage enzymes can be used to induce targeted mutagenesis of specific genes, including those of exogenous viruses. Although initial in vitro and even in vivo studies have been carried out using DNA cleavage enzymes targeting various viruses, many questions still remain concerning the feasibility of these strategies as they transition into preclinical research. Here, we review the most recent findings on DNA cleavage enzymes for human viral infections, consider the most relevant animal models for several human viral infections, and address issues regarding safety and enzyme delivery. Results from well-designed in vivo studies will ideally provide answers to the most urgent remaining questions, and allow continued progress toward clinical application. - Highlights: • Recent in vitro and in vivo results for DNA cleavage enzymes targeting persistent viral infections. • Analysis of the best animal models for testing enzymes for HBV, HSV, HIV and HPV. • Challenges facing in vivo delivery of therapeutic enzymes for persistent viral infections. • Safety issues to be addressed with proper animal studies.

  9. Advances in host and vector development for the production of plasmid DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mairhofer, Juergen; Lara, Alvaro R

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in DNA vaccine research provide a new momentum for this rather young and potentially disruptive technology. Gene-based vaccines are capable of eliciting protective immunity in humans to persistent intracellular pathogens, such as HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis, for which the conventional vaccine technologies have failed so far. The recent identification and characterization of genes coding for tumor antigens has stimulated the development of DNA-based antigen-specific cancer vaccines. Although most academic researchers consider the production of reasonable amounts of plasmid DNA (pDNA) for immunological studies relatively easy to solve, problems often arise during this first phase of production. In this chapter we review the current state of the art of pDNA production at small (shake flasks) and mid-scales (lab-scale bioreactor fermentations) and address new trends in vector design and strain engineering. We will guide the reader through the different stages of process design starting from choosing the most appropriate plasmid backbone, choosing the right Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain for production, and cultivation media and scale-up issues. In addition, we will address some points concerning the safety and potency of the produced plasmids, with special focus on producing antibiotic resistance-free plasmids. The main goal of this chapter is to make immunologists aware of the fact that production of the pDNA vaccine has to be performed with as much as attention and care as the rest of their research.

  10. Recent Advances in the Synthesis and Functions of Reconfigurable Interlocked DNA Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chun-Hua; Cecconello, Alessandro; Willner, Itamar

    2016-04-27

    Interlocked circular DNA nanostructures, e.g., catenanes or rotaxanes, provide functional materials within the area of DNA nanotechnology. Specifically, the triggered reversible reconfiguration of the catenane or rotaxane structures provides a means to yield new DNA switches and to use them as dynamic scaffolds for controlling chemical functions and positioning functional cargoes. The synthesis of two-ring catenanes and their switchable reconfiguration by pH, metal ions, or fuel/anti-fuel stimuli are presented, and the functions of these systems, as pendulum or rotor devices or as switchable catalysts, are described. Also, the synthesis of three-, five-, and seven-ring catenanes is presented, and their switchable reconfiguration using fuel/anti-fuel strands is addressed. Implementation of the dynamically reconfigured catenane structures for the programmed organization of Au nanoparticle (NP) assemblies, which allows the plasmonic control of the fluorescence properties of Au NP/fluorophore loads associated with the scaffold, and for the operation of logic gates is discussed. Interlocked DNA rotaxanes and their different synthetic approaches are presented, and their switchable reconfiguration by means of fuel/anti-fuel strands or photonic stimuli is described. Specifically, the use of the rotaxane as a scaffold to organize Au NP assemblies, and the control of the fluorescence properties with Au NP/fluorophore hybrids loaded on the rotaxane scaffold, are introduced. The future prospectives and challenges in the field of interlocked DNA nanostructures and the possible applications are discussed.

  11. Advances and challenges in the development of therapeutic DNA vaccines against hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cova, Lucyna

    2014-01-01

    Despite the existence of an effective prophylactic vaccine, chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major public health problem. Because very weak and functionally impaired virus-specific immune responses play a key role in the persistence of HBV infection, the stimulation of these responses appears to be of particular importance for virus clearance. In this regard DNA-based vaccination has emerged as novel, promising therapeutic approach for chronic hepatitis B. This review provides an update of preclinical studies in animal models (mouse, chimpanzee, duck, woodchuck), which evaluated the ability of DNA vaccines targeting hepadnaviral proteins to induce potent and sustained immune responses in naïve animals and to enhance virus clearance and break immune tolerance in chronic virus-carriers. Different strategies have been developed and evaluated in these models to optimize DNA vaccine including genetic adjuvants, combination with antiviral drugs, prime-boost regimens and plasmid delivery. The delivery of DNA by in vivo electroporation appears to be of particular interest for increase of vaccine potency in both small and large animal models. Based on the promising results generated in preclinical studies, first clinical trials of DNA vaccines have been initiated, although effective therapy of chronic hepatitis B awaits further improvements in vaccine efficacy.

  12. Advancements in the Underlying Pathogenesis of Schizophrenia: Implications of DNA Methylation in Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing-Shu; Huang, Nanxin; Michael, Namaka; Xiao, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a chronic and severe mental illness for which currently there is no cure. At present, the exact molecular mechanism involved in the underlying pathogenesis of SZ is unknown. The disease is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic, biological, psychological, and environmental factors. Recent studies have shown that epigenetic regulation is involved in SZ pathology. Specifically, DNA methylation, one of the earliest found epigenetic modifications, has been extensively linked to modulation of neuronal function, leading to psychiatric disorders such as SZ. However, increasing evidence indicates that glial cells, especially dysfunctional oligodendrocytes undergo DNA methylation changes that contribute to the pathogenesis of SZ. This review primarily focuses on DNA methylation involved in glial dysfunctions in SZ. Clarifying this mechanism may lead to the development of new therapeutic interventional strategies for the treatment of SZ and other illnesses by correcting abnormal methylation in glial cells. PMID:26696822

  13. DNA Replication Fading As Proliferating Cells Advance in Their Commitment to Terminal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Estefanía, Monturus Ma.; Ganier, Olivier; Hernández, Pablo; Schvartzman, Jorge B.; Mechali, Marcel; Krimer, Dora B.

    2012-01-01

    Terminal differentiation is the process by which cycling cells stop proliferating to start new specific functions. It involves dramatic changes in chromatin organization as well as gene expression. In the present report we used cell flow cytometry and genome wide DNA combing to investigate DNA replication during murine erythroleukemia-induced terminal cell differentiation. The results obtained indicated that the rate of replication fork movement slows down and the inter-origin distance becomes shorter during the precommitment and commitment periods before cells stop proliferating and accumulate in G1. We propose this is a general feature caused by the progressive heterochromatinization that characterizes terminal cell differentiation. PMID:22359734

  14. DNA Advanced Glycation End Products (DNA-AGEs) Are Elevated in Urine and Tissue in an Animal Model of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Richard; Shuck, Sarah C; Chan, Yin S; Liu, Xueli; Bates, Steven E; Lim, Punnajit P; Tamae, Daniel; Lacoste, Sandrine; O'Connor, Timothy R; Termini, John

    2017-02-20

    More precise identification and treatment monitoring of prediabetic/diabetic individuals will require additional biomarkers to complement existing diagnostic tests. Candidates include hyperglycemia-induced adducts such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs) of proteins, lipids, and DNA. The potential for DNA-AGEs as diabetic biomarkers was examined in a longitudinal study using the Lepr(db/db) animal model of metabolic syndrome. The DNA-AGE, N(2)-(1-carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (CEdG) was quantified by mass spectrometry using isotope dilution from the urine and tissue of hyperglycemic and normoglycemic mice. Hyperglycemic mice (fasting plasma glucose, FPG, ≥ 200 mg/dL) displayed a higher median urinary CEdG value (238.4 ± 112.8 pmol/24 h) than normoglycemic mice (16.1 ± 11.8 pmol/24 h). Logistic regression analysis revealed urinary CEdG to be an independent predictor of hyperglycemia. Urinary CEdG was positively correlated with FPG in hyperglycemic animals and with HbA1c for all mice. Average tissue-derived CEdG was also higher in hyperglycemic mice (18.4 CEdG/10(6) dG) than normoglycemic mice (4.4 CEdG/10(6) dG). Urinary CEdG was significantly elevated in Lepr(db/db) mice relative to Lepr(wt/wt), and tissue CEdG values increased in the order Lepr(wt/wt) < Lepr(wt/db) < Lepr(db/db). These data suggest that urinary CEdG measurement may provide a noninvasive quantitative index of glycemic status and augment existing biomarkers for the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes.

  15. Recent advances in design of immunogenic and effective naked DNA vaccines against cancer.

    PubMed

    Fioretti, Daniela; Iurescia, Sandra; Rinaldi, Monica

    2014-01-01

    A variety of clinical trials for vaccines against cancer have provided evidence that DNA vaccines are well tolerated and have an excellent safety profile. DNA vaccines require much improvement to make them sufficiently effective against cancer in the clinic. Nowadays, it is clear that an increased antigen expression correlates with improved immunogenicity and it is critical to vaccine performance in large animals and humans. Similarly, additional strategies are required to activate effective immunity against poorly immunogenic tumour antigens. This review discusses very recent scientific references focused on the development of sophisticated DNA vaccines against cancer. We report a selection of novel and relevant patents employed to improve their immunogenicity through several strategies such as the use of tissue-specific transcriptional elements, nuclear localisation signalling, codon-optimisation and by targeting antigenic proteins to secretory pathway. Recent patents validating portions or splice variants of tumour antigens as candidates for cancer DNA vaccines with improved specificity, such as mesothelin and hTERT, are also discussed. Lastly, we review novel patents on the use of genetic immunomodulators, such as "universal" T helper epitopes derived from tetanus toxin, E. coli heat labile enterotoxin and vegetable proteins, as well as cytokines, chemokines or costimulatory molecules such as IL-6, IL-15, IL- 21 to amplify immunity against cancer.

  16. Advances in chromatographic supports for pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA purification.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Angela; Sousa, Fani; Queiroz, João A

    2012-11-01

    Chromatographic technology is undoubtedly one of the most diverse and powerful purification methods for downstream process applications. The diversity and quantity of biomolecules present in crude extracts as well as the similarities between impurities and the target biomolecule are considered the critical challenges in the extraction and purification steps. Thus, it is important to optimize the purification protocol to achieve maximum recovery of the target sample. The structure of chromatographic supports has been continuously developed to afford rapid and efficient separations, as well as, the application of specific ligands to improve the selectivity for the target molecule. The present review discusses the structural progress and evolution of the chromatographic supports that have been used for plasmid DNA purification. Nowadays, the most desirable form of plasmid for gene therapy and DNA vaccination is the supercoiled isoform, due to its stability and higher transfection efficiency over other plasmid topologies. However, the main challenge is not only to produce high quantities of supercoiled plasmid DNA but also to preserve its quality, meeting the strict requirements recommended by the regulatory agencies. Therefore, this review will focus on the chemical and structural classification of the different media and on some of the specific ligands used for plasmid DNA bioseparation.

  17. Nuclear DNA content and p53 overexpression in stage I squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue compared with advanced tongue carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Högmo, A; Kuylenstierna, R; Lindholm, J; Nathansson, A; Auer, G; Munck-Wikland, E

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the predictive value of the nuclear DNA content (image cytometry) and p53 overexpression (immuno-histochemistry using antibody CM-1) in uniformly treated stage I carcinomas of the mobile tongue. Also, to compare stage I carcinomas with advanced tongue carcinomas (stages II-IV). METHODS: Archival formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tumour specimens from 54 patients with stage I squamous cell carcinoma and 37 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma were analysed. Mean follow up time of the stage I carcinomas was 71 months (median, 62.5; range, 6-175). RESULTS: Twenty three patients (stage I) had recurring disease: 10 had local recurrence (in the tongue) and 13 had regional recurrence (cervical metastases). Locally recurring stage I carcinomas had a more pronounced DNA deviation than the other stage I carcinomas and this degree of deviation was comparable with the DNA content of advanced carcinomas. Stage I carcinomas that developed regional recurrences overexpressed p53 more frequently. In Cox multivariate regression analysis of time to recurrence, DNA deviation was a significant parameter in tumours that recurred locally (p = 0.032). p53 overexpression was the only parameter close to significance for regional recurrence (p = 0.065). CONCLUSIONS: Nuclear DNA content and p53 immunostaining are of value for the prediction of recurrence of stage I squamous cell carcinomas of the mobile tongue. Stage I tongue carcinomas that are prone to local recurrence show the same DNA content as do advanced tongue carcinomas. PMID:10193521

  18. Combining natural and man-made DNA tracers to advance understanding of hydrologic flow pathway evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlke, H. E.; Walter, M. T.; Lyon, S. W.; Rosqvist, G. N.

    2014-12-01

    Identifying and characterizing the sources, pathways and residence times of water and associated constituents is critical to developing improved understanding of watershed-stream connections and hydrological/ecological/biogeochemical models. To date the most robust information is obtained from integrated studies that combine natural tracers (e.g. isotopes, geochemical tracers) with controlled chemical tracer (e.g., bromide, dyes) or colloidal tracer (e.g., carboxilated microspheres, tagged clay particles, microorganisms) applications. In the presented study we explore how understanding of sources and flow pathways of water derived from natural tracer studies can be improved and expanded in space and time by simultaneously introducing man-made, synthetic DNA-based microtracers. The microtracer used were composed of polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres into which short strands of synthetic DNA and paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are incorporated. Tracer experiments using both natural tracers and the DNA-based microtracers were conducted in the sub-arctic, glacierized Tarfala (21.7 km2) catchment in northern Sweden. Isotopic hydrograph separations revealed that even though storm runoff was dominated by pre-event water the event water (i.e. rainfall) contributions to streamflow increased throughout the summer season as glacial snow cover decreased. This suggests that glaciers are a major source of the rainwater fraction in streamflow. Simultaneous injections of ten unique DNA-based microtracers confirmed this hypothesis and revealed that the transit time of water traveling from the glacier surface to the stream decreased fourfold over the summer season leading to instantaneous rainwater contributions during storm events. These results highlight that integrating simultaneous tracer injections (injecting tracers at multiple places at one time) with traditional tracer methods (sampling multiple times at one place) rather than using either approach in isolation can

  19. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  20. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  1. Recent advance in immunotherapies for Alzheimer disease: with special reference to DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Okura, Yoshio; Matsumoto, Yoh

    2009-06-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia characterized by progressive neurodegeneration. Based on the amyloid cascade hypothesis, several immunotherapies for AD have been developed as curative treatment. In 1999, Schenk et al. reported for the first time that amyloid beta (Abeta) deposits in AD model mice could be reduced by active vaccination with Abeta peptide. Although clinical trials with the Abeta peptide were halted due to the development of meningoencephalitis in some treated patients, the vaccine therapy was judged to be effective on the basis of clinical and pathological analyses. Passive immunization using humanized anti-Abeta monoclonal antibodies is also under clinical trials; however they have some problems to be solved. As other strategies, DNA vaccines have been developed as immunotherapies for AD, which is simple, easily modified and can be administered without adjuvant. DNA vaccines were developed by several groups including our laboratory, which induced Abeta reduction in AD model mice without side effects. DNA vaccination may be open up new avenue of vaccine therapies for AD in the near future.

  2. Targeting DNA base pair mismatch with artificial nucleobases. Advances and perspectives in triple helix strategy.

    PubMed

    Malnuit, Vincent; Duca, Maria; Benhida, Rachid

    2011-01-21

    This review, divided into three sections, describes the contribution of the chemists' community to the development and application of triple helix strategy by using artificial nucleic acids, particularly for the recognition of DNA sequences incorporating base pair inversions. Firstly, the development of nucleobases that recognise CG inversion is surveyed followed secondly by specific recognition of TA inverted base pair. Finally, we point out in the last section recent perspectives and applications, driven from knowledge in nucleic acids interactions, in the growing field of nanotechnology and supramolecular chemistry at the border area of physics, chemistry and molecular biology.

  3. Measuring the microbiome: perspectives on advances in DNA-based techniques for exploring microbial life

    PubMed Central

    Bunge, John; Gilbert, Jack A.; Moore, Jason H.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in ‘microbiome studies’: molecular, statistical and graphical techniques to explore and quantify how microbial organisms affect our environments and ourselves given recent increases in sequencing technology. Microbiome studies are moving beyond mere inventories of specific ecosystems to quantifications of community diversity and descriptions of their ecological function. We review the last 24 months of progress in this sort of research, and anticipate where the next 2 years will take us. We hope that bioinformaticians will find this a helpful springboard for new collaborations with microbiologists. PMID:22308073

  4. Anthracyclines and ellipticines as DNA-damaging anticancer drugs: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Kizek, Rene; Adam, Vojtech; Hrabeta, Jan; Eckschlager, Tomas; Smutny, Svatopluk; Burda, Jaroslav V; Frei, Eva; Stiborova, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Over the past forty years, anthracyclines and ellipticines have attracted attention as promising cytostatics. In this review, we focus on their mechanisms of cytoxicity, DNA-damaging effects and adverse side-effects. We also summarize ways to enhance the therapeutic effects of these drugs together with a decrease in their adverse effects. Current drug design strategies are focused on drug bioavailability and their tissue targeting, whereas drug delivery to specific intracellular compartments is rarely addressed. Therefore, therapies utilizing the antineoplastic activities of anthracyclines and ellipticines combined with novel strategies such as nanotechnologies for safer drug delivery, as well as strategies based on gene therapy, could significantly contribute to medical practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Usefulness of circulating free DNA for monitoring epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cao, Maria; Ramirez, Santiago Viteri; Ariza, Nuria Jordana; Balada, Ariadna; Garzón, Mónica; Teixidó, Cristina; Karachaliou, Niki; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Molina-Vila, Miguel Ángel; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Genomic analysis of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) released from cancer cells into the bloodstream has been proposed as a useful method to capture dynamic changes during the course of the disease. In particular, the ability to monitor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status in cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA) isolated from advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients EGFR can help to the correct management of the disease and overcome the challenges associated with tumor heterogeneity and insufficient biopsied material to perform key molecular diagnosis. Here, we report a case of long term monitorization of EGFR mutation status in cfDNA from peripheral blood in an NSCLC patient in, with excellent correlation with clinical evolution. PMID:27826535

  6. Advanced DNA- and Protein-based Methods for the Detection and Investigation of Food Allergens.

    PubMed

    Prado, M; Ortea, I; Vial, S; Rivas, J; Calo-Mata, P; Barros-Velázquez, J

    2016-11-17

    Currently, food allergies are an important health concern worldwide. The presence of undeclared allergenic ingredients or the presence of traces of allergens due to contamination during food processing poses a great health risk to sensitized individuals. Therefore, reliable analytical methods are required to detect and identify allergenic ingredients in food products. The present review addresses the recent developments regarding the application of DNA- and protein-based methods for the detection of allergenic ingredients in foods. The fitness-for-purpose of reviewed methodology will be discussed, and future trends will be highlighted. Special attention will be given to the evaluation of the potential of newly developed and promising technologies that can improve the detection and identification of allergenic ingredients in foods, such as the use of biosensors and/or nanomaterials to improve detection limits, specificity, ease of use, or to reduce the time of analysis. Such rapid food allergen test methods are required to facilitate the reliable detection of allergenic ingredients by control laboratories, to give the food industry the means to easily determine whether its product has been subjected to cross-contamination and, simultaneously, to identify how and when this cross-contamination occurred.

  7. Development of an Advanced Electrochemical DNA Biosensor for Bacterial Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Joseph C.; Mastali, Mitra; Li, Yang; Gau, Vincent; Suchard, Marc A.; Babbitt, Jane; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Landaw, Elliot M.; McCabe, Edward R.B.; Churchill, Bernard M.; Haake, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical sensors have the capacity for rapid and accurate detection of a wide variety of target molecules in biological fluids. We have developed an electrochemical sensor assay involving hybridization of bacterial 16S rRNA to fluorescein-modified detector probes and to biotin-modified capture probes anchored to the sensor surface. Signal is generated by an oxidation-reduction current produced by the action of horseradish peroxidase conjugated to an anti-fluorescein monoclonal Fab. A previous study found that this electrochemical sensor strategy could identify uropathogens in clinical urine specimens. To improve assay sensitivity, we examined the key steps that affect the current amplitude of the electrochemical signal. Efficient lysis and release of 16S rRNA from both gram-negative and -positive bacteria was achieved with an initial treatment with Triton X-100 and lysozyme followed by alkaline lysis, resulting in a 12-fold increase in electrochemical signal compared with alkaline lysis alone. The distance in nucleotides between the target hybridization sites of the detector and capture probes and the location of fluorescein modification on the detector probe contributed to a 23-fold change in signal intensity. These results demonstrate the importance of target-probe and probe-probe interactions in the detection of bacterial 16S rRNA using an electrochemical DNA sensor approach. PMID:17384207

  8. DNA technological progress toward advanced diagnostic tools to support human hookworm control.

    PubMed

    Gasser, R B; Cantacessi, C; Loukas, A

    2008-01-01

    Blood-feeding hookworms are parasitic nematodes of major human health importance. Currently, it is estimated that 740 million people are infected worldwide, and more than 80 million of them are severely affected clinically by hookworm disease. In spite of the health problems caused and the advances toward the development of vaccines against some hookworms, limited attention has been paid to the need for improved, practical methods of diagnosis. Accurate diagnosis and genetic characterization of hookworms is central to their effective control. While traditional diagnostic methods have considerable limitations, there has been some progress toward the development of molecular-diagnostic tools. The present article provides a brief background on hookworm disease of humans, reviews the main methods that have been used for diagnosis and describes progress in establishing polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for the specific diagnosis of hookworm infection and the genetic characterisation of the causative agents. This progress provides a foundation for the rapid development of practical, highly sensitive and specific diagnostic and analytical tools to be used in improved hookworm prevention and control programmes.

  9. Frequent germline deleterious mutations in DNA repair genes in familial prostate cancer cases are associated with advanced disease

    PubMed Central

    Leongamornlert, D; Saunders, E; Dadaev, T; Tymrakiewicz, M; Goh, C; Jugurnauth-Little, S; Kozarewa, I; Fenwick, K; Assiotis, I; Barrowdale, D; Govindasami, K; Guy, M; Sawyer, E; Wilkinson, R; Antoniou, A C; Eeles, R; Kote-Jarai, Z

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer (PrCa) is one of the most common diseases to affect men worldwide and among the leading causes of cancer-related death. The purpose of this study was to use second-generation sequencing technology to assess the frequency of deleterious mutations in 22 tumour suppressor genes in familial PrCa and estimate the relative risk of PrCa if these genes are mutated. Methods: Germline DNA samples from 191 men with 3 or more cases of PrCa in their family were sequenced for 22 tumour suppressor genes using Agilent target enrichment and Illumina technology. Analysis for genetic variation was carried out by using a pipeline consisting of BWA, Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK) and ANNOVAR. Clinical features were correlated with mutation status using standard statistical tests. Modified segregation analysis was used to determine the relative risk of PrCa conferred by the putative loss-of-function (LoF) mutations identified. Results: We discovered 14 putative LoF mutations in 191 samples (7.3%) and these mutations were more frequently associated with nodal involvement, metastasis or T4 tumour stage (P=0.00164). Segregation analysis of probands with European ancestry estimated that LoF mutations in any of the studied genes confer a relative risk of PrCa of 1.94 (95% CI: 1.56–2.42). Conclusions: These findings show that LoF mutations in DNA repair pathway genes predispose to familial PrCa and advanced disease and therefore warrants further investigation. The clinical utility of these findings will become increasingly important as targeted screening and therapies become more widespread. PMID:24556621

  10. DNA nanostructure meets nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guomei; Surwade, Sumedh P; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Haitao

    2013-04-07

    Recent advances in DNA nanotechnology have made it possible to construct DNA nanostructures of almost arbitrary shapes with 2-3 nm of precision in their dimensions. These DNA nanostructures are ideal templates for bottom-up nanofabrication. This review highlights the challenges and recent advances in three areas that are directly related to DNA-based nanofabrication: (1) fabrication of large scale DNA nanostructures; (2) pattern transfer from DNA nanostructure to an inorganic substrate; and (3) directed assembly of DNA nanostructures.

  11. Label-free and enzyme-free platform for the construction of advanced DNA logic devices based on the assembly of graphene oxide and DNA-templated AgNCs.

    PubMed

    Fan, Daoqing; Zhu, Jinbo; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-02-14

    DNA-based molecular logic computation has drawn extensive attention in bioanalysis, intelligent diagnostics of diseases and other nanotechnology areas. Herein, taking 2-to-1 and 4-to-2 encoders and a 1-to-2 decoder as model molecular logic devices, we for the first time combined the quenching ability of GO (graphene oxide) to DNA-templated AgNCs with G-quadruplex-enhanced fluorescence intensity of porphyrin dyes for the construction of label-free and enzyme-free dual-output advanced DNA molecular logic devices. Also, through the application of negative logic conversion to an XOR logic gate and combined with an INHIBIT logic gate, we also operated a label-free and enzyme-free comparator.

  12. DNA aptamer raised against advanced glycation end products inhibits neointimal hyperplasia in balloon-injured rat carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Ayako; Oda, Eriko; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Matsui, Takanori; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2014-02-15

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction elicit inflammatory and proliferative reactions in arteries, thus playing a role in cardiovascular disease. We have recently found that high-affinity DNA aptamer directed against AGE (AGE-aptamer) prevents the progression of experimental diabetic nephropathy by blocking the harmful actions of AGEs in the kidney. However, effects of AGE-aptamer on vascular injury remain unknown. In this study, we examined whether and how AGE-aptamer inhibits neointimal hyperplasia in balloon-injured rat carotid arteries. Male Wistar rats (weighting ca. 400 g at 11 weeks old) were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital. The left common carotid artery was balloon-injured 3 times with 2F Fogaty catheter inserted through the femoral artery. Then the rats received continuous intraperitoneal infusion (3 μg/day) of either AGE-aptamer or control-aptamer by an osmotic mini pump for 2 weeks. 14 days after the procedure, the left common carotid arteries were excised for morphometric, immunohistochemical and western blot analyses. Compared with control-aptamer, AGE-aptamer significantly suppressed neointima formation after balloon injury and reduced AGE accumulation, oxidative stress generation, proliferation cell nuclear antigen-positive area, macrophage infiltration, RAGE and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) expression levels in balloon-injured carotid arteries. The present study suggests that AGE-aptamer could prevent balloon injury-induced neointimal hyperplasia by reducing PDGF-BB and macrophage infiltration via suppression of the AGE-RAGE-mediated oxidative stress generation. AGE-aptamer might be a novel therapeutic strategy for suppressing neointima formation after balloon angioplasty. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Label-free and enzyme-free platform for the construction of advanced DNA logic devices based on the assembly of graphene oxide and DNA-templated AgNCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Daoqing; Zhu, Jinbo; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-02-01

    DNA-based molecular logic computation has drawn extensive attention in bioanalysis, intelligent diagnostics of diseases and other nanotechnology areas. Herein, taking 2-to-1 and 4-to-2 encoders and a 1-to-2 decoder as model molecular logic devices, we for the first time combined the quenching ability of GO (graphene oxide) to DNA-templated AgNCs with G-quadruplex-enhanced fluorescence intensity of porphyrin dyes for the construction of label-free and enzyme-free dual-output advanced DNA molecular logic devices. Also, through the application of negative logic conversion to an XOR logic gate and combined with an INHIBIT logic gate, we also operated a label-free and enzyme-free comparator.DNA-based molecular logic computation has drawn extensive attention in bioanalysis, intelligent diagnostics of diseases and other nanotechnology areas. Herein, taking 2-to-1 and 4-to-2 encoders and a 1-to-2 decoder as model molecular logic devices, we for the first time combined the quenching ability of GO (graphene oxide) to DNA-templated AgNCs with G-quadruplex-enhanced fluorescence intensity of porphyrin dyes for the construction of label-free and enzyme-free dual-output advanced DNA molecular logic devices. Also, through the application of negative logic conversion to an XOR logic gate and combined with an INHIBIT logic gate, we also operated a label-free and enzyme-free comparator. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Optimization experiments, Table S1, Fig. S1-S5 in ESI. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00032k

  14. Concordance of Hypermethylated DNA and the Tumor Markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA in Serum during Monitoring of Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Lars Mønster; Hansen, Morten Høgh; Nielsen, Dorte; Sölétormos, György

    2015-01-01

    The serological protein tumor markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA are frequently used to monitor tumor burden among metastatic breast cancer patients. Breast cancer is associated with global DNA hypomethylation and hypermethylation of some promoter regions. No monitoring study has yet investigated the interrelationship between protein tumor markers, the global DNA hypomethylation, and hypermethylated genes in serum from patients with advanced disease. Twenty-nine patients with histologically proven advanced breast cancer received first-line chemotherapy with epirubicin. Samples were collected prior to each treatment and prospectively analyzed for CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA. The same samples were retrospectively analyzed for the concentration of hypermethylated RASSF1A and for global DNA hypomethylation using LINE-1. Among patients with elevated concentrations of the protein markers, concordance could be observed between serial changes of the hypermethylated RASSF1A gene and the protein markers. Among patients with lower concentrations, RASSF1A could only be detected periodically. There was discordance between changes of the hypomethylated LINE-1 as compared to the protein markers. Circulating hypermethylated RASSF1A and protein markers may have similar kinetics during monitoring of tumor burden. Further investigations are needed to determine whether any of the hypermethylated DNA genes may provide predictive information during monitoring.

  15. The impact of sperm DNA damage in assisted conception and beyond: recent advances in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Sheena E M; John Aitken, R; Conner, Sarah J; Iuliis, Geoffry De; Evenson, Donald P; Henkel, Ralph; Giwercman, Aleksander; Gharagozloo, Parviz

    2013-10-01

    Sperm DNA damage is a useful biomarker for male infertility diagnosis and prediction of assisted reproduction outcomes. It is associated with reduced fertilization rates, embryo quality and pregnancy rates, and higher rates of spontaneous miscarriage and childhood diseases. This review provides a synopsis of the most recent studies from each of the authors, all of whom have major track records in the field of sperm DNA damage in the clinical setting. It explores current laboratory tests and the accumulating body of knowledge concerning the relationship between sperm DNA damage and clinical outcomes. The paper proceeds to discuss the strengths, weaknesses and clinical applicability of current sperm DNA tests. Next, the biological significance of DNA damage in the male germ line is considered. Finally, as sperm DNA damage is often the result of oxidative stress in the male reproductive tract, the potential contribution of antioxidant therapy in the clinical management of this condition is discussed. DNA damage in human spermatozoa is an important attribute of semen quality. It should be part of the clinical work up and properly controlled trials addressing the effectiveness of antioxidant therapy should be undertaken as a matter of urgency. Sperm DNA damage is a useful biomarker for male infertility diagnosis and prediction of assisted reproduction outcomes. It is associated with reduced fertilization rates, embryo quality and pregnancy rates, and higher rates of spontaneous miscarriage and childhood diseases. With all of these fertility check points, it shows more promise than conventional semen parameters from a diagnostic perspective. Despite this, few infertility clinics use it routinely. This review provides a synopsis of the most recent studies from each of the authors, all of whom have major track records in the field of sperm DNA damage in the clinical setting. It explores current laboratory tests and the accumulating body of knowledge concerning the

  16. Experimental and molecular docking studies on DNA binding interaction of adefovir dipivoxil: Advances toward treatment of hepatitis B virus infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Falsafi, Monireh

    The toxic interaction of adefovir dipivoxil with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by multi-spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling study. The fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorption spectroscopy indicated drug interacted with CT-DNA in a groove binding mode. The binding constant of UV-visible and the number of binding sites were 3.33 ± 0.2 × 104 L mol-1and 0.99, respectively. The fluorimetric studies showed that the reaction between the drug and CT-DNA is exothermic (ΔH = 34.4 kJ mol-1; ΔS = 184.32 J mol-1 K-1). Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) was employed to measure the conformational change of CT-DNA in the presence of adefovir dipivoxil, which verified the groove binding mode. Furthermore, the drug induces detectable changes in its viscosity. The molecular modeling results illustrated that adefovir strongly binds to groove of DNA by relative binding energy of docked structure -16.83 kJ mol-1. This combination of multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods can be widely used in the investigation on the toxic interaction of small molecular pollutants and drugs with bio macromolecules, which contributes to clarify the molecular mechanism of toxicity or side effect in vivo.

  17. Advanced Characterization of DNA Molecules in rAAV Vector Preparations by Single-stranded Virus Next-generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lecomte, Emilie; Tournaire, Benoît; Cogné, Benjamin; Dupont, Jean-Baptiste; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Martin-Fontaine, Mélanie; Broucque, Frédéric; Robin, Cécile; Hebben, Matthias; Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Blouin, Véronique; François, Achille; Redon, Richard; Moullier, Philippe; Léger, Adrien

    2015-01-01

    Recent successful clinical trials with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAVs) have led to a renewed interest in gene therapy. However, despite extensive developments to improve vector-manufacturing processes, undesirable DNA contaminants in rAAV preparations remain a major safety concern. Indeed, the presence of DNA fragments containing antibiotic resistance genes, wild-type AAV, and packaging cell genomes has been found in previous studies using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses. However, because qPCR only provides a partial view of the DNA molecules in rAAV preparations, we developed a method based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) to extensively characterize single-stranded DNA virus preparations (SSV-Seq). In order to validate SSV-Seq, we analyzed three rAAV vector preparations produced by transient transfection of mammalian cells. Our data were consistent with qPCR results and showed a quasi-random distribution of contaminants originating from the packaging cells genome. Finally, we found single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) along the vector genome but no evidence of large deletions. Altogether, SSV-Seq could provide a characterization of DNA contaminants and a map of the rAAV genome with unprecedented resolution and exhaustiveness. We expect SSV-Seq to pave the way for a new generation of quality controls, guiding process development toward rAAV preparations of higher potency and with improved safety profiles. PMID:26506038

  18. Advanced Characterization of DNA Molecules in rAAV Vector Preparations by Single-stranded Virus Next-generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lecomte, Emilie; Tournaire, Benoît; Cogné, Benjamin; Dupont, Jean-Baptiste; Lindenbaum, Pierre; Martin-Fontaine, Mélanie; Broucque, Frédéric; Robin, Cécile; Hebben, Matthias; Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Blouin, Véronique; François, Achille; Redon, Richard; Moullier, Philippe; Léger, Adrien

    2015-10-27

    Recent successful clinical trials with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAVs) have led to a renewed interest in gene therapy. However, despite extensive developments to improve vector-manufacturing processes, undesirable DNA contaminants in rAAV preparations remain a major safety concern. Indeed, the presence of DNA fragments containing antibiotic resistance genes, wild-type AAV, and packaging cell genomes has been found in previous studies using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses. However, because qPCR only provides a partial view of the DNA molecules in rAAV preparations, we developed a method based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) to extensively characterize single-stranded DNA virus preparations (SSV-Seq). In order to validate SSV-Seq, we analyzed three rAAV vector preparations produced by transient transfection of mammalian cells. Our data were consistent with qPCR results and showed a quasi-random distribution of contaminants originating from the packaging cells genome. Finally, we found single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) along the vector genome but no evidence of large deletions. Altogether, SSV-Seq could provide a characterization of DNA contaminants and a map of the rAAV genome with unprecedented resolution and exhaustiveness. We expect SSV-Seq to pave the way for a new generation of quality controls, guiding process development toward rAAV preparations of higher potency and with improved safety profiles.

  19. Advanced glycation end products of DNA: quantification of N2-(1-Carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine in biological samples by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Synold, Timothy; Xi, Bixin; Wuenschell, Gerald E; Tamae, Daniel; Figarola, James L; Rahbar, Samuel; Termini, John

    2008-11-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) and related alpha-oxoaldehydes react with proteins, lipids, and DNA to give rise to covalent adducts known as advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Elevated levels of AGEs have been implicated in the pathological complications of diabetes, uremia, Alzheimer's disease, and possibly cancer. There is therefore widespread interest in developing sensitive methods for the in vivo measurement of AGEs as prognostic biomarkers and for treatment monitoring. The two diastereomeric MG-DNA adducts of N(2)-(1-carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (CEdG) are the primary glycation products formed in DNA; however, accurate assessment of their distribution in vivo has not been possible since there is no readily available quantitative method for CEdG determination in biological samples. To address these issues, we have developed a sensitive and quantitative liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry assay using the stable isotope dilution method with an (15)N(5)-CEdG standard. Methods for CEdG determination in urine or tissue extracted DNA are described. Changes in urinary CEdG in diabetic rats in response to oral administration of the AGE inhibitor LR-90 are used to demonstrate the potential utility of the method for treatment monitoring. Both stereoisomeric CEdG adducts were detected in a human breast tumor and normal adjacent tissue at levels of 3-12 adducts/10(7) dG, suggesting that this lesion may be widely distributed in vivo. Strategies for dealing with artifactual adduct formation due to oxoaldehyde generation during DNA isolation and enzymatic workup procedures are described.

  20. Relationship between pretreatment level of plasma Epstein-Barr virus DNA, tumor burden, and metabolic activity in advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Brigette; King, Ann; Lo, Y.M. Dennis; Yau, Y.Y.; Zee, Benny; Hui, Edwin P.; Leung, Sing F.; Mo, Frankie; Kam, Michael K.; Ahuja, Anil; Kwan, Wing H.; Chan, Anthony . E-mail: anthony@clo.cuhk.edu.hk

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: Plasma Epstein-Barr virus DNA (pEBV DNA) is an important prognostic marker in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). This study tested the hypotheses that pEBV DNA reflects tumor burden and metabolic activity by evaluating its relationship with tumor volume and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) uptake in NPC. Methods and Materials: Pre-treatment pEBV DNA analysis, {sup 18}F-FDG positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan (PET-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head and neck were performed in 57 patients. Net volume (cm{sup 3}) of the primary tumor (T{sub vol}) and regional nodes (N{sub vol}) were quantified on MRI. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was expressed as the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) at the primary tumor (T{sub suv}) and regional nodes (N{sub suv}). Lesions with SUV{sub max} {>=} 2.5 were considered malignant. Relationship between SUV{sub max}, natural logarithm (log) of pEBV DNA, and square root (sq) of MRI volumes was analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. A linear regression model was constructed to test for any interaction between variables and disease stage. Results: Log-pEBV DNA showed significant correlation with sq-T{sub vol} (r = 0.393), sq-N{sub vol} (r = 0.452), total tumor volume (sq-Total{sub vol} = T{sub vol} + N{sub vol}, r = 0.554), T{sub suv} (r = 0.276), N{sub suv} (r = 0.434), and total SUV{sub max} (Total{sub suv} = T{sub suv} + N{sub suv}, r = 0.457). Likewise, sq-T{sub vol} was correlated to T{sub suv} (r 0.426), and sq-N{sub vol} with N{sub suv} (r = 0.651). Regression analysis showed that only log-pEBV DNA was significantly associated with sq-Total{sub vol} (p < 0.001; parameter estimate = 8.844; 95% confidence interval = 3.986-13.703), whereas Sq-T{sub vol} was significantly associated with T{sub suv} (p = 0.002; parameter estimate = 3.923; 95% confidence interval = 1.498-6.348). Conclusion: This study supports the hypothesis that cell-free plasma EBV DNA is a marker of tumor burden in EBV

  1. Circulating tumor DNA profiling reveals clonal evolution and real-time disease progression in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhi-Xiong; Chen, Geng; Zeng, Yong-Yi; Dong, Xiu-Qing; Lin, Min-Jie; Huang, Xin-Hui; Zhang, Da; Liu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Jing-Feng

    2017-09-01

    Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) provides a potential non-invasive biomarker for cancer diagnosis and prognosis, but whether it could reflect tumor heterogeneity and monitor therapeutic responses in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unclear. Focusing on 574 cancer genes known to harbor actionable mutations, we identified the mutation repertoire of HCC tissues, and monitored the corresponding ctDNA features in blood samples to evaluate its clinical significance. Analysis of 3 HCC patients' mutation profiles revealed that ctDNA could overcome tumor heterogeneity and provide information of tumor burden and prognosis. Further analysis was conducted on the 4th HCC case with multiple lesion samples and sequential plasma samples. We identified 160 subclonal SNVs in tumor tissues as well as matched peritumor tissues with PBMC as control. 96.9% of this patient's tissue mutations could be also detected in plasma samples. These subclonal SNVs were grouped into 9 clusters according to their trends of cellular prevalence shift in tumor tissues. Two clusters constituted of tumor stem somatic mutations showed circulating levels relating with cancer progression. Analysis of tumor somatic mutations revealed that circulating level of such tumor stem somatic mutations could reflect tumor burden and even predict prognosis earlier than traditional strategies. Furthermore, HCK (p.V174M), identified as a recurrent/metastatic related mutation site, could promote migration and invasion of HCC cells. Taken together, study of mutation profiles in biopsy and plasma samples in HCC patients showed that ctDNA could overcome tumor heterogeneity and real-time track the therapeutic responses in the longitudinal monitoring. © 2017 UICC.

  2. Second-generation non-invasive high-throughput DNA sequencing technology in the screening of Down's syndrome in advanced maternal age women

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIAO; ZHANG, BIN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of using non-invasive DNA testing technology in screening Down's syndrome among women of advanced maternal age (AMA) and to provide evidence for prenatal screening of Down's syndrome. With a double-blind design, 8 ml of peripheral venous blood samples were collected from 87 women aged ≥35 years after 12 weeks of pregnancy. All cases were recorded with unique identification cards with clinical details and followed up until delivery. All the non-invasive prenatal testing results were confirmed by amniotic fluid fetal karyotyping (the gold standard of aneuploidy test), follow-up examination by neonatologists or neonatal blood karyotyping. The sensitivity, specificity and other indicators of non-invasive DNA testing technology were calculated based on the data of 87 women of AMA. Among the 87 women of AMA, 5 were cases with abnormal numbers of chromosomes (3 cases of trisomy 21, 1 case of trisomy 18 and 1 case of 47, XXX). The sensitivity and specificity reached 100% for trisomy 21, trisomy 18 and 47, XXX. The present study supports that non-invasive DNA testing is a useful method of AMA screening of Down's syndrome with 100% accuracy. Therefore, it can be used as an important alternative screening method for Down's syndrome in women of AMA. PMID:27313855

  3. Increased Levels of Plasma Epstein Barr Virus DNA Identify a Poor-Risk Subset of Patients With Advanced Stage Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Haverkos, Bradley M.; Gru, Alejandro A.; Geyer, Susan M.; Bingman, Anissa K.; Hemminger, Jessica A.; Mishra, Anjali; Wong, Henry K.; Pancholi, Preeti; Freud, Aharon G.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    Discovering prognostic factors that simultaneously describe tumor characteristics and improve risk stratification is a priority in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). More than a third of advanced stage CTCL patients in this cohort had detectable cell free plasma Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-DNA (pEBVd) using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. An increased level of pEBVd was highly concordant with EBV (ie, Epstein–Barr virus RNAs) in tumor tissue and was associated with inferior survival. Introduction Outcomes in advanced stage (AS) cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) are poor but with great variability. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a subset of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Frequency of plasma EBV-DNA (pEBVd) detection, concordance with EBV RNA (EBER) in tumor tissue, codetection of plasma cytomegalovirus DNA (pCMVd), and prognostic effect in AS CTCL are unknown. Patients and Methods Patients (n = 46; 2006–2013) with AS CTCL (≥IIB) were retrospectively studied. pEBVd and pCMVd were longitudinally measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. EBER in situ hybridization (ISH) was performed on tumor samples. Survival from time of diagnosis (ToD) and time of progression to AS was assessed. Results Plasma EBV-DNA and pCMVd were detected in 37% (17 of 46) and 17% (8 of 46) of AS CTCL patients, respectively. pCMVd detection was significantly more frequent in pEBVd-positive (pEBVd+) than pEBVd− patients (35% vs. 7%; P = .038). Tumor tissue for EBER-ISH was available in 14 of 17 pEBVd+ and 22 of 29 pEBVd− patients; 12 of 14 (85.7%) pEBVd+ patients were EBER+ versus 0 of 22 pEBVd− patients. Frequency of large cell transformation (LCT) tended to be greater in pEBVd+ patients, but was not significant (10 of 14 pEBVd+ vs. 10 of 23 pEBVd−; P = .17). No notable differences in rates of increased levels of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were observed (17 of 17 pEBVd+ vs. 27 of 29 pEBVd−). pEBVd detection was associated with

  4. DNA repair after gamma radiation and superoxide dismutase activity in lymphocytes from subjects of far advanced age

    SciTech Connect

    Licastro, F.; Chiricolo, M.; Battelli, M.G. . Inst. of General Pathology); Franceschi, C. . Inst. of General Pathology); Tabacchi, P.; Cenci, M.; Barboni, F. . Lab. of Clinical Analysis); Pallenzona, D. . Ist. di Genetica)

    1982-01-01

    DNA repair after gamma radiation was studied in purified T lymphocytes from young and aged subjects. Two different assays were employed. In the first, T lymphocytes were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) for 72 h and then treated with hydroxyurea, irradiated with 30 K rads and pulsed with (/sup 3/H)thymidine (TdR) for 4 h. In the second, T lymphocytes were first irradiated with graded doses of gamma rays (200-800 rads) and then stimulated with PHA, cultured for 72 h and pulsed with /sup 3/H-TdR for the last 6 h of culture. T lymphocytes from aged subjects showed a lack of DNA repair synthesis in the first assay whereas only minor differences were found in the second assay between the two groups, i.e., a certain degree of radioresistance in aged lymphocytes. Lymphocyte superoxide dismutase activity showed great individual variations in both groups and a slight increase in old subjects.

  5. Extraction platform evaluations: a comparison of AutoMate Express™, EZ1® Advanced XL, and Maxwell® 16 Bench-top DNA extraction systems.

    PubMed

    Davis, Carey P; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce; Eisenberg, Arthur J; Turnbough, Meredith A

    2012-01-01

    The DNA extraction performance of three low-throughput extraction systems was evaluated. The instruments and respective chemistries all use a similar extraction methodology that involves binding DNA to a coated magnetic resin in the presence of chaotropic salt, washing of the resin to remove undesirable compounds, and elution of DNA from the particles in a low-salt solution. The AutoMate Express™ (Life Technologies Corporation, Carlsbad, CA), EZ1® Advanced XL (Qiagen Inc., Valencia, CA), and Maxwell® 16 (Promega Corporation, Madison, WI) were compared using a variety of samples including: blood on swabs, blood on denim, blood on cotton, blood mixed with inhibitors (a mixture of indigo, hematin, humic acid, and urban dust) on cotton, blood on FTA® paper, saliva residue on cigarette butt paper, epithelial cells on cotton swabs, neat semen on cotton, hair roots, bones, and teeth. Each instrument had a recommended pre-processing protocol for each sample type, and these protocols were followed strictly to reduce user bias. All extractions were performed in triplicate for each sample type. The three instruments were compared on the basis of quantity of DNA recovered (as determined by real-time PCR), relative level of inhibitors present in the extract (shown as shifts in the C(T) value for the internal PCR control in the real-time PCR assay), STR peak heights, use of consumables not included in the extraction kits, ease of use, and application flexibility. All three systems performed well; however extraction efficiency varied by sample type and with the preprocessing protocol applied to the various samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular studies in olive (Olea europaea L.): overview on DNA markers applications and recent advances in genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Bracci, T; Busconi, M; Fogher, C; Sebastiani, L

    2011-04-01

    Olive (Olea europaea L.) is one of the oldest agricultural tree crops worldwide and is an important source of oil with beneficial properties for human health. This emblematic tree crop of the Mediterranean Basin, which has conserved a very wide germplasm estimated in more than 1,200 cultivars, is a diploid species (2n = 2x = 46) that is present in two forms, namely wild (Olea europaea subsp. europaea var. sylvestris) and cultivated (Olea europaea subsp. europaea var. europaea). In spite of its economic and nutritional importance, there are few data about the genetic of olive if compared with other fruit crops. Available molecular data are especially related to the application of molecular markers to the analysis of genetic variability in Olea europaea complex and to develop efficient molecular tools for the olive oil origin traceability. With regard to genomic research, in the last years efforts are made for the identification of expressed sequence tag, with particular interest in those sequences expressed during fruit development and in pollen allergens. Very recently the sequencing of chloroplast genome provided new information on the olive nucleotide sequence, opening the olive genomic era. In this article, we provide an overview of the most relevant results in olive molecular studies. A particular attention was given to DNA markers and their application that constitute the most part of published researches. The first important results in genome analysis were reported.

  7. Research Advances: DNA Computing Targets West Nile Virus, Other Deadly Diseases, and Tic-Tac-Toe; Marijuana Component May Offer Hope for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment; New Wound Dressing May Lead to Maggot Therapy--Without the Maggots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents three reports of research advances. The first report describes a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based computer that could lead to faster, more accurate tests for diagnosing West Nile Virus and bird flu. Representing the first "medium-scale integrated molecular circuit," it is the most powerful computing device of its type to…

  8. Research Advances: DNA Computing Targets West Nile Virus, Other Deadly Diseases, and Tic-Tac-Toe; Marijuana Component May Offer Hope for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment; New Wound Dressing May Lead to Maggot Therapy--Without the Maggots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents three reports of research advances. The first report describes a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based computer that could lead to faster, more accurate tests for diagnosing West Nile Virus and bird flu. Representing the first "medium-scale integrated molecular circuit," it is the most powerful computing device of its type to…

  9. HPV16 DNA status is a strong prognosticator of loco-regional control after postoperative radiochemotherapy of locally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma: results from a multicentre explorative study of the German Cancer Consortium Radiation Oncology Group (DKTK-ROG).

    PubMed

    Lohaus, Fabian; Linge, Annett; Tinhofer, Inge; Budach, Volker; Gkika, Eleni; Stuschke, Martin; Balermpas, Panagiotis; Rödel, Claus; Avlar, Melanie; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Abdollahi, Amir; Debus, Jürgen; Bayer, Christine; Belka, Claus; Pigorsch, Steffi; Combs, Stephanie E; Mönnich, David; Zips, Daniel; von Neubeck, Cläre; Baretton, Gustavo B; Löck, Steffen; Thames, Howard D; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the impact of HPV status in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), who received surgery and cisplatin-based postoperative radiochemotherapy. For 221 patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the hypopharynx, oropharynx or oral cavity treated at the 8 partner sites of the German Cancer Consortium, the impact of HPV DNA, p16 overexpression and p53 expression on outcome were retrospectively analysed. The primary endpoint was loco-regional tumour control; secondary endpoints were distant metastases and overall survival. In the total patient population, univariate analyses revealed a significant impact of HPV16 DNA positivity, p16 overexpression, p53 positivity and tumour site on loco-regional tumour control. Multivariate analysis stratified for tumour site showed that positive HPV 16 DNA status correlated with loco-regional tumour control in patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma (p=0.02) but not in the oral cavity carcinoma group. Multivariate evaluation of the secondary endpoints in the total population revealed a significant association of HPV16 DNA positivity with overall survival (p<0.01) but not with distant metastases. HPV16 DNA status appears to be a strong prognosticator of loco-regional tumour control after postoperative cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy of locally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma and is now being explored in a prospective validation trial. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Advances in recombinant DNA technology: corifollitropin alfa, a hybrid molecule with sustained follicle-stimulating activity and reduced injection frequency.

    PubMed

    Fauser, B C J M; Mannaerts, B M J L; Devroey, P; Leader, A; Boime, I; Baird, D T

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant DNA technologies have been used to develop longer-acting therapeutic proteins. One approach is to introduce sequences containing additional glycosylation sites. Using this technique, a new chimeric gene has been developed containing the coding sequences of the FSH beta-subunit and the C-terminal peptide of the hCG beta-subunit, which bears four O-linked oligosaccharide binding sites. Co-expression of the alpha-subunit and the chimeric FSH beta-subunit produces a new recombinant molecule, named corifollitropin alfa, with a prolonged elimination half-life and enhanced in vivo bioactivity compared with wild-type FSH. Medline searches by subject and additional searching by hand. Initial studies in pituitary suppressed female volunteers confirmed the extended half-life of the compound. Phase II studies have shown that corifollitropin alfa is able to induce and sustain multi-follicular growth for an entire week in women undergoing ovarian stimulation using GnRH antagonist co-treatment for IVF. Corifollitropin alfa regimens have been developed with dosages of 100 and 150 microg, for patients with body weight 60 kg, respectively. Corifollitropin alfa is the first long-acting hybrid molecule with sustained follicle-stimulating activity developed for the induction of multi-follicular growth along with GnRH antagonist co-treatment for IVF. This new treatment option may be simpler and more convenient for patients compared with conventional long protocols of daily FSH injections in combination with GnRH agonist co-treatment. The safety and efficacy of such regimens is currently being evaluated in large comparative phase III clinical trials. The development of corifollitropin alfa is the first step towards a new generation of recombinant gonadotrophins.

  11. Missense mutations in the TP53 DNA-binding domain predict outcomes in patients with advanced oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Li-Yu; Lin, Chien-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Chen, Shu-Jen; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-01-01

    TP53 mutations have been linked to reduced survival in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, the impact of different types of TP53 mutations remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the carriage of missense mutations in the TP53 DNA binding domain (DBD missense mutations) is associated with decreased disease-specific survival (DSS) compared with wild-type TP53 (P=0.002) in a cohort of 345 OSCC patients. In contrast, DSS of patients bearing all of the remaining TP53 mutations did not differ from that observed in wild-type TP53 patients (P=0.955). Our classification method for TP53 mutations was superior to previously reported approaches (disruptive, truncating, Evolutionary Action score, mutations in L2/L3/LSH) for distinguishing between low- and high-risk patients. When analyzed in combination with traditional clinicopathological factors, TP53 DBD missense mutations were an independent prognostic factor for shorter DSS (P=0.014) alongside with advanced AJCC T- and N-classifications and the presence of extracapsular spread. A scoring system that included the four independent prognostic factors allowed a reliable patient stratification into distinct risk groups (high-risk patients, 16.2%). Our results demonstrate the usefulness of TP53 DBD missense mutations combined with clinicopathological factors for improving the prognostic stratification of OSCC patients. PMID:27283772

  12. DNA aptamer raised against advanced glycation end products (AGEs) improves glycemic control and decreases adipocyte size in fructose-fed rats by suppressing AGE-RAGE axis.

    PubMed

    Ojima, A; Matsui, T; Nakamura, N; Higashimoto, Y; Ueda, S; Fukami, K; Okuda, S; Yamagishi, S

    2015-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) decrease adiponectin expression and suppress insulin signaling in cultured adipocytes through the interaction with a receptor for AGEs (RAGE) via oxidative stress generation. We have recently found that high-affinity DNA aptamer directed against AGE (AGE-aptamer) prevents the progression of experimental diabetic nephropathy by blocking the harmful actions of AGEs in the kidney. This study examined the effects of AGE-aptamer on adipocyte remodeling, AGE-RAGE-oxidative stress axis, and adiponectin expression in fructose-fed rats. Although AGE-aptamer treatment by an osmotic mini pump for 8 weeks did not affect serum insulin levels, it significantly decreased average fasting blood glucose and had a tendency to inhibit body weight gain in fructose-fed rats. Furthermore, AGE-aptamer significantly suppressed the increase in adipocyte size and prevented the elevation in AGEs, RAGE, and an oxidative stress marker, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), levels in adipose tissues of fructose-fed rats at 14-week-old, while it restored the decrease in adiponectin mRNA levels. Our present study suggests that AGE-aptamer could improve glycemic control and prevent adipocyte remodeling in fructose-fed rats partly by suppressing the AGE-RAGE-mediated oxidative stress generation. AGE-aptamer might be a novel therapeutic strategy for fructose-induced metabolic derangements.

  13. Missense mutations in the TP53 DNA-binding domain predict outcomes in patients with advanced oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lapke, Nina; Lu, Yen-Jung; Liao, Chun-Ta; Lee, Li-Yu; Lin, Chien-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Chen, Shu-Jen; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-07-12

    TP53 mutations have been linked to reduced survival in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, the impact of different types of TP53 mutations remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the carriage of missense mutations in the TP53 DNA binding domain (DBD missense mutations) is associated with decreased disease-specific survival (DSS) compared with wild-type TP53 (P=0.002) in a cohort of 345 OSCC patients. In contrast, DSS of patients bearing all of the remaining TP53 mutations did not differ from that observed in wild-type TP53 patients (P=0.955). Our classification method for TP53 mutations was superior to previously reported approaches (disruptive, truncating, Evolutionary Action score, mutations in L2/L3/LSH) for distinguishing between low- and high-risk patients. When analyzed in combination with traditional clinicopathological factors, TP53 DBD missense mutations were an independent prognostic factor for shorter DSS (P=0.014) alongside with advanced AJCC T- and N-classifications and the presence of extracapsular spread. A scoring system that included the four independent prognostic factors allowed a reliable patient stratification into distinct risk groups (high-risk patients, 16.2%). Our results demonstrate the usefulness of TP53 DBD missense mutations combined with clinicopathological factors for improving the prognostic stratification of OSCC patients.

  14. Immunogenicity of DNA-advanced glycation end product fashioned through glyoxal and arginine in the presence of Fe³⁺: its potential role in prompt recognition of diabetes mellitus auto-antibodies.

    PubMed

    Shahab, Uzma; Tabrez, Shams; Khan, M Salman; Akhter, Firoz; Khan, Mohd Sajid; Saeed, Mohd; Ahmad, Khurshid; Srivastava, A K; Ahmad, Saheem

    2014-08-05

    Glyoxal, methylglyoxal and 3-deoxyglucosones are reactive dicarbonyl compounds, which transform free amino groups of proteins and lipoproteins macromolecule into advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). AGEs play a significant role in the pathophysiology of aging and diabetic complications because of their genotoxic effect. Glyoxal also reacts with free amino group of nucleic acids resulting in the formation of DNA-AGEs. The present study reports the genotoxicity and immunogenicity of AGEs formed by Glyoxal-Arginine-Fe(3+) (G-Arg-Fe(3+)) system as a glycating agent. Immunogenicity of native and G-Arg-Fe(3+)-DNA was probed in female rabbits. Immunofluorescence suggests the presence of immune complex deposition in the kidney section of immunized rabbits. Spectroscopic analysis and melting temperature indicates the structural modification in the human DNA. The modified human DNA is found to be highly immunogenic, whereas unmodified form was simply non-immunogenic. This study shows the presence of auto-antibodies against G-Arg-Fe(3+) modified human DNA in the sera of diabetes type 1 and in few cases type 2 patients due to secondary complications of nephropathy. The glyco-oxidative lesions have also been detected in the lymphocyte DNA isolated from patients having type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The results show structural perturbations generating new epitopes in G-Arg-Fe(3+)-DNA rendering it pretty immunogenic.

  15. Patenting DNA.

    PubMed

    Bobrow, Martin; Thomas, Sandy

    2002-12-01

    The protection of inventions based on human DNA sequences has been achieved mainly through application of the patent system. Over the past decade, there has been continuing debate about whether this use of intellectual property rights is acceptable. Companies and universities have been active during this period in filing thousands of patent applications. Although many have argued that to claim a DNA sequence in a patent is to claim a discovery, patent law allows discoveries that are useful to be claimed as part of an invention. As the technology to isolate DNA sequences has advanced, the criterion for inventiveness, necessary for any invention to be eligible for filing, has become more difficult to justify in the case of claims to DNA sequences. Moreover, the discovery that a gene is associated with a particular disease is, it is argued, to discover a fact about the world and undeserving of the status of an invention. Careful examination of the grounds for allowing the patenting of DNA sequences as research tools suggests such rewards will rarely be justified. The patenting of DNA sequences as chemical intermediates necessary for the manufacture of therapeutic proteins is, however, reasonable given that the information within the sequence is applied to produce a tangible substance which has application as a medicine. Despite the legal, technical and political complexities of applying the flexibilities with the current law, it is argued that much could be achieved in the area of patenting DNA by raising the thresholds for patentability.

  16. Immunochemical detection of N2-[1-(1-carboxy)ethyl]guanosine, an advanced glycation end product formed by the reaction of DNA and reducing sugars or L-ascorbic acid in vitro.

    PubMed

    Seidel, W; Pischetsrieder, M

    1998-11-27

    In the Maillard reaction, free amino groups of proteins and nucleic acids react with reducing sugars to form advanced glycation end products (AGE). A major product found in reaction mixtures of guanosine and glucose is N2-[1-(1-carboxy)ethyl]guanosine (CEG), which, therefore, can be used as a marker of advanced glycation of DNA. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to detect and to semi-quantitate nonenzymatic glycosylation of DNA. A polyclonal antiserum was raised against CEG linked to keyhole limpet hemocyanin. A protocol for a competitive ELISA was developed, and the antiserum was tested for crossreactivity. Several unmodified nucleotides and N2-modified guanosine derivatives showed no or negligible crossreactivity. Only very similar structures like N2-(carboxymethyl)guanosine and N2-(1-carboxy-3-hydroxypropyl)guanosine, which have been identified as reaction products of glucose or l-ascorbic acid and guanosine, display significant binding activity. The signal can be totally repressed by free CEG, yet protein-bound CEG is a stronger inhibitor. DNA incubated with d-glucose, dihydroxyacetone, l-ascorbic or l-dehydroascorbic acid shows a signal inhibition indicating the formation of CEG in vitro. The competitive ELISA procedure proved to be a sensitive method which can be used to detect glycation of DNA in vivo.

  17. DNA adductomics.

    PubMed

    Balbo, Silvia; Turesky, Robert J; Villalta, Peter W

    2014-03-17

    Systems toxicology is a broad-based approach to describe many of the toxicological features that occur within a living system under stress or subjected to exogenous or endogenous exposures. The ultimate goal is to capture an overview of all exposures and the ensuing biological responses of the body. The term exposome has been employed to refer to the totality of all exposures, and systems toxicology investigates how the exposome influences health effects and consequences of exposures over a lifetime. The tools to advance systems toxicology include high-throughput transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and adductomics, which is still in its infancy. A well-established methodology for the comprehensive measurement of DNA damage resulting from every day exposures is not fully developed. During the past several decades, the (32)P-postlabeling technique has been employed to screen the damage to DNA induced by multiple classes of genotoxicants; however, more robust, specific, and quantitative methods have been sought to identify and quantify DNA adducts. Although triple quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometry, particularly when using multistage scanning (LC-MS(n)), have shown promise in the field of DNA adductomics, it is anticipated that high-resolution and accurate-mass LC-MS(n) instrumentation will play a major role in assessing global DNA damage. Targeted adductomics should also benefit greatly from improved triple quadrupole technology. Once the analytical MS methods are fully mature, DNA adductomics along with other -omics tools will contribute greatly to the field of systems toxicology.

  18. The Dynamics of DNA Sequencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morvillo, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Describes a paper-and-pencil activity that helps students understand DNA sequencing and expands student understanding of DNA structure, replication, and gel electrophoresis. Appropriate for advanced biology students who are familiar with the Sanger method. (DDR)

  19. DNA Methylation within Transcribed Regions

    PubMed Central

    To, Taiko K.; Saze, Hidetoshi; Kakutani, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation within transcribed genes is commonly found in diverse animals and plants. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances and the remaining mystery regarding intragenic DNA methylation. PMID:26143255

  20. DNA Repair by Reversal of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chengqi; He, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous factors constantly challenge cellular DNA, generating cytotoxic and/or mutagenic DNA adducts. As a result, organisms have evolved different mechanisms to defend against the deleterious effects of DNA damage. Among these diverse repair pathways, direct DNA-repair systems provide cells with simple yet efficient solutions to reverse covalent DNA adducts. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the field of direct DNA repair, namely, photolyase-, alkyltransferase-, and dioxygenase-mediated repair processes. We present specific examples to describe new findings of known enzymes and appealing discoveries of new proteins. At the end of this article, we also briefly discuss the influence of direct DNA repair on other fields of biology and its implication on the discovery of new biology. PMID:23284047

  1. Ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In the past two decades, ancient DNA research has progressed from the retrieval of small fragments of mitochondrial DNA from a few late Holocene specimens, to large-scale studies of ancient populations, phenotypically important nuclear loci, and even whole mitochondrial genome sequences of extinct species. However, the field is still regularly marred by erroneous reports, which underestimate the extent of contamination within laboratories and samples themselves. An improved understanding of these processes and the effects of damage on ancient DNA templates has started to provide a more robust basis for research. Recent methodological advances have included the characterization of Pleistocene mammal populations and discoveries of DNA preserved in ancient sediments. Increasingly, ancient genetic information is providing a unique means to test assumptions used in evolutionary and population genetics studies to reconstruct the past. Initial results have revealed surprisingly complex population histories, and indicate that modern phylogeographic studies may give misleading impressions about even the recent evolutionary past. With the advent and uptake of appropriate methodologies, ancient DNA is now positioned to become a powerful tool in biological research and is also evolving new and unexpected uses, such as in the search for extinct or extant life in the deep biosphere and on other planets. PMID:15875564

  2. Non-invasive detection of genomic imbalances in Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells in early and advanced stage Hodgkin's lymphoma by sequencing of circulating cell-free DNA: a technical proof-of-principle study.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, Peter; Wlodarska, Iwona; Tousseyn, Thomas; Dehaspe, Luc; Dierickx, Daan; Verheecke, Magali; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Bechter, Oliver; Delforge, Michel; Vandecaveye, Vincent; Brison, Nathalie; Verhoef, Gregor E G; Legius, Eric; Amant, Frederic; Vermeesch, Joris R

    2015-02-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is one of the most common lymphoid neoplasms in young adults, but the low abundance of neoplastic Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells in the tumour hampers the elucidation of its pathogenesis, biology, and diversity. After an incidental observation that genomic aberrations known to occur in Hodgkin's lymphoma were detectable in circulating cell-free DNA, this study was undertaken to investigate whether circulating cell-free DNA can be informative about genomic imbalances in Hodgkin's lymphoma. We applied massive parallel sequencing to circulating cell-free DNA in a prospective study of patients with biopsy proven nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma. Genomic imbalances in Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells were investigated by fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (FISH) on tumour specimens. By non-invasive prenatal testing, we observed several genomic imbalances in circulating cell-free DNA of a pregnant woman, who was subsequently diagnosed with early-stage nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma stage IIA during gestation. FISH on tumour tissue confirmed corresponding genomic imbalances in Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells. We prospectively studied circulating cell-free DNA of nine nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma cases: eight at first diagnosis and one at first relapse. Seven patients had stage IIA disease and two had stage IVB disease. In eight, genomic imbalances were detected, including, among others, gain of chromosomes 2p and 9p, known to occur in Hodgkin's lymphoma. These gains and losses in circulating cell-free DNA were extensively validated by FISH on Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells in biopsy samples. Initiation of chemotherapy induced normalisation of circulating cell-free DNA profiles within 2-6 weeks. The cell cycle indicator Ki67 and cleaved caspase-3 were detected in Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells by immunohistochemistry, suggesting high turnover of Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells. In early and advanced stage nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma, genomic

  3. Advanced microscopy techniques used for comparison of UVA- and γ-irradiation-induced DNA damage in the cell nucleus and nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Stixová, L; Hrušková, T; Sehnalová, P; Legartová, S; Svidenská, S; Kozubek, S; Bártová, E

    2014-01-01

    Every day, genomes are affected by genotoxic factors that create multiple DNA lesions. Several DNA repair systems have evolved to counteract the deleterious effects of DNA damage. These systems include a set of DNA repair mechanisms, damage tolerance processes, and activation of cell-cycle checkpoints. This study describes selected confocal microscopy techniques that investigate DNA damage-related nuclear events after UVA- and γ-irradiation and compare the DNA damage response (DDR) induced by the two experimental approaches. In both cases, we observed induction of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway and formation of localized double-strand breaks (DSBs). This was confirmed by analysis of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in the DNA lesions and by increased levels of γH2AX and 53BP1 proteins in the irradiated genome. DNA damage by UVA-lasers was potentiated by either BrdU or Hoechst 33342 pre-sensitization and compared to non-photosensitized cells. DSBs were also induced without BrdU or Hoechst 33342 pre-treatment. Interestingly, no cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) were detected after 405 nm UVA laser micro-irradiation in non-photosensitized cells. The effects of UVA and γ-irradiation were also studied by silver staining of nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs). This experimental approach revealed changes in the morphology of nucleoli after genome injury. Additionally, to precisely characterize DDR in locally induced DNA lesions, we analysed the kinetics of the 53BP1 protein involved in DDR by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP).

  4. DNA synthesis security.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Ali; Chyba, Christopher F

    2012-01-01

    It is generally assumed that genetic engineering advances will, inevitably, facilitate the misapplication of biotechnology toward the production of biological weapons. Unexpectedly, however, some of these very advances in the areas of DNA synthesis and sequencing may enable the implementation of automated and nonintrusive safeguards to avert the illicit applications of biotechnology. In the case of DNA synthesis, automated DNA screening tools could be built into DNA synthesizers in order to block the synthesis of hazardous agents. In addition, a comprehensive safety and security regime for dual-use genetic engineering research could include nonintrusive monitoring of DNA sequencing. This is increasingly feasible as laboratories outsource this service to just a few centralized sequencing factories. The adoption of automated, nonintrusive monitoring and surveillance of the DNA synthesis and sequencing pipelines may avert many risks associated with dual-use biotechnology. Here, we describe the historical background and current challenges associated with dual-use biotechnologies and propose strategies to address these challenges.

  5. Phase I/II study of GM-CSF DNA as an adjuvant for a multipeptide cancer vaccine in patients with advanced melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Perales, Miguel-Angel; Yuan, Jianda; Powel, Sarah; Gallardo, Humilidad F.; Rasalan, Teresa S.; Gonzalez, Christina; Manukian, Gregor; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Yan; Chapman, Paul B.; Krown, Susan E.; Livingston, Philip O.; Ejadi, Samuel; Panageas, Katherine S.; Engelhorn, Manuel E.; Terzulli, Stephanie L.; Houghton, Alan N.; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2014-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) enhances immune responses by inducing dendritic cell proliferation, maturation, and migration and B and T lymphocyte expansion and differentiation. The potency of DNA vaccines can be enhanced by the addition of DNA encoding cytokines, acting as molecular adjuvants. We conducted a phase I/II trial of human GM-CSF DNA in conjunction with a multipeptide vaccine (gp100 and tyrosinase) in stage III/IV melanoma patients. Nineteen human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201(+) patients were treated. Three dose levels were studied: 100, 400, and 800 mcg DNA/injection, administered subcutaneously (SQ) every month with 500 mcg of each peptide. In the dose-ranging study, 3 patients were treated at each dose level. The remaining patients were then treated at the highest dose. Most toxicities were grade 1 injection site reactions. Eight patients (42%) developed CD8+ T-cell responses, defined by a ≥3 SD increase in baseline reactivity to tyrosinase or gp100 peptide in tetramer or intracellular cytokine staining assays. There was no relationship between dose and T-cell response. Responding T cells had an effector memory cell phenotype. Polyfunctional T cells were also demonstrated. At a median of 31 months follow-up, median survival has not been reached. Human GM-CSF DNA was found to be a safe adjuvant. PMID:18797450

  6. Biology of DNA restriction.

    PubMed Central

    Bickle, T A; Krüger, D H

    1993-01-01

    Our understanding of the evolution of DNA restriction and modification systems, the control of the expression of the structural genes for the enzymes, and the importance of DNA restriction in the cellular economy has advanced by leaps and bounds in recent years. This review documents these advances for the three major classes of classical restriction and modification systems, describes the discovery of a new class of restriction systems that specifically cut DNA carrying the modification signature of foreign cells, and deals with the mechanisms developed by phages to avoid the restriction systems of their hosts. PMID:8336674

  7. Advanced loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for sensitive and specific detection of Tomato chlorosis virus using a uracil DNA glycosylase to control carry-over contamination.

    PubMed

    Kil, Eui-Joon; Kim, Sunhoo; Lee, Ye-Ji; Kang, Eun-Ha; Lee, Minji; Cho, Sang-Ho; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Kyeong-Yeoll; Heo, Noh-Youl; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kwon, Suk-Tae; Lee, Sukchan

    2015-03-01

    In 2013, Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV) was identified in symptomatic tomato plants in Korea. In the present study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method was developed using four specific primers designed against ORF6 in ToCV RNA2 to detect ToCV rapidly and with high sensitivity. The optimized reaction involved incubation of a reaction mixture containing 2U Bst DNA polymerase and 4mM MgSO4 for 1h at 60-62 °C. Although specific and rapid detection of ToCV by LAMP was confirmed, false-positive reactions caused by carry-over contamination sometimes occurred because of the high sensitivity of LAMP compared with other detection methods. To prevent false-positive reactions, dUTP was substituted for dTTP and uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) was added to the LAMP reaction. First, the LAMP reaction was conducted successfully with substitution of dUTP for dTTP. Before the next reaction, LAMP products with incorporated dUTP were cleaved selectively by UDG without any effect on thymine-containing DNA (template DNA). This modified LAMP method complemented with UDG treatment to prevent carry-over contamination offers a potentially powerful method for detecting plant viruses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fetal blood group genotyping from DNA from maternal plasma: an important advance in the management and prevention of haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn.

    PubMed

    Daniels, G; Finning, K; Martin, P; Soothill, P

    2004-11-01

    The cloning of blood group genes and subsequent identification of the molecular bases of blood group polymorphisms has made it possible to predict blood group phenotypes from DNA with a reasonable degree of accuracy. The major application of this technology, which has now become the standard of care, is the determination of a fetal RHD genotype in women with anti-D, to assess whether the fetus is at risk of haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Initially, the procurement of fetal DNA required the invasive procedures of amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Since the discovery of fetal DNA in maternal plasma in 1997, the technology of detecting an RHD gene in this very small quantity of fetal DNA has developed rapidly, so that non-invasive fetal D typing can now be provided as a diagnostic service for D-negative pregnant women with anti-D. Within a few years, it is probable that fetuses of all D-negative pregnant women will be tested for RHD, to establish whether the mother requires antenatal anti-D immunoglobulin prophylaxis.

  9. Mutagenesis and repair induced by the DNA advanced glycation end product N2-1-(carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine in human cells.

    PubMed

    Tamae, Daniel; Lim, Punnajit; Wuenschell, Gerald E; Termini, John

    2011-03-29

    Glycation of biopolymers by glucose-derived α-oxo-aldehydes such as methylglyoxal (MG) is believed to play a major role in the complex pathologies associated with diabetes and metabolic disease. In contrast to the extensive literature detailing the formation and physiological consequences of protein glycation, there is little information about the corresponding phenomenon for DNA. To assess the potential contribution of DNA glycation to genetic instability, we prepared shuttle vectors containing defined levels of the DNA glycation adduct N(2)-(1-carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (CEdG) and transfected them into isogenic human fibroblasts that differed solely in the capacity to conduct nucleotide excision repair (NER). In the NER-compromised fibroblasts, the induced mutation frequencies increased up to 18-fold relative to background over a range of ∼10-1400 CEdG adducts/10(5) dG, whereas the same substrates transfected into NER-competent cells induced a response that was 5-fold over background at the highest adduct density. The positive linear correlation (R(2) = 0.998) of mutation frequency with increasing CEdG level in NER-defective cells suggested that NER was the primary if not exclusive mechanism for repair of this adduct in human fibroblasts. Consistent with predictions from biochemical studies using CEdG-substituted oligonucleotides, guanine transversions were the predominant mutation resulting from replication of MG-modified plasmids. At high CEdG levels, significant increases in the number of AT → GC transitions were observed exclusively in NER-competent cells (P < 0.0001). This suggested the involvement of an NER-dependent mutagenic process in response to critical levels of DNA damage, possibly mediated by error-prone Y-family polymerases.

  10. Advancing forensic RNA typing: On non-target secretions, a nasal mucosa marker, a differential co-extraction protocol and the sensitivity of DNA and RNA profiling.

    PubMed

    van den Berge, Margreet; Bhoelai, Bryan; Harteveld, Joyce; Matai, Anuska; Sijen, Titia

    2016-01-01

    The forensic identification of human body fluids and tissues by means of messenger RNA (mRNA) profiling is a long studied methodology that is increasingly applied to casework samples. Previously, we have described an mRNA multiplex system that targets blood, saliva, semen, menstrual secretion, vaginal mucosa and skin (Lindenbergh et al. and van den Berge et al.). In this study we consider various topics to improve this mRNA profiling system or its use and adapt the method accordingly. Bodily secretions that may be encountered at a crime scene whilst not targeted by the multiplex-id est nasal mucosa, sweat, tears, faeces and urine-were examined for false positive signals. The results prompted us to identify a nasal mucosa marker that allows the discrimination of nasal mucosa from saliva or vaginal mucosa and nosebleed blood from peripheral blood. An updated version of the multiplex was prepared to which the nasal mucosa marker was added and in which markers for semen, vaginal mucosa and blood were replaced. Lactobacillus markers were regarded unsuitable as replacement for vaginal mucosa mRNA markers because of background signals on penile swabs that appeared devoid of female DNA. Furthermore, we provide approaches to deal with highly unbalanced mixtures. First, a differential extraction protocol was incorporated into a co-extraction protocol to allow DNA and RNA analysis of separated non-sperm and sperm fractions. In a second approach, besides the standard multiplex, a customized multiplex is used which excludes markers for prevailing cell types. This allows the use of lower cDNA inputs for the prevailing cell types and higher inputs for cell types that appear masked. Additionally, we assessed the relation between the percentage of alleles or markers detected in DNA or RNA profiles when decreasing sample amounts are analysed. While blood, saliva, semen and menstrual secretion show the trend that DNA profiling is more sensitive than RNA profiling, the reverse is seen

  11. Electrocatalysis in DNA Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Furst, Ariel; Hill, Michael G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2014-01-01

    Electrocatalysis is often thought of solely in the inorganic realm, most often applied to energy conversion in fuel cells. However, the ever-growing field of bioelectrocatalysis has made great strides in advancing technology for both biofuel cells as well as biological detection platforms. Within the context of bioelectrocatalytic detection systems, DNA-based platforms are especially prevalent. One subset of these platforms, the one we have developed, takes advantage of the inherent charge transport properties of DNA. Electrocatalysis coupled with DNA-mediated charge transport has enabled specific and sensitive detection of lesions, mismatches and DNA-binding proteins. Even greater signal amplification from these platforms is now being achieved through the incorporation of a secondary electrode to the platform both for patterning DNA arrays and for detection. Here, we describe the evolution of this new DNA sensor technology. PMID:25435647

  12. DNA supercoiling during transcription.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D

    2016-11-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  13. DNA supercoiling during transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  14. Three-year Follow up of GMCSF/bi-shRNA(furin) DNA-transfected Autologous Tumor Immunotherapy (Vigil) in Metastatic Advanced Ewing's Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ghisoli, Maurizio; Barve, Minal; Mennel, Robert; Lenarsky, Carl; Horvath, Staci; Wallraven, Gladice; Pappen, Beena O; Whiting, Sam; Rao, Donald; Senzer, Neil; Nemunaitis, John

    2016-08-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is a devastating rare pediatric cancer of the bone. Intense chemotherapy temporarily controls disease in most patients at presentation but has limited effect in patients with progressive or recurrent disease. We previously described preliminary results of a novel immunotherapy, FANG (Vigil) vaccine, in which 12 advanced stage Ewing's patients were safely treated and went on to achieve a predicted immune response (IFNγ ELISPOT). We describe follow-up through year 3 of a prospective, nonrandomized study comparing an expanded group of Vigil-treated advanced disease Ewing's sarcoma patients (n = 16) with a contemporaneous group of Ewing's sarcoma patients (n = 14) not treated with Vigil. Long-term follow-up results show a survival benefit without evidence of significant toxicity (no ≥ grade 3) to Vigil when administered once monthly by intradermal injection (1 × 10e(6) cells/injection to 1 × 10e(7) cells/injection). Specifically, we report a 1-year actual survival of 73% for Vigil-treated patients compared to 23% in those not treated with Vigil. In addition, there was a 17.2-month difference in overall survival (OS; Kaplan-Meier) between the Vigil (median OS 731 days) and no Vigil patient groups (median OS 207 days). In conclusion, these results supply the rational for further testing of Vigil in advanced stage Ewing's sarcoma.

  15. Advanced In vivo Use of CRISPR/Cas9 and Anti-sense DNA Inhibition for Gene Manipulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Brandon J.; Azam, Amber B.; Gillon, Colleen J.; Josselyn, Sheena A.; Zovkic, Iva B.

    2016-01-01

    Gene editing tools are essential for uncovering how genes mediate normal brain–behavior relationships and contribute to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent progress in gene editing technology now allows neuroscientists unprecedented access to edit the genome efficiently. Although many important tools have been developed, here we focus on approaches that allow for rapid gene editing in the adult nervous system, particularly CRISPR/Cas9 and anti-sense nucleotide-based techniques. CRISPR/Cas9 is a flexible gene editing tool, allowing the genome to be manipulated in diverse ways. For instance, CRISPR/Cas9 has been successfully used to knockout genes, knock-in mutations, overexpress or inhibit gene activity, and provide scaffolding for recruiting specific epigenetic regulators to individual genes and gene regions. Moreover, the CRISPR/Cas9 system may be modified to target multiple genes at one time, affording simultaneous inhibition and overexpression of distinct genetic targets. Although many of the more advanced applications of CRISPR/Cas9 have not been applied to the nervous system, the toolbox is widely accessible, such that it is poised to help advance neuroscience. Anti-sense nucleotide-based technologies can be used to rapidly knockdown genes in the brain. The main advantage of anti-sense based tools is their simplicity, allowing for rapid gene delivery with minimal technical expertise. Here, we describe the main applications and functions of each of these systems with an emphasis on their many potential applications in neuroscience laboratories. PMID:26793235

  16. Expression of the inhibitor of DNA-binding (ID)-1 protein as an angiogenic mediator in tumour advancement of uterine cervical cancers.

    PubMed

    Maw, M K; Fujimoto, J; Tamaya, T

    2008-11-18

    The ID protein, an inhibitor of basic helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factors, has been involved in multiple cellular processes. To investigate the association between tumour advancement and ID expressions of uterine cervical cancers, the levels of ID-1, ID-2 and ID-3 mRNAs were determined by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the histoscore with the localisation of ID-1 was determined by immunohistochemistry and patient survival in 60 patients. ID-1 histoscores and mRNA levels both significantly (P<0.05) increased in uterine cervical cancers according to clinical stage regardless of histopathological type or lymph node metastasis. Furthermore, the 36-month survival rate of the 30 patients with high ID-1 was poor (60%), whereas that of the other 30 patients with low ID-1 was significantly higher (83%). ID-1 histoscores and mRNA levels significantly (P<0.0001) correlated with microvessel counts in uterine cervical cancers. Tumour cells show mostly diffuse to strong cytoplasmic expression of ID-1 and also very faint expression in endothelial cells. Moreover, ID-1 expression not only correlated with microvessel counts but also correlated significantly with histoscore. Therefore, ID-1 might work on tumour advancement through angiogenic activity and is considered to be a candidate for a prognostic indicator in uterine cervical cancers.

  17. Advances in the Use of DNA Barcodes to Build a Community Phylogeny for Tropical Trees in a Puerto Rican Forest Dynamics Plot

    PubMed Central

    Kress, W. John; Erickson, David L.; Swenson, Nathan G.; Thompson, Jill; Uriarte, Maria; Zimmerman, Jess K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Species number, functional traits, and phylogenetic history all contribute to characterizing the biological diversity in plant communities. The phylogenetic component of diversity has been particularly difficult to quantify in species-rich tropical tree assemblages. The compilation of previously published (and often incomplete) data on evolutionary relationships of species into a composite phylogeny of the taxa in a forest, through such programs as Phylomatic, has proven useful in building community phylogenies although often of limited resolution. Recently, DNA barcodes have been used to construct a robust community phylogeny for nearly 300 tree species in a forest dynamics plot in Panama using a supermatrix method. In that study sequence data from three barcode loci were used to generate a well-resolved species-level phylogeny. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we expand upon this earlier investigation and present results on the use of a phylogenetic constraint tree to generate a community phylogeny for a diverse, tropical forest dynamics plot in Puerto Rico. This enhanced method of phylogenetic reconstruction insures the congruence of the barcode phylogeny with broadly accepted hypotheses on the phylogeny of flowering plants (i.e., APG III) regardless of the number and taxonomic breadth of the taxa sampled. We also compare maximum parsimony versus maximum likelihood estimates of community phylogenetic relationships as well as evaluate the effectiveness of one- versus two- versus three-gene barcodes in resolving community evolutionary history. Conclusions/Significance As first demonstrated in the Panamanian forest dynamics plot, the results for the Puerto Rican plot illustrate that highly resolved phylogenies derived from DNA barcode sequence data combined with a constraint tree based on APG III are particularly useful in comparative analysis of phylogenetic diversity and will enhance research on the interface between community ecology and evolution

  18. Role of DNA profiling in forensic odontology.

    PubMed

    Sakari, S Leena; Jimson, Sudha; Masthan, K M K; Jacobina, Jenita

    2015-04-01

    The recent advances in DNA profiling have made DNA evidence to be more widely accepted in courts. This has revolutionized the aspect of forensic odontology. DNA profiling/DNA fingerprinting has come a long way from the conventional fingerprints. DNA that is responsible for all the cell's activities, yields valuable information both in the healthy and diseased individuals. When other means of traditional identification become impossible following mass calamities or fire explosions, teeth provide a rich source of DNA as they have a high chemical as well as physical resistance. The recent evolution in the isolation of DNA and the ways of running a DNA fingerprint are highlighted in this literature review.

  19. Pediatric MATCH: Olaparib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With Defects in DNA Damage Repair Genes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-25

    Advanced Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Deleterious ATM Gene Mutation; Deleterious BRCA1 Gene Mutation; Deleterious BRCA2 Gene Mutation; Deleterious RAD51C Gene Mutation; Deleterious RAD51D Gene Mutation; Histiocytosis; Low Grade Glioma; Malignant Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Glioma; Recurrent Hepatoblastoma; Recurrent Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Refractory Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Refractory Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Refractory Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Refractory Neuroblastoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Rhabdoid Tumor; Stage III Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Wilms Tumor

  20. Advances in pediatrics. Volume 31

    SciTech Connect

    Barness, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the advances made in pediatrics. The topics discussed are--Molecular biology of thalassemia; genetic mapping of humans; technology of recombinant-DNA; DNA-sequencing and human chromosomes and etiology of hereditary diseases; acne; and T-cell abnormalities.

  1. Recent advances in silage microbiology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent advances in our understanding of silage microbiology are reviewed. The ability to extract microbial DNA from silages, amplify portions of DNA, and use the amplified regions to identify strains of microorganisms is at the core of the changes occurring recently in silage microbiology. These dev...

  2. The mRNA expression of inhibitors of DNA binding-1 and -2 is associated with advanced tumour stage and adverse clinical outcome in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wazir, Umar; Jiang, Wen G; Sharma, Anup K; Newbold, Robert F; Mokbel, Kefah

    2013-05-01

    Inhibitors of DNA binding (ID) are known to have a role in embryogenesis and oncogenesis. In this study, we analyzed the role of ID1 and ID2 in breast cancer, by assessing associations of mRNA expression with clinicopathological parameters. Breast cancer tissues (n=152) and adjacent normal tissues (n=31) underwent reverse transcription and quantitative- polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Transcript levels were correlated with clinicopathological data. Patients who were disease-free had significantly lower ID1 mRNA expression than all other patients (p=0.0033). Higher expression was associated with worse disease-free (p=0.001) and overall survival (p=0.02). ID2 expression was directly associated with the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) (NPI 2 vs. 3; p=0.0062) and worsening clinical outcome (disease-free vs. mortality: p=0.0004), and with worse disease-free (p=0.01) and overall survival (p=0.005). Our findings are suggestive of a role for ID1 and ID2 in human breast cancer as possible prognostic markers and therapeutic targets meriting further validating investigations, by immunohistochemistry and mechanistic studies.

  3. DNA methylation status of key cell-cycle regulators such as CDKNA2/p16 and CCNA1 correlates with treatment response to doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil in locally advanced breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Klajic, Jovana; Busato, Florence; Edvardsen, Hege; Touleimat, Nizar; Fleischer, Thomas; Bukholm, Ida; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Lønning, Per Eystein; Tost, Jörg; Kristensen, Vessela N

    2014-12-15

    To explore alterations in gene promoter methylation as a potential cause of acquired drug resistance to doxorubicin or combined treatment with 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C in human breast cancers. Paired tumor samples from locally advanced breast cancer patients treated with doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil-mitomycin C were used in the genome-wide DNA methylation analysis as discovery cohort. An enlarged cohort from the same two prospective studies as those in the discovery cohort was used as a validation set in pyrosequencing analysis. A total of 469 genes were differentially methylated after treatment with doxorubicin and revealed a significant association with canonical pathways enriched for immune cell response and cell-cycle regulating genes including CDKN2A, CCND2, CCNA1, which were also associated to treatment response. Treatment with FUMI resulted in 343 differentially methylated genes representing canonical pathways such as retinoate biosynthesis, gαi signaling, and LXR/RXR activation. Despite the clearly different genes and pathways involved in the metabolism and therapeutic effect of both drugs, 46 genes were differentially methylated before and after treatment with both doxorubicin and FUMI. DNA methylation profiles in genes such as BRCA1, FOXC1, and IGFBP3, and most notably repetitive elements like ALU and LINE1, were associated with TP53 mutations status. We identified and validated key cell-cycle regulators differentially methylated before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy such as CDKN2A and CCNA1 and reported that methylation patterns of these genes may be potential predictive markers to anthracycline/mitomycine sensitivity. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. [Progress of research on DNA vaccines against parasitosis].

    PubMed

    Qi, Wen-Juan; Fang, Qiang

    2011-06-01

    One of the effective prevention and treatment strategies to parasitosis is to develop safe and effective vaccines. The DNA vaccine is a new kind of vaccine developed in last 10 years. In recent years, many advances in DNA vaccines against parasitosis have been made. This article reviews the advances in the mechanism, construction, optimization, adjuvants and delivery ways of DNA vaccines and the advances in the study of DNA vaccines against some parasitosis including malaria, schistosomiasis, cysticercosis and toxoplasmosis in recent years.

  5. DNA nanotechnology and its applications in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lifan; Yu, Lu; Shen, Wanqiu

    2014-09-01

    DNA nanotechnology, which uses DNA as a material to self-assemble designed nanostructures, including DNA 2D arrays, 3D nanostructures, DNA nanotubes and DNA nanomechanical devices, has showed great promise in biomedical applications. Various DNA nanostructures have been used for protein characterization, enzyme assembly, biosensing, drug delivery and biomimetic assemblies. In this review, we will present recent advances of DNA nanotechnology and its applications in biomedical research field.

  6. Human Mitochondrial DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Ian J.; Reyes, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of the process of DNA replication in mitochondria is in its infancy. For many years, maintenance of the mitochondrial genome was regarded as greatly simplified compared to the nucleus. Mammalian mitochondria were reported to lack all DNA repair systems, to eschew DNA recombination, and to possess but a single DNA polymerase, polymerase γ. Polγ was said to replicate mitochondrial DNA exclusively via one mechanism, involving only two priming events and a handful of proteins. In this “strand-displacement model,” leading strand DNA synthesis begins at a specific site and advances approximately two-thirds of the way around the molecule before DNA synthesis is initiated on the “lagging” strand. Although the displaced strand was long-held to be coated with protein, RNA has more recently been proposed in its place. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA molecules with all the features of products of conventional bidirectional replication have been documented, suggesting that the process and regulation of replication in mitochondria is complex, as befits a genome that is a core factor in human health and longevity. PMID:23143808

  7. Retroviral DNA Integration

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into host chromatin is the defining step of retroviral replication. This enzymatic process is catalyzed by the virus-encoded integrase protein, which is conserved among retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons. Retroviral integration proceeds via two integrase activities: 3′-processing of the viral DNA ends, followed by the strand transfer of the processed ends into host cell chromosomal DNA. Herein we review the molecular mechanism of retroviral DNA integration, with an emphasis on reaction chemistries and architectures of the nucleoprotein complexes involved. We additionally discuss the latest advances on anti-integrase drug development for the treatment of AIDS and the utility of integrating retroviral vectors in gene therapy applications. PMID:27198982

  8. Automated DNA profile analysis.

    PubMed

    Graham, Eleanor A M

    2005-12-01

    DNA profile analysis is not a simple process. Stringent demands are placed on the accuracy and consistency of forensic evidence so that complex, robust, and reproducible guidelines are necessary to assist the analyst and ensure mistakes are eliminated before a final profile is reported. The guidelines used for forensic DNA profile interpretation are formulated by investigation and statistical evaluation of all aspects of the analytical procedure. All the resulting rules, formulas, and thresholds are perfectly suited to programming of "expert systems"-software programs that imitate the human expert in decision-based processes to formulate a conclusion. Expert systems in forensic DNA analysis will contribute greatly to this field by increasing analytical throughput. The net result of this will be an increase in the human resources available for the research and development of improved methodologies, to ensure that forensic DNA profiling continues to advance at its current impressive rate.

  9. Research Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    Nanotechnology are employed by researchers at Northwestern University to develop a method of labeling disease markers present in blood with unique DNA tags they have dubbed "bio-bar-codes". The preparation of nanoparticle and magnetic microparticle probes and a nanoparticle-based PSR-less DNA amplification scheme are involved by the DNA-BCA assay.

  10. Research Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    Nanotechnology are employed by researchers at Northwestern University to develop a method of labeling disease markers present in blood with unique DNA tags they have dubbed "bio-bar-codes". The preparation of nanoparticle and magnetic microparticle probes and a nanoparticle-based PSR-less DNA amplification scheme are involved by the DNA-BCA assay.

  11. Imaging of DNA and Protein-DNA Complexes with Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L; Shlyakhtenko, Luda S

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of DNA structure and dynamics and protein-DNA complexes, including recent advances in the visualization of protein-DNA complexes with the use of cutting-edge, high-speed AFM. Special emphasis is given to direct nanoscale visualization of dynamics of protein-DNA complexes. In the area of DNA structure and dynamics, structural studies of local non-B conformations of DNA and the interplay of local and global DNA conformations are reviewed. The application of time-lapse AFM nanoscale imaging of DNA dynamics is illustrated by studies of Holliday junction branch migration. Structure and dynamics of protein-DNA interactions include problems related to site-specific DNA recombination, DNA replication, and DNA mismatch repair. Studies involving the structure and dynamics of chromatin are also described.

  12. Imaging of DNA and Protein–DNA Complexes with Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.; Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of DNA structure and dynamics and protein–DNA complexes, including recent advances in the visualization of protein–DNA complexes with the use of cutting-edge, high-speed AFM. Special emphasis is given to direct nanoscale visualization of dynamics of protein–DNA complexes. In the area of DNA structure and dynamics, structural studies of local non-B conformations of DNA and the interplay of local and global DNA conformations are reviewed. The application of time-lapse AFM nanoscale imaging of DNA dynamics is illustrated by studies of Holliday junction branch migration. Structure and dynamics of protein–DNA interactions include problems related to site-specific DNA recombination, DNA replication, and DNA mismatch repair. Studies involving the structure and dynamics of chromatin are also described. PMID:27278886

  13. Advanced Environmental Monitoring Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Advanced Environmental Monitoring Technologies are presented. The topics include: 1) Monitoring & Controlling the Environment; 2) Illustrative Example: Canary 3) Ground-based Commercial Technology; 4) High Capability & Low Mass/Power + Autonomy = Key to Future SpaceFlight; 5) Current Practice: in Flight; 6) Current Practice: Post Flight; 7) Miniature Mass Spectrometer for Planetary Exploration and Long Duration Human Flight; 8) Hardware and Data Acquisition System; 9) 16S rDNA Phylogenetic Tree; and 10) Preview of Porter.

  14. From DNA to transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Erez; Keren, Kinneret

    2004-06-01

    The rapid advance in molecular biology and nanotechnology opens up the possibility to explore the interface between biology and electronics at the single-molecule level. We focus on the organization of molecular electronic circuits. Interconnecting an immense number of molecular devices into a functional circuit and constructing a framework for integrated molecular electronics requires new concepts. A promising avenue relies on bottom-up assembly where the information for the circuit connectivity and functionality is embedded in the molecular building blocks. Biology can provide concepts and mechanisms for advancing this approach, but there is no straightforward way to apply them to electronics since biological molecules are essentially electrically insulating. Bridging the chasm between biology and electronics therefore presents great challenges. Circuit organization on the molecular scale is considered and contrasted with the levels of organization presented by the living world. The discussion then focuses on our proposal to harness DNA and molecular biology to construct the scaffold for integrated molecular electronics. DNA metallization is used to convert the DNA scaffold into a conductive one. We present the framework of sequence-specific molecular lithography based on the biological mechanism of homologous genetic recombination and carried out by the bacterial protein RecA. Molecular lithography enables us to use the information encoded in the scaffold DNA molecules for directing the construction of an electronic circuit. We show that it can lead all the way from DNA molecules to working transistors in a test-tube. Carbon nanotubes are incorporated as the active electronic components in the DNA-templated transistors. Our approach can, in principle, be applied to the fabrication of larger-scale electronic circuits. The realization of complex DNA-based circuits will, however, require new concepts and additional biological machinery allowing, for example

  15. DNA Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2002-11-01

    DNA is one candidate of promising molecules for molecular electronic devices, since it has the double helix structure with pi-electron bases for electron transport, the address at 0.4 nm intervals, and the self-assembly. Electrical conductivity and nanostructure of DNA and modified DNA molecules are investigated in order to research the application of DNA in nanoelectronic devices. It has been revealed that DNA is a wide-gap semiconductor in the absence of doping. The conductivity of DNA has been controlled by chemical doping, electric field doping, and photo-doping. It has found that Poly(dG)[middle dot]Poly(dC) has the best conductivity and can function as a conducting nanowire. The pattern of DNA network is controlled by changing the concentration of the DNA solution.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  17. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  18. Ultra-high resolution DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, A H; Robinson, H; Gao, Y G

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the progress in our efforts at producing ultra-high resolution (< 0.8 A) DNA structures using advanced cryo-crystallography and synchrotron. Our work is aimed at providing reliable geometric (bond length and bond angle), electronic and motional information of DNA molecules in different conformational contexts. These highly-reliable, new structures will be the basis for constructing better DNA force-field parameters, which will benefit the structural refinement of DNA, protein-DNA complexes, and ligand-DNA complexes.

  19. Development of dengue DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Danko, Janine R; Beckett, Charmagne G; Porter, Kevin R

    2011-09-23

    Vaccination with plasmid DNA against infectious pathogens including dengue is an active area of investigation. By design, DNA vaccines are able to elicit both antibody responses and cellular immune responses capable of mediating long-term protection. Great technical improvements have been made in dengue DNA vaccine constructs and trials are underway to study these in the clinic. The scope of this review is to highlight the rich history of this vaccine platform and the work in dengue DNA vaccines accomplished by scientists at the Naval Medical Research Center. This work resulted in the only dengue DNA vaccine tested in a clinical trial to date. Additional advancements paving the road ahead in dengue DNA vaccine development are also discussed.

  20. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities.

    PubMed

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K

    2014-08-01

    Loss of Werner syndrome protein function causes Werner syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN's DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor HU. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency.

  1. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of WRN function causes Werner Syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN’s DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency. PMID:24965941

  2. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  3. Interactions between DNA damage, repair, and transcription.

    PubMed

    Khobta, Andriy; Epe, Bernd

    2012-08-01

    This review addresses a variety of mechanisms by which DNA repair interacts with transcription and vice versa. Blocking of transcriptional elongation is the best studied of these mechanisms. Transcription recovery after damage therefore has often been used as a surrogate marker of DNA repair in cells. However, it has become evident that relationships between DNA damage, repair, and transcription are more complex due to various indirect effects of DNA damage on gene transcription. These include inhibition of transcription by DNA repair intermediates as well as regulation of transcription and of the epigenetic status of the genes by DNA repair-related mechanisms. In addition, since transcription is emerging as an important endogenous source of DNA damage in cells, we briefly summarise recent advances in understanding the nature of co-transcriptionally induced DNA damage and the DNA repair pathways involved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. DNA Flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widom, Jonathan

    2005-03-01

    Classic experimental and theoretical analyses led to a unified view of DNA as a semiflexible polymer, characterized by a bending persistence length, P, ˜50 nm (˜150 bp). In this view, DNA lengths that are greater than P are, on average, spontaneously gently bent, and require relatively little force to bend significantly, while DNA lengths that are shorter than P are nearly straight, and require great force to bend significantly. Nevertheless, sharply bent DNA plays important roles in biology. We used the method of ligase catalyzed DNA cyclization to investigate the spontaneous looping of short DNAs. Remarkably, DNAs as short as 84 bp spontaneously bend into circles, and 94 bp DNA sequences cyclize up to 10^5 times more easily than predicted from classic theories of DNA bending. In subsequent studies we find that the twistability of sharply looped DNAs exceeds the prediction of classic theories by up to 400-fold. These results can only be understood by greatly enhanced DNA flexibility, not by permanent bends. Our results provide striking support for two new theories of DNA mechanics based on local melted or kinked regions, and they establish DNA as an active participant in the formation and function of looped regulatory complexes in vivo.

  5. DNA Camouflage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-08

    1 DNA Camouflage Supplementary Information Bijan Zakeri1,2*, Timothy K. Lu1,2*, Peter A. Carr2,3* 1Department of Electrical Engineering and...ll.mit.edu). Distribution A: Public Release   2 Supplementary Figure 1 DNA camouflage with the 2-state device. (a) In the presence of Cre, DSD-2[α...Supplementary Figure 2 DNA shuffling does not comprise sequencing outside of DSDs. (a) Sequencing of 1 kb downstream of DSD-2[α] produces high quality

  6. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  7. DNA fingerprinting in the criminal justice system: an overview.

    PubMed

    Varsha

    2006-03-01

    DNA fingerprinting is a powerful technology that has revolutionized forensic science. No two individuals can have an identical DNA pattern except identical twins. Such DNA-based technologies have enormous social implications and can help in the fight against crime. This technology has experienced many changes over time with many advancements occurring. DNA testing is a matter of serious concern as it involves ethical issues. This article describes various trends in DNA fingerprinting and the current technology used in DNA profiling, possible uses and misuses of DNA databanks and ethical issues involved in DNA testing. Limitations and problems prevailing in this field are highlighted.

  8. DNA nanotechnology-enabled biosensors.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jie; Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Yinan; Wang, Lianhui; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-02-15

    Biosensors employ biological molecules to recognize the target and utilize output elements which can translate the biorecognition event into electrical, optical or mass-sensitive signals to determine the quantities of the target. DNA-based biosensors, as a sub-field to biosensor, utilize DNA strands with short oligonucleotides as probes for target recognition. Although DNA-based biosensors have offered a promising alternative for fast, simple and cheap detection of target molecules, there still exist key challenges including poor stability and reproducibility that hinder their competition with the current gold standard for DNA assays. By exploiting the self-recognition properties of DNA molecules, researchers have dedicated to make versatile DNA nanostructures in a highly rigid, controllable and functionalized manner, which offers unprecedented opportunities for developing DNA-based biosensors. In this review, we will briefly introduce the recent advances on design and fabrication of static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, and summarize their applications for fabrication and functionalization of DNA-based biosensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Advanced Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Mike; Nelms, Rick

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study that explores the depth and breadth of scientific facts, principles, and procedures which are required in the Advanced General National Vocational Qualifications (GNVQ) science through comparison with GCE Advanced level. The final report takes account of the updated 1996 version of GNVQ science. (DDR)

  10. DNA ligases.

    PubMed

    Tabor, S

    2001-05-01

    DNA ligases catalyze the formation of phosphodiester bonds between juxtaposed 5' phosphate and a 3'-hydroxyl terminus in duplex DNA. This activity can repair single-stranded nicks in duplex DNA and join duplex DNA restriction fragments having either blunt ends or homologous cohesive ends. Two ligases are used for nucleic acid research and their reaction conditions and applications are described in this unit: E. coli ligase and T4 ligase. These enzymes differ in two important properties. One is the source of energy: T4 ligase uses ATP, while E. coli ligase uses NAD. Another important difference is their ability to ligate blunt ends; under normal reaction conditions, only T4 DNA ligase will ligate blunt ends.

  11. Molecular Advancements in Forensic Odontology.

    PubMed

    Babu Rs, A; Rose, D

    2015-05-11

    Forensic odontology explores the field of human identification through dental tissues in cases where there is the destruction of body tissues in criminal investigations and mass disasters. Forensic odontology involves dentists participating in legal and criminal issues. Parameters such as age and gender identification are important in identifying the person or persons. Over the last two decades, the molecular aspect of forensic sciences has increased, and these molecular techniques now provide a novel approach to forensic odontology. Molecular advancements in science like DNA analysis have extended the range of forensic dentistry, as teeth possess the character of resistance toward physical or chemical aggressions. Teeth provide the abundant space for DNA, and hence teeth represent an excellent source of genomic DNA. The present paper focusses on molecular advancements in the field of forensic odontology.

  12. Role of DNA profiling in forensic odontology

    PubMed Central

    Sakari, S. Leena; Jimson, Sudha; Masthan, K. M. K.; Jacobina, Jenita

    2015-01-01

    The recent advances in DNA profiling have made DNA evidence to be more widely accepted in courts. This has revolutionized the aspect of forensic odontology. DNA profiling/DNA fingerprinting has come a long way from the conventional fingerprints. DNA that is responsible for all the cell's activities, yields valuable information both in the healthy and diseased individuals. When other means of traditional identification become impossible following mass calamities or fire explosions, teeth provide a rich source of DNA as they have a high chemical as well as physical resistance. The recent evolution in the isolation of DNA and the ways of running a DNA fingerprint are highlighted in this literature review. PMID:26015692

  13. Evolution of DNA Methylation across Insects

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Kevin J.; Moore, Allen J.; Schmitz, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation contributes to gene and transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes, and therefore has been hypothesized to facilitate the evolution of plastic traits such as sociality in insects. However, DNA methylation is sparsely studied in insects. Therefore, we documented patterns of DNA methylation across a wide diversity of insects. We predicted that underlying enzymatic machinery is concordant with patterns of DNA methylation. Finally, given the suggestion that DNA methylation facilitated social evolution in Hymenoptera, we tested the hypothesis that the DNA methylation system will be associated with presence/absence of sociality among other insect orders. We found DNA methylation to be widespread, detected in all orders examined except Diptera (flies). Whole genome bisulfite sequencing showed that orders differed in levels of DNA methylation. Hymenopteran (ants, bees, wasps and sawflies) had some of the lowest levels, including several potential losses. Blattodea (cockroaches and termites) show all possible patterns, including a potential loss of DNA methylation in a eusocial species whereas solitary species had the highest levels. Species with DNA methylation do not always possess the typical enzymatic machinery. We identified a gene duplication event in the maintenance DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) that is shared by some Hymenoptera, and paralogs have experienced divergent, nonneutral evolution. This diversity and nonneutral evolution of underlying machinery suggests alternative DNA methylation pathways may exist. Phylogenetically corrected comparisons revealed no evidence that supports evolutionary association between sociality and DNA methylation. Future functional studies will be required to advance our understanding of DNA methylation in insects. PMID:28025279

  14. Advances in viral oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.

    1987-01-01

    Volume 6 of Advances in Viral Oncology presents experimental approaches to multifactorial interactions in tumor development. Included are in-depth analyses of malignant phenotypes by oncogene complementation, as well as studies of complementary interactions among DNA viral oncogenes; multiple cell-derived sequences in single retroviral genomes; and sequences that influence the transforming activity and expression of the mos oncogene. The genetic regulation of tumorigenic expression in somatic cell hybrids, the inhibition of oncogenes by cellular genes, and the interaction of genes that favor and genes that suppress tumorigenesis are examined in detail. The book concludes with a study of the relationship of oncogenes to the evolution of the metastatic phenotype.

  15. [DNA computing].

    PubMed

    Błasiak, Janusz; Krasiński, Tadeusz; Popławski, Tomasz; Sakowski, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Biocomputers can be an alternative for traditional "silicon-based" computers, which continuous development may be limited due to further miniaturization (imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle) and increasing the amount of information between the central processing unit and the main memory (von Neuman bottleneck). The idea of DNA computing came true for the first time in 1994, when Adleman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using short DNA oligomers and DNA ligase. In the early 2000s a series of biocomputer models was presented with a seminal work of Shapiro and his colleguas who presented molecular 2 state finite automaton, in which the restriction enzyme, FokI, constituted hardware and short DNA oligomers were software as well as input/output signals. DNA molecules provided also energy for this machine. DNA computing can be exploited in many applications, from study on the gene expression pattern to diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The idea of DNA computing is still in progress in research both in vitro and in vivo and at least promising results of these research allow to have a hope for a breakthrough in the computer science.

  16. Bacterial identification and subtyping using DNA microarray and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Al-Khaldi, Sufian F; Mossoba, Magdi M; Allard, Marc M; Lienau, E Kurt; Brown, Eric D

    2012-01-01

    The era of fast and accurate discovery of biological sequence motifs in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells is here. The co-evolution of direct genome sequencing and DNA microarray strategies not only will identify, isotype, and serotype pathogenic bacteria, but also it will aid in the discovery of new gene functions by detecting gene expressions in different diseases and environmental conditions. Microarray bacterial identification has made great advances in working with pure and mixed bacterial samples. The technological advances have moved beyond bacterial gene expression to include bacterial identification and isotyping. Application of new tools such as mid-infrared chemical imaging improves detection of hybridization in DNA microarrays. The research in this field is promising and future work will reveal the potential of infrared technology in bacterial identification. On the other hand, DNA sequencing by using 454 pyrosequencing is so cost effective that the promise of $1,000 per bacterial genome sequence is becoming a reality. Pyrosequencing technology is a simple to use technique that can produce accurate and quantitative analysis of DNA sequences with a great speed. The deposition of massive amounts of bacterial genomic information in databanks is creating fingerprint phylogenetic analysis that will ultimately replace several technologies such as Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis. In this chapter, we will review (1) the use of DNA microarray using fluorescence and infrared imaging detection for identification of pathogenic bacteria, and (2) use of pyrosequencing in DNA cluster analysis to fingerprint bacterial phylogenetic trees.

  17. DNA Labeling Using DNA Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Tomkuvienė, Miglė; Kriukienė, Edita; Klimašauskas, Saulius

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases) uniquely combine the ability to recognize and covalently modify specific target sequences in DNA using the ubiquitous cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet). Although DNA methylation plays important roles in biological signaling, the transferred methyl group is a poor reporter and is highly inert to further biocompatible derivatization. To unlock the biotechnological power of these enzymes, two major types of cofactor AdoMet analogs were developed that permit targeted MTase-directed attachment of larger moieties containing functional or reporter groups onto DNA. One such approach (named sequence-specific methyltransferase-induced labeling, SMILing) uses reactive aziridine or N-mustard mimics of the cofactor AdoMet, which render targeted coupling of a whole cofactor molecule to the target DNA. The second approach (methyltransferase-directed transfer of activated groups, mTAG) uses AdoMet analogs with a sulfonium-bound extended side chain replacing the methyl group, which permits MTase-directed covalent transfer of the activated side chain alone. As the enlarged cofactors are not always compatible with the active sites of native MTases, steric engineering of the active site has been employed to optimize their alkyltransferase activity. In addition to the described cofactor analogs, recently discovered atypical reactions of DNA cytosine-5 MTases involving non-cofactor-like compounds can also be exploited for targeted derivatization and labeling of DNA. Altogether, these approaches offer new powerful tools for sequence-specific covalent DNA labeling, which not only pave the way to developing a variety of useful techniques in DNA research, diagnostics, and nanotechnologies but have already proven practical utility for optical DNA mapping and epigenome studies.

  18. Advanced Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This video looks at a spinoff application of the technology from advanced microsensors -- those that monitor and determine conditions of spacecraft like the Space Shuttle. The application featured is concerned with the monitoring of the health of premature babies.

  19. Advanced Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This video looks at a spinoff application of the technology from advanced microsensors -- those that monitor and determine conditions of spacecraft like the Space Shuttle. The application featured is concerned with the monitoring of the health of premature babies.

  20. How We Make DNA Origami.

    PubMed

    Wagenbauer, Klaus F; Engelhardt, Floris A S; Stahl, Evi; Hechtl, Vera K; Stömmer, Pierre; Seebacher, Fabian; Meregalli, Letizia; Ketterer, Philip; Gerling, Thomas; Dietz, Hendrik

    2017-07-17

    DNA origami has attracted substantial attention since its invention ten years ago, due to the seemingly infinite possibilities that it affords for creating customized nanoscale objects. Although the basic concept of DNA origami is easy to understand, using custom DNA origami in practical applications requires detailed know-how for designing and producing the particles with sufficient quality and for preparing them at appropriate concentrations with the necessary degree of purity in custom environments. Such know-how is not readily available for newcomers to the field, thus slowing down the rate at which new applications outside the field of DNA nanotechnology may emerge. To foster faster progress, we share in this article the experience in making and preparing DNA origami that we have accumulated over recent years. We discuss design solutions for creating advanced structural motifs including corners and various types of hinges that expand the design space for the more rigid multilayer DNA origami and provide guidelines for preventing undesired aggregation and on how to induce specific oligomerization of multiple DNA origami building blocks. In addition, we provide detailed protocols and discuss the expected results for five key methods that allow efficient and damage-free preparation of DNA origami. These methods are agarose-gel purification, filtration through molecular cut-off membranes, PEG precipitation, size-exclusion chromatography, and ultracentrifugation-based sedimentation. The guide for creating advanced design motifs and the detailed protocols with their experimental characterization that we describe here should lower the barrier for researchers to accomplish the full DNA origami production workflow. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Advanced Beamformers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Advanced Beamformers Stergios Stergiopoulos Defence R&D Canada Technical Report DRDC Toronto TR 2008-101 September 2008 Defence Research and...Development Canada Recherche et développement pour la défense Canada DEFENCE DÉFENSE & Advanced beamformers Stergios Stergiopoulos... beamformers ; and provide suggestions of how modern technology can be applied to the development of current and next generation ultrasound systems and

  2. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  3. DNA Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    Explains a method to enable students to understand DNA and protein synthesis using model-building and role-playing. Acquaints students with the triplet code and transcription. Includes copies of the charts used in this technique. (DDR)

  4. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  5. Unravelling DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Rs; Danilowicz, C.

    2004-04-01

    The forces involved in the biology of life are carefully balanced between stopping thermal fluctuations ripping our DNA apart and having bonds weak enough to allow enzymes to function. The application of recently developed techniques for measuring piconewton forces and imaging at the nanometre scale on a molecule-by-molecule basis has dramatically increased the impact of single-molecule biophysics. This article describes the most commonly used techniques for imaging and manipulating single biomolecules. Using these techniques, the mechanical properties of DNA can be investigated, for example through measurements of the forces required to stretch and unzip the DNA double helix. These properties determine the ease with which DNA can be folded into the cell nucleus and the size and complexity of the accompanying cellular machinery. Part of this cellular machinery is enzymes, which manipulate, repair and transcribe the DNA helix. Enzymatic function is increasingly being investigated at the single molecule level to give better understanding of the forces and processes involved in the genetic cycle. One of the challenges is to transfer this understanding of single molecules into living systems. Already there have been some notable successes, such as the development of techniques for gene expression through the application of mechanical forces to cells, and the imaging and control of viral infection of a cell. This understanding and control of DNA has also been used to design molecules, which can self-assemble into a range of structures.

  6. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  7. Regulating DNA Replication in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Maria de la Paz; Costas, Celina; Sequeira-Mendes, Joana; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication in plants has requirements and constraints similar to those in other eukaryotes. However, some aspects are plant-specific. Studies of DNA replication control in plants, which have unique developmental strategies, can offer unparalleled opportunities of comparing regulatory processes with yeast and, particularly, metazoa to identify common trends and basic rules. In addition to the comparative molecular and biochemical studies, genomic studies in plants that started with Arabidopsis thaliana in the year 2000 have now expanded to several dozens of species. This, together with the applicability of genomic approaches and the availability of a large collection of mutants, underscores the enormous potential to study DNA replication control in a whole developing organism. Recent advances in this field with particular focus on the DNA replication proteins, the nature of replication origins and their epigenetic landscape, and the control of endoreplication will be reviewed. PMID:23209151

  8. Cryo-EM structure of human DNA-PK holoenzyme.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaotong; Liu, Mengjie; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Jiawei; Xu, Yanhui

    2017-08-25

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase complex composed of a catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and KU70/80 heterodimer bound to DNA. DNA-PK holoenzyme plays a critical role in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major DNA repair pathway. Here, we determined cryo-electron microscopy structure of human DNA-PK holoenzyme at 6.6 Å resolution. In the complex structure, DNA-PKcs, KU70, KU80 and DNA duplex form a 650-kDa heterotetramer with 1:1:1:1 stoichiometry. The N-terminal α-solenoid (∼2 800 residues) of DNA-PKcs adopts a double-ring fold and connects the catalytic core domain of DNA-PKcs and KU70/80-DNA. DNA-PKcs and KU70/80 together form a DNA-binding tunnel, which cradles ∼30-bp DNA and prevents sliding inward of DNA-PKcs along with DNA duplex, suggesting a mechanism by which the broken DNA end is protected from unnecessary processing. Structural and biochemical analyses indicate that KU70/80 and DNA coordinately induce conformational changes of DNA-PKcs and allosterically stimulate its kinase activity. We propose a model for activation of DNA-PKcs in which allosteric signals are generated upon DNA-PK holoenzyme formation and transmitted to the kinase domain through N-terminal HEAT repeats and FAT domain of DNA-PKcs. Our studies suggest a mechanism for recognition and protection of broken DNA ends and provide a structural basis for understanding the activation of DNA-PKcs and DNA-PK-mediated NHEJ pathway.Cell Research advance online publication 25 August 2017; doi:10.1038/cr.2017.110.

  9. Food Fish Identification from DNA Extraction through Sequence Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.

    2015-01-01

    This experiment exposed 3rd and 4th y undergraduates and graduate students taking a course in advanced food analysis to DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and DNA sequence analysis. Students provided their own fish sample, purchased from local grocery stores, and the class as a whole extracted DNA, which was then subjected to PCR,…

  10. Food Fish Identification from DNA Extraction through Sequence Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.

    2015-01-01

    This experiment exposed 3rd and 4th y undergraduates and graduate students taking a course in advanced food analysis to DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and DNA sequence analysis. Students provided their own fish sample, purchased from local grocery stores, and the class as a whole extracted DNA, which was then subjected to PCR,…

  11. Molecular mechanisms for enhanced DNA vaccine immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    Summary In the two decades since their initial discovery, DNA vaccines technologies have come a long way. Unfortunately, when applied to human subjects inadequate immunogenicity is still the biggest challenge for practical DNA vaccine use. Many different strategies have been tested in preclinical models to address this problem, including novel plasmid vectors and codon optimization to enhance antigen expression, new gene transfection systems or electroporation to increase delivery efficiency, protein or live virus vector boosting regimens to maximise immune stimulation, and formulation of DNA vaccines with traditional or molecular adjuvants. Better understanding of the mechanisms of action of DNA vaccines has also enabled better use of the intrinsic host response to DNA to improve vaccine immunogenicity. This review summarizes recent advances in DNA vaccine technologies and related intracellular events and how these might impact on future directions of DNA vaccine development. PMID:26707950

  12. Incorporating DNA Methylation Dynamics Into Epigenetic Codes

    PubMed Central

    Szulwach, Keith E.; Jin, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Summary Genomic function is dictated by a combination of DNA sequence and the molecular mechanisms controlling access to genetic information. Access to DNA can be determined by the interpretation of covalent modifications that influence the packaging of DNA into chromatin, including DNA methylation and histone modifications. These modifications are believed to be forms of “epigenetic codes” that exist in discernable combinations that reflect cellular phenotype. Although DNA methylation is known to play important roles in gene regulation and genomic function, its contribution to the encoding of epigenetic information is just beginning to emerge. Here we discuss paradigms associated with the various components of DNA methylation/demethylation and recent advances in the understanding of its dynamic regulation in the genome, integrating these mechanisms into a framework to explain how DNA methylation could contribute to epigenetic codes. PMID:24242211

  13. Molecular mechanisms for enhanced DNA vaccine immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    In the two decades since their initial discovery, DNA vaccines technologies have come a long way. Unfortunately, when applied to human subjects inadequate immunogenicity is still the biggest challenge for practical DNA vaccine use. Many different strategies have been tested in preclinical models to address this problem, including novel plasmid vectors and codon optimization to enhance antigen expression, new gene transfection systems or electroporation to increase delivery efficiency, protein or live virus vector boosting regimens to maximise immune stimulation, and formulation of DNA vaccines with traditional or molecular adjuvants. Better understanding of the mechanisms of action of DNA vaccines has also enabled better use of the intrinsic host response to DNA to improve vaccine immunogenicity. This review summarizes recent advances in DNA vaccine technologies and related intracellular events and how these might impact on future directions of DNA vaccine development.

  14. Advancement Flaps.

    PubMed

    Kruter, Laura; Rohrer, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Advancement flaps are random-pattern flaps frequently used in the reconstruction of surgical defects on the face after the removal of skin cancer. Proper design and meticulous execution is crucial in achieving reproducible esthetic results. To review the design and execution of advancement flaps in facial reconstruction. A review of the literature on the use of advancement flaps in facial reconstruction was performed and curated with the authors' experience. Many factors come into play when using local flaps to reconstruct surgical defects on the face. Close attention must be given to the tissue surrounding the surgical defect and any free margin in the area. Designing the flap closure lines along cosmetic unit junctions and or relaxed skin tension lines, preserving both the form and function of the surrounding structures, and using excellent surgical techniques during the closure will all together help in providing reproducibly outstanding results.

  15. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  16. Stepping stones in DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Stranneheim, Henrik; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there have been tremendous advances in our ability to rapidly and cost-effectively sequence DNA. This has revolutionized the fields of genetics and biology, leading to a deeper understanding of the molecular events in life processes. The rapid technological advances have enormously expanded sequencing opportunities and applications, but also imposed strains and challenges on steps prior to sequencing and in the downstream process of handling and analysis of these massive amounts of sequence data. Traditionally, sequencing has been limited to small DNA fragments of approximately one thousand bases (derived from the organism's genome) due to issues in maintaining a high sequence quality and accuracy for longer read lengths. Although many technological breakthroughs have been made, currently the commercially available massively parallel sequencing methods have not been able to resolve this issue. However, recent announcements in nanopore sequencing hold the promise of removing this read-length limitation, enabling sequencing of larger intact DNA fragments. The ability to sequence longer intact DNA with high accuracy is a major stepping stone towards greatly simplifying the downstream analysis and increasing the power of sequencing compared to today. This review covers some of the technical advances in sequencing that have opened up new frontiers in genomics. PMID:22887891

  17. Repair-Resistant DNA Lesions

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The eukaryotic global genomic nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) pathway is the major mechanism that removes most bulky and some nonbulky lesions from cellular DNA. There is growing evidence that certain DNA lesions are repaired slowly or are entirely resistant to repair in cells, tissues, and in cell extract model assay systems. It is well established that the eukaryotic DNA lesion-sensing proteins do not detect the damaged nucleotide, but recognize the distortions/destabilizations in the native DNA structure caused by the damaged nucleotides. In this article, the nature of the structural features of certain bulky DNA lesions that render them resistant to NER, or cause them to be repaired slowly, is compared to that of those that are good-to-excellent NER substrates. Understanding the structural features that distinguish NER-resistant DNA lesions from good NER substrates may be useful for interpreting the biological significance of biomarkers of exposure of human populations to genotoxic environmental chemicals. NER-resistant lesions can survive to replication and cause mutations that can initiate cancer and other diseases. Furthermore, NER diminishes the efficacy of certain chemotherapeutic drugs, and the design of more potent pharmaceuticals that resist repair can be advanced through a better understanding of the structural properties of DNA lesions that engender repair-resistance. PMID:28750166

  18. Choosing and Using a Plant DNA Barcode

    PubMed Central

    Hollingsworth, Peter M.; Graham, Sean W.; Little, Damon P.

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of DNA barcoding is to establish a shared community resource of DNA sequences that can be used for organismal identification and taxonomic clarification. This approach was successfully pioneered in animals using a portion of the cytochrome oxidase 1 (CO1) mitochondrial gene. In plants, establishing a standardized DNA barcoding system has been more challenging. In this paper, we review the process of selecting and refining a plant barcode; evaluate the factors which influence the discriminatory power of the approach; describe some early applications of plant barcoding and summarise major emerging projects; and outline tool development that will be necessary for plant DNA barcoding to advance. PMID:21637336

  19. The Epigenetic Pathways to Ribosomal DNA Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rakesh; Srivastava, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Heterochromatin is the transcriptionally repressed portion of eukaryotic chromatin that maintains a condensed appearance throughout the cell cycle. At sites of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) heterochromatin, epigenetic states contribute to gene silencing and genome stability, which are required for proper chromosome segregation and a normal life span. Here, we focus on recent advances in the epigenetic regulation of rDNA silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in mammals, including regulation by several histone modifications and several protein components associated with the inner nuclear membrane within the nucleolus. Finally, we discuss the perturbations of rDNA epigenetic pathways in regulating cellular aging and in causing various types of diseases. PMID:27250769

  20. Advancing Reflectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-21

    transmissions, was first demonstrated using Global Navigation Satellite System ( GNSS ) reflections. Recently, reflectometry has been extended to digital... GNSS +R workshop provided an opportunity for engineers and Earth scientists to assess the state of the art, demonstrate new applications, and discuss...18 Eos, Vol. 94, No. 21, 21 May 2013 MEETING -.~ Advancing Reflectometry Workshop on Renectometry Using GNSS and Other Signals of Opportunity

  1. Technological Advancements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

  2. Research Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    Research advances, a new feature in Journal of Chemical Engineering that brings information about innovations in current areas of research to high school and college science faculty with an intent to provide educators with timely descriptions of latest progress in research that can be integrated into existing courses to update course content and…

  3. Technological Advancements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

  4. Advanced Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-01-02

    The Advanced Space Transportation Group takes the future of space travel far into the 21st Century. Pictured is an artist's concept of a third generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). Projected for the year 2025, this third generation RLV will introduce an era of space travel not unlike air travel today.

  5. DNA codes

    SciTech Connect

    Torney, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    We have begun to characterize a variety of codes, motivated by potential implementation as (quaternary) DNA n-sequences, with letters denoted A, C The first codes we studied are the most reminiscent of conventional group codes. For these codes, Hamming similarity was generalized so that the score for matched letters takes more than one value, depending upon which letters are matched [2]. These codes consist of n-sequences satisfying an upper bound on the similarities, summed over the letter positions, of distinct codewords. We chose similarity 2 for matches of letters A and T and 3 for matches of the letters C and G, providing a rough approximation to double-strand bond energies in DNA. An inherent novelty of DNA codes is 'reverse complementation'. The latter may be defined, as follows, not only for alphabets of size four, but, more generally, for any even-size alphabet. All that is required is a matching of the letters of the alphabet: a partition into pairs. Then, the reverse complement of a codeword is obtained by reversing the order of its letters and replacing each letter by its match. For DNA, the matching is AT/CG because these are the Watson-Crick bonding pairs. Reversal arises because two DNA sequences form a double strand with opposite relative orientations. Thus, as will be described in detail, because in vitro decoding involves the formation of double-stranded DNA from two codewords, it is reasonable to assume - for universal applicability - that the reverse complement of any codeword is also a codeword. In particular, self-reverse complementary codewords are expressly forbidden in reverse-complement codes. Thus, an appropriate distance between all pairs of codewords must, when large, effectively prohibit binding between the respective codewords: to form a double strand. Only reverse-complement pairs of codewords should be able to bind. For most applications, a DNA code is to be bi-partitioned, such that the reverse-complementary pairs are separated

  6. DNA origami nanopores for controlling DNA translocation.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Bell, Nicholas A W; Thacker, Vivek V; Göpfrich, Kerstin; Misiunas, Karolis; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2013-07-23

    We combine DNA origami structures with glass nanocapillaries to reversibly form hybrid DNA origami nanopores. Trapping of the DNA origami onto the nanocapillary is proven by imaging fluorescently labeled DNA origami structures and simultaneous ionic current measurements of the trapping events. We then show two applications highlighting the versatility of these DNA origami nanopores. First, by tuning the pore size we can control the folding of dsDNA molecules ("physical control"). Second, we show that the specific introduction of binding sites in the DNA origami nanopore allows selective detection of ssDNA as a function of the DNA sequence ("chemical control").

  7. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  8. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  9. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  10. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  11. DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marinus, M.G.; Løbner-Olesen, A.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA of E. coli contains 19,120 6-methyladenines and 12,045 5-methylcytosines in addition to the four regular bases and these are formed by the postreplicative action of three DNA methyltransferases. The majority of the methylated bases are formed by the Dam and Dcm methyltransferases encoded by the dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase) and dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) genes. Although not essential, Dam methylation is important for strand discrimination during repair of replication errors, controlling the frequency of initiation of chromosome replication at oriC, and regulation of transcription initiation at promoters containing GATC sequences. In contrast, there is no known function for Dcm methylation although Dcm recognition sites constitute sequence motifs for Very Short Patch repair of T/G base mismatches. In certain bacteria (e.g., Vibrio cholerae, Caulobacter crescentus) adenine methylation is essential and in C. crescentus, it is important for temporal gene expression which, in turn, is required for coordinating chromosome initiation, replication and division. In practical terms, Dam and Dcm methylation can inhibit restriction enzyme cleavage; decrease transformation frequency in certain bacteria; decrease the stability of short direct repeats; are necessary for site-directed mutagenesis; and to probe eukaryotic structure and function. PMID:26442938

  12. Modulation of meiotic homologous recombination by DNA helicases.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    DNA helicases are ATP-driven motor proteins which translocate along DNA capable of dismantling DNA-DNA interactions and/or removing proteins bound to DNA. These biochemical capabilities make DNA helicases main regulators of crucial DNA metabolic processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, and genetic recombination. This budding topic will focus on reviewing the function of DNA helicases important for homologous recombination during meiosis, and discuss recent advances in how these modulators of meiotic recombination are themselves regulated. The emphasis is placed on work in the two model yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which has vastly expanded our understanding of meiotic homologous recombination, a process whose correct execution is instrumental for healthy gamete formation, and thus functioning sexual reproduction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. DNA-PKcs mediated transcriptional regulation drives prostate cancer progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Jonathan F.; Kothari, Vishal; Drake, Justin M.; Zhao, Shuang; Dylgjeri, Emanuela; Dean, Jeffry L.; Schiewer, Matthew J.; McNair, Christopher; Jones, Jennifer K.; Aytes, Alvaro; Magee, Michael S.; Snook, Adam E.; Zhu, Ziqi; Den, Robert B.; Birbe, Ruth C.; Gomella, Leonard G.; Graham, Nicholas A.; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Graeber, Thomas G.; Karnes, R. Jeffrey; Takhar, Mandeep; Davicioni, Elai; Tomlins, Scott A.; Abate-Shen, Cory; Sharifi, Nima; Witte, Owen N.; Feng, Felix Y.; Knudsen, Karen E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Emerging evidence demonstrates that the DNA repair kinase DNA-PKcs exerts divergent roles in transcriptional regulation of unsolved consequence. Here, in vitro and in vivo interrogation demonstrate that DNA-PKcs functions as a selective modulator of transcriptional networks that induce cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Accordingly, suppression of DNA-PKcs inhibits tumor metastases. Clinical assessment revealed that DNA-PKcs is significantly elevated in advanced disease, and independently predicts for metastases, recurrence, and reduced overall survival. Further investigation demonstrated that DNA-PKcs in advanced tumors is highly activated, independent of DNA damage indicators. Combined, these findings reveal unexpected DNA-PKcs functions, identify DNA-PKcs as a potent driver of tumor progression and metastases, and nominate DNA-PKcs as a therapeutic target for advanced malignancies. PMID:26175416

  14. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  15. Recent advances in crustacean genomics.

    PubMed

    Stillman, Jonathon H; Colbourne, John K; Lee, Carol E; Patel, Nipam H; Phillips, Michelle R; Towle, David W; Eads, Brian D; Gelembuik, Greg W; Henry, Raymond P; Johnson, Eric A; Pfrender, Michael E; Terwilliger, Nora B

    2008-12-01

    Crustaceans are a diverse and ancient group of arthropods that have long been studied as interesting model systems in biology, especially for understanding animal evolution and physiology and for environmentally relevant studies. Like many model systems, advances in DNA-sequencing methodologies have led to a large amount of genomics-related projects. The purpose of this article is to highlight the genome projects and functional genomics (transcriptomics) projects that are currently underway in crustacean biology. Specifically, we have surveyed the amount of publicly available DNA sequence data (both genomic and EST data) across all crustacean taxa for which a significant number of DNA sequences have been generated. Several ongoing projects are presented including the ecology of invasive species, thermal physiology, ion and water balance, ecology and evolutionary biology, and developmental biology.

  16. Ancient plant DNA in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Parducci, Laura; Bennett, Keith D; Ficetola, Gentile Francesco; Alsos, Inger Greve; Suyama, Yoshihisa; Wood, Jamie R; Pedersen, Mikkel Winther

    2017-04-03

    Contents I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. References SUMMARY: Recent advances in sequencing technologies now permit the analyses of plant DNA from fossil samples (ancient plant DNA, plant aDNA), and thus enable the molecular reconstruction of palaeofloras. Hitherto, ancient frozen soils have proved excellent in preserving DNA molecules, and have thus been the most commonly used source of plant aDNA. However, DNA from soil mainly represents taxa growing a few metres from the sampling point. Lakes have larger catchment areas and recent studies have suggested that plant aDNA from lake sediments is a more powerful tool for palaeofloristic reconstruction. Furthermore, lakes can be found globally in nearly all environments, and are therefore not limited to perennially frozen areas. Here, we review the latest approaches and methods for the study of plant aDNA from lake sediments and discuss the progress made up to the present. We argue that aDNA analyses add new and additional perspectives for the study of ancient plant populations and, in time, will provide higher taxonomic resolution and more precise estimation of abundance. Despite this, key questions and challenges remain for such plant aDNA studies. Finally, we provide guidelines on technical issues, including lake selection, and we suggest directions for future research on plant aDNA studies in lake sediments.

  17. Novel encoding methods for DNA-templated chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zheng, Wenlu; Liu, Ying; Li, Xiaoyu

    2015-06-01

    Among various types of DNA-encoded chemical libraries, DNA-templated library takes advantage of the sequence-specificity of DNA hybridization, enabling not only highly effective DNA-templated chemical reactions, but also high fidelity in library encoding. This brief review summarizes recent advances that have been made on the encoding strategies for DNA-templated libraries, and it also highlights their respective advantages and limitations for the preparation of DNA-encoded libraries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fleet DNA Project (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-10-01

    The Fleet DNA Project - designed by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory - aims to accelerate the evolution of advanced vehicle development and support the strategic deployment of market-ready technologies that reduce costs, fuel consumption, and emissions. At the heart of the Fleet DNA Project is a clearinghouse of medium- and heavy-duty commercial fleet transportation data for optimizing the design of advanced vehicle technologies or for selecting a given technology to invest in. An easy-to-access online database will help vehicle manufacturers and fleets understand the broad operational range for many of today's commercial vehicle vocations.

  19. DNA nanotechnology. Programming colloidal phase transitions with DNA strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Rogers, W Benjamin; Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2015-02-06

    DNA-grafted nanoparticles have been called "programmable atom-equivalents": Like atoms, they form three-dimensional crystals, but unlike atoms, the particles themselves carry information (the sequences of the grafted strands) that can be used to "program" the equilibrium crystal structures. We show that the programmability of these colloids can be generalized to the full temperature-dependent phase diagram, not just the crystal structures themselves. We add information to the buffer in the form of soluble DNA strands designed to compete with the grafted strands through strand displacement. Using only two displacement reactions, we program phase behavior not found in atomic systems or other DNA-grafted colloids, including arbitrarily wide gas-solid coexistence, reentrant melting, and even reversible transitions between distinct crystal phases. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Mendel Meets CSI: Forensic Genotyping as a Method to Teach Genetics & DNA Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurowski, Scotia; Reiss, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a forensic DNA science laboratory exercise for advanced high school and introductory college level biology courses. Students use a commercial genotyping kit and genetic analyzer or gene sequencer to analyze DNA recovered from a fictitious crime scene. DNA profiling and STR genotyping are outlined. DNA extraction, PCR, and…

  1. Mendel Meets CSI: Forensic Genotyping as a Method to Teach Genetics & DNA Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurowski, Scotia; Reiss, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a forensic DNA science laboratory exercise for advanced high school and introductory college level biology courses. Students use a commercial genotyping kit and genetic analyzer or gene sequencer to analyze DNA recovered from a fictitious crime scene. DNA profiling and STR genotyping are outlined. DNA extraction, PCR, and…

  2. DNA Repair Pathways in Trypanosomatids: from DNA Repair to Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Genois, Marie-Michelle; Paquet, Eric R.; Laffitte, Marie-Claude N.; Maity, Ranjan; Rodrigue, Amélie

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY All living organisms are continuously faced with endogenous or exogenous stress conditions affecting genome stability. DNA repair pathways act as a defense mechanism, which is essential to maintain DNA integrity. There is much to learn about the regulation and functions of these mechanisms, not only in human cells but also equally in divergent organisms. In trypanosomatids, DNA repair pathways protect the genome against mutations but also act as an adaptive mechanism to promote drug resistance. In this review, we scrutinize the molecular mechanisms and DNA repair pathways which are conserved in trypanosomatids. The recent advances made by the genome consortiums reveal the complete genomic sequences of several pathogens. Therefore, using bioinformatics and genomic sequences, we analyze the conservation of DNA repair proteins and their key protein motifs in trypanosomatids. We thus present a comprehensive view of DNA repair processes in trypanosomatids at the crossroads of DNA repair and drug resistance. PMID:24600040

  3. Advances in hereditary deafness.

    PubMed

    Tekin, M; Arnos, K S; Pandya, A

    2001-09-29

    Progress in the Human Genome Project, availability of cochlea-specific cDNA libraries, and development of murine models of deafness have resulted in rapid discovery of many loci and corresponding genes for deafness. Up to now, the chromosomal locations of about 70 genes for non-syndromic deafness have been mapped, and the genes of more than 20 loci have been identified and characterised. Mutations in one gene, connexin 26 (CX26GJB2), are responsible for most cases of recessive non-syndromic deafness, accounting for 30-40% of all childhood genetic deafness in some populations (eg, white people of western European descent). We summarise advances in identification of genes for deafness and provide a guide to the clinical approach to diagnosis of patients with hearing loss.

  4. Advances in Bioconjugation

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Jeet; Raines, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    Bioconjugation is a burgeoning field of research. Novel methods for the mild and site-specific derivatization of proteins, DNA, RNA, and carbohydrates have been developed for applications such as ligand discovery, disease diagnosis, and high-throughput screening. These powerful methods owe their existence to the discovery of chemoselective reactions that enable bioconjugation under physiological conditions—a tremendous achievement of modern organic chemistry. Here, we review recent advances in bioconjugation chemistry. Additionally, we discuss the stability of bioconjugation linkages—an important but often overlooked aspect of the field. We anticipate that this information will help investigators choose optimal linkages for their applications. Moreover, we hope that the noted limitations of existing bioconjugation methods will provide inspiration to modern organic chemists. PMID:20622973

  5. Prokaryotic DNA ligases unwind superhelical DNA.

    PubMed

    Ivanchenko, M; van Holde, K; Zlatanova, J

    1996-09-13

    We have studied the effect on DNA topology of binding of prokaryotic DNA ligases (T4 and E. coli) to superhelical or nicked circular DNA. Performing topoisomerase I-mediated relaxation in the presence of increasing amounts of T4 ligase led to a shift in the topoisomer distribution to increasingly more negative values. This result suggested that T4 ligase unwound the DNA and was further substantiated by ligation of nicked circular molecules by E. coli DNA ligase in the presence of increasing amounts of T4 ligase. Such an experiment was possible since the two DNA ligases require different cofactors for enzymatic activity. Performing a similar experiment with reverse partners, using E. coli DNA ligase as ligand, and T4 ligase as sealing agent, we observed that the E. coli enzyme also unwound the DNA. Thus, prokaryotic DNA ligases can be added to an ever-growing list of DNA-binding proteins that unwind the DNA upon binding.

  6. Sirtuins, Metabolism, and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jee-Eun; Mostoslavsky, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Cells evolve to actively coordinate nutrient availability with cellular activity in order to maintain metabolic homeostasis. In addition, active pathways to repair DNA damage are crucial to avoid deleterious genomic instability. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that availability of intermediate metabolites may play an important role in DNA repair, suggesting that these two seemingly distant cellular activities may be highly coordinated. The sirtuin family of proteins now described as deacylases (they can also remove acyl groups other than acetyl moieties), it appears to have evolved to control both metabolism and DNA repair. In this review, we discuss recent advances that lay the foundation to understanding the role of sirtuins in these two biological processes, and the potential crosstalk to coordinate them. PMID:25005742

  7. Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Biwer, C.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, Sukanta; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Buonanno, A.; Cadonati, L.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chen, Y.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Collette, C.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; D´ıaz, M.; Di Palma, I.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferreira, E. C.; Fisher, R. P.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gaonkar, S.; Gehrels, N.; Gergely, L. Á.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Hee, S.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lormand, M.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meadors, G. D.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, J. D.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second-generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA, USA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in Initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than Initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid and high frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

  8. Forensic DNA methylation profiling from evidence material for investigative leads.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwan Young; Lee, Soong Deok; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-07-01

    DNA methylation is emerging as an attractive marker providing investigative leads to solve crimes in forensic genetics. The identification of body fluids that utilizes tissue-specific DNA methylation can contribute to solving crimes by predicting activity related to the evidence material. The age estimation based on DNA methylation is expected to reduce the number of potential suspects, when the DNA profile from the evidence does not match with any known person, including those stored in the forensic database. Moreover, the variation in DNA implicates environmental exposure, such as cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption, thereby suggesting the possibility to be used as a marker for predicting the lifestyle of potential suspect. In this review, we describe recent advances in our understanding of DNA methylation variations and the utility of DNA methylation as a forensic marker for advanced investigative leads from evidence materials. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 359-369].

  9. Forensic DNA methylation profiling from evidence material for investigative leads

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwan Young; Lee, Soong Deok; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is emerging as an attractive marker providing investigative leads to solve crimes in forensic genetics. The identification of body fluids that utilizes tissue-specific DNA methylation can contribute to solving crimes by predicting activity related to the evidence material. The age estimation based on DNA methylation is expected to reduce the number of potential suspects, when the DNA profile from the evidence does not match with any known person, including those stored in the forensic database. Moreover, the variation in DNA implicates environmental exposure, such as cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption, thereby suggesting the possibility to be used as a marker for predicting the lifestyle of potential suspect. In this review, we describe recent advances in our understanding of DNA methylation variations and the utility of DNA methylation as a forensic marker for advanced investigative leads from evidence materials. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 359-369] PMID:27099236

  10. Evolution of DNA Methylation across Insects.

    PubMed

    Bewick, Adam J; Vogel, Kevin J; Moore, Allen J; Schmitz, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    DNA methylation contributes to gene and transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes, and therefore has been hypothesized to facilitate the evolution of plastic traits such as sociality in insects. However, DNA methylation is sparsely studied in insects. Therefore, we documented patterns of DNA methylation across a wide diversity of insects. We predicted that underlying enzymatic machinery is concordant with patterns of DNA methylation. Finally, given the suggestion that DNA methylation facilitated social evolution in Hymenoptera, we tested the hypothesis that the DNA methylation system will be associated with presence/absence of sociality among other insect orders. We found DNA methylation to be widespread, detected in all orders examined except Diptera (flies). Whole genome bisulfite sequencing showed that orders differed in levels of DNA methylation. Hymenopteran (ants, bees, wasps and sawflies) had some of the lowest levels, including several potential losses. Blattodea (cockroaches and termites) show all possible patterns, including a potential loss of DNA methylation in a eusocial species whereas solitary species had the highest levels. Species with DNA methylation do not always possess the typical enzymatic machinery. We identified a gene duplication event in the maintenance DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) that is shared by some Hymenoptera, and paralogs have experienced divergent, nonneutral evolution. This diversity and nonneutral evolution of underlying machinery suggests alternative DNA methylation pathways may exist. Phylogenetically corrected comparisons revealed no evidence that supports evolutionary association between sociality and DNA methylation. Future functional studies will be required to advance our understanding of DNA methylation in insects. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. Supercoiling of the DNA Template during Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Leroy F.; Wang, James C.

    1987-10-01

    Transcription of a right-handed double-helical DNA requires a relative rotation of the RNA polymerase and its nascent RNA around the DNA. We describe conditions under which the resistance to the rotational motion of the transcription ensemble around the DNA can be large. In such cases, the advancing polymerase generates positive supercoils in the DNA template ahead of it and negative supercoils behind it. Mutual annihilation of the positively and negatively supercoiled regions may be prevented by anchoring points on the DNA to a large structure, or, in the case of an unanchored plasmid, by the presence of two oppositely oriented transcription units. In prokaryotes, DNA topoisomerase I preferentially removes negative supercoils and DNA gyrase (topoisomerase II) removes positive ones. Our model thus provides an explanation for the experimentally observed high degree of negative or positive supercoiling of intracellular pBR322 DNA when DNA topoisomerase I or gyrase is respectively inhibited. We discuss the implications of our model in terms of supercoiling regulation, DNA conformational transitions, and gene regulation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  12. Temperature Dependence of DNA Charge Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlgamuth, Chris; McWilliams, Marc; Slinker, Jason

    2011-10-01

    Charge transport (CT) through DNA has been extensively studied, and yet the mechanism of this process is still not yet fully understood. DNA CT has been utilized in sensing proteins and DNA fragments, and it has been postulated that it may assist DNA damage prevention and repair. Besides the benefits of understanding charge transport through this fundamental molecule, further understanding of this process will elucidate the biological implications of DNA CT and advance sensing technology. Therefore, we have investigated the temperature dependence of DNA CT by measuring the electrochemistry of DNA monolayers modified with a redox-active probe. By using multiplexed electrodes on silicon chips, we compare the cyclic and square wave voltammetry of distinct DNA sequences under identical experimental conditions. Accordingly, we compare well matched DNA duplexes to those containing a single base pair mismatch, which has been shown to attenuate CT. The yield of CT is shown to follow Arrhenius behavior, with increased activation energies for mismatches that structurally distort the duplex. These observations suggest that charge transport is thermally activated and highly dependent upon DNA conformation.

  13. Mechanics and imaging of single DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Hegner, M; Grange, W

    2002-01-01

    We review recent experiments that have revealed mechanical properties of single DNA molecules using advanced manipulation and force sensing techniques(scanning force microscopy (SFM), optical or magnetic tweezers, microneedles). From such measurements, intrinsic relevant parameters (persistence length, stretch modulus) as well as their dependence on external parameters (non-physiological conditions, coating with binding agents or proteins) are obtained on a single-molecule level. In addition, imaging of DNA molecules using SFM is presented.

  14. Single-stranded DNA library preparation uncovers the origin and diversity of ultrashort cell-free DNA in plasma

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Philip; Kim, Min Seong; Agbor-Enoh, Sean; Luikart, Helen; Valantine, Hannah A.; Khush, Kiran K.; De Vlaminck, Iwijn

    2016-01-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is emerging as a powerful monitoring tool in cancer, pregnancy and organ transplantation. Nucleosomal DNA, the predominant form of plasma cfDNA, can be adapted for sequencing via ligation of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) adapters. dsDNA library preparations, however, are insensitive to ultrashort, degraded cfDNA. Drawing inspiration from advances in paleogenomics, we have applied a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) library preparation method to sequencing of cfDNA in the plasma of lung transplant recipients (40 samples, six patients). We found that ssDNA library preparation yields a greater portion of sub-100 bp nuclear genomic cfDNA (p 10−5, Mann-Whitney U Test), and an increased relative abundance of mitochondrial (10.7x, p 10−5) and microbial cfDNA (71.3x, p 10−5). The higher yield of microbial sequences from this method increases the sensitivity of cfDNA-based monitoring for infections following transplantation. We detail the fragmentation pattern of mitochondrial, nuclear genomic and microbial cfDNA over a broad fragment length range. We report the observation of donor-specific mitochondrial cfDNA in the circulation of lung transplant recipients. A ssDNA library preparation method provides a more informative window into understudied forms of cfDNA, including mitochondrial and microbial derived cfDNA and short nuclear genomic cfDNA, while retaining information provided by standard dsDNA library preparation methods. PMID:27297799

  15. The [4Fe4S] cluster of human DNA primase functions as a redox switch using DNA charge transport.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Elizabeth; Holt, Marilyn E; Thompson, Matthew K; Salay, Lauren E; Ehlinger, Aaron C; Chazin, Walter J; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2017-02-24

    DNA charge transport chemistry offers a means of long-range, rapid redox signaling. We demonstrate that the [4Fe4S] cluster in human DNA primase can make use of this chemistry to coordinate the first steps of DNA synthesis. Using DNA electrochemistry, we found that a change in oxidation state of the [4Fe4S] cluster acts as a switch for DNA binding. Single-atom mutations that inhibit this charge transfer hinder primase initiation without affecting primase structure or polymerization. Generating a single base mismatch in the growing primer duplex, which attenuates DNA charge transport, inhibits primer truncation. Thus, redox signaling by [4Fe4S] clusters using DNA charge transport regulates primase binding to DNA and illustrates chemistry that may efficiently drive substrate handoff between polymerases during DNA replication. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Tumorigenic DNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.

    1989-01-01

    The eighth volume of Advances in Viral Oncology focuses on the three major DNA virus groups with a postulated or proven tumorigenic potential: papillomaviruses, animal hepatitis viruses, and the Epstein-Bar virus. In the opening chapters, the contributors analyze the evidence that papillomaviruses and animal hepatitis viruses are involved in tumorigenesis and describe the mechanisms that trigger virus-host cell interactions. A detailed section on the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) - comprising more than half the book - examines the transcription and mRNA processing patterns of the virus genome; the mechanisms by which EBV infects lymphoid and epithelial cells; the immunological aspects of the virus; the actions of EBV in hosts with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; and the involvement of EBV in the etiology of Burkitt's lymphoma.

  17. Advanced Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Synchrony, developed by St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) is an advanced state-of-the-art implantable pacemaker that closely matches the natural rhythm of the heart. The companion element of the Synchrony Pacemaker System is the Programmer Analyzer APS-II which allows a doctor to reprogram and fine tune the pacemaker to each user's special requirements without surgery. The two-way communications capability that allows the physician to instruct and query the pacemaker is accomplished by bidirectional telemetry. APS-II features 28 pacing functions and thousands of programming combinations to accommodate diverse lifestyles. Microprocessor unit also records and stores pertinent patient data up to a year.

  18. Optical DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaywargi, Deepak; Lewis, Dave; Kirovski, Darko

    A certificate of authenticity (COA) is an inexpensive physical object with a random and unique structure S which is hard to near-exactly replicate. An inexpensive device should be able to scan object’s physical “fingerprint,” a set of features that represents S. In this paper, we explore one set of requirements that optical media such as DVDs should satisfy, to be considered as COAs. As manufacturing of such media produces inevitable errors, we use the locations and count of these errors as a “fingerprint” for each optical disc: its optical DNA. The “fingerprint” is signed using publisher’s private-key and the resulting signature is stored onto the optical medium using a post-production process. Standard DVD players with altered firmware that includes publisher’s public-key, should be able to verify the authenticity of DVDs protected with optical DNA. Our key finding is that for the proposed protocol, only DVDs with exceptional wear-and-tear characteristics would result in an inexpensive and viable anti-counterfeiting technology.

  19. Nucleotide Metabolism and DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Warner, Digby F; Evans, Joanna C; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2014-10-01

    The development and application of a highly versatile suite of tools for mycobacterial genetics, coupled with widespread use of "omics" approaches to elucidate the structure, function, and regulation of mycobacterial proteins, has led to spectacular advances in our understanding of the metabolism and physiology of mycobacteria. In this article, we provide an update on nucleotide metabolism and DNA replication in mycobacteria, highlighting key findings from the past 10 to 15 years. In the first section, we focus on nucleotide metabolism, ranging from the biosynthesis, salvage, and interconversion of purine and pyrimidine ribonucleotides to the formation of deoxyribonucleotides. The second part of the article is devoted to DNA replication, with a focus on replication initiation and elongation, as well as DNA unwinding. We provide an overview of replication fidelity and mutation rates in mycobacteria and summarize evidence suggesting that DNA replication occurs during states of low metabolic activity, and conclude by suggesting directions for future research to address key outstanding questions. Although this article focuses primarily on observations from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it is interspersed, where appropriate, with insights from, and comparisons with, other mycobacterial species as well as better characterized bacterial models such as Escherichia coli. Finally, a common theme underlying almost all studies of mycobacterial metabolism is the potential to identify and validate functions or pathways that can be exploited for tuberculosis drug discovery. In this context, we have specifically highlighted those processes in mycobacterial DNA replication that might satisfy this critical requirement.

  20. DNA vaccination against oncoantigens: A promise.

    PubMed

    Iezzi, Manuela; Quaglino, Elena; Amici, Augusto; Lollini, Pier-Luigi; Forni, Guido; Cavallo, Federica

    2012-05-01

    The emerging evidence that DNA vaccines elicit a protective immune response in rodents, dogs and cancer patients, coupled with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of an initial DNA vaccine to treat canine tumors is beginning to close the gap between the optimistic experimental data and their difficult application in a clinical setting. Here we review a series of conceptual and biotechnological advances that are working together to make DNA vaccines targeting molecules that play important roles during cancer progression (oncoantigens) a promise with near-term clinical impact.

  1. Disease diagnosis by recombinant DNA methods

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, C.T.

    1987-06-05

    Recombinant DNA procedures have now been applied to the problem of the identification of molecular defects in man that account for heritable diseases, somatic mutations associated with neoplasia, and acquired infectious disease. Thus, recombinant DNA technology has rapidly expanded the ability to diagnose disease. Substantial advances in the simplification of procedures for diagnostic purposes have been made, and the informed physician has gained in diagnostic accuracy as a consequence of these developments. The wide application of recombinant DNA diagnostics will depend on simplicity, speed of results, and cost containment. 66 references, 7 figures.

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of DNA Polymerase Clamp Loaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelch, Brian; Makino, Debora; Simonetta, Kyle; O'Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John

    Clamp loaders are ATP-driven multiprotein machines that couple ATP hydrolysis to the opening and closing of a circular protein ring around DNA. This ring-shaped clamp slides along DNA, and interacts with numerous proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair and cell cycle control. Recently determined structures of clamp loader complexes from prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases have revealed exciting new details of how these complex AAA+ machines perform this essential clamp loading function. This review serves as background to John Kuriyan's lecture at the 2010 Erice School, and is not meant as a comprehensive review of the contributions of the many scientists who have advanced this field. These lecture notes are derived from recent reviews and research papers from our groups.

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW: DNA computing: applications and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezziane, Z.

    2006-01-01

    DNA computing is a discipline that aims at harnessing individual molecules at the nanoscopic level for computational purposes. Computation with DNA molecules possesses an inherent interest for researchers in computers and biology. Given its vast parallelism and high-density storage, DNA computing approaches are employed to solve many combinatorial problems. However, the exponential scaling of the solution space prevents applying an exhaustive search method to problem instances of realistic size, and therefore artificial intelligence models are used in designing methods that are more efficient. DNA has also been explored as an excellent material and a fundamental building block for building large-scale nanostructures, constructing individual nanomechanical devices, and performing computations. Molecular-scale autonomous programmable computers are demonstrated allowing both input and output information to be in molecular form. This paper presents a review of recent advances in DNA computing and presents major achievements and challenges for researchers in the foreseeable future.

  4. Aging: not all DNA damage is equal.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Wilbert P; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Pothof, Joris

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances have identified accumulation of DNA damage as a major driver of aging. However, there are numerous kinds of DNA lesions each with their own characteristics and cellular outcome, which highly depends on cellular context: proliferation (cell cycle), differentiation, propensity for survival/death, cell condition and systemic hormonal and immunological parameters. In addition, DNA damage is strongly influenced by cellular metabolism, anti-oxidant status and exogenous factors, consistent with the multi-factorial nature of aging. Notably, DNA lesions interfering with replication have very different outcomes compared to transcription. These considerations provide a conceptual framework in which different types of DNA damage and their setting contribute to the aging process in differential manners.

  5. ATRF Houses the Latest DNA Sequencing Technologies | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer By the end of October, the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF) will be one of the few facilities in the world to house all of the latest DNA sequencing technologies.

  6. ATRF Houses the Latest DNA Sequencing Technologies | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer By the end of October, the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF) will be one of the few facilities in the world to house all of the latest DNA sequencing technologies.

  7. The Cartography of UV-induced DNA Damage Formation and DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinchuan; Adar, Sheera

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage presents a barrier to DNA-templated biochemical processes, including gene expression and faithful DNA replication. Compromised DNA repair leads to mutations, enhancing the risk for genetic diseases and cancer development. Conventional experimental approaches to study DNA damage required a researcher to choose between measuring bulk damage over the entire genome, with little or no resolution regarding a specific location, and obtaining data specific to a locus of interest, without a global perspective. Recent advances in high-throughput genomic tools overcame these limitations and provide high-resolution measurements simultaneously across the genome. In this review, we discuss the available methods for measuring DNA damage and their repair, focusing on genomewide assays for pyrimidine photodimers, the major types of damage induced by ultraviolet irradiation. These new genomic assays will be a powerful tool in identifying key components of genome stability and carcinogenesis. © 2016 The American Society of Photobiology.

  8. DNA fingerprinting, DNA barcoding, and next generation sequencing technology in plants.

    PubMed

    Sucher, Nikolaus J; Hennell, James R; Carles, Maria C

    2012-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting of plants has become an invaluable tool in forensic, scientific, and industrial laboratories all over the world. PCR has become part of virtually every variation of the plethora of approaches used for DNA fingerprinting today. DNA sequencing is increasingly used either in combination with or as a replacement for traditional DNA fingerprinting techniques. A prime example is the use of short, standardized regions of the genome as taxon barcodes for biological identification of plants. Rapid advances in "next generation sequencing" (NGS) technology are driving down the cost of sequencing and bringing large-scale sequencing projects into the reach of individual investigators. We present an overview of recent publications that demonstrate the use of "NGS" technology for DNA fingerprinting and DNA barcoding applications.

  9. Efficient Production of Single-Stranded Phage DNA as Scaffolds for DNA Origami

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolded DNA origami enables the fabrication of a variety of complex nanostructures that promise utility in diverse fields of application, ranging from biosensing over advanced therapeutics to metamaterials. The broad applicability of DNA origami as a material beyond the level of proof-of-concept studies critically depends, among other factors, on the availability of large amounts of pure single-stranded scaffold DNA. Here, we present a method for the efficient production of M13 bacteriophage-derived genomic DNA using high-cell-density fermentation of Escherichia coli in stirred-tank bioreactors. We achieve phage titers of up to 1.6 × 1014 plaque-forming units per mL. Downstream processing yields up to 410 mg of high-quality single-stranded DNA per one liter reaction volume, thus upgrading DNA origami-based nanotechnology from the milligram to the gram scale. PMID:26028443

  10. SELF-RECOGNITION OF DNA FROM LIFE PROCESSES TO DNA COMPUTATION

    PubMed Central

    NG, WEI DA; WONG, CHEE KEONG BENJAMIN

    2010-01-01

    Ever since the first appearance of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) in 1953, it has fascinated multitudes with its simplicity. With a modest syllabus of four nucleotides (adenine, thymine, cytosine and guanine), it codes for the complexity of life around us. In this paper, we investigate how the structure of DNA codes for life processes and how we can take advantage of its minuscule size, mechanism of self-recognition and self-assembly for “bottom-up” nanotechnology. High hopes are also placed on miniaturizing present computing technology using DNA computing based on two fundamental features; massive parallelism of DNA strands and Watson–Crick complementarity. Advances in DNA-based computation and algorithmic assembly are then used to complement researches in DNA nanotechnology. PMID:20640192

  11. DNA base identification by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bell, David C; Thomas, W Kelley; Murtagh, Katelyn M; Dionne, Cheryl A; Graham, Adam C; Anderson, Jobriah E; Glover, William R

    2012-10-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing, based on fluorescent microscopy, have transformed many areas of biological research. However, only relatively short molecules can be sequenced by these technologies. Dramatic improvements in genomic research will require accurate sequencing of long (>10,000 base-pairs), intact DNA molecules. Our approach directly visualizes the sequence of DNA molecules using electron microscopy. This report represents the first identification of DNA base pairs within intact DNA molecules by electron microscopy. By enzymatically incorporating modified bases, which contain atoms of increased atomic number, direct visualization and identification of individually labeled bases within a synthetic 3,272 base-pair DNA molecule and a 7,249 base-pair viral genome have been accomplished. This proof of principle is made possible by the use of a dUTP nucleotide, substituted with a single mercury atom attached to the nitrogenous base. One of these contrast-enhanced, heavy-atom-labeled bases is paired with each adenosine base in the template molecule and then built into a double-stranded DNA molecule by a template-directed DNA polymerase enzyme. This modification is small enough to allow very long molecules with labels at each A-U position. Image contrast is further enhanced by using annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM). Further refinements to identify additional base types and more precisely determine the location of identified bases would allow full sequencing of long, intact DNA molecules, significantly improving the pace of complex genomic discoveries.

  12. Superstatistical model of bacterial DNA architecture

    PubMed Central

    Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Markelov, Oleg A.; Kayumov, Airat R.; Bunde, Armin

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the physical principles that govern the complex DNA structural organization as well as its mechanical and thermodynamical properties is essential for the advancement in both life sciences and genetic engineering. Recently we have discovered that the complex DNA organization is explicitly reflected in the arrangement of nucleotides depicted by the universal power law tailed internucleotide interval distribution that is valid for complete genomes of various prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here we suggest a superstatistical model that represents a long DNA molecule by a series of consecutive ~150 bp DNA segments with the alternation of the local nucleotide composition between segments exhibiting long-range correlations. We show that the superstatistical model and the corresponding DNA generation algorithm explicitly reproduce the laws governing the empirical nucleotide arrangement properties of the DNA sequences for various global GC contents and optimal living temperatures. Finally, we discuss the relevance of our model in terms of the DNA mechanical properties. As an outlook, we focus on finding the DNA sequences that encode a given protein while simultaneously reproducing the nucleotide arrangement laws observed from empirical genomes, that may be of interest in the optimization of genetic engineering of long DNA molecules. PMID:28225058

  13. Superstatistical model of bacterial DNA architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Markelov, Oleg A.; Kayumov, Airat R.; Bunde, Armin

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the physical principles that govern the complex DNA structural organization as well as its mechanical and thermodynamical properties is essential for the advancement in both life sciences and genetic engineering. Recently we have discovered that the complex DNA organization is explicitly reflected in the arrangement of nucleotides depicted by the universal power law tailed internucleotide interval distribution that is valid for complete genomes of various prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here we suggest a superstatistical model that represents a long DNA molecule by a series of consecutive ~150 bp DNA segments with the alternation of the local nucleotide composition between segments exhibiting long-range correlations. We show that the superstatistical model and the corresponding DNA generation algorithm explicitly reproduce the laws governing the empirical nucleotide arrangement properties of the DNA sequences for various global GC contents and optimal living temperatures. Finally, we discuss the relevance of our model in terms of the DNA mechanical properties. As an outlook, we focus on finding the DNA sequences that encode a given protein while simultaneously reproducing the nucleotide arrangement laws observed from empirical genomes, that may be of interest in the optimization of genetic engineering of long DNA molecules.

  14. j5 DNA assembly design automation software.

    PubMed

    Hillson, Nathan J; Rosengarten, Rafael D; Keasling, Jay D

    2012-01-20

    Recent advances in Synthetic Biology have yielded standardized and automatable DNA assembly protocols that enable a broad range of biotechnological research and development. Unfortunately, the experimental design required for modern scar-less multipart DNA assembly methods is frequently laborious, time-consuming, and error-prone. Here, we report the development and deployment of a web-based software tool, j5, which automates the design of scar-less multipart DNA assembly protocols including SLIC, Gibson, CPEC, and Golden Gate. The key innovations of the j5 design process include cost optimization, leveraging DNA synthesis when cost-effective to do so, the enforcement of design specification rules, hierarchical assembly strategies to mitigate likely assembly errors, and the instruction of manual or automated construction of scar-less combinatorial DNA libraries. Using a GFP expression testbed, we demonstrate that j5 designs can be executed with the SLIC, Gibson, or CPEC assembly methods, used to build combinatorial libraries with the Golden Gate assembly method, and applied to the preparation of linear gene deletion cassettes for E. coli. The DNA assembly design algorithms reported here are generally applicable to broad classes of DNA construction methodologies and could be implemented to supplement other DNA assembly design tools. Taken together, these innovations save researchers time and effort, reduce the frequency of user design errors and off-target assembly products, decrease research costs, and enable scar-less multipart and combinatorial DNA construction at scales unfeasible without computer-aided design.

  15. Graphene oxide-DNA based sensors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Lian, Chaoqun; Zhou, Yang; Yan, Lirong; Li, Qin; Zhang, Chunxia; Chen, Liang; Chen, Keping

    2014-10-15

    Since graphene oxide (GO) is readily available and exhibits exceptional optical, electrical, mechanical and chemical properties, it has attracted increasing interests for use in GO-DNA based sensors. This paper reviews the advances in GO-DNA based sensors using DNA as recognition elements. In solution, GO is as an excellent acceptor of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to quench the fluorescence in dye labeled DNA sequences. This review discusses the emerging GO-DNA based sensors related to FRET for use in the detection of DNA, proteins, metal ions, cysteine (Cys), and others. The application of the electrochemical GO-DNA based sensors is also summarized because GO possesses exceptional electrochemical properties. The detection mechanisms and the advantages of GO are also revealed and discussed. GO-DNA based sensors perform well at low cost, and high sensitivity, and provide low detection limits. Additionally, GO-DNA based sensors should appear in the near future as scientists explore their usefulness and properties. Finally, future perspectives and possible challenges in this area are outlined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Advanced stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Arnulf

    1983-03-01

    Toroidal confinement of a plasma by an external magnetic field is not compatible with axisymmetry, in contrast to confinement by the pinch effect of induced electric currents as in a tokomak or by the reversed field pinch configuration. The existence of magnetic surfaces throughout the region in which grad p ≠ 0 is therefore not guaranteed in such configurations, though it is necessary for MHD-equilibrium when the lines of force possess a finite twist (or "rotational transform"). These twisted equilibria are called stellarators. The other type of external confinement requires all lines of force to be closed upon themselves and p to be function of the well defined quantity Q = φ d l/ B only. The resulting "bumpy" tori are sometimes also referred to as being M + S like. By discussing specific examples it is shown that stellarator configurations exist which retain as much as possible the properties of M + S like configurations, combine these with the magnetic well, and with an approximation to the isodynamic requirement of D. Palumbo. These so-called Advanced Stellarators shown an improvement in predicted particle confinement and beta-limit compared to the classical stellarators. They can also be viewed as forming a system of linked stabilized mirrors of small mirror ratio. These fields can be produced by modular coils. A prototype of such a configuration is being designed by the stellarator division of IPP under the name of Wendelstein VII-AS. Expected physical data and technical details of W VII-AS are given.

  17. Advances in cancer research. Volume 54

    SciTech Connect

    Vande Woude, G.F. ); Klein, G. )

    1990-01-01

    This book contains articles pertaining to Advances in Cancer Research. Included are the following groups: (1) The Role of DNA Methylation in Cancer, (2) Genetic and Epigenetic Losses of Heterozygosity in Cancer Predisposition and Progression, (3) Genetic and Molecular Studies of Cellular Immortalization.

  18. Recent developments in single-molecule DNA mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Zev; Oberstrass, Florian C.; Basu, Aakash

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, measurements on individual stretched and twisted DNA molecules have helped define the basic elastic properties of the double helix and enabled real-time functional assays of DNA-associated molecular machines. Recently, new magnetic tweezers approaches for simultaneously measuring freely fluctuating twist and extension have begun to shed light on the structural dynamics of large nucleoprotein complexes. Related technical advances have facilitated direct measurements of DNA torque, contributing to a better understanding of abrupt structural transitions in mechanically stressed DNA. The new measurements have also been exploited in studies that hint at a developing synergistic relationship between single-molecule manipulation and structural DNA nanotechnology. PMID:22658779

  19. DNA ligase I, the replicative DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Howes, Timothy R L; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2012-01-01

    Multiple DNA ligation events are required to join the Okazaki fragments generated during lagging strand DNA synthesis. In eukaryotes, this is primarily carried out by members of the DNA ligase I family. The C-terminal catalytic region of these enzymes is composed of three domains: a DNA binding domain, an adenylation domain and an OB-fold domain. In the absence of DNA, these domains adopt an extended structure but transition into a compact ring structure when they engage a DNA nick, with each of the domains contacting the DNA. The non-catalytic N-terminal region of eukaryotic DNA ligase I is responsible for the specific participation of these enzymes in DNA replication. This proline-rich unstructured region contains the nuclear localization signal and a PCNA interaction motif that is critical for localization to replication foci and efficient joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I initially engages the PCNA trimer via this interaction motif which is located at the extreme N-terminus of this flexible region. It is likely that this facilitates an additional interaction between the DNA binding domain and the PCNA ring. The similar size and shape of the rings formed by the PCNA trimer and the DNA ligase I catalytic region when it engages a DNA nick suggest that these proteins interact to form a double-ring structure during the joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I also interacts with replication factor C, the factor that loads the PCNA trimeric ring onto DNA. This interaction, which is regulated by phosphorylation of the non-catalytic N-terminus of DNA ligase I, also appears to be critical for DNA replication.

  20. Number matters: control of mammalian mitochondrial DNA copy number.

    PubMed

    Clay Montier, Laura L; Deng, Janice J; Bai, Yidong

    2009-03-01

    Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis is essential for proper cellular functioning. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and the resulting mitochondrial malfunction have been implicated in cancer, neurodegeneration, diabetes, aging, and many other human diseases. Although it is known that the dynamics of the mammalian mitochondrial genome are not linked with that of the nuclear genome, very little is known about the mechanism of mtDNA propagation. Nevertheless, our understanding of the mode of mtDNA replication has advanced in recent years, though not without some controversies. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA copy number control in mammalian cells, while focusing on both mtDNA replication and turnover. Although mtDNA copy number is seemingly in excess, we reason that mtDNA copy number control is an important aspect of mitochondrial genetics and biogenesis and is essential for normal cellular function.

  1. The polymer physics of single DNA confined in nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Dai, Liang; Renner, C Benjamin; Doyle, Patrick S

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, applications and experimental studies of DNA in nanochannels have stimulated the investigation of the polymer physics of DNA in confinement. Recent advances in the physics of confined polymers, using DNA as a model polymer, have moved beyond the classic Odijk theory for the strong confinement, and the classic blob theory for the weak confinement. In this review, we present the current understanding of the behaviors of confined polymers while briefly reviewing classic theories. Three aspects of confined DNA are presented: static, dynamic, and topological properties. The relevant simulation methods are also summarized. In addition, comparisons of confined DNA with DNA under tension and DNA in semidilute solution are made to emphasize universal behaviors. Finally, an outlook of the possible future research for confined DNA is given.

  2. Advanced Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-01-01

    An artist's rendering of the air-breathing, hypersonic X-43B, the third and largest of NASA's Hyper-X series flight demonstrators, which could fly later this decade. Revolutionizing the way we gain access to space is NASA's primary goal for the Hypersonic Investment Area, managed for NASA by the Advanced Space Transportation Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The Hypersonic Investment area, which includes leading-edge partners in industry and academia, will support future generation reusable vehicles and improved access to space. These technology demonstrators, intended for flight testing by decade's end, are expected to yield a new generation of vehicles that routinely fly about 100,000 feet above Earth's surface and reach sustained speeds in excess of Mach 5 (3,750 mph), the point at which "supersonic" flight becomes "hypersonic" flight. The flight demonstrators, the Hyper-X series, will be powered by air-breathing rocket or turbine-based engines, and ram/scramjets. Air-breathing engines, known as combined-cycle systems, achieve their efficiency gains over rocket systems by getting their oxygen for combustion from the atmosphere, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its oxygen. Once a hypersonic vehicle has accelerated to more than twice the speed of sound, the turbine or rockets are turned off, and the engine relies solely on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn fuel. When the vehicle has accelerated to more than 10 to 15 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators includes three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  3. Advances in understanding begomovirus satellites.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xueping

    2013-01-01

    Begomoviruses are numerous and geographically widespread viruses that cause devastating diseases in many crops. Monopartite begomoviruses are frequently associated with betasatellites or alphasatellites. Both betasatellite and alphasatellite DNA genomes are approximately half the size of begomovirus DNA genomes. Betasatellites are essential for induction of typical disease symptoms. The βC1 genes encoded by the betasatellites have important roles in symptom induction, in suppression of transcriptional and posttranscriptional gene silencing, and they can affect jasmonic acid responsive genes. Host plants of begomoviruses have evolved diverse innate defense mechanisms against the βC1 protein to counter these challenges. Alphasatellites have been identified mainly in monopartite begomoviruses that associate with betasatellites and have no known contributions to pathogenesis of begomovirus-betasatellite disease complexes. Applications of current molecular tools are facilitating viral diagnosis and the discovery of novel species of geminiviruses and satellite DNAs and are also advancing our understanding of the global diversity and evolution of satellite DNAs.

  4. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications.

  5. DNA modifications: Another stable base in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazauskas, Pijus; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine has been proposed to mediate active and passive DNA demethylation. Tracking the history of DNA modifications has now provided the first solid evidence that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is a stable epigenetic modification.

  6. Osmylated DNA, a novel concept for sequencing DNA using nanopores.

    PubMed

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    2015-03-27

    Saenger sequencing has led the advances in molecular biology, while faster and cheaper next generation technologies are urgently needed. A newer approach exploits nanopores, natural or solid-state, set in an electrical field, and obtains base sequence information from current variations due to the passage of a ssDNA molecule through the pore. A hurdle in this approach is the fact that the four bases are chemically comparable to each other which leads to small differences in current obstruction. 'Base calling' becomes even more challenging because most nanopores sense a short sequence and not individual bases. Perhaps sequencing DNA via nanopores would be more manageable, if only the bases were two, and chemically very different from each other; a sequence of 1s and 0s comes to mind. Osmylated DNA comes close to such a sequence of 1s and 0s. Osmylation is the addition of osmium tetroxide bipyridine across the C5-C6 double bond of the pyrimidines. Osmylation adds almost 400% mass to the reactive base, creates a sterically and electronically notably different molecule, labeled 1, compared to the unreactive purines, labeled 0. If osmylated DNA were successfully sequenced, the result would be a sequence of osmylated pyrimidines (1), and purines (0), and not of the actual nucleobases. To solve this problem we studied the osmylation reaction with short oligos and with M13mp18, a long ssDNA, developed a UV-vis assay to measure extent of osmylation, and designed two protocols. Protocol A uses mild conditions and yields osmylated thymidines (1), while leaving the other three bases (0) practically intact. Protocol B uses harsher conditions and effectively osmylates both pyrimidines, but not the purines. Applying these two protocols also to the complementary of the target polynucleotide yields a total of four osmylated strands that collectively could define the actual base sequence of the target DNA.

  7. Osmylated DNA, a novel concept for sequencing DNA using nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    2015-03-01

    Saenger sequencing has led the advances in molecular biology, while faster and cheaper next generation technologies are urgently needed. A newer approach exploits nanopores, natural or solid-state, set in an electrical field, and obtains base sequence information from current variations due to the passage of a ssDNA molecule through the pore. A hurdle in this approach is the fact that the four bases are chemically comparable to each other which leads to small differences in current obstruction. ‘Base calling’ becomes even more challenging because most nanopores sense a short sequence and not individual bases. Perhaps sequencing DNA via nanopores would be more manageable, if only the bases were two, and chemically very different from each other; a sequence of 1s and 0s comes to mind. Osmylated DNA comes close to such a sequence of 1s and 0s. Osmylation is the addition of osmium tetroxide bipyridine across the C5-C6 double bond of the pyrimidines. Osmylation adds almost 400% mass to the reactive base, creates a sterically and electronically notably different molecule, labeled 1, compared to the unreactive purines, labeled 0. If osmylated DNA were successfully sequenced, the result would be a sequence of osmylated pyrimidines (1), and purines (0), and not of the actual nucleobases. To solve this problem we studied the osmylation reaction with short oligos and with M13mp18, a long ssDNA, developed a UV-vis assay to measure extent of osmylation, and designed two protocols. Protocol A uses mild conditions and yields osmylated thymidines (1), while leaving the other three bases (0) practically intact. Protocol B uses harsher conditions and effectively osmylates both pyrimidines, but not the purines. Applying these two protocols also to the complementary of the target polynucleotide yields a total of four osmylated strands that collectively could define the actual base sequence of the target DNA.

  8. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps = 0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps = 0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps = 0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on

  9. Synthesis of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2008-11-18

    A method of synthesizing a desired double-stranded DNA of a predetermined length and of a predetermined sequence. Preselected sequence segments that will complete the desired double-stranded DNA are determined. Preselected segment sequences of DNA that will be used to complete the desired double-stranded DNA are provided. The preselected segment sequences of DNA are assembled to produce the desired double-stranded DNA.

  10. DNA nanotechnology: Bringing lipid bilayers into shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howorka, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    Lipid bilayers form the thin and floppy membranes that define the boundary of compartments such as cells. Now, a method to control the shape and size of bilayers using DNA nanoscaffolds has been developed. Such designer materials advance synthetic biology and could find use in membrane research.

  11. DNA encoding a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-08-15

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  12. Programming and inheritance of parental DNA methylomes in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ci, Weimin; Liu, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    5-Methylcytosine (5mC) is a major epigenetic modification in animals. The programming and inheritance of parental DNA methylomes ensures the compatibility for totipotency and embryonic development. In vertebrates, the DNA methylomes of sperm and oocyte are significantly different. During early embryogenesis, the paternal and maternal methylomes will reset to the same state. Herein, we focus on recent advances in how offspring obtain the DNA methylation information from parents in vertebrates. ©2015 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  13. DNA systematics. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: PLANTS: PLANT DNA: Contents and Systematics. Repeated DNA Sequences and Polyploidy in Cereal Crops. Homology of Nonrepeated DNA Sequences in Phylogeny of Fungal Species. Chloropast DNA and Phylogenetic Relationships. rDNA: Evolution Over a Billion Years. 23S rRNA-derived Small Ribosomal RNAs: Their Structure and Evolution with Reference to Plant Phylogeny. Molecular Analysis of Plant DNA Genomes: Conserved and Diverged DNA Sequences. A Critical Review of Some Terminologies Used for Additional DNA in Plant Chromosomes and Index.

  14. Advances in targeted genome editing.

    PubMed

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Ousterout, David G; Gersbach, Charles A

    2012-08-01

    New technologies have recently emerged that enable targeted editing of genomes in diverse systems. This includes precise manipulation of gene sequences in their natural chromosomal context and addition of transgenes to specific genomic loci. This progress has been facilitated by advances in engineering targeted nucleases with programmable, site-specific DNA-binding domains, including zinc finger proteins and transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs). Recent improvements have enhanced nuclease performance, accelerated nuclease assembly, and lowered the cost of genome editing. These advances are driving new approaches to many areas of biotechnology, including biopharmaceutical production, agriculture, creation of transgenic organisms and cell lines, and studies of genome structure, regulation, and function. Genome editing is also being investigated in preclinical and clinical gene therapies for many diseases.

  15. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj

    2014-10-01

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions.

  16. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj E-mail: rajc@andrew.cmu.edu

    2014-10-28

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions.

  17. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification.

    PubMed

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj

    2014-10-28

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions.

  18. Environmental DNA mapping of Zebra Mussel populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amberg, Jon; Merkes, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) has become a popular tool for detecting aquatic invasive species, but advancements have made it possible to potentially answer other questions like reproduction, movement, and abundance of the targeted organism. In this study we developed a Zebra Mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) eDNA protocol. We then determined if this assay could be used to help determine Zebra Mussel biomass in a lake with a well-established population of Zebra Mussels and a lake with an emerging population of mussels. Our eDNA assay detected DNA of Zebra Mussels but not DNA from more than 20 other species of fish and mussels, many commonly found in Minnesota waters. Our assay did not predict biomass. We did find that DNA from Zebra Mussels accumulated in softer substrates in both lakes, even though the mussels were predominately on the harder substrates. Therefore, we concluded that eDNA may be useful to detect the presence of Zebra Mussels in these lakes but our assay/approach could not predict biomass.

  19. Molecular DNA switches and DNA chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Berkey, Cristin; Lavi, Uri; Cantor, Charles R.; Smith, Cassandra L.

    1999-06-01

    We present an assay to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms on a chip using molecular DNA switches and isothermal rolling- circle amplification. The basic principle behind the switch is an allele-specific oligonucleotide circularization, mediated by DNA ligase. A DNA switch is closed when perfect hybridization between the probe oligonucleotide and target DNA allows ligase to covalently circularize the probe. Mismatches around the ligation site prevent probe circularization, resulting in an open switch. DNA polymerase is then used to preferentially amplify the closed switches, via rolling-circle amplification. The stringency of the molecular switches yields 102 - 103 fold discrimination between matched and mismatched sequences.

  20. DNA methylation in endometriosis (Review)

    PubMed Central

    KOUKOURA, OURANIA; SIFAKIS, STAVROS; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is defined by the presence and growth of functional endometrial tissue, outside the uterine cavity, primarily in the ovaries, pelvic peritoneum and rectovaginal septum. Although it is a benign disease, it presents with malignant characteristics, such as invasion to surrounding tissues, metastasis to distant locations and recurrence following treatment. Accumulating evidence suggests that various epigenetic aberrations may play an essential role in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. Aberrant DNA methylation represents a possible mechanism repsonsible for this disease, linking gene expression alterations observed in endometriosis with hormonal and environmental factors. Several lines of evidence indicate that endometriosis may partially be due to selective epigenetic deregulations influenced by extrinsic factors. Previous studies have shed light into the epigenetic component of endometriosis, reporting variations in the epigenetic patterns of genes known to be involved in the aberrant hormonal, immunologic and inflammatory status of endometriosis. Although recent studies, utilizing advanced molecular techniques, have allowed us to further elucidate the possible association of DNA methylation with altered gene expression, whether these molecular changes represent the cause or merely the consequence of the disease is a question which remains to be answered. This review provides an overview of the current literature on the role of DNA methylation in the pathophysiology and malignant evolution of endometriosis. We also provide insight into the mechanisms through which DNA methylation-modifying agents may be the next step in the research of the pharmaceutical treatment of endometriosis. PMID:26934855

  1. Mechanisms of DNA replication termination.

    PubMed

    Dewar, James M; Walter, Johannes C

    2017-08-01

    Genome duplication is carried out by pairs of replication forks that assemble at origins of replication and then move in opposite directions. DNA replication ends when converging replication forks meet. During this process, which is known as replication termination, DNA synthesis is completed, the replication machinery is disassembled and daughter molecules are resolved. In this Review, we outline the steps that are likely to be common to replication termination in most organisms, namely, fork convergence, synthesis completion, replisome disassembly and decatenation. We briefly review the mechanism of termination in the bacterium Escherichia coli and in simian virus 40 (SV40) and also focus on recent advances in eukaryotic replication termination. In particular, we discuss the recently discovered E3 ubiquitin ligases that control replisome disassembly in yeast and higher eukaryotes, and how their activity is regulated to avoid genome instability.

  2. DNA vaccines: a simple DNA sensing matter?

    PubMed

    Coban, Cevayir; Kobiyama, Kouji; Jounai, Nao; Tozuka, Miyuki; Ishii, Ken J

    2013-10-01

    Since the introduction of DNA vaccines two decades ago, this attractive strategy has been hampered by its low immunogenicity in humans. Studies conducted to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines have shown that understanding the mechanism of action of DNA vaccines might be the key to successfully improving their immunogenicity. Our current understanding is that DNA vaccines induce innate and adaptive immune responses in two ways: (1) encoded protein (or polypeptide) antigen(s) by the DNA plasmid can be expressed in stromal cells (i.e., muscle cells) as well as DCs, where these antigens are processed and presented to naïve CD4 or CD8 T cells either by direct or cross presentation, respectively; and (2) the transfected DNA plasmid itself may bind to an un-identified cytosolic DNA sensor and activate the TBK1-STING pathway and the production of type I interferons (IFNs) which function as an adjuvant. Recent studies investigating double-stranded cytosolic DNA sensor(s) have highlighted new mechanisms in which cytosolic DNA may release secondary metabolites, which are in turn recognized by a novel DNA sensing machinery. Here, we discuss these new metabolites and the possibilities of translating this knowledge into improved immunogenicity for DNA vaccines.

  3. SCIENCE BRIEF: ADVANCED CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on advanced concepts will evaluate and demonstrate the application of innovative infrastructure designs, management procedures and operational approaches. Advanced concepts go beyond simple asset management. The infusion of these advanced concepts into established wastew...

  4. SCIENCE BRIEF: ADVANCED CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on advanced concepts will evaluate and demonstrate the application of innovative infrastructure designs, management procedures and operational approaches. Advanced concepts go beyond simple asset management. The infusion of these advanced concepts into established wastew...

  5. Advancing advanced practice - clarifying the conceptual confusion.

    PubMed

    Stasa, Helen; Cashin, Andrew; Buckley, Thomas; Donoghue, Judith

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a substantial increase in the number of nurses holding advanced practice nursing positions. However, the lack of clarity regarding key terms such as 'advanced practice nursing', 'advanced nursing practice', 'scope of practice' and 'extended practice', and international variability in how these terms are used has created significant confusion. This lack of clarity is problematic for nurses, other health professionals, health service consumers, educators and policy makers, particularly given the global mobility of the nursing workforce. 1) To highlight the significant international variability in how advanced practice nursing, and associated terms such as extended and expanded practice, are defined and regulated across a variety of different English speaking countries, including the US, UK, New Zealand, Canada and Australia. 2) To propose innovative formulations for how the nursing profession may attempt to ensure greater precision and agreement around advanced practice terminology. Discursive paper. It was found that there is a considerable lack of clarity regarding the precise definitions of key terms surrounding the discussion of advanced practice. Additionally, there are large disparities in how the five chosen countries regulate advanced practice nursing, and roles such as that of the nurse practitioner. It is suggested that the confusion regarding advanced practice terminology can be reduced definitionally by minimising the use of the term 'expanded practice'; defining advanced practice nursing to refer to the type of practice in defined and regulated advanced practice nursing scopes; and defining advanced nursing practice as expert practice within a regulated nursing scope. © 2013.

  6. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to the DNA mapping and sequencing technologies. In particular, the present invention provides enhanced methods and compositions for the physical mapping and positional cloning of genomic DNA. The present invention also provides a useful analytical technique to directly map cloned DNA sequences onto individual stretched DNA molecules.

  7. Surface-assisted DNA self-assembly: An enzyme-free strategy towards formation of branched DNA lattice.

    PubMed

    Bhanjadeo, Madhabi M; Nayak, Ashok K; Subudhi, Umakanta

    2017-04-01

    DNA based self-assembled nanostructures and DNA origami has proven useful for organizing nanomaterials with firm precision. However, for advanced applications like nanoelectronics and photonics, large-scale organization of self-assembled branched DNA (bDNA) into periodic lattices is desired. In this communication for the first time we report a facile method of self-assembly of Y-shaped bDNA nanostructures on the cationic surface of Aluminum (Al) foil to prepare periodic two dimensional (2D) bDNA lattice. Particularly those Y-shaped bDNA structures having smaller overhangs and unable to self-assemble in solution, they are easily assembled on the surface of Al foil in the absence of ligase. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) analysis shows homogenous distribution of two-dimensional bDNA lattices across the Al foil. When the assembled bDNA structures were recovered from the Al foil and electrophoresed in nPAGE only higher order polymeric bDNA structures were observed without a trace of monomeric structures which confirms the stability and high yield of the bDNA lattices. Therefore, this enzyme-free economic and efficient strategy for developing bDNA lattices can be utilized in assembling various nanomaterials for functional molecular components towards development of DNA based self-assembled nanodevices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential nuclear and mitochondrial DNA preservation in post-mortem teeth with implications for forensic and ancient DNA studies.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Denice; Rohrlach, Adam B; Kaidonis, John; Townsend, Grant; Austin, Jeremy J

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in genetic analysis of skeletal remains have been made over the last decade, primarily due to improvements in post-DNA-extraction techniques. Despite this, a key challenge for DNA analysis of skeletal remains is the limited yield of DNA recovered from these poorly preserved samples. Enhanced DNA recovery by improved sampling and extraction techniques would allow further advancements. However, little is known about the post-mortem kinetics of DNA degradation and whether the rate of degradation varies between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA or across different skeletal tissues. This knowledge, along with information regarding ante-mortem DNA distribution within skeletal elements, would inform sampling protocols facilitating development of improved extraction processes. Here we present a combined genetic and histological examination of DNA content and rates of DNA degradation in the different tooth tissues of 150 human molars over short-medium post-mortem intervals. DNA was extracted from coronal dentine, root dentine, cementum and pulp of 114 teeth via a silica column method and the remaining 36 teeth were examined histologically. Real time quantification assays based on two nuclear DNA fragments (67 bp and 156 bp) and one mitochondrial DNA fragment (77 bp) showed nuclear and mitochondrial DNA degraded exponentially, but at different rates, depending on post-mortem interval and soil temperature. In contrast to previous studies, we identified differential survival of nuclear and mtDNA in different tooth tissues. Furthermore histological examination showed pulp and dentine were rapidly affected by loss of structural integrity, and pulp was completely destroyed in a relatively short time period. Conversely, cementum showed little structural change over the same time period. Finally, we confirm that targeted sampling of cementum from teeth buried for up to 16 months can provide a reliable source of nuclear DNA for STR-based genotyping using standard

  9. Differential Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Preservation in Post-Mortem Teeth with Implications for Forensic and Ancient DNA Studies

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Denice; Rohrlach, Adam B.; Kaidonis, John; Townsend, Grant; Austin, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in genetic analysis of skeletal remains have been made over the last decade, primarily due to improvements in post-DNA-extraction techniques. Despite this, a key challenge for DNA analysis of skeletal remains is the limited yield of DNA recovered from these poorly preserved samples. Enhanced DNA recovery by improved sampling and extraction techniques would allow further advancements. However, little is known about the post-mortem kinetics of DNA degradation and whether the rate of degradation varies between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA or across different skeletal tissues. This knowledge, along with information regarding ante-mortem DNA distribution within skeletal elements, would inform sampling protocols facilitating development of improved extraction processes. Here we present a combined genetic and histological examination of DNA content and rates of DNA degradation in the different tooth tissues of 150 human molars over short-medium post-mortem intervals. DNA was extracted from coronal dentine, root dentine, cementum and pulp of 114 teeth via a silica column method and the remaining 36 teeth were examined histologically. Real time quantification assays based on two nuclear DNA fragments (67 bp and 156 bp) and one mitochondrial DNA fragment (77 bp) showed nuclear and mitochondrial DNA degraded exponentially, but at different rates, depending on post-mortem interval and soil temperature. In contrast to previous studies, we identified differential survival of nuclear and mtDNA in different tooth tissues. Futhermore histological examination showed pulp and dentine were rapidly affected by loss of structural integrity, and pulp was completely destroyed in a relatively short time period. Conversely, cementum showed little structural change over the same time period. Finally, we confirm that targeted sampling of cementum from teeth buried for up to 16 months can provide a reliable source of nuclear DNA for STR-based genotyping using standard

  10. DNA Origami: Folded DNA-Nanodevices That Can Direct and Interpret Cell Behavior.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Cathal J; Lucas, Christopher R; O'Brien, Fergal J; Castro, Carlos E

    2016-07-01

    DNA origami is a DNA-based nanotechnology that utilizes programmed combinations of short complementary oligonucleotides to fold a large single strand of DNA into precise 2D and 3D shapes. The exquisite nanoscale shape control of this inherently biocompatible material is combined with the potential to spatially address the origami structures with diverse cargoes including drugs, antibodies, nucleic acid sequences, small molecules, and inorganic particles. This programmable flexibility enables the fabrication of precise nanoscale devices that have already shown great potential for biomedical applications such as: drug delivery, biosensing, and synthetic nanopore formation. Here, the advances in the DNA-origami field since its inception several years ago are reviewed with a focus on how these DNA-nanodevices can be designed to interact with cells to direct or probe their behavior.

  11. DNA Origami: Folded DNA-Nanodevices That Can Direct and Interpret Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Cathal J.; Lucas, Christopher R.; O'Brien, Fergal J.; Castro, Carlos E.

    2016-01-01

    DNA origami is a DNA-based nanotechnology that utilizes programmed combinations of short complementary oligonucleotides to fold a large single strand of DNA into precise 2-D and 3-D shapes. The exquisite nanoscale shape control of this inherently biocompatible material is combined with the potential to spatially address the origami structures with diverse cargos including drugs, antibodies, nucleic acid sequences, small molecules and inorganic particles. This programmable flexibility enables the fabrication of precise nanoscale devices that have already shown great potential for biomedical applications such as: drug delivery, biosensing and synthetic nanopore formation. In this Progress Report, we will review the advances in the DNA origami field since its inception several years ago and then focus on how these DNA-nanodevices can be designed to interact with cells to direct or probe their behavior. PMID:26840503

  12. Poxvirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses are large, enveloped viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm and encode proteins for DNA replication and gene expression. Hairpin ends link the two strands of the linear, double-stranded DNA genome. Viral proteins involved in DNA synthesis include a 117-kDa polymerase, a helicase–primase, a uracil DNA glycosylase, a processivity factor, a single-stranded DNA-binding protein, a protein kinase, and a DNA ligase. A viral FEN1 family protein participates in double-strand break repair. The DNA is replicated as long concatemers that are resolved by a viral Holliday junction endonuclease. PMID:23838441

  13. Probing the mechanical unzipping of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulgarakis, Nikos K.; Bishop, Alan R.; Rasmussen, Kim O.

    2006-03-01

    Recent advances in single-molecule force spectroscopy have made a systematic study of local melting in DNA possible. This provide new insight into important biological processes as replication and transcription. In this work, we present an extensive study of the micromechanical unzipping of DNA in the framework of the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois (PBD) model. The force required to separate the doubled strand is derived through analysis of the force-extension curve, while an estimation of the nucleation bubble size of the unzipping process is obtained by the distribution of the rapture force. Our findings are in very good agreement with existing experimental results; for example the force-temperature phase diagram obtained by the PBD model agrees excellently with recent constant-force experimental measurements of the lambda-phage DNA. Fundamental differences between the in vivo and vitro DNA unzipping, as predicted by the PBD model, are also discussed.

  14. Spatiotemporal visualization of DNA replication dynamics.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Marius; Casas-Delucchi, Corella S; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The ability of cells to copy their DNA allows them to transmit their genetic information to their progeny. In such, this central biological process preserves the instructions that direct the entire development of a cell. Earlier biochemical analysis in vitro and genetic analysis in yeast laid the basis of our understanding of the highly conserved mechanism of DNA replication. Recent advances on labeling and live-cell microscopy permit now the dissection of this fundamental process in vivo within the context of intact cells. In this chapter, we describe in detail how to perform multiple DNA replication labeling and detection allowing high spatial resolution imaging, as well as how to follow DNA replication in living cells allowing high temporal resolution imaging.

  15. Thermodynamics of DNA hybridization on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Terry J; Knotts, Thomas A

    2011-05-28

    Hybridization of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) targets to surface-tethered ssDNA probes was simulated using an advanced coarse-grain model to identify key factors that influence the accuracy of DNA microarrays. Comparing behavior in the bulk and on the surface showed, contrary to previous assumptions, that hybridization on surfaces is more thermodynamically favorable than in the bulk. In addition, the effects of stretching or compressing the probe strand were investigated as a model system to test the hypothesis that improving surface hybridization will improve microarray performance. The results in this regard indicate that selectivity can be increased by reducing overall sensitivity by a small degree. Taken as a whole, the results suggest that current methods to enhance microarray performance by seeking to improve hybridization on the surface may not yield the desired outcomes.

  16. Thermodynamics of DNA hybridization on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Terry J.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2011-05-01

    Hybridization of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) targets to surface-tethered ssDNA probes was simulated using an advanced coarse-grain model to identify key factors that influence the accuracy of DNA microarrays. Comparing behavior in the bulk and on the surface showed, contrary to previous assumptions, that hybridization on surfaces is more thermodynamically favorable than in the bulk. In addition, the effects of stretching or compressing the probe strand were investigated as a model system to test the hypothesis that improving surface hybridization will improve microarray performance. The results in this regard indicate that selectivity can be increased by reducing overall sensitivity by a small degree. Taken as a whole, the results suggest that current methods to enhance microarray performance by seeking to improve hybridization on the surface may not yield the desired outcomes.

  17. Engineering Clostridium Strain to Accept Unmethylated DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongjun; Zhang, Yanping; Dai, Zongjie; Li, Yin

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to genetically manipulate the medically and biotechnologically important genus Clostridium due to the existence of the restriction and modification (RM) systems. We identified and engineered the RM system of a model clostridial species, C. acetobutylicum, with the aim to allow the host to accept the unmethylated DNA efficiently. A gene CAC1502 putatively encoding the type II restriction endonuclease Cac824I was identified from the genome of C. acetobutylicum DSM1731, and disrupted using the ClosTron system based on group II intron insertion. The resulting strain SMB009 lost the type II restriction endonuclease activity, and can be transformed with unmethylated DNA as efficiently as with methylated DNA. The strategy reported here makes it easy to genetically modify the clostridial species using unmethylated DNA, which will help to advance the understanding of the clostridial physiology from the molecular level. PMID:20161730

  18. Challenges and opportunities for structural DNA nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Andre V.; Han, Dongran; Shih, William M.; Yan, Hao

    2012-01-01

    DNA molecules have been used to build a variety of nanoscale structures and devices over the past 30 years, and potential applications have begun to emerge. But the development of more advanced structures and applications will require a number of issues to be addressed, the most significant of which are the high cost of DNA and the high error rate of self-assembly. Here we examine the technical challenges in the field of structural DNA nanotechnology and outline some of the promising applications that could be developed if these hurdles can be overcome. In particular, we highlight the potential use of DNA nanostructures in molecular and cellular biophysics, as biomimetic systems, in energy transfer and photonics, and in diagnostics and therapeutics for human health. PMID:22056726

  19. DNA dielectrophoresis: Theory and applications a review.

    PubMed

    Viefhues, Martina; Eichhorn, Ralf

    2017-06-01

    Dielectrophoresis is the migration of an electrically polarizable particle in an inhomogeneous electric field. This migration can be exploited for several applications with (bio)molecules or cells. Dielectrophoresis is a noninvasive technique; therefore, it is very convenient for (selective) manipulation of (bio)molecules or cells. In this review, we will focus on DNA dielectrophoresis as this technique offers several advantages in trapping and immobilization, separation and purification, and analysis of DNA molecules. We present and discuss the underlying theory of the most important forces that have to be considered for applications with dielectrophoresis. Moreover, a review of DNA dielectrophoresis applications is provided to present the state-of-the-art and to offer the reader a perspective of the advances and current limitations of DNA dielectrophoresis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. DNA replication origins, ORC/DNA interaction, and assembly of pre-replication complex in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingya; Kong, Daochun

    2010-07-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication in eukaryotic cells is highly complicated and sophisticatedly regulated. Owing to its large size, a typical eukaryotic genome contains hundreds to tens of thousands of initiation sites called DNA replication origins where DNA synthesis takes place. Multiple initiation sites remove the constraint of a genome size because only a certain amount of DNA can be replicated from a single origin in a limited time. The activation of these multiple origins must be coordinated so that each segment of chromosomal DNA is precisely duplicated only once per cell cycle. Although DNA replication is a vital process for cell growth and its mechanism is highly conserved, recent studies also reveal significant diversity in origin structure, assembly of pre-replication complex (pre-RC) and regulation of replication initiation along evolutionary lines. The DNA replication origins in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe are found to contain a second essential element that is bound by Sap1 protein besides the essential origin recognition complex-binding site. Sap1 is recently demonstrated to be a novel replication initiation protein that plays an essential role in loading the initiation protein Cdc18 to origins and thus directly participates in pre-RC formation. In this review, we summarize the recent advance in understanding how DNA replication origins are organized, how pre-RC is assembled and how DNA replication is initiated and regulated in yeast and metazoans.

  1. USER-derived cloning methods and their primer design.

    PubMed

    Salomonsen, Bo; Mortensen, Uffe H; Halkier, Barbara A

    2014-01-01

    Uracil excision-based cloning through USER™ (Uracil-Specific Excision Reagent) is an efficient ligase-free cloning technique that comprises USER cloning, USER fusion, and USER cassette-free (UCF) USER fusion. These USER-derived cloning techniques enable seamless assembly of multiple DNA fragments in one construct. Though governed by a few simple rules primer design for USER-based fusion of PCR fragments can prove time-consuming for inexperienced users. The Primer Help for USER (PHUSER) software is an easy-to-use primer design tool for USER-based methods. In this chapter, we present a PHUSER software protocol for designing primers for USER-derived cloning techniques.

  2. Advances in Genome Biology & Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas J. Albert, Jon R. Armstrong, Raymond K. Auerback, W. Brad Barbazuk, et al.

    2007-12-01

    This year's meeting focused on the latest advances in new DNA sequencing technologies and the applications of genomics to disease areas in biology and biomedicine. Daytime plenary sessions highlighted cutting-edge research in areas such as complex genetic diseases, comparative genomics, medical sequencing, massively parallel DNA sequencing, and synthetic biology. Technical approaches being developed and utilized in contemporary genomics research were presented during evening concurrent sessions. Also, as in previous years, poster sessions bridged the morning and afternoon plenary sessions. In addition, for the third year in a row, the Advances in Genome Biology and Technology (AGBT) meeting was preceded by a pre-meeting workshop that aimed to provide an introductory overview for trainees and other meeting attendees. This year, speakers at the workshop focused on next-generation sequencing technologies, including their experiences, findings, and helpful advise for others contemplating using these platforms in their research. Speakers from genome centers and core sequencing facilities were featured and the workshop ended with a roundtable discussion, during which speakers fielded questions from the audience.

  3. Mitochondrial diseases: advances and issues

    PubMed Central

    Scarpelli, Mauro; Todeschini, Alice; Volonghi, Irene; Padovani, Alessandro; Filosto, Massimiliano

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases (MDs) are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders caused by a dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. They can be related to mutation of genes encoded using either nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA. The advent of next generation sequencing and whole exome sequencing in studying the molecular bases of MDs will bring about a revolution in the field of mitochondrial medicine, also opening the possibility of better defining pathogenic mechanisms and developing novel therapeutic approaches for these devastating disorders. The canonical rules of mitochondrial medicine remain milestones, but novel issues have been raised following the use of advanced diagnostic technologies. Rigorous validation of the novel mutations detected using deep sequencing in patients with suspected MD, and a clear definition of the natural history, outcome measures, and biomarkers that could be usefully adopted in clinical trials, are mandatory goals for the scientific community. Today, therapy is often inadequate and mostly palliative. However, important advances have been made in treating some clinical entities, eg, mitochondrial neuro-gastrointestinal encephalomyopathy, for which approaches using allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, orthotopic liver transplantation, and carrier erythrocyte entrapped thymidine phosphorylase enzyme therapy have recently been developed. Promising new treatment methods are being identified so that researchers, clinicians, and patients can join forces to change the history of these untreatable disorders. PMID:28243136

  4. Germinal transmission of site-specific excised genomic DNA by the bacterial ParA resolvase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genome engineering is an essential tool in research and product development. Behind some of the recent advances in plant gene transfer is the development of site-specific recombination systems that enable the precise manipulation of DNA, e.g. the deletion, integration or translocation of DNA. DNA ...

  5. Ex vivo programming of antigen-presenting B lymphocytes: considerations on DNA uptake and cell activation.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Matthew; Cortez-Gonzalez, Xotchil; Frazzi, Raffaele; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2006-01-01

    Plasmids used in DNA vaccination not only serve as a source of antigen, but also have an important adjuvant effect. This review focuses on recent advancements made in understanding how cells internalize DNA, and how internalized DNA activates immune response pathways. We also comment on the role of B cells in both of these processes.

  6. Development of fluorescent methods for DNA methyltransferase assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yueying; Zou, Xiaoran; Ma, Fei; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2017-03-01

    DNA methylation modified by DNA methyltransferase (MTase) plays an important role in regulating gene transcription, cell growth and proliferation. The aberrant DNA MTase activity may lead to a variety of human diseases including cancers. Therefore, accurate and sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity is crucial to biomedical research, clinical diagnostics and therapy. However, conventional DNA MTase assays often suffer from labor-intensive operations and time-consuming procedures. Alternatively, fluorescent methods have significant advantages of simplicity and high sensitivity, and have been widely applied for DNA MTase assay. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the development of fluorescent methods for DNA MTase assay. These emerging methods include amplification-free and the amplification-assisted assays. Moreover, we discuss the challenges and future directions of this area.

  7. Alkyltransferase-like proteins: Molecular switches between DNA repair pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tubbs, Julie L.; Tainer, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Alkyltransferase-like proteins (ATLs) play a role in the protection of cells from the biological effects of DNA alkylation damage. Although ATLs share functional motifs with the DNA repair protein and cancer chemotherapy target O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase, they lack the reactive cysteine residue required for alkyltransferase activity, so its mechanism for cell protection was previously unknown. Here, we review recent advances in unravelling the enigmatic cellular protection provided by ATLs against the deleterious effects of DNA alkylation damage. We discuss exciting new evidence that ATLs aid in the repair of DNA O6-alkylguanine lesions through a novel repair cross-talk between DNA-alkylation base damage responses and the DNA nucleotide excision repair pathway. PMID:20502938

  8. Getting Ready for the Dance: FANCJ Irons Out DNA Wrinkles

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Awate, Sanket; Banerjee, Taraswi; Brosh, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that alternate DNA structures, which deviate from normal double helical DNA, form in vivo and influence cellular processes such as replication and transcription. However, our understanding of how the cellular machinery deals with unusual DNA structures such as G-quadruplexes (G4), triplexes, or hairpins is only beginning to emerge. New advances in the field implicate a direct role of the Fanconi Anemia Group J (FANCJ) helicase, which is linked to a hereditary chromosomal instability disorder and important for cancer suppression, in replication past unusual DNA obstacles. This work sets the stage for significant progress in dissecting the molecular mechanisms whereby replication perturbation by abnormal DNA structures leads to genomic instability. In this review, we focus on FANCJ and its role to enable efficient DNA replication when the fork encounters vastly abundant naturally occurring DNA obstacles, which may have implications for targeting rapidly dividing cancer cells. PMID:27376332

  9. Homologous recombination maintenance of genome integrity during DNA damage tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The DNA strand exchange protein Rad51 provides a safe mechanism for the repair of DNA breaks using the information of a homologous DNA template. Homologous recombination (HR) also plays a key role in the response to DNA damage that impairs the advance of the replication forks by providing mechanisms to circumvent the lesion and fill in the tracks of single-stranded DNA that are generated during the process of lesion bypass. These activities postpone repair of the blocking lesion to ensure that DNA replication is completed in a timely manner. Experimental evidence generated over the last few years indicates that HR participates in this DNA damage tolerance response together with additional error-free (template switch) and error-prone (translesion synthesis) mechanisms through intricate connections, which are presented here. The choice between repair and tolerance, and the mechanism of tolerance, is critical to avoid increased mutagenesis and/or genome rearrangements, which are both hallmarks of cancer. PMID:27308329

  10. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans.

  11. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans. PMID:27555866

  12. Dental DNA fingerprinting in identification of human remains.

    PubMed

    Girish, Kl; Rahman, Farzan S; Tippu, Shoaib R

    2010-07-01

    The recent advances in molecular biology have revolutionized all aspects of dentistry. DNA, the language of life yields information beyond our imagination, both in health or disease. DNA fingerprinting is a tool used to unravel all the mysteries associated with the oral cavity and its manifestations during diseased conditions. It is being increasingly used in analyzing various scenarios related to forensic science. The technical advances in molecular biology have propelled the analysis of the DNA into routine usage in crime laboratories for rapid and early diagnosis. DNA is an excellent means for identification of unidentified human remains. As dental pulp is surrounded by dentin and enamel, which forms dental armor, it offers the best source of DNA for reliable genetic type in forensic science. This paper summarizes the recent literature on use of this technique in identification of unidentified human remains.

  13. [Applications of DNA methylation markers in forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gui-sen; Yang, Qing-en

    2005-02-01

    DNA methylation is a post-replication modification that is predominantly found in cytosines of the dinucleotide sequence CpG. Epigenetic information is stored in the distribution of the modified base 5-methylcytosine. DNA methylation profiles represent a more chemically and biologically stable source of molecular diagnostic information than RNA or most proteins. Recent advances attest to the great promise of DNA methylation markers as powerful future tools in the clinic. In the past decade, DNA methylation analysis has been revolutionized by two technological advances--bisulphite modification of DNA and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). The methylation pattern of human genome is space-time specific, sex-specific, parent-of-origin specific and disease specific, providing us an alternative way to solve forensic problems.

  14. Dental DNA fingerprinting in identification of human remains

    PubMed Central

    Girish, KL; Rahman, Farzan S; Tippu, Shoaib R

    2010-01-01

    The recent advances in molecular biology have revolutionized all aspects of dentistry. DNA, the language of life yields information beyond our imagination, both in health or disease. DNA fingerprinting is a tool used to unravel all the mysteries associated with the oral cavity and its manifestations during diseased conditions. It is being increasingly used in analyzing various scenarios related to forensic science. The technical advances in molecular biology have propelled the analysis of the DNA into routine usage in crime laboratories for rapid and early diagnosis. DNA is an excellent means for identification of unidentified human remains. As dental pulp is surrounded by dentin and enamel, which forms dental armor, it offers the best source of DNA for reliable genetic type in forensic science. This paper summarizes the recent literature on use of this technique in identification of unidentified human remains. PMID:21731342

  15. Streamlined purification of plasmid DNA from prokaryotic cultures.

    PubMed

    Pueschel, Laura; Li, Hongshan; Hymes, Matthew

    2011-01-05

    We describe the complete process of AcroPrep Advance Filter Plates for 96 plasmid preparations, starting from prokaryotic culture and ending with high purity DNA. Based on multi-well filtration for bacterial lysate clearance and DNA purification, this method creates a streamlined process for plasmid preparation. Filter plates containing silica-based media can easily be processed by vacuum filtration or centrifuge to yield appreciable quantities of plasmid DNA. Quantitative analyses determine the purified plasmid DNA is consistently of high quality with average OD(260/280;) ratios of 1.97. Overall, plasmid yields offer more pure DNA for downstream applications, such as sequencing and cloning. This streamlined method of using AcroPrep Advance Filter Plates allows for manual, semi-automated or fully-automated processing.

  16. Streamlined Purification of Plasmid DNA From Prokaryotic Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pueschel, Laura; Li, Hongshan; Hymes, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    We describe the complete process of AcroPrep Advance Filter Plates for 96 plasmid preparations, starting from prokaryotic culture and ending with high purity DNA. Based on multi-well filtration for bacterial lysate clearance and DNA purification, this method creates a streamlined process for plasmid preparation. Filter plates containing silica-based media can easily be processed by vacuum filtration or centrifuge to yield appreciable quantities of plasmid DNA. Quantitative analyses determine the purified plasmid DNA is consistently of high quality with average OD260/280 ratios of 1.97. Overall, plasmid yields offer more pure DNA for downstream applications, such as sequencing and cloning. This streamlined method of using AcroPrep Advance Filter Plates allows for manual, semi-automated or fully-automated processing. PMID:21248696

  17. Multiplexed Sequence Encoding: A Framework for DNA Communication

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Bijan; Carr, Peter A.; Lu, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic DNA has great propensity for efficiently and stably storing non-biological information. With DNA writing and reading technologies rapidly advancing, new applications for synthetic DNA are emerging in data storage and communication. Traditionally, DNA communication has focused on the encoding and transfer of complete sets of information. Here, we explore the use of DNA for the communication of short messages that are fragmented across multiple distinct DNA molecules. We identified three pivotal points in a communication—data encoding, data transfer & data extraction—and developed novel tools to enable communication via molecules of DNA. To address data encoding, we designed DNA-based individualized keyboards (iKeys) to convert plaintext into DNA, while reducing the occurrence of DNA homopolymers to improve synthesis and sequencing processes. To address data transfer, we implemented a secret-sharing system—Multiplexed Sequence Encoding (MuSE)—that conceals messages between multiple distinct DNA molecules, requiring a combination key to reveal messages. To address data extraction, we achieved the first instance of chromatogram patterning through multiplexed sequencing, thereby enabling a new method for data extraction. We envision these approaches will enable more widespread communication of information via DNA. PMID:27050646

  18. DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-09-18

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span.

  19. DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2015-01-01

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span. PMID:26385091

  20. Structural DNA nanotechnology for intelligent drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jie; Liu, Huajie; Su, Shao; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei; Fan, Chunhai

    2014-11-01

    Drug delivery carriers have been popularly employed to improve solubility, stability, and efficacy of chemical and biomolecular drugs. Despite the rapid progress in this field, it remains a great challenge to develop an ideal carrier with minimal cytotoxicity, high biocompatibility and intelligence for targeted controlled release. The emergence of DNA nanotechnology offers unprecedented opportunities in this regard. Due to the unparalleled self-recognition properties of DNA molecules, it is possible to create numerous artificial DNA nanostructures with well-defined structures and DNA nanodevices with precisely controlled motions. More importantly, recent studies have proven that DNA nanostructures possess greater permeability to the membrane barrier of cells, which pave the way to developing new drug delivery carriers with nucleic acids, are summarized. In this Concept, recent advances on the design and fabrication of both static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, and the use of these nanostructures for the delivery of various types of drugs, are highlighted. It is also demonstrated that dynamic DNA nanostructures provide the required intelligence to realize logically controlled drug release. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. DNA-nanostructure-assembly by sequential spotting.

    PubMed

    Breitenstein, Michael; Nielsen, Peter E; Hölzel, Ralph; Bier, Frank F

    2011-11-18

    The ability to create nanostructures with biomolecules is one of the key elements in nanobiotechnology. One of the problems is the expensive and mostly custom made equipment which is needed for their development. We intended to reduce material costs and aimed at miniaturization of the necessary tools that are essential for nanofabrication. Thus we combined the capabilities of molecular ink lithography with DNA-self-assembling capabilities to arrange DNA in an independent array which allows addressing molecules in nanoscale dimensions. For the construction of DNA based nanostructures a method is presented that allows an arrangement of DNA strands in such a way that they can form a grid that only depends on the spotted pattern of the anchor molecules. An atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used for molecular ink lithography to generate small spots. The sequential spotting process allows the immobilization of several different functional biomolecules with a single AFM-tip. This grid which delivers specific addresses for the prepared DNA-strand serves as a two-dimensional anchor to arrange the sequence according to the pattern. Once the DNA-nanoarray has been formed, it can be functionalized by PNA (peptide nucleic acid) to incorporate advanced structures. The production of DNA-nanoarrays is a promising task for nanobiotechnology. The described method allows convenient and low cost preparation of nanoarrays. PNA can be used for complex functionalization purposes as well as a structural element.

  2. IHF and HU: flexible architects of bent DNA.

    PubMed

    Swinger, Kerren K; Rice, Phoebe A

    2004-02-01

    The energetic cost of bending short segments of DNA is very high. This bending is critical for the packaging of DNA and is exploited to regulate many cellular processes. In prokaryotes, IHF and HU are key architectural proteins present at high concentrations. New protein-DNA co-crystal structures, and the adaptation of advanced biophysical and biochemical techniques have led to an improved understanding of how these proteins interact with DNA. These techniques include time-resolved synchrotron X-ray footprinting, differential scanning calorimetry, isothermal titration calorimetry and single-molecule experiments.

  3. DNA degradation with ozone.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Franco

    2006-05-30

    DNA was ozonized in solution and the reaction was followed with polarimetry and with iodimetry. Polarimetry was used to determine the molar ratio DNA/O(3) when the DNA optical activity vanishes completely. At a molar ratio DNA/O(3)=2.3 the supramolecular structure of DNA collapses completely. Instead, iodimetry shows that the ozonolysis proceeds until all the nucleobases have been destroyed, an event which occurs at a molar ratio DNA/O(3)=1.1. The ozonolysis of DNA was also followed spectrophotometrically. DNA is reactive with ozone also in the solid state, as fixed bed. Clear indication about its oxidation derives from the FT-IR spectra from polarimetric measurements and from thermal analysis performed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermogravimetric analysis (DTG) and from differential thermal analysis (DTA). Particular remarkable is the fact that RNA has been found much less reactive toward ozone in the solid state than DNA.

  4. Mammalian DNA helicase.

    PubMed Central

    Hübscher, U; Stalder, H P

    1985-01-01

    A forked DNA was constructed to serve as a substrate for DNA helicases. It contains features closely resembling a natural replication fork. The DNA was prepared in large amounts and was used to assay displacement activity during isolation from calf thymus DNA polymerases alpha holoenzyme. One form of DNA polymerase alpha holoenzyme is possibly involved leading strand replication at the replication fork and possesses DNA dependent ATPase activity (Ottiger, H.-P. and Hübscher, U. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81, 3993-3997). The enzyme can be separated from DNA polymerase alpha by velocity sedimentation in conditions of very low ionic strength and then be purified by chromatography on Sephacryl S-200 and ATP-agarose. At all stages of purification, DNA dependent ATPase and displacement activity profiles were virtually superimposable. The DNA dependent ATPase can displace a hybridized DNA fragment with a short single-stranded tail at its 3'hydroxyl end only in the presence of ATP, and this displacement relies on ATP hydrolysis. Furthermore, homogeneous single-stranded binding proteins from calf thymus as well as from other tissues cannot perform this displacement reaction. By all this token the DNA dependent ATPase appears to be a DNA helicase. It is suggested that this DNA helicase might act in concert with DNA polymerase alpha at the leading strand, possibly pushing the replication fork ahead of the polymerase. Images PMID:3162158

  5. New branched DNA constructs.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Madhavaiah; Keller, Sascha; Gloeckner, Christian; Bornemann, Benjamin; Marx, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The Watson-Crick base pairing of DNA is an advantageous phenomenon that can be exploited when using DNA as a scaffold for directed self-organization of nanometer-sized objects. Several reports have appeared in the literature that describe the generation of branched DNA (bDNA) with variable numbers of arms that self-assembles into predesigned architectures. These bDNA units are generated by using cleverly designed rigid crossover DNA molecules. Alternatively, bDNA can be generated by using synthetic branch points derived from either nucleoside or non-nucleoside building blocks. Branched DNA has scarcely been explored for use in nanotechnology or from self-assembling perspectives. Herein, we wish to report our results for the synthesis, characterization, and assembling properties of asymmetrical bDNA molecules that are able to generate linear and circular bDNA constructs. Our strategy for the generation of bDNA is based on a branching point that makes use of a novel protecting-group strategy. The bDNA units were generated by means of automated DNA synthesis methods and were used to generate novel objects by employing chemical and biological techniques. The entities generated might be useful building blocks for DNA-based nanobiotechnology.

  6. DNA damage tolerance by recombination: Molecular pathways and DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Branzei, Dana; Szakal, Barnabas

    2016-08-01

    Replication perturbations activate DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathways, which are crucial to promote replication completion and to prevent fork breakage, a leading cause of genome instability. One mode of DDT uses translesion synthesis polymerases, which however can also introduce mutations. The other DDT mode involves recombination-mediated mechanisms, which are generally accurate. DDT occurs prevalently postreplicatively, but in certain situations homologous recombination is needed to restart forks. Fork reversal can function to stabilize stalled forks, but may also promote error-prone outcome when used for fork restart. Recent years have witnessed important advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and DNA structures that mediate recombination-mediated damage-bypass and highlighted principles that regulate DDT pathway choice locally and temporally. In this review we summarize the current knowledge and paradoxes on recombination-mediated DDT pathways and their workings, discuss how the intermediate DNA structures may influence genome integrity, and outline key open questions for future research. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Amplified DNA Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willner, Itamar; Shlyahovsky, Bella; Willner, Bilha; Zayats, Maya

    Amplified detection of DNA is a central research topic in modern bioanalytical science. Electronic or optical transduction of DNA recognition events provides readout signals for DNA biosensors. Amplification of the DNA analysis is accomplished by the coupling of nucleic acid-functionalized enzymes or nucleic acid-functionalized nanoparticles (NP) as labels for the DNA duplex formation. This chapter discusses the amplified amperometric analysis of DNA by redox enzymes, the amplified optical sensing of DNA by enzymes or DNAzymes, and the amplified voltammetric, optical, or microgravimetric analysis of DNA using metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles. Further approaches to amplify DNA detection involve the use of micro-carriers of redox compounds as labels for DNA complex formation on electrodes, or the use of micro-objects such as liposomes, that label the resulting DNA complexes on electrodes and alter the interfacial properties of the electrodes. Finally, DNA machines are used for the optical detection of DNA, and the systems are suggested as future analytical procedures that could substitute the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process.

  8. Archaeology of Eukaryotic DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Kira S.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the characterization of the archaeal DNA replication system together with comparative genomic analysis have led to the identification of several previously uncharacterized archaeal proteins involved in replication and currently reveal a nearly complete correspondence between the components of the archaeal and eukaryotic replication machineries. It can be inferred that the archaeal ancestor of eukaryotes and even the last common ancestor of all extant archaea possessed replication machineries that were comparable in complexity to the eukaryotic replication system. The eukaryotic replication system encompasses multiple paralogs of ancestral components such that heteromeric complexes in eukaryotes replace archaeal homomeric complexes, apparently along with subfunctionalization of the eukaryotic complex subunits. In the archaea, parallel, lineage-specific duplications of many genes encoding replication machinery components are detectable as well; most of these archaeal paralogs remain to be functionally characterized. The archaeal replication system shows remarkable plasticity whereby even some essential components such as DNA polymerase and single-stranded DNA-binding protein are displaced by unrelated proteins with analogous activities in some lineages. PMID:23881942

  9. DNA Sequencing Sensors: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Cardenas, Jose Antonio; Garcia-Maroto, Federico; Alvarez-Bermejo, Jose Antonio; Manzano-Agugliaro, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The first sequencing of a complete genome was published forty years ago by the double Nobel Prize in Chemistry winner Frederick Sanger. That corresponded to the small sized genome of a bacteriophage, but since then there have been many complex organisms whose DNA have been sequenced. This was possible thanks to continuous advances in the fields of biochemistry and molecular genetics, but also in other areas such as nanotechnology and computing. Nowadays, sequencing sensors based on genetic material have little to do with those used by Sanger. The emergence of mass sequencing sensors, or new generation sequencing (NGS) meant a quantitative leap both in the volume of genetic material that was able to be sequenced in each trial, as well as in the time per run and its cost. One can envisage that incoming technologies, already known as fourth generation sequencing, will continue to cheapen the trials by increasing DNA reading lengths in each run. All of this would be impossible without sensors and detection systems becoming smaller and more precise. This article provides a comprehensive overview on sensors for DNA sequencing developed within the last 40 years. PMID:28335417

  10. DNA as a Versatile Chemical Component for Catalysis, Encoding, and Stereocontrol**

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Scott K.

    2012-01-01

    DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is the genetic material common to all of Earth's organisms. Our biological understanding of DNA is extensive and well-exploited. In recent years, chemists have begun to develop DNA for nonbiological applications in catalysis, encoding, and stereochemical control. This Review summarizes key advances in these three exciting research areas, each of which takes advantage of a different subset of DNA's useful chemical properties. PMID:20669202

  11. Modeling DNA Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  12. Structural Organization of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    1986-01-01

    Explains the structural organization of DNA by providing information on the primary, secondary, tertiary, and higher organization levels of the molecule. Also includes illustrations and descriptions of sign-inversion and rotating models for supercoiling of DNA. (ML)

  13. DNA tagged microparticles

    DOEpatents

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2015-05-05

    A simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the simulant.

  14. Modeling DNA Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  15. Unusual DNA structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, R.D.; Harvey, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Unusual DNS Structures and the Probes Used for Their Detection; The Specificity of Single Strand Specific Endonucleases; Chromatin STructure and DNA Structure at the hsp 26 Locus of Drosophilia; Cruciform Extrusion in Supercoiled DNA-Mechanisms and Contextual Influence; Torsional Stress, Unusual DNA Structures, and Eukaryotic Gene Expression; DNA Sequence and Structure: Bending to Biology. Cruciform Transitions Assayed Using a Psoralen Cross-linking Method: Applications to Measurements of DNA Torisonal Tension; NMR-Distance Geometry Studies of Helical Errors and Sequence Dependent Conformations of DNA in Solution; Hyperreactivity of the B-Z Junctions Probed by Two Aromatic Chemical Carcinogens; Inherently Curved DNA and Its Structural Elements; and DNA Flexibility Under Control: The Juma Algorithm and its Application to BZ Junctions.

  16. Structural Organization of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    1986-01-01

    Explains the structural organization of DNA by providing information on the primary, secondary, tertiary, and higher organization levels of the molecule. Also includes illustrations and descriptions of sign-inversion and rotating models for supercoiling of DNA. (ML)

  17. [Advance in researches on BRCA1].

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-Hua; Ye, Qi-Nong; Huang, Cui-Fen

    2004-05-01

    BRCA1 is one of the most important breast cancer susceptibility genes. It plays key roles in DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoint regulation, gene transcription chromatin stability, and cell proliferation. In this paper, advance in basic researches on BRCA1 is reviewed, and the role of BRCA1 in cancer development and progression is discussed, that may facilitate potential clinical application of BRCA1.

  18. DNA Spools under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulić, I. M.; Schiessel, H.

    2004-06-01

    DNA spools, structures in which DNA is wrapped and helically coiled onto itself or onto a protein core, are ubiquitous in nature. We develop a general theory describing the nonequilibrium behavior of DNA spools under linear tension. Two puzzling and seemingly unrelated recent experimental findings, the sudden quantized unwrapping of nucleosomes and that of DNA toroidal condensates under tension, are theoretically explained and shown to be of the same origin. The study provides new insights into nucleosome and chromatin fiber stability and dynamics.

  19. DNA evidence: current perspective and future challenges in India.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sunil K; Goswami, Gajendra K

    2014-08-01

    Since the discovery of DNA fingerprinting technology in 1985 it has been used extensively as evidence in the court of law world-wide to establish the individual identity both in civil and criminal matters. In India, the first case of parentage dispute solved by the use of DNA fingerprinting technology was in 1989. Since then till date, the DNA technology has been used not only to resolve the cases of paternity and maternity disputes, but also for the establishment of individual identity in various criminal cases and for wildlife forensic identification. Since last half a decade, India is exercising to enact legislation on the use of DNA in the judicial realm and the draft 'Human DNA Bill-2012' is pending in the parliament. Largely, the promoters of forensic DNA testing have anticipated that DNA tests are nearly infallible and DNA technology could be the greatest single advance step in search for truth, conviction of the perpetrator, and acquittal of the innocent. The current article provides a comprehensive review on the status of DNA testing in India and elucidates the consequences of the admissibility of DNA as 'evidence' in the judicial dominion. In this backdrop of civil and criminal laws and changing ethical and societal attitudes, it is concluded that the DNA legislation in India and world-wide needs to be designed with utmost care.

  20. DNA nanomaterials for preclinical imaging and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dawei; England, Christopher G; Cai, Weibo

    2016-10-10

    Besides being the carrier of genetic information, DNA is also an excellent biological organizer to establish well-designed nanostructures in the fields of material engineering, nanotechnology, and biomedicine. DNA-based materials represent a diverse nanoscale system primarily due to their predictable base pairing and highly regulated conformations, which greatly facilitate the construction of DNA nanostructures with distinct shapes and sizes. Integrating the emerging advancements in bioconjugation techniques, DNA nanostructures can be readily functionalized with high precision for many purposes ranging from biosensors to imaging to drug delivery. Recent progress in the field of DNA nanotechnology has exhibited collective efforts to employ DNA nanostructures as smart imaging agents or delivery platforms within living organisms. Despite significant improvements in the development of DNA nanostructures, there is limited knowledge regarding the in vivo biological fate of these intriguing nanomaterials. In this review, we summarize the current strategies for designing and purifying highly-versatile DNA nanostructures for biological applications, including molecular imaging and drug delivery. Since DNA nanostructures may elicit an immune response in vivo, we also present a short discussion of their potential toxicities in biomedical applications. Lastly, we discuss future perspectives and potential challenges that may limit the effective preclinical and clinical employment of DNA nanostructures. Due to their unique properties, we predict that DNA nanomaterials will make excellent agents for effective diagnostic imaging and drug delivery, improving patient outcome in cancer and other related diseases in the near future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel constraint for thermodynamically designing DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Bin; Wei, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Changjun

    2013-01-01

    Biotechnological and biomolecular advances have introduced novel uses for DNA such as DNA computing, storage, and encryption. For these applications, DNA sequence design requires maximal desired (and minimal undesired) hybridizations, which are the product of a single new DNA strand from 2 single DNA strands. Here, we propose a novel constraint to design DNA sequences based on thermodynamic properties. Existing constraints for DNA design are based on the Hamming distance, a constraint that does not address the thermodynamic properties of the DNA sequence. Using a unique, improved genetic algorithm, we designed DNA sequence sets which satisfy different distance constraints and employ a free energy gap based on a minimum free energy (MFE) to gauge DNA sequences based on set thermodynamic properties. When compared to the best constraints of the Hamming distance, our method yielded better thermodynamic qualities. We then used our improved genetic algorithm to obtain lower-bound DNA sequence sets. Here, we discuss the effects of novel constraint parameters on the free energy gap.

  2. Transcriptional quiescence of paternal mtDNA in cyprinid fish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ming; Peng, Liangyue; Hu, Xinjiang; Zhao, Yuling; Liu, Shaojun; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial homoplasmy signifies the existence of identical copies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and is essential for normal development, as heteroplasmy causes abnormal development and diseases in human. Homoplasmy in many organisms is ensured by maternal mtDNA inheritance through either absence of paternal mtDNA delivery or early elimination of paternal mtDNA. However, whether paternal mtDNA is transcribed has remained unknown. Here we report that paternal mtDNA shows late elimination and transcriptional quiescence in cyprinid fishes. Paternal mtDNA was present in zygotes but absent in larvae and adult organs of goldfish and blunt-snout bream, demonstrating paternal mtDNA delivery and elimination for maternal mtDNA inheritance. Surprisingly, paternal mtDNA remained detectable up to the heartbeat stage, suggesting its late elimination leading to embryonic heteroplasmy up to advanced embryogenesis. Most importantly, we never detected the cytb RNA of paternal mtDNA at all stages when paternal mtDNA was easily detectable, which reveals that paternal mtDNA is transcriptionally quiescent and thus excludes its effect on the development of heteroplasmic embryos. Therefore, paternal mtDNA in cyprinids shows late elimination and transcriptional quiescence. Clearly, transcriptional quiescence of paternal mtDNA represents a new mechanism for maternal mtDNA inheritance and provides implications for treating mitochondrion-associated diseases by mitochondrial transfer or replacement. PMID:27334806

  3. Non-equilibrium Dynamics of DNA Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariadi, Rizal Fajar

    nanotubes with an irreversible energy consumption reaction, analogous to nucleotide hydrolysis in actin and microtubule polymerization. Finally, we integrated the DNA strand displacement circuits with DNA nanotube polymerization to achieve programmable kinetic control of behavior within artificial cytoskeleton. Our synthetic approach may provide insights into natural cytoskeleton dynamics, such as minimal architectural or reaction mechanism requirements for non-equilibrium behaviors including treadmilling and dynamic instability. The outgrowth of DNA nanotechnology beyond its own boundaries, serving as a general model system for biomolecular dynamics, can lead to an understanding of molecular processes that advances both basic and applied sciences.

  4. Nanopores: Flossing with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasianowicz, John J.

    2004-06-01

    Passing a DNA strand many times back-and-forth through a protein nanopore would enable the interaction between them to be studied more closely. This may now be possible, using a dumbbell-shaped DNA-polymer complex, which may lead to a more reliable analysis of DNA sequences using nanopores.

  5. DNAzymes in DNA Nanomachines and DNA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu; Tian, Ye; Chen, Yi; Mao, Chengde

    This chapter discusses our efforts in using DNAzymes in DNA nano-machines and DNA analysis systems. 10-23 DNAzymes can cleave specific phos-phodiester bonds in RNA. We use them to construct an autonomous DNA-RNA chimera nanomotor, which constantly extracts chemical energy from RNA substrates and transduces the energy into a mechanical motion: cycles of contraction and extension. The motor's motion can be reversibly turned on and off by a DNA analogue (brake) of the RNA substrate. Addition and removal of the brake stops and restarts, respectively, the motor's motion. Furthermore, when the RNA substrates are preorganized into a one-dimensional track, a DNAzyme can continuously move along the track so long as there are substrates available ahead. Based on a similar mechanism, a novel DNA detection system has been developed. A target DNA activates a DNAzyme to cleave RNA-containing molecular beacons (MB), which generates an enhanced fluorescence signal. A following work integrates two steps of signal amplifications: a rolling-circle amplification (RCA) to synthesize multiple copies of DNAzymes, and the DNAzymes catalyze a chemical reaction to generate a colorimetric signal. This method allows detection of DNA analytes whose concentration is as low as 1 pM.

  6. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Network Archive (DNA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    overview of better methods. We decided for Cipher Feed-Back (CFB). The corresponding function in the OpenSSL library is called EVP_aes_128_cfb128. The...Purpose of this Project ........................................................................... 3 2.3. Guiding Design Principles for Security...the planning of fu- ture work. 5 2.3. Guiding Design Principles for Security 1. Minimization of the security sensitive system

  7. Preparation of DNA and nucleoprotein samples for AFM imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2010-01-01

    Sample preparation techniques allowing reliable and reproducible imaging of DNA with various structures, topologies and complexes with proteins are reviewed. The major emphasis is given to methods utilizing chemical functionalization of mica, enabling preparation of the surfaces with required characteristics. The methods are illustrated by examples of imaging of different DNA structures. Special attention is given to the possibility of AFM to image the dynamics of DNA at the nanoscale. The capabilities of time-lapse AFM in aqueous solutions are illustrated by imaging of dynamic processes as transitions of local alternative structures (transition of DNA between H and B forms). The application of AFM to studies of protein-DNA complexes is illustrated by a few examples of imaging site-specific complexes, as well as such systems as chromatin. The time-lapse AFM studies of protein-DNA complexes including very recent advances with the use of high-speed AFM are reviewed. PMID:20864349

  8. DNA nanotechnology: new adventures for an old warhorse

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Bijan; Lu, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    As the blueprint of life, the natural exploits of DNA are admirable. However, DNA should not only be viewed within a biological context. It is an elegantly simple yet functionally complex chemical polymer with properties that make it an ideal platform for engineering new nanotechnologies. Rapidly advancing synthesis and sequencing technologies are enabling novel unnatural applications for DNA beyond the realm of genetics. Here we explore the chemical biology of DNA nanotechnology for emerging applications in communication and digital data storage. Early studies of DNA as an alternative to magnetic and optical storage mediums have not only been promising, but have demonstrated the potential of DNA to revolutionize the way we interact with digital data in the future. PMID:26056949

  9. DNA nanotechnology: new adventures for an old warhorse.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Bijan; Lu, Timothy K

    2015-10-01

    As the blueprint of life, the natural exploits of DNA are admirable. However, DNA should not only be viewed within a biological context. It is an elegantly simple yet functionally complex chemical polymer with properties that make it an ideal platform for engineering new nanotechnologies. Rapidly advancing synthesis and sequencing technologies are enabling novel unnatural applications for DNA beyond the realm of genetics. Here we explore the chemical biology of DNA nanotechnology for emerging applications in communication and digital data storage. Early studies of DNA as an alternative to magnetic and optical storage mediums have not only been promising, but have demonstrated the potential of DNA to revolutionize the way we interact with digital data in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. DNA damage processing at telomeres: The ends justify the means.

    PubMed

    Fouquerel, Elise; Parikh, Dhvani; Opresko, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    Telomeres at chromosome ends are nucleoprotein structures consisting of tandem TTAGGG repeats and a complex of proteins termed shelterin. DNA damage and repair at telomeres is uniquely influenced by the ability of telomeric DNA to form alternate structures including loops and G-quadruplexes, coupled with the ability of shelterin proteins to interact with and regulate enzymes in every known DNA repair pathway. The role of shelterin proteins in preventing telomeric ends from being falsely recognized and processed as DNA double strand breaks is well established. Here we focus instead on recent developments in understanding the roles of shelterin proteins and telomeric DNA sequence and structure in processing genuine damage at telomeres induced by endogenous and exogenous DNA damage agents. We will highlight advances in double strand break repair, base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair at telomeres, and will discuss important questions remaining in the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcription factors as readers and effectors of DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Heng; Wang, Guohua; Qian, Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Recent technological advances have made it possible to decode DNA methylomes at single-base-pair resolution under various physiological conditions. Many aberrant or differentially methylated sites have been discovered, but the mechanisms by which changes in DNA methylation lead to observed phenotypes, such as cancer, remain elusive. The classical view of methylation-mediated protein-DNA interactions is that only proteins with a methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) can interact with methylated DNA. However, evidence is emerging to suggest that transcription factors lacking a MBD can also interact with methylated DNA. The identification of these proteins and the elucidation of their characteristics and the biological consequences of methylation-dependent transcription factor-DNA interactions are important stepping stones towards a mechanistic understanding of methylation-mediated biological processes, which have crucial implications for human development and disease.

  12. Sequence-Specific Molecular Lithography on Single DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keren, Kinneret; Krueger, Michael; Gilad, Rachel; Ben-Yoseph, Gdalyahu; Sivan, Uri; Braun, Erez

    2002-07-01

    Recent advances in the realization of individual molecular-scale electronic devices emphasize the need for novel tools and concepts capable of assembling such devices into large-scale functional circuits. We demonstrated sequence-specific molecular lithography on substrate DNA molecules by harnessing homologous recombination by RecA protein. In a sequence-specific manner, we patterned the coating of DNA with metal, localized labeled molecular objects and grew metal islands on specific sites along the DNA substrate, and generated molecularly accurate stable DNA junctions for patterning the DNA substrate connectivity. In our molecular lithography, the information encoded in the DNA molecules replaces the masks used in conventional microelectronics, and the RecA protein serves as the resist. The molecular lithography works with high resolution over a broad range of length scales from nanometers to many micrometers.

  13. Transcription factors as readers and effectors of DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Heng; Wang, Guohua; Qian, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Recent technological advances have made it possible to decode DNA methylomes at single-base-pair resolution under various physiological conditions. Many aberrant or differentially methylated sites have been discovered, but the mechanisms by which changes in DNA methylation lead to observed phenotypes, such as cancer, remain elusive. The classical view of methylation-mediated protein-DNA interactions is that only proteins with a methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) can interact with methylated DNA. However, evidence is emerging to suggest that transcription factors lacking a MBD can also interact with methylated DNA. The identification of these proteins and the elucidation of their characteristics and the biological consequences of methylation-dependent transcription factor-DNA interactions are important stepping stones towards a mechanistic understanding of methylation-mediated biological processes, which have crucial implications for human development and disease. PMID:27479905

  14. Three-Dimensional DNA Nanostructures Assembled from DNA Star Motifs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Cheng; Zhang, Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Tile-based DNA self-assembly is a promising method in DNA nanotechnology and has produced a wide range of nanostructures by using a small set of unique DNA strands. DNA star motif, as one of DNA tiles, has been employed to assemble varieties of symmetric one-, two-, three-dimensional (1, 2, 3D) DNA nanostructures. Herein, we describe the design principles, assembly methods, and characterization methods of 3D DNA nanostructures assembled from the DNA star motifs.

  15. Regulation of Replication Fork Advance and Stability by Nucleosome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Prado, Felix; Maya, Douglas

    2017-01-24

    The advance of replication forks to duplicate chromosomes in dividing cells requires the disassembly of nucleosomes ahead of the fork and the rapid assembly of parental and de novo histones at the newly synthesized strands behind the fork. Replication-coupled chromatin assembly provides a unique opportunity to regulate fork advance and stability. Through post-translational histone modifications and tightly regulated physical and genetic interactions between chromatin assembly factors and replisome components, chromatin assembly: (1) controls the rate of DNA synthesis and adjusts it to histone availability; (2) provides a mechanism to protect the integrity of the advancing fork; and (3) regulates the mechanisms of DNA damage tolerance in response to replication-blocking lesions. Uncoupling DNA synthesis from nucleosome assembly has deleterious effects on genome integrity and cell cycle progression and is linked to genetic diseases, cancer, and aging.

  16. Regulation of Replication Fork Advance and Stability by Nucleosome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Felix; Maya, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    The advance of replication forks to duplicate chromosomes in dividing cells requires the disassembly of nucleosomes ahead of the fork and the rapid assembly of parental and de novo histones at the newly synthesized strands behind the fork. Replication-coupled chromatin assembly provides a unique opportunity to regulate fork advance and stability. Through post-translational histone modifications and tightly regulated physical and genetic interactions between chromatin assembly factors and replisome components, chromatin assembly: (1) controls the rate of DNA synthesis and adjusts it to histone availability; (2) provides a mechanism to protect the integrity of the advancing fork; and (3) regulates the mechanisms of DNA damage tolerance in response to replication-blocking lesions. Uncoupling DNA synthesis from nucleosome assembly has deleterious effects on genome integrity and cell cycle progression and is linked to genetic diseases, cancer, and aging. PMID:28125036

  17. Artificial Intelligence, DNA Mimicry, and Human Health.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Kream, Richard M

    2017-08-14

    The molecular evolution of genomic DNA across diverse plant and animal phyla involved dynamic registrations of sequence modifications to maintain existential homeostasis to increasingly complex patterns of environmental stressors. As an essential corollary, driver effects of positive evolutionary pressure are hypothesized to effect concerted modifications of genomic DNA sequences to meet expanded platforms of regulatory controls for successful implementation of advanced physiological requirements. It is also clearly apparent that preservation of updated registries of advantageous modifications of genomic DNA sequences requires coordinate expansion of convergent cellular proofreading/error correction mechanisms that are encoded by reciprocally modified genomic DNA. Computational expansion of operationally defined DNA memory extends to coordinate modification of coding and previously under-emphasized noncoding regions that now appear to represent essential reservoirs of untapped genetic information amenable to evolutionary driven recruitment into the realm of biologically active domains. Additionally, expansion of DNA memory potential via chemical modification and activation of noncoding sequences is targeted to vertical augmentation and integration of an expanded cadre of transcriptional and epigenetic regulatory factors affecting linear coding of protein amino acid sequences within open reading frames.

  18. DNA transposons: nature and applications in genomics.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, Martín; García-Pérez, José L

    2010-04-01

    Repeated DNA makes up a large fraction of a typical mammalian genome, and some repetitive elements are able to move within the genome (transposons and retrotransposons). DNA transposons move from one genomic location to another by a cut-and-paste mechanism. They are powerful forces of genetic change and have played a significant role in the evolution of many genomes. As genetic tools, DNA transposons can be used to introduce a piece of foreign DNA into a genome. Indeed, they have been used for transgenesis and insertional mutagenesis in different organisms, since these elements are not generally dependent on host factors to mediate their mobility. Thus, DNA transposons are useful tools to analyze the regulatory genome, study embryonic development, identify genes and pathways implicated in disease or pathogenesis of pathogens, and even contribute to gene therapy. In this review, we will describe the nature of these elements and discuss recent advances in this field of research, as well as our evolving knowledge of the DNA transposons most widely used in these studies.

  19. ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TEAM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-16

    ZACK JONES AND JIM LYDON OF MSFC’S ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TEAM, WITH MSFC’S M2 SELECTIVE LASER MELTING SYSTEM. THE M2 IS CURRENTLY DEDICATED TO ADVANCED COPPER MATERIAL DEVELOPMENT FOR THE LOW COST UPPER STAGE PROGRAM.

  20. The Many Sides of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores the meaning of DNA. Discusses histories of DNA, literature on DNA, the contributions of Max Delbruck and Barbara McClintock, life, views of control, current research, and the language of DNA. Contains 24 references. (JRH)

  1. The Many Sides of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores the meaning of DNA. Discusses histories of DNA, literature on DNA, the contributions of Max Delbruck and Barbara McClintock, life, views of control, current research, and the language of DNA. Contains 24 references. (JRH)

  2. Archaeal DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  3. DNA-Mediated Electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Buzzeo, Marisa C.

    2009-01-01

    The base pair stack of DNA has been demonstrated as a medium for long range charge transport chemistry both in solution and at DNA-modified surfaces. This chemistry is exquisitely sensitive to structural perturbations in the base pair stack as occur with lesions, single base mismatches, and protein binding. We have exploited this sensitivity for the development of reliable electrochemical assays based on DNA charge transport at self-assembled DNA monolayers. Here we discuss the characteristic features, applications, and advantages of DNA-mediated electrochemistry. PMID:18980370

  4. DNA Sequencing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1992-01-01

    An automated DNA sequencing apparatus having a reactor for providing at least two series of DNA products formed from a single primer and a DNA strand, each DNA product of a series differing in molecular weight and having a chain terminating agent at one end; separating means for separating the DNA products to form a series bands, the intensity of substantially all nearby bands in a different series being different, band reading means for determining the position an This invention was made with government support including a grant from the U.S. Public Health Service, contract number AI-06045. The U.S. government has certain rights in the invention.

  5. DNA Functionalization of Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang; Gang, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    DNA-nanoparticle conjugates are hybrid nanoscale objects that integrate different types of DNA molecules and inorganic nanoparticles with a typical architecture of a DNA shell around an inorganic core. Such incorporation provides particles with unique properties of DNA, addressability and recognition, but, at the same time, allows exploiting the properties of the particle's inorganic core. Thus, these hybrid nano-objects are advantageous for rational fabrication of functional materials and for biomedical applications. Here, we describe several established DNA functionalization procedures for different types of surface ligands and nanoparticle core materials.

  6. Trace DNA: a review, discussion of theory, and application of the transfer of trace quantities of DNA through skin contact.

    PubMed

    Wickenheiser, Ray A

    2002-05-01

    Advances in STR PCR DNA profiling technology allow for the analysis of minute quantities of DNA. It is frequently possible to obtain successful DNA results from cellular material transferred from the skin of an individual who has simply touched an object. Handling objects, such as weapons or other items associated with a crime, touching surfaces, or wearing clothing, may represent sufficient contact to transfer small numbers of DNA bearing cells, or trace DNA, which can be successfully analyzed. With this minimal amount of contact required to yield a suspect profile comes tremendous crime solving potential, and a number of considerations for prudent application, and the maximization of evidentiary value. Evidentiary materials not previously considered must be recognized and preserved, and the resulting DNA type profiles interpreted in their proper forensic context.

  7. A Role for the Host DNA Damage Response in Hepatitis B Virus cccDNA Formation-and Beyond?

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Sabrina; Nassal, Michael

    2017-05-22

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection puts more than 250 million people at a greatly increased risk to develop end-stage liver disease. Like all hepadnaviruses, HBV replicates via protein-primed reverse transcription of a pregenomic (pg) RNA, yielding an unusually structured, viral polymerase-linked relaxed-circular (RC) DNA as genome in infectious particles. Upon infection, RC-DNA is converted into nuclear covalently closed circular (ccc) DNA. Associating with cellular proteins into an episomal minichromosome, cccDNA acts as template for new viral RNAs, ensuring formation of progeny virions. Hence, cccDNA represents the viral persistence reservoir that is not directly targeted by current anti-HBV therapeutics. Eliminating cccDNA will thus be at the heart of a cure for chronic hepatitis B. The low production of HBV cccDNA in most experimental models and the associated problems in reliable cccDNA quantitation have long hampered a deeper understanding of cccDNA molecular biology. Recent advancements including cccDNA-dependent cell culture systems have begun to identify select host DNA repair enzymes that HBV usurps for RC-DNA to cccDNA conversion. While this list is bound to grow, it may represent just one facet of a broader interaction with the cellular DNA damage response (DDR), a network of pathways that sense and repair aberrant DNA structures and in the process profoundly affect the cell cycle, up to inducing cell death if repair fails. Given the divergent interactions between other viruses and the DDR it will be intriguing to see how HBV copes with this multipronged host system.

  8. A Role for the Host DNA Damage Response in Hepatitis B Virus cccDNA Formation—and Beyond?

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Sabrina; Nassal, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection puts more than 250 million people at a greatly increased risk to develop end-stage liver disease. Like all hepadnaviruses, HBV replicates via protein-primed reverse transcription of a pregenomic (pg) RNA, yielding an unusually structured, viral polymerase-linked relaxed-circular (RC) DNA as genome in infectious particles. Upon infection, RC-DNA is converted into nuclear covalently closed circular (ccc) DNA. Associating with cellular proteins into an episomal minichromosome, cccDNA acts as template for new viral RNAs, ensuring formation of progeny virions. Hence, cccDNA represents the viral persistence reservoir that is not directly targeted by current anti-HBV therapeutics. Eliminating cccDNA will thus be at the heart of a cure for chronic hepatitis B. The low production of HBV cccDNA in most experimental models and the associated problems in reliable cccDNA quantitation have long hampered a deeper understanding of cccDNA molecular biology. Recent advancements including cccDNA-dependent cell culture systems have begun to identify select host DNA repair enzymes that HBV usurps for RC-DNA to cccDNA conversion. While this list is bound to grow, it may represent just one facet of a broader interaction with the cellular DNA damage response (DDR), a network of pathways that sense and repair aberrant DNA structures and in the process profoundly affect the cell cycle, up to inducing cell death if repair fails. Given the divergent interactions between other viruses and the DDR it will be intriguing to see how HBV copes with this multipronged host system. PMID:28531167

  9. Advances in forefoot trauma.

    PubMed

    Clements, J Randolph; Schopf, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Forefoot traumas, particularly involving the metatarsals, are commonly occurring injuries. There have been several advances in management of these injuries. These advances include updates in operative technique, internal fixation options, plating constructs, and external fixation. In addition, the advances of soft tissue management have improved outcomes. This article outlines these injuries and provides an update on techniques, principles, and understanding of managing forefoot trauma.

  10. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation research, planetary mission performance, penetrator advanced studies, Mercury mission transport requirements, definition of super solar electric propulsion/solar sail mission discriminators, and advanced planning activities.

  11. DNA structure and function.

    PubMed

    Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2015-06-01

    The proposal of a double-helical structure for DNA over 60 years ago provided an eminently satisfying explanation for the heritability of genetic information. But why is DNA, and not RNA, now the dominant biological information store? We argue that, in addition to its coding function, the ability of DNA, unlike RNA, to adopt a B-DNA structure confers advantages both for information accessibility and for packaging. The information encoded by DNA is both digital - the precise base specifying, for example, amino acid sequences - and analogue. The latter determines the sequence-dependent physicochemical properties of DNA, for example, its stiffness and susceptibility to strand separation. Most importantly, DNA chirality enables the formation of supercoiling under torsional stress. We review recent evidence suggesting that DNA supercoiling, particularly that generated by DNA translocases, is a major driver of gene regulation and patterns of chromosomal gene organization, and in its guise as a promoter of DNA packaging enables DNA to act as an energy store to facilitate the passage of translocating enzymes such as RNA polymerase.

  12. Supramolecular DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Christopher K; Hamblin, Graham D; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2011-12-01

    The powerful self-assembly features of DNA make it a unique template to finely organize and control matter on the nanometre scale. While DNA alone offers a high degree of fidelity in its self-assembly, a new area of research termed 'supramolecular DNA assembly' has recently emerged. This field combines DNA building blocks with synthetic organic, inorganic and polymeric structures. It thus brings together the toolbox of supramolecular chemistry with the predictable and programmable nature of DNA. The result of this molecular partnership is a variety of hybrid architectures, that expand DNA assembly beyond the boundaries of Watson-Crick base pairing into new structural and functional properties. In this tutorial review we outline this emerging field of study, and describe recent research aiming to synergistically combine the properties inherent to DNA with those of a number of supramolecular scaffolds. This ultimately creates structures with numerous potential applications in materials science, catalysis and medicine.

  13. Drying of DNA droplets.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiaohua; Li, Bingquan; Petersen, Eric; Seo, Young-Soo; Samuilov, Vladimir A; Chen, Yong; Sokolov, Jonathan C; Shew, Chwen-Yang; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2006-07-04

    The evaporation kinetics of droplets containing DNA was studied, as a function of DNA concentration. Drops containing very low DNA concentrations dried by maintaining a constant base, whereas those with high concentration dried with a constant contact angle. To understand this phenomenon, the distribution of the DNA inside the droplet was measured using confocal microscopy. The results indicated that the DNA was condensed mostly on the surface of the droplets. In the case of high concentration droplets, it formed a shell, whereas isolated islands were found for droplets of low DNA concentrations. Rheologic results indicate the formation of a hydro gel in the low concentration drops, whereas phase separation between the self-assembled DNA structures and the water phase occurred at higher concentration.

  14. Session: CSP Advanced Systems -- Advanced Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Mehos, M.

    2008-04-01

    The project description is: (1) it supports crosscutting activities, e.g. advanced optical materials, that aren't tied to a single CSP technology and (2) it supports the 'incubation' of new concepts in preliminary stages of investigation.

  15. The cutting edges in DNA repair, licensing, and fidelity: DNA and RNA repair nucleases sculpt DNA to measure twice, cut once

    PubMed Central

    Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien

    2014-01-01

    To avoid genome instability, DNA repair nucleases must precisely target the correct damaged substrate before they are licensed to incise. Damage identification is a challenge for all DNA damage response proteins, but especially for nucleases that cut the DNA and necessarily create a cleaved DNA repair intermediate, likely more toxic than the initial damage. How do these enzymes achieve exquisite specificity without specific sequence recognition or, in some cases, without a non-canonical DNA nucleotide? Combined structural, biochemical, and biological analyses of repair nucleases are revealing their molecular tools for damage verification and safeguarding against inadvertent incision. Surprisingly, these enzymes also often act on RNA, which deserves more attention. Here, we review protein-DNA structures for nucleases involved in replication, base excision repair, mismatch repair, double strand break repair (DSBR), and telomere maintenance: apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), Endonuclease IV (Nfo), tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP2), UV Damage endonuclease (UVDE), very short patch repair endonuclease (Vsr), Endonuclease V (Nfi), Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), exonuclease 1 (Exo1), RNase T and Meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11). DNA and RNA structure-sensing nucleases are essential to life with roles in DNA replication, repair, and transcription. Increasingly these enzymes are employed as advanced tools for synthetic biology and as targets for cancer prognosis and interventions. Currently their structural biology is most fully illuminated for DNA repair, which is also essential to life. How DNA repair enzymes maintain genome fidelity is one of the DNA double helix secrets missed by Watson-Crick, that is only now being illuminated though structural biology and mutational analyses. Structures reveal motifs for repair nucleases and mechanisms whereby these enzymes follow the old carpenter adage: measure twice, cut once. Furthermore, to measure twice these nucleases

  16. Gold nanocrystals with DNA-directed morphologies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xingyi; Huh, June; Park, Wounjhang; Lee, Luke P.; Kwon, Young Jik; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-01-01

    Precise control over the structure of metal nanomaterials is important for developing advanced nanobiotechnology. Assembly methods of nanoparticles into structured blocks have been widely demonstrated recently. However, synthesis of nanocrystals with controlled, three-dimensional structures remains challenging. Here we show a directed crystallization of gold by a single DNA molecular regulator in a sequence-independent manner and its applications in three-dimensional topological controls of crystalline nanostructures. We anchor DNA onto gold nanoseed with various alignments to form gold nanocrystals with defined topologies. Some topologies are asymmetric including pushpin-, star- and biconcave disk-like structures, as well as more complex jellyfish- and flower-like structures. The approach of employing DNA enables the solution-based synthesis of nanocrystals with controlled, three-dimensional structures in a desired direction, and expands the current tools available for designing and synthesizing feature-rich nanomaterials for future translational biotechnology. PMID:27633935

  17. Gold nanocrystals with DNA-directed morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xingyi; Huh, June; Park, Wounjhang; Lee, Luke P.; Kwon, Young Jik; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-09-01

    Precise control over the structure of metal nanomaterials is important for developing advanced nanobiotechnology. Assembly methods of nanoparticles into structured blocks have been widely demonstrated recently. However, synthesis of nanocrystals with controlled, three-dimensional structures remains challenging. Here we show a directed crystallization of gold by a single DNA molecular regulator in a sequence-independent manner and its applications in three-dimensional topological controls of crystalline nanostructures. We anchor DNA onto gold nanoseed with various alignments to form gold nanocrystals with defined topologies. Some topologies are asymmetric including pushpin-, star- and biconcave disk-like structures, as well as more complex jellyfish- and flower-like structures. The approach of employing DNA enables the solution-based synthesis of nanocrystals with controlled, three-dimensional structures in a desired direction, and expands the current tools available for designing and synthesizing feature-rich nanomaterials for future translational biotechnology.

  18. Lattice engineering through nanoparticle–DNA frameworks

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yugang; Wang, Tong; ...

    2016-02-22

    Advances in self-assembly over the past decade have demonstrated that nano- and microscale particles can be organized into a large diversity of ordered three-dimensional (3D) lattices. However, the ability to generate different desired lattice types from the same set of particles remains challenging. Here, we show that nanoparticles can be assembled into crystalline and open 3D frameworks by connecting them through designed DNA-based polyhedral frames. The geometrical shapes of the frames, combined with the DNA-assisted binding properties of their vertices, facilitate the well-defined topological connections between particles in accordance with frame geometry. With this strategy, different crystallographic lattices using themore » same particles can be assembled by introduction of the corresponding DNA polyhedral frames. As a result, this approach should facilitate the rational assembly of nanoscale lattices through the design of the unit cell.« less

  19. Lattice engineering through nanoparticle–DNA frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yugang; Wang, Tong; Xin, Huolin L.; Li, Huilin; Gang, Oleg

    2016-02-22

    Advances in self-assembly over the past decade have demonstrated that nano- and microscale particles can be organized into a large diversity of ordered three-dimensional (3D) lattices. However, the ability to generate different desired lattice types from the same set of particles remains challenging. Here, we show that nanoparticles can be assembled into crystalline and open 3D frameworks by connecting them through designed DNA-based polyhedral frames. The geometrical shapes of the frames, combined with the DNA-assisted binding properties of their vertices, facilitate the well-defined topological connections between particles in accordance with frame geometry. With this strategy, different crystallographic lattices using the same particles can be assembled by introduction of the corresponding DNA polyhedral frames. As a result, this approach should facilitate the rational assembly of nanoscale lattices through the design of the unit cell.

  20. Lattice Engineering via Nanoparticle-DNA Frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yugang; Wang, Tong; Xin, Huolin L.; Li, Huilin; Gang, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    Advances in self-assembly over the last decade have demonstrated that nano- and microscale particles can be organized into a large diversity of ordered three-dimensional (3D) lattices. However, the ability to generate the desired lattice type from the same set of particles remains challenging. Here, we show that nanoparticles can be assembled into crystalline and open 3D frameworks by connecting them through designed DNA-based polyhedral frames. The well-defined geometrical shapes of the frames, combined with the DNA-assisted binding properties of their vertices, facilitate the well-defined topological connections between particles in accordance with frame geometry. With this strategy, different crystallographic lattices using the same particles can be assembled by introduction of the corresponding DNA polyhedral frames. This approach should facilitate the rational assembly of nanoscale lattices through the design of the unit cell. PMID:26901516

  1. Faunal histories from Holocene ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, Mark; Hoelzel, A Rus; Carvalho, Gary R; Hofreiter, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies using ancient DNA have been instrumental in advancing understanding of the impact of Holocene climate change on biodiversity. Ancient DNA has been used to track demography, migration and diversity, and is providing new insights into the long-term dynamics of species and population distributions. The Holocene is key to understanding how the past has impacted on the present, as it bridges the gap between contemporary phylogeographic studies and those with inference on Pleistocene patterns, based on ancient DNA studies. Here, we examine the major patterns of Holocene faunal population dynamics and connectivity; highlighting the dynamic nature of species and population responses to Holocene climatic change, thereby providing an 'analogue' for understanding potential impacts of future change.

  2. Chemically driven traveling waves in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipniacki, Tomasz

    1999-12-01

    The nonlinear mechanical model constructed in a previous paper [Nuovo Cimento D 20, 833 (1998)] is developed in order to study the dynamics of the DNA double helix. It is assumed that the hydrophobic interaction between subsequent base pairs may be influenced by a RNA polymerase. The Lagrangian, constructed on the basis of ``geometrical'' properties of the DNA molecule, depends on time and contains first and second derivatives of the twist angle. The energy dissipation term is added to the dynamical equations resulting from the Lagrange formalism. It is proved that the system has pulselike solitary wave solutions for which the dissipated energy is balanced by the energy pumped by the advancing RNA polymerase. The physical interpretation of our solution is the local untwisting of the DNA molecule during transcription of messenger RNA.

  3. Epigenome Maintenance in Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Dabin, Juliette; Fortuny, Anna; Polo, Sophie E

    2016-06-02

    Organism viability relies on the stable maintenance of specific chromatin landscapes, established during development, that shape cell functions and identities by driving distinct gene expression programs. Yet epigenome maintenance is challenged during transcription, replication, and repair of DNA damage, all of which elicit dynamic changes in chromatin organization. Here, we review recent advances that have shed light on the specialized mechanisms contributing to the restoration of epigenome structure and function after DNA damage in the mammalian cell nucleus. By drawing a parallel with epigenome maintenance during replication, we explore emerging concepts and highlight open issues in this rapidly growing field. In particular, we present our current knowledge of molecular players that support the coordinated maintenance of genome and epigenome integrity in response to DNA damage, and we highlight how nuclear organization impacts genome stability. Finally, we discuss possible functional implications of epigenome plasticity in response to genotoxic stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Epigenome maintenance in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Dabin, Juliette; Fortuny, Anna; Polo, Sophie E.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Organism viability relies on the stable maintenance of specific chromatin landscapes, established during development, that shape cell functions and identities by driving distinct gene expression programs. Yet, epigenome maintenance is challenged during transcription, replication and repair of DNA damage, all of which elicit dynamic changes in chromatin organization. Here, we review recent advances that have shed light on the specialized mechanisms contributing to the restoration of epigenome structure and function after DNA damage in the mammalian cell nucleus. By drawing a parallel with epigenome maintenance during replication, we explore emerging concepts and highlight open issues in this rapidly growing field. In particular, we present our current knowledge of molecular players that support the coordinated maintenance of genome and epigenome integrity in response to DNA damage, and we highlight how nuclear organization impacts genome stability. Finally, we discuss possible functional implications of epigenome plasticity in response to genotoxic stress. PMID:27259203

  5. Antiparasitic DNA vaccines in 21st century.

    PubMed

    Wedrychowicz, Halina

    2015-06-01

    Demands for effective vaccines to control parasitic diseases of humans and livestock have been recently exacerbated by the development of resistance of most pathogenic parasites to anti-parasitic drugs. Novel genomic and proteomic technologies have provided opportunities for the discovery and improvement of DNA vaccines which are relatively easy as well as cheap to fabricate and stable at room temperatures. However, their main limitation is rather poor immunogenicity, which makes it necessary to couple the antigens with adjuvant molecules. This paper review recent advances in the development of DNA vaccines to some pathogenic protozoa and helminths. Numerous studies were conducted over the past 14 years of 21st century, employing various administration techniques, adjuvants and new immunogenic antigens to increase efficacy of DNA vaccines. Unfortunately, the results have not been rewarding. Further research is necessary using more extensive combinations of antigens; alternate delivery systems and more efficient adjuvants based on knowledge of the immunomodulatory capacities of parasitic protozoa and helminths.

  6. [DNA methylation and epigenetics].

    PubMed

    Vaniushin, B F

    2006-09-01

    In eukaryotic cells, nuclear DNA is subject to enzymatic methylation with the formation of 5-methylcytosine residues, mostly within the CG and CNG sequences. In plants and animals this DNA methylation is species-, tissue-, and organelle-specific. It changes (decreases) with age and is regulated by hormones. On the other hand, genome methylation can control hormonal signal. Replicative and post-replicative DNA methylation types are distinguished. They are mediated by multiple DNA methyltransferases with different site-specificity. Replication is accompanied by the appearance of hemimethylated DNA sites. Pronounced asymmetry of the DNA strand methylation disappears to the end of the cell cycle. A model of methylation-regulated DNA replication is proposed. DNA methylation controls all genetic processes in the cell (replication, transcription, DNA repair, recombination, and gene transposition). It is the mechanism of cell differentiation, gene discrimination and silencing. In animals, suppression of DNA methylation stops development (embryogenesis), switches on apoptosis, and is usually lethal. Disruption of DNA methylation pattern results in the malignant cell transformation and serves as one of the early diagnostic features of carcinogenesis. In malignant cell the pattern of DNA methylation, as well as the set of DNA methyltransferase activities, differs from that in normal cell. In plants inhibition of DNA methylation is accompanied by the induction of seed storage and florescence genes. In eukaryotes one and the same gene can be simultaneously methylated both at cytosine and adenine residues. It can be thus suggested, that the plant cell contains at least two different, and probably, interdependent systems of DNA methylation. The first eukaryotic adenine DNA methyltransferase was isolated from plants. This enzyme methylates DNA with the formation of N6-methyladenine residues in the sequence TGATCA (TGATCA-->TGm6ATCA). Plants possess AdoMet-dependent endonucleases

  7. Replication by a single DNA polymerase of a stretched single-stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Berenike; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2000-01-01

    A new approach to the study of DNA/protein interactions has been opened through the recent advances in the manipulation of single DNA molecules. These allow the behavior of individual molecular motors to be studied under load and compared with bulk measurements. One example of such a motor is the DNA polymerase, which replicates DNA. We measured the replication rate by a single enzyme of a stretched single strand of DNA. The marked difference between the elasticity of single- and double-stranded DNA allows for the monitoring of replication in real time. We have found that the rate of replication depends strongly on the stretching force applied to the template. In particular, by varying the load we determined that the biochemical steps limiting replication are coupled to movement. The replication rate increases at low forces, decreases at forces greater than 4 pN, and ceases when the single-stranded DNA substrate is under a load greater than ≈20 pN. The decay of the replication rate follows an Arrhenius law and indicates that multiple bases on the template strand are involved in the rate-limiting step of each cycle. This observation is consistent with the induced-fit mechanism for error detection during replication. PMID:11050232

  8. Profiling genome-wide DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Yong, Wai-Shin; Hsu, Fei-Man; Chen, Pao-Yang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays an important role in regulating gene expression and therefore a broad range of biological processes and diseases. DNA methylation is tissue-specific, dynamic, sequence-context-dependent and trans-generationally heritable, and these complex patterns of methylation highlight the significance of profiling DNA methylation to answer biological questions. In this review, we surveyed major methylation assays, along with comparisons and biological examples, to provide an overview of DNA methylation profiling techniques. The advances in microarray and sequencing technologies make genome-wide profiling possible at a single-nucleotide or even a single-cell resolution. These profiling approaches vary in many aspects, such as DNA input, resolution, genomic region coverage, and bioinformatics analysis, and selecting a feasible method requires knowledge of these methods. We first introduce the biological background of DNA methylation and its pattern in plants, animals and fungi. We present an overview of major experimental approaches to profiling genome-wide DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation and then extend to the single-cell methylome. To evaluate these methods, we outline their strengths and weaknesses and perform comparisons across the different platforms. Due to the increasing need to compute high-throughput epigenomic data, we interrogate the computational pipeline for bisulfite sequencing data and also discuss the concept of identifying differentially methylated regions (DMRs). This review summarizes the experimental and computational concepts for profiling genome-wide DNA methylation, followed by biological examples. Overall, this review provides researchers useful guidance for the selection of a profiling method suited to specific research questions.

  9. Technological advances in precision medicine and drug development

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Elaine; Patterson, Nicole E; Montagna, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    New technologies are rapidly becoming available to expand the arsenal of tools accessible for precision medicine and to support the development of new therapeutics. Advances in liquid biopsies, which analyze cells, DNA, RNA, proteins, or vesicles isolated from the blood, have gained particular interest for their uses in acquiring information reflecting the biology of tumors and metastatic tissues. Through advancements in DNA sequencing that have merged unprecedented accuracy with affordable cost, personalized treatments based on genetic variations are becoming a real possibility. Extraordinary progress has been achieved in the development of biological therapies aimed to even further advance personalized treatments. We provide a summary of current and future applications of blood based liquid biopsies and how new technologies are utilized for the development of biological therapeutic treatments. We discuss current and future sequencing methods with an emphasis on how technological advances will support the progress in the field of precision medicine. PMID:27622214

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage PaP1 DNA polymerase is an A-family DNA polymerase demonstrating ssDNA and dsDNA 3'-5' exonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Binyan; Gu, Shiling; Liang, Nengsong; Xiong, Mei; Xue, Qizhen; Lu, Shuguang; Hu, Fuquan; Zhang, Huidong

    2016-08-01

    Most phages contain DNA polymerases, which are essential for DNA replication and propagation in infected host bacteria. However, our knowledge on phage-encoded DNA polymerases remains limited. This study investigated the function of a novel DNA polymerase of PaP1, which is the lytic phage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PaP1 encodes its sole DNA polymerase called Gp90 that was predicted as an A-family DNA polymerase with polymerase and 3'-5' exonuclease activities. The sequence of Gp90 is homologous but not identical to that of other A-family DNA polymerases, such as T7 DNA polymerases (Pol) and DNA Pol I. The purified Gp90 demonstrated a polymerase activity. The processivity of Gp90 in DNA replication and its efficiency in single-dNTP incorporation are similar to those of T7 Pol with processive thioredoxin (T7 Pol/trx). Gp90 can degrade ssDNA and dsDNA in 3'-5' direction at a similar rate, which is considerably lower than that of T7 Pol/trx. The optimized conditions for polymerization were a temperature of 37 °C and a buffer consisting of 40 mM Tris-HCl (pH 8.0), 30 mM MgCl2, and 200 mM NaCl. These studies on DNA polymerase encoded by PaP1 help advance our knowledge on phage-encoded DNA polymerases and elucidate PaP1 propagation in infected P. aeruginosa.

  11. Immunodetection of human topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complexes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anand G; Flatten, Karen S; Peterson, Kevin L; Beito, Thomas G; Schneider, Paula A; Perkins, Angela L; Harki, Daniel A; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2016-04-07

    A number of established and investigational anticancer drugs slow the religation step of DNA topoisomerase I (topo I). These agents induce cytotoxicity by stabilizing topo I-DNA covalent complexes, which in turn interact with advancing replication forks or transcription complexes to generate lethal lesions. Despite the importance of topo I-DNA covalent complexes, it has been difficult to detect these lesions within intact cells and tumors. Here, we report development of a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes covalent topo I-DNA complexes, but not free topo I or DNA, by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence or flow cytometry. Utilizing this antibody, we demonstrate readily detectable topo I-DNA covalent complexes after treatment with camptothecins, indenoisoquinolines and cisplatin but not nucleoside analogues. Topotecan-induced topo I-DNA complexes peak at 15-30 min after drug addition and then decrease, whereas indotecan-induced complexes persist for at least 4 h. Interestingly, simultaneous staining for covalent topo I-DNA complexes, phospho-H2AX and Rad51 suggests that topotecan-induced DNA double-strand breaks occur at sites distinct from stabilized topo I-DNA covalent complexes. These studies not only provide new insight into the action of topo I-directed agents, but also illustrate a strategy that can be applied to study additional topoisomerases and their inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Immunodetection of human topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complexes

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anand G.; Flatten, Karen S.; Peterson, Kevin L.; Beito, Thomas G.; Schneider, Paula A.; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2016-01-01

    A number of established and investigational anticancer drugs slow the religation step of DNA topoisomerase I (topo I). These agents induce cytotoxicity by stabilizing topo I-DNA covalent complexes, which in turn interact with advancing replication forks or transcription complexes to generate lethal lesions. Despite the importance of topo I-DNA covalent complexes, it has been difficult to detect these lesions within intact cells and tumors. Here, we report development of a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes covalent topo I-DNA complexes, but not free topo I or DNA, by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence or flow cytometry. Utilizing this antibody, we demonstrate readily detectable topo I-DNA covalent complexes after treatment with camptothecins, indenoisoquinolines and cisplatin but not nucleoside analogues. Topotecan-induced topo I-DNA complexes peak at 15–30 min after drug addition and then decrease, whereas indotecan-induced complexes persist for at least 4 h. Interestingly, simultaneous staining for covalent topo I-DNA complexes, phospho-H2AX and Rad51 suggests that topotecan-induced DNA double-strand breaks occur at sites distinct from stabilized topo I-DNA covalent complexes. These studies not only provide new insight into the action of topo I-directed agents, but also illustrate a strategy that can be applied to study additional topoisomerases and their inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26917015

  13. Optical DNA mapping in nanofluidic devices: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Müller, Vilhelm; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2017-02-14

    Optical DNA mapping has over the last decade emerged as a very powerful tool for obtaining long range sequence information from single DNA molecules. In optical DNA mapping, intact large single DNA molecules are labeled, stretched out, and imaged using a fluorescence microscope. This means that sequence information ranging over hundreds of kilobasepairs (kbp) can be obtained in one single image. Nanochannels offer homogeneous and efficient stretching of DNA that is crucial to maximize the information that can be obtained from optical DNA maps. In this review, we highlight progress in the field of optical DNA mapping in nanochannels. We discuss the different protocols for sequence specific labeling and divide them into two main categories, enzymatic labeling and affinity-based labeling. Examples are highlighted where optical DNA mapping is used to gain information on length scales that would be inaccessible with traditional techniques. Enzymatic labeling has been commercialized and is mainly used in human genetics and assembly of complex genomes, while the affinity-based methods have primarily been applied in bacteriology, for example for rapid analysis of plasmids encoding antibiotic resistance. Next, we highlight how the design of nanofluidic channels can been altered in order to obtain the desired information and discuss how recent advances in the field make it possible to retrieve information beyond DNA sequence. In the outlook section, we discuss future directions of optical DNA mapping, such as fully integrated devices and portable microscopes.

  14. DNA from soil mirrors plant taxonomic and growth form diversity.

    PubMed

    Yoccoz, N G; Bråthen, K A; Gielly, L; Haile, J; Edwards, M E; Goslar, T; Von Stedingk, H; Brysting, A K; Coissac, E; Pompanon, F; Sønstebø, J H; Miquel, C; Valentini, A; De Bello, F; Chave, J; Thuiller, W; Wincker, P; Cruaud, C; Gavory, F; Rasmussen, M; Gilbert, M T P; Orlando, L; Brochmann, C; Willerslev, E; Taberlet, P

    2012-08-01

    Ecosystems across the globe are threatened by climate change and human activities. New rapid survey approaches for monitoring biodiversity would greatly advance assessment and understanding of these threats. Taking advantage of next-generation DNA sequencing, we tested an approach we call metabarcoding: high-throughput and simultaneous taxa identification based on a very short (usually <100 base pairs) but informative DNA fragment. Short DNA fragments allow the use of degraded DNA from environmental samples. All analyses included amplification using plant-specific versatile primers, sequencing and estimation of taxonomic diversity. We tested in three steps whether degraded DNA from dead material in soil has the potential of efficiently assessing biodiversity in different biomes. First, soil DNA from eight boreal plant communities located in two different vegetation types (meadow and heath) was amplified. Plant diversity detected from boreal soil was highly consistent with plant taxonomic and growth form diversity estimated from conventional above-ground surveys. Second, we assessed DNA persistence using samples from formerly cultivated soils in temperate environments. We found that the number of crop DNA sequences retrieved strongly varied with years since last cultivation, and crop sequences were absent from nearby, uncultivated plots. Third, we assessed the universal applicability of DNA metabarcoding using soil samples from tropical environments: a large proportion of species and families from the study site were efficiently recovered. The results open unprecedented opportunities for large-scale DNA-based biodiversity studies across a range of taxonomic groups using standardized metabarcoding approaches.

  15. DNA repair in cancer: emerging targets for personalized therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abbotts, Rachel; Thompson, Nicola; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is under constant threat from endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. Mammalian cells have evolved highly conserved DNA repair machinery to process DNA damage and maintain genomic integrity. Impaired DNA repair is a major driver for carcinogenesis and could promote aggressive cancer biology. Interestingly, in established tumors, DNA repair activity is required to counteract oxidative DNA damage that is prevalent in the tumor microenvironment. Emerging clinical data provide compelling evidence that overexpression of DNA repair factors may have prognostic and predictive significance in patients. More recently, DNA repair inhibition has emerged as a promising target for anticancer therapy. Synthetic lethality exploits intergene relationships where the loss of function of either of two related genes is nonlethal, but loss of both causes cell death. Exploiting this approach by targeting DNA repair has emerged as a promising strategy for personalized cancer therapy. In the current review, we focus on recent advances with a particular focus on synthetic lethality targeting in cancer. PMID:24600246

  16. Fructosylation induced structural changes in mammalian DNA examined by biophysical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Asif; Arif, Zarina; Alam, Khursheed

    2017-03-01

    Glycosylation of DNA, proteins, lipids, etc. by reducing sugars, can lead to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). These products may accumulate and involve in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, contributing to tissue injury via several mechanisms. In this study, fructosylation of calf thymus dsDNA was carried out with varying concentrations of fructose. The neo-structure of fructosylated-DNA was studied by various biophysical techniques and morphological characterization. Fructosylated-DNA showed hyperchromicity, increase in fluorescence intensity and decrease in melting temperature. The CD signal of modified-DNA shifted in the direction of higher wavelength indicative of structural changes in DNA. FTIR results indicated shift in specific band positions in fructosylated-DNA. Morphological characterization of fructosylated-DNA exhibited strand breakage and aggregation. The results suggest that the structure and conformation of DNA may be altered under high concentrations of fructose.

  17. Forensic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Jessica; Lehman, Donald C

    2012-01-01

    Before the routine use of DNA profiling, blood typing was an important forensic tool. However, blood typing was not very discriminating. For example, roughly 30% of the United States population has type A-positive blood. Therefore, if A-positive blood were found at a crime scene, it could have come from 30% of the population. DNA profiling has a much better ability for discrimination. Forensic laboratories no longer routinely determine blood type. If blood is found at a crime scene, DNA profiling is performed. From Jeffrey's discovery of DNA fingerprinting to the development of PCR of STRs to the formation of DNA databases, our knowledge of DNA and DNA profiling have expanded greatly. Also, the applications for which we use DNA profiling have increased. DNA profiling is not just used for criminal case work, but it has expanded to encompass paternity testing, disaster victim identification, monitoring bone marrow transplants, detecting fetal cells in a mother's blood, tracing human history, and a multitude of other areas. The future of DNA profiling looks expansive with the development of newer instrumentation and techniques.

  18. Enzymatic initiation of DNA synthesis by yeast DNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Plevani, P; Chang, L M

    1977-01-01

    Partially purified yeast RNA polymerases (RNA nucleotidyltransferases) initiate DNA synthesis by yeast DNA polymerase (DNA nucleotidyltransferase) I and to a lesser extent yeast DNA polymerase II in the replication of single-stranded DNA. The enzymatic initiation of DNA synthesis on phage fd DNA template occurs with dNTPs alone and is further stimulated by the presence of rNTPs in DNA polymerase I reactions. The presence of rNTPs has no effect on the RNA polymerase initiation of the DNA polymerase II reaction. RNA polymerases I and III are more efficient in initiation of DNA synthesis than RNA polymerase II. Analyses of the products of fd DNA replication show noncovalent linkage between the newly synthesized DNA and the template DNA, and covalent linkage between the newly synthesized RNA and DNA. PMID:325562

  19. Functional DNA Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhao

    The discovery of DNA helical structure opened the door of modern molecular biology. Ned Seeman utilized DNA as building block to construct different nanoscale materials, and introduced a new field, know as DNA nanotechnology. After several decades of development, different DNA structures had been created, with different dimension, different morphology and even with complex curvatures. In addition, after construction of enough amounts DNA structure candidates, DNA structure template, with excellent spatial addressability, had been used to direct the assembly of different nanomaterials, including nanoparticles and proteins, to produce different functional nanomaterials. However there are still many challenges to fabricate functional DNA nanostructures. The first difficulty is that the present finite sized template dimension is still very small, usually smaller than 100nm, which will limit the application for large amount of nanomaterials assembly or large sized nanomaterials assembly. Here we tried to solve this problem through developing a new method, superorigami, to construct finite sized DNA structure with much larger dimension, which can be as large as 500nm. The second problem will be explored the ability of DNA structure to assemble inorganic nanomaterials for novel photonic or electronic properties. Here we tried to utilize DNA Origami method to assemble AuNPs with controlled 3D spacial position for possible chiral photonic complex. We also tried to assemble SWNT with discrete length for possible field effect transistor device. In addition, we tried to mimic in vivo compartment with DNA structure to study internalized enzyme behavior. From our results, constructed DNA cage origami can protect encapsulated enzyme from degradation, and internalized enzyme activity can be boosted for up to 10 folds. In summary, DNA structure can serve as an ideal template for construction of functional nanomaterials with lots of possibilities to be explored.

  20. Past, present and future of forensic DNA typing.

    PubMed

    Giardina, Emiliano; Spinella, Aldo; Novelli, Giuseppe

    2011-02-01

    Recent advances in our ability to dissect the human genome and the availability of platforms for genome-wide analysis and whole-genome sequencing are expected to develop new tools for both biomedical and forensic DNA analyses. Nowadays, we can individualize single cells left at the crime scene or analyze ancient human remains. Here, we provide a general view on the past, current and likely future directions of forensic DNA analysis.

  1. Natural history of eukaryotic DNA methylation systems.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Abhiman, Saraswathi; Aravind, L

    2011-01-01

    Methylation of cytosines and adenines in DNA is a widespread epigenetic mark in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In eukaryotes, it has a profound influence on chromatin structure and dynamics. Recent advances in genomics and biochemistry have considerably elucidated the functions and provenance of these DNA modifications. DNA methylases appear to have emerged first in bacterial restriction-modification (R-M) systems from ancient RNA-modifying enzymes, in transitions that involved acquisition of novel catalytic residues and DNA-recognition features. DNA adenine methylases appear to have been acquired by ciliates, heterolobosean amoeboflagellates, and certain chlorophyte algae. Six distinct clades of cytosine methylases, including the DNMT1, DNMT2, and DNMT3 clades, were acquired by eukaryotes through independent lateral transfer of their precursors from bacteria or bacteriophages. In addition to these, multiple adenine and cytosine methylases were acquired by several families of eukaryotic transposons. In eukaryotes, the DNA-methylase module was often combined with distinct modified and unmodified peptide recognition domains and other modules mediating specialized interactions, for example, the RFD module of DNMT1 which contains a permuted Sm domain linked to a helix-turn-helix domain. In eukaryotes, the evolution of DNA methylases appears to have proceeded in parallel to the elaboration of histone-modifying enzymes and the RNAi system, with functions related to counter-viral and counter-transposon defense, and regulation of DNA repair and differential gene expression being their primary ancestral functions. Diverse DNA demethylation systems that utilize base-excision repair via DNA glycosylases and cytosine deaminases appear to have emerged in multiple eukaryotic lineages. Comparative genomics suggests that the link between cytosine methylation and DNA glycosylases probably emerged first in a novel R-M system in bacteria. Recent studies suggest that the 5mC is not

  2. The DNA-polymerase-X family: controllers of DNA quality?

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Kristijan; Shevelev, Igor; Hübscher, Ulrich

    2004-12-01

    Synthesis of the genetic material of the cell is achieved by a large number of DNA polymerases. Besides replicating the genome, they are involved in DNA-repair processes. Recent studies have indicated that certain DNA-polymerase-X-family members can synthesize unusual DNA structures, and we propose that these DNA structures might serve as 'flag wavers' for the induction of DNA-repair and/or DNA-damage-checkpoint pathways.

  3. Detecting hybridization using ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Nathan K; Shapiro, Beth; Green, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    It is well established that related species hybridize and that this can have varied but significant effects on speciation and environmental adaptation. It should therefore come as no surprise that hybridization is not limited to species that are alive today. In the last several decades, advances in technologies for recovering and sequencing DNA from fossil remains have enabled the assembly of high-coverage genome sequences for a growing diversity of organisms, including many that are extinct. Thanks to the development of new statistical approaches for detecting and quantifying admixture from genomic data, genomes from extinct populations have proven useful both in revealing previously unknown hybridization events and informing the study of hybridization between living organisms. Here, we review some of the key recent statistical innovations for detecting ancient hybridization using genomewide sequence data and discuss how these innovations have revised our understanding of human evolutionary history. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Genome: twisting stories with DNA.

    PubMed

    Noguera-Solano, Ricardo; Ruiz-Gutierrez, Rosaura; Rodriguez-Caso, Juan Manuel

    2013-12-01

    In 1920, the German botanist Hans Winkler coined the concept of the 'genome'. This paper explores the history of a concept that has developed in parallel with advances in biology and supports novel and powerful heuristic biological research in the 21st century. From a structural interpretation (the genome as the haploid number of chromosomes), it has changed to keep pace with technological progress and new interpretations of the material of heredity. In the first place, the 'genome' was extended to include all the material in the nucleus, then the sum of all genes, and (with the discovery of the structure of DNA) the sum of the nucleotide base sequences. In the early 21st century, it has become a much more complex and central concept that has spawned the growing field of studies referred to as the 'omics'.

  5. DNA-Grafted Janus Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsueh, Ching; Lin, Keng-Hui; Juan, Wen-Tau

    2008-03-01

    Recently there have been advances in generating Janus microspheres whose two hemispheres have different chemical compositions [1-4]. The new types of particles open up possibilities for assembly of complex structures. Here we attach DNA molecules onto one side of Janus microspheres. The new type of colloidal particles resembles surfactant molecules and may give us interesting new structures.Reference: [1] Y. Lu, H. Xiong, X. Jiang, Y.Xia, M. Prentiss and G. M.Whitesides, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125, 12724 (2003) [2] O.Cayre, V. N.Paunov and O. D. Velev, J. Mater. Chem. 13, 2445 (2003) [3] R. F. Shepherd, J. C. Conrad, S. K. Rhodes, D. R. Link, M. Marquez, D. A. Weitz and J. A. Lewis, Langmuir 22, 8618 (2006) [4] L. Hong, S. Jiang and S. Granick, Langmuir 22, 9495 (2006)

  6. Detecting hybridization using ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Nathan K.; Shapiro, Beth; Green, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that related species hybridize and that this can have varied but significant effects on speciation and environmental adaptation. It should therefore come as no surprise that hybridization is not limited to species that are alive today. In the last several decades, advances in technologies for recovering and sequencing DNA from fossil remains have enabled the assembly of high-coverage genome sequences for a growing diversity of organisms, including many that are extinct. Thanks to the development of new statistical approaches for detecting and quantifying admixture from genomic data, genomes from extinct populations have proven useful both in revealing previously unknown hybridization events and informing the study of hybridization between living organisms. Here, we review some of the key recent statistical innovations for detecting ancient hybridization using genome-wide sequence data, and discuss how these innovations have revised our understanding of human evolutionary history. PMID:26826668

  7. DNA profiles from fingermarks.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Jennifer E L; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    Criminal investigations would be considerably improved if DNA profiles could be routinely generated from single fingermarks. Here we report a direct DNA profiling method that was able to generate interpretable profiles from 71% of 170 fingermarks. The data are based on fingermarks from all 5 digits of 34 individuals. DNA was obtained from the fingermarks using a swab moistened with Triton-X, and the fibers were added directly to one of two commercial DNA profiling kits. All profiles were obtained without increasing the number of amplification cycles; therefore, our method is ideally suited for adoption by the forensic science community. We indicate the use of the technique in a criminal case in which a DNA profile was generated from a fingermark on tape that was wrapped around a drug seizure. Our direct DNA profiling approach is rapid and able to generate profiles from touched items when current forensic practices have little chance of success.

  8. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    PubMed

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  9. DNA topology and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions. PMID:24755522

  10. Rifampin and vaccinia DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, M

    1977-01-01

    The effect of rifampin on the replication of vaccinia DNA was studied in mouse L cells by a cytochemical techinque and by alkaline sucrose sedimentation analysis of newly synthesized viral DNA molecules. By the use of a fluorescent DNA-binding compound (Hoechst 33258), the sequential appearance, size, and location of the viral "factories" in rifampin-treated, virus-infected cells were found to be indistinguishable from those observed in untreated, infected cells. Sedimentation analysis in alkaline scurose gradients of the viral DNA molecules labeled in pulse-chase experiments showed that formation of small fragments, elongation into "intermediate"-sized molecules, and maturation into full-length viral DNA and, finally, into cross-linked viral DNA molecules occurred in the absence or presence of rifampin. The results support the view that the primary effect of the drug is related to assembly or morphogenesis. Images PMID:833950

  11. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  12. DNA fingerprinting in botany: past, present, future.

    PubMed

    Nybom, Hilde; Weising, Kurt; Rotter, Björn

    2014-01-03

    Almost three decades ago Alec Jeffreys published his seminal Nature papers on the use of minisatellite probes for DNA fingerprinting of humans (Jeffreys and colleagues Nature 1985, 314:67-73 and Nature 1985, 316:76-79). The new technology was soon adopted for many other organisms including plants, and when Hilde Nybom, Kurt Weising and Alec Jeffreys first met at the very First International Conference on DNA Fingerprinting in Berne, Switzerland, in 1990, everybody was enthusiastic about the novel method that allowed us for the first time to discriminate between humans, animals, plants and fungi on the individual level using DNA markers. A newsletter coined "Fingerprint News" was launched, T-shirts were sold, and the proceedings of the Berne conference filled a first book on "DNA fingerprinting: approaches and applications". Four more conferences were about to follow, one on each continent, and Alec Jeffreys of course was invited to all of them. Since these early days, methodologies have undergone a rapid evolution and diversification. A multitude of techniques have been developed, optimized, and eventually abandoned when novel and more efficient and/or more reliable methods appeared. Despite some overlap between the lifetimes of the different technologies, three phases can be defined that coincide with major technological advances. Whereas the first phase of DNA fingerprinting ("the past") was dominated by restriction fragment analysis in conjunction with Southern blot hybridization, the advent of the PCR in the late 1980s gave way to the development of PCR-based single- or multi-locus profiling techniques in the second phase. Given that many routine applications of plant DNA fingerprinting still rely on PCR-based markers, we here refer to these methods as "DNA fingerprinting in the present", and include numerous examples in the present review. The beginning of the third phase actually dates back to 2005, when several novel, highly parallel DNA sequencing

  13. DNA fingerprinting in botany: past, present, future

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Almost three decades ago Alec Jeffreys published his seminal Nature papers on the use of minisatellite probes for DNA fingerprinting of humans (Jeffreys and colleagues Nature 1985, 314:67–73 and Nature 1985, 316:76–79). The new technology was soon adopted for many other organisms including plants, and when Hilde Nybom, Kurt Weising and Alec Jeffreys first met at the very First International Conference on DNA Fingerprinting in Berne, Switzerland, in 1990, everybody was enthusiastic about the novel method that allowed us for the first time to discriminate between humans, animals, plants and fungi on the individual level using DNA markers. A newsletter coined “Fingerprint News” was launched, T-shirts were sold, and the proceedings of the Berne conference filled a first book on “DNA fingerprinting: approaches and applications”. Four more conferences were about to follow, one on each continent, and Alec Jeffreys of course was invited to all of them. Since these early days, methodologies have undergone a rapid evolution and diversification. A multitude of techniques have been developed, optimized, and eventually abandoned when novel and more efficient and/or more reliable methods appeared. Despite some overlap between the lifetimes of the different technologies, three phases can be defined that coincide with major technological advances. Whereas the first phase of DNA fingerprinting (“the past”) was dominated by restriction fragment analysis in conjunction with Southern blot hybridization, the advent of the PCR in the late 1980s gave way to the development of PCR-based single- or multi-locus profiling techniques in the second phase. Given that many routine applications of plant DNA fingerprinting still rely on PCR-based markers, we here refer to these methods as “DNA fingerprinting in the present”, and include numerous examples in the present review. The beginning of the third phase actually dates back to 2005, when several novel, highly parallel DNA

  14. DNA methyltransferases as targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Kalpana; Bai, Shoumei

    2007-06-01

    revealed that antineoplastic property of these drugs is mediated through both methylation-dependent and -independent pathways. Recently, we have shown that treatment of cancer cells with these cytidine analogues also induces proteasomal degradation of DNA methyltransferase 1, the ubiquitously expressed enzyme upregulated in almost all cancer cells. Development of related stable drugs that can facilitate gene activation in cancer cells by enhancing degradation of DNA methyltransferases without being incorporated into DNA would be ideal for chemotherapy. In this monograph we review historical perspective and recent advances on the molecular mechanisms of action and clinical applications of these DNA hypomethylating agents.

  15. DNA-based machines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuan; Willner, Bilha; Willner, Itamar

    2014-01-01

    The base sequence in nucleic acids encodes substantial structural and functional information into the biopolymer. This encoded information provides the basis for the tailoring and assembly of DNA machines. A DNA machine is defined as a molecular device that exhibits the following fundamental features. (1) It performs a fuel-driven mechanical process that mimics macroscopic machines. (2) The mechanical process requires an energy input, "fuel." (3) The mechanical operation is accompanied by an energy consumption process that leads to "waste products." (4) The cyclic operation of the DNA devices, involves the use of "fuel" and "anti-fuel" ingredients. A variety of DNA-based machines are described, including the construction of "tweezers," "walkers," "robots," "cranes," "transporters," "springs," "gears," and interlocked cyclic DNA structures acting as reconfigurable catenanes, rotaxanes, and rotors. Different "fuels", such as nucleic acid strands, pH (H⁺/OH⁻), metal ions, and light, are used to trigger the mechanical functions of the DNA devices. The operation of the devices in solution and on surfaces is described, and a variety of optical, electrical, and photoelectrochemical methods to follow the operations of the DNA machines are presented. We further address the possible applications of DNA machines and the future perspectives of molecular DNA devices. These include the application of DNA machines as functional structures for the construction of logic gates and computing, for the programmed organization of metallic nanoparticle structures and the control of plasmonic properties, and for controlling chemical transformations by DNA machines. We further discuss the future applications of DNA machines for intracellular sensing, controlling intracellular metabolic pathways, and the use of the functional nanostructures for drug delivery and medical applications.

  16. Recombinant DNA. Part F

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 36 papers. Some of the titles are: Site-specific cleavage of DNA at 8-, 9-, and 10-bp sequences; The use of DNA methylases to alter the apparent recognition specificities of restriction endonucleases; Random cloning and sequencing by the M13/Dideoxynucleotide chain termination method; Solid-phase methods for sequencing of oligodeoxynucleotides and DNA; and Analysis of modified nucleosides and nucleotide sequence of tRNA.

  17. Advanced Sequencing Technology - Final Technical Report for period February 1, 1994 to January 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Gesteland, Raymond F.

    1997-01-31

    OAK-B135 This project is to develop advanced technologies for DNA sequencing and genotyping. The core technologies are automated probing of multiplexed membranes and high throughput electro-spray mass spectrometry.

  18. Forensic DNA testing.

    PubMed

    Butler, John M

    2011-12-01

    Forensic DNA testing has a number of applications, including parentage testing, identifying human remains from natural or man-made disasters or terrorist attacks, and solving crimes. This article provides background information followed by an overview of the process of forensic DNA testing, including sample collection, DNA extraction, PCR amplification, short tandem repeat (STR) allele separation and sizing, typing and profile interpretation, statistical analysis, and quality assurance. The article concludes with discussions of possible problems with the data and other forensic DNA testing techniques.

  19. Multiprotein DNA Looping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, Jose M. G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2006-06-01

    DNA looping plays a fundamental role in a wide variety of biological processes, providing the backbone for long range interactions on DNA. Here we develop the first model for DNA looping by an arbitrarily large number of proteins and solve it analytically in the case of identical binding. We uncover a switchlike transition between looped and unlooped phases and identify the key parameters that control this transition. Our results establish the basis for the quantitative understanding of fundamental cellular processes like DNA recombination, gene silencing, and telomere maintenance.

  20. Phytoplasma plasmid DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mark T; Liefting, Lia W

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplasma plasmids have generally been detected from DNA extracted from plants and insects using methods designed for the purification of total phytoplasma DNA. Methods include extraction from tissues that are high in phytoplasma titre, such as the phloem of plants, with the use of CsCl-bisbenzimide gradients that exploit the low G+C content of phytoplasma DNA. Many of the methods employed for phytoplasma purification have been described elsewhere in this book. Here we describe in detail two methods that are specifically aimed at isolating plasmid DNA.

  1. Disentangling DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  2. Disentangling DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. DNA: An Extensible Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluzel, Philippe; Lebrun, Anne; Heller, Christoph; Lavery, Richard; Viovy, Jean-Louis; Chatenay, Didier; Caron, Francois

    1996-02-01

    The force-displacement response of a single duplex DNA molecule was measured. The force saturates at a plateau around 70 piconewtons, which ends when the DNA has been stretched about 1.7 times its contour length. This behavior reveals a highly cooperative transition to a state here termed S-DNA. Addition of an intercalator suppresses this transition. Molecular modeling of the process also yields a force plateau and suggests a structure for the extended form. These results may shed light on biological processes involving DNA extension and open the route for mechanical studies on individual molecules in a previously unexplored range.

  4. DNA ELECTROPHORESIS AT SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    RAFAILOVICH, MIRIAM; SOKOLOV, JONATHAN; GERSAPPE, DILIP

    2003-09-01

    During this year we performed two major projects: I. We developed a detailed theoretical model which complements our experiments on surface DNA electrophoresis. We found that it was possible to enhance the separation of DNA chains by imposing a chemical nanoscale pattern on the surface. This approach utilized the surface interaction effect of the DNA chains with the substrate and is a refinement to our previous method in which DNA chains were separated on homogeneous flat surfaces. By introducing the nano-patterns on the surface, the conformational changes of DNA chains of different lengths can be amplified, which results in the different friction strengths with the substrate surface. Our results also show that, when compared to the DNA electrophoresis performed on homogeneous flat surfaces, nanopatterned surfaces offer a larger window in choosing different surface interactions to achieve separation. II. In collaboration with a large international manufacturer of skin care products we also embarked on a project involving photo toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, which are a key ingredient in sunscreen and cosmetic lotions. The results clearly implicated the nanoparticles in catalyzing damage to chromosomal DNA. We then used this knowledge to develop a polymer/anti-oxidant coating which prevented the photocatalytic reaction on DNA while still retaining the UV absorptive properties of the nanoparticles. The standard gel electrophoresis was not sufficient in determining the extent of the DNA damage. The conclusions of this study were based predominantly on analysis obtained with the surface electrophoresis method.

  5. Function of transcription factors at DNA lesions in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Malewicz, Michal; Perlmann, Thomas

    2014-11-15

    Cellular systems for DNA repair ensure prompt removal of DNA lesions that threaten the genomic stability of the cell. Transcription factors (TFs) have long been known to facilitate DNA repair via transcriptional regulation of specific target genes encoding key DNA repair proteins. However, recent findings identified TFs as DNA repair components acting directly at the DNA lesions in a transcription-independent fashion. Together this recent progress is consistent with the hypothesis that TFs have acquired the ability to localize DNA lesions and function by facilitating chromatin remodeling at sites of damaged DNA. Here we review these recent findings and discuss how TFs may function in DNA repair.

  6. Analysis of mtDNA/nDNA Ratio in Mice.

    PubMed

    Quiros, Pedro M; Goyal, Aashima; Jha, Pooja; Auwerx, Johan

    2017-03-02

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lacks the protection provided by the nucleosomes in the nuclear DNA and does not have a DNA repair mechanism, making it highly susceptible to damage, which can lead to mtDNA depletion. mtDNA depletion compromises the efficient function of cells and tissues and thus impacts negatively on health. Here, we describe a brief and easy protocol to quantify mtDNA copy number by determining the mtDNA/nDNA ratio. The procedure has been validated using a cohort of young and aged mice. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. Advance Care Planning.

    PubMed

    Stallworthy, Elizabeth J

    2013-04-16

    Advance care planning should be available to all patients with chronic kidney disease, including end-stage kidney disease on renal replacement therapy. Advance care planning is a process of patient-centred discussion, ideally involving family/significant others, to assist the patient to understand how their illness might affect them, identify their goals and establish how medical treatment might help them to achieve these. An Advance Care Plan is only one useful outcome from the Advance Care Planning process, the education of patient and family around prognosis and treatment options is likely to be beneficial whether or not a plan is written or the individual loses decision making capacity at the end of life. Facilitating Advance Care Planning discussions requires an understanding of their purpose and communication skills which need to be taught. Advance Care Planning needs to be supported by effective systems to enable the discussions and any resulting Plans to be used to aid subsequent decision making.

  8. Frontiers in molecular dynamics simulations of DNA.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Alberto; Luque, F Javier; Orozco, Modesto

    2012-02-21

    It has been known for decades that DNA is extremely flexible and polymorphic, but our knowledge of its accessible conformational space remains limited. Structural data, primarily from X-ray diffraction studies, is sparse in comparison to the manifold configurations possible, and direct experimental examinations of DNA's flexibility still suffer from many limitations. In the face of these shortcomings, molecular dynamics (MD) is now an essential tool in the study of DNA. It affords detailed structural and dynamical insights, which explains its recent transition from a small number of highly specialized laboratories to a large variety of groups dealing with challenging biological problems. MD is now making an irreversible journey to the mainstream of research in biology, with the attendant opportunities and challenges. But given the speed with which MD studies of DNA have spread, the roots remain somewhat shallow: in many cases, there is a lack of deep knowledge about the foundations, strengths, and limits of the technique. In this Account, we discuss how MD has become the most important source of structural and flexibility data on DNA, focusing on advances since 2007 of atomistic MD in the description of DNA under near-physiological conditions and highlighting the possibilities and shortcomings of the technique. The evolution in the field over the past four years is a prelude to the ongoing revolution. The technique has gained in robustness and predictive power, which when coupled with the spectacular improvements in software and hardware has enabled the tackling of systems of increasing complexity. Simulation times of microseconds have now been achieved, with even longer times when specialized hardware is used. As a result, we have seen the first real-time simulation of large conformational transitions, including folding and unfolding of short DNA duplexes. Noteworthy advances have also been made in the study of DNA-ligand interactions, and we predict that a global

  9. Power of surface-based DNA computation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Weiping; Condon, A.E.; Corn, R.M.

    1997-12-01

    A new model of DNA computation that is based on surface chemistry is studied. Such computations involve the manipulation of DNA strands that are immobilized on a surface, rather than in solution as in the work of Adleman. Surface-based chemistry has been a critical technology in many recent advances in biochemistry and offers several advantages over solution-based chemistry, including simplified handling of samples and elimination of loss of strands, which reduce error in the computation. The main contribution of this paper is in showing that in principle, surface-based DNA chemistry can efficiently support general circuit computation on many inputs in parallel. To do this, an abstract model of computation that allows parallel manipulation of binary inputs is described. It is then shown that this model can be implemented by encoding inputs as DNA strands and repeatedly modifying the strands in parallel on a surface, using the chemical processes of hybridization, exonuclease degradation, polymerase extension, and ligation. Thirdly, it is shown that the model supports efficient circuit simulation in the following sense: exactly those inputs that satisfy a circuit can be isolated and the number of parallel operations needed to do this is proportional to the size of the circuit. Finally, results are presented on the power of the model when another resource of DNA computation is limited, namely strand length. 12 refs.

  10. DNA Repair and Personalized Breast Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Xia; Sjolund, Ashley; Harris, Lyndsay; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2010-01-01

    Personalized cancer therapy is likely to be one of the next big advances in our search for a cure for cancer. To be able to treat people in an individualized manner, researchers need to know a great deal about their genetic constitution and the DNA repair status of their tumors. Specific knowledge is required regarding the polymorphisms individuals carry and how these polymorphisms influence responses to therapy. Researchers are actively engaged in biomarker discovery and validation for this purpose. In addition, the design of clinical trials must be reassessed to include new information on biomarkers and drug responses. In this review, we focus on personalized breast cancer therapy. The hypothesis we focus upon in this review is that there is connection between the DNA repair profile of individuals, their breast tumor subtypes, and their responses to cancer therapy. We first briefly review cellular DNA repair pathways that are likely to be impacted by breast cancer therapies. Next, we review the phenotypes of breast tumor subtypes with an emphasis on how a DNA repair deficiency might result in tumorigenesis itself and lead to the chemotherapeutic responses that are observed. Specific examples of breast tumor subtypes and their responses to cancer therapy are given, and we discuss possible DNA repair mechanisms that underlie the responses of tumors to various chemotherapeutic agents. Much is known about breast cancer subtypes and the way each of these subtypes responds to chemotherapy. In addition, we discuss novel design of clinical trials that incorporates rapidly emerging information on biomarkers. PMID:20872853

  11. Comparison of three genomic DNA extraction methods to obtain high DNA quality from maize.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, Amani; Osman, Gamal

    2017-01-01

    The world's top three cereals, based on their monetary value, are rice, wheat, and corn. In cereal crops, DNA extraction is difficult owing to rigid non-cellulose components in the cell wall of leaves and high starch and protein content in grains. The advanced techniques in molecular biology require pure and quick extraction of DNA. The majority of existing DNA extraction methods rely on long incubation and multiple precipitations or commercially available kits to produce contaminant-free high molecular weight DNA. In this study, we compared three different methods used for the isolation of high-quality genomic DNA from the grains of cereal crop, Zea mays, with minor modifications. The DNA from the grains of two maize hybrids, M10 and M321, was extracted using extraction methods DNeasy Qiagen Plant Mini Kit, CTAB-method (with/without 1% PVP) and modified Mericon extraction. Genes coding for 45S ribosomal RNA are organized in tandem arrays of up to several thousand copies and contain codes for 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA units separated by internal transcribed spacers ITS1 and ITS2. While the rRNA units are evolutionary conserved, ITS regions show high level of interspecific divergence and have been used frequently in genetic diversity and phylogenetic studies. In this study, the genomic DNA was then amplified with PCR using primers specific for ITS gene. PCR products were then visualized on agarose gel. The modified Mericon extraction method was found to be the most efficient DNA extraction method, capable to provide high DNA yields with better quality, affordable cost and less time.

  12. DNA Sequencing by Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Karger, Barry L.; Guttman, Andras

    2009-01-01

    Sequencing of human and other genomes has been at the center of interest in the biomedical field over the past several decades and is now leading toward an era of personalized medicine. During this time, DNA sequencing methods have evolved from the labor intensive slab gel electrophoresis, through automated multicapillary electrophoresis systems using fluorophore labeling with multispectral imaging, to the “next generation” technologies of cyclic array, hybridization based, nanopore and single molecule sequencing. Deciphering the genetic blueprint and follow-up confirmatory sequencing of Homo sapiens and other genomes was only possible by the advent of modern sequencing technologies that was a result of step by step advances with a contribution of academics, medical personnel and instrument companies. While next generation sequencing is moving ahead at break-neck speed, the multicapillary electrophoretic systems played an essential role in the sequencing of the Human Genome, the foundation of the field of genomics. In this prospective, we wish to overview the role of capillary electrophoresis in DNA sequencing based in part of several of our articles in this journal. PMID:19517496

  13. DNA Modifications and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rebecca G; Lunnon, Katie

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative disease, affecting millions of people worldwide. While a number of studies have focused on identifying genetic variants that contribute to the development and progression of late-onset AD, the majority of these only have a relatively small effect size. There are also a number of other risk factors, for example, age, gender, and other comorbidities; however, how these influence disease risk is not known. Therefore, in recent years, research has begun to investigate epigenetic mechanisms for a potential role in disease etiology. In this chapter, we discuss the current state of play for research into DNA modifications in AD, the most well studied being 5-methylcytosine (5-mC). We describe the earlier studies of candidate genes and global measures of DNA modifications in human AD samples, in addition to studies in mouse models of AD. We focus on recent epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) in human AD, using microarray technology, examining a number of key study design issues pertinent to such studies. Finally, we discuss how new technological advances could further progress the research field.

  14. DNA hypomethylation and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ann S; Power, Barbara E; Molloy, Peter L

    2007-01-01

    Changes in human DNA methylation patterns are an important feature of cancer development and progression and a potential role in other conditions such as atherosclerosis and autoimmune diseases (e.g., multiple sclerosis and lupus) is being recognised. The cancer genome is frequently characterised by hypermethylation of specific genes concurrently with an overall decrease in the level of 5 methyl cytosine. This hypomethylation of the genome largely affects the intergenic and intronic regions of the DNA, particularly repeat sequences and transposable elements, and is believed to result in chromosomal instability and increased mutation events. This review examines our understanding of the patterns of cancer-associated hypomethylation, and how recent advances in understanding of chromatin biology may help elucidate the mechanisms underlying repeat sequence demethylation. It also considers how global demethylation of repeat sequences including transposable elements and the site-specific hypomethylation of certain genes might contribute to the deleterious effects that ultimately result in the initiation and progression of cancer and other diseases. The use of hypomethylation of interspersed repeat sequences and genes as potential biomarkers in the early detection of tumors and their prognostic use in monitoring disease progression are also examined.

  15. Quantification of DNA by Agarose Gel Electrophoresis and Analysis of the Topoisomers of Plasmid and M13 DNA Following Treatment with a Restriction Endonuclease or DNA Topoisomerase I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweedie, John W.; Stowell, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    A two-session laboratory exercise for advanced undergraduate students in biochemistry and molecular biology is described. The first session introduces students to DNA quantification by ultraviolet absorbance and agarose gel electrophoresis followed by ethidium bromide staining. The second session involves treatment of various topological forms of…

  16. Quantification of DNA by Agarose Gel Electrophoresis and Analysis of the Topoisomers of Plasmid and M13 DNA Following Treatment with a Restriction Endonuclease or DNA Topoisomerase I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweedie, John W.; Stowell, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    A two-session laboratory exercise for advanced undergraduate students in biochemistry and molecular biology is described. The first session introduces students to DNA quantification by ultraviolet absorbance and agarose gel electrophoresis followed by ethidium bromide staining. The second session involves treatment of various topological forms of…

  17. Advances in pediatric anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Burns, L S

    1997-03-01

    Advances in many aspects of pediatric anesthesia have resulted in a significant reduction in morbidity and mortality in children. Research and development have created vast improvements in pharmacology. Sophisticated monitoring and improvements in equipment evolved from advances made in scientific technology. Recognition of the psychological needs of children of all ages likely has reduced the incidence of lasting psychological effects after hospitalization. Finally, these important advances have made pediatric anesthesia a safer and more compassionate specialty.

  18. Advanced echocardiographic techniques

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Echocardiography has advanced significantly since its first clinical use. The move towards more accurate imaging and quantification has driven this advancement. In this review, we will briefly focus on three distinct but important recent advances, three‐dimensional (3D) echocardiography, contrast echocardiography and myocardial tissue imaging. The basic principles of these techniques will be discussed as well as current and future clinical applications. PMID:28191159

  19. Hydromechanical Advanced Coal Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estus, Jay M.; Summers, David

    1990-01-01

    Water-jet cutting reduces coal dust and its hazards. Advanced mining system utilizes full-face, hydromechanical, continuous miner. Coal excavator uses high-pressure water-jet lances, one in each of cutting heads and one in movable lance, to make cuts across top, bottom and middle height, respectively, of coal face. Wedge-shaped cutting heads advance into lower and upper cuts in turn, thereby breaking coal toward middle cut. Thrust cylinders and walking pads advance excavator toward coal face.

  20. Microfluidic devices for DNA sequencing: sample preparation and electrophoretic analysis.

    PubMed

    Paegel, Brian M; Blazej, Robert G; Mathies, Richard A

    2003-02-01

    Modern DNA sequencing 'factories' have revolutionized biology by completing the human genome sequence, but in the race to completion we are left with inefficient, cumbersome, and costly macroscale processes and supporting facilities. During the same period, microfabricated DNA sequencing, sample processing and analysis devices have advanced rapidly toward the goal of a 'sequencing lab-on-a-chip'. Integrated microfluidic processing dramatically reduces analysis time and reagent consumption, and eliminates costly and unreliable macroscale robotics and laboratory apparatus. A microfabricated device for high-throughput DNA sequencing that couples clone isolation, template amplification, Sanger extension, purification, and electrophoretic analysis in a single microfluidic circuit is now attainable.

  1. REVIEW ARTICLE: DNA protein interactions and bacterial chromosome architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavans, Joel; Oppenheim, Amos

    2006-12-01

    Bacteria, like eukaryotic organisms, must compact the DNA molecule comprising their genome and form a functional chromosome. Yet, bacteria do it differently. A number of factors contribute to genome compaction and organization in bacteria, including entropic effects, supercoiling and DNA-protein interactions. A gamut of new experimental techniques have allowed new advances in the investigation of these factors, and spurred much interest in the dynamic response of the chromosome to environmental cues, segregation, and architecture, during both exponential and stationary phases. We review these recent developments with emphasis on the multifaceted roles that DNA-protein interactions play.

  2. Visualizing one-dimensional diffusion of proteins along DNA.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Jason; Greene, Eric C

    2008-08-01

    The ability of proteins to locate specific target sequences or structures among a vast excess of nonspecific DNA is a fundamental property that affects virtually all aspects of biology. Despite this importance, experimental methods have lagged behind the establishment of theoretical principles describing potential target location mechanisms. However, recent advances in single-molecule detection now allow direct visual observation of proteins diffusing along DNA. Here we present an overview of these new observations and discuss the advantages, limitations and future prospects for imaging the motion of proteins along DNA.

  3. Probe Microscopic Studies of DNA Molecules on Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Umemura, Kazuo; Izumi, Katsuki; Oura, Shusuke

    2016-01-01

    Hybrids of DNA and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising nanobioconjugates for nanobiosensors, carriers for drug delivery, and other biological applications. In this review, nanoscopic characterization of DNA-CNT hybrids, in particular, characterization by scanning probe microscopy (SPM), is summarized. In many studies, topographical imaging by atomic force microscopy has been performed. However, some researchers have demonstrated advanced SPM operations in order to maximize its unique and valuable functions. Such sophisticated approaches are attractive and will have a significant impact on future studies of DNA-CNT hybrids. PMID:28335308

  4. Advancing the educational agenda.

    PubMed

    Baker, Cynthia

    2010-12-01

    This timely paper provides a thought-provoking analysis of current advanced practice nursing education in Canada. It comes at a critical juncture in the evolution of Canadian healthcare services and the redefinition of nursing roles. Increasingly, multiple sectors of society are calling for more nurses with advanced practice preparation and for a wider range of advanced practice nursing specialties. Advanced practice nurses (APNs) are being proposed as a solution to a financially overburdened national healthcare system, the increasing complexity of healthcare services, and a crisis in access to primary healthcare. Thus, governments seeking greater fiscal efficiency, medical specialists needing sophisticated collaborative support, and healthcare consumers see APNs as the way forward.

  5. DNA nanotech: Expanding the repertoire of DNA for the assembly of nanoscale objects and electrical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlman, Richard Peter

    Much recent interest has focused on DNA as a material for the construction of objects and the templating of other materials on the nanometer to micrometer scale. Such constructions have made use of the recognition of "complementary" nucleotide sequence by single-stranded stretches of DNA in the formation of double helices. The ability of DNA double helices to act as a semi-conductor for electron transfer has opened more opportunities for using DNA in nanoscale devices. This work describes several advancements involving structural and functional aspect of DNA based nanotechnologies. We have developed a new approach to assemble DNA nanostructures in a cation dependent manner. Association is via the formation of guanine quartets from two G-G mismatch domains within a duplex DNA framework. Association can be regulated by the addition or removal of cation species that promote guanine quartet formation (i.e. K+ or Sr2+). We have also demonstrated that these domains can be 'programmed' to be self-specific in mixed solutions by patterning the G·G mismatches into distinct domains. We have evaluated the process of charge transfer through immobile DNA junctions. This work compares anthraquinone- and rhodium-based methods to induce charge transfer through DNA and identifies some pitfalls in one of the prominently used systems. We have also demonstrated that the conformational transitions of folded DNA structures, more complex than simple double helical DNA, can be utilized in regulating charge transfer. We have successfully constructed 'electrical on/off switches' composed of DNA, which are modulated by the presence or absence of particular compounds in solution. Switches that are modulated by the small molecule adenosine and as well as ones modulated by short oligonucleotides have been assembled. The construction and demonstration of their operation now opens a new window of opportunity for the development of DNA detector systems, which could be directly coupled to

  6. Oxidative DNA modifications.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Henrik E

    2005-07-01

    Oxidative DNA modifications are frequent in mammalian DNA and have been suggested an important mechanism in carcinogenesis, diabetes and ageing. The foundations for this suggestion are: Evidence for the importance of oxidative DNA modifications in cancer development is: high levels of oxidative lesions in cancer tissue; highly conserved and specific DNA repair systems targeting oxidative lesions; high levels of oxidative DNA lesions in oxidative DNA repair knock-out animals; defective repair of oxidative lesions in cancer-prone progeria syndromes; reduced cancer incidence in populations with high dietary antioxidant intake; and increased oxidative stress to DNA in tobacco smokers. Conflicting evidence for a relation between oxidative stress to DNA and cancer is: disagreement about the true levels and occurrence of the oxidative lesions in vivo; failure to identify the localization of oxidative lesions in important genes, e.g. tumor suppressor and oncogenes; lack of evidence that the oxidative lesions induce mutations in vivo; no cancer development in animals knocked-out for specific DNA repair enzymes in spite of high tissue levels of oxidative lesions; and unchanged cancer rates after antioxidant interventions in large clinical controlled and randomized trials. The rate of DNA oxidation has been estimated from urinary excretion of repair products and it is evident that if these lesions were not repaired, a large part of DNA would be oxidized to a degree not compatible with living. The methodologies by which oxidative DNA modifications are measured cover a wide and different range, advantages and disadvantages will be presented. One particular problem is artificial oxidation, and methods to prevent such artifacts will be presented together with results from a large interlaboratory standardization program. The methodology by which the lesions can be measured is complicated and prone to artifacts during DNA isolation, digestion, derivatization and maybe even during

  7. Stability and dynamics of membrane-spanning DNA nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maingi, Vishal; Burns, Jonathan R.; Uusitalo, Jaakko J.; Howorka, Stefan; Marrink, Siewert J.; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2017-03-01

    Recently developed DNA-based analogues of membrane proteins have advanced synthetic biology. A fundamental question is how hydrophilic nanostructures reside in the hydrophobic environment of the membrane. Here, we use multiscale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to explore the structure, stability and dynamics of an archetypical DNA nanotube inserted via a ring of membrane anchors into a phospholipid bilayer. Coarse-grained MD reveals that the lipids reorganize locally to interact closely with the membrane-spanning section of the DNA tube. Steered simulations along the bilayer normal establish the metastable nature of the inserted pore, yielding a force profile with barriers for membrane exit due to the membrane anchors. Atomistic, equilibrium simulations at two salt concentrations confirm the close packing of lipid around of the stably inserted DNA pore and its cation selectivity, while revealing localized structural fluctuations. The wide-ranging and detailed insight informs the design of next-generation DNA pores for synthetic biology or biomedicine.

  8. Activation and Regulation of DNA-Driven Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The innate immune system provides early defense against infections and also plays a key role in monitoring alterations of homeostasis in the body. DNA is highly immunostimulatory, and recent advances in this field have led to the identification of the innate immune sensors responsible for the recognition of DNA as well as the downstream pathways that are activated. Moreover, information on how cells regulate DNA-driven immune responses to avoid excessive inflammation is now emerging. Finally, several reports have demonstrated how defects in DNA sensing, signaling, and regulation are associated with susceptibility to infections or inflammatory diseases in humans and model organisms. In this review, the current literature on DNA-stimulated innate immune activation is discussed, and important new questions facing this field are proposed. PMID:25926682

  9. DNA replication-dependent induction of gene proximity by androgen.

    PubMed

    Coll-Bastus, Nuria; Mao, Xueying; Young, Bryan D; Sheer, Denise; Lu, Yong-Jie

    2015-02-15

    The male hormone androgen, working through the androgen receptor (AR), plays a major role in physiological process and disease development. Previous studies of AR mainly focus on its transcriptional activity. Here, we found that androgen-induced TMPRSS2 and ERG gene proximity is mediated by AR control of DNA replication rather than gene transcription. We demonstrate that, in both AR transactivation-positive and -negative prostate cells, androgen regulates DNA replication and androgen-induced gene proximity relies on both DNA replication-licensing and actual DNA replication activity. Androgen stimulation advances DNA replication timing of certain genomic regions, which may potentially increase gene proximity through sharing the same replication factory at a similar time. Therefore, we have revealed novel mechanisms of AR biological function, which will stimulate new research directions. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Organizing protein-DNA hybrids as nanostructures with programmed functionalities.

    PubMed

    Teller, Carsten; Willner, Itamar

    2010-12-01

    The structural and functional information encoded in the base sequence of nucleic acids provides a means to organize hybrid protein-DNA nanostructures with pre-designed, programmed functionality. This review discusses the activation of enzyme cascades in supramolecular DNA-protein hybrid structures, the bioelectrocatalytic activation of redox enzymes on DNA scaffolds, and the programmed positioning of enzymes on 1D, 2D and 3D DNA nanostructures. These systems provide starting points towards the design of interconnected enzyme networks. Substantial progress in the tailoring of functional protein-DNA nanostructures has been accomplished in recent years, and advances in this field warrant a comprehensive discussion. The application of these systems for the control of biocatalytic transformations, for amplified biosensing, and for the synthesis of metallic nanostructures are addressed, and future prospects for these systems are highlighted.

  11. Retroviral Integrase Proteins and HIV-1 DNA Integration*

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Lavanya; Engelman, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Retroviral integrases catalyze two reactions, 3′-processing of viral DNA ends, followed by integration of the processed ends into chromosomal DNA. X-ray crystal structures of integrase-DNA complexes from prototype foamy virus, a member of the Spumavirus genus of Retroviridae, have revealed the structural basis of integration and how clinically relevant integrase strand transfer inhibitors work. Underscoring the translational potential of targeting virus-host interactions, small molecules that bind at the host factor lens epithelium-derived growth factor/p75-binding site on HIV-1 integrase promote dimerization and inhibit integrase-viral DNA assembly and catalysis. Here, we review recent advances in our knowledge of HIV-1 DNA integration, as well as future research directions. PMID:23043109

  12. A new approach for DNA detection by SERRS.

    PubMed

    Faulds, Karen; Fruk, Ljiljana; Robson, David C; Thompson, David G; Enright, Alexis; Smith, W Ewen; Graham, Duncan

    2006-01-01

    A new approach for the detection of DNA using surface enhance resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) is reported. The majority of existing techniques use fluorescence spectroscopy with advanced probe design to provide information on the identity of specific DNA sequences down to single base resolution. A new approach to the labelling of DNA is discussed which uses Michael addition to couple thiolated DNA to dye labels specifically designed to attach to silver surfaces. When combined with existing strategies for sensitive detection of DNA using commercially available labels, a new class of biomolecular probe known as a SERRS Beacon was produced. The detection techniques of fluorescence and surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) are combined to give a sensitive and selective system for use in the development and creation of novel assays for specifically defined targets. It demonstrates improved potential for multiplexing analysis.

  13. Stability and dynamics of membrane-spanning DNA nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Maingi, Vishal; Burns, Jonathan R.; Uusitalo, Jaakko J.; Howorka, Stefan; Marrink, Siewert J.; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2017-01-01

    Recently developed DNA-based analogues of membrane proteins have advanced synthetic biology. A fundamental question is how hydrophilic nanostructures reside in the hydrophobic environment of the membrane. Here, we use multiscale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to explore the structure, stability and dynamics of an archetypical DNA nanotube inserted via a ring of membrane anchors into a phospholipid bilayer. Coarse-grained MD reveals that the lipids reorganize locally to interact closely with the membrane-spanning section of the DNA tube. Steered simulations along the bilayer normal establish the metastable nature of the inserted pore, yielding a force profile with barriers for membrane exit due to the membrane anchors. Atomistic, equilibrium simulations at two salt concentrations confirm the close packing of lipid around of the stably inserted DNA pore and its cation selectivity, while revealing localized structural fluctuations. The wide-ranging and detailed insight informs the design of next-generation DNA pores for synthetic biology or biomedicine. PMID:28317903

  14. Mitochondrial DNA sequencing of beetle larvae (Nitidulidae: Omosita) recovered from human bone.

    PubMed

    DiZinno, Joseph A; Lord, Wayne D; Collins-Morton, Mary B; Wilson, Mark R; Goff, M Lee

    2002-11-01

    The isolation, amplification, and characterization of human DNA from hematophagous (blood feeding) and necrophagous (carrion feeding) arthropods have been advanced significantly by the development of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA sequencing methodologies. Historically, DNA technology has been successfully utilized to identify individual hosts upon which species of hematophagous arthropods have fed. The analysis of hematophagous insects' gut content blood meals has led to major advances in medical entomology and vector-borne disease epidemiology. In the forensic arena, the ability to apply similar techniques to insects recovered from badly decomposed remains has been greatly enhanced through the advent of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) techniques. Mitochondrial DNA analyses have been utilized to identify both the human remains upon which fly larvae (maggots) have fed and the species of the larvae themselves. The preliminary work detailed here demonstrates, for the first time, the successful application of mtDNA sequencing techniques to the analysis of necrophagous beetle larvae. A small sample of sap beetle larvae, Omosita spp. (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), was collected from human skeletal remains during anthropological examination and analyzed for human DNA using mtDNA sequencing. The beetle larvae yielded mtDNA matching that of the host human bone. The results detailed here further demonstrate the robust nature of human mtDNA and the ability to recover valuable mtDNA evidence from forensically important, late decompositional stage insect species.

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIAL DNA MARKERS FOR THE DETECTION OF HUMAN AND CATTLE FECAL POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technological advances in DNA sequencing and computational biology allow scientists to compare entire microbial genomes. However, the use of these approaches to discern key genomic differences between natural microbial communities remains prohibitively expensive for most laborato...

  16. Identification of Bacterial DNA Markers for the Detection of Human and Cattle Fecal Pollution - SLIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technological advances in DNA sequencing and computational biology allow scientists to compare entire microbial genomes. However, the use of these approaches to discern key genomic differences between natural microbial communities remains prohibitively expensive for most laborato...

  17. Development of DNA-Free Sediment for Ecological Assays with Genomic Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent advances in genomics are currently being exploited to discern ecological changes that have conventionally been measured using laborious counting techniques. For example, next generation sequencing technologies can be used to create DNA libraries from benthic community ass...

  18. Development of DNA-Free Sediment for Ecological Assays with Genomic Endpoints (NAC SETAC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent advances in genomics are currently being exploited to discern ecological changes that have conventionally been measured using laborious counting techniques. For example, next generation sequencing technologies can be used to create DNA libraries from benthic community ass...

  19. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC GENETIC MARKERS IN HUMAN FECAL MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although recent technological advances in DNA sequencing and computational biology now allow scientists to compare entire microbial genomes, the use of these approaches to discern key genomic differences between natural microbial communities remains prohibitively expensive for mo...

  20. Identification of Bacterial DNA Markers for the Detection of Human and Cattle Fecal Pollution - SLIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technological advances in DNA sequencing and computational biology allow scientists to compare entire microbial genomes. However, the use of these approaches to discern key genomic differences between natural microbial communities remains prohibitively expensive for most laborato...

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIAL DNA MARKERS FOR THE DETECTION OF HUMAN AND CATTLE FECAL POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technological advances in DNA sequencing and computational biology allow scientists to compare entire microbial genomes. However, the use of these approaches to discern key genomic differences between natural microbial communities remains prohibitively expensive for most laborato...

  2. Development of DNA-Free Sediment for Ecological Assays with Genomic Endpoints (NAC SETAC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent advances in genomics are currently being exploited to discern ecological changes that have conventionally been measured using laborious counting techniques. For example, next generation sequencing technologies can be used to create DNA libraries from benthic community ass...

  3. Development of DNA-Free Sediment for Ecological Assays with Genomic Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent advances in genomics are currently being exploited to discern ecological changes that have conventionally been measured using laborious counting techniques. For example, next generation sequencing technologies can be used to create DNA libraries from benthic community ass...

  4. From molecules to management: adopting DNA-based methods for monitoring biological invasions in aquatic environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent technological advances have driven rapid development of DNA-based methods designed to facilitate detection and monitoring of invasive species in aquatic environments. These tools promise to significantly alleviate difficulties associated with traditional monitoring approac...

  5. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC GENETIC MARKERS IN HUMAN FECAL MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although recent technological advances in DNA sequencing and computational biology now allow scientists to compare entire microbial genomes, the use of these approaches to discern key genomic differences between natural microbial communities remains prohibitively expensive for mo...

  6. From molecules to management: adopting DNA-based methods for monitoring biological invasions in aquatic environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent technological advances have driven rapid development of DNA-based methods designed to facilitate detection and monitoring of invasive species in aquatic environments. These tools promise to significantly alleviate difficulties associated with traditional monitoring approac...

  7. DNA testing in hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sinéad M; Laurá, Matilde; Reilly, Mary M

    2013-01-01

    The inherited neuropathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders in which there have been rapid advances in the last two decades. Molecular genetic testing is now an integral part of the evaluation of patients with inherited neuropathies. In this chapter we describe the genes responsible for the primary inherited neuropathies. We briefly discuss the clinical phenotype of each of the known inherited neuropathy subgroups, describe algorithms for molecular genetic testing of affected patients and discuss genetic counseling. The basic principles of careful phenotyping, documenting an accurate family history, and testing the available genes in an appropriate manner should identify the vast majority of individuals with CMT1 and many of those with CMT2. In this chapter we also describe the current methods of genetic testing. As advances are made in molecular genetic technologies and improvements are made in bioinformatics, it is likely that the current time-consuming methods of DNA sequencing will give way to quicker and more efficient high-throughput methods, which are briefly discussed here. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel multitarget stool DNA test for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Malik, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Review of: Imperiale TF, Ransohoff DF, Itzkowitz SH, Levin TR, Lavin P, Lidgard GP, Ahlquist DA, Berger BM. Multitarget stool DNA testing for colorectal-cancer screening. N Engl J Med 2014;370(14):1287-97. This Practice Pearl reviews the results of a prospective, multicenter, cross-sectional clinical study that evaluated the performance of a new multitarget stool DNA (or mt-sDNA) screening test for colorectal cancer (CRC) and compared it with a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) in individuals at average risk for CRC. The potential impact of this test on the future of CRC screening is also discussed in a brief commentary. mt-sDNA testing is a noninvasive screening test designed to detect DNA biomarkers associated with colorectal neoplasia and occult hemoglobin in the stool. The sensitivity of mt-sDNA testing for detection of CRC was 92.3%, compared with 73.8% for FIT (p = 0.002). Sensitivity for detecting advanced precancerous lesions was 42.4% for mt-sDNA testing and 23.8% for FIT (p < 0.001). The specificities of mt-sDNA testing and FIT were 86.6% and 94.9%, respectively (p < 0.001). mt-sDNA testing thus may be a first-line screening option for asymptomatic individuals at average risk for CRC who do not want to have a colonoscopy.

  9. Revealing the hidden complexities of mtDNA inheritance.

    PubMed

    White, Daniel James; Wolff, Jonci Nikolai; Pierson, Melanie; Gemmell, Neil John

    2008-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a pivotal tool in molecular ecology, evolutionary and population genetics. The power of mtDNA analyses derives from a relatively high mutation rate and the apparent simplicity of mitochondrial inheritance (maternal, without recombination), which has simplified modelling population history compared to the analysis of nuclear DNA. However, in biology things are seldom simple, and advances in DNA sequencing and polymorphism detection technology have documented a growing list of exceptions to the central tenets of mitochondrial inheritance, with paternal leakage, heteroplasmy and recombination now all documented in multiple systems. The presence of paternal leakage, recombination and heteroplasmy can have substantial impact on analyses based on mtDNA, affecting phylogenetic and population genetic analyses, estimates of the coalescent and the myriad of other parameters that are dependent on such estimates. Here, we review our understanding of mtDNA inheritance, discuss how recent findings mean that established ideas may need to be re-evaluated, and we assess the implications of these new-found complications for molecular ecologists who have relied for decades on the assumption of a simpler mode of inheritance. We show how it is possible to account for recombination and heteroplasmy in evolutionary and population analyses, but that accurate estimates of the frequencies of biparental inheritance and recombination are needed. We also suggest how nonclonal inheritance of mtDNA could be exploited, to increase the ways in which mtDNA can be used in analyses.

  10. The DNA Triangle and Its Application to Learning Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, L. Kate; Catavero, Christina M.; Newman, Dina L.

    2017-01-01

    Although instruction on meiosis is repeated many times during the undergraduate curriculum, many students show poor comprehension even as upper-level biology majors. We propose that the difficulty lies in the complexity of understanding DNA, which we explain through a new model, the DNA triangle. The DNA triangle integrates three distinct scales at which one can think about DNA: chromosomal, molecular, and informational. Through analysis of interview and survey data from biology faculty and students through the lens of the DNA triangle, we illustrate important differences in how novices and experts are able to explain the concepts of ploidy, homology, and mechanism of homologous pairing. Similarly, analysis of passages from 16 different biology textbooks shows a large divide between introductory and advanced material, with introductory books omitting explanations of meiosis-linked concepts at the molecular level of DNA. Finally, backed by textbook findings and feedback from biology experts, we show that the DNA triangle can be applied to teaching and learning meiosis. By applying the DNA triangle to topics on meiosis we present a new framework for educators and researchers that ties concepts of ploidy, homology, and mechanism of homologous pairing to knowledge about DNA on the chromosomal, molecular, and informational levels. PMID:28798212

  11. A multi-field approach to DNA condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Shi-Yong; Jia, Jun-Li

    2015-12-01

    DNA condensation is an important process in many fields including life sciences, polymer physics, and applied technology. In the nucleus, DNA is condensed into chromosomes. In polymer physics, DNA is treated as a semi-flexible molecule and a polyelectrolyte. Many agents, including multi-valent cations, surfactants, and neutral poor solvents, can cause DNA condensation, also referred to as coil-globule transition. Moreover, DNA condensation has been used for extraction and gene delivery in applied technology. Many physical theories have been presented to elucidate the mechanism underlying DNA condensation, including the counterion correlation theory, the electrostatic zipper theory, and the hydration force theory. Recently several single-molecule studies have focused on DNA condensation, shedding new light on old concepts. In this document, the multi-field concepts and theories related to DNA condensation are introduced and clarified as well as the advances and considerations of single-molecule DNA condensation experiments are introduced. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21204065 and 20934004) and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant No. Y4110357).

  12. Magnetic Actuation of Self-Assembled DNA Hinges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauback, S.; Mattioli, K.; Armstrong, M.; Miller, C.; Pease, C.; Castro, C.; Sooryakumar, R.

    DNA nanotechnology offers a broad range of applications spanning from the creation of nanoscale devices, motors and nanoparticle templates to the development of precise drug delivery systems. Central to advancing this technology is the ability to actuate or reconfigure structures in real time, which is currently achieved primarily by DNA strand displacement yielding slow actuation times (about 1-10min). Here we exploit superparamagnetic beads to magnetically actuate DNA structures which also provides a system to measure forces associated with molecular interactions. DNA nanodevices are folded using DNA origami, whereby a long single-stranded DNA is folded into a precise compact geometry using hundreds of short oligonucleotides. Our DNA nanodevice is a nanohinge from which rod shaped DNA nanostructures are polymerized into micron-scale filaments forming handles for actuation. By functionalizing one arm of the hinge and the filament ends, the hinge can be attached to a surface while still allowing an arm to rotate and the filaments can be labeled with magnetic beads enabling the hinge to be actuated almost instantaneously by external magnetic fields. These results lay the groundwork to establish real-time manipulation and direct force application of DNA constructs.

  13. Smart drug delivery nanocarriers with self-assembled DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Fan, Chunhai; Pei, Hao; Shi, Jiye; Huang, Qing

    2013-08-27

    Self-assembled DNA nanostructures have emerged as a type of nano-biomaterials with precise structures, versatile functions and numerous applications. One particularly promising application of these DNA nanostructures is to develop universal nanocarriers for smart and targeted drug delivery. DNA is the genetic material in nature, and inherently biocompatible. Nevertheless, cell membranes are barely permeable to naked DNA molecules, either single- or double- stranded; transport across the cell membrane is only possible with the assistance of transfection agents. Interestingly, recent studies revealed that many DNA nanostructures could readily go into cells with high cell uptake efficiency. In this Progress Report, we will review recent advances on using various DNA nanostructures, e.g., DNA nanotubes, DNA tetrahedra, and DNA origami nanorobot, as drug delivery nanocarriers, and demonstrate several examples aiming at therapeutic applications with CpG-based immunostimulatory and siRNA-based gene silencing oligonucleotides. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Many Ways to Loop DNA

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Jack D.

    2013-01-01

    In the 1960s, I developed methods for directly visualizing DNA and DNA-protein complexes using an electron microscope. This made it possible to examine the shape of DNA and to visualize proteins as they fold and loop DNA. Early applications included the first visualization of true nucleosomes and linkers and the demonstration that repeating tracts of adenines can cause a curvature in DNA. The binding of DNA repair proteins, including p53 and BRCA2, has been visualized at three- and four-way junctions in DNA. The trombone model of DNA replication was directly verified, and the looping of DNA at telomeres was discovered. PMID:24005675

  15. Analysis of sequence variation in Gnathostoma spinigerum mitochondrial DNA by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Ngarmamonpirat, Charinthon; Waikagul, Jitra; Petmitr, Songsak; Dekumyoy, Paron; Rojekittikhun, Wichit; Anantapruti, Malinee T

    2005-03-01

    Morphological variations were observed in the advance third stage larvae of Gnathostoma spinigerum collected from swamp eel (Fluta alba), the second intermediate host. Larvae with typical and three atypical types were chosen for partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequence analysis. A 450 bp polymerase chain reaction product of the COI gene was amplified from mitochondrial DNA. The variations were analyzed by single-strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. The nucleotide variations of the COI gene in the four types of larvae indicated the presence of an intra-specific variation of mitochondrial DNA in the G. spinigerum population.

  16. Sequence-specific nucleic acid mobility using a reversible block copolymer gel matrix and DNA amphiphiles (lipid-DNA) in capillary and microfluidic electrophoretic separations.

    PubMed

    Wagler, Patrick; Minero, Gabriel Antonio S; Tangen, Uwe; de Vries, Jan Willem; Prusty, Deepak; Kwak, Minseok; Herrmann, Andreas; McCaskill, John S

    2015-10-01

    Reversible noncovalent but sequence-dependent attachment of DNA to gels is shown to allow programmable mobility processing of DNA populations. The covalent attachment of DNA oligomers to polyacrylamide gels using acrydite-modified oligonucleotides has enabled sequence-specific mobility assays for DNA in gel electrophoresis: sequences binding to the immobilized DNA are delayed in their migration. Such a system has been used for example to construct complex DNA filters facilitating DNA computations. However, these gels are formed irreversibly and the choice of immobilized sequences is made once off during fabrication. In this work, we demonstrate the reversible self-assembly of gels combined with amphiphilic DNA molecules, which exhibit hydrophobic hydrocarbon chains attached to the nucleobase. This amphiphilic DNA, which we term lipid-DNA, is synthesized in advance and is blended into a block copolymer gel to induce sequence-dependent DNA retention during electrophoresis. Furthermore, we demonstrate and characterize the programmable mobility shift of matching DNA in such reversible gels both in thin films and microchannels using microelectrode arrays. Such sequence selective separation may be employed to select nucleic acid sequences of similar length from a mixture via local electronics, a basic functionality that can be employed in novel electronic chemical cell designs and other DNA information-processing systems.

  17. Searching target sites on DNA by proteins: Role of DNA dynamics under confinement

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Anupam; Bhattacherjee, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins (DBPs) rapidly search and specifically bind to their target sites on genomic DNA in order to trigger many cellular regulatory processes. It has been suggested that the facilitation of search dynamics is achieved by combining 3D diffusion with one-dimensional sliding and hopping dynamics of interacting proteins. Although, recent studies have advanced the knowledge of molecular determinants that affect one-dimensional search efficiency, the role of DNA molecule is poorly understood. In this study, by using coarse-grained simulations, we propose that dynamics of DNA molecule and its degree of confinement due to cellular crowding concertedly regulate its groove geometry and modulate the inter-communication with DBPs. Under weak confinement, DNA dynamics promotes many short, rotation-decoupled sliding events interspersed by hopping dynamics. While this results in faster 1D diffusion, associated probability of missing targets by jumping over them increases. In contrast, strong confinement favours rotation-coupled sliding to locate targets but lacks structural flexibility to achieve desired specificity. By testing under physiological crowding, our study provides a plausible mechanism on how DNA molecule may help in maintaining an optimal balance between fast hopping and rotation-coupled sliding dynamics, to locate target sites rapidly and form specific complexes precisely. PMID:26400158

  18. Searching target sites on DNA by proteins: Role of DNA dynamics under confinement.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Anupam; Bhattacherjee, Arnab

    2015-10-30

    DNA-binding proteins (DBPs) rapidly search and specifically bind to their target sites on genomic DNA in order to trigger many cellular regulatory processes. It has been suggested that the facilitation of search dynamics is achieved by combining 3D diffusion with one-dimensional sliding and hopping dynamics of interacting proteins. Although, recent studies have advanced the knowledge of molecular determinants that affect one-dimensional search efficiency, the role of DNA molecule is poorly understood. In this study, by using coarse-grained simulations, we propose that dynamics of DNA molecule and its degree of confinement due to cellular crowding concertedly regulate its groove geometry and modulate the inter-communication with DBPs. Under weak confinement, DNA dynamics promotes many short, rotation-decoupled sliding events interspersed by hopping dynamics. While this results in faster 1D diffusion, associated probability of missing targets by jumping over them increases. In contrast, strong confinement favours rotation-coupled sliding to locate targets but lacks structural flexibility to achieve desired specificity. By testing under physiological crowding, our study provides a plausible mechanism on how DNA molecule may help in maintaining an optimal balance between fast hopping and rotation-coupled sliding dynamics, to locate target sites rapidly and form specific complexes precisely. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Routine DNA testing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Routine DNA testing. It’s done once you’ve Marker-Assisted Breeding Pipelined promising Qantitative Trait Loci within your own breeding program and thereby established the performance-predictive power of each DNA test for your germplasm under your conditions. By then you are ready to screen your par...

  20. Stool DNA Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... result. A test is considered negative if DNA markers common to colon cancer or precancerous polyps and signs of blood are ... result. A test is considered positive if DNA markers common to colon cancer or precancerous polyps or signs of blood are ...

  1. Metal Sensing by DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenhu; Saran, Runjhun; Liu, Juewen

    2017-06-28

    Metal ions are essential to many chemical, biological, and environmental processes. In the past two decades, many DNA-based metal sensors have emerged. While the main biological role of DNA is to store genetic information, its chemical structure is ideal for metal binding via both the phosphate backbone and nucleobases. DNA is highly stable, cost-effective, easy to modify, and amenable to combinatorial selection. Two main classes of functional DNA were developed for metal sensing: aptamers and DNAzymes. While a few metal binding aptamers are known, it is generally quite difficult to isolate such aptamers. On the other hand, DNAzymes are powerful tools for metal sensing since they are selected based on catalytic activity, thus bypassing the need for metal immobilization. In the last five years, a new surge of development has been made on isolating new metal-sensing DNA sequences. To date, many important metals can be selectively detected by DNA often down to the low parts-per-billion level. Herein, each metal ion and the known DNA sequences for its sensing are reviewed. We focus on the fundamental aspect of metal binding, emphasizing the distinct chemical property of each metal. Instead of reviewing each published sensor, a high-level summary of signaling methods is made as a separate section. In principle, each signaling strategy can be applied to many DNA sequences for designing sensors. Finally, a few specific applications are highlighted, and future research opportunities are discussed.

  2. Behavior of supercoiled DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Strick, T R; Allemand, J F; Bensimon, D; Croquette, V

    1998-01-01

    We study DNA supercoiling in a quantitative fashion by micromanipulating single linear DNA molecules with a magnetic field gradient. By anchoring one end of the DNA to multiple sites on a magnetic bead and the other end to multiple sites on a glass surface, we were able to exert torsional control on the DNA. A rotating magnetic field was used to induce rotation of the magnetic bead, and reversibly over- and underwind the molecule. The magnetic field was also used to increase or decrease the stretching force exerted by the magnetic bead on the DNA. The molecule's degree of supercoiling could therefore be quantitatively controlled and monitored, and tethered-particle motion analysis allowed us to measure the stretching force acting on the DNA. Experimental results indicate that this is a very powerful technique for measuring forces at the picoscale. We studied the effect of stretching forces ranging from 0.01 pN to 100 pN on supercoiled DNA (-0.1 < sigma < 0.2) in a variety of ionic conditions. Other effects, such as stretching-relaxing hysteresis and the braiding of two DNA molecules, are discussed. PMID:9545060

  3. Characterization of muntjac DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.C.

    1981-05-27

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in muntjac chromosomes is generally proportional to the chromosomal DNA content, but the SCE frequency is reduced in the heterochromatic neck region of the X chromosome. The physical properties of muntjac DNA and the kinetics of repair of UV damage in muntjac heterochromatin and euchromatin were examined and compared with the distribution of sister chromatid exchange.

  4. Curating DNA specimens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    DNA data are used in a variety of ethnobiological disciplines including archaeology, conservation, ecology, medicinal plants and natural products research, taxonomy and systematics, crop evolution and domestication, and genetic diversity. It frequently is convenient to store and share DNA among coop...

  5. DNA-cell conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-05-03

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  6. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  7. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  8. Modeling DNA Replication Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Broyde, S.; Roy, D.; Shapiro, R.

    1997-06-01

    While there is now available a great deal of information on double stranded DNA from X-ray crystallography, high resolution NMR and computer modeling, very little is known about structures that are representative of the DNA core of replication intermediates. DNA replication occurs at a single strand/double strand junction and bulged out intermediates near the junction can lead to frameshift mutations. The single stranded domains are particularly challenging. Our interest is focused on strategies for modeling the DNA of these types of replication intermediates. Modeling such structures presents special problems in addressing the multiple minimum problem and in treating the electrostatic component of the force field. We are testing a number of search strategies for locating low energy structures of these types and we are also investigating two different distance dependent dielectric functions in the coulombic term of the force field. We are studying both unmodified DNA and DNA damaged by aromatic amines, carcinogens present in the environment in tobacco smoke, barbecued meats and automobile exhaust. The nature of the structure adopted by the carcinogen modified DNA at the replication fork plays a key role in determining whether the carcinogen will cause a mutation during replication that can initiate the carcinogenic process. In the present work results are presented for unmodified DNA.

  9. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mullane, Stephanie A; Van Allen, Eliezer M

    2016-05-01

    Precision cancer medicine, the use of genomic profiling of patient tumors at the point-of-care to inform treatment decisions, is rapidly changing treatment strategies across cancer types. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer may identify new treatment strategies and change clinical practice. In this review, we discuss the potential and challenges of precision medicine in advanced prostate cancer. Although primary prostate cancers do not harbor highly recurrent targetable genomic alterations, recent reports on the genomics of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer has shown multiple targetable alterations in castration-resistant prostate cancer metastatic biopsies. Therapeutic implications include targeting prevalent DNA repair pathway alterations with PARP-1 inhibition in genomically defined subsets of patients, among other genomically stratified targets. In addition, multiple recent efforts have demonstrated the promise of liquid tumor profiling (e.g., profiling circulating tumor cells or cell-free tumor DNA) and highlighted the necessary steps to scale these approaches in prostate cancer. Although still in the initial phase of precision medicine for prostate cancer, there is extraordinary potential for clinical impact. Efforts to overcome current scientific and clinical barriers will enable widespread use of precision medicine approaches for advanced prostate cancer patients.

  10. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mullane, Stephanie A.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Precision cancer medicine, the use of genomic profiling of patient tumors at the point-of-care to inform treatment decisions, is rapidly changing treatment strategies across cancer types. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer may identify new treatment strategies and change clinical practice. In this review, we discuss the potential and challenges of precision medicine in advanced prostate cancer. Recent findings Although primary prostate cancers do not harbor highly recurrent targetable genomic alterations, recent reports on the genomics of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer has shown multiple targetable alterations in castration-resistant prostate cancer metastatic biopsies. Therapeutic implications include targeting prevalent DNA repair pathway alterations with PARP-1 inhibition in genomically defined subsets of patients, among other genomically stratified targets. In addition, multiple recent efforts have demonstrated the promise of liquid tumor profiling (e.g., profiling circulating tumor cells or cell-free tumor DNA) and highlighted the necessary steps to scale these approaches in prostate cancer. Summary Although still in the initial phase of precision medicine for prostate cancer, there is extraordinary potential for clinical impact. Efforts to overcome current scientific and clinical barriers will enable widespread use of precision medicine approaches for advanced prostate cancer patients. PMID:26909474

  11. DNA barcoding reveals a cryptic nemertean invasion in Atlantic and Mediterranean waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Álvarez, Fernando Ángel; Machordom, Annie

    2013-09-01

    For several groups, like nemerteans, morphology-based identification is a hard discipline, but DNA barcoding may help non-experts in the identification process. In this study, DNA barcoding is used to reveal the cryptic invasion of Pacific Cephalothrix cf. simula into Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts. Although DNA barcoding is a promising method for the identification of Nemertea, only 6 % of the known number of nemertean species is currently associated with a correct DNA barcode. Therefore, additional morphological and molecular studies are necessary to advance the utility of DNA barcoding in the characterisation of possible nemertean alien invasions.

  12. Multiscale simulation of DNA.

    PubMed

    Dans, Pablo D; Walther, Jürgen; Gómez, Hansel; Orozco, Modesto

    2016-04-01

    DNA is not only among the most important molecules in life, but a meeting point for biology, physics and chemistry, being studied by numerous techniques. Theoretical methods can help in gaining a detailed understanding of DNA structure and function, but their practical use is hampered by the multiscale nature of this molecule. In this regard, the study of DNA covers a broad range of different topics, from sub-Angstrom details of the electronic distributions of nucleobases, to the mechanical properties of millimeter-long chromatin fibers. Some of the biological processes involving DNA occur in femtoseconds, while others require years. In this review, we describe the most recent theoretical methods that have been considered to study DNA, from the electron to the chromosome, enriching our knowledge on this fascinating molecule. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. DNA replication in thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Majerník, A I; Jenkinson, E R; Chong, J P J

    2004-04-01

    DNA replication enzymes in the thermophilic Archaea have previously attracted attention due to their obvious use in methods such as PCR. The proofreading ability of the Pyrococcus furiosus DNA polymerase has resulted in a commercially successful product (Pfu polymerase). One of the many notable features of the Archaea is the fact that their DNA processing enzymes appear on the whole to be more like those found in eukaryotes than bacteria. These proteins also appear to be simpler versions of those found in eukaryotes. For these reasons, archaeal organisms make potentially interesting model systems to explore the molecular mechanisms of processes such as DNA replication, repair and recombination. Why archaeal DNA-manipulation systems were adopted over bacterial systems by eukaryotic cells remains a most interesting question that we suggest may be linked to thermophily.

  14. Fidelity of DNA polymerases in DNA amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Keohavong, P.; Thilly, W.G. )

    1989-12-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to separate and isolate the products of DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The strategy permitted direct enumeration and identification of point mutations created by T4, modified T7, Klenow fragment of polymerase I, and Thermus aquaticus (Tag) DNA polymerases. Incorrectly synthesized sequences were separated from the wild type by DGGE as mutant/wild-type heteroduplexes and the heteroduplex fraction was used to calculate the average error rate (mutations per base duplication). The error rate induced in the 104-base-pair low-temperature melting domain of exon 3 of the human hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene was {approx} 3.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} for modified T7, 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for Klenow fragment, and 2.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for Taq polymerases after a 10{sup 6}-fold amplification. The error rate for T4 DNA polymerase was not more than 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} error per base duplication. The predominant mutations were sequenced and found to be transitions of G{center dot}C to A{center dot}T for T4 and modified T7 DNA polymerases, and A{center dot}T to G{center dot}C for Taq polymerase. Klenow fragment induced both possible transitions and deletions of 2 and 4 base pairs.

  15. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT) is developing and maturing innovative and advanced manufacturing technologies that will enable more capable and lower-cost spacecraft, launch vehicles and infrastructure to enable exploration missions. The technologies will utilize cutting edge materials and emerging capabilities including metallic processes, additive manufacturing, composites, and digital manufacturing. The AMT project supports the National Manufacturing Initiative involving collaboration with other government agencies.

  16. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-09-21

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  17. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation research, planetary mission performance, penetrator mission concepts for airless planets/satellites, geology orbiter payload adaptability, lunar mission performance, and advanced planning activities. Study reports and related publications are included in a bibliography section.

  18. Advanced Network Security Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    network. The network observed was the Abilene network of the University Consortium for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID), often known as “ Internet2 ...for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID), often known as “ Internet2 .” This contract was heavily operational in nature, as opposed to a contract

  19. Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambliss, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Advanced Life Support (ALS) Systems are presented. The topics include: 1) Fundamental Need for Advanced Life Support; 2) ALS organization; 3) Requirements and Rationale; 4) Past Integrated tests; 5) The need for improvements in life support systems; 6) ALS approach to meet exploration goals; 7) ALS Projects showing promise to meet exploration goals; and 9) GRC involvement in ALS.

  20. ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TEAM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-16

    QUINCY BEAN, JIM LYDON, AND ZACK JONES OF MSFC’S ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TEAM, WITH MSFC’S M2 SELECTIVE LASER MELTING SYSTEM. THE M2 IS CURRENTLY DEDICATED TO ADVANCED COPPER MATERIAL DEVELOPMENT FOR THE LOW COST UPPER STAGE PROGRAM.