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Sample records for advanced uvoir mirror

  1. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Smith, W. Scott; Mosier, Gary; Abplanalp, Laura; Arnold, William

    2014-01-01

    ASTRO2010 Decadal stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. AMTD builds on the state of art (SOA) defined by over 30 years of monolithic & segmented ground & space-telescope mirror technology to mature six key technologies. AMTD is deliberately pursuing multiple design paths to provide the science community with op-tions to enable either large aperture monolithic or segmented mirrors with clear engineering metrics traceable to science requirements.

  2. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2011-01-01

    Objective of this work is to define and initiate a long-term program to mature six inter-linked critical technologies for future UVOIR space telescope mirrors to TRL6 by 2018 so that a viable flight mission can be proposed to the 2020 Decadal Review. (1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirrors: 4 to 8 m monolithic & 8 to 16 m segmented primary mirrors require larger, thicker, stiffer substrates. (2) Support System:Large-aperture mirrors require large support systems to ensure that they survive launch and deploy on orbit in a stress-free and undistorted shape. (3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error:A very smooth mirror is critical for producing a high-quality point spread function (PSF) for high-contrast imaging. (4) Segment Edges:Edges impact PSF for high-contrast imaging applications, contributes to stray light noise, and affects the total collecting aperture. (5) Segment-to-Segment Gap Phasing:Segment phasing is critical for producing a high-quality temporally stable PSF. (6) Integrated Model Validation:On-orbit performance is determined by mechanical and thermal stability. Future systems require validated performance models. We are pursuing multiple design paths give the science community the option to enable either a future monolithic or segmented space telescope.

  3. Overview and Summary of Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2014-01-01

    ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. AMTD is a multiyear effort to develop, demonstrate and mature critical technologies to TRL-6 by 2018 so that a viable flight mission can be proposed to the 2020 Decadal Review. AMTD builds on the state of art (SOA) defined by over 30 years of monolithic & segmented ground & space-telescope mirror technology to mature six key technologies: center dotLarge-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirror Substrates: Both (4 to 8 m) monolithic and (8 to 16 m) segmented telescopes require larger and stiffer mirrors. center dotSupport System: Large-aperture mirrors require large support systems to ensure that they survive launch, deploy on orbit, and maintain a stable, undistorted shape. center dotMid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error: Very smooth mirror is critical for producing high-quality point spread function (PSF) for high contrast imaging. center dotSegment Edges: The quality of segment edges impacts PSF for high-contrast imaging applications, contributes to stray light noise, and affects total collecting aperture. center dotSegment to Segment Gap Phasing: Segment phasing is critical for producing high-quality temporally-stable PSF. center dotIntegrated Model Validation: On-orbit performance is driven by mechanical & thermal stability. Compliance cannot be 100% tested, but relies on modeling. Because we cannot predict the future, AMTD is pursuing multiple design paths to provide the science community with options to enable either large aperture monolithic or segmented mirrors with clear engineering metrics traceable to science requirements

  4. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Soummer, Remi; Sivramakrishnan, Annand; Macintosh, Bruce; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Stahl, H. Philip; Smith, W. Scott; Mosier, Gary; Kirk, Charles; Arnold, William

    2013-01-01

    ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. AMTD is the start of a multiyear effort to develop, demonstrate and mature critical technologies to TRL-6 by 2018 so that a viable flight mission can be proposed to the 2020 Decadal Review. AMTD builds on the state of art (SOA) defined by over 30 years of monolithic & segmented ground & space-telescope mirror technology to mature six key technologies: (1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirror Substrates: Both (4 to 8 m) monolithic and (8 to 16 m) segmented primary mirrors require larger, thicker, and stiffer substrates. (2) Support System: Large-aperture mirrors require large support systems to ensure that they survive launch and deploy on orbit in a stress-free and undistorted shape. (3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error: Very smooth mirror is critical for producing high-quality point spread function (PSF) for high contrast imaging. (4) Segment Edges: The quality of segment edges impacts PSF for high-contrast imaging applications, contributes to stray light noise, and affects total collecting aperture. (5) Segment to Segment Gap Phasing: Segment phasing is critical for producing high-quality temporally-stable PSF. (6) Integrated Model Validation: On-orbit performance is driven by mechanical & thermal stability. Compliance cannot be 100% tested, but relies on modeling. AMTD is pursuing multiple design paths to provide the science community with options to enable either large aperture monolithic or segmented mirrors with clear engineering metrics traceable to science requirements.

  5. Overview and recent accomplishments of the advanced mirror technology development (AMTD) for large aperture UVOIR space telescopes project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Postman, Marc; Abplanalp, Laura; Arnold, William; Eng, Ron; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand

    2013-09-01

    The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is a three year effort initiated in FY12 to mature by at least a half TRL step six critical technologies required to enable 4 to 8 meter UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. Thus far, AMTD has achieved all of its goals and accomplished all of its milestones. We did this by assembling an outstanding team from academia, industry, and government with extensive expertise in astrophysics and exoplanet characterization, and in the design/manufacture of monolithic and segmented space telescopes; by deriving engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence mirror systems needed to make the required science measurements; and by defining and prioritizing the most important technical problems to be solved.

  6. Overview and Recent Accomplishments of the Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Large Aperture UVOIR Space Telescopes Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Per Astro2010, a new, larger UVO telescope is needed to answer fundamental scientific questions, such as: is there life on Earth-like exoplanets; how galaxies assemble stellar populations; how baryonic matter interacts with intergalactic medium; and how solar systems form and evolve. And, present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVO concept. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is a funded SAT project. Our objective is to mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND result in a high-performance low-cost low-risk system. To provide the science community with options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. We have assembled an outstanding team from academia, industry, and government with extensive expertise in astrophysics and exoplanet characterization, and in the design/manufacture of monolithic and segmented space telescopes. One of our key accomplishments is that we have derived engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence monolithic and segmented mirror systems needed to enable both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets missions as a function of potential launch vehicle and its inherent mass and volume constraints. We defined and initiated a program to mature 6 key technologies required to fabricate monolithic and segmented space mirrors.

  7. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Soummer, Remi; Sivramakrishnan, Annand; Macintosh, Bruce; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Stahl, H. Philip; Smith, W. Scott; Mosier, Gary; Kirk, Charles; Arnold, William

    2013-01-01

    AMTD partner Exelis developed & demonstrated a technique to manufacture a 400 mm thick substrate via stacking and fusing core structural elements to front and back faceplates; making a 40 cm cut-out of a 4 meter diameter 60 kilograms per square meter mirror. This new process offers a lower cost approach for manufacturing large-diameter high-stiffness mirrors.

  8. Advanced Mirror & Modelling Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Abplanalp, Laura; Maffett, Steven; Egerman, Robert; Eng, Ron; Arnold, William; Mosier, Gary; Blaurock, Carl

    2014-01-01

    The 2020 Decadal technology survey is starting in 2018. Technology on the shelf at that time will help guide selection to future low risk and low cost missions. The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) team has identified development priorities based on science goals and engineering requirements for Ultraviolet Optical near-Infrared (UVOIR) missions in order to contribute to the selection process. One key development identified was lightweight mirror fabrication and testing. A monolithic, stacked, deep core mirror was fused and replicated twice to achieve the desired radius of curvature. It was subsequently successfully polished and tested. A recently awarded second phase to the AMTD project will develop larger mirrors to demonstrate the lateral scaling of the deep core mirror technology. Another key development was rapid modeling for the mirror. One model focused on generating optical and structural model results in minutes instead of months. Many variables could be accounted for regarding the core, face plate and back structure details. A portion of a spacecraft model was also developed. The spacecraft model incorporated direct integration to transform optical path difference to Point Spread Function (PSF) and between PSF to modulation transfer function. The second phase to the project will take the results of the rapid mirror modeler and integrate them into the rapid spacecraft modeler.

  9. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is a multi-year effort to systematically mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review. This technology must enable missions capable of both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. To accomplish our objective, We use a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND result in a high-performance low-cost low-risk system.

  10. Advanced Mirror Technology Development for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. P.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is a NASA Strategic Astrophysics Technology project to mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review. The developed mirror technology must enable missions capable of both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. Just as JWST’s architecture was driven by launch vehicle, a future UVOIR mission’s architectures (monolithic, segmented or interferometric) will depend on capacities of future launch vehicles (and budget). Since we cannot predict the future, we must prepare for all potential futures. Therefore, to provide the science community with options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We derived engineering specifications for potential future monolithic or segmented space telescopes based on science needs and implement constraints. And we are maturing six inter-linked critical technologies to enable potential future large aperture UVOIR space telescope: 1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirrors, 2) Support Systems, 3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error, 4) Segment Edges, 5) Segment-to-Segment Gap Phasing, and 6) Integrated Model Validation Science Advisory Team and a Systems Engineering Team. We are maturing all six technologies simultaneously because all are required to make a primary mirror assembly (PMA); and, it is the PMA’s on-orbit performance which determines science return. PMA stiffness depends on substrate and support stiffness. Ability to cost-effectively eliminate mid/high spatial figure errors and polishing edges depends on substrate stiffness. On-orbit thermal and mechanical performance depends on substrate stiffness, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and thermal mass. And, segment-to-segment phasing depends on substrate & structure stiffness

  11. Overview and Summary of the Advanced Mirror Technology Development Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. P.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is a NASA Strategic Astrophysics Technology project to mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review. The developed mirror technology must enable missions capable of both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. Just as JWST’s architecture was driven by launch vehicle, a future UVOIR mission’s architectures (monolithic, segmented or interferometric) will depend on capacities of future launch vehicles (and budget). Since we cannot predict the future, we must prepare for all potential futures. Therefore, to provide the science community with options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We derived engineering specifications for potential future monolithic or segmented space telescopes based on science needs and implement constraints. And we are maturing six inter-linked critical technologies to enable potential future large aperture UVOIR space telescope: 1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirrors, 2) Support Systems, 3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error, 4) Segment Edges, 5) Segment-to-Segment Gap Phasing, and 6) Integrated Model Validation Science Advisory Team and a Systems Engineering Team. We are maturing all six technologies simultaneously because all are required to make a primary mirror assembly (PMA); and, it is the PMA’s on-orbit performance which determines science return. PMA stiffness depends on substrate and support stiffness. Ability to cost-effectively eliminate mid/high spatial figure errors and polishing edges depends on substrate stiffness. On-orbit thermal and mechanical performance depends on substrate stiffness, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and thermal mass. And, segment-to-segment phasing depends on substrate & structure stiffness

  12. Status of the Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) phase 2 1.5m ULE mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egerman, Robert; Matthews, Gary W.; Johnson, Matthew; Ferland, Albert; Stahl, H. P.; Eng, Ron; Effinger, Michael R.

    2015-08-01

    The Decadal Survey stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. Under Science and Technology funding, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Exelis have developed a more cost effective process to make up to 4m monolithic spaceflight UV quality, low areal density, thermally and dynamically stable primary mirrors. Under a Phase I program, a proof of concept mirror was completed at Exelis and tested down to 250K at MSFC which would allow imaging out to 2.5 microns. In 2014, Exelis and NASA started a Phase II program to design and build a 1.5m mirror to demonstrate lateral scalability to a 4m monolithic primary mirror. The current status of the Phase II development program will be provided along with a Phase II program summary.

  13. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) Thermal Trade Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas; Stahl, Phil; Arnold, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is being done at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in preparation for the next Ultraviolet, Optical, Infrared (UVOIR) space observatory. A likely science mission of that observatory is the detection and characterization of 'Earth-like' exoplanets. Direct exoplanet observation requires a telescope to see a planet that is 10-10 times dimmer than its host star. To accomplish this using an internal coronagraph requires a telescope with an ultra-stable wavefront. This paper investigates two topics: 1) parametric relationships between a primary mirror's thermal parameters and wavefront stability, and 2) optimal temperature profiles in the telescope's shroud and heater plate that minimize static wavefront error (WFE) in the primary mirror.

  14. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) Thermal Trade Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is being done at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in preparation for the next large aperture UVOIR space observatory. A key science mission of that observatory is the detection and characterization of 'Earth-like' exoplanets. Direct exoplanet observation requires a telescope to see a planet which will be 10(exp -10) times dimmer than its host star. To accomplish this using an internal coronagraph requires a telescope with an ultra-stable wavefront error (WFE). This paper investigates parametric relationships between primary mirror physical parameters and thermal WFE stability. Candidate mirrors are designed as a mesh and placed into a thermal analysis model to determine the temperature distribution in the mirror when it is placed inside of an actively controlled cylindrical shroud at Lagrange point 2. Thermal strains resulting from the temperature distribution are found and an estimation of WFE is found to characterize the effect that thermal inputs have on the optical quality of the mirror. This process is repeated for several mirror material properties, material types, and mirror designs to determine how to design a mirror for thermal stability.

  15. Status of the Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) Phase 2, 1.5m ULE(Registered Trademark) Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egerman, Robert; Matthews, Gary W.; Johnson, Matthew; Ferland, Albert; Stahl, H. Philip; Eng, Ron; Effinger, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The Decadal Survey stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. Under Science and Technology funding, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Exelis have developed a more cost effective process to make up to 4m monolithic spaceflight UV quality, low areal density, thermally and dynamically stable primary mirrors. Under a Phase I program, a proof of concept mirror was completed at Exelis and tested down to 250K at MSFC which would allow imaging out to 2.5 microns. In 2014, Exelis and NASA started a Phase II program to design and build a 1.5m mirror to demonstrate lateral scalability to a 4m monolithic primary mirror. The current status of the Phase II development program will be provided along with a Phase II program summary.

  16. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) Project: Overview and Year 4 Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort initiated in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, to mature toward the next Technology Readiness Level (TRL) critical technologies required to enable 4-m-or-larger monolithic or segmented ultraviolet, optical, and infrared (UVOIR) space telescope primary-mirror assemblies for general astrophysics and ultra-high-contrast observations of exoplanets. Key hardware accomplishments of 2015/16 are the successful low-temperature fusion of a 1.5-meter diameter ULE mirror that is a 1/3rd scale model of a 4-meter mirror and the initiation of polishing of a 1.2-meter Extreme-Lightweight Zerodur mirror. Critical to AMTD's success is an integrated team of scientists, systems engineers, and technologists; and a science-driven systems engineering approach.

  17. Advanced mirror technology development (AMTD) project: 2.5 year status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Postman, Marc; Abplanalp, Laura; Arnold, William; Blaurock, Carl; Egerman, Robert; Mosier, Gary

    2014-08-01

    The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort, initiated in FY12, to mature by at least a half TRL step six critical technologies required to enable 4 meter or larger UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD continues to achieve all of its goals and accomplished all of its milestones to date. We have done this by assembling an outstanding team from academia, industry, and government with extensive expertise in astrophysics and exoplanet characterization, and in the design/manufacture of monolithic and segmented space telescopes; by deriving engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence mirror systems needed to make the required science measurements; and by defining and prioritizing the most important technical problems to be solved.

  18. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Accomplishments include: Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry and government with expertise in science and space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications for monolithic primary mirror from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Pursuing long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Successfully demonstrated capability to make 0.5 m deep mirror substrate and polish it to UVOIR traceable figure specification.

  19. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) Project: 3.0 Year Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is a funded NASA Strategic Astrophysics Technology project. Begun in 2011, we are in Phase 2 of a multi-year effort. Our objective is to mature towards TRL6 critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable astronomy mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review. The developed technology must enable missions capable of both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. Just as JWST's architecture was driven by launch vehicle, a future UVOIR mission's architecture (monolithic, segmented or interferometric) will depend on capacities of future launch vehicles (and budget). Since we cannot predict the future, we must prepare for all potential futures. Therefore, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND result in a high-performance low-cost low-risk system. One of our key accomplishments is that we have derived engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence monolithic and segmented mirror systems needed to enable both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets missions as a function of potential launch vehicle and its inherent mass and volume constraints. Another key accomplishment is that we have matured our technology by building and testing hardware. To demonstrate stacked core technology, we built a 400 mm thick mirror. Currently, to demonstrate lateral scalability, we are manufacturing a 1.5 meter mirror. To assist in architecture trade studies, the Engineering team develops Structural, Thermal and Optical Performance (STOP) models of candidate mirror assembly systems including substrates, structures, and mechanisms. These models are validated by test of full- and subscale components in relevant thermo-vacuum environments. Specific analyses include: maximum

  20. Testing of a Stacked Core Mirror for UV Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Kirk, Charles S.; Maffett, Steven P.; Abplanalp, Calvin E.; Stahl, H. Philip; Eng, Ron; Arnold, William R. Sr.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Ultraviolet, Optical, Near-Infrared (UVOIR) Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) Testing Summary: (1) Processing of the stacked core mirror converged very quickly using ion figuring. (2) Results show no significant PSD change due to ion figuring in spatial periods smaller than 20mm. (3) Global surface figure limited by mount repeatability

  1. AMTD: Update of Engineering Specifications Derived from Science Requirements for Future UVOIR Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Postman, Marc; Mosier, Gary; Smith, W. Scott; Blaurock, Carl; Ha, Kong; Stark, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort, initiated in FY12, to mature by at least a half TRL step six critical technologies required to enable 4 meter or larger UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND provide a high-performance low-cost low-risk system. To give the science community options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. A key task is deriving engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence monolithic and segmented mirror systems needed to enable both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets missions as a function of potential launch vehicles and their mass and volume constraints. A key finding of this effort is that the science requires an 8 meter or larger aperture telescope

  2. AMTD: update of engineering specifications derived from science requirements for future UVOIR space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Postman, Marc; Mosier, Gary; Smith, W. Scott; Blaurock, Carl; Ha, Kong; Stark, Christopher C.

    2014-08-01

    The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort, initiated in FY12, to mature by at least a half TRL step six critical technologies required to enable 4 meter or larger UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND provide a high-performance low-cost low-risk system. To give the science community options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. A key task is deriving engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence monolithic and segmented mirror systems needed to enable both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets missions as a function of potential launch vehicles and their mass and volume constraints. A key finding of this effort is that the science requires an 8 meter or larger aperture telescope.

  3. Overview and Accomplishments of Advanced Mirror Technology Development Phase 2 (AMTD-2) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-01-01

    The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort, initiated in FY12, to mature by at least a half TRL step critical technologies required to enable 4 meter or larger UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD Phase 1 completed all of its goals and accomplished all of its milestones. AMTD Phase 2 started in 2014. Key accomplishments include deriving primary mirror engineering specifications from science requirements; developing integrated modeling tools and using those tools to perform parametric design trades; and demonstrating new mirror technologies via sub-scale fabrication and test. AMTD-1 demonstrated the stacked core technique by making a 43-cm diameter 400 mm thick 'biscuit-cut' of a 4-m class mirror. AMTD-2 is demonstrating lateral scalability of the stacked core method by making a 1.5 meter 1/3rd scale model of a 4-m class mirror.

  4. Overview and accomplishments of advanced mirror technology development phase 2 (AMTD-2) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-09-01

    The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort, initiated in FY12, to mature by at least a half TRL step critical technologies required to enable 4 meter or larger UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD Phase 1 completed all of its goals and accomplished all of its milestones. AMTD Phase 2 started in 2014. Key accomplishments include deriving primary mirror engineering specifications from science requirements; developing integrated modeling tools and using those tools to perform parametric design trades; and demonstrating new mirror technologies via sub-scale fabrication and test. AMTD-1 demonstrated the stacked core technique by making a 43-cm diameter 400 mm thick `biscuit-cut' of a 4-m class mirror. AMTD-2 is demonstrating lateral scalability of the stacked core method by making a 1.5 meter 1/3rd scale model of a 4-m class mirror

  5. Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) Risk Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byberg, Alicia; Russell, J. Kevin; Kaukler, Donna; Burdine, Robert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper will report risk issues associated with designing, manufacturing, and testing the Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD). The Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) will be developed as a lightweight primary mirror system that can be produced at a low cost and with a short manufacturing schedule. This technology will add to the knowledge base for selection for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), Space Based Laser (SBL), Research Laboratory mission (AFRL), and other government agency programs.

  6. A Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory: Key Technologies and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew Ryan; Stahle, Carl M.; Balasubramaniam, Kunjithapatham; Clampin, Mark; Feinberg, Lee D.; Mosier, Gary E.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Redding, David C.; Rioux, Norman M.; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Stahl, H. Philip; Thronson, Harley A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the key technologies and capabilities that will enable a future, large-aperture ultravioletopticalinfrared (UVOIR) space observatory. These include starlight suppression systems, vibration isolation and control systems, lightweight mirror segments, detector systems, and mirror coatings. These capabilities will provide major advances over current and near-future observatories for sensitivity, angular resolution, and starlight suppression. The goals adopted in our study for the starlight suppression system are 10-10 contrast with an inner working angle of 20 milliarcsec and broad bandpass. We estimate that a vibration and isolation control system that achieves a total system vibration isolation of 140 dB for a vibration-isolated mass of 5000 kg is required to achieve the high wavefront error stability needed for exoplanet coronagraphy. Technology challenges for lightweight mirror segments include diffraction-limited optical quality and high wavefront error stability as well as low cost, low mass, and rapid fabrication. Key challenges for the detector systems include visible-blind, high quantum efficiency UV arrays, photon counting visible and NIR arrays for coronagraphic spectroscopy and starlight wavefront sensing and control, and detectors with deep full wells with low persistence and radiation tolerance to enable transit imaging and spectroscopy at all wavelengths. Finally, mirror coatings with high reflectivity ( 90), high uniformity ( 1) and low polarization ( 1) that are scalable to large diameter mirror substrates will be essential for ensuring that both high throughput UV observations and high contrast observations can be performed by the same observatory.

  7. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study interim design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    The status of the design of a tenth-of-a-kind commercial tandem-mirror fusion reactor is described at the midpoint of a two-year study. When completed, the design is to serve as a strategic goal for the mirror fusion program. The main objectives of the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) are: (1) to design an attractive tandem-mirror fusion reactor producing electricity and synfuels (in alternate versions), (2) to identify key development and technology needs, and (3) to exploit the potential of fusion for safety, low activation, and simple disposal of radioactive waste. In the first year we have emphasized physics and engineering of the central cell and physics of the end cell. Design optimization and trade studies are continuing, and we expect additional modifications in the end cells to further improve the performance of the final design.

  8. Advances in Tandem Mirror fusion power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.J.; Logan, B.G.

    1986-05-20

    The Tandem Mirror exhibits several distinctive features which make the reactor embodiment of the principle very attractive: Simple low-technology linear central cell; steady-state operation; high-..beta.. operation; no driven current or disruptions; divertorless operation; direction conversion of end-loss power; low-surface heat loads; and advanced fusion fuel capability. In this paper, we examine these features in connection with two tandem mirror reactor designs, MARS and MINIMARS, and several advanced reactor concepts including the wall-stabilized reactor and the field-reversed mirror. With a novel compact end plug scheme employing octopole stabilization, MINIMARS is expressly designed for short construction times, factory-built modules, and a small (600 MWe) but economic reactor size. We have also configured the design for low radioactive afterheat and inherent/passive safety under LOCA/LOFA conditions, thereby obviating the need for expensive engineered safety systems. In contrast to the complex and expensive double-quadrupole end-cell of the MARS reactor, the compact octopole end-cell of MINIMARS enables ignition to be achieved with much shorter central cell lengths and considerably improves the economy of scale for small (approx.250 to 600 MWe) tandem mirror reactors. Finally, we examine the prospects for realizing the ultimate potential of the tandem mirror with regard to both innovative configurations and novel neutron energy conversion schemes, and stress that advanced fuel applications could exploit its unique reactor features.

  9. Development of Stacked Core Technology for the Fabrication of Deep Lightweight UV Quality Space Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Gary; Kirk, Charlie; Maffett, Steve; Abplanalp, Cal; Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Decadal Survey stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. Under Science and Technology funding, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and ITT Exelis have developed a more cost effective process to make up to 4m monolithic spaceflight UV quality, low areal density, thermally and dynamically stable primary mirrors. A proof of concept mirror was completed at ITT Exelis and tested down to 250K at MSFC which would allow imaging out to 2.5 microns. The parameters and test results of this concept mirror will be shown. The scale-up process will be discussed and the technology development path to a 4m mirror system by 2018 will also be outlined.

  10. Summary of the mirror advanced reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Henning, C.D.; Carlson, G.A.; Gordon, J.D.; Maniscalco, J.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Perkins, L.J.; Parmer, J.F.; Bilton, J.R.; Glancy, J.E.

    1984-07-26

    The Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) is a conceptual design of a 1200-MWe commercial tandem mirror reactor for electricity and synfuels (methanol) production. Thermal barrier end plugs of the TMX-U/MFTF-B type allow steady-state ignition of a 130-m-long central-cell DT plasma. Compact, gridless direct converters supply all the plant auxiliary power. The simple lead-lithium eutectic-cooled blanket has high neutron energy multiplication (1.36) as well as a low tritium inventory (< 8 g), and it will not melt in accidents.

  11. Overview and Recent Accomplishments of Advanced Mirror Technology Development Phase 2 (AMTD-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-01-01

    AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach to define & execute a long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Because we cannot predict the future, we are pursuing multiple technology paths including monolithic & segmented mirrors. Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry & government; experts in science & space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Maturing 6 critical technologies required to enable 4 to 8 meter UVOIR space telescope mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast exoplanet imaging. AMTD achieving all its goals & accomplishing all its milestones.

  12. Overview and Recent Accomplishments of Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach to define & execute a long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Because we cannot predict the future, we are pursuing multiple technology paths including monolithic & segmented mirrors. Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry & government; experts in science & space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Maturing 6 critical technologies required to enable 4 to 8 meter UVOIR space telescope mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast exoplanet imaging. AMTD achieving all its goals & accomplishing all its milestones.

  13. The Development of Stacked Core Technology for the Fabrication of Deep Lightweight UV-quality Space Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Kirk, Charles S.; Maffett, Steven P.; Abplanalp, Calvin E.; Stahl, H. Philip; Effinger, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    The Decadal Survey stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. Under Science and Technology funding, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Exelis have developed a more cost effective process to make up to 4m monolithic spaceflight UV quality, low areal density, thermally and dynamically stable primary mirrors. A proof of concept mirror was completed at Exelis and tested down to 250K at MSFC which would allow imaging out to 2.5 microns. The parameters and test results of this concept mirror will be shown. The scale-up process will be discussed and the technology development path to a 4m mirror system by 2018 will also be outlined.

  14. An Engineering Design Reference Mission for a Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thronson, Harley A.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Clampin, Mark; Crooke, Julie A.; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Stahl, H. Philip

    2016-01-01

    From the 2010 NRC Decadal Survey and the NASA Thirty-Year Roadmap, Enduring Quests, Daring Visions, to the recent AURA report, From Cosmic Birth to Living Earths, multiple community assessments have recommended development of a large-aperture UVOIR space observatory capable of achieving a broad range of compelling scientific goals. Of these priority science goals, the most technically challenging is the search for spectroscopic biomarkers in the atmospheres of exoplanets in the solar neighborhood. Here we present an engineering design reference mission (EDRM) for the Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST), which was conceived from the start as capable of breakthrough science paired with an emphasis on cost control and cost effectiveness. An EDRM allows the engineering design trade space to be explored in depth to determine what are the most demanding requirements and where there are opportunities for margin against requirements. Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI study team has used community-provided science goals to derive mission needs, requirements, and candidate mission architectures for a future large-aperture, non-cryogenic UVOIR space observatory. The ATLAST observatory is designed to operate at a Sun-Earth L2 orbit, which provides a stable thermal environment and excellent field of regard. Our reference designs have emphasized a serviceable 36-segment 9.2 m aperture telescope that stows within a five-meter diameter launch vehicle fairing. As part of our cost-management effort, this particular reference mission builds upon the engineering design for JWST. Moreover, it is scalable to a variety of launch vehicle fairings. Performance needs developed under the study are traceable to a variety of additional reference designs, including options for a monolithic primary mirror.

  15. AMTD: Update of Engineering Specifications Derived from Science Requirements for Future UVOIR Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2014-01-01

    AMTD is using a Science Driven Systems Engineering approach to develop Engineering Specifications based on Science Measurement Requirements and Implementation Constraints. Science requirements meet the needs of both Exoplanet and General Astrophysics science. Engineering Specifications are guiding our effort to mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review.

  16. A Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory: Reference Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley; Rioux, Norman; Feinberg, Lee; Stahl, H. Philip; Redding, Dave; Jones, Andrew; Sturm, James; Collins, Christine; Liu, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI study team has used community-provided science goals to derive mission needs, requirements, and candidate mission architectures for a future large-aperture, non-cryogenic UVOIR space observatory. We describe the feasibility assessment of system thermal and dynamic stability for supporting coronagraphy. The observatory is in a Sun-Earth L2 orbit providing a stable thermal environment and excellent field of regard. Reference designs include a 36-segment 9.2 m aperture telescope that stows within a five meter diameter launch vehicle fairing. Performance needs developed under the study are traceable to a variety of reference designs including options for a monolithic primary mirror.

  17. A future large-aperture UVOIR space observatory: reference designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Norman; Thronson, Harley; Feinberg, Lee; Stahl, H. Philip; Redding, Dave; Jones, Andrew; Sturm, James; Collins, Christine; Liu, Alice

    2015-09-01

    Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI study team has used community-provided science goals to derive mission needs, requirements, and candidate mission architectures for a future large-aperture, non-cryogenic UVOIR space observatory. We describe the feasibility assessment of system thermal and dynamic stability for supporting coronagraphy. The observatory is in a Sun-Earth L2 orbit providing a stable thermal environment and excellent field of regard. Reference designs include a 36-segment 9.2 m aperture telescope that stows within a five meter diameter launch vehicle fairing. Performance needs developed under the study are traceable to a variety of reference designs including options for a monolithic primary mirror.

  18. Thermal Testing of a Stacked Core Mirror for UV Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Kirk, Charles S.; Maffett, Steven P.; Stahl, H. Philip; Abplanalp, Calvin E.; Eng, Ron; Arnold, William R., Sr.

    2013-01-01

    The ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. Under Science and Technology funding, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and ITT Exelis have developed a more cost effective process to make 4m monolithic spaceflight UV quality, low areal density, thermally and dynamically stable primary mirrors. A proof of concept mirror was built and tested down to 250K which would allow imaging out to 2.5 microns. This mirror was thermally tested at the Marshall Spaceflight Center to understand the thermal changes between the processing temperature of 293K and the potential low end of the operational temperature of 250K. Isothermal testing results and front plate gradient results have been evaluated and compared to analysis predictions. Measurement of gravity effects on surface figure will be compared to analytical predictions. Future testing of a larger Pathfinder mirror will also be discussed.

  19. Advances in precision mirror figure metrology (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Furenlid, K. ); Church, E.L. )

    1992-01-01

    New developments in optical measurement techniques have made it possible to test the surface quality on grazing incidence optics with extreme precision and accuracy. An instrument developed at Brookhaven, the Long Trace Profiler (LTP), measures the figure of large (up to 1 m long) cylindrical aspheres with nanometer accuracy. The LTP optical system is based around a common-path interferometer design belonging to the class of slope measuring interferometers and, as such, it is very robust, stable, and vibration insensitive. A unique error correction technique removes the effect of tilt errors in the optical head as it traverses the air bearing, thus allowing one to accurately measure the absolute surface profile and radius of curvature. This is of critical importance to the manufacture of long-radius spherical optics used in high-resolution soft x-ray monochromators and in the testing of mirror bending systems. This talk will review the principle of operation of the LTP, probe the factors limiting the performance of the system, and will examine the current state of the art in synchrotron radiation mirror manufacturing quality (as viewed by our metrology techniques). This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC02-76CH00016.

  20. The Development of Stacked Core for the Fabrication of Deep Lightweight UV-Quality Space Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Egerman, Robert; Maffett, Steven P.; Stahl, H. Philip; Eng, Ron; Effinger, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The 2010 Decadal Survey stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. Under Science and Technology funding, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Exelis have developed a more cost effective process to make 4m class or larger monolithic spaceflight UV quality, low areal density, thermally and dynamically stable primary mirrors. A proof of concept 0.43m mirror was completed at Exelis optically tested at 250K at MSFC which demonstrated the ability for imaging out to 2.5 microns. The parameters and test results of this concept mirror are shown. The next phase of the program includes a 1.5m subscale mirror that will be optically and dynamically tested. The scale-up process will be discussed and the technology development path to a 4m mirror system by 2018 will be outlined.

  1. Advanced X-Ray Telescope Mirrors Provide Sharpest Focus Ever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-03-01

    Performing beyond expectations, the high- resolution mirrors for NASA's most powerful orbiting X-ray telescope have successfully completed initial testing at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Calibration Facility, Huntsville, AL. "We have the first ground test images ever generated by the telescope's mirror assembly, and they are as good as -- or better than -- expected," said Dr. Martin Weisskopf, Marshall's chief scientist for NASA's Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The mirror assembly, four pairs of precisely shaped and aligned cylindrical mirrors, will form the heart of NASA's third great observatory. The X-ray telescope produces an image by directing incoming X-rays to detectors at a focal point some 30 feet beyond the telescope's mirrors. The greater the percentage of X-rays brought to focus and the smaller the size of the focal spot, the sharper the image. Tests show that on orbit, the mirror assembly of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility will be able to focus approximately 70 percent of X-rays from a source to a spot less than one-half arc second in radius. The telescope's resolution is equivalent to being able to read the text of a newspaper from half a mile away. "The telescope's focus is very clear, very sharp," said Weisskopf. "It will be able to show us details of very distant sources that we know are out there, but haven't been able to see clearly." In comparison, previous X-ray telescopes -- Einstein and Rosat -- were only capable of focusing X- rays to five arc seconds. The Advanced X-ray Telescope's resolving power is ten times greater. "Images from the new telescope will allow us to make major advances toward understanding how exploding stars create and disperse many of the elements necessary for new solar systems and for life itself," said Dr. Harvey Tananbaum, director of the Advanced X- ray Astrophysics Facility Science Center at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, in Cambridge, MA -- responsible for the telescope

  2. Beyond JWST: A Technology Path to the Next Great UVOIR Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redding, David; Schiminovich, David; Seager, Sara; Dalcanton, Julianne; Aigrain, Suzanne; Battel, Steven; Brandt, W. Niel; Conroy, Charlie; Feinberg, Lee; Gezari, Suvi; Guyon, Olivier; Harris, Walter M.; Hirata, Chris; Mather, John C.; Postman, Marc; Stahl, H. Philip; Tumlinson, Jason

    2015-01-01

    We report on the AURA 'Beyond JWST' committee's considerations and conclusions regarding technology paths for the development of a large UVOIR observatory, to be launched following JWST and WFIRST-AFTA. The ambitious science goals for this mission include the discovery and spectral characterization of exo-earth candidates; the study of galaxies and stellar populations at spatial resolutions of 100 parsec at any redshift in the UV and visible universe; and multi-object spectroscopy up to R of 50,000, especially in the UV, to probe the chemical evolution and gas kinematics in and around galaxies both near and far. Requirements for aperture size, starlight suppression efficiency, and sensitivity at Far-UV wavelengths, all present significant technology challenges - but challenges that are within reach, building incrementally on current NASA investments and progress within the community. WFIRST-AFTA is pioneering new methods for coronagraphs that work with obscured apertures - work that can be extended to include larger segmented apertures. Exoplanet Program investments in starshade technologies for smaller telescopes inform choices for larger apertures. Cosmic Origins Program and non-NASA investments in mirrors, coatings and detectors already enable a range of telescope and scientific instrument architectures. We will present the consensus recommendations of the AURA committee on both the current readiness levels of these key technologies and on the additional steps needed to support a viable flight concept for a future large UVOIR space telescope.

  3. Finite mirror effects in advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Andrew P.; Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Tsang, David; Bondarescu, Mihai

    2008-02-01

    Thermal noise is expected to be the dominant source of noise in the most sensitive frequency band of second-generation, ground-based gravitational-wave detectors. Reshaping the beam to a flatter, wider profile which probes more of the mirror surface reduces this noise. The “Mesa” beam shape has been proposed for this purpose and was subsequently generalized to a family of hyperboloidal beams with two parameters: twist angle α and beam width D. Varying α allows a continuous transition from the nearly flat (α=0) to the nearly concentric (α=π) Mesa beam configurations. We analytically prove that in the limit D→∞ hyperboloidal beams become Gaussians. The ideal beam choice for reducing thermal noise is the widest possible beam that satisfies the Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) diffraction loss design constraint of 1 part per million (ppm) per bounce for a mirror radius of 17 cm. In the past the diffraction loss has often been calculated using the clipping approximation that, in general, underestimates the diffraction loss. We develop a code using pseudospectral methods to compute the diffraction loss directly from the propagator. We find that the diffraction loss is not a strictly monotonic function of beam width, but has local minima that occur due to finite mirror effects and leads to natural choices of D. For an α=π Mesa beam a local minimum occurs at D=10.67cm and leads to a diffraction loss of 1.4 ppm. We then compute the thermal noise for the entire hyperboloidal family. We find that if one requires a diffraction loss of strictly 1 ppm, the α=0.91π hyperboloidal beam is optimal, leading to the coating thermal noise (the dominant source of noise for fused-silica mirrors) being lower by about 10% than for a Mesa beam while other types of thermal noise decrease as well. We then develop an iterative process that reconstructs the mirror to specifically account for finite mirror effects. This allows us to increase the

  4. Finite mirror effects in advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, Andrew P.; Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Tsang, David; Bondarescu, Mihai

    2008-02-15

    Thermal noise is expected to be the dominant source of noise in the most sensitive frequency band of second-generation, ground-based gravitational-wave detectors. Reshaping the beam to a flatter, wider profile which probes more of the mirror surface reduces this noise. The 'Mesa' beam shape has been proposed for this purpose and was subsequently generalized to a family of hyperboloidal beams with two parameters: twist angle {alpha} and beam width D. Varying {alpha} allows a continuous transition from the nearly flat ({alpha}=0) to the nearly concentric ({alpha}={pi}) Mesa beam configurations. We analytically prove that in the limit D{yields}{infinity} hyperboloidal beams become Gaussians. The ideal beam choice for reducing thermal noise is the widest possible beam that satisfies the Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) diffraction loss design constraint of 1 part per million (ppm) per bounce for a mirror radius of 17 cm. In the past the diffraction loss has often been calculated using the clipping approximation that, in general, underestimates the diffraction loss. We develop a code using pseudospectral methods to compute the diffraction loss directly from the propagator. We find that the diffraction loss is not a strictly monotonic function of beam width, but has local minima that occur due to finite mirror effects and leads to natural choices of D. For an {alpha}={pi} Mesa beam a local minimum occurs at D=10.67 cm and leads to a diffraction loss of 1.4 ppm. We then compute the thermal noise for the entire hyperboloidal family. We find that if one requires a diffraction loss of strictly 1 ppm, the {alpha}=0.91{pi} hyperboloidal beam is optimal, leading to the coating thermal noise (the dominant source of noise for fused-silica mirrors) being lower by about 10% than for a Mesa beam while other types of thermal noise decrease as well. We then develop an iterative process that reconstructs the mirror to specifically account for finite

  5. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS): executive summary and overview

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Perkins, L.J.; Gordon, J.D.

    1984-07-01

    Two self-consistent MARS configurations are discussed - a 1200-MWe commercial electricity-generating plant and a synguels-generating plant that produces hydrogen with an energy equivalent to 26,000 barrels of oil per day. The MARS machine emphasizes the attractive features of the tandem mirror concept, including steady-state operation, a small-diameter high-beta plasma, a linear central cell with simple low-maintenance blankets, low first-wall heat fluxes (<10 W/cm/sup 2/), no driven plasma currents or associated disruptions, natural halo impurity diversion, and direct conversion of end-loss charged-particle power. The MARS electric plant produces 2600 MW of fusion power in a 130-m-long central cell. Advanced tandem-mirror plasma-engineering concepts, a high-efficiency liquid lithium-lead (Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/) blanket, and efficient direct electrical conversion of end loss power combine to produce a high net plant efficiency of 36%. With a total capital cost of $2.9 billion (constant 1983 dollars), the MARS electric plant produces busbar electricity at approx. 7 cents/kW-hour. The MARS synfuels plant produces 3500 MW of fusion power in a 150-m-long central cell. A helium-gas-cooled silicon carbide pebble-bed blanket provides high-temperature (1000/sup 0/C) heat to a thermochemical water-splitting cycle and the resulting hydrogen is catalytically converted to methanol for distribution. With a total capital cost of $3.6 billion (constant 1983 dollars), the synfuels plant produces methanol fuel at about $1.7/gal. The major features of the MARS reactor include sloshing-ion thermal barrier plugs for efficient plasma confinement, a high efficiency blanket, high-field (24-T) choke cells, drift pumping for trapped plasma species, quasi-optical electron-cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) systems, and a component gridless direct converter.

  6. AMTD - Advanced Mirror Technology Development in Mechanical Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. Brent

    2015-01-01

    Analytical tools and processes are being developed at NASA Marshal Space Flight Center in support of the Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project. One facet of optical performance is mechanical stability with respect to structural dynamics. Pertinent parameters are: (1) the spacecraft structural design, (2) the mechanical disturbances on-board the spacecraft (sources of vibratory/transient motion such as reaction wheels), (3) the vibration isolation systems (invariably required to meet future science needs), and (4) the dynamic characteristics of the optical system itself. With stability requirements of future large aperture space telescopes being in the lower Pico meter regime, it is paramount that all sources of mechanical excitation be considered in both feasibility studies and detailed analyses. The primary objective of this paper is to lay out a path to perform feasibility studies of future large aperture space telescope projects which require extreme stability. To get to that end, a high level overview of a structural dynamic analysis process to assess an integrated spacecraft and optical system is included.

  7. Ball Semi-Rigid Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendrick, Stephen; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The AMSD Program is to design, fabricate, and test a 1.4-m point-to-point hexagon mirror system. The Ball semi-rigid approach will be described and its current status presented, The mirror system includes a lightweighted beryllium mirror that is attached through flexures and actuators to a composite reaction structure enabling optical performance at ambient and cryogenic temperatures and allowing changes of curvature to be imposed via actuation. This program is administered through NASA MSFC and is jointly funded by NASA, the USAF, and the NRO.

  8. Mirror mounts designed for the Advanced Photon Source SRI-CAT

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.; Benson, C.; Chang, J.

    1997-09-01

    Use of a mirror for beamlines at third-generation synchrotron radiation facilities, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National laboratory, has many advantages. A mirror as a first optical component provides significant reduction in the beam peak heat flux and total power on the downstream monochromator and simplifies the bremsstrahlung shielding design for the beamline transport. It also allows one to have a system for multibeamline branching and switching. More generally, a mirror is used for beam focusing and/or low-pass filtering. Six different mirror mounts have been designed for the SRI-CAT beamlines. Four of them are designed as water-cooled mirrors for white or pink beam use, and the other two are for monochromatic beam use. Mirror mount designs, including vacuum vessel structure and precision supporting stages, are presented in this paper.

  9. Mirror mounts designed for the Advanced Photon Source SRI-CAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, D.; Benson, C.; Chang, J.; Barraza, J.; Kuzay, T. M.; Alp, E. E.; Sturhahn, W.; Lai, B.; McNulty, I.; Randall, K.; Srajer, G.; Xu, Z.; Yun, W.

    1997-07-01

    Use of a mirror for beamlines at third-generation synchrotron radiation facilities, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory, has many advantages. [Yun et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67(9)(1996)CD-ROM] A mirror as a first optical component provides significant reduction in the beam peak heat flux and total power on the downstream monochromator and simplifies the bremsstrahlung shielding design for the beamline transport. It also allows us to have a system for multibeamline branching and switching. More generally, a mirror is used for beam focusing and/or low-pass filtering. Six different mirror mounts have been designed for the SRI-CAT beamlines. Four of them are designed as water-cooled mirrors for white or pink beam use, and the other two are for monochromatic beam use. Mirror mount designs, including vacuum vessel structure and precision supporting stages, are presented in this paper.

  10. Advanced technologies for fabrication and testing of large flat mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellowhair, Julius Eldon

    Classical fabrication methods alone do not enable manufacturing of large flat mirrors that are much larger than 1 meter. This dissertation presents the development of enabling technologies for manufacturing large high performance flat mirrors and lays the foundation for manufacturing very large flat mirrors. The enabling fabrication and testing methods were developed during the manufacture of a 1.6 meter flat. The key advantage over classical methods is that our method is scalable to larger flat mirrors up to 8 m in diameter. Large tools were used during surface grinding and coarse polishing of the 1.6 m flat. During this stage, electronic levels provided efficient measurements on global surface changes in the mirror. The electronic levels measure surface inclination or slope very accurately. They measured slope changes across the mirror surface. From the slope information, we can obtain surface information. Over 2 m, the electronic levels can measure to 50 nm rms of low order aberrations that include power and astigmatism. The use of electronic levels for flatness measurements is analyzed in detail. Surface figuring was performed with smaller tools (size ranging from 15 cm to 40 cm in diameter). A radial stroker was developed and used to drive the smaller tools; the radial stroker provided variable tool stroke and rotation (up to 8 revolutions per minute). Polishing software, initially developed for stressed laps, enabled computer controlled polishing and was used to generate simulated removal profiles by optimizing tool stroke and dwell to reduce the high zones on the mirror surface. The resulting simulations from the polishing software were then applied to the real mirror. The scanning pentaprism and the 1 meter vibration insensitive Fizeau interferometer provided accurate and efficient surface testing to guide the remaining fabrication. The scanning pentaprism, another slope test, measured power to 9 nm rms over 2 meters. The Fizeau interferometer measured 1

  11. Breakthrough capability for UVOIR space astronomy: Reaching the darkest sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Benson, Scott W.; Englander, Jacob; Falck, Robert D.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Oleson, Steven R.; Thronson, Harley A.

    2015-02-01

    We describe how availability of new solar electric propulsion (SEP) technology can substantially increase the science capability of space astronomy missions working within the near-UV to far-infrared (UVOIR) spectrum by making dark sky orbits accessible for the first time. We present a proof of concept case study in which SEP is used to enable a 700 kg Explorer-class observatory payload to reach an orbit beyond where the zodiacal dust limits observatory sensitivity. The resulting scientific performance advantage relative to a Sun-Earth L2 point orbit is presented and discussed. We find that making SEP available to astrophysics Explorers can enable this small payload program to rival the science performance of much larger long development-time systems. We also present flight dynamics analysis which illustrates that this concept can be extended beyond Explorers to substantially improve the sensitivity performance of heavier (7000 kg) flagship-class astrophysics payloads such as the UVOIR successor to the James Webb Space Telescope by using high power SEP that is being developed for the Asteroid Redirect Robotics Mission.

  12. Breakthrough Capability for UVOIR Space Astronomy: Reaching the Darkest Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Benson, Scott W.; Englander, Jacob; Falck, Robert D.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Kruk, Jeffery W.; Oleson, Steven R.; Thronson, Harley A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe how availability of new solar electric propulsion (SEP) technology can substantially increase the science capability of space astronomy missions working within the near-UV to far-infrared (UVOIR) spectrum by making dark sky orbits accessible for the first time. We present two case studies in which SEP is used to enable a 700 kg Explorer-class and 7000 kg flagship-class observatory payload to reach an orbit beyond where the zodiacal dust limits observatory sensitivity. The resulting scientific performance advantage relative to a Sun-Earth L2 point (SEL2) orbit is presented and discussed. We find that making SEP available to astrophysics Explorers can enable this small payload program to rival the science performance of much larger long development-time systems. Similarly, we find that astrophysics utilization of high power SEP being developed for the Asteroid Redirect Robotics Mission (ARRM) can have a substantial impact on the sensitivity performance of heavier flagship-class astrophysics payloads such as the UVOIR successor to the James Webb Space Telescope.

  13. Breakthrough Capability for UVOIR Space Astronomy: Reaching the Darkest Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Benson, Scott W.; Englander, Jacob; Falck, Robert D.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Oleson, Steven R.; Thronson, Harley A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe how availability of new solar electric propulsion (SEP) technology can substantially increase the science capability of space astronomy missions working within the near-UV to far-infrared (UVOIR) spectrum by making dark sky orbits accessible for the first time. We present a proof of concept case study in which SEP is used to enable a 700 kg Explorer-class observatory payload to reach an orbit beyond where the zodiacal dust limits observatory sensitivity. The resulting scientific performance advantage relative to a Sun-Earth L2 point orbit is presented and discussed. We find that making SEP available to astrophysics Explorers can enable this small payload program to rival the science performance of much larger long development-time systems. We also present flight dynamics analysis which illustrates that this concept can be extended beyond Explorers to substantially improve the sensitivity performance of heavier (7000 kg) flagship-class astrophysics payloads such as the UVOIR successor to the James Webb Space Telescope by using high power SEP that is being developed for the Asteroid Redirect Robotics Mission.

  14. Advanced Dispersed Fringe Sensing Algorithm for Coarse Phasing Segmented Mirror Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spechler, Joshua A.; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Sigrist, Norbert; Shi, Fang; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa A.

    2013-01-01

    Segment mirror phasing, a critical step of segment mirror alignment, requires the ability to sense and correct the relative pistons between segments from up to a few hundred microns to a fraction of wavelength in order to bring the mirror system to its full diffraction capability. When sampling the aperture of a telescope, using auto-collimating flats (ACFs) is more economical. The performance of a telescope with a segmented primary mirror strongly depends on how well those primary mirror segments can be phased. One such process to phase primary mirror segments in the axial piston direction is dispersed fringe sensing (DFS). DFS technology can be used to co-phase the ACFs. DFS is essentially a signal fitting and processing operation. It is an elegant method of coarse phasing segmented mirrors. DFS performance accuracy is dependent upon careful calibration of the system as well as other factors such as internal optical alignment, system wavefront errors, and detector quality. Novel improvements to the algorithm have led to substantial enhancements in DFS performance. The Advanced Dispersed Fringe Sensing (ADFS) Algorithm is designed to reduce the sensitivity to calibration errors by determining the optimal fringe extraction line. Applying an angular extraction line dithering procedure and combining this dithering process with an error function while minimizing the phase term of the fitted signal, defines in essence the ADFS algorithm.

  15. Thermal Analysis of the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) 8 Meter Primary Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornsby, Linda; Stahl, H. Philip; Hopkins, Randall C.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) preliminary design concept consists of an 8 meter diameter monolithic primary mirror enclosed in an insulated, optical tube with stray light baffles and a sunshade. ATLAST will be placed in orbit about the Sun-Earth L2 and will experience constant exposure to the sun. The insulation on the optical tube and sunshade serve to cold bias the telescope which helps to minimize thermal gradients. The primary mirror will be maintained at 280K with an active thermal control system. The geometric model of the primary mirror, optical tube, sun baffles, and sunshade was developed using Thermal Desktop(R) SINDA/FLUINT(R) was used for the thermal analysis and the radiation environment was analyzed using RADCAD(R). A XX node model was executed in order to characterize the static performance and thermal stability of the mirror during maneuvers. This is important because long exposure observations, such as extra-solar terrestrial planet finding and characterization, require a very stable observatory wave front. Steady state thermal analyses served to predict mirror temperatures for several different sun angles. Transient analyses were performed in order to predict thermal time constant of the primary mirror for a 20 degree slew or 30 degree roll maneuver. This paper describes the thermal model and provides details of the geometry, thermo-optical properties, and the environment which influences the thermal performance. All assumptions that were used in the analysis are also documented. Parametric analyses are summarized for design parameters including primary mirror coatings and sunshade configuration. Estimates of mirror heater power requirements are reported. The thermal model demonstrates results for the primary mirror heated from the back side and edges using a heater system with multiple independently controlled zones.

  16. Advanced metal mirror processing for tactical ISR systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, John P.

    2013-05-01

    Using its patented VQ™ finishing process, Raytheon EO Innovations has been producing low-scatter, low-figure and affordable aluminum 6061-based mirrors for long stand-off intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) systems in production since 2005. These common aperture multispectral systems require λ/30 root mean square (RMS) surface figure and sub-20Å RMS finishes for optimal visible imaging performance. This paper discusses the process results, scatter performance, and fabrication capabilities of Multispectral Reflective Lightweight Optics Technology (MeRLOT™), a new lightweight substrate material. This new technology enables lightweight, common-aperture, broadband performance that can be put in the hands of the warfighter for precision targeting and surveillance operations.

  17. 3D shape measurement of the aspheric mirror by advanced phase measuring deflectometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Su, Xianyu; Liu, Yuankun; Jing, Hailong

    2008-09-15

    An advanced Phase Measuring Deflectometry(PMD) is proposed to measure the three dimensional (3D) shape of the aspheric mirror. In the measurement process, a liquid crystal display(LCD)screen displaying sinusoidal fringe patterns and a camera observing the fringe patterns reflected via the tested mirror, are moved along the tested mirror optical axis, respectively. At each movement position, the camera records the fringe patterns of the screen located at two different positions. Using these fringe patterns, every camera pixels can find a corresponding point on the tested mirror and gets its coordinate and slope. By integrating, the 3D shape of the tested mirror can be reconstructed. Compared with the traditional PMD, this method doesn???t need complex calibration and can measure the absolute height of the aspheric mirror which has large range of surface geometries unambiguously. Furthermore, this method also has strong anti-noise ability. Computer simulations and preliminary experiment validate the feasibility of this method. PMID:18795046

  18. Advanced materials for multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet solar astronomy.

    PubMed

    Bogachev, S A; Chkhalo, N I; Kuzin, S V; Pariev, D E; Polkovnikov, V N; Salashchenko, N N; Shestov, S V; Zuev, S Y

    2016-03-20

    We provide an analysis of contemporary multilayer optics for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) solar astronomy in the wavelength ranges: λ=12.9-13.3  nm, λ=17-21  nm, λ=28-33  nm, and λ=58.4  nm. We found new material pairs, which will make new spaceborne experiments possible due to the high reflection efficiencies, spectral resolution, and long-term stabilities of the proposed multilayer coatings. In the spectral range λ=13  nm, Mo/Be multilayer mirrors were shown to demonstrate a better ratio of reflection efficiency and spectral resolution compared with the commonly used Mo/Si. In the spectral range λ=17-21  nm, a new multilayer structure Al/Si was proposed, which had higher spectral resolution along with comparable reflection efficiency compared with the commonly used Al/Zr multilayer structures. In the spectral range λ=30  nm, the Si/B4C/Mg/Cr multilayer structure turned out to best obey reflection efficiency and long-term stability. The B4C and Cr layers prevented mutual diffusion of the Si and Mg layers. For the spectral range λ=58  nm, a new multilayer Mo/Mg-based structure was developed; its reflection efficiency and long-term stability have been analyzed. We also investigated intrinsic stresses inherent for most of the multilayer structures and proposed possibilities for stress elimination. PMID:27140543

  19. Crack Branching and Fracture Mirror Data of Glasses and Advanced Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1998-01-01

    The fracture mirror and crack branching constants were determined from three glasses and nine advanced ceramics tested under various loading and specimen configurations in an attempt to use the constants as a data base for fractography. The ratios of fracture mirror or crack branching constant to fracture toughness were found to be approximately two for most ceramic materials tested. A demonstration of how to use the two constants as a tool for verifying stress measurements was presented for silicon nitride disk specimens subjected to high-temperature, constant stress-rate biaxial flexure testing.

  20. Recent Progress on 2012 SAT for UVOIR Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Del Hoyo, Javier G.; Rice, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    Astronomical observations in the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) spectral region are some of the more challenging due to the very distant and faint objects that are typically searched for in cosmic origin studies such as origin of large scale structure, the formation, evolution, and age of galaxies and the origin of stellar and planetary systems. These challenges are driving the need to improve the performance of optical coatings over a wide spectral range that would increase reflectance in mirrors and reduced absorption in dielectric filters used in optical telescope for FUV observations. This paper will present recent advances in reflectance performance for Al+MgF2 mirrors optimized for Lyman-alpha wavelength by performing the deposition of the MgF2 overcoat at elevated substrate temperatures. We will also present optical characterization of little studied rare-earth fluorides such as GdF3 and LuF3 that exhibit low-absorption over a wide wavelength range and could therefore be used as high refractive index alternatives fordielectric coatings at FUV wavelengths.

  1. A Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory: Study Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postman, Marc; Thronson, Harley A.; Feinberg, Lee; Redding, David; Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-01-01

    The scientific drivers for very high angular resolution coupled with very high sensitivity and wavefront stability in the UV and optical wavelength regime have been well established. These include characterization of exoplanets in the habitable zones of solar type stars, probing the physical properties of the circumgalactic medium around z < 2 galaxies, and resolving stellar populations across a broad range of galactic environments. The 2010 NRC Decadal Survey and the 2013 NASA Science Mission Directorate 30-Year Roadmap identified a large-aperture UVOIR observatory as a priority future space mission. Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI team has extended several earlier studies of the technology and engineering requirements needed to design and build a single filled aperture 10-meter class space-based telescope that can enable these ambitious scientific observations. We present here an overview of our new technical work including a brief summary of the reference science drivers as well as in-depth investigations of the viable telescope architectures, the requirements on thermal control and active wavefront control systems, and the range of possible launch configurations.

  2. Fundamental Performance Improvement of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors for UVOIR Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, Benjamin

    Ultraviolet, Optical, and near-Infrared Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (UVOIR MKIDs) are one of the most powerful new technologies to emerge out of the NASA APRA detectors program in the last decade. This proposal seeks to build on previous APRA grants to drastically improve the performance of UVOIR MKIDs. Like an X-ray microcalorimeter ultraviolet, optical, and near-IR (UVOIR) MKIDs are cryogenic detectors capable of detecting single photons and measuring their energy without filters or gratings. Our team has created this technology from the ground up, and fielded a 2024-pixel UVOIR MKID array on five separate observing runs at 5-m class telescopes. With 34 observing nights successfully completed and two astronomy papers published using MKID data (the first astronomy papers published using MKID data at any wavelength), UVOIR MKIDs are at TRL 5-6 for ground-based astronomy, and TRL 3 for space-based astronomy. The outstanding potential of these detectors was recognized in the recent NASA long term vision, "Enduring Quests, Daring Visions'', which recognized on page 88 that MKIDs have tremendous potential for future NASA UVOIR space missions, especially for finding Earth twins around nearby stars: "..microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) would be a game-changing capability..''. Current UVOIR MKIDs feature array sizes in the 10-30 kpix range, energy resolution R=16 at 254 nm, ~70% pixel yield, and quantum efficiency that goes from 70% in the UV to 25% in the near-IR. These arrays, fabricated out of Titanium Nitride (TiN) on a high resistivity silicon substrate, are fully functional for ground-based science. However, our current MKIDs are far away from their theoretical limits, especially in yield (70% vs. 100%) and energy resolution (R=10 vs. R=100 at 400 nm). The yield is of especially urgent concern as missing pixels make accurate photometry difficult, especially for rapidly time variable sources like compact binaries that we have been studying

  3. Production of the 4.26 m ZERODUR mirror blank for the Advanced Technology Solar telescope (ATST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Werner, Thomas; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope, ATST) will be the most powerful solar telescope in the world. It is currently being built by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) in a height of 3000 m above sea level on the mountain Haleakala of Maui, Hawaii. The primary mirror blank of diameter 4.26 m is made of the extremely low thermal expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR® of SCHOTT AG Advanced Optics. The DKIST primary mirror design is extremely challenging. With a mirror thickness of only 78 to 85 mm it is the smallest thickness ever machined on a mirror of 4.26 m in diameter. Additionally the glassy ZERODUR® casting is one of the largest in size ever produced for a 4 m class ZERODUR® mirror blank. The off axis aspherical mirror surface required sophisticated grinding procedures to achieve the specified geometrical tolerance. The small thickness of about 80 mm required special measures during processing, lifting and transport. Additionally acid etch treatment was applied to the convex back-surface and the conical shaped outer diameter surface to improve the strength of the blank. This paper reports on the challenging tasks and the achievements on the material property and dimensional specification parameter during the production of the 4.26 m ZERODUR® primary mirror blank for AURA.

  4. Metrology of a mirror at the Advanced Photon Source : comparison between optical and x-ray measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Assoufid, L.

    1998-10-14

    This paper describes metrology of a vertically focusing mirror on the bending magnet beamline in sector-1 of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. The mirror was evaluated using measurements from both an optical long trace profiler and x-rays. Slope error profiles obtained with the two methods were compared and were found to be in a good agreement. Further comparisons were made between x-ray measurements and results from the SHADOW ray-tracing code.

  5. Testing Dark Energy with the Advanced Liquid-Mirror Probe of Asteroids, Cosmology and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LoVerde, M.; Corasaniti, P. S.; Crotts, A.; Blake, C.

    2006-06-01

    The Advanced Liquid-Mirror Probe of Asteroids, Cosmology and Astrophysics (ALPACA) is a proposed 8-meter liquid mirror telescope surveying ˜ 1000 deg2 of the southern-hemisphere sky. It will be a remarkably simple and inexpensive telescope that will nonetheless deliver a powerful sample of optical data for studying dark energy. The bulk of the cosmological data consists of nightly, high signal-to-noise, multiband light curves of SN Ia. At the end of the three-year run ALPACA is expected to collect ˜ 100,000 SN Ia up to z ˜ 1. This will allow accurate calibration of the standard-candle relation and reduce the systematic uncertainties. The survey will also provide several other datasets such as the detection of baryon acoustic oscillations in the matter power spectrum and shear weak lensing measurements. In this preliminary analysis we forecast constraints on dark energy parameters from SN Ia and baryon acoustic oscillations. The combination of these two datasets will provide competitive constraints on the dark energy parameters with minimal prior assumptions. Further studies are needed to address the accuracy of weak lensing measurements.

  6. Testing dark energy with the Advanced Liquid-mirror Probe of Asteroids, Cosmology and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corasaniti, Pier Stefano; LoVerde, Marilena; Crotts, Arlin; Blake, Chris

    2006-06-01

    The Advanced Liquid-mirror Probe of Asteroids, Cosmology and Astrophysics (ALPACA) is a proposed 8-m liquid-mirror telescope surveying ~1000deg2 of the Southern hemisphere sky. It will be a remarkably simple and inexpensive telescope that none the less will deliver a powerful sample of optical data for studying dark energy. The bulk of the cosmological data consist of nightly, high signal-to-noise ratio, multiband light curves of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). At the end of the 3-yr run, ALPACA is expected to collect >~100000 SNe Ia up to z ~ 1. This will allow us to reduce present systematic uncertainties affecting the standard-candle relation. The survey will also provide several other data sets such as the detection of baryon acoustic oscillations in the matter power spectrum and shear weak-lensing measurements. In this preliminary analysis, we forecast constraints on dark energy parameters from SNe Ia and baryon acoustic oscillations. The combination of these two data sets will provide competitive constraints on the dark energy parameters under minimal prior assumptions. Further studies are needed to address the accuracy of weak-lensing measurements.

  7. SiC lightweight telescopes for advanced space applications. I - Mirror technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anapol, Michael I.; Hadfield, Peter

    1992-01-01

    A SiC based telescope is an extremely attractive emerging technology which offers the lightweight and stiffness features of beryllium, the optical performance of glass to diffraction limited visible resolution, superior optical/thermal stability to cryogenic temperatures, and the cost advantages of an aluminum telescope. SSG has developed various SiC mirrors with and without a silicon coating and tested these mirrors over temperature ranges from +50 C to -250 C. Our test results show less than 0.2 waves P-V in visible wavefront change and no hysteresis over this wide temperature range. Several SSG mirrors are representative of very lightweight SiC/Si mirrors including (1) a 9 cm diameter, high aspect ratio mirror weighing less than 30 grams and (2) a 23 cm diameter eggcrated mirror weighing less than 400 grams. SSG has also designed and analyzed a 0.6 meter SiC based, on axis, three mirror reimaging telescope in which the primary mirror weighs less than 6 kg and a 0.5 meter GOES-like scan mirror. SSG has also diamond turned several general aspheric SiC/Si mirrors with excellent cryo optical performance.

  8. The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) Technology Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahle, Carl; Balasubramanian, K.; Bolcar, M.; Clampin, M.; Feinberg, L.; Hartman, K.; Mosier, C.; Quijada, M.; Rauscher, B.; Redding, D.; Shaklan, S.; Stahl, P.; Thronson, H.

    2014-01-01

    We present the key technologies and capabilities that will enable a future, large-aperture ultravioletopticalinfrared (UVOIR) space observatory. These include starlight suppression systems, vibration isolation and control systems, lightweight mirror segments, detector systems, and mirror coatings. These capabilities will provide major advances over current and near-future observatories for sensitivity, angular resolution, and starlight suppression. The goals adopted in our study for the starlight suppression system are 10-10 contrast with an inner working angle of 40 milliarcsec and broad bandpass. We estimate that a vibration and isolation control system that achieves a total system vibration isolation of 140 dB for a vibration-isolated mass of 5000 kg is required to achieve the high wavefront error stability needed for exoplanet coronagraphy. Technology challenges for lightweight mirror segments include diffraction-limited optical quality and high wavefront error stability as well as low cost, low mass, and rapid fabrication. Key challenges for the detector systems include visible-blind, high quantum efficiency UV arrays, photon counting visible and NIR arrays for coronagraphic spectroscopy and starlight wavefront sensing and control, and detectors with deep full wells with low persistence and radiation tolerance to enable transit imaging and spectroscopy at all wavelengths. Finally, mirror coatings with high reflectivity ( 90), high uniformity ( 1) and low polarization ( 1) that are scalable to large diameter mirror substrates will be essential for ensuring that both high throughput UV observations and high contrast observations can be performed by the same observatory.

  9. Thermal effects and mirror surface figure requirements for a diagnostic beamline at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, T. ); Sharma, S. )

    1991-10-28

    An imaging beamline based on a Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror configuration has been designed to image the electron beam in the ALS storage ring, to measure its size and shape. The electron beam emittance will be small ({epsilon}h = 3.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} m rad) and the quality of the image is extremely sensitive to surface figure distortion of the mirrors. Thermal distortions and surface temperatures have been calculated for radiatively cooled mirrors of various materials in a search for a simple design which avoids water cooling. The choice of mirror material and the thermal and mechanical design is discussed. 6 refs.

  10. Analytical Verifications in Cryogenic Testing of NGST Advanced Mirror System Demonstrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, Ramona; Levine, Marie; VanBuren, Dave; Kegley, Jeff; Green, Joseph; Hadaway, James; Presson, Joan; Cline, Todd; Stahl, H. Philip (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ground based testing is a critical and costly part of component, assembly, and system verifications of large space telescopes. At such tests, however, with integral teamwork by planners, analysts, and test personnel, segments can be included to validate specific analytical parameters and algorithms at relatively low additional cost. This paper opens with strategy of analytical verification segments added to vacuum cryogenic testing of Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) assemblies. These AMSD assemblies incorporate material and architecture concepts being considered in the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) design. The test segments for workmanship testing, cold survivability, and cold operation optical throughput are supplemented by segments for analytical verifications of specific structural, thermal, and optical parameters. Utilizing integrated modeling and separate materials testing, the paper continues with support plan for analyses, data, and observation requirements during the AMSD testing, currently slated for late calendar year 2002 to mid calendar year 2003. The paper includes anomaly resolution as gleaned by authors from similar analytical verification support of a previous large space telescope, then closes with draft of plans for parameter extrapolations, to form a well-verified portion of the integrated modeling being done for NGST performance predictions.

  11. End-to-End Assessment of a Large Aperture Segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Bolcar, Matt; Liu, Alice; Guyon, Olivier; Stark,Chris; Arenberg, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Key challenges of a future large aperture, segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope capable of performing a spectroscopic survey of hundreds of Exoplanets will be sufficient stability to achieve 10-10 contrast measurements and sufficient throughput and sensitivity for high yield Exo-Earth spectroscopic detection. Our team has collectively assessed an optimized end to end architecture including a high throughput coronagraph capable of working with a segmented telescope, a cost-effective and heritage based stable segmented telescope, a control architecture that minimizes the amount of new technologies, and an Exo-Earth yield assessment to evaluate potential performance.

  12. Advances in thermal control and performance of the MMT M1 mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. D.; Williams, G. G.; Callahan, S.; Comisso, B.; Ortiz, R.; Williams, J. T.

    2010-07-01

    Strategies for thermal control of the 6.5-meter diameter borosilicate honeycomb primary (M1) mirror at the MMT Observatory have included: 1) direct control of ventilation system chiller setpoints by the telescope operator, 2) semiautomated control of chiller setpoints, using a fixed offset from the ambient temperature, and 3) most recently, an automated temperature controller for conditioned air. Details of this automated controller, including the integration of multiple chillers, heat exchangers, and temperature/dew point sensors, are presented here. Constraints and sanity checks for thermal control are also discussed, including: 1) mirror and hardware safety, 2) aluminum coating preservation, and 3) optimization of M1 thermal conditions for science acquisition by minimizing both air-to-glass temperature differences, which cause mirror seeing, and internal glass temperature gradients, which cause wavefront errors. Consideration is given to special operating conditions, such as high dew and frost points. Precise temperature control of conditioned ventilation air as delivered to the M1 mirror cell is also discussed. The performance of the new automated controller is assessed and compared to previous control strategies. Finally, suggestions are made for further refinement of the M1 mirror thermal control system and related algorithms.

  13. Vibratory response of a mirror support/positioning system for the Advanced Photon Source project at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Basdogan, I.; Shu, Deming; Kuzay, T.M.; Royston, T.J.; Shabana, A.A.

    1996-08-01

    The vibratory response of a typical mirror support/positioning system used at the experimental station of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) project at Argonne National Laboratory is investigated. Positioning precision and stability are especially critical when the supported mirror directs a high-intensity beam aimed at a distant target. Stability may be compromised by low level, low frequency seismic and facility-originated vibrations traveling through the ground and/or vibrations caused by flow-structure interactions in the mirror cooling system. The example case system has five positioning degrees of freedom through the use of precision actuators and rotary and linear bearings. These linkage devices result in complex, multi-dimensional vibratory behavior that is a function of the range of positioning configurations. A rigorous multibody dynamical approach is used for the development of the system equations. Initial results of the study, including estimates of natural frequencies and mode shapes, as well as limited parametric design studies, are presented. While the results reported here are for a particular system, the developed vibratory analysis approach is applicable to the wide range of high-precision optical positioning systems encountered at the APS and at other comparable facilities.

  14. Profile Coating for KB Mirror Applications at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Assoufid, L.; Macrander, A.; Ice, G.; Tischler, J.

    2002-01-01

    For microfocusing x-ray mirrors, an ellipse shape is desirable for aberration-free optics. However, it is difficult to polish elliptical mirrors to x-ray quality smoothness. A differential coating method to convert a cylindrical mirror to an elliptical one has been previously reported The differential coating was obtained by varying the sputter source power while the mirror was passed through. Here we report a new method of profile coating to achieve the same goal more effectively. In the profile coating, the sputter source power is kept constant, while the substrate is passed over a contoured mask at a constant speed. The mask is placed very close to the substrate level (within 1.0 mm) on a shield-can over the sputter gun. Four-inch-diameter Si wafers were coated through a 100-mm-long by 152-mm-wide aperture on the top of the shield-can. The thickness distribution was then obtained using a spectroscopic ellipsometer with computer-controlled X-Y translation stages. A model has been developed to fit the measured thickness distribution of stationary growth. The relative thickness weightings are then digitized at every point 1 mm apart for the entire open area of the aperture. When the substrate is moving across the shield-can during a deposition, the film thickness is directly proportional to the length of the opening on the can along the moving direction. By equating the summation of relative weighting to the required relative thickness at the same position, the length of the opening at that position can be determined. By repeating the same process for the whole length of the required profile, a contour can be obtained for a desired thickness profile. The contoured mask is then placed on the opening of the shield-can. The number of passes and the moving speed of the substrate are determined according to the required thickness and the growth-rate calibration. The mirror coating profile is determined from the ideal surface figure of a focus ellipse and that obtained

  15. Advanced ultraviolet-resistant silver mirrors for use in solar reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Gary J.; Gee, Randy

    2009-11-03

    A silver mirror construction that maintains a high percentage of hemispherical reflectance throughout the UV and visible spectrum when used in solar reflectors, comprising:a) a pressure sensitive adhesive layer positioned beneath a silver overlay;b) a polymer film disposed on the silver overlay;c) an adhesive layer positioned on the polymer film; andd) a UV screening acrylic film disposed on the adhesive layer.

  16. End-to-End Assessment of a Large Aperture Segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Rioux, Norman; Bolcar, Matthew; Liu, Alice; Guyon, Oliver; Stark, Chris; Arenberg, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Key challenges of a future large aperture, segmented Ultraviolet Optical Infrared (UVOIR) Telescope capable of performing a spectroscopic survey of hundreds of Exoplanets will be sufficient stability to achieve 10^-10 contrast measurements and sufficient throughput and sensitivity for high yield Exo-Earth spectroscopic detection. Our team has collectively assessed an optimized end to end architecture including a high throughput coronagraph capable of working with a segmented telescope, a cost-effective and heritage based stable segmented telescope, a control architecture that minimizes the amount of new technologies, and an Exo-Earth yield assessment to evaluate potential performance. These efforts are combined through integrated modeling, coronagraph evaluations, and Exo-Earth yield calculations to assess the potential performance of the selected architecture. In addition, we discusses the scalability of this architecture to larger apertures and the technological tall poles to enabling it.

  17. Profile coating for KB mirror applications at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chian; Assoufid, L.; Macrander, Albert T.; Ice, Gene E.; Tischler, J. Z.

    2002-12-01

    For microfocusing x-ray mirrors, an ellipse shape is desirable for aberration-free optics. However, it is difficult to polish elliptical mirrors to x-ray quality smoothness. A differential coating method to convert a cylindrical mirror to an elliptical one has been previously reported The differential coating was obtained by varying the sputter source power while the mirror was passed through. Here we report a new method of profile coating to achieve the same goal more effectively. In the profile coating, the sputter source power is kept constant, while the substrate is passed over a contoured mask at a constant speed. The mask is placed very close to the substrate level (within 1.0 mm) on a shield-can over the sputter gun. Four-inch-diameter Si wafers were coated through a 100-mm-long by 152-mm-wide aperture on the top of the shield-can. The thickness distribution was then obtained using a spectroscopic ellipsometer with computer-controlled X-Y translation stages. A model has been developed to fit the measured thickness distribution of stationary growth. The relative thickness weightings are then digitized at every point 1 mm apart for the entire open area of the aperture. When the substrate is moving across the shield-can during a deposition, the film thickness is directly proportional to the length of the opening on the can along the moving direction. By equating the summation of relative weighting to the required relative thickness at the same position, the length of the opening at that position can be determined. By repeating the same process for the whole length of the required profile, a contour can be obtained for a desired thickness profile. The contoured mask is then placed on the opening of the shield-can. The number of passes and the moving speed of the substrate are determined according to the required thickness and the growth-rate calibration. The mirror coating profile is determined from the ideal surface figure of a focus ellipse and that obtained

  18. Topological Mirror Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Kane, C. L.; Mele, E. J.

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate the existence of topological superconductors (SCs) protected by mirror and time-reversal symmetries. D-dimensional (D=1, 2, 3) crystalline SCs are characterized by 2D-1 independent integer topological invariants, which take the form of mirror Berry phases. These invariants determine the distribution of Majorana modes on a mirror symmetric boundary. The parity of total mirror Berry phase is the Z2 index of a class DIII SC, implying that a DIII topological SC with a mirror line must also be a topological mirror SC but not vice versa and that a DIII SC with a mirror plane is always time-reversal trivial but can be mirror topological. We introduce representative models and suggest experimental signatures in feasible systems. Advances in quantum computing, the case for nodal SCs, the case for class D, and topological SCs protected by rotational symmetries are pointed out.

  19. Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors to focus hard X-rays in two dimensions as fabricated, tested and installed at the Advanced Photon Source.

    PubMed

    Kujala, Naresh; Marathe, Shashidhara; Shu, Deming; Shi, Bing; Qian, Jun; Maxey, Evan; Finney, Lydia; Macrander, Albert; Assoufid, Lahsen

    2014-07-01

    The micro-focusing performance for hard X-rays of a fixed-geometry elliptical Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) mirrors assembly fabricated, tested and finally implemented at the micro-probe beamline 8-BM of the Advanced Photon Source is reported. Testing of the K-B mirror system was performed at the optics and detector test beamline 1-BM. K-B mirrors of length 80 mm and 60 mm were fabricated by profile coating with Pt metal to produce focal lengths of 250 mm and 155 mm for 3 mrad incident angle. For the critical angle of Pt, a broad bandwidth of energies up to 20 keV applies. The classical K-B sequential mirror geometry was used, and mirrors were mounted on micro-translation stages. The beam intensity profiles were measured by differentiating the curves of intensity data measured using a wire-scanning method. A beam size of 1.3 µm (V) and 1.2 µm (H) was measured with monochromatic X-rays of 18 keV at 1-BM. After installation at 8-BM the measured focus met the design requirements. In this paper the fabrication and metrology of the K-B mirrors are reported, as well as the focusing performances of the full mirrors-plus-mount set-up at both beamlines. PMID:24971959

  20. Design and analysis of a beryllium three-mirror anastigmat telescope for the Japanese Advanced Meteorological Imager (JAMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, James L., Jr.; Pavlov, Milutin M.

    2005-01-01

    Raytheon's Santa Barbara Remote Sensing facility in Goleta, California designed and built an advanced meteorological imager for the Japanese Ministry of Transport between March, 2000 and July, 2002 for MTSAT-1R. One of the most stressing requirements is visible band image quality near local midnight. The 30 month program schedule forced the design team to make key decisions about the telescope design based on very preliminary analyses. Subsequent detailed analyses revealed that thermal distortions in the beryllium three-mirror anastigmat telescope would cause unacceptable performance degradation during much of the orbit. Through careful thermal, structural, and optical (STOP) analysis, the design team was able to optimize the designs of the telescope and thermal control system while meeting the challenging procurement schedule for the telescope.

  1. Beyond JWST: Science Drivers for the Next Great UVOIR Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumlinson, Jason; Seager, Sara; Dalcanton, Julianne; Postman, Marc; Aigrain, Suzanne; battel, Steven; Brandt, W. Niel; Conroy, Charlie; Feinberg, Lee; Gezari, Suvi; Guyon, Olivier; Harris, Walter M.; Hirata, Chris; Mather, John C.; Redding, David; Schiminovich, David; Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-01-01

    We report on the AURA 'Beyond JWST' committee's considerations and conclusions regarding the science case for the development of a large UVOIR observatory, to be launched following JWST and WFIRST-AFTA. We find that a space-based UVOIR telescope of 10 meters or more in aperture will uniquely enable a wide range of transformational science investigations by itself and in tandem with ground-based OIR and radio facilities in its era. The chief goal of this facility is to assess the possibility of life beyond our Solar System by discovering Earth-like planets in the habitable zones of their host stars, via direct imaging, and by searching spectroscopically for biosignature gases in the atmospheres of the best exo-Earth candidates. The large aperture and mission architecture required to characterize the atmospheres of a significant number of potentially life-bearing planets will also transform studies of the galaxies and stars that led up to them. At 10 meters or larger, the telescope will spatially resolve scales of 100 AU everywhere in the Milky Way, 0.1 parsec everywhere in the Local Group, and 100 parsec everywhere in the observable Universe. This unprecedented spatial resolution over large fields, with stable optics and low backgrounds, will allow astronomers to follow, in high definition, the formation and evolution of the star forming regions inside galaxies over the past 10 Gyr, to robustly determine the complete star formation histories in every galaxy within the local volume (to 10 Mpc), and to track the motions of virtually any star in the Milky Way. High spectral resolution and multi-object spectroscopy in the UV will enable revolutionary new studies of gas flows in galaxies, bodies in the outer solar system, and the evolution of the most massive stars. We present these compelling science drivers and their associated observational requirements here; we summarize the technology requirements for high angular resolution, sensitivity, wavefront stability

  2. Advancement of the segment support system for the Thirty Meter Telescope primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Eric C.; Baffes, Curtis; Mast, Terry; Nelson, Jerry; Platt, Benjamin; Ponchione, R. J.; Ponslet, Eric; Setoodeh, Shahriar; Sirota, Mark; Stephens, Vince; Stepp, Larry; Tubb, Alan

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents refinements to the design of the TMT primary mirror segment passive-support system that are effective in reducing gravity print-through and thermal distortion effects. First, a novel analytical method is presented for tuning the axial and lateral support systems in a manner that results in improved optical performance when subject to varying gravity fields. The method utilizes counterweights attached to the whiffletrees to cancel astigmatic and comatic errors normally resulting when the lateral support system resists transverse loads induced by gravity. Secondly, several central diaphragm designs are presented and analyzed to assess lateral-gravity and thermal distortion performance: 1) a simple flat diaphragm, 2) a stress-relieving diaphragm having a slotted outer rim and a circumferential convolution near the outside diameter, and 3) a flat diaphragm having a slotted outer rim. The latter design is chosen based on results from analytical studies which show it to have better overall optical performance in the presence of gravity and thermal environments.

  3. 8 Meter Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST-8m)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    ATLAST-8m (Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope) is a proposed 8-meter monolithic UV/optical/NIR space observatory (wavelength range 110 to 2500 nm) to be placed in orbit at Sun-Earth L2 by NASA's planned Ares V heavy lift vehicle. Given its very high angular resolution (15 mas @ 500 nm), sensitivity and performance stability, ATLAST-8m is capable of achieving breakthroughs in a broad range of astrophysics including: Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy? An 8-meter UVOIR observatory has the performance required to detect habitability (H2O, atmospheric column density) and biosignatures (O2, O3, CH4) in terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres, to reveal the underlying physics that drives star formation, and to trace the complex interactions between dark matter, galaxies, and intergalactic medium. The ATLAST Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study developed a detailed point design for an 8-m monolithic observatory including optical design; structural design/analysis including primary mirror support structure, sun shade and secondary mirror support structure; thermal analysis; spacecraft including structure, propulsion, GN&C, avionics, power systems and reaction wheels; mass and power budgets; and system cost. The results of which were submitted by invitation to NRC's 2010 Astronomy & Astrophysics Decadal Survey.

  4. Mirror Technology Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Phil

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mirror Technology Roadmap identifies specific capabilities requiring significant advances in optical fabrication and testing to enable the next generation of large-aperture space telescopes for astronomy and Earth science missions ranging from x-ray to infrared.

  5. Mirror monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Mankos, Marian; Shadman, Khashayar

    2014-12-02

    energy of 80-120 keV). Specialized software packages that have been developed by MEBS, Ltd. were used to calculate the electron optical properties of the key monochromator components: namely, the magnetic prism, the electron mirror, and the electron lenses. In the final step, these results were folded into a model describing the key electron-optical parameters of the complete monochromator. The simulations reveal that the mirror monochromator can reduce the energy spread of a Schottky electron source, an established electron emitter used widely in EMs, to 10 meV for practical beam current values and that further reduction of the energy spread down to 3 meV is possible for low current applications with a Cold Field Emitter (an electron source with 10x the brightness of a Schottky source). MirrorChroms can be designed and built to attach to different types of TEMs and SEMs, thus making them suitable for enhancing the study of the structure, composition, and bonding states of new materials at the nanoscale to advance material science research in the field of nanotechnology as well as biomedical research.

  6. Virtual Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The multiple-reflection photograph in Fig. 1 was taken in an elevator on board the cruise ship Norwegian Jade in March 2008. Three of the four walls of the elevator were mirrored, allowing me to see the combination of two standard arrangements of plane mirrors: two mirrors set at 90 degrees to each other and two parallel mirrors. Optical phenomena…

  7. EUV reflectance characterization of the 94/304 ? flight secondary AIA mirror at beamline 6.3.2 of the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Soufli, R; Spiller, E; Aquila, A L; Gullikson, E M; Windt, D L

    2006-02-22

    The AIA secondary flight mirror, previously coated at Columbia University with Mg/SiC for the 303.8 {angstrom} channel and Mo/Y for the 93.9 {angstrom} channel was characterized by means of EUV reflectance measurements at beamline 6.3.2 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron at LBNL on January 10, 2006. Paul Boerner (LMSAL) also participated in these measurements.

  8. Design, development, and manufacturing of highly advanced and cost effective aluminium sputtering plant for large area telescopic mirrors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Rajeev R.; Sanjith K., K.; Mohanachandran, K.; Sakhamuri, Nagarjun; Shukla, Vishal; Gupta, Alok

    2012-09-01

    The design, development and manufacturing of a fully automated and cost effective aluminum sputtering unit for the deposition of aluminum on large area telescopic mirrors (maximum diameter of 3600mm) is presented here. The unit employs DC planar magnetron sputtering for the deposition process. A large area glow discharge unit is also designed for the pre-cleaning of the mirrors prior to aluminum coating. A special kinematic support structure with rotation is designed to support heavy mirrors of large area to minimize the deflection of the mirrors during deposition process. A custom designed 'mask' is employed in the magnetron system to improve the thickness uniformity within <±3%. The adhesion, thickness uniformity and reflectivity properties are studied in detail to validate the sputtering plant. Special fixtures have been designed for the system to accommodate smaller mirrors and studies have been conducted for the coatings and reported in the paper. The unit was successfully tested at HHV facility in Bangalore and will be installed at the ARIES Facility, Nainital.

  9. Controllable Mirror Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A deformable Mirror Device (DMD) is a type of spatial light modulator in which mirrors fabricated monolithically on a silicon chip are deformed, or tilted, under electronic control to change the direction of light that falls upon the mirror. NASA and Texas Instruments (TI) have worked to develop this technology, which has subsequently been commercialized by TI. Initial application is the DMD 2000 Travel Information Printer for high speed, high volume printing of airline tickets and boarding passes. Other possible applications range from real-time object tracking to advanced industrial machine vision systems.

  10. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.; Bender, Donald A.

    1994-01-01

    A unique lens or mirror mount having adjustable constraints at two key locations to allow for "X" and "Y" tilts of the mirror only. The device uses two pair of flexures of a type such that the pivots of the mirror gimble are rigidly fixed in all planes allowing the device to have zero stacking tolerance and zero wear over time.

  11. Einstein's Mirror

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Skeparovski, Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Reflection of light from a plane mirror in uniform rectilinear motion is a century-old problem, intimately related to the foundations of special relativity. The problem was first investigated by Einstein in his famous 1905 paper by using the Lorentz transformations to switch from the mirror's rest frame to the frame where the mirror moves at a…

  12. Chiral mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Eric; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2015-06-01

    Mirrors are used in telescopes, microscopes, photo cameras, lasers, satellite dishes, and everywhere else, where redirection of electromagnetic radiation is required making them arguably the most important optical component. While conventional isotropic mirrors will reflect linear polarizations without change, the handedness of circularly polarized waves is reversed upon reflection. Here, we demonstrate a type of mirror reflecting one circular polarization without changing its handedness, while absorbing the other. The polarization-preserving mirror consists of a planar metasurface with a subwavelength pattern that cannot be superimposed with its mirror image without being lifted out of its plane, and a conventional mirror spaced by a fraction of the wavelength from the metasurface. Such mirrors enable circularly polarized lasers and Fabry-Pérot cavities with enhanced tunability, gyroscopic applications, polarization-sensitive detectors of electromagnetic waves, and can be used to enhance spectroscopies of chiral media.

  13. Micromachined mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conant, Robert Alan

    This dissertation discusses the fundamental limits of scanning mirror design, focusing on the limitations due to the interaction between mechanical properties (mirror flatness and dynamic deformation), and optical properties (beam divergence and optical resolution). The performance criteria for both resonant-scanning mirrors and steady-state, beam-positioning mirrors are related to the mirror geometries, desired optical resolution, material properties, and mechanical resonant frequencies. The optical resolution of the scanning mirror is linearly dependent on the mirror length, so longer mirrors should provide higher-resolution scanners. However, when undergoing an angular acceleration mirrors exhibit dynamic deformation, which is shown to be proportional to the fifth power of the length. Two different implementations of MEMS scanning mirrors are presented: polysilicon surface-micromachined mirrors and a new design we call the Staggered Torsional Electrostatic Combdrive (STEC) micromirror. The surface-micromachined mirrors are shown to be capable of reliable operation, but they have significant performance limitations caused by the limited thickness obtainable with the LPCVD-polysilicon structures. Calculations show that surface-micromachined mirrors of thickness 1.5 mum and diameter 550 mum are only capable of scanning +/-10 degrees at 251 Hz while retaining diffraction-limited optical performance. The STEC micromirrors, designed to overcome the limitations of the surface-micromachined mirrors, are capable of much higher-speed scanning (up to 61 kHz) without performance-limiting dynamic deformation of the mirror surface. The STEC micromirror fabrication process is extended to create Tensile Optical Surface (TOS) micromirrors---mirrors with thick silicon rib support structures and thin membranes that provide the reflective surface. An application of scanning mirrors is presented: a raster-scanning video display. This demonstration uses two surface

  14. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Primary Mirror Material Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Feinberg, Lee D.; Russell, Kevin; Texter, Scott

    2004-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) conducted a phase down select process via the Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) project to assess the Technology Readiness Level of various candidate mirror materials. This process culminated in the selection of Beryllium as the JWST primary mirror material. This paper outlines the mirror evaluation process, defines the selection criteria and summarizes the candidate mirror's performances.

  15. The Athena Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wille, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The Athena mission (Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics) requires lightweight X-ray Wolter optics with a high angular resolution and large effective area. For achieving an effective area of 2 m^2 (at 1 keV) and an angular resolution of below 5 arcsec, the Silicon Pore Optics technology was developed by ESA together with a consortium of European industry. Silicon Pore Optics are made of commercial Si wafers using process technology adapted from the semiconductor industry. We present the current design of the Athena mirror concentrating on the technology development status of the Silicon Pore Optics, ranging from the manufacturing of single mirror plates towards complete focusing mirror modules and their integration into the mirror structure.

  16. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.; Bender, D.A.

    1994-10-04

    A unique lens or mirror mount having adjustable constraints at two key locations to allow for ''X'' and ''Y'' tilts of the mirror only is disclosed. The device uses two pair of flexures of a type such that the pivots of the mirror gimble are rigidly fixed in all planes allowing the device to have zero stacking tolerance and zero wear over time. 4 figs.

  17. Magic Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2011-01-01

    "Magic mirrors" were so named because, when they were positioned to throw a reflected patch of sunlight on a nearby wall, this area contained an outline of a design cast on the back of the (bronze) mirror. Investigations begun in the 19th century showed that this was a response to heavy localized pressures exerted on the face of the thin mirror…

  18. Slumped mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pteancu, Mircea; Dragan, Dorin; Dragan, Olivier; Miron, Andrei; Stanescu, Octavian

    2008-02-01

    The authors discusse the construction of slumped mirrors, their fabrication and testing (polishing and lapping). An important topic of the discussion is thermal fabrication of mirrors by using of matrixes. One of the authors of the entry is combining astronomy and aquariums construction.

  19. Einstein's Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Skeparovski, Aleksandar

    2008-10-01

    Reflection of light from a plane mirror in uniform rectilinear motion is a century-old problem, intimately related to the foundations of special relativity.1-4 The problem was first investigated by Einstein in his famous 1905 paper by using the Lorentz transformations to switch from the mirror's rest frame to the frame where the mirror moves at a constant velocity.5 Einstein showed an intriguing fact that the usual law of reflection would not hold in the case of a uniformly moving mirror, that is, the angles of incidence and reflection of the light would not equal each other. Later on, it has been shown that the law of reflection at a moving mirror can be obtained in various alternative ways,6-10 but none of them seems suitable for bringing this interesting subject into the high school classroom.

  20. Mirror, Mirror on the Wall...?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pflaster, Gail

    1979-01-01

    The study determined the value of using a mirror for speech teaching by recording manner, place, voicing, and blend errors produced by 27 hearing-impaired children (5-13 years old) while imitating consonant-vowel syllables under three conditions (audition alone, audition plus direct vision, and audition plus vision using a mirror). (Author)

  1. JWST Mirror Technology Development Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2007-01-01

    Mirror technology is a critical enabling capability for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). JWST requires a Primary Mirror Segment Assembly (PMSA) that can survive launch, deploy and align itself to form a 25 square meter collecting area 6.5 meter diameter primary mirror with a 131 nm rms wavefront error at temperatures less than 50K and provide stable optical performance. At the inception of JWST in 1996, such a capability did not exist. A highly successful technology development program was initiated including the Sub-scale Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator (SBMD) and Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) projects. These projects along with flight program activities have matured and demonstrated mirror technology for JWST. Directly traceable prototypes or flight hardware has been built, tested and operated in a relevant environment. This paper summarizes that technology development effort.

  2. Fused silica mirror development for SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, W. P., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An advanced design, lightweight, fuse-quartz mirror of sandwich construction was evaluated for optical figure performance at cryogenic temperatures. A low temperature shroud was constructed with an integral mirror mount and interface to a cryostat for use in a vacuum chamber. The mirror was tested to 13 K. Cryogenic distortion of the mirror was measured interferometrically. Separate interferometry of the chamber window during the test permitted subtraction of the small window distortions from the data. Results indicate that the imaging performance of helium cooled, infrared telescopes will be improved using this type of mirror without correction of cryogenic distortion of the primary mirror.

  3. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Humpal, H.H.

    1987-11-10

    A mirror mount is provided that allows free pitch, yaw and roll motion of the mirror while keeping the location of a point on the surface of the mirror fixed in the rest frame of reference of the mount. Yaw movement is provided by two yaw cylinders that are bearing mounted to provide rotation. Pitch and roll motion is provided by a spherically annular shell that is air bearing mounted to move between a clamp and an upper pedestal bearing. The centers of curvature of the spherical surfaces of the shell lie upon the point. Pitch motion and roll motion are separately and independently imparted to mirror by a pair of pitch paddles and a pair of roll paddles that are independently and separately moved by control rods driven by motors. 5 figs.

  4. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Humpal, H.H.

    1986-03-21

    A mirror mount is provided that allows free pitch, yaw and roll motion of the mirror while keeping the location of a point on the surface of the mirror fixed in the rest frame of reference of the mount. Yaw movement is provided by two yaw cylinders that are bearing mounted to provide rotation. Pitch and roll motion is provided by a spherically annular shell that is air bearing mounted to move between a clamp and an upper pedestal bearing. The centers of curvature of the spherical surfaces of the shell lie upon the point. Pitch motion and roll motion are separately and independently imparted to mirror by a pair of pitch paddles and a pair of roll paddles that are independently and separately moved by control rods driven by motors.

  5. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Humpal, Harold H.

    1987-01-01

    A mirror mount (10) is provided that allows free pitch, yaw and roll motion of the mirror (28) while keeping the location of a point (56) on the surface of the mirror (28) fixed in the rest frame of reference of the mount (10). Yaw movement is provided by two yaw cylinders (30,32) that are bearing (52) mounted to provide rotation. Pitch and roll motion is provided by a spherically annular shell (42) that is air bearing (72,74) mounted to move between a clamp (60) and an upper pedestal bearing (44). The centers of curvature of the spherical surfaces of the shell (42) lie upon the point (56). Pitch motion and roll motion are separately and independently imparted to mirror (28) by a pair of pitch paddles (34) and a pair of roll paddles (36) that are independently and separately moved by control rods (76,80) driven by motors (78,82).

  6. Innovative Magnetic Mirror Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonen, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    In the past two decades, while magnetic mirror research in the US was curtailed, several innovations have been proposed and many have been demonstrated in Japan and Russia in the Gamma 10 and GDT experiments. These advances have led to new scientific understanding, means of overcoming previous short comings, and reconsideration of magnetic mirror systems as a modest size material testing neutron source or as a fusion- fission hybrid system. Compared to toroidal systems, the linear geometry of mirror systems has the significant advantages of easing construction, operation and maintenance, but has a less developed data base. The recent innovations include reliance on axi-symmetric mirror coils, suppression of energetic-ion cyclotron-modes with potential confined warm plasma, and sheared ExB flow stabilization of drift waves. To enable increased electron temperature, the magnetic field expansion ratio from the mirror to the end wall is increased beyond the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. This expansion inhibits electron thermal conduction, reduces the incident wall power flux to low levels, and isolates plasma-wall interactions far from the confined plasma.

  7. Design for an 8 Meter Monolithic UV/OIR Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Postman, Marc; Hornsby, Linda; Hopkins, Randall; Mosier, Gary E.; Pasquale, Bert A.; Arnold, William R.

    2009-01-01

    ATLAST-8 is an 8-meter monolithic UV/optical/NIR space observatory to be placed in orbit at Sun-Earth L2 by NASA's planned Ares V cargo launch vehicle. The ATLAST-8 will yield fundamental astronomical breakthroughs. The mission concept utilizes two enabling technologies: planned Ares-V launch vehicle (scheduled for 2019) and autonomous rendezvous and docking (AR&D). The unprecedented Ares-V payload and mass capacity enables the use of a massive, monolithic, thin-meniscus primary mirror - similar to a VLT or Subaru. Furthermore, it enables simple robust design rules to mitigate cost, schedule and performance risk. AR&D enables on-orbit servicing, extending mission life and enhancing science return.

  8. Mirror Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Under a NASA contract, MI-CVD developed a process for producing bulk silicon carbide by means of a chemical vapor deposition process. The technology allows growth of a high purity material with superior mechanical/thermal properties and high polishability - ideal for mirror applications. The company employed the technology to develop three research mirrors for NASA Langley and is now marketing it as CVD SILICON CARBIDE. Its advantages include light weight, thermal stability and high reflectivity. The material has nuclear research facility applications and is of interest to industrial users of high power lasers.

  9. Conicoid Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castano, Diego J.; Hawkins, Lawrence C.

    2011-01-01

    The first-order equation relating object and image location for a mirror of arbitrary conic-sectional shape is derived. It is also shown that the parabolic reflecting surface is the only one free of aberration and only in the limiting case of distant sources. (Contains 3 figures.)

  10. Mirror Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, Richard L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a method of making a mirror support comprising a composite, the composite comprising a plurality of carbon nanotubes, wherein at least two of the plurality of carbon nanotubes are bonded to each other through a bridging moiety bound to each of the two carbon nanotubes, and a laminate comprising the composite.

  11. Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory; Redding, David; Lowman, Andrew; Cohen, David; Ohara, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The figure depicts the planned Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope (AHMT), which is intended to demonstrate a new approach to the design and construction of wide-aperture spaceborne telescopes for astronomy and Earth science. This technology is also appropriate for Earth-based telescopes. The new approach can be broadly summarized as using advanced lightweight mirrors that can be manufactured rapidly at relatively low cost. More specifically, it is planned to use precise replicated metallic nanolaminate mirrors to obtain the required high-quality optical finishes. Lightweight, dimensionally stable silicon carbide (SiC) structures will support the nanolaminate mirrors in the required surface figures. To enable diffraction- limited telescope performance, errors in surface figures will be corrected by use of mirror-shape-control actuators that will be energized, as needed, by a wave-front-sensing and control system. The concepts of nanolaminate materials and mirrors made from nanolaminate materials were discussed in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. Nanolaminates constitute a relatively new class of materials that can approach theoretical limits of stiffness and strength. Nanolaminate mirrors are synthesized by magnetron sputter deposition of metallic alloys and/or compounds on optically precise master surfaces to obtain optical-quality reflector surfaces backed by thin shell structures. As an integral part of the deposition process, a layer of gold that will constitute the reflective surface layer is deposited first, eliminating the need for a subsequent and separate reflective-coating process. The crystallographic textures of the nanolaminate will be controlled to optimize the performance of the mirror. The entire deposition process for making a nanolaminate mirror takes less than 100 hours, regardless of the mirror diameter. Each nanolaminate mirror will be bonded to its lightweight SiC supporting structure. The lightweight nanolaminate mirrors and Si

  12. Kodak AMSD Mirror Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Gary; Dahl, Roger; Barrett, David; Bottom, John; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Mirror System Demonstration Program is developing minor technology for the next generation optical systems. Many of these systems will require extremely lightweight and stable optics due to the overall size of the primary mirror. These segmented, deployable systems require new technology that AMSD is developing. The on-going AMSD program is a critical enabler for Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) which will start in 2002. The status of Kodak's AMSD mirror and future plans will be discussed with respect to the NGST program.

  13. TRL-6 Qualification of JWST Mirror Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2009-01-01

    Since 1996, all key mirror technology for a JWST Primary Mirror Segment Assembly (PMSA), as defined directly from the JWST Level 1 Science Requirements, have been developed and matured from a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 3 to 6. This has occurred as the result of a highly successful technology development program including sub-scale Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator (SBMD), Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD), and JWST flight mirror fabrication. Directly traceable prototypes (and in some cases the flight hardware itself) has been built, tested and operated in a relevant environment.

  14. Mirror, Mirror, on the Wall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Jim; Rose, M. Annette

    1998-01-01

    Students use tables of anthropometric data, their own measurements, underlying principles of physics, and math to solve a problem. The problem is to determine the height of a wall mirror, and where to mount it, so that 90% of the clientele can view their entire length without stretching or bending. (Author)

  15. MEMS Actuated Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Walton, C; Cohn, M

    2005-11-10

    This ongoing work concerns the creation of a deformable mirror by the integration of MEMS actuators with Nanolaminate foils through metal compression boning. These mirrors will use the advantages of these disparate technologies to achieve dense actuation of a high-quality, continuous mirror surface. They will enable advanced adaptive optics systems in large terrestrial telescopes. While MEMS actuators provide very dense actuation with high precision they can not provide large forces typically necessary to deform conventional mirror surfaces. Nanolaminate foils can be fabricated with very high surface quality while their extraordinary mechanical properties enable very thin, flexible foils to survive the rigors of fabrication. Precise metal compression bonding allows the attachment of the fragile MEMS actuators to the thin nanolaminate foils without creating distortions at the bond sites. This paper will describe work in four major areas: (1) modeling and design, (2) bonding development, (3) nanolaminate foil development, (4) producing a prototype. A first-principles analytical model was created and used to determine the design parameters. A method of bonding was determined that is both strong, and minimizes the localized deformation or print through. Work has also been done to produce nanolaminate foils that are sufficiently thin, flexible and flat to be deformed by the MEMS actuators. Finally a prototype was produced by bonding thin, flexible nanolaminate foils to commercially available MEMS actuators.

  16. Mirror systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.

    1985-12-01

    The physics of VUV and x-ray reflection is reviewed. The main functions of mirrors in synchrotron beamlines are stated briefly and include deflection, filtration, power absorption, formation of a real image of the source, focusing, and collimation. Methods of fabrication of optical surfaces are described. Types of imperfections are discussed, including, aberrations, surface figure inaccuracy, roughness, and degradation due to use. Calculation of the photon beam thermal load, including computer modelling, is considered. 50 refs., 7 figs. (LEW)

  17. JWST Lightweight Mirror TRL-6 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2007-01-01

    Mirror technology for a Primary Mirror Segment Assembly (PMSA) is a system of components: reflective coating; polished optical surface; mirror substrate; actuators, mechanisms and flexures; and reaction structure. The functional purpose of a PMSA is to survive launch, deploy and align itself to form a 25 square meter collecting area 6.5 meter diameter primary mirror with a 131 nm rms wavefront error at temperatures less than 50K and provide stable optical performance for the anticipated thermal environment. At the inception of JWST in 1996, such a capability was at a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 3. A highly successful technology development program was initiated including the Sub-scale Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator (SBMD) and Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) projects. These projects along with flight program activities have matured mirror technology for JWST to TRL-6. A directly traceable prototype (and in some cases the flight hardware itself) has been built, tested and operated in a relevant environment.

  18. Design of a rapidly cooled cryogenic mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Ron; Hsu, Ike

    1993-01-01

    The paper discusses the design, analysis, and testing of a rapidly cooled beryllium cryogenic mirror, which is the primary mirror in the four-element optical system for the Long Wavelength Infrared Advanced Technology Seeker. The mirror is shown to meet the requirement of five minutes for cooling to cryogenic operating temperature; it also maintains its optical figure and vacuum integrity and meets the nuclear specification. Results of a detailed thermal analysis on the mirror showed that, using nitrogen gas at 80 K as coolant, the front face of the mirror can be cooled from an initial temperature of 300 K to less than 90 K within five minutes. In a vacuum chamber, using liquid nitrogen as coolant, the mirror can be cooled to 80 K within 1.5 min. The mirror is well thermally insulated, so that it can be maintained at less than its operating temperature for a long time without active cooling.

  19. Chinese "Magic" Mirrors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinson, Derek B.

    1992-01-01

    Chinese "magic" mirrors are made from bronze with the front side a mirror and the reverse side a molded image. When light is reflected from the mirror,the image on the reverse side appears. Discusses reflections of conventional mirrors, possible explanations for the magic mirror phenomenon, and applications of the phenomenon to semiconductor…

  20. Status on NGST Mirror Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, David

    2000-01-01

    NGST Mirror System Demonstrator (NMSD), in order to establish a benchmark for the state-of-the-art in lightweight optics and to establish credibility that the goals of NGST could be achieved. The past two years of the program has seen major steps in the development of several mirror materials, which not only might have NGST applicability but could also support other programs for other customers. Additionally, a second large mirror procurement, the Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD), has been implemented providing a focal point to complete the mirror technology development and lead ultimately to the production of mirrors that will fly on NEXUS (the NGST flight experiment- discussed below) and NGST. This talk will focus on the mirror technology developed over the past 4 years on the NGST program.

  1. Technology for large tandem mirror experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1980-09-04

    Construction of a large tandem mirror (MFTF-B) will soon begin at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Designed to reach break-even plasma conditions, the facility will significantly advance the physics and technology of magnetic-mirror-based fusion reactors. This paper describes the objectives and the design of the facility.

  2. ZERODUR for lightweight secondary/tertiary mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morian, Hans F.; Mackh, Reiner

    1998-08-01

    ZERODUR, the glass ceramic, with CTE values near zero, has excellent performance up to 8.2 m primary mirrors as well as for lightweight (LW) mirrors for Secondaries and Tertiaries. The high homogeneity of major properties of ZERODUR is an important prerequisite for the LW production and application. The production of CNC grinding and subsequent lightening via acid etching for additional weight reduction will be discussed. Results of Secondary and Tertiary LW mirrors for advanced technology telescopes like 8 m, 6.5 m and 3.5 m telescopes will be addressed. This paper presents also some examples of space based satellites with LW Zerodur mirrors in use since several years.

  3. Evolution of the mirror machine

    SciTech Connect

    Damm, C. C.

    1983-08-18

    The history of the magnetic-mirror approach to a fusion reactor is primarily the history of our understanding and control of several crucial physics issues, coupled with progress in the technology of heating and confining a reacting plasma. The basic requirement of an MHD-stable plasma equilibrium was achieved following the early introduction of minimum-B multipolar magnetic fields. In refined form, the same magnetic-well principle carries over to our present experiments and to reactor designs. The higher frequency microinstabilities, arising from the non-Maxwellian particle distributions inherent in mirror machines, have gradually come under control as theoretical prescriptions for distribution functions have been applied in the experiments. Even with stability, the classical plasma leakage through the mirrors posed a serious question for reactor viability until the principle of electrostatic axial stoppering was applied in the tandem mirror configuration. Experiments to test this principle successfully demonstrated the substantial improvement in confinement predicted. Concurrent with advances in mirror plasma physics, development of both high-power neutral beam injectors and high-speed vacuum pumping techniques has played a crucial role in ongoing experiments. Together with superconducting magnets, cryogenic pumping, and high-power radiofrequency heating, these technologies have evolved to a level that extrapolates readily to meet the requirements of a tandem mirror fusion reactor.

  4. National Mirror Fusion Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Gerich, C.A.

    1982-08-01

    This Plan is current as of August 1982. The major milestones listed herein represent an aggressive, success-oriented program paced primarily by technical results. Consistent with applicable government policies and the overall program planning of the Department's Office of Fusion Energy, this Plan assumes approval of the Mirror Program's next major step beyond MFTF-B - a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning engineering reactor called the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) facility (formerly the Tandem Mirror Next Step). The near-term goal of the tandem mirror program is to lay the scientific and technical groundwork for an economically attractive, D-T fusion reactor design before the end of the 1980s. Construction of the FPD facility based on the tandem mirror could be initited around 1988. A second phase, complete with a nuclear power blanket demonstration, could be initiated in the mid-1990s, based on nuclear engineering data from a facility such as the Technology Demonstration Facility (TDF) described below. The outline of an acceptable tandem mirror reactor (TMR) design was first published in 1981, and will be further developed and described in the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) during FY 1982-1983.

  5. Microfabricated mirrors for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Dara; Ataman, Caglar; Guldimann, Benedikt; Lani, Sébastien; Noell, Wilfried; de Rooij, Nico

    2011-03-01

    We report on the advances towards the design and fabrication of a system consisting of two 10mm mirrors, one actuated magnetically and the other electrostatically. The system will be used for beam steering. The maximum resonant frequencies and deflection angle of each of the actuators will be reviewed and compared.

  6. Double arch mirror study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a method of mounting light weight glass mirrors for astronomical telescopes compatible with the goals of the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) was investigated. A 20 in. diameter double arch lightweight mirror previously fabricated was modified to use a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed and fabricated. The mounting concept of the double mounting mirror is outlined. The modifications made to the mirror, fabrication of the mirror mount, and room temperature testing of the mirror and mount and the extension of the mirror and mount concept to a full size (40 in. diameter) primary mirror for SIRTF are discussed.

  7. Floating mirror mount

    SciTech Connect

    Koop, D.E.

    1989-01-03

    This patent describes a floating mirror mount for a mirror of a laser is described consisting of: a mirror having a front surface and a back surface, a keeper encircling the mirror and having a peripheral flange engaging the front surface of the mirror when the mirror is not installed in a laser, a retainer positioned rearwardly of the back surface of the mirror and connected to the keeper and having a spring seating surface, spring means engageable with the spring seating surface of the retainer for exerting a resilient biasing force on the mirror, and fastening means for connecting the retainer to the mirror positioning structure of the laser on installation of the mirror mount in the laser.

  8. Kinematic high bandwidth mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1995-03-21

    An adjustable mirror mount system for a mirror is disclosed comprising a mirror support having a planar surface thereon, a mirror frame containing a mirror and having a planar surface behind the mirror facing the planar surface of the mirror support and parallel to the reflecting surface of the mirror and mounted pivotally to the mirror support at a point central to the frame, a first adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along one axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame; and a second adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along a second axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame and perpendicular to the first axis. 7 figures.

  9. Kinematic high bandwidth mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1995-01-01

    An adjustable mirror mount system for a mirror is disclosed comprising a mirror support having a planar surface thereon, a mirror frame containing a mirror and having a planar surface behind the mirror facing the planar surface of the mirror support and parallel to the reflecting surface of the mirror and mounted pivotally to the mirror support at a point central to the frame, a first adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along one axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame; and a second adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along a second axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame and perpendicular to the first axis.

  10. Light, Color, and Mirrors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiburzi, Brian; Tamborino, Laurie; Parker, Gordon A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an exercise in which students can use flashlights, mirrors, and colored paper to discover scientific principles regarding optics. Addresses the concepts of angles of incidence and reflection, colored vs. white light, and mirror images. (WRM)

  11. CVD silicon carbide mirrors for EUV applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Osantowski, John F.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Saha, Timo T.; Wright, Geraldine A.; Boucarut, Rene A.; Fleetwood, Charles M.; Madison, Timothy J.

    1995-10-01

    Advances in optical coating and materials technology have made possible the development of instruments with substantially improved efficiency in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). For example, the development of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC mirrors provides an opportunity to extend the range of normal incidence instruments down to 60 nm. CVD-SiC is a highly polishable material yielding low scatter surfaces. High UV reflectivity and desirable mechanical and thermal properties make CVD-SiC an attractive mirror and/or coating material for EUV applications. The EUV performance of SiC mirrors as well as some strengths and problem areas are discussed.

  12. Attractive characteristics of mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, R. F.; Ryutov, D. D.

    1994-12-01

    A summary of the attractive characteristics of mirror devices is presented. Recent progress in development of axisymmetric mirror devices is described. Potentialities of mirrors as a basis for D(3)He fusion power generators and high-flux neutron sources for fusion material tests are discussed.

  13. Anastigmatic three-mirror telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korsch, D. G. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A three-mirror telescope for extraterrestrial observations is described. An ellipsoidal primary mirror, a hyperbolic secondary mirror, and an ellipsoidal tertiary mirror, produce an image in a conveniently located finite plane for viewing.

  14. Indium Second-Surface Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.; Hasegawa, T.

    1982-01-01

    Second-surface mirrors are formed by vapor deposition of indium onto glass. Mirrors have reflectances comparable to those of ordinary silver or aluminized mirrors and are expected to show superior corrosion resistance. Mirrors may be used in solar concentrators.

  15. Water Cooled Mirror Design

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E.; Holloway, Michael Andrew; Pulliam, Elias Noel

    2015-03-30

    This design is intended to replace the current mirror setup being used for the NorthStar Moly 99 project in order to monitor the target coupon. The existing setup has limited movement for camera alignment and is difficult to align properly. This proposed conceptual design for a water cooled mirror will allow for greater thermal transfer between the mirror and the water block. It will also improve positioning of the mirror by using flexible vacuum hosing and a ball head joint capable of a wide range of motion. Incorporating this design into the target monitoring system will provide more efficient cooling of the mirror which will improve the amount of diffraction caused by the heating of the mirror. The process of aligning the mirror for accurate position will be greatly improved by increasing the range of motion by offering six degrees of freedom.

  16. At the limit of nondispersive micro and nanofocusing mirror optics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, G. E.; Specht, E. D.; Tischler, J. Z.; Khounsary, A.; Assoufid, L.; Liu, C.; Experimental Facilities Division; ORNL

    2004-01-01

    We describe x-ray Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror designs with the potential to produce hard x-ray beams of 40 nm or smaller. The x-ray quality mirrors required to achieve the desired performance can be fabricated by differential deposition on ultra-smooth surfaces, or by differential polishing. Various mirror systems designed for nanofocusing to {approx}40 nm and below are compared. The performance limits of total-external-reflection mirrors are compared with the limits of multilayer mirrors that can potentially focus to an even smaller spot size. The advantages of side-by-side Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors are evaluated and more advanced, four-mirror systems with significantly greater geometrical demagnification are discussed. These systems can potentially reach 5 - 20 nm focal spot sizes for multilayer and total-external-reflection optics respectively.

  17. LOXT mirror design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanspeybroeck, L.; Antrim, W.; Boyd, D.; Giacconi, R.; Sinnamon, G.; Stille, F.

    1972-01-01

    The final report for the large orbiting X-ray telescope (LOXT) high resolution mirror design study is presented. The following tasks were performed: (1) Generation of a reference and alternate preliminary design for the LOXT high resolution mirror assembly, which will meet the LOXT scientific requirements, and are within the present state of the art of materials and fabrication techniques. (2) Measurement, in X-rays, of the scattering properties of a variety of optical flats, embodying materials, coatings, and polishing techniques which might be applicable to the flight configuration LOXT high resolution mirror. (3) Preparation of a procurement specification for a paraboloid test mirror of the size of the innermost paraboloid of the high resolution mirror assembly, including the design requirements for the reference design evolved from this preliminary design study. The results of the engineering and scientific analysis and the conclusions drawn are presented. The procurement specification for the test mirror is included.

  18. Erected mirror optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Allen, James J.

    2005-06-07

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) optical switching apparatus is disclosed that is based on an erectable mirror which is formed on a rotatable stage using surface micromachining. An electrostatic actuator is also formed on the substrate to rotate the stage and mirror with a high angular precision. The mirror can be erected manually after fabrication of the device and used to redirect an incident light beam at an arbitrary angel and to maintain this state in the absence of any applied electrical power. A 1.times.N optical switch can be formed using a single rotatable mirror. In some embodiments of the present invention, a plurality of rotatable mirrors can be configured so that the stages and mirrors rotate in unison when driven by a single micromotor thereby forming a 2.times.2 optical switch which can be used to switch a pair of incident light beams, or as a building block to form a higher-order optical switch.

  19. Mesmerising mirror neurons.

    PubMed

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-06-01

    Mirror neurons have been hailed as the key to understanding social cognition. I argue that three currents of thought-relating to evolution, atomism and telepathy-have magnified the perceived importance of mirror neurons. When they are understood to be a product of associative learning, rather than an adaptation for social cognition, mirror neurons are no longer mesmerising, but they continue to raise important questions about both the psychology of science and the neural bases of social cognition. PMID:20167276

  20. Integration of Mirror Design with Suspension System using NASA's New Mirror Modeling Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold,William R., Sr.; Bevan, Ryan M.; Stahl, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Advances in mirror fabrication are making very large space based telescopes possible. In many applications, only monolithic mirrors can meet the performance requirements. The existing and near-term planned heavy launch vehicles place a premium on lowest possible mass, and then available payload shroud sizes limit near term designs to 4 meter class mirrors. Practical 8 meter class and beyond designs could encourage planners to include larger shrouds, if it can be proven that such mirrors can be manufactured. These two factors, lower mass and larger mirrors, present the classic optimization problem. There is a practical upper limit to how large of a mirror can be supported by a purely kinematic mount system handling both operational and launch loads. This paper shows how the suspension system and mirror blank need to be designed simultaneously. We will also explore the concepts of auxiliary support systems which act only during launch and disengage on orbit. We will define required characteristics of these systems and show how they can substantially reduce the mirror mass.

  1. Integration of Mirror Design with Suspension System Using NASA's New Mirror Modeling Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William R., Sr.; Bevan, Ryan M.; Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Advances in mirror fabrication are making very large space based telescopes possible. In many applications, only monolithic mirrors can meet the performance requirements. The existing and near-term planned heavy launch vehicles place a premium on lowest possible mass, and then available payload shroud sizes limit near term designs to 4 meter class mirrors. Practical 8 meter class and beyond designs could encourage planners to include larger shrouds, if it can be proven that such mirrors can be manufactured. These two factors, lower mass and larger mirrors, present the classic optimization problem. There is a practical upper limit to how large of a mirror can be supported by a purely kinematic mount system handling both operational and launch loads. This paper shows how the suspension system and mirror blank need to be designed simultaneously. We will also explore the concepts of auxiliary support systems which act only during launch and disengage on orbit. We will define required characteristics of these systems and show how they can substantially reduce the mirror mass.

  2. Integration of mirror design with suspension system using NASA's new mirror modeling software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, William R.; Bevan, Ryan M.; Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-09-01

    Advances in mirror fabrication are making very large space based telescopes possible. In many applications, only monolithic mirrors can meet the performance requirements. The existing and near-term planned heavy launch vehicles place a premium on lowest possible mass, and then available payload shroud sizes limit near term designs to 4 meter class mirrors. Practical 8 meter class and beyond designs could encourage planners to include larger shrouds, if it can be proven that such mirrors can be manufactured. These two factors, lower mass and larger mirrors, present the classic optimization problem. There is a practical upper limit to how large of a mirror can be supported by a purely kinematic mount system handling both operational and launch loads. This paper shows how the suspension system and mirror blank need to be designed simultaneously. We will also explore the concepts of auxiliary support systems which act only during launch and disengage on orbit. We will define required characteristics of these systems and show how they can substantially reduce the mirror mass.

  3. Castable Amorphous Metal Mirrors and Mirror Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Davis, Gregory L.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Shapiro, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    A revolutionary way to produce a mirror and mirror assembly is to cast the entire part at once from a metal alloy that combines all of the desired features into the final part: optical smoothness, curvature, flexures, tabs, isogrids, low CTE, and toughness. In this work, it has been demonstrated that castable mirrors are possible using bulk metallic glasses (BMGs, also called amorphous metals) and BMG matrix composites (BMGMCs). These novel alloys have all of the desired mechanical and thermal properties to fabricate an entire mirror assembly without machining, bonding, brazing, welding, or epoxy. BMGs are multi-component metal alloys that have been cooled in such a manner as to avoid crystallization leading to an amorphous (non-crystalline) microstructure. This lack of crystal structure and the fact that these alloys are glasses, leads to a wide assortment of mechanical and thermal properties that are unlike those observed in crystalline metals. Among these are high yield strength, carbide-like hardness, low melting temperatures (making them castable like aluminum), a thermoplastic processing region (for improving smoothness), low stiffness, high strength-to-weight ratios, relatively low CTE, density similar to titanium alloys, high elasticity and ultra-smooth cast parts (as low as 0.2-nm surface roughness has been demonstrated in cast BMGs). BMGMCs are composite alloys that consist of a BMG matrix with crystalline dendrites embedded throughout. BMGMCs are used to overcome the typically brittle failure observed in monolithic BMGs by adding a soft phase that arrests the formation of cracks in the BMG matrix. In some cases, BMGMCs offer superior castability, toughness, and fatigue resistance, if not as good a surface finish as BMGs. This work has demonstrated that BMGs and BMGMCs can be cast into prototype mirrors and mirror assemblies without difficulty.

  4. Comparison of SiC mirror approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, Keith; Riso, Michael; Khatri, Shayna; Douglas, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) mirrors hold many advantages over traditional optical materials and are increasingly common in optical systems. The wide range of optical applications necessitates different approaches to the manufacturing and finishing of SiC mirrors. Three key advancements have led to this differentiation: 1) manufacturing of CVD clad SiC mirrors in near cost and schedule parity with Zerodur, 2) super-polish of amorphous Silicon claddings, 3) low-roughness polishing results of bare reaction-bonded SiC aspheres. Three approaches which utilize these advancements will be discussed, each with its own strengths and weaknesses for specific applications. The relative schedules and performance of these approaches will also be compared, with Zerodur used as a reference.

  5. Stable mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1990-01-01

    An improved mirror mount assembly is disclosed. The mirror mount assembly provides a post assembly slidable in a Y-axis orientation and a nut plate assembly slidable in an X-axis orientation and a device for simultaneously locking the post assembly and the key assembly in a fixed position.

  6. Stable mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, R.W.

    1983-11-04

    An improved mirror mount assembly is disclosed. The mirror mount assembly provides a post assembly slidable in a Y-axis orientation and a nut plate assembly slidable in an X-axis orientation and means for simultaneously locking said post assembly and said key assembly in a fixed position.

  7. Bronze rainbow hologram mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, P.

    2006-02-01

    This project draws on holographic embossing techniques, ancient artistic conventions of bronze mirror design and modelling and casting processes to accomplish portraiture of reflection. Laser scanning, 3D computer graphics and holographic imaging are employed to enable a permanent 3D static holographic image to appear integrated with the real-time moving reflection of a viewer's face in a polished bronze disc. The disc and the figure which holds it (caryatid) are cast in bronze from a lost wax model, a technique which has been used for millennia to make personal mirrors. The Caryatid form of bronze mirror which went through many permutations in ancient Egyptian, Greece and Rome shows a plethora of expressive figure poses ranging from sleek nudes to highly embellished multifigure arrangements. The prototype of this series was made for Australian choreographer Graeme Murphy, Artistic Director of the Sydney Dance Company. Each subsequent mirror will be unique in figure and holographic imagery as arranged between artist and subject. Conceptually this project references both the modern experience of viewing mirrors retrieved from ancient tombs, which due to deterioration of the surface no longer reflect, and the functioning of Chinese Magic mirrors, which have the ability to project a predetermined image. Inspired by the metaphorical potential of these mirrors, which do not reflect the immediate reality of the viewer, this bronze hologram mirror series enables each viewer to reflect upon himself or herself observing simultaneously the holographic image and their own partially obliterated reflection.

  8. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Smith, James R.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Monjes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp.

  9. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, E.S.; Smith, J.R.; Salmon, J.T.; Monjes, J.A.

    1991-05-21

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp. 5 figures.

  10. Tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, T. Kenneth

    1978-11-14

    Apparatus and method for confining a plasma in a center mirror cell by use of two end mirror cells as positively charged end stoppers to minimize leakage of positive particles from the ends of the center mirror cell.

  11. Vibration damping for the Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Yingling, Adam J.; Griffin, Steven F.; Agrawal, Brij N.; Cobb, Richard G.; Chambers, Trevor S.

    2012-09-01

    The Segmented Mirror Telescope (SMT) at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey is a next-generation deployable telescope, featuring a 3-meter 6-segment primary mirror and advanced wavefront sensing and correction capabilities. In its stowed configuration, the SMT primary mirror segments collapse into a small volume; once on location, these segments open to the full 3-meter diameter. The segments must be very accurately aligned after deployment and the segment surfaces are actively controlled using numerous small, embedded actuators. The SMT employs a passive damping system to complement the actuators and mitigate the effects of low-frequency (<40 Hz) vibration modes of the primary mirror segments. Each of the six segments has three or more modes in this bandwidth, and resonant vibration excited by acoustics or small disturbances on the structure can result in phase mismatches between adjacent segments thereby degrading image quality. The damping system consists of two tuned mass dampers (TMDs) for each of the mirror segments. An adjustable TMD with passive magnetic damping was selected to minimize sensitivity to changes in temperature; both frequency and damping characteristics can be tuned for optimal vibration mitigation. Modal testing was performed with a laser vibrometry system to characterize the SMT segments with and without the TMDs. Objectives of this test were to determine operating deflection shapes of the mirror and to quantify segment edge displacements; relative alignment of λ/4 or better was desired. The TMDs attenuated the vibration amplitudes by 80% and reduced adjacent segment phase mismatches to acceptable levels.

  12. Space Mirror Alignment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.; McKinney, Colin; Smythe, Robert F.; Palmer, Dean L.

    2011-01-01

    An optical alignment mirror mechanism (AMM) has been developed with angular positioning accuracy of +/-0.2 arcsec. This requires the mirror s linear positioning actuators to have positioning resolutions of +/-112 nm to enable the mirror to meet the angular tip/tilt accuracy requirement. Demonstrated capabilities are 0.1 arc-sec angular mirror positioning accuracy, which translates into linear positioning resolutions at the actuator of 50 nm. The mechanism consists of a structure with sets of cross-directional flexures that enable the mirror s tip and tilt motion, a mirror with its kinematic mount, and two linear actuators. An actuator comprises a brushless DC motor, a linear ball screw, and a piezoelectric brake that holds the mirror s position while the unit is unpowered. An interferometric linear position sensor senses the actuator s position. The AMMs were developed for an Astrometric Beam Combiner (ABC) optical bench, which is part of an interferometer development. Custom electronics were also developed to accommodate the presence of multiple AMMs within the ABC and provide a compact, all-in-one solution to power and control the AMMs.

  13. Disassembling and reintegration of large telescope primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qi-rui; Fan, Bin; Zhang, Ming

    2014-09-01

    The success of the large telescope is largely linked to the excellent performance and reliability of the primary mirror. In order to maintain the quality of its reflective surface at the high expectations of astronomers, the primary mirror after almost two or three years of astronomical observations, needs to be removed and reinstalled for its cleaning and re-coating operation. There are a series of procedures such as the primary mirror cell dissembling from telescope, mirror handling, transportation, reintegration, alignment and so on. This paper will describe the experiences of disassembling and reintegration of large telescope primary mirror, taking a two meter grade primary mirror for example. As with all advanced and complex opto-mechanical systems, there has been the usual problems and trouble shooting.

  14. Final Results of the Ball AMSD Beryllium Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaney, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The 1.4-meter semi-rigid, beryllium Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) mirror completed initial cryogenic testing at Marshall's X-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) in August of 2003. Results of this testing show the mirror to have very low cryogenic surface deformation and possess exceptional figure stability. Subsequent to this cryogenic testing beryllium was selected as the material of choice for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) multi-segment primary mirror. Therefore, the AMSD mirror was sent back to SSG-Tinsley for additional ambient polishing to JWST requirements. The mirror was successfully polished to less than 22nm rms of low frequency error. Those additional results are presented with comparisons to the JWST requirements.

  15. Design and Analysis of Mirror Modules for IXO and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClelland, Ryan S.; Powell, Cory; Saha, Timo T.; Zhang, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Advancements in X-ray astronomy demand thin, light, and closely packed thin optics which lend themselves to segmentation of the annular mirrors and, in turn, a modular approach to the mirror design. The functionality requirements of such a mirror module are well understood. A baseline modular concept for the proposed International X-Ray Observatory (IXO) Flight Mirror Assembly (FMA) consisting of 14,000 glass mirror segments divided into 60 modules was developed and extensively analyzed. Through this development, our understanding of module loads, mirror stress, thermal performance, and gravity distortion have greatly progressed. The latest progress in each of these areas is discussed herein. Gravity distortion during horizontal X-ray testing and on-orbit thermal performance have proved especially difficult design challenges. In light of these challenges, fundamental trades in modular X-ray mirror design have been performed. Future directions in module X-ray mirror design are explored including the development of a 1.8 m diameter FMA utilizing smaller mirror modules. The effect of module size on mirror stress, module self-weight distortion, thermal control, and range of segment sizes required is explored with advantages demonstrated from smaller module size in most cases.

  16. Mirror plasma apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Moir, Ralph W.

    1981-01-01

    A mirror plasma apparatus which utilizes shielding by arc discharge to form a blanket plasma and lithium walls to reduce neutron damage to the wall of the apparatus. An embodiment involves a rotating liquid lithium blanket for a tandem mirror plasma apparatus wherein the first wall of the central mirror cell is made of liquid lithium which is spun with angular velocity great enough to keep the liquid lithium against the first material wall, a blanket plasma preventing the lithium vapor from contaminating the plasma.

  17. Nanolaminate deformable mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.; Olivier, Scot S.

    2009-04-14

    A deformable mirror formed out of two layers of a nanolaminate foil attached to a stiff substrate is introduced. Deformation is provided by an electrostatic force between two of the layers. The internal stiffness of the structure allows for high-spatial-frequency shapes. The nanolaminate foil of the present invention allows for a high-quality mirror surface. The device achieves high precision in the vertical direction by using foils with accurately controlled thicknesses, but does not require high precision in the lateral dimensions, allowing such mirrors to be fabricated using crude lithography techniques. Such techniques allow structures up to about the meter scale to be fabricated.

  18. Nanolaminate deformable mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.; Olivier, Scot S.

    2010-04-06

    A deformable mirror formed out of two layers of a nanolaminate foil attached to a stiff substrate is introduced. Deformation is provided by an electrostatic force between two of the layers. The internal stiffness of the structure allows for high-spatial-frequency shapes. The nanolaminate foil of the present invention allows for a high-quality mirror surface. The device achieves high precision in the vertical direction by using foils with accurately controlled thicknesses, but does not require high precision in the lateral dimensions, allowing such mirrors to be fabricated using crude lithography techniques. Such techniques allow structures up to about the meter scale to be fabricated.

  19. NIF small mirror mount

    SciTech Connect

    McCarville, T

    1999-07-01

    A number of small mirror mounts have been identified that meet the stringent stability, wave front, and cleanliness standards of the NIF. These requirements are similar to those required in other performance critical optical design applications. Future design teams would conserve time and effort if recognized standards were established for mirror mount design and performance characteristics. Standards for stability, physical features, wave front distortion, and cleanliness would simplify the qualification process considerably. At this point such standards are not difficult to define, as the technical support work has been performed repeatedly by mirror mount consumers and suppliers.

  20. Ferrofluid based deformable mirrors: a new approach to adaptive optics using liquid mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Phil R.; Bergamasco, R.; Bérubé, Vincent; Borra, Ermanno F.; Gingras, Julie; Ritcey, Anna-Marie R.; Rioux, Myriam; Robitaille, Nathalie; Thibault, Simon; Vieira da Silva, L., Jr.; Yockell-Lelièvre, Helene

    2003-02-01

    The trend towards ever larger telescopes and more advanced adaptive optics systems is driving the need for deformable mirrors with a large number of low cost actuators. Liquid mirrors have long been recognized a potential low cost alternative to conventional solid mirrors. By using a water or oil based ferrofluid we are able to benefit from a stronger magnetic response than is found in magnetic liquid metal amalgams and avoid the difficulty of passing a uniform current through a liquid. Depositing a thin silver colloid known as a metal liquid like film (MELLF) on the ferrofluid surface solves the problem of low reflectivity of pure ferrofluids. This combination provides a liquid optical surface that can be precisely shaped in a magnetic field. We present experimental results obtained with a prototype deformable liquid mirror based on this combination.

  1. Composite Material Mirror Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In this photograph, the composite material mirror is tested in the X-Ray Calibration Facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The mirror test conducted was to check the ability to accurately model and predict the cryogenic performance of complex mirror systems, and the characterization of cryogenic dampening properties of beryllium. The JWST, a next generation successor to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), was named in honor of James W. Webb, NASA's second administrator, who led NASA in the early days of the fledgling Aerospace Agency. Scheduled for launch in 2010 aboard an expendable launch vehicle, the JWST will be able to look deeper into the universe than the HST because of the increased light-collecting power of its larger mirror and the extraordinary sensitivity of its instrument to infrared light.

  2. JWST Mirror Installation

    NASA Video Gallery

    The first six of 18 hexagonal shaped segments that will form NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope’s primary mirror for space observations were readied this week to begin final cryogenic testing at...

  3. The Rotating Mirror.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses theory of the rotating mirror, its use in measuring the velocity of the electrical signal in wires, and the velocity of light. Concludes with a description of the manometric flame apparatus developed for analyzing sound waves. (SK)

  4. Towards a better mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, David

    1987-01-01

    Telesat's Getaway Special competition was designed to promote interest in space among high school students in Canada. The winning entry proposed the manufacture of mirrors in microgravity and to compare the optical properties of these mirrors with similar ones made on Earth. Telesat engineers designed and built the experiment which flew on the Atlantic shuttle on November 27, 1985. This paper outlines the design evolution, its implementation, the manufacture and test of the GAS and the results of the experiment.

  5. Notes on moving mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Obadia, N.; Parentani, R.

    2001-08-15

    The Davies-Fulling (DF) model describes the scattering of a massless field by a noninertial mirror in two dimensions. In this paper, we generalize this model in two different ways. First, we consider partially reflecting mirrors. We show that the Bogoliubov coefficients relating inertial modes can be expressed in terms of the reflection factor and the transformation from inertial modes to modes at rest with respect to the mirror. In this perspective, the DF model is simply the limiting case when the reflection factor is unity for all frequencies. In the second part, we introduce an alternative model which is based on self-interactions described by an action principle. When the coupling is constant, this model can be solved exactly and gives rise to a partially reflecting mirror. The usefulness of this dynamical model lies in the possibility of switching off the coupling between the mirror and field. This allows us to obtain regularized expressions for the fluxes in situations where they are singular when using the DF model. Two examples are considered. The first concerns the flux induced by the disappearance of the reflection condition, a situation which bears some analogies with the end of the evaporation of a black hole. The second case concerns the flux emitted by a uniformly accelerated mirror.

  6. Space Adaptation of Active Mirror Segment Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Gregory H.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a three year effort by Blue Line Engineering Co. to advance the state of segmented mirror systems in several separate but related areas. The initial set of tasks were designed to address the issues of system level architecture, digital processing system, cluster level support structures, and advanced mirror fabrication concepts. Later in the project new tasks were added to provide support to the existing segmented mirror testbed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in the form of upgrades to the 36 subaperture wavefront sensor. Still later, tasks were added to build and install a new system processor based on the results of the new system architecture. The project was successful in achieving a number of important results. These include the following most notable accomplishments: 1) The creation of a new modular digital processing system that is extremely capable and may be applied to a wide range of segmented mirror systems as well as many classes of Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) control systems such as active structures or industrial automation. 2) A new graphical user interface was created for operation of segmented mirror systems. 3) The development of a high bit rate serial data loop that permits bi-directional flow of data to and from as many as 39 segments daisy-chained to form a single cluster of segments. 4) Upgrade of the 36 subaperture Hartmann type Wave Front Sensor (WFS) of the Phased Array Mirror, Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) testbed at MSFC resulting in a 40 to 5OX improvement in SNR which in turn enabled NASA personnel to achieve many significant strides in improved closed-loop system operation in 1998. 5) A new system level processor was built and delivered to MSFC for use with the PAMELA testbed. This new system featured a new graphical user interface to replace the obsolete and non-supported menu system originally delivered with the PAMELA system. The hardware featured Blue Line's new stackable

  7. Mechanical principles of large mirror supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärcher, Hans J.; Eisenträger, Peter; Süss, Martin

    2010-07-01

    Large thin meniscus mirrors use force-controlled shape actuators to obtain the required optical performance. The shape actuators can be interpreted as an advancement of classical mirror supports as whiffle trees or iso-static levers, which worked purely mechanical. The paper develops, after a short historical overview, the theoretical background of mirror mechanics. Different combinations of force-controlled shape actuators with mechanical, hydraulic or pneumatic whiffle trees or iso-static levers are analyzed in regard of their impact on optical performance, dynamic and control behavior. The investigations were the basis for the choice of the shape actuator system for the E-ELT M2, executed by MT Mechatronics under an ESO contract in 2008-09.

  8. Integration of Mirror Design with Suspension System using NASA's New Mirror Modeling Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William; Bevan Ryan M.; Stahl, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Advances in mirror fabrication is making very large space based telescopes possible. In the many applications, only monolithic mirrors meet the performance requirements. The existing and near-term planned heavy launch vehicles place a premium on lowest possible mass. Again, available and planned payload shroud size limits near term designs to 4 meter class mirror. Practical 8 meter and beyond designs could encourage planners to include larger shrouds if it can be proven that such mirrors can be manufactured. These two factors lower mass and larger mirrors, presents the classic optimization problem. There is a practical upper limit to how large a mirror can be supported by a purely kinematic mount system and be launched. This paper shows how the design of the suspension system and mirror blank needs to be designed simultaneously. We will also explore the concepts of auxiliary support systems, which act only during launch and disengage on orbit. We will define required characteristics of these systems and show how they can substantially reduce the mirror mass. The AMTD project is developing and maturing the processes for future replacements for HUBBLE, creating the design tools, validating the methods and techniques necessary to manufacture, test and launch extremely large optical missions. This paper will use the AMTD 4 meter "design point" as an illustration of the typical use of the modeler in generating the multiple models of mirror and suspension systems used during the conceptual design phase of most projects. The influence of Hexapod geometry, mirror depth, cell size and construction techniques (Exelsis Deep Core Low Temperature Fusion (c) versus Corning Frit Bonded (c) versus Schott Pocket Milled Zerodur (c) in this particular study) are being evaluated. Due to space and time consideration we will only be able to present snippets of the study in this paper. The advances in manufacturing techniques for lightweight mirrors, such as EXELSIS deep core low

  9. Thermal performance of the ATST secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myung K.; DeVries, Joe; Hansen, Eric

    2007-12-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) has a 4.24m off-axis primary mirror designed to deliver diffractionlimited images of the sun. Its baseline secondary mirror (M2) design uses a 0.65m diameter Silicon Carbide mirror mounted kinematically by a bi-pod flexure mechanism at three equally spaced locations. Unlike other common telescopes, the ATST M2 is to be exposed to a significant solar heat loading. A thermal management system (TMS) will be developed to accommodate the solar loading and minimize "mirror seeing effect" by controlling the temperature difference between the M2 optical surface and the ambient air at the site. Thermo-elastic analyses for steady state thermal behaviors of the ATST secondary mirror was performed using finite element analysis by I-DEAS TM and PCRINGE TM for the optical analysis. We examined extensive heat transfer simulation cases and their results were discussed. The goal of this study is to establish thermal models by I-DEAS for an adequate thermal environment. These thermal models will be useful for estimating segment thermal responses. Current study assumes a few sample time dependent thermal loadings to synthesize the operational environment.

  10. Performance evaluations of the ATST secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myung K.; DeVries, Joseph; Hansen, Eric

    2007-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) has a 4.24m off-axis primary mirror designed to deliver diffraction-limited images of the sun. Its baseline secondary mirror (M2) design uses a 0.65m diameter Silicon Carbide mirror mounted kinematically by a bi-pod flexure mechanism at three equally spaced locations. Unlike other common telescopes, the ATST M2 is to be exposed to a significant solar heat loading. A thermal management system will be developed to accommodate the solar loading and minimize "mirror seeing effect" by controlling the temperature difference between the M2 optical surface and the ambient air at the site. Thermo-elastic analyses for steady state thermal behaviors of the ATST secondary mirror was performed using finite element analysis by I-DEAS TM and PCFRINGE TM for the optical analysis. We examined extensive heat transfer simulation cases and their results are discussed. The goal of this study is to evaluate the optical performances of M2 using thermal models and mechanical models. Thermal responses from the models enable us to manipulate time dependent thermal loadings to synthesize the operational environment for the design and development of TMS.

  11. Rollable Thin-Shell Nanolaminate Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Barbee, Troy, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A class of lightweight, deployable, thin-shell, curved mirrors with built-in precise-shape-control actuators is being developed for high-resolution scientific imaging. This technology incorporates a combination of advanced design concepts in actuation and membrane optics that, heretofore, have been considered as separate innovations. These mirrors are conceived to be stowed compactly in a launch shroud and transported aboard spacecraft, then deployed in outer space to required precise shapes at much larger dimensions (diameters of the order of meters or tens of meters). A typical shell rollable mirror structure would include: (1) a flexible single- or multiple-layer face sheet that would include an integrated reflective surface layer that would constitute the mirror; (2) structural supports in the form of stiffeners made of a shape-memory alloy (SMA); and (3) piezoelectric actuators. The actuators, together with an electronic control subsystem, would implement a concept of hierarchical distributed control, in which (1) the SMA actuators would be used for global shape control and would generate the large deformations needed for the deployment process and (2) the piezoelectric actuators would generate smaller deformations and would be used primarily to effect fine local control of the shape of the mirror.

  12. Elliptically Bent X-ray Mirrors with Active Temperature Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng; Church, Matthew; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Rich; McKinney, Wayne R.; Kirschman, Jonathan; Morrison, Greg; Noll, Tino; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard A.

    2010-01-31

    We present details of design of elliptically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors developed and successfully used at the Advanced Light Source for submicron focusing. A distinctive feature of the mirror design is an active temperature stabilization based on a Peltier element attached directly to the mirror body. The design and materials have been carefully optimized to provide high heat conductance between the mirror body and substrate. We describe the experimental procedures used when assembling and precisely shaping the mirrors, with special attention paid to laboratory testing of the mirror-temperature stabilization. For this purpose, the temperature dependence of the surface slope profile of a specially fabricated test mirror placed inside a temperature-controlled container was measured. We demonstrate that with active mirror-temperature stabilization, a change of the surrounding temperature by more than 3K does not noticeably affect the mirror figure. Without temperature stabilization, the surface slope changes by approximately 1.5 ?mu rad rms (primarily defocus) under the same conditions.

  13. Robotic Mirror Therapy System for Functional Recovery of Hemiplegic Arms.

    PubMed

    Beom, Jaewon; Koh, Sukgyu; Nam, Hyung Seok; Kim, Wonshik; Kim, Yoonjae; Seo, Han Gil; Oh, Byung-Mo; Chung, Sun Gun; Kim, Sungwan

    2016-01-01

    Mirror therapy has been performed as effective occupational therapy in a clinical setting for functional recovery of a hemiplegic arm after stroke. It is conducted by eliciting an illusion through use of a mirror as if the hemiplegic arm is moving in real-time while moving the healthy arm. It can facilitate brain neuroplasticity through activation of the sensorimotor cortex. However, conventional mirror therapy has a critical limitation in that the hemiplegic arm is not actually moving. Thus, we developed a real-time 2-axis mirror robot system as a simple add-on module for conventional mirror therapy using a closed feedback mechanism, which enables real-time movement of the hemiplegic arm. We used 3 Attitude and Heading Reference System sensors, 2 brushless DC motors for elbow and wrist joints, and exoskeletal frames. In a feasibility study on 6 healthy subjects, robotic mirror therapy was safe and feasible. We further selected tasks useful for activities of daily living training through feedback from rehabilitation doctors. A chronic stroke patient showed improvement in the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale and elbow flexor spasticity after a 2-week application of the mirror robot system. Robotic mirror therapy may enhance proprioceptive input to the sensory cortex, which is considered to be important in neuroplasticity and functional recovery of hemiplegic arms. The mirror robot system presented herein can be easily developed and utilized effectively to advance occupational therapy. PMID:27583794

  14. Helically linked mirror arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, P.

    1986-08-01

    A scheme is described for helical linking of mirror sections, which endeavors to combine the better features of toroidal and mirror devices by eliminating the longitudinal loss of mirror machines, having moderately high average ..beta.. and steady state operation. This scheme is aimed at a device, with closed magnetic surfaces having rotational transform for equilibrium, one or more axisymmetric straight sections for reduced radial loss, a simple geometrical axis for the links and an overall positive magnetic well depth for stability. We start by describing several other attempts at linking of mirror sections, made both in the past and the present. Then a description of our helically linked mirror scheme is given. This example has three identical straight sections connected by three sections having helical geometric axes. A theoretical analysis of the magnetic field and single-particle orbits in them leads to the conclusion that most of the passing particles would be confined in the device and they would have orbits independent of pitch angle under certain conditions. Numerical results are presented, which agree well with the theoretical results as far as passing particle orbits are concerned.

  15. Physics of mirror systems

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    1982-05-01

    In recent years the emphasis in research on the magnetic mirror approach to fusion has been shifted to address what are essentially economically-motivated issues. The introduction of the Tandem Mirror idea solved in principal the problem of low Q (low fusion power gain) of mirror-based fusion systems. In order to optimize the tandem mirror idea from an economic standpoint, some important improvements have been suggested. These improvements include the thermal barrier idea of Baldwin and Logan and the axicell concept of Kesner. These new modifications introduce some special physics considerations. Among these are (1) The MHD stability properties of high energy electron components in the end cells; (2) The optimization of end-cell magnetic field configurations with the objective of minimizing equilibrium parallel currents; (3) The suppression of microstabilities by use of sloshing ion distributions. Following a brief outline of tandem mirror concepts, the above three topics are discussed, with illustrative examples taken from earlier work or from recent design studies.

  16. Cryogenic mirror analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, S.

    1988-01-01

    Due to extraordinary distances scanned by modern telescopes, optical surfaces in such telescopes must be manufactured to unimaginable standards of perfection of a few thousandths of a centimeter. The detection of imperfections of less than 1/20 of a wavelength of light, for application in the building of the mirror for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, was undertaken. Because the mirror must be kept very cold while in space, another factor comes into effect: cryogenics. The process to test a specific morror under cryogenic conditions is described; including the follow-up analysis accomplished through computer work. To better illustrate the process and analysis, a Pyrex Hex-Core mirror is followed through the process from the laser interferometry in the lab, to computer analysis via a computer program called FRINGE. This analysis via FRINGE is detailed.

  17. Smart materials optical mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas M.

    2014-08-01

    We report the fabrication of imaging quality optical mirrors with smooth surfaces using carbon nanotubes embedded in an epoxy matrix. CNT/epoxy is a multifunctional or `smart' composite material that has sensing capabilities and can be made to incorporate self-actuation as well. Moreover, since the precursor is a low density liquid, large and lightweight mirrors can be fabricated by processes such as replication, spincasting, and 3D printing. The technology therefore holds promise for development of a new generation of lightweight, compact `smart' telescope mirrors with figure sensing and active or adaptive figure control. We report on measurements made of optical and mechanical characteristics. We discuss possible paths for future development.

  18. Carbon nanotube optical mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of imaging quality optical mirrors with smooth surfaces using carbon nanotubes (CNT) embedded in an epoxy matrix. CNT/epoxy is a multifunctional composite material that has sensing capabilities and can be made to incorporate self-actuation. Moreover, as the precursor is a low density liquid, large and lightweight mirrors can be fabricated by processes such as replication, spincasting, and three-dimensional printing. Therefore, the technology holds promise for the development of a new generation of lightweight, compact "smart" telescope mirrors with figure sensing and active or adaptive figure control. We report on measurements made of optical and mechanical characteristics, active optics experiments, and numerical modeling. We discuss possible paths for future development.

  19. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  20. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2010-01-08

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  1. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-29

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  2. Mirror Measurement Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract led to a commercially available instrument used to measure the shape profile of mirror surfaces in scientific instruments. Bauer Associates, Inc.'s Bauer Model 200 Profilometer is based upon a different measurement concept. The local curvature of the mirror's surface is measured at many points, and the collection of data is computer processed to yield the desired shape profile. (Earlier profilometers are based on the principle of interferometry.) The system is accurate and immune to problems like vibration and turbulence. Two profilometers are currently marketed, and a third will soon be commercialized.

  3. Flat Focusing Mirror

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y. C.; Kicas, S.; Trull, J.; Peckus, M.; Cojocaru, C.; Vilaseca, R.; Drazdys, R.; Staliunas, K.

    2014-01-01

    The control of spatial propagation properties of narrow light beams such as divergence, focusing or imaging are main objectives in optics and photonics. In this letter, we propose and demonstrate experimentally a flat focusing mirror, based on an especially designed dielectric structure without any optical axis. More generally, it also enables imaging any light pattern in reflection. The flat focusing mirror with a transversal invariance can largely increase the applicability of structured photonic materials for light beam propagation control in small-dimension photonic circuits. PMID:25228358

  4. Flat focusing mirror.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y C; Kicas, S; Trull, J; Peckus, M; Cojocaru, C; Vilaseca, R; Drazdys, R; Staliunas, K

    2014-01-01

    The control of spatial propagation properties of narrow light beams such as divergence, focusing or imaging are main objectives in optics and photonics. In this letter, we propose and demonstrate experimentally a flat focusing mirror, based on an especially designed dielectric structure without any optical axis. More generally, it also enables imaging any light pattern in reflection. The flat focusing mirror with a transversal invariance can largely increase the applicability of structured photonic materials for light beam propagation control in small-dimension photonic circuits. PMID:25228358

  5. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    2009-08-21

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  6. The mirror neuron system in post-stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Different treatments for stroke patients have been proposed; among them the mirror therapy and motion imagery lead to functional recovery by providing a cortical reorganization. Up today the basic concepts of the current literature on mirror neurons and the major findings regarding the use of mirror therapy and motor imagery as potential tools to promote reorganization and functional recovery in post-stroke patients. Bibliographic research was conducted based on publications over the past thirteen years written in English in the databases Scielo, Pubmed/MEDLINE, ISI Web of Knowledge. The studies showed how the interaction among vision, proprioception and motor commands promotes the recruitment of mirror neurons, thus providing cortical reorganization and functional recovery of post-stroke patients. We conclude that the experimental advances on Mirror Neurons will bring new rational therapeutic approaches to post-stroke rehabilitation. PMID:24134862

  7. Paranal Receives New Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    A 4.1-metre diameter primary mirror, a vital part of the world's newest and fastest survey telescope, VISTA (the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy) has been delivered to its new mountaintop home at Cerro Paranal, Chile. The mirror will now be coupled with a small camera for initial testing prior to installing the main camera in June. Full scientific operations are due to start early next year. VISTA will form part of ESO's Very Large Telescope facility. ESO PR Photo 10d/08 ESO PR Photo 10d/08 The VISTA Mirror The mirror arrived over the Easter weekend at the Paranal Observatory where the telescope is being assembled at an altitude of 2518m, in Chile's Atacama Desert. VISTA Project Manager Alistair McPherson from STFC's UK Astronomy Technology Centre (UK ATC) accompanied the mirror on its journey to Chile: "This is a major milestone for the VISTA project. The precious mirror was loaded on to a plane in a special cradle that used tennis balls to cushion it from impact for its arduous journey across three continents. " "The mirror had a difficult four-day journey, by air and by road. It arrived in perfect condition and now that it has been coated, we will install the mirror in the telescope with a small test camera for about four weeks testing. We plan to install the main camera in June," said the Project Scientist on VISTA, Will Sutherland of Queen Mary, University of London, UK. The VISTA 4.1-metre diameter primary mirror is the most strongly curved large mirror ever polished to such a precise and exacting surface accuracy - deviations from a perfect surface of less than 1/3000th of the thickness of a human hair. On arrival at Cerro Paranal it was safely craned into the telescope dome where it was washed and coated with a thin layer of protected silver in the facility's coating plant. Silver is the best metal for the purpose since it reflects over 98% of near-infrared light, better than the more commonly used aluminium. To date, the reflectivity

  8. JWST Mirror Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    Since the initial Design Studies leading to JWST, Mirror Technology was identified as a (if not the) critical capability necessary to enable the next generation of large aperture space telescopes required to achieve the science goals of imaging the earliest galaxies and proto-galaxies after the big bang. Specific telescope architectures were explored via three independent design concept studies conducted during the summer of 1996. Achieving the desired science objectives required a never before demonstrated space telescope capability, one with an 8 meter class primary mirror that is diffraction limited at 2 micrometers and operating in deep space at temperatures well below 70K. Beryllium was identified in the NASA "Yardstick" design as the preferred material because of its ability to provide stable optical performance in the anticipated thermal environment as well as its excellent specific stiffness. Because of launch vehicle constraints, two very significant architectural constraints were placed upon the telescope: segmentation and areal density. Each of these directly resulted in specific technology capability requirements. First, because the maximum launch vehicle payload fairing diameter is approximately 4.5 meters, the only way to launch an 8 meter class mirror is to segment it, fold it and deploy it on orbit - resulting in actuation and control requirements. Second, because of launch vehicle mass limits, the primary mirror allocation was only 1000 kg - resulting in a maximum areal density specification of 20 kilograms per square meter.

  9. Tandem mirror fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, D.E.

    1983-12-02

    The tandem mirror program has evolved considerably in the last decade. Of significance is the viable reactor concept embodied in the MARS design. An aggressive experimental program, culminating in the operation of MFTF-B in late 1986, will provide a firm basis for refining the MARS design as necessary for constructing a reactor prototype in the 1990s.

  10. Rearview Mirror Dimming Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layton, William

    2011-01-01

    Students are often unaware of the little tab on a rear-view mirror that is used to dim headlights from the rear. Those who know about this tab are usually interested in knowing how it works. Explanations of the optics involved can be found in Serway and Jewett and Jones and Edge. An alternate explanation is given.

  11. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOEpatents

    Schissel, Paul O.; Kennedy, Cheryl E.; Jorgensen, Gary J.; Shinton, Yvonne D.; Goggin, Rita M.

    1994-01-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate.

  12. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOEpatents

    Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

    1994-11-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

  13. Cosmology with liquid mirror telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogg, David W.; Gibson, Brad K.; Hickson, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Liquid mirrors provide an exciting means to obtain large optical telescopes for substantially lower costs than conventional technologies. The liquid mirror concept has been demonstrated in the lab with the construction of a diffraction limited 1.5 m mirror. The mirror surface, using liquid mercury, forms a perfect parabolic shape when the mirror cell is rotated at a uniform velocity. A liquid mirror must be able to support a heavy mercury load with minimal flexure and have a fundamental resonant frequency that is as high as possible, to suppress the amplitude of surface waves caused by small vibrations transmitted to the mirror. To minimize the transmission of vibrations to the liquid surface, the entire mirror rests on an air bearing. This necessitates the mirror cell being lightweight, due to the limited load capabilities of the air bearing. The mirror components must also have physical characteristics which minimize the effects of thermal expansion with ambient temperature fluctuations in the observatory. In addition, the 2.7 m mirror construction is designed so that the techniques used may be readily extended to the construction of large mirrors. To attain the goals of a lightweight, rigid mirror, a composite laminant construction was used. The mirror consists of a foam core cut to the desired parabolic shape, with an accuracy of a few mm. An aluminum hub serves as an anchor for the foam and skin, and allows precise centering of the mirror on the air bearing and drive system. Several plys of Kevlar, covered in an epoxy matrix, are then applied to the foam. A final layer of pure epoxy is formed by spin casting. This final layer is parabolic to within a fraction of a mm. An aluminum ring bonded to the circumference of the mirror retains the mercury, and incorporates stainless-steel hard-points for the attachment of balance weights.

  14. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) Project Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2014-01-01

    To date, AMTD Phase 1 has accomplished all of its technical tasks on-schedule and on-budget. AMTD was awarded a Phase 2 contract. We are now performing Phase 2 tasks along with those tasks continued from Phase 1.

  15. Optimum selection of high performance mirror substrates for diamond finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodard, Kenneth S.; Comstock, Lovell E.; Wamboldt, Leonard; Sutherland, James S.

    2016-05-01

    Due to advances in manufacturing processes, the substrate options for high performance diamond machined mirrors are expanding. Fewer compromises have to be made to achieve the needed weight, stiffness and finish while maintaining reasonable costs. In addition to the traditional mirror materials like aluminum and beryllium, there are some less common materials that can now be included in the trade space that fill the cost and performance continuum between wrought aluminum and beryllium mirrors. Aluminum and beryllium, respectively, had been the low cost/fair performance and very high cost/very high performance bounds for substrate selection. These additional substrates provide multiple near net shape blank options and processes, mostly within these bounds, that can be considered in a mirror cost versus performance trade analysis. This paper will include a summary of some advances in manufacturing processes that provide more substrate options for diamond machined mirrors with some sample performance analysis and data. This is merged with the traditional substrate options to illustrate the now larger mirror substrate trade space. Some benchmark structural analysis is provided to back up a generic mirror design trade study.

  16. Finite Element Modeling of a Semi-Rigid Hybrid Mirror and a Highly Actuated Membrane Mirror as Candidates for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Larry; Jacobson, Dave; Mosier, Gary; Nein, Max; Page, Timothy; Redding, Dave; Sutherlin, Steve; Wilkerson, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Advanced space telescopes, which will eventually replace the Hubble Space Telescope (HTS), will have apertures of 8 - 20 n. Primary mirrors of these dimensions will have to be foldable to fit into the space launcher. By necessity these mirrors will be extremely light weight and flexible and the historical approaches to mirror designs, where the mirror is made as rigid as possible to maintain figure and to serve as the anchor for the entire telescope, cannot be applied any longer. New design concepts and verifications will depend entirely on analytical methods to predict optical performance. Finite element modeling of the structural and thermal behavior of such mirrors is becoming the tool for advanced space mirror designs. This paper discusses some of the preliminary tasks and study results, which are currently the basis for the design studies of the Next Generation Space Telescope.

  17. How mirror-touch informs theories of synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Meier, Beat; Lunke, Katrin; Rothen, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Ward and Banissy provide an excellent overview of the state of mirror-touch research in order to advance this field. They present a comparison of two prominent theoretical approaches for understanding mirror-touch phenomena. According to the threshold theory, the phenomena arise as a result of a hyperactive mirror neuron system. According to the Self-Other Theory, they are due to disturbances in the ability to distinguish the self from others. Here, we explore how these two theories can inform theories of synesthesia more generally. We conclude that both theories are not suited as general models of synesthesia. PMID:26118388

  18. Chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide mirrors for extreme ultraviolet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Osantowski, John F.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Saha, Timo T.; Wright, Geraldine A.; Boucarut, Rene A.; Fleetwood, Charles M.; Madison, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in optical coating and materials technology have made possible the development of instruments with substantially improved efficiency in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). For example, the development of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) SiC mirrors provides an opportunity to extend the range of normal-incidence instruments dow to 60 nm. CVD SiC is a highly polishable material yielding low- scattering surfaces. High UV reflectivity and desirable mechanical and thermal properties make CVD SiC an attractive mirror and/or coating material for EUV applications. The EUV performance of SiC mirrors, as well as some strengths and problem areas, is discussed.

  19. [Mirror, mirror of the wall: mirror therapy in the treatment of phantom limbs and phantom limb pain].

    PubMed

    Casale, Roberto; Furnari, Anna; Lamberti, Raul Coelho; Kouloulas, Efthimios; Hagenberg, Annegret; Mallik, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Phantom limb and phantom limb pain control are pivotal points in the sequence of intervention to bring the amputee to functional autonomy. The alterations of perception and sensation, the pain of the residual limb and the phantom limb are therefore aspects of amputation that should be taken into account in the "prise en charge" of these patients. Within the more advanced physical therapies to control phantom and phantom limb pain there is the use of mirrors (mirror therapy). This article willfocus on its use and on the possible side effects induced by the lack of patient selection and a conflict of body schema restoration through mirror therapy with concurrent prosthetic training and trauma acceptance. Advice on the need to select patients before treatment decisions, with regard to their psychological as well as clinical profile (including time since amputation and clinical setting), and the need to be aware of the possible adverse effects matching different and somehow conflicting therapeutic approaches, are put forward. Thus a coordinated sequence of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic procedures carried out by an interdisciplinary rehabilitation team that works globally on all patients' problems is fundamental in the management of amputees and phantom limb pain. Further studies and the development of a multidisciplinary network to study this and other applications of mirror therapy are needed. PMID:26731959

  20. Alignment and Integration of Lightweight Mirror Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Tyler; Biskach, Michael; Mazzarella, Jim; McClelland, Ryan; Saha, Timo; Zhang, Will; Chan, Kai-Wing

    2011-01-01

    The optics for the International X-Ray Observatory (IXO) require alignment and integration of about fourteen thousand thin mirror segments to achieve the mission goal of 3.0 square meters of effective area at 1.25 keV with an angular resolution of five arc-seconds. These mirror segments are 0.4 mm thick, and 200 to 400 mm in size, which makes it difficult not to impart distortion at the sub-arc-second level. This paper outlines the precise alignment, permanent bonding, and verification testing techniques developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Improvements in alignment include new hardware and automation software. Improvements in bonding include two module new simulators to bond mirrors into, a glass housing for proving single pair bonding, and a Kovar module for bonding multiple pairs of mirrors. Three separate bonding trials were x-ray tested producing results meeting the requirement of sub ten arc-second alignment. This paper will highlight these recent advances in alignment, testing, and bonding techniques and the exciting developments in thin x-ray optic technology development.

  1. Congenital mirror movements.

    PubMed Central

    Schott, G D; Wyke, M A

    1981-01-01

    In this report are described seven patients assessed clinically and neuropsychologically in whom mirror movements affecting predominantly the hands occurred as a congenital disorder. These mirror movements, representing a specific type of abnormal synkinesia, may arise as a hereditary condition, in the presence of a recognisable underlying neurological abnormality, and sporadically, and the seven patients provide more or less satisfactory examples of each of these three groups. Despite the apparent uniformity of the disorder, the heterogeneity and variability may be marked, examples in some of our patients including the pronounced increase in tone that developed with arm movement, and the capacity for modulation of the associated movement by alteration of neck position and bio-feedback. Various possible mechanisms are considered; these include impaired cerebral inhibition of unwanted movements, and functioning of abnormal motor pathways. Emphasis has been placed on the putative role of the direct, crossed corticomotoneurone pathways and on the unilateral and bilateral cerebral events that precede movement. PMID:7288446

  2. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    PubMed Central

    Xu, M.

    2016-01-01

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation. PMID:26937296

  3. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeylikovich, I.; Xu, M.

    2016-02-01

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation.

  4. Complex/Symplectic Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Wu-yen; Kachru, Shamit; Tomasiello, Alessandro; /Stanford U., ITP

    2005-10-28

    We construct a class of symplectic non-Kaehler and complex non-Kaehler string theory vacua, extending and providing evidence for an earlier suggestion by Polchinski and Strominger. The class admits a mirror pairing by construction. Comparing hints from a variety of sources, including ten-dimensional supergravity and KK reduction on SU(3)-structure manifolds, suggests a picture in which string theory extends Reid's fantasy to connect classes of both complex non-Kaehler and symplectic non-Kaehler manifolds.

  5. Lightweight Substrates For Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. Kyle

    1991-01-01

    New substrate uses conventional quasi-isotropic fabric laminate with surfacing layer of carbon-fiber paper consisting of randomly oriented chopped carbon fibers. Layered structure of fabric and paper relatively easy to manufacture. When impregnated with carbon, structure rigid and stable. Substrates of this type made quite thin, thus keeping areal weights to minimum. Mirrors of this type made faster, and cost less, than predecessors.

  6. Joined Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Parsonage, Tom; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fabrications of large Beryllium optical components are fundamentally limited by available facility capabilities. To overcome this limitation, NASA funded Brush Wellman Corp to study a Be joining process. Four 76 mm diameters samples and a 0.5 mm diameter Joined Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator (JBMD) were fabricated. This presentation will review the fabrication of these samples and summarize the results of their cryogenic testing at MSFCs XRCF.

  7. The Multiple Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, J. M.; Ulich, B. L.; Shannon, R. R.; Carleton, N. P.; Geary, J. C.; Latham, D. W.; Angel, J. R. P.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Low, F. J.; Weymann, R. J.

    The Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT), located on top of Mount Hopkins (2600 m) in Arizona, consists of six main telescope systems, each of which is a classical Cassegrain with a 1.8 m diameter parabolic primary with focal ratio f/2.7, and a hyperbolic secondary producing a final f/31.6 for each of the individual telescopes. The most significant departures of the MMT from conventional optical telescope technology are (1) the use of light-weight 'egg-crate' mirrors, which reduced the telescope weight, (2) the use of an alt-azimuth mount, which simplifies the gravitational effects on the structure, (3) the use of a ball-bearing support rather than hydrostatic bearings, resulting in cost savings and less maintenance, (4) the use of spur gear drives rather than worm gears, and (5) the use of multiple coaligned light collectors rather than a single monolithic mirror. Early multiple objective telescopes are discussed, and the early history of the MMT project is given. The design and performance of the telescope are explained, and MMT instrumentation (spectrograph, optical design, detector, infrared photometer, SAO CCD camera) is given. Astronomical research with the telescope is discussed, along with plans for future multiple objective telescopes.

  8. Replication of lightweight mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming Y.; Matson, Lawrence E.; Lee, Heedong; Chen, Chenggang

    2009-08-01

    The fabrication of lightweight mirror assemblages via a replication technique offers great potential for eliminating the high cost and schedule associated with the grinding and polishing steps needed for conventional glass or SiC mirrors. A replication mandrel is polished to an inverse figure shape and to the desired finish quality. It is then, coated with a release layer, the appropriate reflective layer, and followed by a laminate for coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) tailorability and strength. This optical membrane is adhered to a mirror structural substrate with a low shrinkage, CTE tailored adhesive. Afterwards, the whole assembly is separated from the mandrel. The mandrel is then cleaned and reused for the next replication run. The ultimate goal of replication is to preserve the surface finish and figure of the optical membrane upon its release from the mandrel. Successful replication requires a minimization of the residual stresses within the optical coating stack, the curing stresses from the adhesive and the thermal stress resulting from CTE mismatch between the structural substrate, the adhesive, and the optical membrane. In this paper, the results on replicated trials using both metal/metal and ceramic/ceramic laminates adhered to light weighted structural substrates made from syntactic foams (both inorganic and organic) will be discussed.

  9. Mirror versus parallel bimanual reaching

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In spite of their importance to everyday function, tasks that require both hands to work together such as lifting and carrying large objects have not been well studied and the full potential of how new technology might facilitate recovery remains unknown. Methods To help identify the best modes for self-teleoperated bimanual training, we used an advanced haptic/graphic environment to compare several modes of practice. In a 2-by-2 study, we compared mirror vs. parallel reaching movements, and also compared veridical display to one that transforms the right hand’s cursor to the opposite side, reducing the area that the visual system has to monitor. Twenty healthy, right-handed subjects (5 in each group) practiced 200 movements. We hypothesized that parallel reaching movements would be the best performing, and attending to one visual area would reduce the task difficulty. Results The two-way comparison revealed that mirror movement times took an average 1.24 s longer to complete than parallel. Surprisingly, subjects’ movement times moving to one target (attending to one visual area) also took an average of 1.66 s longer than subjects moving to two targets. For both hands, there was also a significant interaction effect, revealing the lowest errors for parallel movements moving to two targets (p < 0.001). This was the only group that began and maintained low errors throughout training. Conclusion Combined with other evidence, these results suggest that the most intuitive reaching performance can be observed with parallel movements with a veridical display (moving to two separate targets). These results point to the expected levels of challenge for these bimanual training modes, which could be used to advise therapy choices in self-neurorehabilitation. PMID:23837908

  10. A spectrum of shadowed mirroring.

    PubMed

    Wanamaker, Melissa C

    2012-04-01

    The central focus of this paper is to explore and extend Kohut's theory of maternal mirroring and to place it within the current context of psychoanalytic thinking. Kohut believed a child must experience "positive" mirroring from his or her mother in infancy and beyond to ensure development of a healthy self. Kohut alludes, however, to a possible situation in which the mother's face, metaphorically a mirror, can appear "faceless" to her child. From this I have inferred the concept of what I shall call "shadowed mirroring." Clinical and literary examples show that distorted, "shadowed" mirroring appears on a spectrum, with passive mirroring at one end and hostile (either verbal or nonverbal) mirroring on the other; some individuals experience both. I then consider how "shadowed mirroring," especially hostile mirroring, can be understood within the twin contexts of the overall mother-child relationship and present-day Intersubjective/Relational thinking that is both bidirectional and co-constructed. Shadowed mirroring can lead to severe personality dysfunction along the borderline-narcissistic range, as well as to difficulties in the areas of identity formation, failure of self-cohesiveness, and the blunting of certain humane qualities like empathy. PMID:22489812

  11. Next generation lightweight mirror modeling software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, William R.; Fitzgerald, Matthew; Rosa, Rubin Jaca; Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-09-01

    The advances in manufacturing techniques for lightweight mirrors, such as EXELSIS deep core low temperature fusion, Corning's continued improvements in the Frit bonding process and the ability to cast large complex designs, combined with water-jet and conventional diamond machining of glasses and ceramics has created the need for more efficient means of generating finite element models of these structures. Traditional methods of assembling 400,000 + element models can take weeks of effort, severely limiting the range of possible optimization variables. This paper will introduce model generation software developed under NASA sponsorship for the design of both terrestrial and space based mirrors. The software deals with any current mirror manufacturing technique, single substrates, multiple arrays of substrates, as well as the ability to merge submodels into a single large model. The modeler generates both mirror and suspension system elements, suspensions can be created either for each individual petal or the whole mirror. A typical model generation of 250,000 nodes and 450,000 elements only takes 3-5 minutes, much of that time being variable input time. The program can create input decks for ANSYS, ABAQUS and NASTRAN. An archive/retrieval system permits creation of complete trade studies, varying cell size, depth, and petal size, suspension geometry with the ability to recall a particular set of parameters and make small or large changes with ease. The input decks created by the modeler are text files which can be modified by any text editor, all the shell thickness parameters and suspension spring rates are accessible and comments in deck identify which groups of elements are associated with these parameters. This again makes optimization easier. With ANSYS decks, the nodes representing support attachments are grouped into components; in ABAQUS these are SETS and in NASTRAN as GRIDPOINT SETS, this make integration of these models into large telescope or satellite

  12. Next Generation Lightweight Mirror Modeling Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William R., Sr.; Fitzgerald, Mathew; Rosa, Rubin Jaca; Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    The advances in manufacturing techniques for lightweight mirrors, such as EXELSIS deep core low temperature fusion, Corning's continued improvements in the Frit bonding process and the ability to cast large complex designs, combined with water-jet and conventional diamond machining of glasses and ceramics has created the need for more efficient means of generating finite element models of these structures. Traditional methods of assembling 400,000 + element models can take weeks of effort, severely limiting the range of possible optimization variables. This paper will introduce model generation software developed under NASA sponsorship for the design of both terrestrial and space based mirrors. The software deals with any current mirror manufacturing technique, single substrates, multiple arrays of substrates, as well as the ability to merge submodels into a single large model. The modeler generates both mirror and suspension system elements, suspensions can be created either for each individual petal or the whole mirror. A typical model generation of 250,000 nodes and 450,000 elements only takes 5-10 minutes, much of that time being variable input time. The program can create input decks for ANSYS, ABAQUS and NASTRAN. An archive/retrieval system permits creation of complete trade studies, varying cell size, depth, and petal size, suspension geometry with the ability to recall a particular set of parameters and make small or large changes with ease. The input decks created by the modeler are text files which can be modified by any editor, all the key shell thickness parameters are accessible and comments in deck identify which groups of elements are associated with these parameters. This again makes optimization easier. With ANSYS decks, the nodes representing support attachments are grouped into components; in ABAQUS these are SETS and in NASTRAN as GRIDPOINT SETS, this make integration of these models into large telescope or satellite models easier.

  13. Next-Generation Lightweight Mirror Modeling Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William R., Sr.; Fitzgerald, Mathew; Rosa, Rubin Jaca; Stahl, Phil

    2013-01-01

    The advances in manufacturing techniques for lightweight mirrors, such as EXELSIS deep core low temperature fusion, Corning's continued improvements in the Frit bonding process and the ability to cast large complex designs, combined with water-jet and conventional diamond machining of glasses and ceramics has created the need for more efficient means of generating finite element models of these structures. Traditional methods of assembling 400,000 + element models can take weeks of effort, severely limiting the range of possible optimization variables. This paper will introduce model generation software developed under NASA sponsorship for the design of both terrestrial and space based mirrors. The software deals with any current mirror manufacturing technique, single substrates, multiple arrays of substrates, as well as the ability to merge submodels into a single large model. The modeler generates both mirror and suspension system elements, suspensions can be created either for each individual petal or the whole mirror. A typical model generation of 250,000 nodes and 450,000 elements only takes 5-10 minutes, much of that time being variable input time. The program can create input decks for ANSYS, ABAQUS and NASTRAN. An archive/retrieval system permits creation of complete trade studies, varying cell size, depth, and petal size, suspension geometry with the ability to recall a particular set of parameters and make small or large changes with ease. The input decks created by the modeler are text files which can be modified by any editor, all the key shell thickness parameters are accessible and comments in deck identify which groups of elements are associated with these parameters. This again makes optimization easier. With ANSYS decks, the nodes representing support attachments are grouped into components; in ABAQUS these are SETS and in NASTRAN as GRIDPOINT SETS, this make integration of these models into large telescope or satellite models possible

  14. Next Generation Lightweight Mirror Modeling Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William; Fitzgerald, Matthew; Stahl, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The advances in manufacturing techniques for lightweight mirrors, such as EXELSIS deep core low temperature fusion, Corning's continued improvements in the Frit bonding process and the ability to cast large complex designs, combined with water-jet and conventional diamond machining of glasses and ceramics has created the need for more efficient means of generating finite element models of these structures. Traditional methods of assembling 400,000 + element models can take weeks of effort, severely limiting the range of possible optimization variables. This paper will introduce model generation software developed under NASA sponsorship for the design of both terrestrial and space based mirrors. The software deals with any current mirror manufacturing technique, single substrates, multiple arrays of substrates, as well as the ability to merge submodels into a single large model. The modeler generates both mirror and suspension system elements, suspensions can be created either for each individual petal or the whole mirror. A typical model generation of 250,000 nodes and 450,000 elements only takes 5-10 minutes, much of that time being variable input time. The program can create input decks for ANSYS, ABAQUS and NASTRAN. An archive/retrieval system permits creation of complete trade studies, varying cell size, depth, and petal size, suspension geometry with the ability to recall a particular set of parameters and make small or large changes with ease. The input decks created by the modeler are text files which can be modified by any editor, all the key shell thickness parameters are accessible and comments in deck identify which groups of elements are associated with these parameters. This again makes optimization easier. With ANSYS decks, the nodes representing support attachments are grouped into components; in ABAQUS these are SETS and in NASTRAN as GRIDPOINT SETS, this make integration of these models into large telescope or satellite models possible.

  15. 15 meter multiple mirror telescope design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.; Woolf, N. J.

    1986-01-01

    Taking as a starting point the existing Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT), a concept for a larger and more advanced instrument has been developed. It makes use of four 7.5-m diameter paraboloidal glass primaries of the honeycomb sandwich type being developed by the University of Arizona. These are mounted quite close together in a square configuration, with their axes coaligned. Separate optical configurations are provided, for optical and infrared applications. To minimze telescope emissivity in the thermal infrared at the combined focus, all the beam combining and streering optics that follow the tertiary mirrors are enclosed in a large central dewar and cooled with liquid nitrogen. The diffraction-limited resolution at the combined focus of 0.11 arcsec at 10 micrometers wavelength is equivalent to that of a 20.5 meter filled aperture. Diffraction-limited resolution should be routinely achievable at 10 and 20 micrometers, if active correction of large-scale wavefront errors is implemented.

  16. The Marshall Magnetic Mirror Beam-Plasma Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Todd A.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Edwards, David L.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Plasma propulsion is an advanced propulsion concept with the potential to realize very high specific impulse. Present designs for plasma propulsion devices share a common feature, the incorporation of a magnetic mirror. A magnetic mirror is a plasma confinement scheme whereby charged particles are trapped (or reflected) between two regions of high magnetic field strength. A cylindrical geometry is most often employed to create a magnetic mirror, which is a natural geometry for propulsion devices. To utilize the magnetic mirror configuration in a plasma propulsion device, however, will require efficient coupling of power into the system. With the development of compact and efficient electron sources, such as hollow cathode sources, coupling power into a magnetic mirror using electron beams may be an attractive approach. A system, the Marshall Magnetic Mirror (M3), has been constructed to study the coupling of an electron beam into a magnetic mirror. A description of the M3 device will be provided as well as data from initial beam-plasma coupling experiments.

  17. Developmental long trace profiler using optimally aligned mirror based pentaprism

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, Samuel K; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Buchheim, Jana; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas

    2010-07-21

    A low-budget surface slope measuring instrument, the Developmental Long Trace Profiler (DLTP), was recently brought into operation at the Advanced Light Source Optical Metrology Laboratory [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 616, 212-223 (2010)]. The instrument is based on a precisely calibrated autocollimator and a movable pentaprism. The capability of the DLTP to achieve sub-microradian surface slope metrology has been verified via cross-comparison measurements with other high-performance slope measuring instruments when measuring the same high-quality test optics. In the present work, a further improvement of the DLTP is achieved by replacing the existing bulk pentaprism with a specially designed mirror based pentaprism. A mirror based pentaprism offers the possibility to eliminate systematic errors introduced by inhomogeneity of the optical material and fabrication imperfections of a bulk pentaprism. We provide the details of the mirror based pentaprism design and describe an original experimental procedure for precision mutual alignment of the mirrors. The algorithm of the alignment procedure and its efficiency are verified with rigorous ray tracing simulations. Results of measurements of a spherically curved test mirror and a flat test mirror using the original bulk pentaprism are compared with measurements using the new mirror based pentaprism, demonstrating the improved performance.

  18. Developmental long trace profiler using optimally aligned mirror based pentaprism

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, Samuel K; Morrison, Gregory Y; Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Gubarev, Mikhail V; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Buchheim, Jana; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas

    2010-12-20

    A low-budget surface slope measuring instrument, the Developmental Long Trace Profiler (DLTP), was recently brought into operation at the Advanced Light Source Optical Metrology Laboratory. The instrument is based on a precisely calibrated autocollimator and a movable pentaprism. The capability of the DLTP to achieve sub-microradian surface slope metrology has been verified via cross-comparison measurements with other high-performance slope measuring instruments when measuring the same high-quality test optics. In the present work, a further improvement of the DLTP is achieved by replacing the existing bulk pentaprism with a specially designed mirror based pentaprism. A mirror based pentaprism offers the possibility to eliminate systematic errors introduced by inhomogeneity of the optical material and fabrication imperfections of a bulk pentaprism. We provide the details of the mirror based pentaprism design and describe an original experimental procedure for precision mutual alignment of the mirrors. The algorithm of the alignment procedure and its efficiency are verified with rigorous ray tracing simulations. Results of measurements of a spherically curved test mirror and a flat test mirror using the original bulk pentaprism are compared with measurements using the new mirror based pentaprism, demonstrating the improved performance.

  19. The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Science Drivers and Technology Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Giavalisco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Phillip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Remi; Hyde, Tupper

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers and the resulting performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsecond angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 m to 2.4 m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We also discuss the priorities for technology development needed to enable the construction of ATLAST for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions. Keywords: Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST); ultraviolet/optical space telescopes; astrophysics; astrobiology; technology development.

  20. Duality relation between nonspherical mirror optical cavities and its application to gravitational-wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Agresti, Juri; Chen, Yanbei; D'Ambrosio, Erika; Savov, Pavlin

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we analytically prove a unique duality relation between the eigenspectra of paraxial optical cavities with nonspherical mirrors: a one-to-one mapping between eigenmodes and eigenvalues of cavities deviating from flat mirrors by h(r) and cavities deviating from concentric mirrors by -h(r), where h need not be a small perturbation. We then illustrate its application to optical cavities, proposed for advanced interferometric gravitational-wave detectors, where the mirrors are designed to support beams with rather flat intensity profiles over the mirror surfaces. This unique mapping might be very useful in future studies of alternative optical designs for advanced gravitational wave interferometers or experiments employing optical cavities with nonstandard mirrors. PMID:23201935

  1. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  2. Mirror distortion measurements with an in-situ LTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takacs, Peter Z.; Qian, Shinan; Randall, Kevin J.; Yun, Wenbing; Li, Haizhang

    1998-11-01

    An in-situ long trace profiler developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory under the auspices of a CRADA with Continental Optical Corporation has successfully measured thermal distortion on a side-cooled mirror in a beam line at the Advanced Photon Source. The instrument scanned the central 90 mm of the 200 mm long mirror through a vacuum window while the mirror was subjected to heat loading from the synchrotron beam. Results clearly show transient effects occurring when the mirror is first illuminated that relax after about 15 minutes, in accord with finite element thermal calculations. The steady state curvature of the surface is measured to be slightly concave with an additional 5 km radius relative to the initial nominal curvature of about 1 km. The magnitude of this steady state condition was not expected and was not predicted by the calculations.

  3. Nickel-plated invar mirrors for synchrotron radiation beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Burt, P.; Cambie, Daniela; Duarte, Robert M.; Franck, A.; Irick, Steven C.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; MacGill, D.; Paquin, R.; Plate, David W.

    2002-12-01

    We report the experience of the Advanced Light Source group in designing and building a series of nine electroless nickel-plated invar mirrors. The first four mirrors constructed appeared initially to be good but later it became evident that the nickel plating on all nine had been done improperly. The problem first appeared as blister-like defects about half a micron high and one to three centimeters wide. The cause turned out to be local separation of the plating from the substrate. In this paper we discuss the technical issues involved in building mirrors from invar and in preparing for and applying the needed electroless nickel coatings. We describe the studies that we carried out to evaluate the questions of adhesion, stress and polishability and report broad success in remanufacturing four of the mirrors. At time of writing one of the four has met specification showing good figure (0.8 μr rms) and finish (6 Å rms).

  4. SXI prototype mirror mount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule. A number of development hardware parts have been designed and fabricated jointly by MSFC and UAH for the engineering model of SXI. The major parts include a nickel electroformed mirror and a mirror mount, plating and coating of the ceramic spacers, and gold plating of the contact rings and fingers for the camera assembly. An aluminum model of the high accuracy sun sensor (HASS) was also designed and fabricated. A number of fiber optic tapers for the camera assembly were also coated with indium tin oxide and phosphor for testing and evaluation by MSFC. A large number of the SXI optical bench parts were also redesigned and simplified for a prototype telescope. These parts include the forward and rear support flanges, front aperture plate, the graphite epoxy optical bench and a test fixture for the prototype telescope. More than fifty (50) drawings were generated for various components of the prototype telescope. Some of these parts were subsequently fabricated at UAH machine shop or at MSFC or by the outside contractors. UAH also provide technical support to MSFC staff for a number of preliminary and critical design reviews. These design reviews included PDR and CDR for the mirror assembly by United Technologies Optical Systems (UTOS), and the program quarterly reviews, and SXI PDR and CDR. UAH staff also regularly attended the monthly status reviews, and made a significant number of suggestions to improve

  5. SXI Prototype mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This final report describes the work performed from June 1993 to January 1995. The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule.

  6. SXI prototype mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule. A number of development hardware parts have been designed and fabricated jointly by MSFC and UAH for the engineering model of SXI. The major parts include a nickel electroformed mirror and a mirror mount, plating and coating of the ceramic spacers, and gold plating of the contact rings and fingers for the camera assembly. An aluminum model of the high accuracy sun sensor (HASS) was also designed and fabricated. A number of fiber optic tapers for the camera assembly were also coated with indium tin oxide and phosphor for testing and evaluation by MSFC. A large number of the SXI optical bench parts were also redesigned and simplified for a prototype telescope. These parts include the forward and rear support flanges, front aperture plate, the graphite epoxy optical bench and a test fixture for the prototype telescope. More than fifty (50) drawings were generated for various components of the prototype telescope. Some of these parts were subsequently fabricated at UAH machine shop or at MSFC or by the outside contractors. UAH also provide technical support to MSFC staff for a number of preliminary and critical design reviews. These design reviews included PDR and CDR for the mirror assembly by United Technologies Optical Systems (UTOS), and the program quarterly reviews, and SXI PDR and CDR. UAH staff also regularly attended the monthly status reviews, and made a significant number of suggestions to improve

  7. A mirror to analysis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M

    2000-12-01

    Three books written by psychiatrists for a lay audience are examined. Two are novels, and the third is a psychiatrist's account of the years of his psychiatric residency training. In all three books psychoanalysts are portrayed in negative roles, as arrogant, cold, uncaring, and even venal. The reasons why psychiatrists would portray analysis in this light are examined, and some ways in which psychoanalysts will need to re-examine their role in education and in their relationships with psychiatric colleagues in order to counteract this negative "mirror" are suggested. PMID:11143896

  8. Poco Graphite Mirror Metrology Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kester, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Recently a lightweight mirror technology was tested at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optic Manufacturing Technology Center (MSFC, SOMTC). The mirror is a Poco Graphite CVD Si clad SiC substrate. It was tested for cryogenic (cryo) survivability to 20deg Kelvin in SOMTC's X-ray Calibration and Cryogenic Test Facility. The surface figure of the mirror was measured before and after cry0 cycling. The test technique and results are discussed.

  9. Scanning mirror for infrared sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. H.; Bernstein, S. B.

    1972-01-01

    A high resolution, long life angle-encoded scanning mirror, built for application in an infrared attitude sensor, is described. The mirror uses a Moire' fringe type optical encoder and unique torsion bar suspension together with a magnetic drive to meet stringent operational and environmental requirements at a minimum weight and with minimum power consumption. Details of the specifications, design, and construction are presented with an analysis of the mirror suspension that allows accurate prediction of performance. The emphasis is on mechanical design considerations, and brief discussions are included on the encoder and magnetic drive to provide a complete view of the mirror system and its capabilities.

  10. JWST Primary Mirror Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    Mirror Technology was identified as a (if not the) critical capability necessary to achieve the Level 1 science goals. A never before demonstrated space telescope capability was required: 6 to 8 meter class pri mary mirror, diffraction limited at 2 micrometers and operates at temperatures below 50K. Launch vehicle constraints placed significant architectural constraints: deployed/segmented primary mirror (4.5 meter fairing diameter) 20 kg/m2 areal density (PM 1000 kg mass) Such mirror technology had never been demonstrated - and did not exist

  11. Gasdynamic Mirror Fusion Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emrich, Bill

    2000-10-01

    A gasdynamic mirror (GDM) fusion propulsion experiment is currently being constructed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to test the feasibility of this particular type of fusion device. Because of the open magnetic field line configuration of mirror fusion devices, they are particularly well suited for propulsion system applications since they allow for the easy ejection of thrust producing plasma. Currently, the MSFC GDM is constructed in three segments. The vacuum chamber mirror segment, the plasma injector mirror segment, and the main plasma chamber segment. Enough magnets are currently available to construct up to three main plasma chamber segments. The mirror segments are also segmented such that they can be expanded to accommodate new end plugging strategies without requiring the disassembly of the entire mirror segment. The plasma for the experiment is generated in a microwave cavity located between the main magnets and the mirror magnets. Ion heating is accomplished through ambipolar diffusion. The objective of the experiment is to investigate the stability characteristics of the gasdynamic mirror and to map a region of parameter space within which the plasma can be confined in a stable steady state configuration. The mirror ratio, plasma density, and plasma ``b" will be varied over a range of values and measurements subsequently taken to determine the degree of plasma stability.

  12. Gasdynamic Mirror Fusion Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, Bill; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A gasdynamic mirror (GDM) fusion propulsion experiment is currently being constructed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to test the feasibility of this particular type of fusion device. Because of the open magnetic field line configuration of mirror fusion devices, they are particularly well suited for propulsion system applications since they allow for the easy ejection of thrust producing plasma. Currently, the MSFC GDM is constructed in three segments. The vacuum chamber mirror segment, the plasma injector mirror segment, and the main plasma chamber segment. Enough magnets are currently available to construct up to three main plasma chamber segments. The mirror segments are also segmented such that they can be expanded to accommodate new end plugging strategies with out requiring the disassembly of the entire mirror segment. The plasma for the experiment is generated in a microwave cavity located between the main magnets and the mirror magnets. Ion heating is accomplished through ambipolar diffusion. The objective of the experiment is to investigate the stability characteristics of the gasdynamic mirror and to map a region of parameter space within which the plasma can be confined in a stable steady state configuration. The mirror ratio, plasma density, and plasma "b" will be varied over a range of values and measurements subsequently taken to determine the degree of plasma stability.

  13. Relay mirror experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begley, David L.

    1996-04-01

    Originating out of a SDIO-funded, Phase 1 study effort, two ground systems and an orbiting EO payload/spacecraft were the primary equipment for the RME. The RME was originally conceived to be a shuttle deployed experiment. Shortly after program start, the Challenger disaster occurred, with the promise of extensive delays. A completely new space segment was to be designed incorporating a free-flying spacecraft. During the midphase of the program, a variety of launch vehicles were envisioned to replace the shuttle, requiring the BASD team to design accommodations for Delta, Atlas, and Titan, with a Delta launch being the final solution. The ground systems tracked the spacecraft and illuminated it with green and blue beacon lasers. The Payload Experiment Package (PEP) housed the bisection tracker, a key innovation central to the experiment. The bisection tracker acquired both beacons and controlled steerable mirrors to accomplish fine tracking of the two cooperative beacons. In the process, the relay mirror was precisely positioned to enable a successful relay of a third infrared laser between the two ground sites via the orbiting spacecraft. Many of the key technologies employed in the PEP were originally developed for Ball laser communications research and development programs and other laser pointing efforts. The WAVE sensor package, built by ATA and integrated by Ball, measured the vibrations of the optical base structure on which it was mounted. These spacecraft vibration data are critical to the accurate pointing of space laser communication terminals.

  14. Ultrasonic Time Reversal Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Mathias; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickael

    2004-11-01

    For more than ten years, time reversal techniques have been developed in many different fields of applications including detection of defects in solids, underwater acoustics, room acoustics and also ultrasound medical imaging and therapy. The essential property that makes time reversed acoustics possible is that the underlying physical process of wave propagation would be unchanged if time were reversed. In a non dissipative medium, the equations governing the waves guarantee that for every burst of sound that diverges from a source there exists in theory a set of waves that would precisely retrace the path of the sound back to the source. If the source is pointlike, this allows focusing back on the source whatever the medium complexity. For this reason, time reversal represents a very powerful adaptive focusing technique for complex media. The generation of this reconverging wave can be achieved by using Time Reversal Mirrors (TRM). It is made of arrays of ultrasonic reversible piezoelectric transducers that can record the wavefield coming from the sources and send back its time-reversed version in the medium. It relies on the use of fully programmable multi-channel electronics. In this paper we present some applications of iterative time reversal mirrors to target detection in medical applications.

  15. Mirror development for CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, A.; Doro, M.; Brun, P.; Canestrari, R.; Chadwick, P.; Font, L.; Ghigo, M.; Lorenz, E.; Mariotti, M.; Michalowski, J.; Niemiec, J.; Pareschi, G.; Peyaud, B.; Seweryn, K.

    2009-08-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), currently in its early design phase, is a proposed new project for groundbased gamma-ray astronomy with at least 10 times higher sensitivity than current instruments. CTA is planned to consist of several tens of large Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) with a combined reflective surface of up to 10,000 m2. The challenge for the future CTA array is to develop lightweight and cost efficient mirrors with high production rates, good longterm durability and adequate optical properties. The technologies currently under investigation comprise different methods of carbon fibre/epoxy based substrates, sandwich concepts with cold-slumped surfaces made of thin float glass and different structural materials like aluminum honeycomb, glass foam or PU foam inside, and aluminum sandwich structures with either diamond milled surfaces or reflective foils. The current status of the mirror development for CTA will be summarized together with investigations on the improvement of the reflective surfaces and their protection against degradation.

  16. "Mirror-Image" Errors without Mirror-Image Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barroso, Felix; Braine, Lila Ghent

    1974-01-01

    Young children matching the orientation of (a) identical realistic figures that could form mirror images of each other, or (b) nonidentical realistic figures that could not form mirror images, produced the same pattern of errors. The explanation proposed is a strategy of matching analogous parts of the two figures. (Author/SDH)

  17. Status of the secondary mirrors (M2) for the Gemini 8-m telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knohl, Ernst-Dieter; Schoeppach, Armin; Pickering, Michael A.

    1998-08-01

    The 1-m diameter lightweight secondary mirrors (M2) for the Gemini 8-m telescopes will be the largest CVD-SiC mirrors ever produced. The design and manufacture of these mirrors is a very challenging task. In this paper we will discuss the mirror design, structural and mechanical analysis, and the CVD manufacturing process used to produce the mirror blanks. The lightweight design consist of a thin faceplate (4-mm) and triangular backstructure cells with ribs of varying heights. The main drivers in the design were weight (40 kg) and manufacturing limitations imposed on the backstructure cells and mirror mounts. Finite element modeling predicts that the mirror design will meet all of the Gemini M2 requirements for weight, mechanical integrity, resonances, and optical performance. Special design considerations were necessary to avoid stress concentration in the mounting areas and to meet the requirement that the mirror survive an 8-g earthquake. The highest risk step in the mirror blank manufacturing process is the near-net-shape CVD deposition of the thin, curved faceplate. Special tooling and procedures had to be developed to produce faceplates free of fractures, cracks, and stress during the cool-down from deposition temperature (1350 C) to room temperature. Due to time delay with the CVD manufacturing process in the meantime a backup solution from Zerodur has been started. This mirror is now in the advanced polishing process. Because the design of both mirrors is very similar an excellent comparison of both solutions is possible.

  18. Development of lightweight mirror elements for the Euro50 mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Harold E.; Romeo, Robert C.; Shaffer, Joseph J.; Chen, Peter C.

    2004-07-01

    New, very large telescopes with apertures of 30, 50, and 100 meters are being proposed by the astronomical community. Superpolished or ultrapolished mirrors with low scattered light levels and the use of adaptive optics for near-diffraction-limited performance would make such large telescopes a turning point in astronomy. The secondary mirror for the Euro50 will be a four meter adaptive optic made of a low expansion graphite-filled cyanate ester resin composite produced using a replica transfer technique. We have made three 1/3rd meter diameter prototype composite adaptive optic mirrors of this cyanate ester composite material. Because of the embedded graphite fibers, the composite material has a measured expansion coefficient in the 10-8 range, as has Zerodur or ULE glass. It is very much lighter, more rugged and more economical than Zerodur or ULE, and can be fabricated in weeks, not months. The Zerodur mandrels upon which these replica transfer mirrors are made are superpolished using centrifugal elutriation, so the replica surface has an rms roughness of 0.6 to 0.8 nm. It thus scatters about an order of magnitude less light than typical conventionally polished astronomical mirrors. In adaptive optic mirrors with sub-mm thick faceplates the number of plies used is insufficient to produce an isotropic surface. For mirrors 2 mm thick, with more plies, the surfaces are isotropic, and the slight astigmatism sometimes resulting from the mesh in the ply can be corrected by actuators to make them attractive mirrors. They must be supported to maintain a good optical figure over a meter diameter mirror. The support requirement may be met by using a new type of mechanical/piezoelectric actuator adjustable to a fraction of a wavelength. The mechanical actuators have a coarse adjust of over an mm and a fine adjust of less than a wavelength of light. They can be used in series with a novel type of piezoelectric actuator for final static adjustment. The low voltage, up to 2

  19. Mirror profile optimization for nano-focusing KB mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Lin; Baker, Robert; Barrett, Ray; Cloetens, Peter; Dabin, Yves

    2010-06-23

    A KB focusing mirror width profile has been optimized to achieve nano-focusing for the nano-imaging end-station ID22NI at the ESRF. The complete mirror and flexure bender assembly has been modeled in 3D with finite element analysis using ANSYS. Bender stiffness, anticlastic effects and geometrical non-linear effects have been considered. Various points have been studied: anisotropy and crystal orientation, stress in the mirror and bender, actuator resolution and the mirror-bender adhesive bonding... Extremely high performance of the mirror is expected with residual slope error smaller than 0.6 {mu}rad, peak-to-valley, compared to the bent slope of 3000 {mu}rad.

  20. Laser beam scanning by rotary mirrors. I. Modeling mirror-scanning devices.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Katz, J

    1995-10-01

    Avector approach to tracing the path of a laser beam through an optical system containing movable plane mirrors is described, which permits a unified treatment of a number of basic mirror-scanning devices. We show that the scan field produced by the mirror-scanning system is a curved surface with a straight line as its generating element. The cross section of the scan field can be a circle, an ellipse, or a curve in the shape of an egg. Based on this understanding, some advanced topics are addressed, e.g., the relationship between the scan field and the scan pattern, the dependence of the scan pattern on the location and orientation of the observation surface, optical distortions in a scan pattern, spot-size enlargement caused by non-normal incidence of the scan beam on the observation plane, and so on. Design equations and curves are derived for the mirror-scanning devices that most frequently exist in linear and circular scan technology. Part II contains an analysis of the galvanometer-based optical scanner paddle scanner and the regular polygon. In Part III, X-Y scanning systems are studied. PMID:21060488

  1. Forming Mirrors on Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauldin, R. E.; Ramohalli, K.

    1983-01-01

    Smooth coatings deposited on hard-to-polish substrates. Lightweight mirror, leaning against conventional glass mirror, consists of metallic relective layer on substrate coated with polyester resin. Smooth surface of polyester resin made by covering freshly applied resin with piece of smooth glass coated with release agent.

  2. Polishing technique for beryllium mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froechtenigt, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    Performance tests, accomplished by inserting entire X ray telescope and polished mirror into vacuum line 67 m long and taking photographs of an X ray resolution source, indicate that polishing increases mirror efficiency from 0.06 percent for X rays at 0.8 nm and increases resolution from 15 to 3.75 arc-seconds.

  3. Acoustic Models of Optical Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, V. V.; Varaksina, E. I.

    2014-01-01

    Students form a more exact idea of the action of optical mirrors if they can observe the wave field being formed during reflection. For this purpose it is possible to organize model experiments with flexural waves propagating in thin elastic plates. The direct and round edges of the plates are used as models of plane, convex and concave mirrors.…

  4. Stroke amplifier for deformable mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Robert H.; Albanese, Marc J.; Zhou, Yaopeng; Bifano, Thomas; Burns, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple optical configuration that amplifies the usable stroke of a deformable mirror. By arranging for the wavefront to traverse the deformable mirror more than once, we correct it more than once. The experimental implementation of the idea demonstrates a doubling of 2.0 and 2.04 by two different means. PMID:15495423

  5. Silicon Carbide Technologies for Lightweighted Aerospace Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, L.; Chen, M.; Deblonk, B.; Palusinski, I.

    The use of monolithic glass and beryllium to produce lightweighted aerospace mirror systems has reached its limits due to the long lead times, high processing costs, environmental effects and launch load/weight requirements. New material solutions and manufacturing processes are required to meet DoD's directed energy weapons, reconnaissance/surveillance, and secured communications needs. Over the past several years the Air Force, MDA, and NASA has focused their efforts on the fabrication, lightweighting, and scale-up of numerous silicon carbide (SiC) based materials. It is anticipated that SiC can be utilized for most applications from cryogenic to high temperatures. This talk will focus on describing the SOA for these (near term) SiC technology solutions for making mirror structural substrates, figuring and finishing technologies being investigated to reduce cost time and cost, and non-destructive evaluation methods being investigated to help eliminate risk. Mirror structural substrates made out of advanced engineered materials (far term solutions) such as composites, foams, and microsphere arrays for ultra lightweighting will also be briefly discussed.

  6. Electrons and Mirror Symmetry

    ScienceCinema

    Kumar, Krishna

    2009-09-01

    The neutral weak force between an electron and a target particle, mediated by the Z boson, can be isolated by measuring the fractional change under a mirror reflection of the scattering probability of relativistic longitudinally polarized electrons off unpolarized targets. This technique yields neutral weak force measurements at a length scale of 1 femtometer, in contrast to high energy collider measurements that probe much smaller length scales. Study of the variation of the weak force over a range of length scales provides a stringent test of theory, complementing collider measurements. We describe a recent measurement of the neutral weak force between two electrons by the E158 experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. While the weak force between an electron and positron has been extensively studied, that between two electrons had never directly been measured. We conclude by discussing prospects for even more precise measurements at future facilities.

  7. Electrons and Mirror Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Krishna

    2007-04-04

    The neutral weak force between an electron and a target particle, mediated by the Z boson, can be isolated by measuring the fractional change under a mirror reflection of the scattering probability of relativistic longitudinally polarized electrons off unpolarized targets. This technique yields neutral weak force measurements at a length scale of 1 femtometer, in contrast to high energy collider measurements that probe much smaller length scales. Study of the variation of the weak force over a range of length scales provides a stringent test of theory, complementing collider measurements. We describe a recent measurement of the neutral weak force between two electrons by the E158 experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. While the weak force between an electron and positron has been extensively studied, that between two electrons had never directly been measured. We conclude by discussing prospects for even more precise measurements at future facilities.

  8. The kinaesthetic mirror illusion: How much does the mirror matter?

    PubMed

    Chancel, Marie; Brun, Clémentine; Kavounoudias, Anne; Guerraz, Michel

    2016-06-01

    The reflection of a moving hand in a mirror positioned in the sagittal plane can create an illusion of symmetrical, bimanual movement. This illusion is implicitly presumed to be of visual origin. However, muscle proprioceptive afferents of the arm reflected in the mirror might also affect the perceived position and movement of the other arm. We characterized the relative contributions of visual and proprioceptive cues by performing two experiments. In Experiment 1, we sought to establish whether kinaesthetic illusions induced using the mirror paradigm would survive marked visual impoverishment (obtained by covering between 0 and 100 % of the mirror in 16 % steps). We found that the mirror illusion was only significantly influenced when the visual degradation was 84 % or more. In Experiment 2, we masked the muscle proprioceptive afferents of the arm reflected in the mirror by co-vibrating antagonistic muscles. We found that masking the proprioceptive afferents reduced the velocity of the illusory displacement of the other arm. These results confirm that the mirror illusion is not a purely visual illusion but emerges from a combination of congruent signals from the two arms, i.e. visual afferents from the virtually moving arm and proprioceptive afferents from the contralateral, moving arm. PMID:26790422

  9. Mirror man: a case of skilled deliberate mirror writing.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Robert D; De Lucia, Natascia; Della Sala, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Mirror writing is a striking behaviour that is common in children and can reemerge in adults following brain damage. Skilled deliberate mirror writing has also been reported, but only anecdotally. We provide the first quantitative study of skilled deliberate mirror writing. K.B. can write forward or backward, vertically upright or inverted, with the hands acting alone or simultaneously. K.B. is predominantly left handed, but writes habitually with his right hand. Of his writing formats, his left hand mirror writing is by far the most similar in style to his normal handwriting. When writing bimanually, he performs better when his two hands make mirror-symmetrical movements to write opposite scripts than if they move in the same direction to write similar scripts. He has no special facility for reading mirrored text. These features are consistent with prior anecdotal cases and support a motor basis for K.B.'s ability, according to which his skilled mirror writing results from the left hand execution of a low-level motor program for a right hand abductive writing action. Our methods offer a novel framework for investigating the sharing of motor representations across effectors. PMID:24593311

  10. Point Relay Scanner Utilizing Ellipsoidal Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manhart, Paul K. (Inventor); Pagano, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A scanning system uses a polygonal mirror assembly with each facet of the polygon having an ellipsoidal mirror located thereon. One focal point of each ellipsoidal mirror is located at a common point on the axis of rotation of the polygonal mirror assembly. As the mirror assembly rotates. a second focal point of the ellipsoidal mirrors traces out a scan line. The scanner can be utilized for scanned output display of information or for scanning information to be detected.

  11. Chandra X-Ray Observatory High Resolution Mirror Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photograph shows the mirrors of the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) for the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), formerly Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), being assembled in the Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, New York. The AXAF was renamed CXO in 1999. The CXO is the most sophisticated and the world's most powerful x-ray telescope ever built. It observes x-rays from high-energy regions of the universe, such as hot gas in the remnants of exploded stars. The HRMA, the heart of the telescope system, is contained in the cylindrical 'telescope' portion of the observatory. Since high-energy x-rays would penetrate a normal mirror, special cylindrical mirrors were created. The two sets of four nested mirrors resemble tubes within tubes. Incoming x-rays graze off the highly polished mirror surface and are furneled to the instrument section for detection and study. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development of the CXO and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for its project management. The Observatory was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-93 mission.

  12. Resonant biaxial 7-mm MEMS mirror for omnidirectional scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, U.; Aikio, M.; Janes, J.; Senger, F.; Stenchly, V.; Weiss, M.; Quenzer, H.-J.; Wagner, B.; Benecke, W.

    2013-03-01

    Low-cost automotive laser scanners for environment perception are needed to enable the integration of advanced driver assistant systems (ADAS) into all automotive vehicle segments, a key to reducing the number of traffic accidents on roads. An omnidirectional 360 degree laser scanning concept has been developed based on combination of an omnidirectional lens and a biaxial large aperture MEMS mirror. This omnidirectional scanning concept is the core of a small sized low-cost time-of-flight based range sensor development. This paper describes concept, design, fabrication and first measurement results of a resonant biaxial 7mm gimbal-less MEMS mirror that is electrostatically actuated by stacked vertical comb drives. Identical frequencies of the two resonant axes are necessary to enable the required circle scanning capability. A tripod suspension was chosen since it allows minimizing the frequency splitting of the two resonant axes. Low mirror curvature is achieved by a thickness of the mirror of more than 500 μm. Hermetic wafer level vacuum packaging of such large mirrors based on multiple wafer bonding has been developed to enable to achieve a large mechanical tilt angle of +/- 6.5 degrees in each axis. The 7mm-MEMS mirror demonstrates large angle circular scanning at 1.5kHz.

  13. Observational physics of mirror world

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khlopov, M. YA.; Beskin, G. M.; Bochkarev, N. E.; Pustilnik, L. A.; Pustilnik, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    The existence of the whole world of shadow particles, interacting with each other and having no mutual interactions with ordinary particles except gravity is a specific feature of modern superstring models, being considered as models of the theory of everything. The presence of shadow particles is the necessary condition in the superstring models, providing compensation of the asymmetry of left and right chirality states of ordinary particles. If compactification of additional dimensions retains the symmetry of left and right states, shadow world turns to be the mirror one, with particles and fields having properties strictly symmetrical to the ones of corresponding ordinary particles and fields. Owing to the strict symmetry of physical laws for ordinary and mirror particles, the analysis of cosmological evolution of mirror matter provides rather definite conclusions on possible effects of mirror particles in the universe. A general qualitative discussion of possible astronomical impact of mirror matter is given, in order to make as wide as possible astronomical observational searches for the effects of mirror world, being the unique way to test the existence of mirror partners of ordinary particles in the Nature.

  14. Stressed mirror polishing: finite element simulation of mirror blank deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yu; Lu, Lihong

    2014-08-01

    The theoretical principle of Stressed Mirror Polishing (SMP) is introduced, including the representation method of elastic deformation, the formulations of discrete bending moment and shearing force. A Finite Element Analysis (FEA) simulation model of has been set up by ANSYS software. The warping facility in this model is consisted of 36 aluminum alloy arms equally distribute on the ambit of mirror blank. Two forces are applied on each arm to provide bending moment and shearing force. Taking type 82 segment of Thirty Meters Telescope (TMT) primary mirror for example, a FEA simulation of mirror blank deformation has been performed. Simulation result shows that, the deformation error is 33μm PV. The theoretical deformation PV value is 205μm and the simulation deformation PV value is 172μm, converging rate reaches to 0.84 in a single warping cycle. After three or four warping cycles, the residue error may converge into 1μm.

  15. JWST NIRCam flight mirror assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammini, Paul V.; Holmes, Howard C.; Huff, Lynn; Jacoby, Mike S.; Lopez, Frank

    2011-10-01

    The Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) instrument for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has an optical prescription which includes numerous fold mirror assemblies. The instrument will operate at 35K after experiencing launch loads at ~293K. The optic mounts must accommodate all associated thermal and mechanical stresses, plus maintain exceptional optical quality during operation. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) conceived, designed, analyzed, assembled, tested, and integrated the mirror assemblies for the NIRCam instrument. This paper covers the design, analysis, assembly, and test of two of the instruments key fold mirrors.

  16. Fueling of tandem mirror reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gorker, G.E.; Logan, B.G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper summarizes the fueling requirements for experimental and demonstration tandem mirror reactors (TMRs), reviews the status of conventional pellet injectors, and identifies some candidate accelerators that may be needed for fueling tandem mirror reactors. Characteristics and limitations of three types of accelerators are described; neutral beam injectors, electromagnetic rail guns, and laser beam drivers. Based on these characteristics and limitations, a computer module was developed for the Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code (TMRSC) to select the pellet injector/accelerator combination which most nearly satisfies the fueling requirements for a given machine design.

  17. Polarimetry with multiple mirror telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, S. C.

    1986-01-01

    The polarizations of multiple mirror telescopes are calculated using Mueller calculus. It is found that the Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) produces a constant depolarization that is a function of wavelength and independent of sky position. The efficiency and crosstalk are modeled and experimentally verified. The two- and four-mirror new generation telescopes are found to produce sinusoidal depolarization for which an accurate interpretation of the incident Stokes vector requires inverse matrix calculations. Finally, the depolarization of f/1 paraboloids is calculated and found to be less than 0.1 percent at 3000 A.

  18. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  19. Next Generation Space Telescope Ultra-Lightweight Mirror Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, James W.

    1998-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope is currently envisioned as a eight meter diameter cryogenic deployable telescope that will operate at the earth sun libration point L2. A number of different designs are being examined within NASA and under industry studies by Ball Aerospace, Lockheed-Martin and TRW. Although these designs differ in many respects, they all require significant advancements in the state-of-the-art with respect to large diameter, ultra-lightweight, mirrors. The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the current status of the mirror development program NGST is a tremendously ambitious undertaking that sets the mark for new NASA missions. In order to achieve the weight, cost and performance requirements of NGST, the primary mirror must be made lighter, cheaper and better than anything that has ever been done. In order to accomplish this an aggressive technology program has been put in place. The scope of the program was determined by examining historically what has been accomplished; assessing recent technological advances in fabrication and testing; and evaluating the effect of these advances relative to enabling the manufacture of lightweight mirrors that meet NGST requirements. As it is currently envisioned, the primary mirror for NGST is on the order of eight meters in diameter, it is to be diffraction limited at a wave length of 2 microns and has an overall weight requirement of 15 kilograms per square meter. Two large scale demonstration projects are under way along with a number of smaller scale demonstrations on a variety of mirror materials and concepts. The University of Arizona (UA) mirror concept is based around a 2mm thick Borosilicate glass face sheet mounted to a composite backplane structure via actuators for mirror figure correction. The Composite Optics Inc.(COI) concept consists of a 3.2mm thick Zerodur face sheet bonded to a composite support structure which in turn is mounted to a composite backplane structure via

  20. Tinbergen on mirror neurons

    PubMed Central

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Niko Tinbergen defined the scope of behavioural biology with his four problems: causation, ontogeny, survival value and evolution. About 20 years ago, there was another highly significant development in behavioural biology—the discovery of mirror neurons (MNs). Here, I use Tinbergen's original four problems (rather than the list that appears in textbooks) to highlight the differences between two prominent accounts of MNs, the genetic and associative accounts; to suggest that the latter provides the defeasible ‘best explanation’ for current data on the causation and ontogeny of MNs; and to argue that functional analysis, of the kind that Tinbergen identified somewhat misleadingly with studies of ‘survival value’, should be a high priority for future research. In this kind of functional analysis, system-level theories would assign MNs a small, but potentially important, role in the achievement of action understanding—or another social cognitive function—by a production line of interacting component processes. These theories would be tested by experimental intervention in human and non-human animal samples with carefully documented and controlled developmental histories. PMID:24778376

  1. Responder fast steering mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullard, Andrew; Shawki, Islam

    2013-09-01

    Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (SAS) has designed, built and tested a 3.3-inch diameter fast steering mirror (FSM) for space application. This 2-axis FSM operates over a large angle (over 10 degree range), has a very high servo bandwidth (over 3.3 Khz closed loop bandwidth), has nanoradian-class noise, and is designed to support microradian class line of sight accuracy. The FSM maintains excellent performance over large temperature ranges (which includes wave front error) and has very high reliability with the help of fully redundant angle sensors and actuator circuits. The FSM is capable of achieving all its design requirements while also being reaction-compensated. The reaction compensation is achieved passively and does not need a separate control loop. The FSM has undergone various environmental testing which include exported forces and torques and thermal vacuum testing that support the FSM design claims. This paper presents the mechanical design and test results of the mechanism which satisfies the rigorous vacuum and space application requirements.

  2. Responder fast steering mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullard, Andrew; Shawki, Islam

    2013-10-01

    Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (SAS) has designed, built and tested a 3.3-inch diameter fast steering mirror (FSM) for space application. This 2-axis FSM operates over a large angle (over 10 degree range), has a very high servo bandwidth (over 3.3 Khz closed loop bandwidth), has nanoradian-class noise, and is designed to support microradian class line of sight accuracy. The FSM maintains excellent performance over large temperature ranges (which includes wave front error) and has very high reliability with the help of fully redundant angle sensors and actuator circuits. The FSM is capable of achieving all its design requirements while also being reaction-compensated. The reaction compensation is achieved passively and does not need a separate control loop. The FSM has undergone various environmental testing which include exported forces and torques and thermal vacuum testing that support the FSM design claims. This paper presents the mechanical design and test results of the mechanism which satisfies the rigorous vacuum and space application requirements.

  3. The AXAF technology mirror assembly program - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyman, Charles L.; Dailey, Carroll C.; Reily, Cary; Weisskopf, Martin; Mckinnon, Phil

    1986-01-01

    The manufacture and testing of the Technology Mirror Assembly (TMA), a prototype Wolter I telescope scaled to the dimensions of the innermost element of the High-Resolution Mirror Assembly for the NASA Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), are reviewed. Consideration is given to the grinding, polishing, coating, and assembly of the zerodur TMA blanks, the TMA mount design, and the test procedures used at the MSFC X-ray Calibration Facility. Test results indicate FWHM resolution less than 0.5 arcsec, but with significant near-field scattering attributed to ripple; further long-lap polishing is suggested.

  4. The magic of relay mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, Edward A.; Washburn, Donald C.

    2004-09-01

    Laser weapon systems would be significantly enhanced with the addition of high altitude or space-borne relay mirrors. Such mirrors, operating alone with a directed energy source, or many in a series fashion, can be shown to effectively move the laser source to the last, so-called fighting mirror. This "magically" reduces the range to target and offers to enhance the performance of directed energy systems like the Airborne Laser and even ground-based or ship-based lasers. Recent development of high altitude airships will be shown to provide stationary positions for such relay mirrors thereby enabling many new and important applications for laser weapons. The technical challenges to achieve this capability are discussed.

  5. JWST Primary Mirror Installation Complete

    NASA Video Gallery

    Completing the assembly of the primary mirror, which took place at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, is a significant milestone and the culmination of over a decade of desi...

  6. Paper like cholesteric interferential mirror.

    PubMed

    Petriashvili, Gia; Japaridze, Kokhta; Devadze, Lali; Zurabishvili, Cisana; Sepashvili, Nino; Ponjavidze, Nino; De Santo, Maria P; Matranga, Mario A; Hamdi, Ridha; Ciuchi, Federica; Barberi, Riccardo

    2013-09-01

    A new type of flexible cholesteric liquid crystal mirror is presented. The simple and effective method for the deposition of a cholesteric mixture on a paper substrate and the particular design of the device give a homogeneous alignment of the cholesteric texture providing mirrors with an intense and uniform light reflectance. A desired polarization state for the reflected light, linear or circular, can be easily obtained varying the thickness and optical anisotropy of the polymer cover film. By using non-azobenzene based photosensitive materials a permanent array of RGB mirrors with high reflectivity can be obtained on the same device. Paper like reflective mirrors are versatile and they can find applications in reflective displays, adaptive optics, UV detectors and dosimeters, information recording, medicine and IR converters. PMID:24103954

  7. Morphing of Segmented Bimorph Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Gonçalo; Bastaits, Renaud; Preumont, André

    2010-08-01

    Atmospheric turbulence compensation for the next generation of terrestrial telescopes (30-40 m diameter) will require deformable mirrors of increasing size and a number of actuators reaching several thousands. However, the mere extrapolation of existing designs leads to complicated and extremely expensive mirrors. This article discusses an alternative solution based on the use of segmented identical hexagonal bimorph mirrors. This allows to indefinitely increase the degree of correction while maintaining the first mechanical resonance at the level of a single segment, and shows an increase in price only proportional to the number of segments. Extensive simulations using random turbulent screens show that the segmentation produces only moderate reductions of the Strehl number, compared to a monolithic bimorph mirror with the same number of actuators (S = 0.86 instead of S = 0.89 in this study).

  8. JWST Secondary Mirror Deploy Timelapse

    NASA Video Gallery

    Setting up NASA's James Webb Space Telescope's secondary mirror in space will require special arms that resemble a tripod that was recently demonstrated in a NASA cleanroom. TRT: 1:25 / Credit: NAS...

  9. Large Scale Nanolaminate Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Miles, R; Chang, K

    2005-11-30

    This work concerns the development of a technology that uses Nanolaminate foils to form light-weight, deformable mirrors that are scalable over a wide range of mirror sizes. While MEMS-based deformable mirrors and spatial light modulators have considerably reduced the cost and increased the capabilities of adaptive optic systems, there has not been a way to utilize the advantages of lithography and batch-fabrication to produce large-scale deformable mirrors. This technology is made scalable by using fabrication techniques and lithography that are not limited to the sizes of conventional MEMS devices. Like many MEMS devices, these mirrors use parallel plate electrostatic actuators. This technology replicates that functionality by suspending a horizontal piece of nanolaminate foil over an electrode by electroplated nickel posts. This actuator is attached, with another post, to another nanolaminate foil that acts as the mirror surface. Most MEMS devices are produced with integrated circuit lithography techniques that are capable of very small line widths, but are not scalable to large sizes. This technology is very tolerant of lithography errors and can use coarser, printed circuit board lithography techniques that can be scaled to very large sizes. These mirrors use small, lithographically defined actuators and thin nanolaminate foils allowing them to produce deformations over a large area while minimizing weight. This paper will describe a staged program to develop this technology. First-principles models were developed to determine design parameters. Three stages of fabrication will be described starting with a 3 x 3 device using conventional metal foils and epoxy to a 10-across all-metal device with nanolaminate mirror surfaces.

  10. FAME: Freeform Active Mirrors Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugot, Emmanuel; Agocs, Tibor; Challita, Zalpha; Jasko, Attila; Kroes, Gabby; Banyai, Evelin; Miller, Chris; Taylor, William; Schnetler, Hermine; Venema, Lars

    2014-07-01

    This paper discusses the development of a demonstrator freeform active mirror for future astronomical instruments both on Earth and in space. It consists of a system overview and progress in various areas of technology in the building blocks of the mirror: an extreme freeform thin face sheet, an active array, design tools and the metrology and control of the system. The demonstrator aims to investigate the applicability of the technique in high end astronomical systems, also for space and cryogenically.

  11. High temperature current mirror amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, III, Raymond B.

    1984-05-22

    A high temperature current mirror amplifier having biasing means in the transdiode connection of the input transistor for producing a voltage to maintain the base-collector junction reversed-biased and a current means for maintaining a current through the biasing means at high temperatures so that the base-collector junction of the input transistor remained reversed-biased. For accuracy, a second current mirror is provided with a biasing means and current means on the input leg.

  12. Ultraviolet-Induced Mirror Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.; Hasegawa, T. T.; Cleland, E. L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent tests of second-surface mirrors show that ultraviolet radiation penetrates glass and metalized zone and impinges upon backing paint. According to report, many backing materials are degraded by ultraviolet radiation. Mirror corrosion is a serious problem in solar-energy collection systems. Effects of UV on polymeric materials have been studied, and in general, all are degraded by UV. Polymers most resistant to UV radiation are polyimides.

  13. Some Reflections on Plane Mirrors and Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galili, Igal; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the following questions based on the assumption that students' personal experiences and prior beliefs about plane mirrors can promote interesting discussions: (1) How mirror images are formed? (2) Why doesn't paper behave like a mirror? (3) Does a mirror left-right reverse objects? and (4) Why are corner images of two perpendicular…

  14. EAGLE: relay mirror technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Mary; Restaino, Sergio R.; Baker, Jeffrey T.; Payne, Don M.; Bukley, Jerry W.

    2002-06-01

    EAGLE (Evolutionary Air & Space Global Laser Engagement) is the proposed high power weapon system with a high power laser source, a relay mirror constellation, and the necessary ground and communications links. The relay mirror itself will be a satellite composed of two optically-coupled telescopes/mirrors used to redirect laser energy from ground, air, or space based laser sources to distant points on the earth or space. The receiver telescope captures the incoming energy, relays it through an optical system that cleans up the beam, then a separate transmitter telescope/mirror redirects the laser energy at the desired target. Not only is it a key component in extending the range of DoD's current laser weapon systems, it also enables ancillary missions. Furthermore, if the vacuum of space is utilized, then the atmospheric effects on the laser beam propagation will be greatly attenuated. Finally, several critical technologies are being developed to make the EAGLE/Relay Mirror concept a reality, and the Relay Mirror Technology Development Program was set up to address them. This paper will discuss each critical technology, the current state of the work, and the future implications of this program.

  15. Polymer glazing for silver mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Neidlinger, H H; Schissel, P

    1985-07-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation and modification of polymeric glazings to protect silver mirrors. The mirrors were made using Corning 7809 glass as a substrate onto which a thin silver film is deposited. The modified polymeric films are then cast from solution onto the silver. The mirrors were characterized by measuring the hemispherical reflectance and the specular reflectance at 660 nm and selected acceptance angles (7.5 mrad or 3.5 mrad). The mirrors were exposed to environmental degradation using accelerated weathering devices and outdoor exposure. Empirical evidence has demonstrated that polymethylmethacrylate is a stable polymer in a terrestrial environment, but the polymer does not provide adequate protection for the silver reflector. The crucial role in degradation played by ultraviolet (uv) light is shown by several experimental results. It has been demonstrated that uv stabilizers added to the polymer improve the weatherability of mirrors. The relative effectiveness of different stabilizers will be discussed in terms of the weathering modes, retention of optical properties, and effectiveness of the additives. The process for silver deposition influences the reflectance of silver mirrors, and the optical properties depend on subtle relationships between the metallization and the dielectric (polymeric) films that are in contact with the silver.

  16. Directly polished lightweight aluminum mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ter Horst, Rik; Tromp, Niels; de Haan, Menno; Navarro, Ramon; Venema, Lars; Pragt, Johan

    2008-07-01

    During the last ten years, Astron has been a major contractor for the design and manufacturing of astronomical instruments for Space- and Earth based observatories, such as VISIR, MIDI, SPIFFI, X-Shooter and MIRI. The collaboration between optical- and mechanical designers at Astron led to new design philosophies and strategies. Driven by the need to reduce the weight of optically ultra-stiff structures, two promising techniques have been developed in the last years: ASTRON Extreme Lightweighting for mechanical structures and an improved Polishing Technique for Aluminum Mirrors. Using one single material for both optical components and mechanical structure simplifies the design of a cryogenic instrument significantly, it is very beneficial during instrument test and verification, and makes the instrument insensitive to temperature changes. Aluminum has been the main material used for cryogenic optical instruments, and optical aluminum mirrors are generally diamond turned. The application of a polishable hard top coating like nickel removes excess stray light caused by the groove pattern, but limits the degree of lightweighting of the mirrors due to the bi-metal effect. By directly polishing the aluminum mirror surface, the recent developments at Astron allow for using a non-exotic material for light weighted yet accurate optical mirrors, with a lower surface roughness (~1nm RMS), higher surface accuracy and reduced light scattering. This paper presents the techniques, obtained results and a global comparison with alternative lightweight mirror solutions.

  17. High stroke pixel for a deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.

    2005-09-20

    A mirror pixel that can be fabricated using standard MEMS methods for a deformable mirror. The pixel is electrostatically actuated and is capable of the high deflections needed for spaced-based mirror applications. In one embodiment, the mirror comprises three layers, a top or mirror layer, a middle layer which consists of flexures, and a comb drive layer, with the flexures of the middle layer attached to the mirror layer and to the comb drive layer. The comb drives are attached to a frame via spring flexures. A number of these mirror pixels can be used to construct a large mirror assembly. The actuator for the mirror pixel may be configured as a crenellated beam with one end fixedly secured, or configured as a scissor jack. The mirror pixels may be used in various applications requiring high stroke adaptive optics.

  18. On time reversal mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannjiang, Albert C.

    2009-09-01

    The concept of time reversal (TR) of a scalar wave is reexamined from basic principles. Five different time-reversal mirrors (TRMs) are introduced and their relations are analyzed. For the boundary behavior, it is shown that for a paraxial wave only the monopole TR scheme satisfies the exact boundary condition while for the spherical wave only the MD-mode TR scheme satisfies the exact boundary condition. The asymptotic analysis of the near-field focusing property is presented for two dimensions and three dimensions. It is shown that to have a subwavelength focal spot, the TRM should consist of dipole transducers. The transverse resolution of the dipole TRM is linearly proportional to the distance between the point source and the TRM. The mixed mode TRM has the similar (linear) behavior in three dimensions, but in two dimensions the transverse resolution behaves as the square root of the distance between the point source and the TRM. The monopole TRM is ineffective in focusing below the wavelength. Contrary to the matched field processing and the phase processor, both of which resemble TR, TR in a weak- or non-scattering medium is usually biased in the longitudinal direction, especially when TR is carried out on a single plane with a finite aperture. This is true for all five TR schemes. On the other hand, the TR focal spot has been shown repeatedly in the literature, both theoretically and experimentally, to be centered at the source point when the medium is multiple scattering. A reconciliation of the two seemingly conflicting results is found in the random fluctuations in the intensity of the Green function for a multiple scattering medium and the notion of scattering-enlarged effective aperture.

  19. Coated laser mirror and method of coating

    SciTech Connect

    Shuskus, A.J.; Cowher, M.E.

    1984-04-24

    A method of applying an intermediate bond coat on a laser mirror substrate is described comprising surface polishing the mirror substrate followed by depositing a layer of amorphous silicon, amorphous germanium, or mixtures thereof on the mirror surface, and polishing the thus coated mirror surface to a substantially void-free surface finish. Laser mirror substrates such as graphite fiber reinforced glass, molybdenum and silicon carbide coated by such process are also described.

  20. Alignment Mirror Mechanisms for Space Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.; McKinney, Colin M.; Smythe, Robert F.; Palmer, Dean

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes an optical Alignment Mirror Mechanism (AMM), and discusses its control scheme. The mirror's angular positioning accuracy requirement is +/- 0.2 arc-sec. This requires the mirror's linear positioning actuators to have a positioning accuracy of +/- 109 nm to enable the mirror to meet the angular tip/tilt accuracy requirement. Demonstrated capabilities are +/- 35 nm linear positioning capability at the actuator, which translates into +/- 0.07 arc-sec angular mirror positioning accuracy.

  1. Surface Slope Metrology on Deformable Soft X-ray Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Rich; Church, Matthew; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Greg; Warwick, Tony

    2010-01-31

    We report on the current state of surface slope metrology on deformable mirrors for soft x-rays at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). While we are developing techniques for in situ at-wavelength tuning, we are refining methods of ex situ visible-light optical metrology to achieve sub-100-nrad accuracy. This paper reports on laboratory studies, measurements and tuning of a deformable test-KB mirror prior to its use. The test mirror was bent to a much different optical configuration than its original design, achieving a 0.38 micro-radian residual slope error. Modeling shows that in some cases, by including the image conjugate distance as an additional free parameter in the alignment, along with the two force couples, fourth-order tangential shape errors (the so-called bird shape) can be reduced or eliminated.

  2. Surface Slope Metrology on Deformable Soft X-ray Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, S.; Yashchuk, V.V.; Goldberg, K.A.; Celestre, R.; Church, M.; McKinney, W.R.; Morrison, G.; Warwick, T.

    2009-09-18

    We report on the current state of surface slope metrology on deformable mirrors for soft x-rays at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). While we are developing techniques for in situ at-wavelength tuning, we are refining methods of ex situvisible-light optical metrology to achieve sub-100-nrad accuracy. This paper reports on laboratory studies, measurements and tuning of a deformable test-KB mirror prior to its use. The test mirror was bent to a much different optical configuration than its original design, achieving a 0.38 micro-radian residual slope error. Modeling shows that in some cases, by including the image conjugate distance as an additional free parameter in the alignment, along with the two force couples, fourth-order tangential shape errors (the so-called bird shape) can be reduced or eliminated.

  3. Cost effective aluminum beryllium mirrors for critical optics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Say, Carissa; Duich, Jack; Huskamp, Chris; White, Ray

    2013-09-01

    The unique performance of aluminum-beryllium frequently makes it an ideal material for manufacturing precision optical-grade metal mirrors. Traditional methods of manufacture utilize hot-pressed powder block in billet form which is subsequently machined to final dimensions. Complex component geometries such as lightweighted, non-plano mirrors require extensive tool path programming, fixturing, and CNC machining time and result in a high buy-to-fly ratio (the ratio of the mass of raw material purchased to the mass of the finished part). This increases the cost of the mirror structure as a significant percentage of the procurement cost is consumed in the form of machining, tooling, and scrap material that do not add value to the final part. Inrad Optics, Inc. and IBC Advanced Alloys Corp. undertook a joint study to evaluate the suitability of investment-cast Beralcast® 191 and 363 aluminum-beryllium as a precision mirror substrate material. Net shape investment castings of the desired geometry minimizes machining to just cleanup stock, thereby reducing the recurring procurement cost while still maintaining performance. The thermal stability of two mirrors, (one each of Beralcast® 191 and Beralcast® 363), was characterized from -40°F to +150°F. A representative pocketed mirror was developed, including the creation of a relevant geometry and production of a cast component to validate the approach. Information from the demonstration unit was used as a basis for a comparative cost study of the representative mirror produced in Beralcast® and one machined from a billet of AlBeMet® 162 (AlBeMet® is a registered trademark of Materion Corporation). The technical and financial results of these studies will be discussed in detail.

  4. Contactless Large Deformable Mirrors: ELT AO corrector technology available now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele

    2011-09-01

    We present our design of ESO E-ELT M4 deformable mirror and GMT Adaptive Secondary Mirrors unit. Both systems are based on our consolidated design of large deformable mirrors for 8-m class telescopes, successfully implemented on MMT and LBT and currently in advanced construction and testing phase for VLT and Magellan telescopes respectively. We describe the main features of the technology adopted: thin Zerodur mirror shell with contactless voice coil motors, co-located capacitive sensors to close a local position loop at each actuator, centralized control by force feedforward, embedded real time control and communication electronics. We then highlight how the same concept has been scaled up on the E-ELT M4AU and the GMT-ASM cases, adapting the technology to deal with thousands of actuators, while maintaining its intrinsic advantages: tolerance to actuators' failures, mechanical de-coupling and relaxed tolerances between correcting mirror and reference structure, large stroke, hysteresis-free behavior. For the next generation systems, we report the predicted performances based on the actual results attained on our 1-m class DMs currently in use: the LBT adaptive secondary for the GMT-ASM and the 330 actuators Demonstration Prototype for the E-ELT M4AU.

  5. The removal, mechanical handling and installation procedures for re-aluminising the UKIRT 3.8m primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neild, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    Operational procedures for observatory personnel involved in removing, handling, or installing the mirror of the United Kingdom infrared telescope are outlined. The ordering, location, etc. of chemicals, cleaning materials, safety clothing, equipment, etc. within the observatory are covered. Preparation of the telescope, pickup truck, etc., are detailed. The importance of transporting mirror trolley, mirror boxes, gases, etc., to desired location in advance of their being required is stressed. Six to eight people are required to carry out the operations.

  6. A simple way of characterizing x-ray downwards-deflecting mirror-bender assemblies using the long trace profiler

    SciTech Connect

    Assoufid, L.; Her, P.

    1999-11-22

    A simple device composed of a modular double-pentaprism system that enables the long trace profiler (LTP) to measure mirrors in nonconventional ways, i.e., in the vertical-downward and sideways positions, has been devised and implemented in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) long trace profiler (LTP II). The systems is very useful in calibrating mirror-bender assemblies. This paper describes the system and gives results of measurements performed with it on a mirror used at the APS.

  7. Position sensors for segmented mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozière, Didier; Buous, Sébastien; Courteville, Alain

    2004-09-01

    There are currently several projects for giant telescopes with segmented mirrors under way. These future telescopes will have their primary mirror made of several thousand segments. The main advantage of segmentation is that it enables the active control of the whole mirror, so as to suppress the deformations of the support structure due to the wind, gravity, thermal inhomogeneities etc. ..., thus getting the best possible stigmatism. However, providing active control of segmented mirrors requires numerous accurate edges sensors. It is acknowledged that capacitance-based technology nowadays offers the best metrological performances-to-cost ratio. As the leader in capacitive technology, FOGALE nanotech offers an original concept which reduces the cost of instrumentation, sensors and electronics, while keeping a very high level of performances with a manufacturing process completely industrialised. We present here the sensors developed for the Segment Alignment Measurement System (SAMS) of the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). This patented solution represents an important improvement in terms of cost, to market the Position Sensors for Segmented Mirrors of ELTs, whilst maintaining a very high performance level. We present here the concept, the laboratory qualification, and the first trials on the 7 central segments of SALT. The laboratory results are good, and we are now working on the on-site implementation to improve the immunity of the sensors to environment.

  8. Gasdynamic Multiple-Mirror Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beklemishev, Alexei; Anikeev, Andrei; Bagryansky, Peter; Burdakov, Alexander; Gavrilenko, Dmitrii; Ivanov, Alexander; Polosatkin, Sergei; Sinitsky, Stanislav

    2013-10-01

    The new linear device for confinement of fusion plasmas, GDMT, is being developed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk. The facility will combine features of existing GOL-3 and GDT devices: the central GDT-like cell with sloshing NBI ions, and the multiple-mirror plugs for suppression of axial losses. Such combination became feasible due to recent discoveries. In particular, the requirement of flute-mode stability can be relaxed by using vortex confinement, achieved by plasma biasing through open field lines. This allows the use of potentially destabilizing multiple-mirror sections. Another key effect is the enhanced multiple-mirror confinement at low densities, which is due to collective rather than coulomb scattering of ions. Hence the multiple-mirror plugs can work at pressures compatible with magnetic confinement. These two main technologies are supplemented by axial injection of pulsed electron beams. Besides additional plasma heating (like in GOL-3), such injection can be used for induced collective scattering in the multiple-mirror plugs and for plasma biasing. The new device is designed to be superconducting and modular. It will be built in stages, with the first stage, GDMT-T, intended for PMI studies. The work was financially supported by Ministry of Education and Science RF.

  9. Arc-Second Alignment of International X-Ray Observatory Mirror Segments in a Fixed Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Tyler, C.; Chan, Kai-Wing; Saha, Timo T.

    2010-01-01

    The optics for the International X-Ray Observatory (IXO) require alignment and integration of about fourteen thousand thin mirror segments to achieve the mission goal of 3.0 square meters of effective area at 1.25 keV with an angular resolution of five arc-seconds. These mirror segments are 0.4 mm thick, and 200 to 400 mm in size, which makes it hard to meet the strict angular resolution requirement of 5 arc-seconds for the telescope. This paper outlines the precise alignment, verification testing, and permanent bonding techniques developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). These techniques are used to overcome the challenge of transferring thin mirror segments from a temporary mount to a fixed structure with arc-second alignment and minimal figure distortion. Recent advances in technology development in addition to the automation of several processes have produced significant results. Recent advances in the mirror fixture process known as the suspension mount has allowed for a mirror to be mounted to a fixture with minimal distortion. Once on the fixture, mirror segments have been aligned to around 5 arc-seconds which is halfway to the goal of 2.5 arc-seconds per mirror segment. This paper will highlight the recent advances in alignment, testing, and permanent bonding techniques as well as the results they have produced.

  10. The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Science Drivers, Technology Developments, and Synergies with Other Future Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Giavalisco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Remi; Hyde, Tupper

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers that define the main performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsec angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 m to 2.4 m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We will also discuss the synergy between ATLAST and other anticipated future facilities (e.g., TMT, EELT, ALMA) and the priorities for technology development that will enable the construction for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions.

  11. Compact neutron imaging system using axisymmetric mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Khaykovich, Boris; Moncton, David E; Gubarev, Mikhail V; Ramsey, Brian D; Engelhaupt, Darell E

    2014-05-27

    A dispersed release of neutrons is generated from a source. A portion of this dispersed neutron release is reflected by surfaces of a plurality of nested, axisymmetric mirrors in at least an inner mirror layer and an outer mirror layer, wherein the neutrons reflected by the inner mirror layer are incident on at least one mirror surface of the inner mirror layer N times, wherein N is an integer, and wherein neutrons reflected by the outer mirror are incident on a plurality of mirror surfaces of the outer layer N+i times, where i is a positive integer, to redirect the neutrons toward a target. The mirrors can be formed by a periodically reversed pulsed-plating process.

  12. A mirror for science.

    PubMed

    Jasanoff, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Early conceptions of the public understanding of science suffered from a narrow framing of what science means and a presumption that science is divided from its publics by walls of ignorance and indifference. Those assumptions amplified misunderstanding and led to faulty policies. It is time to reopen each element in the term "public understanding of science" to renewed reflection. This journal can advance that goal by encouraging research on actual rather than imagined public responses to science, on representations of science in the public sphere, and on interactions between science, technology and society. PMID:24434707

  13. Metrology of IXO Mirror Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kai-Wing

    2011-01-01

    For future x-ray astrophysics mission that demands optics with large throughput and excellent angular resolution, many telescope concepts build around assembling thin mirror segments in a Wolter I geometry, such as that originally proposed for the International X-ray Observatory. The arc-second resolution requirement posts unique challenges not just for fabrication, mounting but also for metrology of these mirror segments. In this paper, we shall discuss the metrology of these segments using normal incidence metrological method with interferometers and null lenses. We present results of the calibration of the metrology systems we are currently using, discuss their accuracy and address the precision in measuring near-cylindrical mirror segments and the stability of the measurements.

  14. Alpha Channeling in Mirror Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch N.J.

    2005-10-19

    Because of their engineering simplicity, high-β, and steady-state operation, mirror machines and related open-trap machines such as gas dynamic traps, are an attractive concept for achieving controlled nuclear fusion. In these open-trap machines, the confinement occurs by means of magnetic mirroring, without the magnetic field lines closing upon themselves within the region of particle confinement. Unfortunately, these concepts have not achieved to date very spectacular laboratory results, and their reactor prospects are dimmed by the prospect of a low Q-factor, the ratio of fusion power produced to auxiliary power. Nonetheless, because of its engineering promise, over the years numerous improvements have been proposed to enhance the reactor prospects of mirror fusion, such as tandem designs, end-plugging, and electric potential barriers.

  15. Fokker-Planck equation in mirror research

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    1983-08-11

    Open confinement systems based on the magnetic mirror principle depend on the maintenance of particle distributions that may deviate substantially from Maxwellian distributions. Mirror research has therefore from the beginning relied on theoretical predictions of non-equilibrium rate processes obtained from solutions to the Fokker-Planck equation. The F-P equation plays three roles: Design of experiments, creation of classical standards against which to compare experiment, and predictions concerning mirror based fusion power systems. Analytical and computational approaches to solving the F-P equation for mirror systems will be reviewed, together with results and examples that apply to specific mirror systems, such as the tandem mirror.

  16. High temperature current mirror amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, R.B. III.

    1984-05-22

    Disclosed is a high temperature current mirror amplifier having biasing means in the transdiode connection of the input transistor for producing a voltage to maintain the base-collector junction reversed-biased and a current means for maintaining a current through the biasing means at high temperatures so that the base-collector junction of the input transistor remained reversed-biased. For accuracy, a second current mirror is provided with a biasing means and current means on the input leg. 2 figs.

  17. Microwave Tomography Using Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Udpa, Lalita; Udpa, Satish S.

    2008-09-01

    Microwave tomography aims to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the electrical property of penetrable objects using field measurements acquired from multiple views at single or multiple frequencies. This paper presents a novel microwave tomography technique to image penetrable scatterers using deformable mirrors. The deformable mirror consists of a continuum of radiating elements that yields multi-view field measurements for noninvasive characterization of the spatial dielectric property of the scatterer in the microwave regime. Computational feasibility of the proposed technique is presented for heterogeneous two dimensional dielectric scatterers.

  18. Silicon cladding for mirror substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duston, Christopher J.; Gunda, Nilesh; Schwartz, Jay R.; Robichaud, Joseph L.

    2009-08-01

    To reduce the finishing costs of silicon carbide mirror substrates, silicon claddings are applied allowing the surfaces to be more easily diamond turned and polished than the bare chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide or bimodal reaction bonded SiC (RB-SiC). The benefits of using silicon as the optical face will be reviewed as will the process for applying plasma enhanced chemical vapor (PE-CVD) deposited amorphous silicon cladding on substrates. Using one mirror as an example, the successful finishing results will be shared.

  19. Controllable objective with deformable mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Agafonov, V V; Safronov, A G

    2004-03-31

    A new optical device - an objective with deformable mirrors and parameters controlled in the dynamic regime is proposed. The computer simulation of the objective is performed. The dependences of some parameters of the objective on the control voltage are determined. The simulation showed that the ranges of control of the rear focal segment and the focal distance for the objective with the focal distance 602 mm were 1057 and 340 mm, respectively, which is substantially greater than in the control of an equivalent deformable mirror. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  20. Compaction managed mirror bend achromat

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David

    2005-10-18

    A method for controlling the momentum compaction in a beam of charged particles. The method includes a compaction-managed mirror bend achromat (CMMBA) that provides a beamline design that retains the large momentum acceptance of a conventional mirror bend achromat. The CMMBA also provides the ability to tailor the system momentum compaction spectrum as desired for specific applications. The CMMBA enables magnetostatic management of the longitudinal phase space in Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) thereby alleviating the need for harmonic linearization of the RF waveform.

  1. NASA CONNECT: Algebra: Mirror, Mirror on the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    'Algebra: Mirror, Mirror on the Universe' is the last of seven programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology concepts in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes the 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and technology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. Each program in the series supports the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; includes a resource-rich teacher guide; and uses a classroom experiment and web-based activity to complement and enhance the math, science, and technology concepts presented in the program. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site and register. http://connect.larc.nasa.gov In 'Algebra: Mirror, Mirror on the Universe', students will learn how algebra is used to explore the universe.

  2. Generation-X mirror technology development plan and the development of adjustable x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Paul B.; Davis, William; O'Dell, Stephen; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Tolier-McKinstry, Susan; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Zhang, William

    2009-08-01

    Generation-X is being studied as an extremely high resolution, very large area grazing incidence x-ray telescope. Under a NASA Advanced Mission Concepts Study, we have developed a technology plan designed to lead to the 0.1 arcsec (HPD) resolution adjustable optics with 50 square meters of effective area necessary to meet Generation-X requirements. We describe our plan in detail. In addition, we report on our development activities of adjustable grazing incidence optics via the fabrication of bimorph mirrors. We have successfully deposited thin-film piezo-electric material on the back surface of thin glass mirrors. We report on the electrical and mechanical properties of the bimorph mirrors. We also report on initial finite element modeling of adjustable grazing incidence mirrors; in particular, we examine the impact of how the mirrors are supported - the boundary conditions - on the deformations which can be achieved.

  3. Performance of an optimally contact-cooled high-heat-load mirror at the APS.

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Khounsary, A.; Lai, B.; McNulty, I.; Yun, W.

    1998-11-18

    X-ray undulator beamlines at third-generation synchrotrons facilities use either a monochromator or a mirror as the first optical element. In this paper, the thermal and optical performance of an optimally designed contact-cooled high-heat-load x-ray mirror used as the first optical element on the 2ID undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is reported. It is shown that this simple and economical mirror design can comfortably handle the high heat load of undulator beamlines and provide good performance with long-term reliability and ease of operation. Availability and advantages of such mirrors can make the mirror-first approach to high-heat-load beamline design an attractive alternative to monochromator-first beamlines in many circumstances.

  4. Timecourse of mirror and counter-mirror effects measured with transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Andrea; Heyes, Cecilia; Becchio, Cristina; Bird, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    The human mirror system has been the subject of much research over the past two decades, but little is known about the timecourse of mirror responses. In addition, it is unclear whether mirror and counter-mirror effects follow the same timecourse. We used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to investigate the timecourse of mirror and counter-mirror responses in the human brain. Experiment 1 demonstrated that mirror responses can be measured from around 200 ms after observed action onset. Experiment 2 demonstrated significant effects of counter-mirror sensorimotor training at all timepoints at which a mirror response was found in Experiment 1 (i.e. from 200 ms onward), indicating that mirror and counter-mirror responses follow the same timecourse. By suggesting similarly direct routes for mirror and counter-mirror responses, these results support the associative account of mirror neuron origins whereby mirror responses arise as a result of correlated sensorimotor experience during development. More generally, they contribute to theorizing regarding mirror neuron function by providing some constraints on how quickly mirror responses can influence social cognition. PMID:23709352

  5. Timecourse of mirror and counter-mirror effects measured with transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Andrea; Heyes, Cecilia; Becchio, Cristina; Bird, Geoffrey; Catmur, Caroline

    2014-08-01

    The human mirror system has been the subject of much research over the past two decades, but little is known about the timecourse of mirror responses. In addition, it is unclear whether mirror and counter-mirror effects follow the same timecourse. We used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to investigate the timecourse of mirror and counter-mirror responses in the human brain. Experiment 1 demonstrated that mirror responses can be measured from around 200 ms after observed action onset. Experiment 2 demonstrated significant effects of counter-mirror sensorimotor training at all timepoints at which a mirror response was found in Experiment 1 (i.e. from 200 ms onward), indicating that mirror and counter-mirror responses follow the same timecourse. By suggesting similarly direct routes for mirror and counter-mirror responses, these results support the associative account of mirror neuron origins whereby mirror responses arise as a result of correlated sensorimotor experience during development. More generally, they contribute to theorizing regarding mirror neuron function by providing some constraints on how quickly mirror responses can influence social cognition. PMID:23709352

  6. Collodion technique of mirror cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyndall, J. B.

    1970-01-01

    Cleaning method is modified by addition of a layer of cheesecloth between thin coatings of U.S.P. collodion. After drying, the collodion is peeled off by an even pull on the cheesecloth, leaving the mirror clean and ready for use.

  7. RF plugging of mirror plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kotelnikov, I.A.; Kuzmin, S.G.

    1996-12-01

    Discovery of superconducting materials that operate at high temperatures revives interest in the use of rf field for plasma confinement. This paper discusses feasibility of a scheme where resonant rf cavities are attached to the mirror ends of an open system for plasma confinement. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Mirror Confinement Systems: project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    This report contains descriptions of the projects supported by the Mirror Confinement Systems (MCS) Division of the Office of Fusion Energy. The individual project summaries were prepared by the principal investigators, in collaboration with MCS staff office, and include objectives and milestones for each project. In addition to project summaries, statements of Division objectives and budget summaries are also provided.

  9. Mirror with thermally controlled radius of curvature

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George R.; Shinn, Michelle D.

    2010-06-22

    A radius of curvature controlled mirror for controlling precisely the focal point of a laser beam or other light beam. The radius of curvature controlled mirror provides nearly spherical distortion of the mirror in response to differential expansion between the front and rear surfaces of the mirror. The radius of curvature controlled mirror compensates for changes in other optical components due to heating or other physical changes. The radius of curvature controlled mirror includes an arrangement for adjusting the temperature of the front surface and separately adjusting the temperature of the rear surface to control the radius of curvature. The temperature adjustment arrangements can include cooling channels within the mirror body or convection of a gas upon the surface of the mirror. A control system controls the differential expansion between the front and rear surfaces to achieve the desired radius of curvature.

  10. Bonding Thin Mirror Segments Without Distortion for the International X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Tyler C.; Chan, Kai-Wing; Saha, Timo T.

    2011-01-01

    The International X-Ray Observatory (IXO) uses thin glass optics to maximize large effective area and precise low angular resolution. The thin glass mirror segments must be transferred from their fabricated state to a permanent structure without imparting distortion. IXO will incorporate about fourteen thousand thin mirror segments to achieve the mission goal of 3.0 square meters of effective area at 1.25 keV with an angular resolution of five arcseconds. To preserve figure and alignment, the mirror segment must be bonded with sub-micron movement at each corner. Recent advances in technology development have produced significant x-ray test results of a bonded pair of mirrors. Three specific bonding cycles will be described highlighting the improvements in procedure, temperature control, and precision bonding. This paper will highlight the recent advances in alignment and permanent bonding as well as the results they have produced.

  11. Secrets of the Chinese magic mirror replica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Se-yuen; Yip, Din-yan

    2001-03-01

    We examine the structure of five Chinese magic mirror replicas using a special imaging technique developed by the authors. All mirrors are found to have a two-layered structure. The reflecting surface that gives rise to a projected magic pattern on the screen is hidden under a polished half-reflecting top layer. An alternative method of making the magic mirror using ancient technology has been proposed. Finally, we suggest a simple method of reconstructing a mirror replica in the laboratory.

  12. Mounting and Alignment of IXO Mirror Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kai-Wing; Zhang, William; Evans, Tyler; McClelland, Ryan; Hong, Melinda; Mazzarella, James; Saha, Timo; Jalota, Lalit; Olsen, Lawrence; Byron, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    A suspension-mounting scheme is developed for the IXO (International X-ray Observatory) mirror segments in which the figure of the mirror segment is preserved in each stage of mounting. The mirror, first fixed on a thermally compatible strongback, is subsequently transported, aligned and transferred onto its mirror housing. In this paper, we shall outline the requirement, approaches, and recent progress of the suspension mount processes.

  13. Detecting surface faults on solar mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argoud, M. J.; Shumate, M. S.; Walker, W. L.; Zanteson, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Two quality control tests determine reflectivity and curvature faults of concave solar mirrors. Curvature defects in solar mirrors are easily revealed by photographing mirror surface. Calibrated aperture placed in front of camera lens admits rays reflecting only from acceptable areas of mirror, blocking out diverging rays reflected from defective areas. Defects can pinpoint problems that may exist in production. Same photograph can be obtained using calibrated disk instead of aperture, except that, this time, only defective areas would be exposed.

  14. The Axisymmetric Tandem Mirror: A Magnetic Mirror Concept Game Changer Magnet Mirror Status Study Group

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T; Cohen, R; Correll, D; Fowler, K; Post, D; Berk, H; Horton, W; Hooper, E B; Fisch, N; Hassam, A; Baldwin, D; Pearlstein, D; Logan, G; Turner, B; Moir, R; Molvik, A; Ryutov, D; Ivanov, A A; Kesner, J; Cohen, B; McLean, H; Tamano, T; Tang, X Z; Imai, T

    2008-10-24

    Experimental results, theory and innovative ideas now point with increased confidence to the possibility of a Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT) neutron source which would be on the path to an attractively simple Axisymmetric Tandem Mirror (ATM) power plant. Although magnetic mirror research was terminated in the US 20 years ago, experiments continued in Japan (Gamma 10) and Russia (GDT), with a very small US effort. This research has now yielded data, increased understanding, and generated ideas resulting in the new concepts described here. Early mirror research was carried out with circular axisymmetric magnets. These plasmas were MHD unstable due to the unfavorable magnetic curvature near the mid-plane. Then the minimum-B concept emerged in which the field line curvature was everywhere favorable and the plasma was situated in a MHD stable magnetic well (70% average beta in 2XII-B). The Ioffe-bar or baseball-coil became the standard for over 40 years. In the 1980's, driven by success with minimum-B stabilization and the control of ion cyclotron instabilities in PR6 and 2XII-B, mirrors were viewed as a potentially attractive concept with near-term advantages as a lower Q neutron source for applications such as a hybrid fission fuel factory or toxic waste burner. However there are down sides to the minimum-B geometry: coil construction is complex; restraining magnetic forces limit field strength and mirror ratios. Furthermore, the magnetic field lines have geodesic curvature which introduces resonant and neoclassical radial transport as observed in early tandem mirror experiments. So what now leads us to think that simple axisymmetric mirror plasmas can be stable? The Russian GDT experiment achieves on-axis 60% beta by peaking of the kinetic plasma pressure near the mirror throat (where the curvature is favorable) to counter-balance the average unfavorable mid-plane curvature. Then a modest augmentation of plasma pressure in the expander results in stability. The GDT

  15. New family of light beams and mirror shapes for future LIGO interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarescu, Mihai; Thorne, Kip S.

    2006-10-01

    Advanced LIGO’s present baseline design uses arm cavities with Gaussian light beams supported by spherical mirrors. Because Gaussian beams have large intensity gradients in regions of high intensity, they average somewhat poorly over fluctuating bumps and valleys on the mirror surfaces (thermal noise). Flat-topped light beams (mesa beams) are being considered as an alternative because they average over thermal noise more effectively. However, the proposed mesa beams are supported by nearly-flat mirrors, which experience a very serious tilt instability. In this paper we propose an alternative configuration in which mesa-shaped beams are supported by nearly-concentric spheres, which experience only a weak tilt instability. The tilt instability is analyzed for these mirrors in a companion paper by Savov and Vyatchanin. We also propose a one-parameter family of light beams and mirrors in which, as the parameter α varies continuously from 0 to π, the beams and supporting mirrors get deformed continuously from the nearly-flat-mirrored mesa configuration (FM) at α=0, to the nearly-concentric-mirrored mesa configuration (CM) at α=π. The FM and CM configurations at the endpoints are close to optically unstable, and as α moves away from 0 or π, the optical stability improves.

  16. Assessing human mirror activity with EEG mu rhythm: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fox, Nathan A; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Yoo, Kathryn H; Bowman, Lindsay C; Cannon, Erin N; Vanderwert, Ross E; Ferrari, Pier F; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H

    2016-03-01

    A fundamental issue in cognitive neuroscience is how the brain encodes others' actions and intentions. In recent years, a potential advance in our knowledge on this issue is the discovery of mirror neurons in the motor cortex of the nonhuman primate. These neurons fire to both execution and observation of specific types of actions. Researchers use this evidence to fuel investigations of a human mirror system, suggesting a common neural code for perceptual and motor processes. Among the methods used for inferring mirror system activity in humans are changes in a particular frequency band in the electroencephalogram (EEG) called the mu rhythm. Mu frequency appears to decrease in amplitude (reflecting cortical activity) during both action execution and action observation. The current meta-analysis reviewed 85 studies (1,707 participants) of mu that infer human mirror system activity. Results demonstrated significant effect sizes for mu during execution (Cohen's d = 0.46, N = 701) as well as observation of action (Cohen's d = 0.31, N = 1,508), confirming a mirroring property in the EEG. A number of moderators were examined to determine the specificity of these effects. We frame these meta-analytic findings within the current discussion about the development and functions of a human mirror system, and conclude that changes in EEG mu activity provide a valid means for the study of human neural mirroring. Suggestions for improving the experimental and methodological approaches in using mu to study the human mirror system are offered. PMID:26689088

  17. Development of precision Wolter mirrors for future solar x-ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakao, Taro; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Kime, Ayumi; Goto, Takumi; Nishihara, Akihiko; Nakamori, Hiroki; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Miyake, Akira; Hashizume, Hirokazu; Maezawa, Tadakazu; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Narukage, Noriyuki

    2015-09-01

    High resolution imagery of the solar X-ray corona provides a crucial key to understand dynamics and heating processes of plasma particles there. However, X-ray imagery of the Sun with sub-arcsecond resolution has yet to be conducted due to severe technical difficulty in fabricating precision Wolter mirrors. For future X-ray observations of the Sun's corona, we are attempting to realize precision Wolter mirrors with sub-arcsecond resolution by adopting advanced surface polish and metrology methods based on nano-technology to sector mirrors which consist of a portion of an entire annulus. Following fabrication of the first engineering mirror and subsequent evaluation on the X-ray focusing performance in 2013, the second engineering mirror was made with improvements in both precision polish and metrology introduced. Measurement of focusing performance on the second mirror at SPring-8 synchrotron facility with 8 keV X-rays has demonstrated that the FWHM size of the PSF core reached down to 0.2" while its HPD (Half Power Diameter) size remained at ~3" due to the presence of small-angle scatter just outside of the core. Also, there was notable difference in the focal length between sagittal and meridional focusing which could have been caused by an error in the sag in the meridional direction of <10 nm in the mirror area. Further improvements to overcome these issues have been planned for the next engineering mirror.

  18. New family of light beams and mirror shapes for future LIGO interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarescu, Mihai; Thorne, Kip S.

    2006-10-15

    Advanced LIGO's present baseline design uses arm cavities with Gaussian light beams supported by spherical mirrors. Because Gaussian beams have large intensity gradients in regions of high intensity, they average somewhat poorly over fluctuating bumps and valleys on the mirror surfaces (thermal noise). Flat-topped light beams (mesa beams) are being considered as an alternative because they average over thermal noise more effectively. However, the proposed mesa beams are supported by nearly-flat mirrors, which experience a very serious tilt instability. In this paper we propose an alternative configuration in which mesa-shaped beams are supported by nearly-concentric spheres, which experience only a weak tilt instability. The tilt instability is analyzed for these mirrors in a companion paper by Savov and Vyatchanin. We also propose a one-parameter family of light beams and mirrors in which, as the parameter {alpha} varies continuously from 0 to {pi}, the beams and supporting mirrors get deformed continuously from the nearly-flat-mirrored mesa configuration (FM) at {alpha}=0, to the nearly-concentric-mirrored mesa configuration (CM) at {alpha}={pi}. The FM and CM configurations at the endpoints are close to optically unstable, and as {alpha} moves away from 0 or {pi}, the optical stability improves.

  19. Development of achromatic full-field hard x-ray microscopy with two monolithic imaging mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, S.; Kino, H.; Yasuda, S.; Kohmura, Y.; Okada, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Yamauchi, K.

    2015-09-01

    Advanced Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror optics using two monolithic imaging mirrors was developed to realize an achromatic, high-resolution, and a high-stability full-field X-ray microscope. The mirror consists of an elliptical section and a hyperbolic section on a quartz glass substrate, in which the geometry follows the Wolter (type I) optics rules. A preliminary test was performed at SPring-8 using X-rays monochromatized to 9.881 keV. A 100-nm feature on a Siemens star chart could be clearly observed.

  20. Silver coating of the 1.3 m infrared secondary mirror of Subaru.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzawa, T.; Sasaki, G.; Yutani, M.; Torii, Y.; Ohshima, N.; Kamata, Y.; Hayashi, S. S.; Nakagiri, M.; Imi, K.; Noguchi, T.

    1999-09-01

    The authors report the silver coating of 1266 mm secondary mirror to be used for infrared observations at Subaru Telescope. Silver was deposited over the chromium bondage layer, using a 1.6-m vacuum coating chamber at the Advanced Technology Center of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. The witness mirrors coated at the same time with this mirror show the characteristics as follows: 1) Total thickness of the chromium plus silver film is 1300±100 Å. 2) Reflectivity is 98±1% over the wide range of visible wavelength to the near infrared wavelength.

  1. 21 CFR 886.1500 - Headband mirror.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Headband mirror. 886.1500 Section 886.1500 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1500 Headband mirror. (a) Identification. A headband mirror is a device intended to be strapped to the head of the user to reflect light for use...

  2. 21 CFR 886.1500 - Headband mirror.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Headband mirror. 886.1500 Section 886.1500 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1500 Headband mirror. (a) Identification. A headband mirror is a device intended to be strapped to the head of the user to reflect light for use...

  3. Light Weight Silicon Mirrors for Space Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bly, Vincent T.; Hill, Peter C.; Hagopian, John G.; Strojay, Carl R.; Miller, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Each mirror is a monolithic structure from a single crystal of silicon. The mirrors are light weighted after the optical surface is ground and polished. Mirrors made during the initial phase of this work were typically 1/50 lambda or better (RMS at 633 n m)

  4. Tandem mirror next step conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Doggett, J.N.; Damm, C.C.; Bulmer, R.H.

    1980-10-14

    A study was made to define the features of the experimental mirror fusion device - The Tandem Mirror Next Step, or TMNS - that will bridge the gap between present mirror confinement experiments and a power-producing reactor. We outline the project goals, describe some initial device parameters, and relate the technological requirements to ongoing development programs.

  5. Phase-Controlled Magnetic Mirror for Wavefront Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John; Wollack, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Typically, light interacts with matter via the electric field and interaction with weakly bound electrons. In a magnetic mirror, a patterned nanowire is fabricated over a metallic layer with a dielectric layer in between. Oscillation of the electrons in the nanowires in response to the magnetic field of incident photons causes a re-emission of photons and operation as a "magnetic mirror." By controlling the index of refraction in the dielectric layer using a local applied voltage, the phase of the emitted radiation can be controlled. This allows electrical modification of the reflected wavefront, resulting in a deformable mirror that can be used for wavefront control. Certain applications require wavefront quality in the few-nanometer regime, which is a major challenge for optical fabrication and alignment of mirrors or lenses. The use of a deformable magnetic mirror allows for a device with no moving parts that can modify the phase of incident light over many spatial scales, potentially with higher resolution than current approaches. Current deformable mirrors modify the incident wavefront by using nano-actuation of a substrate to physically bend the mirror to a desired shape. The purpose of the innovation is to modify the incident wavefront for the purpose of correction of fabrication and alignment-induced wavefront errors at the system level. The advanced degree of precision required for some applications such as gravity wave detection (LISA - Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) or planet finding (FKSI - Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer) requires wavefront control at the limits of the current state of the art. All the steps required to fabricate a magnetic mirror have been demonstrated. The modification is to apply a bias voltage to the dielectric layer so as to change the index of refraction and modify the phase of the reflected radiation. Light is reflected off the device and collected by a phase-sensing interferometer. The interferometer determines the

  6. Shaping light: MOEMS deformable mirrors for microscopes and telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bifano, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Micromachined deformable mirrors (DMs) have enabled rapid advances in applications ranging from large telescope astronomy and free space laser communication to biological microscopy and retinal imaging over the past decade. In this talk I describe our efforts at Boston University and at Boston Micromachines Corporation to design, fabricate, and control MOEMS DMs for adaptive optics (AO) applications. Integration of the DMs in AO systems is described, along with results demonstrating unprecedented advances in resolution and contrast in microscopes and telescopes challenged by unavoidable wavefront aberrations. MEMS-DM research offers the rare opportunity to introduce technology that is both more economical and more capable than the state-of-the-art.

  7. Superconducting (radiation hardened) magnets for mirror fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Miller, J.R.; Perkins, J.R.

    1983-12-07

    Superconducting magnets for mirror fusion have evolved considerably since the Baseball II magnet in 1970. Recently, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) yin-yang has been tested to a full field of 7.7 T with radial dimensions representative of a full scale reactor. Now the emphasis has turned to the manufacture of very high field solenoids (choke coils) that are placed between the tandem mirror central cell and the yin-yang anchor-plug set. For MFTF-B the choke coil field reaches 12 T, while in future devices like the MFTF-Upgrade, Fusion Power Demonstration and Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) reactor the fields are doubled. Besides developing high fields, the magnets must be radiation hardened. Otherwise, thick neutron shields increase the magnet size to an unacceptable weight and cost. Neutron fluences in superconducting magnets must be increased by an order of magnitude or more. Insulators must withstand 10/sup 10/ to 10/sup 11/ rads, while magnet stability must be retained after the copper has been exposed to fluence above 10/sup 19/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/.

  8. The VST secondary mirror support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipani, P.; Perrotta, F.; Molfese, C.; Caputi, O.; Ferragina, L.; Marty, L.; Capaccioli, M.; Gallieni, D.; Fumi, P.; Anaclerio, E.; Lazzarini, P.; De Paris, G.

    2008-07-01

    The VST telescope is equipped with an active optics system based on a wavefront sensor, a set of axial actuators to change the primary mirror shape and a secondary mirror positioner stage. The secondary mirror positioning capability allows the correction of defocus and coma optical aberrations, mainly caused by incorrect relative positions of the optics. The secondary mirror positioner is a 6-6 Stewart platform (also called "hexapod"). It is a parallel robot with a mobile platform moved by 6 linear actuators acting simultaneously. This paper describes the secondary mirror support system and the current status of the work.

  9. A microstitching interferometer for evaluating the surface profile of precisely figured hard x-ray K-B mirrors.

    SciTech Connect

    Assoufid, L.; Qian, J.; Kewish, C. M.; Liu, C.; Conley, R.; Macrander, A. T.; Lindley, D.; Saxer, C.; X-Ray Science Division; KLA-Tencor

    2007-01-01

    Fabrication and evaluation of elliptical X-ray mirrors, such as Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) mirrors produced by the profile-coating technique, requires accurate surface figure measurements over a wide range of spatial frequencies. Microstitching interferometry has proven to fulfill this requirement for length scales from a few {micro}m up to the full mirror length. At the Advanced Photon Source, a state-of-the-art microroughness microscope interferometer that incorporates advanced microstitching capability has been used to obtain measurements of profile-coated elliptical K-B mirrors. The stitched surface height data provide previously unattainable resolution and reproducibility, which has facilitated the fabrication of ultrasmooth (< 1 nm rms residual height) profile-coated mirrors, whose hard X-ray focusing performance is expected to approach the diffraction limit. This paper describes the system capabilities and limitations. Results of measurements obtained with it will be discussed and compared with those obtained with the Long Trace Profiler.

  10. Constellation-X mirror technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. W.; Bolognese, J.; Byron, G.; Chang, K. W.; Content, D. A.; Hadjimichael, T. J.; He, Charles; Hill, M. D.; Hong, M.; Lehan, J. P.; Lozipone, L.; Mazzarella, J. M.; McClelland, R.; Nguyen, D. T.; Olsen, L.; Petre, R.; Robinson, D.; Rohrbach, S. O.; Russell, R.; Saha, T. T.; Sharpe, M.; Gubarev, M. V.; Jones, W. D.; O'Dell, S. L.; Davis, W.; Caldwell, D. R.; Freeman, M.; Podgorski, W.; Reid, P. B.

    2008-07-01

    As NASA's next major space X-ray observatory, the Constellation-X mission (Bookbinder et al. 2008) requires mirror assemblies with unprecedented characteristics that cannot be provided by existing optical technologies. In the past several years, the project has supported a vigorous mirror technology development program. This program includes the fabrication of lightweight mirror segments by slumping commercially available thin glass sheets, the support and mounting of these thin mirror segments for accurate metrology, the mounting and attachment of these mirror segments for the purpose of X-ray tests, and development of methods for aligning and integrating these mirror segments into mirror assemblies. This paper describes our efforts and developments in these areas.

  11. A Deployable Primary Mirror for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Phelps, James E.; Dyer, Jack E.; Caudle, David A.; Tam, Anthony; Escobedo, Javier; Kasl, Eldon P.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center, Composite Optics, Inc., and Nyma/ADF have developed jointly a deployable primary mirror for space telescopes that combines over five years of research on deployment of optical-precision structures and over ten years of development of fabrication techniques for optical-precision composite mirror panels and structures. The deployable mirror is directly applicable to a broad class of non-imaging "lidar" (light direction and ranging) telescopes whose figure-error requirements are in the range of one to ten microns RMS. Furthermore, the mirror design can be readily modified to accommodate imaging-quality reflector panels and active panel-alignment control mechanisms for application to imaging telescopes. The present paper: 1) describes the deployable mirror concept; 2) explains the status of the mirror development; and 3) provides some technical specifications for a 2.55-m-diameter, proof-of-concept mirror.

  12. Radius of curvature controlled mirror

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George R.; Rathke, John Wickham; Schultheiss, Thomas John; Shinn, Michelle D.; Dillon-Townes, Lawrence A.

    2006-01-17

    A controlled radius of curvature mirror assembly comprising: a distortable mirror having a reflective surface and a rear surface; and in descending order from the rear surface; a counter-distortion plate; a flow diverter having a flow diverter aperture at the center thereof; a flow return plate having a flow return aperture at the center thereof; a thermal isolation plate having a thermal isolation plate aperture at the center thereof and a flexible heater having a rear surface and a flexible heater aperture at the center thereof; a double walled tube defining a coolant feed chamber and a coolant return chamber; said coolant feed chamber extending to and through the flow diverter aperture and terminating at the counter-distortion plate and the coolant return chamber extending to and through the thermal isolation backplate and terminating at the flow diverter; and a coolant feed and a coolant return exit at the rear of said flexible heater.

  13. Oculometer focus and mirror control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    An automatic focusing system designed around an ultrasonic range measurement is described. Besides maintaining the focus, subject distance is a by-product which could lighten the NOVA computational effort. An automatic head tracking unit is also discussed. It is intended to reduce the search time required when track is lost. An X-Y ultrasonic measurement is also made in this design to control the deflection mirrors.

  14. Afocal correctors for paraboloidal mirrors.

    PubMed

    Wynne, C G

    1967-07-01

    A new form of field corrector for astronomical telescopes with paraboloidal primary mirrors is described. It consists of four separated spherical surfaced lenses and gives improved aberration correction. The method of designing is described, and the adaptability of the design to telescopes of different characteristics is discussed. Numerical data and details of performance are given for a specific design for the Palomar Observatory 200-in. (5.08-m) telescope. PMID:20062169

  15. Nine toes; Mirror Foot Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Vlahovic, Aleksandar M; Pistignjat, Boris S; Vlahovic, Natasa S

    2015-01-01

    Mirror foot is a very rare congenital anomaly, with only a few papers presenting definitive treatment for this entity. There are limited management recommendations. Most cases are treated before walking age. In our case, there were no associated developmental defects of the leg. The child underwent complex rays resection with medial foot reconstruction. After 7.5 years of followup, definitive surgical treatment was performed with satisfactory cosmetic and functional outcome. PMID:26229172

  16. Advancement's Sticky Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    The author did not expect to be surprised or disturbed by the data from the latest Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) salary survey; however, she was. CASE has been conducting the survey since 1982, so she assumed the findings would mirror her own salary history and those of her peers. While she suspected that older women…

  17. Construction of Prototype Lightweight Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    This contract and the work described was in support of a Seven Segment Demonstrator (SSD) and demonstration of a different technology for construction of lightweight mirrors. The objectives of the SSD were to demonstrate functionality and performance of a seven segment prototype array of hexagonal mirrors and supporting electromechanical components which address design issues critical to space optics deployed in large space based telescopes for astronomy and for optics used in spaced based optical communications systems. The SSD was intended to demonstrate technologies which can support the following capabilities; Transportation in dense packaging to existing launcher payload envelopes, then deployable on orbit to form space telescope with large aperture. Provide very large (less than 10 meters) primary reflectors of low mass and cost. Demonstrate the capability to form a segmented primary or quaternary mirror into a quasi-continuous surface with individual subapertures phased so that near diffraction limited imaging in the visible wavelength region is achieved. Continuous compensation of optical wavefront due to perturbations caused by imperfections, natural disturbances, and equipment induced vibrations/deflections to provide near diffraction limited imaging performance in the visible wavelength region. Demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating such systems with reduced mass and cost compared to past approaches. While the SSD could not be expected to satisfy all of the above capabilities, the intent was to start identifying and understanding new technologies that might be applicable to these goals.

  18. Deflectometric measurement of large mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesch, Evelyn; Häusler, Gerd; Wörnlein, André; Stinzing, Friedrich; van Eldik, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    We discuss the inspection of large-sized, spherical mirror tiles by `Phase Measuring Deflectometry' (PMD). About 10 000 of such mirror tiles, each satisfying strict requirements regarding the spatial extent of the point-spread-function (PSF), are planned to be installed on the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a future ground-based instrument to observe the sky in very high energy gamma-rays. Owing to their large radii of curvature of up to 60 m, a direct PSF measurement of these mirrors with concentric geometry requires large space. We present a PMD sensor with a footprint of only 5×2×1.2 m3 that overcomes this limitation. The sensor intrinsically acquires the surface slope; the shape data are calculated by integration. In this way, the PSF can be calculated for real case scenarios, e.g., when the light source is close to infinity and off-axis. The major challenge is the calibration of the PMD sensor, specifically because the PSF data have to be reconstructed from different camera views. The calibration of the setup is described, and measurements presented and compared to results obtained with the direct approach.

  19. Mirror Metrology Using Nano-Probe Supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David; Hong, Maoling; Byron, Glenn; McClelland, Ryan; Chan, Kai-Wing

    2012-01-01

    Thin, lightweight mirrors are needed for future x-ray space telescopes in order to increase x-ray collecting area while maintaining a reduced mass and volume capable of being launched on existing rockets. However, it is very difficult to determine the undistorted shape of such thin mirrors because the mounting of the mirror during measurement causes distortion. Traditional kinematic mounts have insufficient supports to control the distortion to measurable levels and prevent the mirror from vibrating during measurement. Over-constrained mounts (non-kinematic) result in an unknown force state causing mirror distortion that cannot be determined or analytically removed. In order to measure flexible mirrors, it is necessary to over-constrain the mirror. Over-constraint causes unknown distortions to be applied to the mirror. Even if a kinematic constraint system can be used, necessary imperfections in the kinematic assumption can lead to an unknown force state capable of distorting the mirror. Previously, thicker, stiffer, and heavier mirrors were used to achieve low optical figure distortion. These mirrors could be measured to an acceptable level of precision using traditional kinematic mounts. As lighter weight precision optics have developed, systems such as the whiffle tree or hydraulic supports have been used to provide additional mounting supports while maintaining the kinematic assumption. The purpose of this invention is to over-constrain a mirror for optical measurement without causing unacceptable or unknown distortions. The invention uses force gauges capable of measuring 1/10,000 of a Newton attached to nano-actuators to support a thin x-ray optic with known and controlled forces to allow for figure measurement and knowledge of the undeformed mirror figure. The mirror is hung from strings such that it is minimally distorted and in a known force state. However, the hanging mirror cannot be measured because it is both swinging and vibrating. In order to

  20. Manufacturing Large Membrane Mirrors at Low Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive processes have been developed for manufacturing lightweight, wide-aperture mirrors that consist mainly of reflectively coated, edge-supported polyimide membranes. The polyimide and other materials in these mirrors can withstand the environment of outer space, and the mirrors have other characteristics that make them attractive for use on Earth as well as in outer space: With respect to the smoothness of their surfaces and the accuracy with which they retain their shapes, these mirrors approach the optical quality of heavier, more expensive conventional mirrors. Unlike conventional mirrors, these mirrors can be stowed compactly and later deployed to their full sizes. In typical cases, deployment would be effected by inflation. Potential terrestrial and outer-space applications for these mirrors include large astronomical telescopes, solar concentrators for generating electric power and thermal power, and microwave reflectors for communication, radar, and short-distance transmission of electric power. The relatively low cost of manufacturing these mirrors stems, in part, from the use of inexpensive tooling. Unlike in the manufacture of conventional mirrors, there is no need for mandrels or molds that have highly precise surface figures and highly polished surfaces. The surface smoothness is an inherent property of a polyimide film. The shaped area of the film is never placed in contact with a mold or mandrel surface: Instead the shape of a mirror is determined by a combination of (1) the shape of a fixture that holds the film around its edge and (2) control of manufacturing- process parameters. In a demonstration of this manufacturing concept, spherical mirrors having aperture diameters of 0.5 and 1.0 m were fabricated from polyimide films having thicknesses ranging from <20 m to 150 m. These mirrors have been found to maintain their preformed shapes following deployment.

  1. ATLAST ULE mirror segment performance analytical predictions based on thermally induced distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhower, Michael J.; Cohen, Lester M.; Feinberg, Lee D.; Matthews, Gary W.; Nissen, Joel A.; Park, Sang C.; Peabody, Hume L.

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for a 9.2 m aperture space-borne observatory operating across the UV/Optical/NIR spectra. The primary mirror for ATLAST is a segmented architecture with pico-meter class wavefront stability. Due to its extraordinarily low coefficient of thermal expansion, a leading candidate for the primary mirror substrate is Corning's ULE® titania-silicate glass. The ATLAST ULE® mirror substrates will be maintained at `room temperature' during on orbit flight operations minimizing the need for compensation of mirror deformation between the manufacturing temperature and the operational temperatures. This approach requires active thermal management to maintain operational temperature while on orbit. Furthermore, the active thermal control must be sufficiently stable to prevent time-varying thermally induced distortions in the mirror substrates. This paper describes a conceptual thermal management system for the ATLAST 9.2 m segmented mirror architecture that maintains the wavefront stability to less than 10 pico-meters/10 minutes RMS. Thermal and finite element models, analytical techniques, accuracies involved in solving the mirror figure errors, and early findings from the thermal and thermal-distortion analyses are presented.

  2. Minimizing high spatial frequency residual error in active space telescope mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Thomas L.; Smith, Matthew W.; Cohan, Lucy E.; Miller, David W.

    2009-08-01

    The trend in future space telescopes is towards larger apertures, which provide increased sensitivity and improved angular resolution. Lightweight, segmented, rib-stiffened, actively controlled primary mirrors are an enabling technology, permitting large aperture telescopes to meet the mass and volume restrictions imposed by launch vehicles. Such mirrors, however, are limited in the extent to which their discrete surface-parallel electrostrictive actuators can command global prescription changes. Inevitably some amount of high spatial frequency residual error is added to the wavefront due to the discrete nature of the actuators. A parameterized finite element mirror model is used to simulate this phenomenon and determine designs that mitigate high spatial frequency residual errors in the mirror surface figure. Two predominant residual components are considered: dimpling induced by embedded actuators and print-through induced by facesheet polishing. A gradient descent algorithm is combined with the parameterized mirror model to allow rapid trade space navigation and optimization of the mirror design, yielding advanced design heuristics formulated in terms of minimum machinable rib thickness. These relationships produce mirrors that satisfy manufacturing constraints and minimize uncorrectable high spatial frequency error.

  3. Fabrication of single crystal silicon mirror substrates for X-ray astronomical missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveros, Raul E.; Bly, Vincent T.; Kolos, Linette D.; McKeon, Kevin P.; Mazzarella, James R.; Miller, Timothy M.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-07-01

    The advancement of X-ray astronomy largely depends on technological advances in the manufacturing of X-ray optics. Future X-ray astronomy missions will require thousands of nearly perfect mirror segments to produce an X-ray optical assembly with < 5 arcsecond resolving capability. Present-day optical manufacturing technologies are not capable of producing thousands of such mirrors within typical mission time and budget allotments. Therefore, efforts towards the establishment of a process capable of producing sufficiently precise X-ray mirrors in a time-efficient and cost-effective manner are needed. Single-crystal silicon is preferred as a mirror substrate material over glass since it is stronger and free of internal stress, allowing it to retain its precision when cut into very thin mirror substrates. This paper details our early pursuits of suitable fabrication technologies for the mass production of sub-arcsecond angular resolution single-crystal silicon mirror substrates for X-ray telescopes.

  4. Mirrors, mirrors on the wall…the ubiquitous multiple reflection error.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Participants decided when somebody, Janine, could see their face in a horizontal row of adjacent mirrors mounted flat on the same wall. They saw real mirrors and a shop-dummy representing Janine. Such coplanar mirrors reflect different, non-overlapping areas of a scene. However, almost everybody made an unexpected error: they claimed that Janine would see her face reflected in multiple mirrors simultaneously. They therefore responded as if each mirror showed similar information and thus grossly overestimated how much each mirror revealed. Further studies established that this multiple reflection error also occurred for vertical rows of mirrors and for different areas of a single, large mirror. The error was even common if the participant themselves sat in front of a set of covered-up mirrors and indicated where they would be able to see their own reflection. In the latter case, people often made multiple reflection errors despite having seen all the mirrors uncovered immediately before they responded. People's gross overestimation of how much of a scene a mirror reflects and their inability to learn to correct this false belief explains why, despite a lifetime's experience of mirrors, they incorrectly think they will see themselves in all nearby mirrors. PMID:21889132

  5. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Camera Integrated With Mirror Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photo shows the High Resolution Camera (HRC) for the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), formerly Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), being integrated with the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) in Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) 24-foot Vacuum Chamber at the X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF). The AXAF was renamed CXO in 1999. The CXO is the most sophisticated and the world's most poweful x-ray telescope ever built. It observes x-rays from high-energy regions of the universe, such as hot gas in the remnants of exploded stars. The HRC is one of the two instruments used at the focus of CXO, where it will detect x-rays reflected from an assembly of eight mirrors. The unique capabilities of the HRC stem from the close match of its imaging capability to the focusing of the mirrors. When used with CXO mirrors, the HRC makes images that reveal detail as small as one-half an arc second. This is equivalent to the ability to read a newspaper at a distance of 1 kilometer. MSFC's XRCF is the world's largest, most advanced laboratory for simulating x-ray emissions from distant celestial objects. It produces a space-like environment in which components relatedto x-ray telescope imaging are tested and the quality of their performances in space is predicted. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development of the CXO and NASA's MSFC was responsible for its project management. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations of the CXO for NASA from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The CXO was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-93).

  6. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Camera Integrated With Mirror Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photo shows the High Resolution Camera (HRC) for the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), formerly Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), being integrated with the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) in Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) 24-foot Vacuum Chamber at the X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF). The AXAF was renamed CXO in 1999. The CXO is the most sophisticated and the world's most powerful x-ray telescope ever built. It observes x-rays from high-energy regions of the universe, such as hot gas in the remnants of exploded stars. The HRC is one of the two instruments used at the focus of CXO, where it will detect x-rays reflected from an assembly of eight mirrors. The unique capabilities of the HRC stem from the close match of its imaging capability to the focusing of the mirrors. When used with CXO mirrors, the HRC makes images that reveal detail as small as one-half an arc second. This is equivalent to the ability to read a newspaper at a distance of 1 kilometer. MSFC's XRCF is the world's largest, most advanced laboratory for simulating x-ray emissions from distant celestial objects. It produces a space-like environment in which components related to x-ray telescope imaging are tested and the quality of their performances in space is predicted. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development of the CXO and NASA's MSFC was responsible for its project management. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations of the CXO for NASA from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The CXO was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-93).

  7. Excess mechanical loss associated with dielectric mirror coatings on test masses in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooks, D. R. M.; Sneddon, P.; Cagnoli, G.; Hough, J.; Rowan, S.; Fejer, M. M.; Gustafson, E.; Route, R.; Nakagawa, N.; Coyne, D.; Harry, G. M.; Gretarsson, A. M.

    2002-03-01

    Interferometric gravitational wave detectors use mirrors whose substrates are formed from materials of low intrinsic mechanical dissipation. The two most likely choices for the test masses in future advanced detectors are fused silica or sapphire (Rowan S et al 2000 Phys. Lett. A 265 5). These test masses must be coated to form mirrors, highly reflecting at 1064 nm. We have measured the excess mechanical losses associated with adding dielectric coatings to substrates of fused silica and calculated the effect of the excess loss on the thermal noise in an advanced interferometer.

  8. Magnetic mirror fusion: status and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    1980-02-11

    Two improved mirror systems, the tandem mirror (TM) and the field-reversed mirror (FRM) are being intensively studied. The twin practical aims of these studies: to improve the economic prospects for mirror fusion power plants and to reduce the size and/or complexity of such plants relative to earlier approaches to magnetic fusion. While at the present time the program emphasis is still strongly oriented toward answering scientific questions, the emphasis is shifting as the data accumulates and as larger facilities - ones with a heavy technological and engineering orientation - are being prepared. The experimental and theoretical progress that led to the new look in mirror fusion research is briefly reviewed, the new TM and the FRM ideas are outlined, and the projected future course of mirror fusion research is discussed.

  9. Novel unimorph adaptive mirrors for astronomy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rausch, Peter; Verpoort, Sven; Wittrock, Ulrich

    2012-07-01

    We have developed a new type of unimorph deformable mirror for the correction of low-order Zernike modes. The mirror features a clear aperture of 50 mm combined with large peak-to-valley amplitudes of up to 35 μm. Newly developed fabrication processes allow the use of prefabricated, coated, super-polished glass substrates. The mirror's unique features suggest the use in several astronomical applications like the compensation of atmospheric aberrations seen by laser beacons and the use in woofer-tweeter systems. Additionally, the design enables an efficient correction of the inevitable wave-front error imposed by the floppy structure of primary mirrors in future large space telescopes. We have modeled the mirror by using analytical as well as finite element models. We will present design, key features and manufacturing steps of the deformable mirror.

  10. Passivation coating for flexible substrate mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.

    1990-01-01

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate before metal deposition thereon to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors. Also, the silver or other reflective metal layer on mirrors comprising thin, lightweight, flexible substrates of metal or polymer sheets coated with glassy layers can be protected with silicon nitride according to this invention.

  11. Thermal analysis of multifacet-mirror ring resonator for XUV free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, B.D.; Goldstein, J.C.; McFarland, R.D.; Newnam, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    XUV (10 nm {le} {lambda} {le} 100 nm) free-electron lasers (FELs) are potentially important light sources for advanced lithography and materials applications. The average power of an XUV FEL oscillator may be limited by thermal loading of the resonator mirrors. We analyze the requirements for the thermal performance of the mirrors of a metal, multifacet-mirror ring resonator for use at 12 nm. We use analytical methods and numerical approaches which include simulations with the 3-D FEL code FELEX. Thermal distortion of mirror surfaces leads to optical wavefront aberrations which reduce the focusability of the light beam in the gain medium (wiggler/electron beam) and limit the laser performance. 10 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Ultra-lightweighted HB-Cesic one-meter mirror demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krödel, Matthias R.; Hofbauer, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Future space missions, such as SPICA and DARWIN, require large, light-weighted, and stiff mirrors with excellent stability. During the past years, ECM fabricated a number of light-weighted mirrors. However, future large missions require further advances with light-weighting, pushing this technology to the limit possible with recently developed composite materials, new fabrication processes, and innovative designs. In 2009, ECM took steps in this direction by fabricating successfully an ultra-lightweighted HB-Cesic® mirror demonstrator 1 m in size. We demonstrated that HB-Cesic®, due to its extreme light-weighting capability and manufacturing versatility, combined with high stiffness, high mechanical strength, and low CTE at cryogenic temperatures, is able to fully meet the requirements of future large cryogenic space mirrors. In this paper we describe the fabrication process of this demonstrator and its physical characteristics.

  13. Tandem mirror technology demonstration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    This report describes a facility for generating engineering data on the nuclear technologies needed to build an engineering test reactor (ETR). The facility, based on a tandem mirror operating in the Kelley mode, could be used to produce a high neutron flux (1.4 MW/M/sup 2/) on an 8-m/sup 2/ test area for testing fusion blankets. Runs of more than 100 h, with an average availability of 30%, would produce a fluence of 5 mW/yr/m/sup 2/ and give the necessary experience for successful operation of an ETR.

  14. Deformable Mirrors Correct Optical Distortions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    By combining the high sensitivity of space telescopes with revolutionary imaging technologies consisting primarily of adaptive optics, the Terrestrial Planet Finder is slated to have imaging power 100 times greater than the Hubble Space Telescope. To this end, Boston Micromachines Corporation, of Cambridge, Massachusetts, received Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for space-based adaptive optical technology. The work resulted in a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) called the Kilo-DM. The company now offers a full line of MEMS DMs, which are being used in observatories across the world, in laser communication, and microscopy.

  15. Process for preparing improved silvered glass mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Buckwalter, Jr., Charles Q.

    1981-01-01

    Glass mirrors having improved weathering properties are prepared by an improvement in the process for making the mirrors. The glass surface after it has been cleaned but before it is silvered, is contacted with a solution of lanthanide rare earths in addition to a sensitization solution of tin or palladium. The addition of the rare earths produces a mirror which has increased resistance to delamination of the silver from the glass surface in the presence of water.

  16. Process for preparing improved silvered glass mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Buckwalter, C.Q. Jr.

    1980-01-28

    Glass mirrors having improved weathering properties are prepared by an improvement in the process for making the mirrors. The glass surface after it has been cleaned but before it is silvered, is contacted with a solution of lanthanide rare earths in addition to a sensitization solution of tin or palladium. The addition of the rare earths produces a mirror which has increased resistance to delamination of the silver from the glass surface in the presence of water.

  17. Integrated dual-stage deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Mike; Laycock, Leslie; Archer, Nick; Myers, Richard; Kirby, Andrew; Doel, Peter; Brooks, David

    2010-07-01

    We present the results of a study on Dual-Stage Deformable Mirrors using Zonal Bimorph Deformable Mirror (ZBDM) technology. A high density 'tweeter' DM has been assembled onto a lower density, high dynamic range 'woofer' DM to generate an integrated mirror which offers both high resolution and dynamic range simultaneously. Such a device has the potential to significantly simplify the design of astronomical Adaptive Optics (AO) systems. The latest developments are presented, including the fabrication of a small scale demonstrator.

  18. Fabricating the LSST Mirrors: A Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebag, Jacques; Gressler, W.; Neill, D.; Hileman, E.; LSST Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The LSST uses a modified Paul-Baker 3-mirror optical design with 8.4-m primary, 3.4-m secondary and 5-m tertiary mirrors feeding a 3 element refractive corrector to produce a 3.5-degree diameter field of view over a 64-cm flat focal surface in 6 spectral bands with excellent image quality. The proximity of the primary and tertiary surfaces enables fabrication of both mirrors from a single substrate. This unique design, referred to as the M1M3 monolith, offers significant advantages in the reduction of degrees of freedom during operational alignment and improved structural stiffness for the otherwise annular primary surface. The convex secondary will be the largest of its kind. As with all large optical elements, both of the LSST mirrors have long procurement times. In order to meet the LSST's first light schedule for the fall of 2014 we have started the fabrication process on both mirrors using private funding. The M1M3 monolith is being fabricated at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab using their structured borosilicate spin casting technology. The M1M3 was successfully cast over the summer of 2008. The mold refractory cleanout process and detailed inspections are underway in preparation for back side processing. The casting includes special design features to enable the mirror to operate under the increased loads caused by the high accelerations needed by the LSST. The secondary mirror substrate is being made using Corning's Ultra Low Expansion (ULE) process, resulting in an annular meniscus mirror 100mm thick and a 1.8m diameter central hole. Glass selection for the secondary mirror has begun and the substrate will be fused late in 2008. Both mirrors are on schedule and their early start has substantially reduced risk within the LSST project. Topics: LSST Optics Mirrors

  19. Deformable mirror for short wavelength applications

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    1999-01-01

    A deformable mirror compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation that can be precisely controlled to nanometer and subnanometer accuracy is described. Actuators are coupled between a reaction plate and a face plate which has a reflective coating. A control system adjusts the voltage supplied to the actuators; by coordinating the voltages supplied to the actuators, the reflective surface of the mirror can be deformed to correct for dimensional errors in the mirror or to produce a desired contour.

  20. Imaging performance of elliptical-boundary varifocal mirrors in active optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukes, Sarah Jane

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems deformable-membrane mirrors provide a means of focus control and attendant spherical aberration correction for miniaturized imaging systems. The technology has greatly advanced in the last decade, thereby extending their focal range capabilities. This dissertation describes a novel SU-8 2002 silicon-on-insulator wafer deformable mirror. A 4.000 mm x 5.657 mm mirror for 45o incident light rays achieves 22 mum stroke or 65 diopters, limited by snapdown. The mirrors show excellent optical quality while flat. Most have peak-to-valley difference of less than 150 nm and root-mean-square less than 25 nm. The process proves simple, only requiring a silicon-on-insulator wafer, SU-8 2002, and a metal layer. Xenon difluoride etches the silicon to release the mirrors. Greater than 90% of the devices survive fabrication and release. While current literature includes several aberration analyses on static mirrors, analyses that incorporate the dynamic nature of these mirrors do not exist. Optical designers may have a choice between deformable mirrors and other types of varifocal mirrors or lenses. Furthermore, a dynamic mirror at an incidence angle other than normal may be desired due to space limitations or for higher throughput (normal incidence requires a beam splitter). This dissertation presents an analysis based on the characteristic function of the system. It provides 2nd and 3rd order aberration coefficients in terms of dynamic focus range and base ray incidence angle. These afford an understanding of the significance of different types of aberrations. Root-mean-square and Strehl calculations provide insight into overall imaging performance for various conditions. I present general guidelines for maximum incidence angle and field of fiew that provide near diffraction-limited performance. Experimental verification of the MEMS mirrors at 5o and 45o incidence angles validates the analytical results. A Blu-ray optical pick-up imaging

  1. Engineering Specifications derived from Science Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Arnold, William; Bevan, Ryan M.; Smith, W. Scott; Kirk, Charles S.; Postman, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is a multi-year effort to systematically mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review. This technology must enable missions capable of both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. To accomplish our objective, we use a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND result in a high-performance low-cost low-risk system.

  2. Membrane Mirrors With Bimorph Shape Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    Deformable mirrors of a proposed type would be equipped with relatively-large-stroke microscopic piezoelectric actuators that would be used to maintain their reflective surfaces in precise shapes. These mirrors would be members of the class of MEMS-DM (for microelectromechanical system deformable mirror) devices, which offer potential for a precise optical control in adaptive-optics applications in such diverse fields as astronomy and vision science. The proposed mirror would be fabricated, in part, by use of a membrane-transfer technique. The actuator design would contain bimorph-type piezoelectric actuators.

  3. Are mirror-sensations really synesthetic?

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, Stuart W G

    2015-01-01

    Mirror-sensations, including touch and pain, are often referred to as synesthetic. The term can be challenged, however, because mirror-sensations lack the incongruency and saliency of synesthesia, may involve problems of perspective rather than entangled sensations, and may be easier to generate with suggestion. If mirror-sensations are truly sensations then they might be expected to act like the true sensation and mirror-pain, for example, might inhibit pain at a distance or itch in the same location. These predictions are highly testable. PMID:25997924

  4. Topology optimization design of a space mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiazhen; Jiang, Bo

    2015-11-01

    As key components of the optical system of the space optical remote sensor, Space mirrors' surface accuracy had a direct impact that couldn't be ignored of the imaging quality of the remote sensor. In the future, large-diameter mirror would become an important trend in the development of space optical technology. However, a sharp increase in the mirror diameter would cause the deformation of the mirror and increase the thermal deformation caused by temperature variations. A reasonable lightweight structure designed to ensure the optical performance of the system to meet the requirements was required. As a new type of lightweight approach, topology optimization technology was an important direction of the current space optical remote sensing technology research. The lightweight design of rectangular mirror was studied. the variable density method of topology optimization was used. The mirror type precision of the mirror assemblies was obtained in different conditions. PV value was less than λ/10 and RMS value was less than λ/50(λ = 632.8nm). The results show that the entire The mirror assemblies can achieve a sufficiently high static rigidity, dynamic stiffness and thermal stability and has the capability of sufficient resistance to external environmental interference . Key words: topology optimization, space mirror, lightweight, space optical remote sensor

  5. First mirrors for diagnostic systems of ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litnovsky, A.; Voitsenya, V. S.; Costley, A.; Donné, A. J. H.; SWG on First Mirrors of the ITPA Topical Group on Diagnostics

    2007-08-01

    The majority of optical diagnostics presently foreseen for ITER will implement in-vessel metallic mirrors as plasma-viewing components. Mirrors are used for the observation of the plasma radiation in a very wide wavelength range: from about 1 nm up to a few mm. In the hostile ITER environment, mirrors are subject to erosion, deposition, particle implantation and other adverse effects which will change their optical properties, affecting the entire performance of the respective diagnostic systems. The Specialists Working Group (SWG) on first mirrors was established under the wings of the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) Topical Group (TG) on Diagnostics to coordinate and guide the investigations on diagnostic mirrors towards the development of optimal, robust and durable solutions for ITER diagnostic systems. The results of tests of various ITER-candidate mirror materials, performed in Tore-Supra, TEXTOR, DIII-D, TCV, T-10, TRIAM-1M and LHD under various plasma conditions, as well as an overview of laboratory investigations of mirror performance and mirror cleaning techniques are presented in the paper. The current tasks in the R&D of diagnostic mirrors will be addressed.

  6. Double curvature mirrors for linear concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, Tamir; Ackler, Harold; Finot, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Skyline Solar's medium concentration photovoltaic system uses quasi-parabolic mirrors and one axis tracking. Improvements in levelized cost of energy can be achieved by effective management of non-uniformity of the flux line on the panels. To reduce non uniformity of the flux line due to mirror to mirror gaps, Skyline developed a dual curvature mirror that stretches the flux line along the panel. Extensive modeling and experiments have been conducted to analyze the impact of this new design and to optimize the design.

  7. Isospin symmetry in mirror α decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeyuk, N. K.; Descouvemont, P.; Johnson, R. C.

    2007-03-01

    We show that a consequence of isospin symmetry, recently discovered in mirror conjugated one-nucleon decays, can be extended to mirror-conjugated α-particle decays, both virtual and real. For virtual α decays of bound mirror pairs this symmetry manifests itself as a relation between the asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANCs) of α-particle overlap integrals. This relation is given by a simple analytical formula that involves α-particle separation energies and charges of residual nuclei. For bound-unbound mirror pairs, the ANC of a bound nucleus is related to the α width of the mirror unbound level. For unbound mirror pairs we get a new analytical formula that relates the widths of mirror resonances. We test the validity of these analytical formulas against the predictions of a two-body potential and of a many-body microscopic cluster model for several mirror states in Li7-Be7, B11-C11, and F19-Ne19 isotopes. We show that these analytical formulas are valid in many cases but that some deviations can be expected for isotopes with strongly deformed and easily excited cores. In general, the results from microscopic model are not very sensitive to model assumptions and can be used to predict unknown astrophysically relevant cross sections using known information about mirror systems.

  8. The uncanny mirror: a re-framing of mirror self-experience.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Philippe; Zahavi, Dan

    2011-06-01

    Mirror self-experience is re-casted away from the cognitivist interpretation that has dominated discussions on the issue since the establishment of the mirror mark test. Ideas formulated by Merleau-Ponty on mirror self-experience point to the profoundly unsettling encounter with one's specular double. These ideas, together with developmental evidence are re-visited to provide a new, psychologically and phenomenologically more valid account of mirror self-experience: an experience associated with deep wariness. PMID:20889353

  9. Interference in multilayer relativistic mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzanejhad, Saeed; Sohbatzadeh, Farshad; Babaei, Javad; Taghipour, Meisam; Mohammadzadeh, Zahra

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, reflection coefficient of a relativistic ultra-thin electron multilayer is calculated using electromagnetic interference procedures. The relativistic electron layers are assumed to be formed by nonlinear plasma wake waves that constitute the electron density cusps. It is shown that the interference between successive relativistic mirrors is restricted by the condition, τ p ≫ ( 2 γ 0 ) 5 / 2 / ω p 0 , where τp is the laser pulse duration. The results showed that tailoring the pulse amplitude, incident wave frequency value, incidence angle, and plasma density leads to increasing reflection coefficient a few orders of magnitudes. This constructive interference condition can be used for increasing conversion efficiency in the reflected energy from relativistic mirrors for the purpose of generating ultra-short coherence pulses in the extreme ultraviolet and x-ray regions. We also performed reflection from relativistic thin electron layers using relativistic 1D3V electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. It was found that the results of PIC simulation are in agreement with analytical considerations.

  10. Shape memory composite deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, M.; Bettini, P.; Di Landro, L.; Sala, G.

    2009-03-01

    This paper deals with some of the critical aspects regarding Shape Memory Composite (SMC) design: firstly some technological aspects concerning embedding technique and their efficiency secondarily the lack of useful numerical tools for this peculiar design. It has been taken into account as a possible application a deformable panel which is devoted to act as a substrate for a deformable mirror. The activity has been mainly focused to the study of embedding technologies, activation and authority. In detail it will be presented the "how to" manufacturing of some smart panels with embedded NiTiNol wires in order to show the technology developed for SMC structures. The first part of the work compares non conventional pull-out tests on wires embedded in composites laminates (real condition of application), with standard pull-out in pure epoxy resin blocks. Considering the numerical approach some different modeling techniques to be implemented in commercial codes (ABAQUS) have been investigated. The Turner's thermo-mechanical model has been adopted for the modeling of the benchmark: A spherical panel devoted to work as an active substrate for a Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) deformable mirror has been considered as a significant technological demonstrator and possible future application (f=240mm, r.o.c.=1996mm).

  11. Explaining mirror-touch synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jamie; Banissy, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Mirror-touch synesthesia (MTS) is the conscious experience of tactile sensations induced by seeing someone else touched. This paper considers two different, although not mutually exclusive, theoretical explanations and, in the final section, considers the relation between MTS and other forms of synesthesia and also other kinds of vicarious perception (e.g., contagious yawning). The Threshold Theory explains MTS in terms of hyper-activity within a mirror system for touch and/or pain. This offers a good account for some of the evidence (e.g., from fMRI) but fails to explain the whole pattern (e.g., structural brain differences outside of this system; performance on some tests of social cognition). The Self-Other Theory explains MTS in terms of disturbances in the ability to distinguish the self from others. This can be construed in terms of over-extension of the bodily self in to others, or as difficulties in the control of body-based self-other representations. In this account, MTS is a symptom of a broader cognitive profile. We suggest this meets the criteria for synesthesia, despite the proximal causal mechanisms remaining largely unknown, and that the tendency to localize vicarious sensory experiences distinguishes it from other kinds of seemingly related phenomena (e.g., non-localized affective responses to observing pain). PMID:25893437

  12. Relativistic Tennis Using Flying Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kando, M.; Ma, J.; Fukuda, Y.; Chen, L.-M.; Daito, I.; Ogura, K.; Homma, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Sagisaka, A.; Mori, M.; Koga, J. K.; Kawachi, T.; Daido, H.; Kimura, T.; Kato, Y.; Tajima, T.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2008-06-24

    Upon reflection from a relativistic mirror, the electromagnetic pulse frequency is upshifted and the duration is shortened by the factor proportional to the relativistic gamma-factor squared due to the double Doppler effect. We present the results of the proof-of-principle experiment for frequency upshifting of the laser pulse reflected from the relativistic 'flying mirror', which is a wake wave near the breaking threshold created by a strong driver pulse propagating in underdense plasma. Experimentally, the wake wave is created by a 2 TW, 76 fs Ti:S laser pulse from the JLITE-X laser system in helium plasma with the electron density of {approx_equal}4-6x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. The reflected signal is observed with a grazing-incidence spectrograph in 24 shots. The wavelength of the reflected radiation ranges from 7 to 14 nm, the corresponding frequency upshifting factors are {approx}55-115, and the gamma-factors are y = 4-6. The reflected signal contains at least 3x10{sup 7} photons/sr. This effect can be used to generate coherent high-frequency ultrashort pulses that inherit temporal shape and polarization from the original (low-frequency) ones. Apart from this, the reflected radiation contains important information about the wake wave itself, e.g. location, size, phase velocity, etc.

  13. ROSAT wide field camera mirrors.

    PubMed

    Willingale, R

    1988-04-15

    The ROSAT wide field camera (WFC) is an XUV telescope operating in the 12-250-eV energy band. The mirror system utilizes Wolter-Schwarzschild type I (WS I) grazing incidence optics with a focal length of 525 mm, comprised of three nested aluminum shells with an outermost diameter of 576 mm providing a geometric aperture area of 456 cm(2). The reflecting surfaces are electroless nickel plated and coated with gold to enhance their reflectivity in the XUV. The mirrors have undergone full aperture optical testing, narrow beam XUV testing, and full aperture XUV testing. Measurements of the reflectivity are compared to theoretical values derived from the optical constants of gold in the XUV range. Analysis of the focused distribution is used to estimate the surface roughness and figuring errors of the polished surfaces. The results are compared to the mechanical metrology data collected during manufacture of the shells and the power spectral density of the reflecting surfaces is found to have a power-law form. PMID:20531591

  14. Gasdynamic mirror fusion propulsion experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emrich, William J.

    2001-02-01

    Nuclear fusion appears to be the most promising concept for producing extremely high specific impulse rocket engines. One particular fusion concept which seems to be particularly well suited for fusion propulsion applications is the gasdynamic mirror (GDM). This device would operate at much higher plasma densities and with much larger L/D ratios than previous mirror machines. Several advantages accrue from such a design. First, the high L/D ratio minimizes to a large extent certain magnetic curvature effects which lead to plasma instabilities causing a loss of plasma confinement. Second, the high plasma density will result in the plasma behaving much more like a conventional fluid with a mean free path shorter than the length of the device. This characteristic helps reduce problems associated with ``loss cone'' microinstabilities. An experimental GDM device is currently being constructed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to provide an initial assessment of the feasibility of this type of propulsion system. Initial experiments are expected to commence in the late fall of 2000. .

  15. Gasdynamic Mirror Fusion Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear fusion appears to be the most promising concept for producing extremely high specific impulse rocket engines. One particular fusion concept which seems to be particularly well suited for fusion propulsion applications is the gasdynamic mirror (GDM). This device would operate at much higher plasma densities and with much larger LD ratios than previous mirror machines. Several advantages accrue from such a design. First, the high LA:) ratio minimizes to a large extent certain magnetic curvature effects which lead to plasma instabilities causing a loss of plasma confinement. Second, the high plasma density will result in the plasma behaving much more Re a conventional fluid with a mean free path shorter than the length of the device. This characteristic helps reduce problems associated with "loss cone" microinstabilities. An experimental GDM device is currently being constructed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to provide an initial assessment of the feasibility of this type of propulsion system. Initial experiments are expected to commence in the late fall of 2000.

  16. Mirrors, Mirrors on the Wall...The Ubiquitous Multiple Reflection Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Participants decided when somebody, Janine, could see their face in a horizontal row of adjacent mirrors mounted flat on the same wall. They saw real mirrors and a shop-dummy representing Janine. Such coplanar mirrors reflect different, non-overlapping areas of a scene. However, almost everybody made an unexpected error: they claimed that Janine…

  17. Plasma confinement apparatus using solenoidal and mirror coils

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, T. Kenneth; Condit, William C.

    1979-01-01

    A plasma confinement apparatus, wherein multiple magnetic mirror cells are linked by magnetic field lines inside of a solenoid with the mirroring regions for adjacent magnetic mirror cells each formed by a separate mirror coil inside of the solenoid. The magnetic mirror cells may be field reversed.

  18. Particle confinement property in the cusp-mirror field of a compact fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Limin; Liu, Haifeng; Wang, Xianqu

    2016-09-01

    The cusp-mirror magnetic structure in a compact fusion reactor (CFR) is investigated to understand the properties of the particle confinement for the first time. Compared with a cascade magnetic mirror device, its advanced performance is shown by means of test particle simulations. Some interesting results are obtained as follows: the adiabatic region and non-adiabatic region are found in the CFR’s magnetic configuration. In the non-adiabatic region, due to the magnetic field-free space existing, the ions are scattered stochastically and are not directly guided into the loss cone, unlike the particles around the fixed magnetic lines in the adiabatic region, which decrease the ion loss fraction. The CFR’s configuration, combining advantages of cusp-magnetic configuration and mirror-magnetic configuration, leads to confine particles longer than cascade magnetic mirror’s. This phenomenon may be relevant to the construction of advanced magnetic-confinement devices.

  19. Manufacturing Precise, Lightweight Paraboloidal Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermann, Frederick Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A process for fabricating a precise, diffraction- limited, ultra-lightweight, composite- material (matrix/fiber) paraboloidal telescope mirror has been devised. Unlike the traditional process of fabrication of heavier glass-based mirrors, this process involves a minimum of manual steps and subjective judgment. Instead, this process involves objectively controllable, repeatable steps; hence, this process is better suited for mass production. Other processes that have been investigated for fabrication of precise composite-material lightweight mirrors have resulted in print-through of fiber patterns onto reflecting surfaces, and have not provided adequate structural support for maintenance of stable, diffraction-limited surface figures. In contrast, this process does not result in print-through of the fiber pattern onto the reflecting surface and does provide a lightweight, rigid structure capable of maintaining a diffraction-limited surface figure in the face of changing temperature, humidity, and air pressure. The process consists mainly of the following steps: 1. A precise glass mandrel is fabricated by conventional optical grinding and polishing. 2. The mandrel is coated with a release agent and covered with layers of a carbon- fiber composite material. 3. The outer surface of the outer layer of the carbon-fiber composite material is coated with a surfactant chosen to provide for the proper flow of an epoxy resin to be applied subsequently. 4. The mandrel as thus covered is mounted on a temperature-controlled spin table. 5. The table is heated to a suitable temperature and spun at a suitable speed as the epoxy resin is poured onto the coated carbon-fiber composite material. 6. The surface figure of the optic is monitored and adjusted by use of traditional Ronchi, Focault, and interferometric optical measurement techniques while the speed of rotation and the temperature are adjusted to obtain the desired figure. The proper selection of surfactant, speed or rotation

  20. LED structure with enhanced mirror reflectivity

    DOEpatents

    Bergmann, Michael; Donofrio, Matthew; Heikman, Sten; Schneider, Kevin S; Haberern, Kevin W; Edmond, John A

    2014-04-01

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally related to LED chips having improved overall emission by reducing the light-absorbing effects of barrier layers adjacent mirror contacts. In one embodiment, a LED chip comprises one or more LEDs, with each LED having an active region, a first contact under the active region having a highly reflective mirror, and a barrier layer adjacent the mirror. The barrier layer is smaller than the mirror such that it does not extend beyond the periphery of the mirror. In another possible embodiment, an insulator is further provided, with the insulator adjacent the barrier layer and adjacent portions of the mirror not contacted by the active region or by the barrier layer. In yet another embodiment, a second contact is provided on the active region. In a further embodiment, the barrier layer is smaller than the mirror such that the periphery of the mirror is at least 40% free of the barrier layer, and the second contact is below the first contact and accessible from the bottom of the chip.

  1. Design for Underwater Aplanatic Straubel Acoustic Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuji; Mizutani, Koichi; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Nakamura, Toshiaki

    2011-07-01

    An aplanatic Fresnel lens was developed in a previous study to reduce the thickness of underwater acoustic lenses. Showing better convergence properties than aplanatic biconvex and hyperbolic Fresnel lenses, the aplanatic Fresnel lens had limitations in terms of frequency and number of waves owing to its shape. An underwater aplanatic Straubel acoustic mirror, the concept o which is based on a Straubel mirror, was designed to remove the two limitations of aplanatic Fresnel lenses. When the lens is used for underwater imaging sonar, the range resolution deteriorates because of these problems. The shape of the aplanatic Straubel mirror was designed using a numerical optimization method, and its convergence properties were evaluated in simulations. The mirror could correct spherical and coma aberrations in accordance with ray theory. In a comparison of the aplanatic Straubel mirror with an aplanatic Fresnel lens, the mirror had less coma aberration and field curvature than the lens. Additionally, the aplanatic Straubel mirror did not have the two limitations of the lens. Therefore, the aplanatic Straubel mirror showed better convergence than the aplanatic Fresnel lens.

  2. The Mirror Neuron System and Action Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buccino, Giovanni; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Riggio, Lucia

    2004-01-01

    Mirror neurons, first described in the rostral part of monkey ventral premotor cortex (area F5), discharge both when the animal performs a goal-directed hand action and when it observes another individual performing the same or a similar action. More recently, in the same area mirror neurons responding to the observation of mouth actions have been…

  3. Hands-On Discovery of Mirror Planes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Deborah A.; Cortes-Figueroa, Jose E.

    2001-01-01

    In the study of chemical applications of group theory, some students find it difficult to identify the symmetry elements in a simple geometrical figure or molecular model. Suggests that pattern blocks and mirrors can identify mirror planes in geometrical figures to help students construct, develop, and explain concepts of symmetry elements. (ASK)

  4. Foil Panel Mirrors for Nonimaging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuyper, D. J.; Castillo, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    Large durable, lightweight mirrors made by bonding thick aluminum foil to honeycomb panels or other rigid, flat backings. Mirrors suitable for use as infrared shields, telescope doors, solar-furnance doors, advertising displays, or other reflectors that require low thermal emissivity and high specularity but do not require precise surface figure necessary for imaging.

  5. Naive Optics: Acting on Mirror Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Heiko; Bertamini, Marco; Gamer, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    It is known that naive observers have striking misconceptions about mirror reflections. In 5 experiments, this article systematically extends the findings to graphic stimuli, to interactive visual tasks, and finally to tasks involving real mirrors. The results show that the perceptual knowledge of nonexpert adults is far superior to their…

  6. Thermal loading considerations for synchrotron radiation mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Holdener, F.R.; Berglin, E.J.; Fuchs, B.A.; Humpal, H.H.; Karpenko, V.P.; Martin, R.W.; Tirsell, K.G.

    1986-03-26

    Grazing incidence mirrors used to focus synchrotron radiation beams through small distant apertures have severe optical requirements. The surface distortion due to heat loading of the first mirror in a bending magnet beam line is of particular concern when a large fraction of the incident beam is absorbed. In this paper we discuss mirror design considerations involved in minimizing the thermal/mechanical loading on vertically deflecting first surface mirrors required for SPEAR synchrotron radiation beam lines. Topics include selection of mirror material and cooling method, the choice of SiC for the substrate, optimization of the thickness, and the design of the mirror holder and cooling mechanism. Results obtained using two-dimensional, finite-element thermal/mechanical distortion analysis are presented for the case of a 6/sup 0/ grazing incidence SiC mirror absorbing up to 260 W at Beam Line VIII on the SPEAR ring. Test descriptions and results are given for the material used to thermally couple this SiC mirror to a water-cooled block. The interface material is limited to applications for which the equivalent normal heat load is less than 20 W/cm/sup 2/.

  7. Unbroken Mirror Neurons in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Yang-Teng; Decety, Jean; Yang, Chia-Yen; Liu, Ji-Lin; Cheng, Yawei

    2010-01-01

    Background: The "broken mirror" theory of autism, which proposes that a dysfunction of the human mirror neuron system (MNS) is responsible for the core social and cognitive deficits in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), has received considerable attention despite weak empirical evidence. Methods: In this electroencephalographic…

  8. Three-point spherical mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1990-01-01

    A three-point spherical mirror mount for use with lasers is disclosed. The improved mirror mount is adapted to provide a pivot ring having an outer surface with at least three spaced apart mating points to engage an inner spherical surface of a support housing.

  9. Three-point spherical mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, R.W.

    1984-01-23

    A three-point spherical mirror mount for use with lasers is disclosed. The improved mirror mount is adapted to provide a pivot ring having an outer surface with at least three spaced apart mating points to engage an inner spherical surface of a support housing.

  10. Development Of Composite Panels For Telescope Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, Robert E.; Mcelroy, Paul M.; Johnston, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes continuing program for development of lightweight hexagonal graphite/epoxy composite panels intended to support precisely curved mirror surfaces assembled into large telescope mirror. Discusses development requirements, technical decisions, fabrication methods, measurements of properties of materials, analytical simulation, and thermal vacuum testing. Telescope flown in orbit around Earth to observe at wavelengths down to 30 micrometers.

  11. 21 CFR 886.1500 - Headband mirror.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Headband mirror. 886.1500 Section 886.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... mirror is a device intended to be strapped to the head of the user to reflect light for use...

  12. Design development of a deployable tertiary mirror for Keck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, J. X.; Cabak, J.; Ratliff, C.; Adkins, S.; Bolte, M.; Cowley, D.; Epps, H.; Nelson, J.; Tripsas, A.; Phillips, A. C.; Deich, W.; Peck, M.

    2014-07-01

    The University of California Observatories will design and construct a deployable tertiary mirror (named K1DM3) for the Keck 1 telescope, which will complement technical and scientific advances in the area of time-domain astronomy. The K1DM3 device will enable astronomers to swap between any of the foci on Keck 1 in under 2 minutes, both to monitor varying sources (e.g. stars orbiting the Galactic center) and catch rapidly fading sources (e.g. supernovae, flares, gamma-ray bursts). In this paper, we report on the design development during our in-progress Preliminary Design phase. The design consists of a passive wiffle tree axial support system and a diaphragm lateral support system with a 5 arcminute field-of-view mirror. The mirror assembly is inserted into the light path with an actuation system and it relies on a kinematic mechanism for achieving repeatable, precise positioning. This project, funded by an NSF MRI grant, aspires to complete by the end of 2016.

  13. Optimal alignment of mirror based pentaprisms for scanning deflectometric devices

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, Samuel K.; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Buchheim, Jana; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas

    2011-03-04

    In the recent work [Proc. of SPIE 7801, 7801-2/1-12 (2010), Opt. Eng. 50(5) (2011), in press], we have reported on improvement of the Developmental Long Trace Profiler (DLTP), a slope measuring profiler available at the Advanced Light Source Optical Metrology Laboratory, achieved by replacing the bulk pentaprism with a mirror based pentaprism (MBPP). An original experimental procedure for optimal mutual alignment of the MBPP mirrors has been suggested and verified with numerical ray tracing simulations. It has been experimentally shown that the optimally aligned MBPP allows the elimination of systematic errors introduced by inhomogeneity of the optical material and fabrication imperfections of the bulk pentaprism. In the present article, we provide the analytical derivation and verification of easily executed optimal alignment algorithms for two different designs of mirror based pentaprisms. We also provide an analytical description for the mechanism for reduction of the systematic errors introduced by a typical high quality bulk pentaprism. It is also shown that residual misalignments of an MBPP introduce entirely negligible systematic errors in surface slope measurements with scanning deflectometric devices.

  14. [The mirror neuron system in motor and sensory rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Oouchida, Yutaka; Izumi, Shinichi

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of the mirror neuron system has dramatically changed the study of motor control in neuroscience. The mirror neuron system provides a conceptual framework covering the aspects of motor as well as sensory functions in motor control. Previous studies of motor control can be classified as studies of motor or sensory functions, and these two classes of studies appear to have advanced independently. In rehabilitation requiring motor learning, such as relearning movement after limb paresis, however, sensory information of feedback for motor output as well as motor command are essential. During rehabilitation from chronic pain, motor exercise is one of the most effective treatments for pain caused by dysfunction in the sensory system. In rehabilitation where total intervention unifying the motor and sensory aspects of motor control is important, learning through imitation, which is associated with the mirror neuron system can be effective and suitable. In this paper, we introduce the clinical applications of imitated movement in rehabilitation from motor impairment after brain damage and phantom limb pain after limb amputation. PMID:24899347

  15. Development of an improved mirror facet for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schertz, Paul; Saifee, Shabbar; Lammert, Luke

    1991-01-01

    A fabrication technique was successfully developed for a metallic aluminum honeycomb, high-accuracy, lightweight, and long-life solar concentrator (mirror) for Advanced Solar Dynamic Space Power Systems. The program scope was limited to the development, fabrication, evaluation, and delivery of a solar concentrator facet (petal) that was sized for a 2-meter deployable solar concentrator. A surface accuracy of 1.0 mrad was achieved. The development incorporated tooling design, material selection, facet forming, adhesive selection, testing, and analysis. Techniques for applying levelizing, reflective, and protective optical coatings were also developed.

  16. Optical properties of relativistic plasma mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Vincenti, H.; Monchocé, S.; Kahaly, S.; Bonnaud, G.; Martin, Ph.; Quéré, F.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of ultrahigh-power femtosecond lasers creates a need for an entirely new class of optical components based on plasmas. The most promising of these are known as plasma mirrors, formed when an intense femtosecond laser ionizes a solid surface. These mirrors specularly reflect the main part of a laser pulse and can be used as active optical elements to manipulate its temporal and spatial properties. Unfortunately, the considerable pressures exerted by the laser can deform the mirror surface, unfavourably affecting the reflected beam and complicating, or even preventing, the use of plasma mirrors at ultrahigh intensities. Here we derive a simple analytical model of the basic physics involved in laser-induced deformation of a plasma mirror. We validate this model numerically and experimentally, and use it to show how such deformation might be mitigated by appropriate control of the laser phase. PMID:24614748

  17. CubeSat deformable mirror demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahoy, Kerri; Marinan, Anne; Kerr, Caitlin; Cheng, Kezi; Jamil, Sara

    2012-09-01

    The goal of the CubeSat Deformable Mirror Demonstration (DeMi) is to characterize the performance of a small deformable mirror over a year in low-Earth orbit. Small form factor deformable mirrors are a key technology needed to correct optical system aberrations in high contrast, high dynamic range space telescope applications such as space-based coronagraphic direct imaging of exoplanets. They can also improve distortions and reduce bit error rates for space-based laser communication systems. While follow-on missions can take advantage of this general 3U CubeSat platform to test the on-orbit performance of several different types of deformable mirrors, this first design accommodates a 32-actuator Boston Micromachines MEMS deformable mirror.

  18. A ferrofluidic deformable mirror for ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, J. B.; Thibault, S.; Borra, E. F.; Ritcey, A. M.; Carufel, N.; Asselin, D.; Jerominek, H.; Campbell, M. C. W.

    2005-09-01

    Optical aberrations reduce the imaging quality of the human eye. In addition to degrading vision, this limits our ability to illuminate small points of the retina for therapeutic, surgical or diagnostic purposes. When viewing the rear of the eye, aberrations cause structures in the fundus to appear blurred, limiting the resolution of ophthalmoscopes (diagnostic instruments used to image the eye). Adaptive optics, such as deformable mirrors may be used to compensate for aberrations, allowing the eye to work as a diffraction-limited optical element. Unfortunately, this type of correction has not been widely available for ophthalmic applications because of the expense and technical limitations of current deformable mirrors. We present preliminary design and characterisation of a deformable mirror suitable for ophthalmology. In this ferrofluidic mirror, wavefronts are reflected from a fluid whose surface shape is controlled by a magnetic field. Challenges in design are outlined, as are advantages over traditional deformable mirrors.

  19. Mirror Neurons through the Lens of Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Pier F.; Tramacere, Antonella; Simpson, Elizabeth A.; Iriki, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    The consensus view in mirror neuron research is that mirror neurons comprise a uniform, stable execution-observation matching system. In this article, we argue that, in light of recent evidence, this is, at best, an incomplete and oversimplified view of mirror neurons, whose activity is actually quite variable and more plastic than previously theorized. We propose an epigenetic account for understanding developmental changes in sensorimotor systems, including variations in mirror neuron activity. Although extant associative and genetic accounts fail to consider the complexity of genetic and non-genetic interactions, we propose a new Evo-Devo perspective, which predicts that environmental differences early in development, or through sensorimotor training, should produce variations in mirror neuron response patterns, tuning them to the social environment. PMID:23953747

  20. Optical properties of relativistic plasma mirrors.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, H; Monchocé, S; Kahaly, S; Bonnaud, G; Martin, Ph; Quéré, F

    2014-01-01

    The advent of ultrahigh-power femtosecond lasers creates a need for an entirely new class of optical components based on plasmas. The most promising of these are known as plasma mirrors, formed when an intense femtosecond laser ionizes a solid surface. These mirrors specularly reflect the main part of a laser pulse and can be used as active optical elements to manipulate its temporal and spatial properties. Unfortunately, the considerable pressures exerted by the laser can deform the mirror surface, unfavourably affecting the reflected beam and complicating, or even preventing, the use of plasma mirrors at ultrahigh intensities. Here we derive a simple analytical model of the basic physics involved in laser-induced deformation of a plasma mirror. We validate this model numerically and experimentally, and use it to show how such deformation might be mitigated by appropriate control of the laser phase. PMID:24614748

  1. Mirror-image-induced magnetic modes.

    PubMed

    Xifré-Pérez, Elisabet; Shi, Lei; Tuzer, Umut; Fenollosa, Roberto; Ramiro-Manzano, Fernando; Quidant, Romain; Meseguer, Francisco

    2013-01-22

    Reflection in a mirror changes the handedness of the real world, and right-handed objects turn left-handed and vice versa (M. Gardner, The Ambidextrous Universe, Penguin Books, 1964). Also, we learn from electromagnetism textbooks that a flat metallic mirror transforms an electric charge into a virtual opposite charge. Consequently, the mirror image of a magnet is another parallel virtual magnet as the mirror image changes both the charge sign and the curl handedness. Here we report the dramatic modification in the optical response of a silicon nanocavity induced by the interaction with its image through a flat metallic mirror. The system of real and virtual dipoles can be interpreted as an effective magnetic dipole responsible for a strong enhancement of the cavity scattering cross section. PMID:23194368

  2. Cryostable lightweight frit bonded silicon mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, F.; McCarter, D.; Tangedahl, M.; Content, D.

    The excellent polishability, low density and relatively high stiffness of silicon make it an attractive candidate for optical applications that require superior performance. Assembly of silicon details by means of glass frit bonding permits significant light weighting thus enhancing the benefit of silicon mirrors. To demonstrate the performance potential, a small lightweight glass frit bonded silicon mirror was fabricated and tested for cryoability. The test mirror was 12.5cm in diameter with a 60cm spherical radius and a maximum thickness, at the perimeter, of 2.5cm. A machined silicon core was used to stiffen the two face sheets of the silicon sandwich. These three elements were assembled, by glass frit bonding, to form the substrate that was polished. The experimental evaluation in a liquid nitrogen cryostat, demonstrated cryostability performance significantly better than required by the mirror specification. Key WordsCryostable, Lightweight, Silicon, Frit Bond, Spherical, Mirror

  3. Numerical modeling of electroactive polymer mirrors for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, X.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Chang, Z.; Sherrit, S.

    2003-01-01

    A controllable mirror made of single-layer EAP mirror is proposed in this paper. An analytical solution of required voltage distribution for forming a parabolic mirror from a planar film is presented.

  4. [Motion control of moving mirror based on fixed-mirror adjustment in FTIR spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-bing; Xu, Xian-ze; Le, Yi; Xu, Feng-qiu; Li, Jun-wei

    2012-08-01

    The performance of the uniform motion of the moving mirror, which is the only constant motion part in FTIR spectrometer, and the performance of the alignment of the fixed mirror play a key role in FTIR spectrometer, and affect the interference effect and the quality of the spectrogram and may restrict the precision and resolution of the instrument directly. The present article focuses on the research on the uniform motion of the moving mirror and the alignment of the fixed mirror. In order to improve the FTIR spectrometer, the maglev support system was designed for the moving mirror and the phase detection technology was adopted to adjust the tilt angle between the moving mirror and the fixed mirror. This paper also introduces an improved fuzzy PID control algorithm to get the accurate speed of the moving mirror and realize the control strategy from both hardware design and algorithm. The results show that the development of the moving mirror motion control system gets sufficient accuracy and real-time, which can ensure the uniform motion of the moving mirror and the alignment of the fixed mirror. PMID:23156801

  5. Mirror Modes in the Heliosheath

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Guarnieri, F. L.; Echer, E. E.; Lakhina, G. S.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.

    2011-01-04

    Mirror mode (MM) structures are identified in the Voyager 1 heliosheath magnetic field data. Their characteristics are: (1) quasiperiodic structures with a typical scale size of {approx}57 {rho}{sub p}(proton gyroradii), (2) little or no angular changes across the structures ({approx}3 deg. longitude and {approx}3 deg. latitude), and (3) a lack of sharp boundaries at the magnetic dip edges. It is proposed that the pickup of interstellar neutrals in the upstream region of the termination shock (TS) is the likely cause of MM instability during intervals when the IMF is nearly orthogonal to the solar wind flow direction. Concomitant (quasiperpendicular) shock compression of the MM structures at the TS and additional injection of pickup ions (PUIs) throughout the heliosheath will enhance MM growth.

  6. Tandem mirrors for neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Doggett, J.N.

    1983-03-31

    Two mirror machine concepts are being studied as early-time, low-cost, neutron-producing devices for testing and demonstrating reactor-relevant fusion technology. The first of these concepts is for a new, small, driven, steady-state, D-T reactor, called the Technology Demonstration Facility (TDF). The second concept is for upgrades to the MFTF-B machine that burn tritium and run for pulse lengths of some hours. Both devices operate in the Kelley mode in order to provide high-wall loadings of 14-MeV neutrons, thereby providing a valuable test bed for reactor-relevant hardware and subsystems. Either one of these devices could be running in the early 1990's with first wall fluxes between 1.4 and 2.0 MW m/sup -2/.

  7. Durable silver coating for mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, Jesse D.; Thomas, Norman L.

    2000-01-01

    A durable multilayer mirror includes reflective layers of aluminum and silver and has high reflectance over a broad spectral range from ultraviolet to visible to infrared. An adhesion layer of a nickel and/or chromium alloy or nitride is deposited on an aluminum surface, and a thin layer of silver is then deposited on the adhesion layer. The silver layer is protected by a passivation layer of a nickel and/or chromium alloy or nitride and by one or more durability layers made of metal oxides and typically a first layer of metal nitride. The durability layers may include a composite silicon aluminum nitride and an oxinitride transition layer to improve bonding between nitride and oxide layers.

  8. Deformable Mirror Materials Issue Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E

    2008-05-27

    It was a pleasure to speak with you and Dr. Olivier Guyon about your project to develop a coronagraph and in particular about materials science considerations in the development of the deformable mirror (DM) for the coronagraph. The coronagraph application will demand more of a DM than previous applications with regard to precision, and since the characterization and modeling tools are currently under development, you asked me to comment on materials issues that might impact the DM design and testing. I have not conducted research on this question, and my own research on modeling MEMS has not included DM systems. I am only in a position to discuss some general considerations that may help in developing a research plan for the DM system. As I understand it, the relevant points about the DM system are as follows. The DM surface needs to be positioned to less than 1 {angstrom} RMS of the desired shape, and be stable to 0.3 {angstrom} RMS for an hour. In the ultimate application in space the stability requirements may be greater. For example, the DM shape can be set using a bright star and then allow the coronagraph to be turned to a dim star to collect data for several hours, counting on the mirror shape to be stable. The DM is made of a polysilicon membrane coated with one or more metal layers for the reflective surface and actuated by 32x32 or 64x64 electrostatic actuators on the back side. The uncertainty in the position of any one actuator should be at the few-picometer level or less averaged over the 300-{micro}m region of the actuator. Currently, experiments are conducted that can characterize the surface shape to the 1 nm level, and it is anticipated that the experiments will be able to characterize the shape at the sub-Angstrom level but not in the immediate future. Regarding stability, under relatively large deformations (10's of nm), the DM mirror surface shows no hysteresis at the measurable nm level. Let me begin by saying that I am not aware of any

  9. Ion microstability in tandem mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlstein, L.D.

    1983-08-29

    The formalism describing ion-cyclotron modes in mirror traps will be developed. Emphasis will be placed on the effects of finite axial boundaries on the normal modes of the system. Wave properties are a composite picture of: positive energy waves (plasma oscillation, shear Alfven and drift waves), negative energy waves (ion Bernstein waves in a loss-cone media), positive dissipation (electron Landau damping, outgoing waves), and negative dissipation (ion cyclotron damping in a loss-cone and anisotropic temperature medium). Stability boundaries in this bounded media is affected by scale lengths along the magnetic field; first, because they determine the widths of the resonances, and second, because they restrict the parallel structure of the modes.

  10. Qualifying parabolic mirrors with deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, J.; Li, W.; Heimsath, A.; von Kopylow, C.; Bergmann, R. B.

    2013-02-01

    Phase-measuring deflectometry is a full-field gradient technique that lends itself very well to testing reflective optical surfaces. In the past, the industry's interest has been focussed mainly on the detection of defects and ripples, since it is easy to achieve sensitivity in the nm range. On the other hand, attempts to reconstruct the absolute surface shape from the gradient map have been plagued by systematic errors that accumulate to unacceptable uncertainties during data integration. Recently, thanks to improved measurement and evaluation techniques, the state of the art in absolute surface measurement has reached a level of maturity that allows its practical usage in precision optical manufacturing and qualification systems. We demonstrate the techniques, and the progress, by way of results from mirrors for telescopes, solar concentrators, and precision laboratory assemblies.

  11. Toward a large lightweight mirror for AO: development of a 1m Ni coated CFRP mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. J.; Doel, A. P.; Brooks, D.; Strangwood, M.

    2008-07-01

    We present our recent developments towards the construction of a large, thin, single-piece mirror for adaptive optics (AO). Our current research program aims to have completed fabrication and testing of a 1m diameter, nickel coated carbon-fibre reinforced cyanate ester resin mirror by the last quarter of 2009. This composite mirror material is being developed to provide a lightweight and robust alternative to thin glass shell mirrors, with the challenge of future large deformable mirrors such as the 2.5m M4 on the E-ELT in mind. A detailed analysis of the material properties of test mirror samples is being performed at the University of Birmingham (UK), the first results of which are discussed and presented here. We discuss the project progress achieved so far, including fabrication of the 1m flat moulds for the replication process, manufacturing and testing methods for 20 cm diameter sample mirrors and system simulations.

  12. Correction of an active space telescope mirror using a gradient approach and an additional deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Matthew R.; Kim, Jae Jun; Agrawal, Brij N.

    2015-09-01

    High development cost is a challenge for space telescopes and imaging satellites. One of the primary reasons for this high cost is the development of the primary mirror, which must meet diffraction limit surface figure requirements. Recent efforts to develop lower cost, lightweight, replicable primary mirrors include development of silicon carbide actuated hybrid mirrors and carbon fiber mirrors. The silicon carbide actuated hybrid mirrors at the Naval Postgraduate School do not meet the surface quality required for an optical telescope due to high spatial frequency residual surface errors. A technique under investigation at the Naval Postgraduate School is to correct the residual surface figure error using a deformable mirror in the optical path. We present a closed loop feedback gradient controller to actively control a SMT active segment and an additional deformable mirror to reduce residual wavefront error. The simulations and experimental results show that the gradient controller reduces the residual wavefront error more than an integral controller.

  13. Archetypal-imaging and mirror-gazing.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Giovanni B

    2014-03-01

    Mirrors have been studied by cognitive psychology in order to understand self-recognition, self-identity, and self-consciousness. Moreover, the relevance of mirrors in spirituality, magic and arts may also suggest that mirrors can be symbols of unconscious contents. Carl G. Jung investigated mirrors in relation to the unconscious, particularly in Psychology and Alchemy. However, the relationship between the conscious behavior in front of a mirror and the unconscious meaning of mirrors has not been clarified. Recently, empirical research found that gazing at one's own face in the mirror for a few minutes, at a low illumination level, produces the perception of bodily dysmorphic illusions of strange-faces. Healthy observers usually describe huge distortions of their own faces, monstrous beings, prototypical faces, faces of relatives and deceased, and faces of animals. In the psychiatric population, some schizophrenics show a dramatic increase of strange-face illusions. They can also describe the perception of multiple-others that fill the mirror surface surrounding their strange-face. Schizophrenics are usually convinced that strange-face illusions are truly real and identify themselves with strange-face illusions, diversely from healthy individuals who never identify with them. On the contrary, most patients with major depression do not perceive strange-face illusions, or they perceive very faint changes of their immobile faces in the mirror, like death statues. Strange-face illusions may be the psychodynamic projection of the subject's unconscious archetypal contents into the mirror image. Therefore, strange-face illusions might provide both an ecological setting and an experimental technique for "imaging of the unconscious". Future researches have been proposed. PMID:25379264

  14. Large thin adaptive x-ray mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doel, Peter; Atkins, Carolyn; Thompson, Samantha; Brooks, David; Yao, Jun; Feldman, Charlotte; Willingale, Richard; Button, Tim; Zhang, Dou; James, Ady

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes the progress made in a proof of concept study and recent results of a research program into large active x-ray mirrors that is part of the UK Smart X-ray Optics project. The ultimate aim is to apply the techniques of active/adaptive optics to the next generation of nested shell astronomical X-ray space telescopes. A variety of deformable mirror technologies are currently available, the most promising of which for active X-ray mirrors are probably unimorph and bimorph piezoelectric mirrors. In this type of mirror one or more sheets of piezoelectric material are bonded to or coated with a passive reflective layer. On the back or between the piezoceramic layer/layers are series of electrodes. Application of an electric field causes the piezoelectric material to undergo local deformation thus changing the mirror shape. Starting in 2005 a proof of concept active mirror research program has been undertaken. This work included modelling and development of actively controlled thin shell mirrors. Finite element models of piezo-electric actuated mirrors have been developed and verified against experimental test systems. This has included the modelling and test of piezo-electric hexagonal unimorph segments. Various actuator types and low shrinkage conductive bonding methods have been investigated and laboratory tests of the use of piezo-electric actuators to adjust the form of an XMM-Newton space telescope engineering model mirror shell have been conducted and show that movement of the optics at the required level is achievable. Promising technological approaches have been identified including moulded piezo-ceramics and piezo-electrics fibre bundles.

  15. Mirror Figuring Techniques of Sir William Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, E. F.

    2004-05-01

    Between the years 1773 to 1818, Sir William Herschel constructed dozens of speculum telescope mirrors, with diameters ranging from 6 - 48 inches. Very little, if any, detailed information has ever been published on the specifics of his mirror figuring efforts. The reason for this certainly relates to his desire to closely guard mirror production trade secrets. Upon Herschel's death, all telescope-making documents were passed on to his only son, Sir John Herschel. These materials are now in the possession of the British RAS and primarily consist of: a) a four volume series entitled "Experiments on the Construction of Specula," b) a 129 page treaty called "On the Construction of Specula," and c) a 179 page manuscript entitled "Results of Experiments on the Construction of Mirrors." It is suggested that publication was further delayed and then eventually abandoned due to silver-coated glass mirrors coming into favor. A recent investigation by the author, of the unpublished manuscripts on the construction of specula, suggests that Herschel's mirror figuring techniques did not involve any guess work; in fact, his methods were highly refined -- never leaving to chance the evolution of a spherical surface into the required paraboloid. At the heart of Herschel's figuring techniques were a series of aperture diaphragms (similar to the Couder masks used by modern telescope makers) that were placed over the mirror, which allowed for the precise determination of its curvature at various predefined zones. With this information, Herschel was able to vary his figuring strokes with his polishing tool accordingly. In addition, all mirrors were subsequently "star tested," sometimes with aperture diaphragms in place, allowing for field examination of the mirror's "distinctness" or performance. Double stars and the planet Saturn were favorite targets used to analyze and then correct a mirror's figure.

  16. Lightweight deformable mirrors for future space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Keith

    This thesis presents a concept for ultra-lightweight deformable mirrors based on a thin substrate of optical surface quality coated with continuous active piezopolymer layers that provide modes of actuation and shape correction. This concept eliminates any kind of stiff backing structure for the mirror surface and exploits micro-fabrication technologies to provide a tight integration of the active materials into the mirror structure, to avoid actuator print-through effects. Proof-of-concept, 10-cm-diameter mirrors with a low areal density of about 0.5 kg/m2 have been designed, built and tested to measure their shape-correction performance and verify the models used for design. The low cost manufacturing scheme uses replication techniques, and strives for minimizing residual stresses that deviate the optical figure from the master mandrel. It does not require precision tolerancing, is lightweight, and is therefore potentially scalable to larger diameters for use in large, modular space telescopes. Other potential applications for such a laminate could include ground-based mirrors for solar energy collection, adaptive optics for atmospheric turbulence, laser communications, and other shape control applications. The immediate application for these mirrors is for the Autonomous Assembly and Reconfiguration of a Space Telescope (AAReST) mission, which is a university mission under development by Caltech, the University of Surrey, and JPL. The design concept, fabrication methodology, material behaviors and measurements, mirror modeling, mounting and control electronics design, shape control experiments, predictive performance analysis, and remaining challenges are presented herein. The experiments have validated numerical models of the mirror, and the mirror models have been used within a model of the telescope in order to predict the optical performance. A demonstration of this mirror concept, along with other new telescope technologies, is planned to take place during

  17. Archetypal-Imaging and Mirror-Gazing

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Giovanni B.

    2013-01-01

    Mirrors have been studied by cognitive psychology in order to understand self-recognition, self-identity, and self-consciousness. Moreover, the relevance of mirrors in spirituality, magic and arts may also suggest that mirrors can be symbols of unconscious contents. Carl G. Jung investigated mirrors in relation to the unconscious, particularly in Psychology and Alchemy. However, the relationship between the conscious behavior in front of a mirror and the unconscious meaning of mirrors has not been clarified. Recently, empirical research found that gazing at one’s own face in the mirror for a few minutes, at a low illumination level, produces the perception of bodily dysmorphic illusions of strange-faces. Healthy observers usually describe huge distortions of their own faces, monstrous beings, prototypical faces, faces of relatives and deceased, and faces of animals. In the psychiatric population, some schizophrenics show a dramatic increase of strange-face illusions. They can also describe the perception of multiple-others that fill the mirror surface surrounding their strange-face. Schizophrenics are usually convinced that strange-face illusions are truly real and identify themselves with strange-face illusions, diversely from healthy individuals who never identify with them. On the contrary, most patients with major depression do not perceive strange-face illusions, or they perceive very faint changes of their immobile faces in the mirror, like death statues. Strange-face illusions may be the psychodynamic projection of the subject’s unconscious archetypal contents into the mirror image. Therefore, strange-face illusions might provide both an ecological setting and an experimental technique for “imaging of the unconscious”. Future researches have been proposed. PMID:25379264

  18. Impedance Matched to Vacuum, Invisible Edge, Diffraction Suppressed Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John G. (Inventor); Roman, Patrick A. (Inventor); Shiri, Sharham (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Diffraction suppressed mirrors having an invisible edge are disclosed for incident light at both targeted wavelengths and broadband incident light. The mirrors have a first having at least one discontiguous portion having a plurality of nanostructured apertures. The discontiguous mirror portion impedance matches a relatively high impedance portion of the mirror to a relatively low impedance portion of the mirror, thereby reducing the diffraction edge effect otherwise present in a conventional mirror.

  19. Double arch mirror study. Part 3: Fabrication and test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    A method of mounting a cryogenically cooled, lightweight, double arch, glass mirror was developed for infrared, astronomical telescopes such as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). A 50 cm, fused silica mirror which was previously fabricated was modified for use with a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed. The modification of the mirror, the fabrication of the mirror mount, and the room temperature testing of the mounted mirror are reported. A design for a SIRTF class primary mirror is suggested.

  20. Cross-check of ex-situ and in-situ metrology of a bendable temperature stabilized KB mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng Sam; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Celestre, Richard; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory; Macdougall, James; Mochi, Iacopo; Warwick, Tony

    2010-09-15

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in-situ, at-wavelength wavefront slope measurement techniques for Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror nano-focusing. In this paper, we report an initial cross-check of ex-situ and in-situ metrology of a bendable temperature stabilized KB mirror. This cross-check provides a validation of the in-situ shearing interferometry currently under development at the ALS.

  1. Design and Analysis of an X-Ray Mirror Assembly Using the Meta-Shell Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClelland, Ryan S.; Bonafede, Joseph; Saha, Timo T.; Solly, Peter M.; Zhang, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Lightweight and high resolution optics are needed for future space-based x-ray telescopes to achieve advances in high-energy astrophysics. Past missions such as Chandra and XMM-Newton have achieved excellent angular resolution using a full shell mirror approach. Other missions such as Suzaku and NuSTAR have achieved lightweight mirrors using a segmented approach. This paper describes a new approach, called meta-shells, which combines the fabrication advantages of segmented optics with the alignment advantages of full shell optics. Meta-shells are built by layering overlapping mirror segments onto a central structural shell. The resulting optic has the stiffness and rotational symmetry of a full shell, but with an order of magnitude greater collecting area. Several meta-shells so constructed can be integrated into a large x-ray mirror assembly by proven methods used for Chandra and XMM-Newton. The mirror segments are mounted to the meta-shell using a novel four point semi-kinematic mount. The four point mount deterministically locates the segment in its most performance sensitive degrees of freedom. Extensive analysis has been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the four point mount and meta-shell approach. A mathematical model of a meta-shell constructed with mirror segments bonded at four points and subject to launch loads has been developed to determine the optimal design parameters, namely bond size, mirror segment span, and number of layers per meta-shell. The parameters of an example 1.3 m diameter mirror assembly are given including the predicted effective area. To verify the mathematical model and support opto-mechanical analysis, a detailed finite element model of a meta-shell was created. Finite element analysis predicts low gravity distortion and low sensitivity to thermal gradients.

  2. A comparison of performance of lightweight mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Myung K.; Richard, Ralph M.; Hileman, Edward A.

    1990-01-01

    Four lightweight solid contoured back mirror shapes (a double arch, a single arch, a modified single arch, and a double concave mirror) and a cellular sandwich lightweight meniscus mirror, have been considered for the primary mirror of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). A parametric design study using these shapes for the SIRTF 40 inch primary mirror with a focal ratio f/2 is presented. Evaluations of the optical performance and fundamental frequency analyses are performed to compare relative merits of each mirror configuration. Included in these are structural, optical, and frequency analyses for (1) different back contour shapes, (2) different number and location of the support points, and (3) two gravity orientations (ZENITH and HORIZON positions). The finite element program NASTRAN is used to obtain the structural deflections of the optical surface. For wavefront error analysis, FRINGE and PCFRINGE programs are used to evaluate the optical performance. A scaling law relating the optical and structural performance for various mirror contoured back shapes is developed.

  3. Towards plasma cleaning of ITER first mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, L.; Marot, L.; Eren, B.; Steiner, R.; Mathys, D.; Leipold, F.; Reichle, R.; Meyer, E.

    2015-06-01

    To avoid reflectivity losses in ITER's optical diagnostic systems, on-site cleaning of metallic first mirrors via plasma sputtering is foreseen to remove deposit build-ups migrating from the main wall. In this work, the influence of aluminium and tungsten deposits on the reflectivity of molybdenum mirrors as well as the possibility to clean them with plasma exposure is investigated. Porous ITER-like deposits are grown to mimic the edge conditions expected in ITER, and a severe degradation in the specular reflectivity is observed as these deposits build up on the mirror surface. In addition, dense oxide films are produced for comparisons with porous films. The composition, morphology and crystal structure of several films were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The cleaning of the deposits and the restoration of the mirrors' optical properties are possible either with a Kaufman source or radio frequency directly applied to the mirror (or radio frequency plasma generated directly around the mirror surface). Accelerating ions of an external plasma source through a direct current applied onto the mirror does not remove deposits composed of oxides. A possible implementation of plasma cleaning in ITER is addressed.

  4. Laser cleaning of ITER's diagnostic mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, C. H.; Gentile, C. A.; Doerner, R.

    2012-10-01

    Practical methods to clean ITER's diagnostic mirrors and restore reflectivity will be critical to ITER's plasma operations. We report on laser cleaning of single crystal molybdenum mirrors coated with either carbon or beryllium films 150 - 420 nm thick. A 1.06 μm Nd laser system provided 220 ns pulses at 8 kHz with typical power densities of 1-2 J/cm^2. The laser beam was fiber optically coupled to a scanner suitable for tokamak applications. The efficacy of mirror cleaning was assessed with a new technique that combines microscopic imaging and reflectivity measurements [1]. The method is suitable for hazardous materials such as beryllium as the mirrors remain sealed in a vacuum chamber. Excellent restoration of reflectivity for the carbon coated Mo mirrors was observed after laser scanning under vacuum conditions. For the beryllium coated mirrors restoration of reflectivity has so far been incomplete and modeling indicates that a shorter duration laser pulse is needed. No damage of the molybdenum mirror substrates was observed.[4pt][1] C.H. Skinner et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. at press.

  5. Compliant deformable mirror approach for wavefront improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, James H.; Penado, F. Ernesto

    2016-04-01

    We describe a compliant static deformable mirror approach to reduce the wavefront concavity at the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI). A single actuator pressing on the back surface of just one of the relay mirrors deforms the front surface in a correcting convex shape. Our design uses the mechanical advantage gained from a force actuator sandwiched between a rear flexure plate and the back surface of the mirror. We superimpose wavefront contour measurements with our finite element deformed mirror model. An example analysis showed improvement from 210-nm concave-concave wavefront to 51-nm concave-concave wavefront. With our present model, a 100-nm actuator increment displaces the mirror surface by 1.1 nm. We describe the need for wavefront improvement that arises from the NPOI reconfigurable array, offer a practical design approach, and analyze the support structure and compliant deformable mirror using the finite element method. We conclude that a 20.3-cm-diameter, 1.9-cm-thick Zerodur® mirror shows that it is possible to deform the reflective surface and cancel out three-fourths of the wavefront deformation without overstressing the material.

  6. A Deployable Primary Mirror for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Phelps, James E.; Dyer, Jack E.; Caudle, David A.; Tam, Anthony; Escobedo, Javier; Kasl, Eldon P.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center, Composite Optics, Inc., and Nyma/ADF have developed jointly a deployable primary mirror for space telescopes that combines over five years of research on deployment of optical-precision structures and over ten years of development of fabrication techniques for optical-precision composite mirror panels and structures. The deployable mirror is directly applicable to a broad class of non-imaging "lidar" (light direction a nd ranging) telescopes whose figure-error requirements are in the range of one to ten microns RMS. Furthermore, the mirror design can be readily modified to accommodate imaging-quality reflector panels and active panel-alignment control mechanisms for application to imaging telescopes. The present paper: 1) describes the deployable mirror concept; 2) explains the status of the mirror development; and 3) provides some technical specifications for a 2.55- m-diameter, proof-of-concept mirror. Keywords: precision deployment, hinge joint, latch joint, deployable structures, fabrication, space telescopes, optical instruments, microdynamics.

  7. Active polishing technology for large aperture aspherical mirror and ultra thin mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xaingqun; Gao, Bilie; Li, Xinnan

    2006-02-01

    Some results on active polishing technology for large aperture aspherical mirrors and ultra thin mirrors, which have been developed in recent years in Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology, CAS, are presented in this paper. There are two polishing methods developed for the large aperture ultra thin mirrors with two different trial mirrors respectively. One is a hexagonal mirror with diagonal size of 1100mm, and thickness of 25mm by no-separate support method specially for polish the sub-mirror of Schmidt corrector of LAMOST, which is a national large scientific project of China. Another is a circular mirror with 1035mm in diameter and 26mm in thickness by active support method. The active stressed polishing technology developed for large aperture aspherical mirror with fast f ratio, and a paraboloidal mirror with a diameter of 910mm and an f ratio 2 as was successfully polished. The computer controlled polishing is also different from the normal way in the system. Some complicated aspects were added. The results showed the final surface accuracy of all these trial mirrors is better than expected requirements for normal application in astronomical telescopes.

  8. Degradation of back surface acrylic mirrors for low concentration and mirror-augmented photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Myles P.; Bruckman, Laura S.; Gordon, Devin; Richardson, Samuel; Reinbolt, Greg; Schuetz, Mark; French, Roger H.

    2012-10-01

    Back-surface acrylic mirrors can be used in low concentration and mirror augmented photovoltaics (LCPV, MAPV) to increase the irradiance on a module. Back-surface mirrors can spectrally filter incoming solar radiation reducing the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) load on the module, while useful radiation is coupled into a module or photovoltaic cell. Degradation of these mirrors can occur from UV induced photodegradative processes and metallization corrosion. Environmental stresses such as humidity, thermal cycling and exposure to corrosive substances can cause an increase in scattering, reducing mirror performance. In order to increase the lifetime and durability of back-surface acrylic mirrors a better understanding of the degradation modes is necessary. In a study of acrylic back-surface mirrors for LCPV and MAPV applications, optical properties and bidirectional scattering distribution functions (BSDF) were investigated and correlated to simulated exposure protocols. Formulations of Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) with differing concentration of UV absorbers were used for the aluminum backsurface acrylic mirrors. The formulations of aluminum back-surface acrylic mirrors were exposed in a QUV accelerated weathering tester (QLabs) to ASTM G154 Cycle 4. Total and diffuse reflectance spectra were measured for each mirror under exposure using a diffuse reflectance accessory (DRA) from 180-1800 nm on a Varian Cary 6000i at defined dose intervals. The total reflectance losses in the 250-400 nm region were greater and diffuse-only reflectance increased for formulations of acrylic mirrors that contained the least amount of UV stabilizer after each dose of QUV exposure. Acrylic back-surface mirrors were exposed to salt fog corrosion and QUV and were analyzed using BSDF. There was an increase in scattering from roughening of the mirror surface after exposure to the corrosive environment.

  9. ZERODUR mirror substrates for solar telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döhring, T.; Jedamzik, R.; Hartmann, P.

    The zero-expansion glass ceramic material, ZERODUR, is well known for nighttime telescope mirror substrates. Also for solar telescopes, ZERODUR is often selected as mirror blank material. Examples are the Swedish 1m Solar Telescope (SST), the balloon-born telescope SUNRISE, and the New Solar Telescope (NST) of the Big Bear Solar Observatory. The properties of ZERODUR are discussed with respect to the special technical requirements of solar observatories, resulting in the conclusion that mirrors made of this glass ceramic material are an excellent choice for solar telescopes.

  10. Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code (Version I)

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.L.; Finn, P.A.; Gohar, M.Y.; Barrett, R.J.; Gorker, G.E.; Spampinaton, P.T.; Bulmer, R.H.; Dorn, D.W.; Perkins, L.J.; Ghose, S.

    1985-09-01

    A computer code was developed to model a Tandem Mirror Reactor. Ths is the first Tandem Mirror Reactor model to couple, in detail, the highly linked physics, magnetics, and neutronic analysis into a single code. This report describes the code architecture, provides a summary description of the modules comprising the code, and includes an example execution of the Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code. Results from this code for two sensitivity studies are also included. These studies are: (1) to determine the impact of center cell plasma radius, length, and ion temperature on reactor cost and performance at constant fusion power; and (2) to determine the impact of reactor power level on cost.

  11. Fine alignment of a large segmented mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dey, Thomas William (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system for aligning a segmented mirror includes a source of radiation directed along a first axis to the segmented mirror and a beamsplitter removably inserted along the first axis for redirecting radiation from the first axis to a second axis, substantially perpendicular to the first axis. An imaging array is positioned along the second axis for imaging the redirected radiation, and a knife-edge configured for cutting the redirected radiation is serially positioned to occlude and not occlude the redirected radiation, effectively providing a variable radiation pattern detected by the imaging array for aligning the segmented mirror.

  12. Mirror Symmetry for Quasi-Homogeneous Singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathnakumara, Himal; Jarvis, Tyler

    2008-10-01

    I will present an introduction to mirror symmetry in the context of string theory. Then I will describe an instance of mirror symmetry for singularties defined by quasi-homogeneous polynomials in weighted projective spaces. Milnor rings and the FJRW (Fan-Jarvis-Ruan-Witten) rings associated with these singularities and their relation to the Landua-Ginzburg A model and the Landua-Ginzburg B model will be explained. Results of the calculations for certain singularities for which the mirror symmetry conjecture has been verified will be presented.

  13. Actuated Hybrid Mirrors for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory; Ealey, Mark; Redding, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes new, large, ultra-lightweight, replicated, actively controlled mirrors, for use in space telescopes. These mirrors utilize SiC substrates, with embedded solid-state actuators, bonded to Nanolaminate metal foil reflective surfaces. Called Actuated Hybrid Mirrors (AHMs), they use replication techniques for high optical quality as well as rapid, low cost manufacturing. They enable an Active Optics space telescope architecture that uses periodic image-based wavefront sensing and control to assure diffraction-limited performance, while relaxing optical system fabrication, integration and test requirements. The proposed International Space Station Observatory seeks to demonstrate this architecture in space.

  14. Particle Deconfinement in a Bent Magnetic Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Renaud Gueroult and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2012-09-06

    Coils misalignment in a magnetic mirror can produce additional particle transport. The magnetic field non axi-symmetry is responsible for radial and longitudinal drifts in a way much similar to the neo-classical transport in a tandem mirror cell distorted by end plugs. Accordingly, a regime exhibiting large radial displacements - similar to the resonant regime in tandem mirrors - can be obtained by confining ions azimuthally, for example by means of a properly tuned radial electric field. Because of the mass dependence of the magnetic field non-homogeneity drift velocities, the azimuthal trapping is mass specific, allowing in principle the filtering of a specific species based on its mass.

  15. Particle deconfinement in a bent magnetic mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Gueroult, Renaud; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2012-11-15

    Coils misalignment in a magnetic mirror can produce additional particle transport. The magnetic field non axi-symmetry is responsible for radial and longitudinal drifts in a way much similar to the neo-classical transport in a tandem mirror cell distorted by end plugs. Accordingly, a regime exhibiting large radial displacements--similar to the resonant regime in tandem mirrors--can be obtained by confining ions azimuthally, for example by means of a properly tuned radial electric field. Because of the mass dependence of the magnetic field non-homogeneity drift velocities, the azimuthal trapping is mass specific, allowing, in principle, the filtering of a specific species based on its mass.

  16. Affect regulation: holding, containing and mirroring.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Signe Holm; Poulsen, Stig; Lunn, Susanne

    2014-10-01

    Gergely and colleagues' state that their "Social Biofeedback Theory of Parental Affect Mirroring" can be seen as a kind of operationalization of the classical psychoanalytic concepts of holding, containing and mirroring. This article examines to what extent the social biofeedback theory of parental affect mirroring may be understood as a specification of these concepts. It is argued that despite similarities at a descriptive level the concepts are embedded in theories with different ideas of subjectivity. Hence an understanding of the concept of affect regulation as a concretization and specification of the classical concepts dilutes the complexity of both the concept of affect regulation and of the classical concepts. PMID:25351730

  17. HCN laser with an adaptive output mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Kamenev, Yu E; Masalov, S A; Filimonova, A A

    2006-09-30

    A device for optimal coupling between a laser resonator and the external medium, having the form of one-dimensional wire grating conjugated with a plane mirror with an aperture, is proposed, developed and tested experimentally. The dependences of the output laser power on the separation between the grating and the mirror, diameter of the aperture in the plane mirror, and the grating period, are studied. The obtained results not only confirm the possibility of using such a coupling device, but also point towards the ways and principles of its application. (lasers)

  18. Enabling materials and processes for large aerospace mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Lawrence E.; Chen, Ming Y.

    2008-07-01

    The use of monolithic glass to produce large, rigid segmented members for lightweight space-based mirror systems appears to have reached its limits due to the long production lead times, high processing costs, and launch load/weight requirements. New material solutions and processes are required to meet the US Air Force's optical needs for directed energy, reconnaissance/surveillance, and communications. Mirror structural substrates made out of advanced materials (metal, ceramic, and polymer), composites, foams, and microsphere arrays should allow for CTE and modulus tailorability, low-density, and high values in strength, stiffness, thermal conductivity and toughness. Conventional mechanical polishing to visual specifications for figure and surface finish roughness requirements will be difficult, due to the multi-phase complexities of these new systems. Advances in surface removal technologies as well as replication processes will be required to produce the required optical finishes with reduced schedule and cost. In this paper selected material and process solutions being considered will be discussed.

  19. Scaling laws for light weight optics, studies of light weight mirrors mounting and dynamic mirror stress, and light weight mirror and mount designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukobratovich, Daniel; Richard, Ralph M.; Valente, Tina M.; Cho, Myung K.

    1990-01-01

    Scaling laws for light-weight optical systems are examined. A cubic relationship between mirror diameter and weight has been suggested and used by many designers of optical systems as the best description for all light-weight mirrors. A survey of existing light-weight systems in the open literature was made to clarify this issue. Fifty existing optical systems were surveyed with all varieties of light-weight mirrors including glass and beryllium structured mirrors, contoured mirrors, and very thin solid mirrors. These mirrors were then categorized and weight to diameter ratio was plotted to find a best curve for each case. A best fitting curve program tests nineteen different equations and ranks a goodness-to-fit for each of these equations. The resulting relationship found for each light-weight mirror category helps to quantify light-weight optical systems and methods of fabrication and provides comparisons between mirror types.

  20. A low-cost mirror mount control system for optics setups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Maithreyi; Gühr, Markus

    2015-02-01

    We describe a flexible, simple to build, low-cost, and computer-controlled optical mirror actuator system, developed for undergraduate research laboratories. Geared motors for hobby robotics are controlled by an Arduino microcontroller in combination with an H bridge to finely position mirror mount actuators. We present a graphical user interface based on the Python script language. The price of the fully controlled actuator system is only a small fraction of the price of a commercial system. It can be quickly implemented due to the use of open-hardware electronics. We discuss the performance of the system and give an outlook for future expansions and use in advanced optical setups.

  1. Auditory–vocal mirroring in songbirds

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Mirror neurons are theorized to serve as a neural substrate for spoken language in humans, but the existence and functions of auditory–vocal mirror neurons in the human brain remain largely matters of speculation. Songbirds resemble humans in their capacity for vocal learning and depend on their learned songs to facilitate courtship and individual recognition. Recent neurophysiological studies have detected putative auditory–vocal mirror neurons in a sensorimotor region of the songbird's brain that plays an important role in expressive and receptive aspects of vocal communication. This review discusses the auditory and motor-related properties of these cells, considers their potential role on song learning and communication in relation to classical studies of birdsong, and points to the circuit and developmental mechanisms that may give rise to auditory–vocal mirroring in the songbird's brain. PMID:24778375

  2. Wind responses of the LSST secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myung K.; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos; Sebag, Jacques; Neill, Douglas R.

    2012-09-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) optical design calls for a large annular 3.4 m diameter meniscus convex aspheric Secondary Mirror (M2). The M2 has a mass of approximately 1.5 metric tons and the optimized mirror support system consists of 72 axial actuators, mounted at the mirror back surface, and 6 tangent link lateral supports mounted around the outer edge. A fully integrated M2 Finite Element Model (FEM) including the mirror and the support systems has been developed to investigate the performance of the M2 assembly and to determine the image degradation due to dynamic wind loading. Detailed wind response analysis was performed based on the input from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. Image quality calculations of the time history responses and Power Spectrum Density (PSD) are addressed.

  3. Distortion compensation in interferometric testing of mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Brian M.; Reardon, Patrick J

    2009-01-20

    We present a method to compensate for the imaging distortion encountered in interferometric testing of mirrors, which is introduced by interferometer optics as well as from geometric projection errors. Our method involves placing a mask, imprinted with a regular square grid, over the mirror and finding a transformation that relates the grid coordinates to coordinates in the base plane of the parent surface. This method can be used on finished mirrors since no fiducials have to be applied to the surfaces. A critical step in the process requires that the grid coordinates be projected onto the mirror base plane before the regression is performed. We apply the method successfully during a center-of-curvature null test of an F/2 off-axis paraboloid.

  4. Coating considerations for mirrors of CPV devices

    SciTech Connect

    Schmauder, Torsten; Sauer, Peter; Ickes, Gerd

    2014-09-26

    One of the different optical concepts for concentrator devices is to place a focussing primary mirror behind a transparent front plate. In addition (also in case of Fresnel-diffractive main optics), further 'secondary' reflectors may be used further along the beam path. Such mirrors are usually implemented as coating stacks of a highly reflective metal - usually silver - and protective layers. The protective layers are preferably designed as reflection enhancing interference stack. The design of such protective layer stacks yields two difficulties, which are addressed in this paper: (a) vacuum coating of three-dimensional parts will result in a thickness distribution and the optical design of the stack should thus be tolerant to layer thickness variations, and (b) different places of the mirror will have different angle-of-incidence of the sunlight under operating conditions. As result, the layer stack has a different design at different places of the mirror.

  5. Cold atom reflection from curved magnetic mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Ifan G.; Barton, P. A.; Boshier, M. G.; Hinds, Edward A.

    1997-05-01

    Multiple bounces of cold rubidium atoms have been observed for times up to one second in a trap formed by gravity and a 2 cm-diameter spherical mirror made from a sinusoidally magnetized floppy disk. We have studied the dynamics of the atoms bouncing in this trap from several different heights up to 40.5 mm and we conclude that the atoms are reflected specularly and with reflectivity 1.01(3). Slight roughness of the mirror is caused by harmonics in the magnetization of the surface and by discontinuities at the boundaries between recorded tracks. As the next step in this atom optics program we propose using a magnetic mirror to create a 2D atomic gas. We discuss how cold atoms can be loaded into the ground state of a static magnetic potential well that exists above the surface of the mirror as a consequence of the intermediate-field Zeeman effect.

  6. Cryostable lightweight frit-bonded silicon mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Frank M.; McCarter, Douglas R.; Tangedahl, Matt; Content, David A.

    2002-11-01

    The excellent polishability, low density and relatively high stiffness of silicon make it an attractive candidate for optical applications that require superior performance. Assembly of silicon details by means of glass frit bonding permits significant weight reduction thus enhancing the benefit of silicon mirrors. To demonstrate the performance potential, a small lightweight glass frit bonded silicon mirror was fabricated and tested for cryostability. The test mirror was 12.5cm in diameter with a 60cm spherical radius and a maximum thickness, at the perimeter, of 2.5cm. A machined silicon core was used to stiffen the two face sheets of the silicon sandwich. These three elements were assembled, by glass frit bonding, to form the substrate that was polished. The experimental evaluation, in a liquid nitrogen cryostat, demonstrated cryostability performance significantly better than required by the mirror specification.

  7. Lessons learned in recent beryllium mirror fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, J. A.; Lombard, C. M.; Sloan, G. B.; Moore, W. W.; Martin, C. E.

    1991-09-01

    The lessons learned in recent fabrication of beryllium mirrors could have a significant impact on how beryllium optics of the future are produced. This paper provides an overview of the latest techniques for beryllium optics fabrication and a comparison of the results achieved. Specific technical ureas discussed include: new beryllium powders, results of consolidation, beryllium material property improvements, modified machining procedures, thermal stabilization, single point turning, burnishing techniques, replica faceplates, support structure bonding, mirror superpolishing, and new optical testing techniques.

  8. Novel technologies for small deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, Mel; Myers, Richard; Cooke, Kevin; Hampshire, Joanne; Hough, Jim; Rowan, Sheila; van Veggel, Marielle; Kirk, Katherine; Hutson, David; Uzgur, Erman; Kim, Shin-Sung

    2010-07-01

    Adaptive optic requirements for instrumentation such as EAGLE for the European extremely large telescope present an enormous challenge to deformable mirror technology. We have developed a unique approach using fabricated arrays of multilayer actuator technology to address the requirements of actuator density and deflection. Our programme of work has uncovered a novel approach which has led to a built in test capability. We will present the outcomes of our work which we believe will lead to a compact deformable mirror.

  9. Experimental study of solar simulator mirror cryocontamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galjaev, V. L.; Makarov, A. A.; Afanassiev, N. A.

    1994-01-01

    The background and tasks formulation of the study of Solar Simulator collimation mirror cryocontamination in Large Thermal Vacuum Facility are outlined, research methods and experiment procedures are described, experimental relationships obtained are analyzed and practical recommendations are given. The accepted procedure of thermal vacuum tests as a rule defines the sequence of operations for verifying the spacecraft under test without taking into account measures for preventing Solar Simulator collimation mirror contamination and degradation. On the other hand, evacuation procedures is defined for conditions of achieving the required vacuum in the shortest possible time with using the available evacuation equipment at a regime close to the optimum one. Similarly, cryopanel cooling down cyclogram and test object preparation process are not analyzed from the viewpoint of ways of reducing environmental detrimental effects on thermal vacuum facility contamination-sensitive systems. Solar Simulator mirror contamination and its reflective characteristics change results in degradation of solar flux parameters and reduction of simulator continuous operation time. Methods of consideration of optical effects due to mirror surface contamination are actually missing. The effects themselves are not quite understood and data cited in literature as a rule, were obtained under conditions different from real thermal vacuum facility and therefore should be subjected to additional experimental verification. Only in the last few years contamination effect on optical surfaces degradation has been considered with using empirical relations. Mirror reflective properties degradation leads to the increase of Solar Simulator errors. This ultimately has an adverse effect on S/C ground development, schedule and cost of thermal vacuum tests. Besides, the mirror maintenance in operable state becomes more expensive. The present paper is dedicated to the study of Solar Simulator collimation

  10. Motorized control for mirror mount apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1989-01-01

    A motorized control and automatic braking system for adjusting mirror mount apparatus is disclosed. The motor control includes a planetary gear arrangement to provide improved pitch adjustment capability while permitting a small packaged design. The motor control for mirror mount adjustment is suitable for laser beam propagation applications. The brake is a system of constant contact, floating detents which engage the planetary gear at selected between-teeth increments to stop rotation instantaneously when the drive motor stops.

  11. Anesthetic management of maternal Mirror syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tayler, E; DeSimone, C

    2014-11-01

    Mirror syndrome (Ballantyne syndrome, triple edema, maternal hydrops, pseudotoxemia) is a rarely diagnosed condition associated with pregnancy that can be life-threatening for both the mother and fetus. There is limited literature on its pathogenesis and anesthetic management, making prevention and treatment complex. The duration of pregnancy and severity of maternal or fetal presentation often determines outcome. We describe the anesthetic considerations of a morbidly obese parturient with Mirror syndrome. PMID:25066819

  12. Mirror therapy for phantom limb pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sae Young; Kim, Yun Young

    2012-10-01

    Phantom limb pain is a painful sensation that is perceived in a body part that no longer exists. To control this pain, many methods have been used such as medication, physical treatment, nerve block, neuromodulation, surgical treatment and mirror therapy. However, until now, there effects have been uncertain. We report the successful reduction of phantom limb pain using mirror therapy when other treatments initially failed to control the pain. PMID:23091690

  13. 49 CFR 571.111 - Standard No. 111; Rearview mirrors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... mirror that reflect images, excluding the mirror rim or mounting brackets. Unit magnification mirror... image of an object is equal to the angular height and width of the object when viewed directly at the... WHILE BUS IS MOVING. IMAGES IN SUCH MIRRORS DO NOT ACCURATELY SHOW ANOTHER VEHICLE'S LOCATION.”...

  14. 49 CFR 571.111 - Standard No. 111; Rearview mirrors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... mirror that reflect images, excluding the mirror rim or mounting brackets. Unit magnification mirror... image of an object is equal to the angular height and width of the object when viewed directly at the... WHILE BUS IS MOVING. IMAGES IN SUCH MIRRORS DO NOT ACCURATELY SHOW ANOTHER VEHICLE'S LOCATION.”...

  15. The Dizzying Depths of the Cylindrical Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWeerd, Alan J.; Hill, S. Eric

    2005-02-01

    A typical introduction to geometrical optics treats plane and spherical mirrors. At first glance, it may be surprising that texts seldom mention the cylindrical mirror, except for the occasional reference to use in fun houses and to viewing anamorphic art.1,2 However, even a cursory treatment reveals its complexity. Holzberlein used an extended object to qualitatively illustrate that images are produced both before and behind a concave cylindrical mirror.3 He also speculated on how this extreme astigmatism results in an observer's dizziness. By considering a simple point object, we make a more detailed analysis of the cylindrical mirror and the dizziness it induces. First, we illustrate how rays from a point object reflect to form not one point image but two line images. Next, we describe how an observer perceives a likeness of the object. Finally, we suggest how confusing depth cues induce dizziness. Although we focus on the concave cylindrical mirror, the discussion is easy to generalize to the convex cylindrical mirror.

  16. Development of CFRP mirrors for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Shin; Kamiya, Tomohiro; Shimizu, Ryuzo

    2013-09-01

    CFRP (Caron fiber reinforced plastics) have superior properties of high specific elasticity and low thermal expansion for satellite telescope structures. However, difficulties to achieve required surface accuracy and to ensure stability in orbit have discouraged CFRP application as main mirrors. We have developed ultra-light weight and high precision CFRP mirrors of sandwich structures composed of CFRP skins and CFRP cores using a replica technique. Shape accuracy of the demonstrated mirrors of 150 mm in diameter was 0.8 μm RMS (Root Mean Square) and surface roughness was 5 nm RMS as fabricated. Further optimization of fabrication process conditions to improve surface accuracy was studied using flat sandwich panels. Then surface accuracy of the flat CFRP sandwich panels of 150 mm square was improved to flatness of 0.2 μm RMS with surface roughness of 6 nm RMS. The surface accuracy vs. size of trial models indicated high possibility of fabrication of over 1m size mirrors with surface accuracy of 1μm. Feasibility of CFRP mirrors for low temperature applications was examined for JASMINE project as an example. Stability of surface accuracy of CFRP mirrors against temperature and moisture was discussed.

  17. Evaluation of microfabricated deformable mirror systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, William D.; Lee, Max K.; Bright, Victor M.; Welsh, Byron M.

    1998-09-01

    This paper presents recent result for aberration correction and beam steering experiments using polysilicon surface micromachined piston micromirror arrays. Microfabricated deformable mirrors offer a substantial cost reduction for adaptive optic systems. In addition to the reduced mirror cost, microfabricated mirrors typically require low control voltages, thus eliminating high voltage amplifiers. The greatly reduced cost per channel of adaptive optic systems employing microfabricated deformable mirrors promise high order aberration correction at low cost. Arrays of piston micromirrors with 128 active elements were tested. Mirror elements are on a 203 micrometers 12 by 12 square grid. The overall array size is 2.4 mm square. The arrays were fabricated in the commercially available DARPA supported MUMPs surface micromachining foundry process. The cost per mirror array in this prototyping process is less than 200 dollars. Experimental results are presented for a hybrid correcting element comprised of a lenslet array and piston micromirror array, and for a piston micromirror array only. Also presented is a novel digital deflection micromirror which requires no digital to analog converters, further reducing the cost of adaptive optics system.

  18. Development of Nanolaminate Thin Shell Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.

    2002-12-01

    The space science community has identified a need for ultra-light weight, large aperture optical systems that are capable of producing high-resolution images of low contrast. Current mirror technologies are limited due either to not being scalable to larger sizes at reasonable masses, or to lack of surface finish, dimensional stability in a space environment or long fabrication times. This paper will discuss the development of thin-shell, nano-laminate mirror substrates that are capable of being electro-actively figured. This technology has the potential to substantially reduce the cost of space based optics by allowing replication of ultra-lightweight primary mirrors from a master precision tool. Precision master tools have been shown to be used multiple times with repeatable surface quality results with less than one week fabrication times for the primary optical mirror substrate. Current development has developed a series of 0.25 and 0.5 meter spherical nanolaminate mirrors that are less than 0.5 kg/m2 areal density before electroactive components are mounted, and a target of less than 2.0 kg/m with control elements. This paper will provide an overview of nanolaminate materials for optical mirrors, modeling of their behavior under figure control and experiments conducted to validate precision control.

  19. Aspheric mirror measurement based on fringe reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xianyu; Tang, Yan; Liu, Yuankun; Zhang, Qican; Xiang, Liqun

    2009-05-01

    The aspheric mirror can correct aberrations and improve imaging quality of optical system . M oreover using such mirror can reduce the num ber of optical elem ents in an optical system and further reduce the weight and size of the system . In order to improve the accuracy of aspheric mirror fabrication, there are many methods used to m easure aspheric mirror. Am ong these methods, the most popular one is interferom etry which can m easure the surface with very high accuracy. However, interferom etry commonly requires com plicated and expensive assistant optics, and its m easurem ent range is limited. In order to measure aspheric mirror conveniently and effectively, we further evolve the well know n approaches of 'Phase M easuring Deflectom ety'(PM D) to measure such surface. In this study, we present a novel m ethod based on fringe reflection to m easure aspheric m irror. In the m easurem ent process, the screen and the cam era are m oved along the mirror optical axis, respectively. Using the phase information of the recording fringe patterns, for each cam era pixel, we can calculate the slope and coordinate of its corresponding point on the surface to be tested. By integrating, the absolute height of the tested surface can be reconstructed. Com pared with traditional PM D, this m ethod can m easure the absolute height of an aspheric m irror unam biguously and doesn't need com plex calibration.

  20. Grazing Optical Polishing: a Fast and Efficient Technique for Making Lightweight Sub- Arc-Second X-ray Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, William

    -ray images. The existence and availability of these mirrors will stimulate competition and collaboration in our community to develop corresponding alignment and integration techniques. The combination of the excellent mirrors and an integration process, together with good detector technology, will extend the current golden age of x-ray astronomy and advance it into the 2020’s and beyond.

  1. Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Biwer, C.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, Sukanta; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Buonanno, A.; Cadonati, L.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chen, Y.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Collette, C.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; D´ıaz, M.; Di Palma, I.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferreira, E. C.; Fisher, R. P.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gaonkar, S.; Gehrels, N.; Gergely, L. Á.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Hee, S.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lormand, M.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meadors, G. D.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, J. D.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second-generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA, USA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in Initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than Initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid and high frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

  2. Mirror thermal noise in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Shanti Raja

    2003-12-01

    The LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) project has begun its search for gravitational waves, and efforts are being made to improve its ability to detect these. The LIGO observatories are long, Fabry-Perot-Michelson interferometers, where the interferometer mirrors are also the gravitational wave test masses. LIGO is designed to detect the ripples in spacetime caused by cataclysmic astrophysical events, with a target gravitational wave minimum strain sensitivity of 4 × 10-22 [7] around 100 Hz. The Advanced LIGO concept [57] calls for an order of magnitude improvement in strain sensitivity, with a better signal to noise ratio to increase the rate of detection of events. Some of Advanced LIGO's major requirements are improvements over the LIGO design for thermal noise in the test mass substrates and reflective coatings [57]. Thermal noise in the interferometer mirrors is a significant challenge in LIGO's development. This thesis reviews the theory of test mass thermal noise and reports on several experiments conducted to understand this theory. Experiments to measure the thermal expansion of mirror substrates and coatings use the photothermal effect in a cross-polarized Fabry-Perot interferometer, with displacement sensitivity of 10-15m/rHz. Data are presented from 10 Hz to 4 kHz on solid aluminum, and on sapphire, BK7, and fused silica, with and without commercial TiO2/SiO2 dielectric mirror coatings. The substrate contribution to thermal expansion is compared to theories by Cerdonio et al. [32] and Braginsky, Vyatchanin, and Gorodetsky [22]. New theoretical models are presented for estimating the coating contribution to the thermal expansion. These results can also provide insight into how heat flows between coatings and substrates relevant to predicting coating thermoelastic noise [26, 108]. The Thermal Noise Interferometer (TNI) project is a interferometer built specifically to study thermal noise, and this thesis describes its

  3. Performance of a magnetic driven tip-tilt mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinato, Jacopo; Esposito, Simone; Marchetti, Enrico; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Bruns, Donald G.

    1997-03-01

    ThermoTrex Corporation has designed and built a prototype of the fast steering mirror to be used for image motion control in the TNG adaptive optics system. The principal characteristic of this mirror is the use of voice coil actuators whose positions are controlled with closed loops based on capacitive sensors. Here we report the main features of the mirror assembly and laboratory measurements done to characterize the mirror behavior. The Bode diagram of the mirror is reported and discussed.

  4. Spontaneous mirror-symmetry breaking in coupled photonic-crystal nanolasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, Philippe; Haddadi, Samir; Raineri, Fabrice; Monnier, Paul; Beaudoin, Gregoire; Sagnes, Isabelle; Levenson, Ariel; Yacomotti, Alejandro M.

    2015-05-01

    Multi-cavity photonic systems, also known as photonic molecules, exhibit multi-well potentials that may prove useful for advanced quantum and nonlinear optics. A key phenomenon arising in double-well potentials is the spontaneous breaking of inversion symmetry, with a transition to two localized states in the wells, which are mirror images of each other. Although a few theoretical studies have addressed mirror-symmetry breaking in micro- and nanophotonic systems, no experimental evidence has been reported to date. Here, we demonstrate spontaneous mirror-symmetry breaking through a pitchfork bifurcation in a photonic molecule composed of two coupled photonic-crystal nanolasers. The coexistence of localized states is shown by switching them with short pulses. This offers exciting prospects for the realization of ultra-compact, integrated, scalable optical flip-flops. Analysis suggests that such symmetry breaking should be possible with a small number of intracavity photons and is thus suitable for quantum correlation devices.

  5. High-speed miniaturized swept sources based on resonant MEMS mirrors and diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloor, S.; Bachmann, A. H.; Epitaux, M.; von Niederhäusern, T.; Vorreau, P.; Matuschek, N.; Hsu, K.; Duelk, M.; Vélez, C.

    2013-03-01

    We show a broad range of swept source performances based on a highly-flexible external cavity laser architecture. Specifically, we demonstrate a 40-kHz 1300-nm swept source with 10 mm coherence length realized in a compact butterfly package. Fast wavelength sweeping is achieved through a 1D 20-kHz MEMS mirror in combination with an advanced diffraction grating. The MEMS mirror is a resonant electrostatic mirror that performs harmonic oscillation only within a narrow frequency range, resulting in low-jitter and long-term phase-stable sinusoidal bidirectional sweep operation with an A-scan rate of 40 kHz. The source achieves a coherence length of 10 mm for both the up- and downsweep and an OCT sensitivity of 105 dB.

  6. A novel collinear optical system with annulus mirrors for holographic disc driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ye

    2008-12-01

    This paper focus on a novel collinear lens system with annulus mirrors for holographic disc driver, both information beam and reference beam are use same laser beam. The expanded and parallel laser beam, center part of it as the information beam then through Fourier transform lens, the beam around center part as a reference beam. On this axis, the ring reference beam reflected by two annulus shaped mirrors, then became a convergent beam, together with the information beam which through the first Fourier transform lens then produce holographic pattern to be write into the holographic disc behind of them, this lens system with two mirrors made the angle between information beam and reference beam more wide, can improved the multiplex level of holographic storage. Pair of Fourier transform lens with advance performance is designed in this paper.

  7. The testing of the aspheric mirror high-frequency band error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, JinLong; Li, Bo; Li, XinNan

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, high frequency errors of mirror surface are taken seriously gradually. In manufacturing process of advanced telescope, there is clear indicator about high frequency errors. However, the sub-mirror off-axis aspheric telescope used is large. If uses the full aperture interferometers shape measurement, you need to use complex optical compensation device. Therefore, we propose a method to detect non-spherical lens based on the high-frequency stitching errors. This method does not use compensation components, only to measure Aperture sub-surface shape. By analyzing Zernike polynomial coefficients corresponding to the frequency errors, removing the previous 15 Zernike polynomials, then joining the surface shape, you can get full bore inside tested mirror high-frequency errors. 330mm caliber off-axis aspherical hexagon are measured with this method, obtain a complete face type of high-frequency surface errors and the feasibility of the approach.

  8. Short focal length Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors for a hard x-ray nanoprobe

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wenjun; Ice, Gene E.; Tischler, Jonathan Z.; Khounsary, Ali; Liu, Chian; Assoufid, Lahsen; Macrander, Albert T.

    2005-11-15

    We describe progress in the fabrication of short-focal-length total-external-reflection Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray mirrors with ultralow figure errors. The short focal length optics produce nanoscale beams (<100 nm) on conventional ({approx}64 m long) beamlines at third generation synchrotron sources. The total-external reflection optics are inherently achromatic and efficiently focus a white (polychromatic) or a tunable monochromatic spectrum of x rays. The ability to focus independent of wavelength allows novel new experimental capabilities. Mirrors have been fabricated both by computer assisted profiling (differential polishing) and by profile coating (coating through a mask onto ultra-smooth surfaces). A doubly focused 85x95 nm{sup 2} hard x-ray nanobeam has been obtained on the UNICAT beamline 34-ID at the Advanced Photon Source. The performance of the mirrors, techniques for characterizing the spot size, and factors limiting focusing performance are discussed.

  9. Short Focal Length Kirkpatrick-Baez Mirrors for a Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenjun; Ice, Gene E; Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Khounsary, Ali; Liu, Chian; Assoufid, Lahsen; Macrander, Albert T.

    2005-01-01

    We describe progress in the fabrication of short-focal-length total-external-reflection Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray mirrors with ultralow figure errors. The short focal length optics produce nanoscale beams (<100 nm) on conventional ({approx} 64 m long) beamlines at third generation synchrotron sources. The total-external reflection optics are inherently achromatic and efficiently focus a white (polychromatic) or a tunable monochromatic spectrum of x rays. The ability to focus independent of wavelength allows novel new experimental capabilities. Mirrors have been fabricated both by computer assisted profiling (differential polishing) and by profile coating (coating through a mask onto ultra-smooth surfaces). A doubly focused 85 x 95 nm{sup 2} hard x-ray nanobeam has been obtained on the UNICAT beamline 34-ID at the Advanced Photon Source. The performance of the mirrors, techniques for characterizing the spot size, and factors limiting focusing performance are discussed.

  10. Two-foci bendable mirrors for the ALS MAESTRO beamline: design and metrology characterization and optimal tuning of the mirror benders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemiev, Nikolay A.; Chow, Ken P.; Merthe, Daniel J.; Rotenberg, Eli; Takakuwa, Jeffrey H.; Warwick, Tony; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2013-09-01

    MAESTRO, the Microscopic and Electronic STRucture Observatory, currently under construction at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), will be a world premier facility for the study of electronic and structural properties of in situ grown crystals. The new facility will be comprised of several end-stations, including angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, μARPES and nARPES end-stations, and a photoemission electron microscope combined with a lowenergy electron microscope (PEEM/LEEM). Redirection of the x-ray beam between the μARPES and PEEM/LEEM end-stations, which are longitudinally separated by 2.5 meters, uses a system of two bendable mirrors, placed in Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration designed for two foci. Here we present the details of the mirrors' design and report on the characterization of the mirrors carried out at the ALS X-ray optical laboratory (XROL). Optimal tuning and calibration of the mirrors was performed using a technique recently developed at the OML [Opt. Eng. 48(8), 083601 (2009)]. The technique is based on regression analysis of surface slope data obtained with a long trace profiler (LTP). We provide results of tests of temporal and temperature stabilities of the shape of the mirrors. High reliability of the optical metrology with the mirrors has become possible due to a modification of the tuning procedure described in the present article. The modification allows accounting for the gravity sag effect, as well as the LTP systematic error in measurements with significantly curved x-ray optics.

  11. Advanced Adaptive Optics Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2001-09-18

    The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

  12. Effects of action observation on corticospinal excitability: Muscle specificity, direction, and timing of the mirror response.

    PubMed

    Naish, Katherine R; Houston-Price, Carmel; Bremner, Andrew J; Holmes, Nicholas P

    2014-11-01

    Many human behaviours and pathologies have been attributed to the putative mirror neuron system, a neural system that is active during both the observation and execution of actions. While there are now a very large number of papers on the mirror neuron system, variations in the methods and analyses employed by researchers mean that the basic characteristics of the mirror response are not clear. This review focuses on three important aspects of the mirror response, as measured by modulations in corticospinal excitability: (1) muscle specificity; (2) direction; and (3) timing of modulation. We focus mainly on electromyographic (EMG) data gathered following single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), because this method provides precise information regarding these three aspects of the response. Data from paired-pulse TMS paradigms and peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) are also considered when we discuss the possible mechanisms underlying the mirror response. In this systematic review of the literature, we examine the findings of 85 TMS and PNS studies of the human mirror response, and consider the limitations and advantages of the different methodological approaches these have adopted in relation to discrepancies between their findings. We conclude by proposing a testable model of how action observation modulates corticospinal excitability in humans. Specifically, we propose that action observation elicits an early, non-specific facilitation of corticospinal excitability (at around 90ms from action onset), followed by a later modulation of activity specific to the muscles involved in the observed action (from around 200ms). Testing this model will greatly advance our understanding of the mirror mechanism and provide a more stable grounding on which to base inferences about its role in human behaviour. PMID:25281883

  13. Optical Performance Modeling of FUSE Telescope Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Friedman, Scott D.; Moos, H. Warren

    2000-01-01

    We describe the Metrology Data Processor (METDAT), the Optical Surface Analysis Code (OSAC), and their application to the image evaluation of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) mirrors. The FUSE instrument - designed and developed by the Johns Hopkins University and launched in June 1999 is an astrophysics satellite which provides high resolution spectra (lambda/Delta(lambda) = 20,000 - 25,000) in the wavelength region from 90.5 to 118.7 nm The FUSE instrument is comprised of four co-aligned, normal incidence, off-axis parabolic mirrors, four Rowland circle spectrograph channels with holographic gratings, and delay line microchannel plate detectors. The OSAC code provides a comprehensive analysis of optical system performance, including the effects of optical surface misalignments, low spatial frequency deformations described by discrete polynomial terms, mid- and high-spatial frequency deformations (surface roughness), and diffraction due to the finite size of the aperture. Both normal incidence (traditionally infrared, visible, and near ultraviolet mirror systems) and grazing incidence (x-ray mirror systems) systems can be analyzed. The code also properly accounts for reflectance losses on the mirror surfaces. Low frequency surface errors are described in OSAC by using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence mirrors and Legendre-Fourier polynomials for grazing incidence mirrors. The scatter analysis of the mirror is based on scalar scatter theory. The program accepts simple autocovariance (ACV) function models or power spectral density (PSD) models derived from mirror surface metrology data as input to the scatter calculation. The end product of the program is a user-defined pixel array containing the system Point Spread Function (PSF). The METDAT routine is used in conjunction with the OSAC program. This code reads in laboratory metrology data in a normalized format. The code then fits the data using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence

  14. Progress at the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Steve C.; Nagel, Robert H.; Harvey, David A.; Brar, A.; Phillips, B.; Ray, J.; Trebisky, T. J.; Cromwell, Richard H.; Woolf, Neville J.; Corbally, Chris; Boyle, R.; Blanco, Daniel R.; Otten, L.

    1997-03-01

    The Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope incorporates a fast (f/1.0) borosilicate honeycomb primary mirror and an f/0.9 secondary in an aplanatic Gregorian optical configuration. We provide a brief technical and performance overview by describing the optical layout, the primary and secondary mirror systems, and the telescope drive and control system. Results from a high resolution wavefront sensor and a current wide-field image taken at the f/9 focus demonstrates the overall fine performance of the telescope.

  15. Dual-use bimorph deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, M. S.; Laycock, L. C.; Bagshaw, J. M.; Rowe, D.

    2005-11-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) is a critical underpinning technology for future optical countermeasures, laser delivery, target illumination and imaging systems. It measures and compensates for optical distortion caused by transmission through the atmosphere, resulting in the ability to deploy smaller lasers and identify targets at greater ranges. AO is also well established in ground based astronomy, and is finding applications in free space optical communications and ophthalmology. One of the key components in an AO system is the wavefront modifier, which acts on the incoming or outgoing beam to counter the effects of the atmosphere. BAE SYSTEMS ATC is developing multi-element Deformable Bimorph Mirrors (DBMs) for such applications. A traditional bimorph deformable mirror uses a set of edge electrodes outside the active area in order to meet the required boundary conditions for the active aperture. This inflicts a significant penalty in terms of bandwidth, which is inversely proportional to the square of the full mirror diameter. We have devised a number of novel mounting arrangements that reduce dead space and thus provide a much improved trade-off between bandwidth and stroke. These schemes include a novel method for providing vertical displacement at the periphery of the aperture, a method for providing a continuous compliant support underneath the bimorph mirror, and a method for providing a three point support underneath the bimorph. In all three cases, there is no requirement for edge electrodes to provide the boundary conditions, resulting in devices of much higher bandwidth. The target is to broaden the use of these types of mirror beyond the current limits of either low order/low bandwidth, to address the high order, high bandwidth systems required by long range, horizontal path applications. This paper will discuss the different mirror designs, and present experimental results for the most recently assembled mirrors.

  16. Compensation of X-ray mirror shape-errors using refractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawhney, Kawal; Laundy, David; Dhamgaye, Vishal; Pape, Ian

    2016-08-01

    Focusing of X-rays to nanometre scale focal spots requires high precision X-ray optics. For nano-focusing mirrors, height errors in the mirror surface retard or advance the X-ray wavefront and after propagation to the focal plane, this distortion of the wavefront causes blurring of the focus resulting in a limit on the spatial resolution. We describe here the implementation of a method for correcting the wavefront that is applied before a focusing mirror using custom-designed refracting structures which locally cancel out the wavefront distortion from the mirror. We demonstrate in measurements on a synchrotron radiation beamline a reduction in the size of the focal spot of a characterized test mirror by a factor of greater than 10 times. This technique could be used to correct existing synchrotron beamline focusing and nanofocusing optics providing a highly stable wavefront with low distortion for obtaining smaller focus sizes. This method could also correct multilayer or focusing crystal optics allowing larger numerical apertures to be used in order to reduce the diffraction limited focal spot size.

  17. Optimizing the frequency response of a steering mirror mount for interferometry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penado, F. Ernesto; Clark, James H., III

    2009-08-01

    The Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI) in Flagstaff, Arizona, makes use of separate smaller telescopes spaced along a Y-array and used simultaneously to simulate an equivalent single large telescope. The performance of the NPOI can be improved by increasing the steering response of the 8-in. diameter Narrow Angle Tracker (NAT). The mirrors of the NAT correct the image position for atmospherically induced motion. The current tracker has a slow response due to the low fundamental frequency of the mount and limits the quality of the data. A higher frequency will allow a faster servo feedback to the steering mirror, which will enhance the tracking performance on stellar objects resulting in final fringe data of higher quality. Also, additional and fainter objects could be observed with a faster response system, and the interferometer as a whole would be less sensitive to fluctuations in atmospheric quality. Improvements in the NAT performance over the current cast aluminum frame and glass mirror were achieved by the use of advanced composite materials in the design of the frame and mirror. Various design possibilities were evaluated using finite element analysis. It was found that the natural frequency of the NAT can be increased from 68 to 217 Hz, and the corresponding weight decreased by a factor of 5.6, by using a composite mount with a composite mirror.

  18. Space Active Optics: toward optimized correcting mirrors for future large spaceborne observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, Marie; Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc; Lemaitre, Gérard; Liotard, Arnaud

    2011-10-01

    Wave-front correction in optical instruments is often needed, either to compensate Optical Path Differences, off-axis aberrations or mirrors deformations. Active optics techniques are developed to allow efficient corrections with deformable mirrors. In this paper, we will present the conception of particular deformation systems which could be used in space telescopes and instruments in order to improve their performances while allowing relaxing specifications on the global system stability. A first section will be dedicated to the design and performance analysis of an active mirror specifically designed to compensate for aberrations that might appear in future 3m-class space telescopes, due to lightweight primary mirrors, thermal variations or weightless conditions. A second section will be dedicated to a brand new design of active mirror, able to compensate for given combinations of aberrations with a single actuator. If the aberrations to be corrected in an instrument and their evolutions are known in advance, an optimal system geometry can be determined thanks to the elasticity theory and Finite Element Analysis.

  19. Is that me in the mirror? Depersonalisation modulates tactile mirroring mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Adler, Julia; Schabinger, Nadine; Michal, Matthias; Beutel, Manfred E; Gillmeister, Helge

    2016-05-01

    Our sense of self is thought to develop through sensory-motor contingencies provided, not only by observing one's own body, but also by mirroring interactions with others. This suggests that there is a strong link between mirroring mechanisms and the bodily self. The present study tested whether this link is expressed at early, implicit stages of the mirroring process or at later, more cognitive stages. We also provide, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of how inter-individual differences in our sense of bodily self may affect mirroring mechanisms. We used somatosensory event-related potentials (SEPs) to investigate the temporal dynamics of mirroring highly self-related information (viewed touch on one's own face) compared to other-related information (viewed touch on a stranger's face), in individuals with low and high levels of depersonalisation, a mental condition characterised by feeling detached or estranged from one's self and body. For the low-depersonalisation group, mirroring for self-related events (P45) preceded mirroring for other-related events (N80). At later stages (P200), mirroring was stronger for other-related than self-related events. This shows that early, implicit and later, more cognitive processes play different relative roles in mirroring self- and other-related bodily events. Critically, mirroring differed in the high-depersonalisation group, specifically for self-related events. An absence of early, implicit mirroring for self-related events over P45 suggests that the associated processes may be the neural correlates of the disembodiment experienced in depersonalisation. A lack of differential mirroring for self- and other-related events over P200 may reflect compensatory mechanisms that redress deficiencies in mirroring at earlier stages, which may break down to give rise to symptoms of depersonalisation. Alternatively, or in addition, they may represent an attenuation of processes related to self-other distinction

  20. Flute instability and the associated radial transport in the tandem mirror with a divertor mirror cell

    SciTech Connect

    Katanuma, I.; Yagi, K.; Haraguchi, Y.; Ichioka, N.; Masaki, S.; Ichimura, M.; Imai, T.

    2010-11-15

    The flute instability and the associated radial transport are investigated in the tandem mirror with a divertor mirror cell (the GAMMA10 A-divertor) with help of computer simulation, where GAMMA10 is introduced [Inutake et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 939 (1985)]. The basic equations used in the simulation were derived on the assumption of an axisymmetric magnetic field. So the high plasma pressure in a nonaxisymmetric minimum-B anchor mirror cell, which is important for the flute mode stability, is taken into account by redefining the specific volume of a magnetic field line. It is found that the flute modes are stabilized by the minimum-B magnetic field even with a divertor mirror although its stabilizing effects are weaker than that without the divertor mirror. The flute instability enhances the radial transport by intermittently repeating the growing up and down of the Fourier amplitude of the flute instability in time.

  1. Tape-Drive Based Plasma Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; Osterhoff, Jens; Evans, Eugene; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-22

    We present experimental results on a tape-drive based plasma mirror which could be used for a compact coupling of a laser beam into a staged laser driven electron accelerator. This novel kind of plasma mirror is suitable for high repetition rates and for high number of laser shots. In order to design a compact, staged laser plasma based accelerator or collider [1], the coupling of the laser beam into the different stages represents one of the key issues. To limit the spatial foot print and thus to realize a high overall acceleration gradient, a concept has to be found which realizes this in-coupling within a few centimeters (cf. Fig 1). The fluence of the laser pulse several centimeters away from the acceleration stage (focus) exceeds the damage threshold of any available mirror coating. Therefore, in reference [2] a plasma mirror was suggested for this purpose. We present experiments on a tape-drive based plasma mirror which could be used to reflect the focused laser beam into the acceleration stage. Plasma mirrors composed of antireflection coated glass substrates are usually used to improve the temporal laser contrast of laser pulses by several orders of magnitudes [3,4]. This is particularly important for laser interaction with solid matter, such as ion acceleration [5,6] and high harmonic generation on surfaces [7]. Therefore, the laser pulse is weekly focused onto a substrate. The main pulse generates a plasma and is reflected at the critical surface, whereas the low intensity pre-pulse (mainly the Amplified Spontaneous Emission pedestal) will be transmitted through the substrate before the mirror has been triggered. Several publications [3,4] demonstrate a conservation of the spatial beam quality and a reflectivity of about 70 %. The drawback of this technique is the limited repetition rate since for every shot a fresh surface has to be provided. In the past years several novel approaches for high repetition rate plasma mirrors have been developed [2, 8

  2. MEMS deformable mirrors for astronomical adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, S. A.; Hartzell, A. L.; Stewart, J. B.; Bifano, T. G.; Bierden, P. A.

    2010-07-01

    We report on the development of high actuator count, micro-electromechanical (MEMS) deformable mirrors designed for high order wavefront correction in ground and space-based astronomical adaptive optics instruments. The design of these polysilicon, surface-micromachined MEMS deformable mirrors builds on technology that has been used extensively to correct for ocular aberrations in retinal imaging systems and for compensation of atmospheric turbulence in free-space laser communication. These light-weight, low power deformable mirrors have an active aperture of up to 25.2mm consisting of a thin silicon membrane mirror supported by an array of 140 to 4092 electrostatic actuators which exhibit no hysteresis and have sub-nanometer repeatability making them well suited for open-loop control applications such as Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO). The continuous membrane deformable mirrors, coated with a highly reflective metal film, are capable of up to 6μm of stroke, have a surface finish of <10nm RMS with a fill factor of 99.8%. Presented in this paper are device characteristics and performance test results, as well as reliability test data and device lifetime predictions that show that trillions of actuator cycles can be achieved without failures.

  3. Electrostatic membrane deformable mirror characterization and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Keith; Marrs, Anthony; Schoen, Michael

    2005-08-01

    Electrostatic Membrane Deformable Mirror (MDM) technology developed using silicon bulk micro-machining techniques offers the potential of providing low-cost, compact wavefront control systems for diverse optical system applications. Electrostatic mirror construction using bulk micro-machining allows for custom designs to satisfy wavefront control requirements for most optical systems. An electrostatic MDM consists of a thin membrane, generally with a thin metal or multi-layer high-reflectivity coating, suspended over an actuator pad array that is connected to a high-voltage driver. Voltages applied to the array elements deflect the membrane to provide an optical surface capable of correcting for measured optical aberrations in a given system. Electrostatic membrane DM designs are derived from well-known principles of membrane mechanics and electrostatics, the desired optical wavefront control requirements, and the current limitations of mirror fabrication and actuator drive electronics. MDM performance is strongly dependent on mirror diameter and air damping in meeting desired spatial and temporal frequency requirements. In this paper, we discuss characterization measurements and modeling of MDM spatial and temporal performance for different mirror designs and present application results illustrating the diverse uses of MDM technology in optical wavefront compensation systems.

  4. Design of off-axis PIAACMC mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluzhnik, Eugene; Guyon, Olivier; Belikov, Ruslan; Bendek, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    The Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization Complex Mask Coronagraph (PIAACMC) provides an efficient way to control diffraction propagation effects caused by the central obstruction/segmented mirrors of the telescope. PIAACMC can be optimized in a way that takes into account both chromatic diffraction effects caused by the telescope obstructed aperture and tip/tilt sensitivity of the coronagraph. As a result, unlike classic PIAA, the PIAACMC mirror shapes are often slightly asymmetric even for an on-axis configuration and require more care in calculating off-axis shapes when an off-axis configuration is preferred. A method to design off-axis PIAA mirror shapes given an on-axis mirror design is presented. The algorithm is based on geometrical ray tracing and is able to calculate off-axis PIAA mirror shapes for an arbitrary geometry of the input and output beams. The method is demonstrated using the third generation PIAACMC design for WFIRST-AFTA telescope. Geometrical optics design issues related to the off-axis diffraction propagation effects are also discussed.

  5. Demonstration of Flying Mirror with Improved Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Kando, Masaki; Fukuda, Yuji; Chen Liming; Daito, Izuru; Ogura, Koichi; Homma, Takayuki; Hayashi, Yukio; Kotaki, Hideyuki; Sagisaka, Akito; Mori, Michiaki; Koga, James K.; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Okada, Hajime; Kawase, Keigo; Kameshima, Takashi; Nishimori, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Toyoaki; Tajima, Toshiki

    2009-07-25

    A strongly nonlinear wake wave driven by an intense laser pulse can act as a partially reflecting relativistic mirror (the flying mirror)[S. V. Bulanov, et al., Bulletin of the Lebedev Physics Institute, No. 6, 9 (1991); S. V. Bulanov, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 085001 (2003)]. Upon reflection from such mirror, a counter-propagating optical-frequency laser pulse is directly converted into high-frequency radiation, with a frequency multiplication factor approx4gamma{sup 2}(the double Doppler effect). We present the results of recent experiment in which the photon number in the reflected radiation was at least several thousand times larger than in our proof-of-principle experiment [M. Kando, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 135001 (2007); A. S. Pirozhkov, et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 123106 (2007)]. The flying mirror holds promise of generating intense coherent ultrashort XUV and x-ray pulses that inherit their temporal shape and polarization from the original optical-frequency (laser) pulses. Furthermore, the reflected radiation bears important information about the reflecting wake wave itself, which can be used for its diagnostics.

  6. Microinstabilities in the Gasdynamic Mirror Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William

    2005-01-01

    The gasdynamic mirror has been proposed as a concept which could form the basis of a highly efficient fusion rocket engine. Gasdynamic mirrors differ from most other mirror type plasma confinement schemes in that they have much larger aspect ratios and operate at somewhat higher plasma densities. There are several types of instabilities which are known to plague mirror type confinement schemes. These instabilities fall into two general classes. One class of instability is the Magnetohdrodynamic or MHD instability which induces gross distortions in the plasma geometry. The other class of instability is the "loss cone" microinstability which leads to general plasma turbulence. The "loss cone" microinstability is caused by velocity space asymmetries resulting from the loss of plasma having constituent particle velocities within the angle of the magnetic mirror "loss cone." These instabilities generally manifest themselves in high temperature, moderately dense plasmas. The present study indicates that a GDM configured as a rocket engine might operate in a plasma regine where microinstabilities could potentially be significant.

  7. Microinstabilities in the Gasdynamic Mirror Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William

    2005-01-01

    The gasdynamic mirror has been proposed as a concept which could form the basis of a highly efficient fusion rocket engine. Gasdynamic mirrors differ from most other mirror type plasma confinement schemes in that they have much larger aspect ratios and operate at somewhat higher plasma densities. There are several types of instabilities which are known to plague mirror type confinement schemes. These instabilities fall into two general classes. One class of instability is the Magnetohydrodynamic or MHD instability which induces gross distortions in the plasma geometry. The other class of instability is the "loss cone" microinstability which leads to general plasma turbulence. The "loss cone" microinstability is caused by velocity space asymmetries resulting from the loss of plasma having constituent particle velocities within the angle of the magnetic mirror "loss cone." These instabilities generally manifest themselves in high temperature, moderately dense plasmas. The present study indicates that a GDM configured as a rocket engine might operate in a plasma regime where microinstabilities could potentially be significant.

  8. Mirror, Mirror by the Stairs: The Impact of Mirror Exposure on Stair versus Elevator Use in College Students

    PubMed Central

    Hodgin, Katie L.; Graham, Dan J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that self-awareness-inducing mirrors can successfully incite behaviors that align with one’s personal values, such as helping others. Other research has found a large discrepancy between the high percentage of young adults who report valuing the healthfulness of physical activity (PA) and the low percentage who actually meet PA participation standards. However, few studies have examined how mirror exposure and both perceived and actual body size influence highly valued PA participation among college students. The present study assessed stair versus elevator use on a western college campus and hypothesized that mirror exposure would increase the more personally healthy transportation method of stair use. In accordance with previous research, it was also hypothesized that males and those with a lower body mass index (BMI) would be more likely to take the stairs, and that body size distorting mirrors would impact the stair–elevator decision. One hundred sixty-seven students (51% male) enrolled in an introductory psychology course were recruited to take a survey about their “transportation choices” at an indoor campus parking garage. Participants were individually exposed to either no mirror, a standard full-length mirror, or a full-length mirror manipulated to make the reflected body size appear either slightly thinner or slightly wider than normal before being asked to go to the fourth floor of the garage for a survey. Participants’ choice of floor-climbing method (stairs or elevator) was recorded, and they were administered an Internet-based survey assessing demographic information, BMI, self-awareness, perceived body size, and other variables likely to be associated with stair use. Results from logistic regression analyses revealed that participants who were not exposed to a mirror [odds ratios (OR) = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.14–0.96], males (OR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.13–0.85), those with lower BMI (OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0

  9. Mirror, Mirror by the Stairs: The Impact of Mirror Exposure on Stair versus Elevator Use in College Students.

    PubMed

    Hodgin, Katie L; Graham, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that self-awareness-inducing mirrors can successfully incite behaviors that align with one's personal values, such as helping others. Other research has found a large discrepancy between the high percentage of young adults who report valuing the healthfulness of physical activity (PA) and the low percentage who actually meet PA participation standards. However, few studies have examined how mirror exposure and both perceived and actual body size influence highly valued PA participation among college students. The present study assessed stair versus elevator use on a western college campus and hypothesized that mirror exposure would increase the more personally healthy transportation method of stair use. In accordance with previous research, it was also hypothesized that males and those with a lower body mass index (BMI) would be more likely to take the stairs, and that body size distorting mirrors would impact the stair-elevator decision. One hundred sixty-seven students (51% male) enrolled in an introductory psychology course were recruited to take a survey about their "transportation choices" at an indoor campus parking garage. Participants were individually exposed to either no mirror, a standard full-length mirror, or a full-length mirror manipulated to make the reflected body size appear either slightly thinner or slightly wider than normal before being asked to go to the fourth floor of the garage for a survey. Participants' choice of floor-climbing method (stairs or elevator) was recorded, and they were administered an Internet-based survey assessing demographic information, BMI, self-awareness, perceived body size, and other variables likely to be associated with stair use. Results from logistic regression analyses revealed that participants who were not exposed to a mirror [odds ratios (OR) = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.14-0.96], males (OR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.13-0.85), those with lower BMI (OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.71-0.99), those

  10. Mirror Mode Structures in the Solar Wind: STEREO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enríquez-Rivera, O.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2010-03-01

    Mirror mode structures occur in the solar wind either as an isolated magnetic field depression or as trains of magnetic holes (or peaks). Some trains have long durations and have been named mirror mode storms [1]. In this work we investigate mirror mode structures at 1 AU using STEREO A and B high resolution data. Magnetic field data were scanned to search for magnetic holes and peaks in a relatively steady ambient solar wind. We found several examples of mirror mode structures present in the ambient solar wind and also associated with SIRs. In order to study mirror mode origin, we present a case study with mirror mode structures present in the leading edge of a SIR during almost 8 hours corresponding to mirror mode storms. We analyze mirror mode shape and duration as well as plasma and magnetic field conditions that occur in the region surrounding mirror mode storms.

  11. Four-mirror extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography projection system

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Simon J; Jeong, Hwan J; Shafer, David R

    2000-01-01

    The invention is directed to a four-mirror catoptric projection system for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography to transfer a pattern from a reflective reticle to a wafer substrate. In order along the light path followed by light from the reticle to the wafer substrate, the system includes a dominantly hyperbolic convex mirror, a dominantly elliptical concave mirror, spherical convex mirror, and spherical concave mirror. The reticle and wafer substrate are positioned along the system's optical axis on opposite sides of the mirrors. The hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors are positioned on the same side of the system's optical axis as the reticle, and are relatively large in diameter as they are positioned on the high magnification side of the system. The hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors are relatively far off the optical axis and hence they have significant aspherical components in their curvatures. The convex spherical mirror is positioned on the optical axis, and has a substantially or perfectly spherical shape. The spherical concave mirror is positioned substantially on the opposite side of the optical axis from the hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors. Because it is positioned off-axis to a degree, the spherical concave mirror has some asphericity to counter aberrations. The spherical concave mirror forms a relatively large, uniform field on the wafer substrate. The mirrors can be tilted or decentered slightly to achieve further increase in the field size.

  12. Performance Optimization of the Gasdynamic Mirror Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.; Kammash, Terry

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear fusion appears to be a most promising concept for producing extremely high specific impulse rocket engines. Engines such as these would effectively open up the solar system to human exploration and would virtually eliminate launch window restrictions. A preliminary vehicle sizing and mission study was performed based on the conceptual design of a Gasdynamic Mirror (GDM) fusion propulsion system. This study indicated that the potential specific impulse for this engine is approximately 142,000 sec. with about 22,100 N of thrust using a deuterium-tritium fuel cycle. The engine weight inclusive of the power conversion system was optimized around an allowable engine mass of 1500 Mg assuming advanced superconducting magnets and a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) end plug at the mirrors. The vehicle habitat, lander, and structural weights are based on a NASA Mars mission study which assumes the use of nuclear thermal propulsion' Several manned missions to various planets were analyzed to determine fuel requirements and launch windows. For all fusion propulsion cases studied, the fuel weight remained a minor component of the total system weight regardless of when the missions commenced. In other words, the use of fusion propulsion virtually eliminates all mission window constraints and effectively allows unlimited manned exploration of the entire solar system. It also mitigates the need to have a large space infrastructure which would be required to support the transfer of massive amounts of fuel and supplies to lower a performing spacecraft.

  13. Performance optimization of the Gasdynamic mirror propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emrich, William J.; Kammash, Terry

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear fusion appears to be a most promising concept for producing extremely high specific impulse rocket engines. Engines such as these would effectively open up the solar system to human exploration and would virtually eliminate launch window restrictions. A preliminary vehicle sizing and mission study was performed based on the conceptual design of a Gasdynamic Mirror (GDM) fusion propulsion system. This study indicated that the potential specific impulse for this engine is approximately 142,000 sec. with about 22,100 N of thrust using a deuterium-tritium fuel cycle. The engine weight inclusive of the power conversion system was optimized around an allowable engine mass of 1500 Mg assuming advanced superconducting magnets and a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) end plug at the mirrors. The vehicle habitat, lander, and structural weights are based on a NASA Mars mission study which assumes the use of nuclear thermal propulsion. Several manned missions to various planets were analyzed to determine fuel requirements and launch windows. For all fusion propulsion cases studied, the fuel weight remained a minor component of the total system weight regardless of when the missions commenced. In other words, the use of fusion propulsion virtually eliminates all mission window constraints and effectively allows unlimited manned exploration of the entire solar system. It also mitigates the need to have a large space infrastructure which would be required to support the transfer of massive amounts of fuel and supplies to lower a performing spacecraft. .

  14. Physics requirements for pellet fueling of mirror reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1983-11-15

    Requirements for pellet fueling of mirror reactors, such as the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS), have been assessed. To avoid perturbing the MARS central-cell plasma density more than 10%, we have determined that the fuel injected per pellet must not exceed 2 x 10/sup 21/ deuterium-tritium (DT) atoms. This implies a maximum radius of 2 mm for each of the frozen DT pellets and a repetition rate of at least 6.2 pellets/s. Furthermore, the required pellet velocity will depend on the plasma density and temperature, including the effects of fusion products such as 3.5-MeV alphas, the shapes of these profiles, and the effectiveness of fueling the center of the plasma by radial diffusion. Under MARS conditions, the velocity requirement for frozen DT pellets will range from 4 to 20 km/s. To minimize this requirement, we will inject the pellets near the end of the central cell where the plasma radius is reduced by the strong magnetic field and where trapped alphas can be avoided by design of the magnetic field. To meet these fueling objectives, we are looking for new technologies for increasing the pellet speeds. One technology under consideration is the railgun for high-speed acceleration.

  15. Photothermal transfer function of dielectric mirrors for precision measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, Stefan W.

    2015-01-01

    The photothermal transfer function from absorbed power incident on a dielectric mirror to the effective mirror position is calculated using the coating design as input. The effect is found to change in amplitude and sign for frequencies corresponding to diffusion length comparable to the coating thickness. Transfer functions are calculated for the T i -doped Ta2O5:SiO2 coating used in Advanced LIGO and for a crystalline AlxGa1 -xAs coating. The shape of the transfer function at high frequencies is shown to be a sensitive indicator of the effective absorption depth, providing a potentially powerful tool to distinguish coating-internal absorption from surface contamination related absorption. The sign change of the photothermal effect could also be useful to stabilize radiation pressure-based optomechanical systems. High frequency corrections to the previously published thermo-optic noise estimates are also provided. Finally, estimating the quality of the thermo-optic noise cancellation occurring in fine-tuned AlxGa1 -xAs coatings requires the detailed heat flow analysis done in this paper.

  16. Enhanced Fluoride Over-Coated Al Mirrors for FUV Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; DelHoyo, Javier; Rice, Steve; Threat, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Astronomical observations in the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) spectral region are some of the more challenging due to the very distant and faint objects that are typically searched for in cosmic origin studies such as origin of large scale structure, the formation, evolution, and age of galaxies and the origin of stellar and planetary systems. These challenges are driving the need to improve the performance of optical coatings over a wide spectral range that would increase reflectance in mirrors and reduced absorption in dielectric filters used in optical telescope for FUV observations. This paper will present recent advances in reflectance performance for Al+MgF2 mirrors optimized for Lyman-alpha wavelength by performing the deposition of the MgF2 overcoat at elevated substrate temperatures. We will also present optical characterization of little studied rare-earth fluorides such as GdF3 and LuF3 that exhibit low-absorption over a wide wavelength range and could therefore be used as high refractive index alternatives for dielectric coatings at FUV wavelengths.

  17. Mirrors Steer NASA in the Right Direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Left Hand Design completed the production of the fine-steering mirror technology through 1995 Phase I and 1996 Phase II SBIR contracts with JPL's Interferometric Astronomy group. Presently, the work resulting from the collaboration with NASA represents the company's main line of products for the commercial sector. Aerospace-related applications include: image motion compensation; interceptor seekers for the U.S. Army and Navy; Earth observation and resource monitoring from spacecraft and airborne platforms; space astronomy; helicopter-based surveillance; and interferometric metrology. Left Hand Design's fine-steering mirrors have also penetrated the commercial marketplace with non-aerospace applications, including laser communications, video cameras, infrared inspection, solar observatories, and bathymeters. These cost-effective, commercial mirrors perform a variety of functions, such as scanning, alignment, chopping, tracking, pointing, and beam stabilization. Potential future applications include laser surgery and photolithography.

  18. Casimir effect with rough metallic mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Neto, Paulo A. Maia; Lambrecht, Astrid; Reynaud, Serge

    2005-07-15

    We calculate the second-order roughness correction to the Casimir energy for two parallel metallic mirrors. Our results may also be applied to the plane-sphere geometry used in most experiments. The metallic mirrors are described by the plasma model, with arbitrary values for the plasma wavelength, the mirror separation, and the roughness correlation length, with the roughness amplitude remaining the smallest length scale for perturbation theory to hold. From the analysis of the intracavity field fluctuations, we obtain the Casimir energy correction in terms of generalized reflection operators, which account for diffraction and polarization coupling in the scattering by the rough surfaces. We present simple analytical expressions for several limiting cases, as well as numerical results that allow for a reliable calculation of the roughness correction in real experiments. The correction is larger than the result of the proximity force approximation, which is obtained from our theory as a limiting case (very smooth surfaces)

  19. Casimir effect with uniformly moving mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Bordag, M.; Dittes, F.; Robaschik, D.

    1986-06-01

    We study a simple example of quantum electrodynamics with nonstationary boundary conditions in (3+1) dimensions: the problem of two parallel mirrors moving relative to each other with constant speed v. The Green functions are constructed using the reflection principle. The behavior of physical quantities like the Casimir force and the vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor are discussed. If the motion of an arbitrary point between the mirrors is described by a straight world line, then in the local rest frame at the point in question the energy-momentum tensor has the same structure as in the standard Casimir problem with stationary mirrors. In particular, all physical quantities are smooth functions of v, so that the limit v..-->..0 leads to the expected results.

  20. Gasdynamic Mirror (GDM) Fusion Propulsion Engine Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Gasdynamic Mirror, or GDM, is an example of a magnetic mirror-based fusion propulsion system. Its design is primarily consisting of a long slender solenoid surrounding a vacuum chamber that contains plasma. The bulk of the fusion plasma is confined by magnetic field generated by a series of toroidal-shaped magnets in the center section of the device. the purpose of the GDM Fusion Propulsion Experiment is to confirm the feasibility of the concept and to demonstrate many of the operational characteristics of a full-size plasma can be confined within the desired physical configuration and still reman stable. This image shows an engineer from Propulsion Research Technologies Division at Marshall Space Flight Center inspecting solenoid magnets-A, an integrate part of the Gasdynamic Mirror Fusion Propulsion Engine Experiment.