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Sample records for advanced vasodilatory shock

  1. Vasopressin in vasodilatory shock: hemodynamic stabilization at the cost of the liver and the kidney?

    PubMed

    Bracht, Hendrik; Asfar, Pierre; Radermacher, Peter; Calzia, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    Infusing arginine vasopressin (AVP) in advanced vasodilatory shock is usually accompanied by a decrease in cardiac index and systemic oxygen transport. Whether or not such a vasoconstriction impedes regional blood flow and thus visceral organ function, even when low AVP is used, is still a matter of debate. Krejci and colleagues now report, in this issue of Critical Care, that infusing 'low-dose' AVP during early, short-term, normotensive and normodynamic fecal peritonitis-induced porcine septicemia markedly reduced both renal and portal blood flow, and consequently total hepatic blood flow, whereas hepatic arterial flow was not affected. This macrocirculatory response was concomitant with reduced kidney microcirculatory perfusion, whereas liver micro-circulation remained unchanged. From these findings the authors conclude that the use of AVP to treat hypotension should be cautioned against in patients with septic shock. Undoubtedly, given its powerful vasoconstrictor properties, which are not accompanied by positive inotropic qualities (in contrast with most of the equally potent standard care 'competitors', namely catecholamines), the safety of AVP is still a matter of concern. Nevertheless, the findings reported by Krejci and colleagues need to be discussed in the context of the model design, the timing and dosing of AVP as well as the complex interaction between visceral organ perfusion and function.

  2. Early norepinephrine decreases fluid and ventilatory requirements in pediatric vasodilatory septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Ranjit, Suchitra; Natraj, Rajeswari; Kandath, Sathish Kumar; Kissoon, Niranjan; Ramakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Marik, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We previously reported that vasodilatation was common in pediatric septic shock, regardless of whether they were warm or cold, providing a rationale for early norepinephrine (NE) to increase venous return (VR) and arterial tone. Our primary aim was to evaluate the effect of smaller fluid bolus plus early-NE versus the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) approach to more liberal fluid boluses and vasoactive-inotropic agents on fluid balance, shock resolution, ventilator support and mortality in children with septic shock. Secondly, the impact of early NE on hemodynamic parameters, urine output and lactate levels was assessed using multimodality-monitoring. Methods: In keeping with the primary aim, the early NE group (N-27) received NE after 30ml/kg fluid, while the ACCM group (N-41) were a historical cohort managed as per the ACCM Guidelines, where after 40-60ml/kg fluid, patients received first line vasoactive-inotropic agents. The effect of early-NE was characterized by measuring stroke volume variation(SVV), systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) and cardiac function before and after NE, which were monitored using ECHO + Ultrasound-Cardiac-Output-Monitor (USCOM) and lactates. Results: The 6-hr fluid requirement in the early-NE group (88.9+31.3 to 37.4+15.1ml/kg), and ventilated days [median 4 days (IQR 2.5-5.25) to 1day (IQR 1-1.7)] were significantly less as compared to the ACCM group. However, shock resolution and mortality rates were similar. In the early NE group, the overall SVRI was low (mean 679.7dynes/sec/cm5/m2, SD 204.5), and SVV decreased from 23.8±8.2 to 18.5±9.7, p=0.005 with NE infusion suggesting improved preload even without further fluid loading. Furthermore, lactate levels decreased and urine-output improved. Conclusion: Early-NE and fluid restriction may be of benefit in resolving shock with less fluid and ventilator support as compared to the ACCM approach. PMID:27829710

  3. Exogenous Vasopressin-Induced Hyponatremia in Patients With Vasodilatory Shock: Two Case Reports and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Miguel; Hu, Bee Bee; Vazquez, Joyce; Wintz, Ruth L; Varon, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Vasopressin has gained wide support as an adjunct vasopressor in patients with septic shock. This agent exerts its vasoconstriction effects through smooth muscle V1 receptors and also has antidiuretic activity via renal V2 receptors. This interaction with the renal V2 receptors results in the integration of aquaporin 2 channels in the apical membrane of the renal collecting duct leading to free water reabsorption. Thus, water intoxication with subsequent hyponatremia, although rare, is a potentially serious side effect of exogenous vasopressin administration. We present 2 patients who developed hyponatremia within hours of initiation of vasopressin infusion. Extensive diuresis followed its discontinuation with subsequent normalization of serum sodium. One of the patients required the use of hypertonic saline for more rapid normalization of serum sodium due to concerns for potential seizure activity. A review of the literature relevant to the incidence of vasopressin-induced hyponatremia is provided as well as discussion on additional factors relevant to septic shock that should be considered when determining the relative risk of hyponatremia in patients receiving vasopressin.

  4. Non-Adrenergic Vasopressors in Patients with or at Risk for Vasodilatory Shock. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Belletti, Alessandro; Musu, Mario; Silvetti, Simona; Saleh, Omar; Pasin, Laura; Monaco, Fabrizio; Hajjar, Ludhmila A.; Fominskiy, Evgeny; Finco, Gabriele; Zangrillo, Alberto; Landoni, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypotensive state is frequently observed in several critical conditions. If an adequate mean arterial pressure is not promptly restored, insufficient tissue perfusion and organ dysfunction may develop. Fluids and catecholamines are the cornerstone of critical hypotensive states management. Catecholamines side effects such as increased myocardial oxygen consumption and development of arrhythmias are well known. Thus, in recent years, interest in catecholamine-sparing agents such as vasopressin, terlipressin and methylene blue has increased; however, few randomized trials, mostly with small sample sizes, have been performed. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis of randomized trials to investigate the effect of non-catecholaminergic vasopressors on mortality. Methods PubMed, BioMed Central and Embase were searched (update December 31st, 2014) by two independent investigators. Inclusion criteria were: random allocation to treatment, at least one group receiving a non-catecholaminergic vasopressor, patients with or at risk for vasodilatory shock. Exclusion criteria were: crossover studies, pediatric population, non-human studies, studies published as abstract only, lack of data on mortality. Studied drugs were vasopressin, terlipressin and methylene blue. Primary endpoint was mortality at the longest follow-up available. Results A total of 1,608 patients from 20 studies were included in our analysis. The studied settings were sepsis (10/20 studies [50%]), cardiac surgery (7/20 [35%]), vasodilatory shock due to any cause (2/20 [19%]), and acute traumatic injury (1/20 [5%]). Overall, pooled estimates showed that treatment with non-catecholaminergic agents improves survival (278/810 [34.3%] versus 309/798 [38.7%], risk ratio = 0.88, 95% confidence interval = 0.79 to 0.98, p = 0.02). None of the drugs was associated with significant reduction in mortality when analyzed independently. Results were not confirmed when analyzing studies with a low risk of bias

  5. Traumatic hemorrhagic shock: advances in fluid management.

    PubMed

    Cherkas, David

    2011-11-01

    A number of concerns have been raised regarding the advisability of the classic principles of aggressive crystalloid resuscitation in traumatic hemorrhagic shock. This issue reviews the advances that have led to a shift in the emergency department (ED) protocols in resuscitation from shock state, including recent literature regarding the new paradigm for the treatment of traumatic hemorrhagic shock, which is most generally known as damage control resuscitation (DCR). Goals and endpoints for resuscitation and a review of initial fluid choice are discussed, along with the coagulopathy of trauma and its management, how to address hemorrhagic shock in traumatic brain injury (TBI), and new pharmacologic treatment for hemorrhagic shock. The primary conclusions include the administration of tranexamic acid (TXA) for all patients with uncontrolled hemorrhage (Class I), the implementation of a massive transfusion protocol (MTP) with fixed blood product ratios (Class II), avoidance of large-volume crystalloid resuscitation (Class III), and appropriate usage of permissive hypotension (Class III). The choice of fluid for initial resuscitation has not been shown to affect outcomes in trauma (Class I).

  6. Advances in NIF Shock Timing Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, Harry

    2012-10-01

    Experiments are underway to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to multiple shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of all four shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector). Experiments are now routinely conducted in a mirrored keyhole geometry, which allows for simultaneous diagnosis of the shock timing at both the hohlraum pole and equator. Further modifications are being made to improve the surrogacy to ignition hohlraums by replacing the standard liquid deuterium (D2) capsule fill with a deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer. These experiments will remove any possible surrogacy difference between D2 and DT as well as incorporate the physics of shock release from the ice layer, which is absent in current experiments. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented.

  7. Advanced Hemodynamic Management in Patients with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Wolfgang; Nierhaus, Axel; Kluge, Stefan; Reuter, Daniel A.; Wagner, Julia Y.

    2016-01-01

    In patients with sepsis and septic shock, the hemodynamic management in both early and later phases of these “organ dysfunction syndromes” is a key therapeutic component. It needs, however, to be differentiated between “early goal-directed therapy” (EGDT) as proposed for the first 6 hours of emergency department treatment by Rivers et al. in 2001 and “hemodynamic management” using advanced hemodynamic monitoring in the intensive care unit (ICU). Recent large trials demonstrated that nowadays protocolized EGDT does not seem to be superior to “usual care” in terms of a reduction in mortality in emergency department patients with early identified septic shock who promptly receive antibiotic therapy and fluid resuscitation. “Hemodynamic management” comprises (a) making the diagnosis of septic shock as one differential diagnosis of circulatory shock, (b) assessing the hemodynamic status including the identification of therapeutic conflicts, and (c) guiding therapeutic interventions. We propose two algorithms for hemodynamic management using transpulmonary thermodilution-derived variables aiming to optimize the cardiocirculatory and pulmonary status in adult ICU patients with septic shock. The complexity and heterogeneity of patients with septic shock implies that individualized approaches for hemodynamic management are mandatory. Defining individual hemodynamic target values for patients with septic shock in different phases of the disease must be the focus of future studies. PMID:27703980

  8. MP4, a vasodilatory PEGylated hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Cole, Russell H; Vandegriff, Kim D

    2011-01-01

    A vasodilatory hemoglobin (Hb)-based O(2) carrier (HBOC) has been developed by surface conjugation polyethylene glycol to tetrameric human Hb (MP4, Sangart, San Diego). Because the NO-binding kinetics of MP4 are similar to vasoconstrictive HBOCs, we propose that the decoupling of NO scavenging from vascular response is a consequence of MP4's high O(2) affinity (p50 = 5 mmHg) and unique surface chemistry. The release of ATP from erythrocytes is vasodilatory and the application of a high O(2) affinity HBOC minimizes ATP interference with intravascular ATP signaling. A second potential mechanism of action for MP4 involves the surface conjugation of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to tetrameric human Hb. It has been shown that the addition of unconjugated high molecular weight (Mw) PEG to cultured lung endothelial cells causes an immediate and significant reduction in endothelial permeability; an effect opposite to that of endothelial agonists such as cell-free Hb. It appears that some of the benefits of the PEG-endothelium interaction are carried onto molecules such as PEGylated Hb and PEGylated albumin, as demonstrated by favorable hemodynamic responses in vivo. PEGylation of ß93 cysteine residues, as in MP4, has also been reported to increase the nitrite reductase activity of Hb and enhance conversion of endogenous nitrite to bioactive NO.

  9. Advances in temporary mechanical support for treatment of cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Koprivanac, Marijan; Kelava, Marta; Soltesz, Edward; Smedira, Nicholas; Kapadia, Samir; Brzezinski, Anna; Alansari, Shehab; Moazami, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support devices are the mainstay of treatment for severe cardiogenic shock refractory to pharmacologic therapy. Their evolution over the past few decades has been remarkable with a common theme of developing reliable, less bulky and more easily percutaneously implantable devices. The goal of this article is to review existing devices and advances in technology and provide insight into direction of further research and evolution of mechanical circulatory support devices for temporary support.

  10. The Advanced Composition Explorer Shock Database and Application to Particle Acceleration Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    The theory of particle acceleration via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) has been studied in depth by Gosling et al. (1981), van Nes et al. (1984), Mason (2000), Desai et al. (2003), Zank et al. (2006), among many others. Recently, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) using the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) shock database at 1 AU explored two questions: does the upstream distribution alone have enough particles to account for the accelerated downstream distribution and can the slope of the downstream accelerated spectrum be explained using DSA? As was shown in this research, diffusive shock acceleration can account for a large population of the shocks. However, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) used a subset of the larger ACE database. Recently, work has successfully been completed that allows for the entire ACE database to be considered in a larger statistical analysis. We explain DSA as it applies to single and multiple shocks and the shock criteria used in this statistical analysis. We calculate the expected injection energy via diffusive shock acceleration given upstream parameters defined from the ACE Solar Wind Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (SWEPAM) data to construct the theoretical upstream distribution. We show the comparison of shock strength derived from diffusive shock acceleration theory to observations in the 50 keV to 5 MeV range from an instrument on ACE. Parameters such as shock velocity, shock obliquity, particle number, and time between shocks are considered. This study is further divided into single and multiple shock categories, with an additional emphasis on forward-forward multiple shock pairs. Finally with regard to forward-forward shock pairs, results comparing injection energies of the first shock, second shock, and second shock with previous energetic population will be given.

  11. The Advanced Composition Explorer Shock Database and Application to Particle Acceleration Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    The theory of particle acceleration via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) has been studied in depth by Gosling et al. (1981), van Nes et al. (1984), Mason (2000), Desai et al. (2003), Zank et al. (2006), among many others. Recently, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) using the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) shock database at 1 AU explored two questions: does the upstream distribution alone have enough particles to account for the accelerated downstream distribution and can the slope of the downstream accelerated spectrum be explained using DSA? As was shown in this research, diffusive shock acceleration can account for a large population of the shocks. However, Parker and Zank (2012, 2014) and Parker et al. (2014) used a subset of the larger ACE database. Recently, work has successfully been completed that allows for the entire ACE database to be considered in a larger statistical analysis. We explain DSA as it applies to single and multiple shocks and the shock criteria used in this statistical analysis. We calculate the expected injection energy via diffusive shock acceleration given upstream parameters defined from the ACE Solar Wind Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (SWEPAM) data to construct the theoretical upstream distribution. We show the comparison of shock strength derived from diffusive shock acceleration theory to observations in the 50 keV to 5 MeV range from an instrument on ACE. Parameters such as shock velocity, shock obliquity, particle number, and time between shocks are considered. This study is further divided into single and multiple shock categories, with an additional emphasis on forward-forward multiple shock pairs. Finally with regard to forwardforward shock pairs, results comparing injection energies of the first shock, second shock, and second shock with previous energetic population will be given.

  12. Advances in Vascular Hyporeactivity After Shock: The Mechanisms and Managements.

    PubMed

    Duan, Chenyang; Yang, Guangming; Li, Tao; Liu, Liangming

    2015-12-01

    Vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictors and vasodilators is greatly reduced after severe trauma, shock, and sepsis or multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. This reduced vascular reactivity severely interferes with the treatment of shock and other critical conditions. In particular, it interferes with the efficacy of vasoactive agents. Consequently, it is very important to elucidate the mechanisms and search for the effective treatment measures. In recent years, a lot of studies focused on the characteristics and the change rules of vascular hyporeactivity and mechanisms following shock. Also, the treatment approaches based on various mechanisms have been a hot pot these years.

  13. Antioxidant and Vasodilatory Effects of Blackberry and Grape Wines

    PubMed Central

    Mudnic, Ivana; Budimir, Danijela; Modun, Darko; Gunjaca, Grgo; Generalic, Ivana; Skroza, Danijela; Katalinic, Visnja; Ljubenkov, Ivica

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In contrast to the well-described various biological effects of grape wines, the potential effects of commonly consumed blackberry wine have not been studied. We examined in vitro antioxidant and vasodilatory effects of four blackberry wines and compared them with the effects of two red and two white grape wines. Although some blackberry wines had lower total phenolic content relative to the red grape wines, their antioxidant capacity was stronger, which may be related to a higher content of non-flavonoid compounds (most notably gallic acid) in blackberry wines. Although maximal vasodilation induced by blackberry wines was generally similar to that of red wines, blackberry wines were less potent vasodilators. Vasodilatory activity of all wines, in addition to their flavonoid and total phenolic content, was most significantly associated with their content of anthocyanins. No association of vasodilation with any individual polyphenolic compound was found. Our results indicate the biological potential of blackberry wines, which deserves deeper scientific attention. PMID:22082099

  14. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... Many organs can be damaged as a result. Shock requires immediate treatment and can get worse very rapidly. As many 1 in 5 people who suffer shock will die from it. Considerations The main types ...

  15. A comparative study of advanced shock-capturing schemes applied to Burgers' equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; Przekwas, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic evaluation is conducted of all extant numerical schemes for nonlinear scalar transport problems, and several advanced shock-capturing schemes are used to solve the nonlinear Burgers' equation in order to characterize their ability to resolve the sharp discontinuity, expansion zone, and propagation and collision features of shocks. For discontinuous functions, the Warming-Beam scheme generates preshock wiggles, while the Lax-Wendroff scheme generates postshock ones. Such limiters as the MUSCL or the superbee are more compressive than minimod or monotonic limiters. The performance of such TVD schemes as the upwind, the symmetric, and the Roe-Sweby, resemble each other.

  16. Heat Shock Proteins in Dermatophytes: Current Advances and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Rossi, Nilce M.; Jacob, Tiago R.; Sanches, Pablo R.; Peres, Nalu T.A.; Lang, Elza A.S.; Martins, Maíra P.; Rossi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are proteins whose transcription responds rapidly to temperature shifts. They constitute a family of molecular chaperones, involved in the proper folding and stabilisation of proteins under physiological and adverse conditions. HSPs also assist in the protection and recovery of cells exposed to a variety of stressful conditions, including heat. The role of HSPs extends beyond chaperoning proteins, as they also participate in diverse cellular functions, such as the assembly of macromolecular complexes, protein transport and sorting, dissociation of denatured protein aggregates, cell cycle control, and programmed cell death. They are also important antigens from a variety of pathogens, are able to stimulate innate immune cells, and are implicated in acquired immunity. In fungi, HSPs have been implicated in virulence, dimorphic transition, and drug resistance. Some HSPs are potential targets for therapeutic strategies. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of HSPs in dermatophytes, which are a group of keratinophilic fungi responsible for superficial mycoses in humans and animals. Computational analyses were performed to characterise the group of proteins in these dermatophytes, as well as to assess their conservation and to identify DNA-binding domains (5′-nGAAn-3′) in the promoter regions of the hsp genes. In addition, the quantification of the transcript levels of few genes in a pacC background helped in the development of an extended model for the regulation of the expression of the hsp genes, which supports the participation of the pH-responsive transcriptional regulator PacC in this process. PMID:27226766

  17. Shock.

    PubMed

    Wacker, David A; Winters, Michael E

    2014-11-01

    Critically ill patients with undifferentiated shock are complex and challenging cases in the ED. A systematic approach to assessment and management is essential to prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. The simplified, systematic approach described in this article focuses on determining the presence of problems with cardiac function (the pump), intravascular volume (the tank), or systemic vascular resistance (the pipes). With this approach, the emergency physician can detect life-threatening conditions and implement time-sensitive therapy.

  18. Impact of age on the vasodilatory function of human skeletal muscle feed arteries

    PubMed Central

    Park, Song-Young; Ives, Stephen J.; Gifford, Jayson R.; Andtbacka, Robert H. I.; Hyngstrom, John R.; Reese, Van; Layec, Gwenael; Bharath, Leena P.; Symons, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Although advancing age is often associated with attenuated skeletal muscle blood flow and skeletal muscle feed arteries (SMFAs) have been recognized to play a regulatory role in the vasculature, little is known about the impact of age on the vasodilatory capacity of human SMFAs. Therefore, endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation were assessed in SMFAs (diameter: 544 ± 63 μm) obtained from 24 (equally represented) young (33 ± 2 yr) and old (71 ± 2 yr) subjects in response to three stimuli: 1) flow-induced shear stress, 2) ACh, and 3) sodium nitropusside (SNP). Both assessments of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, flow (young subjects: 68 ± 1% and old subjects: 32 ± 7%) and ACh (young subjects: 92 ± 3% and old subjects: 73 ± 4%), were significantly blunted (P < 0.05) in SMFAs of old compared with young subjects, with no such age-related differences in endothelium-independent vasodilation (SNP). In response to an increase in flow-induced shear stress, vasodilation kinetics (time constant to reach 63% of the amplitude of the response: 55 ± 1 s in young subjects and 92 ± 7 s in old subjects) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation (phospho-eNOSs1177/total eNOS: 1.0 ± 0.1 in young subjects and 0.2 ± 0.1 in old subjects) were also significantly attenuated in old compared with young subjects (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the vessel superoxide concentration was greater in old subjects (old subjects: 3.9 ± 1.0 area under curve/mg and young subjects: 1.7 ± 0.1 area under the curve/mg, P < 0.05). These findings reveal that the endothelium-dependent vasodilatory capacity, including vasodilation kinetics but not smooth muscle function, of human SMFAs is blunted with age and may be due to free radicals. Given the potential regulatory role of SMFAs in skeletal muscle blood flow, these findings may explain, at least in part, the often observed attenuated perfusion of skeletal muscle with advancing age that may contribute to exercise

  19. Impact of age on the vasodilatory function of human skeletal muscle feed arteries.

    PubMed

    Park, Song-Young; Ives, Stephen J; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Hyngstrom, John R; Reese, Van; Layec, Gwenael; Bharath, Leena P; Symons, John D; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-01-15

    Although advancing age is often associated with attenuated skeletal muscle blood flow and skeletal muscle feed arteries (SMFAs) have been recognized to play a regulatory role in the vasculature, little is known about the impact of age on the vasodilatory capacity of human SMFAs. Therefore, endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation were assessed in SMFAs (diameter: 544 ± 63 μm) obtained from 24 (equally represented) young (33 ± 2 yr) and old (71 ± 2 yr) subjects in response to three stimuli: 1) flow-induced shear stress, 2) ACh, and 3) sodium nitropusside (SNP). Both assessments of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, flow (young subjects: 68 ± 1% and old subjects: 32 ± 7%) and ACh (young subjects: 92 ± 3% and old subjects: 73 ± 4%), were significantly blunted (P < 0.05) in SMFAs of old compared with young subjects, with no such age-related differences in endothelium-independent vasodilation (SNP). In response to an increase in flow-induced shear stress, vasodilation kinetics (time constant to reach 63% of the amplitude of the response: 55 ± 1 s in young subjects and 92 ± 7 s in old subjects) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation (phospho-eNOS(s1177)/total eNOS: 1.0 ± 0.1 in young subjects and 0.2 ± 0.1 in old subjects) were also significantly attenuated in old compared with young subjects (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the vessel superoxide concentration was greater in old subjects (old subjects: 3.9 ± 1.0 area under curve/mg and young subjects: 1.7 ± 0.1 area under the curve/mg, P < 0.05). These findings reveal that the endothelium-dependent vasodilatory capacity, including vasodilation kinetics but not smooth muscle function, of human SMFAs is blunted with age and may be due to free radicals. Given the potential regulatory role of SMFAs in skeletal muscle blood flow, these findings may explain, at least in part, the often observed attenuated perfusion of skeletal muscle with advancing age that may contribute to exercise

  20. [Septic shock in ICU: advanced therapeutics, immunoparalysis and genomics. State of the art].

    PubMed

    Arriagada S, Daniela; Donoso F, Alejandro; Cruces R, Pablo; Díaz R, Franco

    2014-08-01

    New and important concepts have emerged for the advanced management of the child with septic shock in the recent decades. Attending physicians in the Pediatric intensive care unit must be fully aware of them to improve patient care in the critical care unit. It should be considered the use of immune therapy only in selected groups of patients. Continuous renal replacement therapies are well tolerated and their early use prevents deleterious fluid overload. Removal of inflammatory mediators by using high volume hemofiltration may play a role in hyperdynamic septic patients. The use of plasmapheresis is recommended in patients with thrombocytopenia-associated multiple organ failure. Extracorporeal support use should be considered in those with refractory septic shock despite goals directed therapy. The immunoparalysis has been associated with nosocomial infections and late mortality. The information from genetic markers may allow early intervention and preventive genomics-based medicine.

  1. Potential Improvements in Shock-Mitigation Efficacy of a Polyurea-Augmented Advanced Combat Helmet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, A.; LaBerge, M.; Grujicic, M.; Pandurangan, B.; Runt, J.; Tarter, J.; Dillon, G.

    2012-08-01

    The design of the currently used Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH) has been optimized to attain maximum protection against ballistic impacts (fragments, shrapnel, etc.) and hard-surface collisions. However, the ability of the ACH to protect soldiers against blast loading appears not to be as effective. Polyurea, a micro-segregated elastomeric copolymer has shown superior shock-mitigation capabilities. In the present work, a combined Eulerian/Lagrangian transient non-linear dynamics computational fluid/solid interaction analysis is used to investigate potential shock-mitigation benefits which may result from different polyurea-based design augmentations of the ACH. Specific augmentations include replacement of the currently used suspension-pad material with polyurea and the introduction of a thin polyurea internal lining/external coating to the ACH shell. Effectiveness of different ACH designs was quantified by: (a) establishing the main forms of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI); (b) identifying the key mechanical causes for these injuries; and (c) quantifying the extents of reductions in the magnitude of these mechanical causes. The results obtained show that while the ACH with a 2-mm-thick polyurea internal lining displays the best blast mitigation performance, it does not provide sufficient protection against mTBI.

  2. Phytochemical Study of Tapirira guianensis Leaves Guided by Vasodilatory and Antioxidant Activities.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Amélia M G; Guimarães, Denise O; Konno, Tatiana U P; Tinoco, Luzineide W; Barth, Thiago; Aguiar, Fernando A; Lopes, Norberto P; Leal, Ivana C R; Raimundo, Juliana M; Muzitano, Michelle F

    2017-02-18

    The aim of this research was to perform a phytochemical study of the methanol leaves extract of T. guianensis (MET) guided by vasodilatory and antioxidant activities. The chemical profile of MET and the ethyl acetate fraction (EA fraction) was determined by HPLC-UV-MS and EA fraction guided fractionation by reverse-phase chromatography. The vasorelaxant effects of MET, fractions, sub-fractions and constituents were assessed on rat aorta pre-contracted with phenylephrine. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by using a DPPH assay. The results show that MET-induced vasodilation was dependent on NO/cGMP; and that the PI3K/Akt pathway seems to be the main route involved in eNOS activation. The EA fraction showed greater vasodilatory and antioxidant potency and was submitted to further fractionation. This allowed the isolation and characterization of quercetin, quercetin 3-O-(6″-O-galloyl)-β-d-galactopyranoside and 1,4,6-tri-O-galloyl-β-d-glucose. Also, galloyl-HHDP-hexoside and myricetin deoxyhexoside were identified by HPLC-UV-MS. These compounds are being described for the first time for T. guianensis. 1,4,6-tri-O-galloyl-β-d-glucose and quercetin 3-O-(6″-O-galloyl)-β-d-galactopyranoside showed no vasodilatory activity. Quercetin and myricetin glycoside seems to contribute to the MET activity, since they have been reported as vasodilatory flavonoids. MET-induced vasodilation could contribute to the hypotensive effect of T. guianensis previously reported.

  3. Time course of vasodilatory responses in skeletal muscle arterioles: role in hyperemia at onset of exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wunsch, S. A.; Muller-Delp, J.; Delp, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    At the onset of dynamic exercise, muscle blood flow increases within 1-2 s. It has been postulated that local vasodilatory agents produced by the vascular endothelium or the muscle itself contribute to this response. We hypothesized that only vasodilators that act directly on the vascular smooth muscle could produce vasodilation of skeletal muscle arterioles in <2 s. To test this hypothesis, we determined the time course of the vasodilatory response of isolated skeletal muscle arterioles to direct application of potassium chloride, adenosine, acetylcholine, and sodium nitroprusside. Soleus and gastrocnemius muscles were dissected from the hindlimbs of male Sprague-Dawley rats. First-order arterioles (100-200 microm) were isolated, cannulated on micropipettes, and pressurized to 60 cmH(2)O in an organ bath. Vasodilatory agents were added directly to the bath, and diameter responses of the arterioles were recorded in real time on a videotape recorder. Frame-by-frame analysis of the diameter responses indicated that none of the vasodilator agents tested produced significant diameter increases in <4 s in either soleus or gastrocnemius muscle arterioles. These results indicate that, although these local vasodilators produce significant vasodilation of skeletal muscle resistance arterioles, these responses are not rapid enough (within 1-2 s) to contribute to the initiation of the exercise hyperemic response at the onset of dynamic exercise.

  4. Advances in the diagnosis of shock, its assessment and resuscitation during the Great War.

    PubMed

    Bullingham, A G P

    2016-07-01

    The Great War of 1914-1918 ushered in a new era of technology on the battlefield resulting in casualties on an unprecedented scale. There had been progress in many related areas of medicine before the outbreak of hostilities but these had not been applied or fully developed in clinical practice. This is particularly true for the management of haemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. This article discusses the history and development of medical treatment of shock and trauma patients during the conflict.

  5. Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy in a Person With Advanced Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yue Wen; Jiang, Dong Lei; Zhang, Dai; Wang, Xiao Bei; Yu, Xiao Tong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This case report describes the first patient with avascular necrosis of the femoral head of Association Research Circulation Osseous stage IV, treated with radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy. By contrast, previous studies demonstrated the efficacy of a single treatment of focused extracorporeal shock wave therapy in improving pain and Harris Hip Scale in patients with avascular necrosis of the femoral head of Association Research Circulation Osseous stage I to III. The affected hip was treated with 6000 impulses of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy at 10 Hz and an intensity ranging from 2.5 to 4.0 bar at 7-day intervals for 24 mos. The Harris Hip Scale values were 33, 43, 56, 77, 81, 88, and 92 at baseline and 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 mos, respectively. The radiographs showed that the subluxation of the right hip was slightly aggravated. Joint effusion was reduced, bone marrow edema disappeared, the density became more uniform, and the gluteal muscles were more developed based on magnetic resonance imaging. Increased tracer uptake was evident along the joint margin and superolateral aspect of the head both before and after radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy. This case report demonstrates the feasibility of long-term radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy in Association Research Circulation Osseous stage IV patients. PMID:27003206

  6. Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy in a Person With Advanced Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yue Wen; Jiang, Dong Lei; Zhang, Dai; Wang, Xiao Bei; Yu, Xiao Tong

    2016-09-01

    This case report describes the first patient with avascular necrosis of the femoral head of Association Research Circulation Osseous stage IV, treated with radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy. By contrast, previous studies demonstrated the efficacy of a single treatment of focused extracorporeal shock wave therapy in improving pain and Harris Hip Scale in patients with avascular necrosis of the femoral head of Association Research Circulation Osseous stage I to III. The affected hip was treated with 6000 impulses of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy at 10 Hz and an intensity ranging from 2.5 to 4.0 bar at 7-day intervals for 24 mos. The Harris Hip Scale values were 33, 43, 56, 77, 81, 88, and 92 at baseline and 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 mos, respectively. The radiographs showed that the subluxation of the right hip was slightly aggravated. Joint effusion was reduced, bone marrow edema disappeared, the density became more uniform, and the gluteal muscles were more developed based on magnetic resonance imaging. Increased tracer uptake was evident along the joint margin and superolateral aspect of the head both before and after radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy. This case report demonstrates the feasibility of long-term radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy in Association Research Circulation Osseous stage IV patients.

  7. Peripheral microvascular vasodilatory response to estradiol and genistein in women with insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wenner, Megan M.; Taylor, Hugh S.; Stachenfeld, Nina S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Estradiol enhances vasodilation in healthy women, but vascular effects of the phytoestrogen genistein are still under investigation. Insulin resistance (IR) compromises microvascular function. We therefore examined the interaction of estradiol, genistein, and IR on microvascular vasodilatory responsiveness. Methods We hypothesized that estradiol and genistein increase microvascular vasodilation in healthy women (control, n=8, 23±2 yr, BMI 25.9±2.9 kg/m2) but not in women with IR (n=7, 20±1 yr, BMI 27.3±3.0 kg/m2). We used the cutaneous circulation as a model of microvascular vasodilatory function. We determined cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) with laser Doppler flowmetry and beat-to-beat blood pressure during local cutaneous heating (42°C) with estradiol or genistein microdialysis perfusions. Because heat induced vasodilation is primarily an NO mediated response, we examined microvascular vasodilation with and without L-NMMA. Results In control women, estradiol enhanced CVC (94.4±2.6 % vs. saline 81.6±4.2 % CVCmax, P<0.05), which was reversed with L-NMMA (80.9±7.8 % CVCmax, P<0.05), but genistein did not affect vasodilation. Neither estradiol nor genistein altered CVC in IR, although L-NMMA attenuated CVC during genistein. Conclusions Our study does not support improved microvascular responsiveness during genistein exposure in healthy young women, and demonstrates that neither estradiol nor genistein improve microvascular vasodilatory responsiveness in women with IR. PMID:25996650

  8. Relationship between nonlinear properties of sacral skin blood flow oscillations and vasodilatory function in people at risk for pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Liao, Fuyuan; Garrison, David W; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2010-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to quantify the nonlinear properties of sacral skin blood flow oscillations (BFO) and to explore their relationships with impaired vasodilatory function in people at risk for pressure ulcers. A total of 25 people with various levels of vasodilatory functions were studied, 10 people with normal vasodilatory function (Biphasic thermal index, BTI (5.5, 4.5, 10.1)), 10 people with slight impaired vasodilatory function (BTI (3.7, 3.2, 6.7)), and 5 people with severe impaired vasodilation (BTI (2.4, 1.7, 4.5)). A non-painful fast heating protocol was applied to the sacral region to induce biphasic vasodilation, axon reflex mediated and nitric oxide mediated. Biphasic thermal index is defined as ratios of first peak, nadir, and second peak to baseline blood flow. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to record the BFO signals. Nonlinear properties of BFO were quantified based on self-similarity using Hurst exponent (HE) and detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), regularity using sample entropy (SampEn), complexity using correlation dimension (CD), and chaotic behavior using largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE). The Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to examine the differences between groups. Our results showed that local heating reduces the self-similarity and increases complexity of skin blood flow oscillations. Vasodilatory function has an inverse relationship with nonlinear properties in sacral skin baseline BFO. Nonlinear indexes, including HE, DFA, CD, and LLE, are appropriate tools to quantify nonlinear properties of BFO to study the microvascular dysfunction (p<0.05), and that SampEn may not be appropriate for this purpose (p>0.05). Our study supports the use of nonlinear indexes to predict the vasodilatory function, which can complement current analysis of blood flow control mechanisms using spectral (wavelet) analysis.

  9. Vasodilatory effect of nitroglycerin in Japanese subjects with different aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) genotypes.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takeshi; Nishinaka, Toru; Terada, Tomoyuki; Yonezawa, Kazuya

    2017-03-23

    The functional genetic polymorphism of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) influences the enzymatic activities of its wild type (Glu504 encoded by ALDH2*1) and mutant type (Lys504 encoded by ALDH2*2) proteins. The enzymatic activities of mutant-type ALDH2 are limited compared with those of the wild type. ALDH2 has been suggested as a critical factor for nitroglycerin-mediated vasodilation by some human studies and in vitro studies. Currently, there is no research on direct observations of the vasodilatory effect of nitroglycerin sublingual tablets, which is the generally used dosage form. In the present study, the contribution of ALDH2 to the vasodilatory effect of nitroglycerin sublingual tablets was investigated among three genotype groups (ALDH2*1/*1, ALDH2*1/*2, and ALDH2*2/*2) in Japanese. The results by direct assessments of in vivo nitroglycerin-mediated dilation showed no apparent difference in vasodilation among all genotypes of ALDH2. Furthermore, to analyze the effect of other factors (age and flow-mediated dilation), multiple regression analysis and Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis were carried out. These analyses also indicated that the genotypes of ALDH2 were not related to the degree of vasodilation. These results suggest the existence of other predominant pathway(s) for nitroglycerin biotransformation, at least with regard to clinical nitroglycerin (e.g., a sublingual tablet) in Japanese subjects.

  10. Vasodilatory effects of cinnamaldehyde and its mechanism of action in the rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yong-Liang; Shi, Hai-Xia; Murad, Ferid; Bian, Ka

    2011-01-01

    The vasodilatory effect of cinnamaldehyde was investigated for its mechanism of action using isolated rings of rat aorta. Cinnamaldehyde relaxed aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine in a dose-dependent manner, was not affected by either the presence or removal of the endothelium. Pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazole-[4,3-a]-quinoxalin-1-one could not block vasodilation by cinnamaldehyde, indicating that nitric oxide signaling is not involved. Potassium channel blockers, such as glibenclamide, tetraethylammonium, and BaCl2, had no effect on the relaxation produced by cinnamaldehyde. In addition, treatment with either indomethacin or propranolol did not affect cinnamaldehyde-induced vasodilatation. On the other hand, pretreatment of endothelium-denuded rings with cinnamaldehyde significantly inhibited vasoconstriction induced by endogenous vasoconstrictors, including angiotensin II, 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine, endothelin-1, and phenylephrine. In a Ca2+-free experimental setting, this natural vasodilator not only blocked Ca2+ influx-dependent vasoconstriction by either phenylephrine or KCl, but also inhibited phenylephrine-induced tonic contraction, which relies on intracellular Ca2+ release. This study shows that endothelium-independent, Ca2+ influx and/or an inhibitory release mechanism contributes to the vasodilatory effect of cinnamaldehyde.

  11. Effect of postprandial thermogenesis on the cutaneous vasodilatory response during exercise.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Keiji; Ito, Nozomi; Ichikawa, Yoko; Suzuki, Yuichi

    2014-08-01

    To examine the effect of postprandial thermogenesis on the cutaneous vasodilatory response, 10 healthy male subjects exercised for 30 min on a cycle ergometer at 50% of peak oxygen uptake, with and without food intake. Mean skin temperature, mean body temperature (Tb), heart rate, oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide elimination, and respiratory quotient were all significantly higher at baseline in the session with food intake than in the session without food intake. To evaluate the cutaneous vasodilatory response, relative laser Doppler flowmetry values were plotted against esophageal temperature (Tes) and Tb. Regression analysis revealed that the [Formula: see text] threshold for cutaneous vasodilation tended to be higher with food intake than without it, but there were no significant differences in the sensitivity. To clarify the effect of postprandial thermogenesis on the threshold for cutaneous vasodilation, the between-session difference in the Tes threshold and the Tb threshold were plotted against the between-session difference in baseline Tes and baseline Tb, respectively. Linear regression analysis of the resultant plot showed significant positive linear relationships (Tes: r = 0.85, P < 0.01; Tb: r = 0.67, P < 0.05). These results suggest that postprandial thermogenesis increases baseline body temperature, which raises the body temperature threshold for cutaneous vasodilation during exercise.

  12. Vasodilatory effects of cinnamaldehyde and its mechanism of action in the rat aorta

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yong-Liang; Shi, Hai-Xia; Murad, Ferid; Bian, Ka

    2011-01-01

    The vasodilatory effect of cinnamaldehyde was investigated for its mechanism of action using isolated rings of rat aorta. Cinnamaldehyde relaxed aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine in a dose-dependent manner, was not affected by either the presence or removal of the endothelium. Pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazole-[4,3-a]-quinoxalin-1-one could not block vasodilation by cinnamaldehyde, indicating that nitric oxide signaling is not involved. Potassium channel blockers, such as glibenclamide, tetraethylammonium, and BaCl2, had no effect on the relaxation produced by cinnamaldehyde. In addition, treatment with either indomethacin or propranolol did not affect cinnamaldehyde-induced vasodilatation. On the other hand, pretreatment of endothelium-denuded rings with cinnamaldehyde significantly inhibited vasoconstriction induced by endogenous vasoconstrictors, including angiotensin II, 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine, endothelin-1, and phenylephrine. In a Ca2+-free experimental setting, this natural vasodilator not only blocked Ca2+ influx-dependent vasoconstriction by either phenylephrine or KCl, but also inhibited phenylephrine-induced tonic contraction, which relies on intracellular Ca2+ release. This study shows that endothelium-independent, Ca2+ influx and/or an inhibitory release mechanism contributes to the vasodilatory effect of cinnamaldehyde. PMID:21603596

  13. Advanced Shock Position Control for Mode Transition in a Turbine Based Combined Cycle Engine Inlet Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Stueber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    A dual flow-path inlet system is being tested to evaluate methodologies for a Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) propulsion system to perform a controlled inlet mode transition. Prior to experimental testing, simulation models are used to test, debug, and validate potential control algorithms. One simulation package being used for testing is the High Mach Transient Engine Cycle Code simulation, known as HiTECC. This paper discusses the closed loop control system, which utilizes a shock location sensor to improve inlet performance and operability. Even though the shock location feedback has a coarse resolution, the feedback allows for a reduction in steady state error and, in some cases, better performance than with previous proposed pressure ratio based methods. This paper demonstrates the design and benefit with the implementation of a proportional-integral controller, an H-Infinity based controller, and a disturbance observer based controller.

  14. Advances in CFD Prediction of Shock Wave Turbulent Boundary Layer Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    on the Baldwin and Lomax [151] algebraic turbulence model. Fig. 58 from Panaras [150] includes all the critical elements of the swept shock/turbulent...pitot pressure, yaw angle and surface pressure are predictable with reasonable accuracy using algebraic or two-equation turbulence models, however the...calculations they tested algebraic turbulence models and the k−² model, integrated to the wall or employing the wall-function technique. They have found

  15. Advanced Spectroscopic and Thermal Imaging Instrumentation for Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF, an aeroballistic range) at NASA Ames support basic research in aerothermodynamic phenomena of atmospheric entry, specifically shock layer radiation spectroscopy, convective and radiative heat transfer, and transition to turbulence. Innovative optical instrumentation has been developed and implemented to meet the challenges posed from obtaining such data in these impulse facilities. Spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of absolute radiance of a travelling shock wave in EAST are acquired using multiplexed, time-gated imaging spectrographs. Nearly complete spectral coverage from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near infrared is possible in a single experiment. Time-gated thermal imaging of ballistic range models in flight enables quantitative, global measurements of surface temperature. These images can be interpreted to determine convective heat transfer rates and reveal transition to turbulence due to isolated and distributed surface roughness at hypersonic velocities. The focus of this paper is a detailed description of the optical instrumentation currently in use in the EAST and HFFAF.

  16. Battlefield trauma, traumatic shock and consequences: war-related advances in critical care.

    PubMed

    Allison, Carrie E; Trunkey, Donald D

    2009-01-01

    Over the course of history, while the underlying causes for wars have remained few, mechanisms of inflicting injury and our ability to treat the consequent wounds have dramatically changed. Success rates in treating war-related injuries have improved greatly, although the course of progress has not proceeded linearly. From Homer's Iliad to the Civil War to Vietnam, there have been significant improvements in mortality, despite a concurrent increase in the lethality of weapons. These improvements have occurred primarily as a result of progress in three key areas: management of wounds, treatment of shock, and systems of organization.

  17. New organic nitrate-containing benzyloxy isonipecotanilide derivatives with vasodilatory and anti-platelet activity.

    PubMed

    de Candia, Modesto; Marini, Elisabetta; Zaetta, Giorgia; Cellamare, Saverio; Di Stilo, Antonella; Altomare, Cosimo D

    2015-05-25

    A number of new nitric oxide (NO)-precursors were synthesized by grafting nitrate-containing moieties on the structures of the benzyloxy isonipecotanilide derivatives 1 and 2 already reported as moderately potent antiplatelet agents. Various nitrooxy (ONO2)-alkyl side chains were covalently linked to the piperidine nitrogen of the parent compounds through carbamate and amide linkage, and the synthesis of a benzyl nitrate analog (15) of compound 1 was also achieved. The in vitro vasodilatory activities, as well as platelet anti-aggregatory effects, of the newly synthesized organic nitrates were assessed. The (ONO2)methyl carbamate-based derivative 5a and the benzyl nitrate analog 15, which on the other hand retain activity as inhibitors of ADP-induced platelet aggregation, exhibited strong NO-mediated vasodilatory effects on pre-contracted rat aorta strips, with EC50 values in the low nanomolar range (13 and 29 nM, respectively). Experiments carried out with the selectively inhibited soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), which is the key enzyme of the NO-mediated pathway leading to vascular smooth muscle relaxation, confirmed the involvement of NO in the observed vasodilation. The nitrate derivatives proved to be stable in acidic aqueous solution and at pH 7.4. In human serum, unlike 5a, which showed not to undergo enzyme-catalyzed decomposition, the other tested (ONO2)-alkyl carbamate-based compounds (5b and 5e) and benzyl nitrate 15 underwent a faster degradation. However, their decomposition rates in serum were quite slow (t½>2.6 h), which suggests that nitrate moiety is poorly metabolized in blood plasma and that much of the in vitro anti-platelet activity has to be attributed to the intact (ONO2)-containing molecules.

  18. Limitations to vasodilatory capacity and .VO2 max in trained human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Barden, Jeremy; Lawrenson, Lesley; Poole, Jennifer G; Kim, Jeannie; Wray, D Walter; Bailey, Damian M; Richardson, Russell S

    2007-05-01

    To further explore the limitations to maximal O(2) consumption (.VO(2 max)) in exercise-trained skeletal muscle, six cyclists performed graded knee-extensor exercise to maximum work rate (WR(max)) in hypoxia (12% O(2)), hyperoxia (100% O(2)), and hyperoxia + femoral arterial infusion of adenosine (ADO) at 80% WR(max). Arterial and venous blood sampling and thermodilution blood flow measurements allowed the determination of muscle O(2) delivery and O(2) consumption. At WR(max), O(2) delivery rose progressively from hypoxia (1.0 +/- 0.04 l/min) to hyperoxia (1.20 +/- 0.09 l/min) and hyperoxia + ADO (1.33 +/- 0.05 l/min). Leg .VO(2 max) varied with O(2) availability (0.81 +/- 0.05 and 0.97 +/- 0.07 l/min in hypoxia and hyperoxia, respectively) but did not improve with ADO-mediated vasodilation (0.80 +/- 0.09 l/min in hyperoxia + ADO). Although a vasodilatory reserve in the maximally working quadriceps muscle group may have been evidenced by increased leg vascular conductance after ADO infusion beyond that observed in hyperoxia (increased blood flow but no change in blood pressure), we recognize the possibility that the ADO infusion may have provoked vasodilation in nonexercising tissue of this limb. Together, these findings imply that maximally exercising skeletal muscle may maintain some vasodilatory capacity, but the lack of improvement in leg .VO(2 max) with significantly increased O(2) delivery (hyperoxia + ADO), with a degree of uncertainty as to the site of this dilation, suggests an ADO-induced mismatch between O(2) consumption and blood flow in the exercising limb.

  19. In vitro and in vivo vasodilatory activity of barnidipine and its enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, O; Asano, M; Takenaka, T

    1999-02-01

    Barnidipine, (3'S)-1-benzyl-3-pyrrolidinyl methyl (4S)-2,6-dimethyl-4-(m-nitrophenyl)-1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylat e, is a dihydropyridine calcium antagonist with asymmetric carbons at the dihydropyridine C-4 and the pyrrolidine C-3' positions. In this study, the vasodilatory activity of barnidipine and its 3 optical isomers were compared in vitro and in vivo to assess the steric effects of these asymmetric carbons. All these enantiomers produced concentration-dependent relaxation on KCI (40 mM)-induced contractions in isolated guinea pig aorta with a potency order of barnidipine>(3'R,4R) approximately/= (3'R,4S)>(3'S,4R). The potency ratio between barnidipine and the (3'S,4R) enantiomer was 118. All enantiomers increased coronary blood flow after intra-arterial administration to anesthetized coronary-perfused dogs. The potency order almost agreed with that obtained in vitro, although the potency ratio between barnidipine and the (3'S,4R) enantiomer was only 15. These 4 enantiomers showed stereoselectivity for time course changes as well. The onset and disappearance of blood flow increase after intracoronary administration of barnidipine were slower than those of other enantiomers. The duration for barnidipine was longer than those for other dihydropyridine calcium antagonists such as nifedipine or nitrendipine. The present study suggests stereoselectivity for the C-4 dihydropyridine and to a lesser degree for the C-3' of pyrrolidine in an ester moiety. The steric effects of these carbons were observed not only in the potency of vasodilatory activity but also in its duration.

  20. Vasodilatory Effects of Combined Traditional Chinese Medicinal Herbs in Optimized Ratio.

    PubMed

    Loh, Yean Chun; Tan, Chu Shan; Ch'ng, Yung Sing; Ahmad, Mariam; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini; Yam, Mun Fei

    2017-03-01

    Recently, a new syndromic disease combination theory of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for hypertensive treatment has been introduced. In the wake of this new concept, a new science-based TCM formula that counteracts various syndromes is needed. The objective of this study was to develop such a formula. Five of the most clinically prescribed TCM herbs that work on different syndromes, namely Gastrodia elata, Uncaria rhynchophylla, Pueraria thomsonii, Panax notoginseng, and Alisma orientale, were selected for this study. The fingerprints of these five herbs were analyzed by tri-step Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Three different solvents, 95% ethanol, 50% ethanol, and distilled water, were used for the maceration of the herbs and their vasodilatory effects were studied using in vitro precontracted aortic ring model. Among these, the 50% ethanolic extracts of G. elata (GE50) and A. orientale (AO50), and 95% ethanolic extracts of U. rhynchophylla (UR95), P. thomsonii (PT95), and P. notoginseng (PN95) were found to be the most effective for eliciting vasodilation. Thus, these five extracts were used for orthogonal stimulus-response compatibility group studies by using L25 (5(5)) formula. The best combination ratio for GE50, UR95, PT95, PN95, and AO50, which was assigned as Formula 1 (F1), was found at EC0, EC25, EC20, EC20, and EC10, respectively. The vasodilatory effect of the extracts prepared from different extraction methods using F1 ratio was also studied. From the results, the EC50 and Rmax of total 50% ethanolic extract of five herbs using F1 ratio (F1-2) were 0.028 ± 0.005 mg/mL and 101.71% ± 3.64%, with better values than F1 (0.104 ± 0.014 mg/mL and 97.80% ± 3.12%, respectively). In conclusion, the optimum ratio and appropriate extraction method (F1-2) for the new TCM formula were revealed.

  1. Synthesis of a new series of 4-aryl-1,4-dihydropyridines with calcium channel blocking and vasodilatory activity.

    PubMed

    Jain, P; Narang, G; Jindal, D P; Bansal, R; Calle, C; Carron, R; Pemberton, K; Harvey, A L

    2006-05-01

    Synthesis of a new series of 4-aryl-1,4-dihydropyridines possessing potential calcium channel blocking activity along with good vasodilatory profile is reported. The compounds were synthesized using modified Hantzsch condensation of various aldehydes with methyl 3-aminocrotonate in the presence of a catalytic amount of trifluoroacetic acid and subsequent alkylation with various hydrochlorides of dialkylaminoalkyl chlorides. In vitro calcium channel blocking activity has been evaluated in cultures of neonatal rat cortical neurons by measuring the inhibitory response at L-type calcium channels activated by veratridine. Many compounds exhibited moderate to significant calcium channel blockade around 1 microM. The vasodilatory activity was assessed on isolated rat thoracic aortic rings precontracted by phenylephrine/KCl (30 mM). Most of the compounds produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the contractile response.

  2. Percutaneous Hemodynamic Support (Impella) in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure and/or Cardiogenic Shock Not Eligible to PROTECT II Trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Mukku, Venkata Kishore; Gilani, Syed; Fujise, Ken; Barbagelata, Alejandro

    2013-12-01

    PROTECT I and II trials have tested the efficacy of Impella in patents with high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, patients with severe hemodynamic instability such as cardiac arrest, ST-segment elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI), or cardiogenic shock were excluded. The objective was to investigate the efficacy of Impella in sicker patient population who were not included in PROTECT trials. These patients merit high-risk PCI who had cardiogenic shock and unstable or decompensated heart failure (HF). From December 2010 to March 2012, 10 consecutive patients with extremely high surgical risk and hemodynamic instability underwent urgent PCI with Impella 2.5 support (Abiomed Inc., Danvers, MA). These patients were presented with advance HF and/or cardiogenic shock. Among the 10 included patients, 3 patients were with cardiac arrest and 1 patient was with acute myocardial infarction. All patients had successful Impella implantation and remained hemodynamically stable during high-risk PCI. Among the 10 patients 2 patients (20%) died within 1 month and 1 patient developed limb ischemia. In high-risk population nonrandomizable to PROTECT trials with advance HF/cardiogenic shock, Impella could be an important tool for hemodynamic support to PCI or could be a bridge to left ventricle assist device to achieve good recovery. Larger studies need to be conducted on this high-risk population.

  3. Attenuated cerebral vasodilatory capacity in response to hypercapnia in college-aged African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Hurr, Chansol; Kim, Kiyoung; Harrison, Michelle L; Brothers, R Matthew

    2015-01-01

    African Americans (AAs) have increased risk for cardiovascular, cerebral vascular and metabolic disease, including hypertension, stroke, coronary artery disease, metabolic syndrome and type II diabetes, relative to Caucasian Americans (CAs). While it is accepted that endothelial function is impaired in AAs, less is known regarding their cerebral vasodilatory capacity in response to hypercapnia. We hypothesized that AAs have a reduction in the total range of change in cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) measured in the middle cerebral artery and an index of cerebral vascular conductance (CVCI) in response to changes in the partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide () during rebreathing-induced hypercapnia when compared with CAs. Twenty-one healthy, college-aged AA (10 male) and 21 age- and sex-matched CA (10 male) subjects participated in this study. A four-parameter logistic regression was used for curve fitting the responses of CBFV and CVCI relative to changes in . The total ranges of change in CBFV (101 ± 18 versus 69 ± 23%; P < 0.001) and CVCI (83 ± 21 versus 58 ± 21%; P < 0.001) as well as the maximal increase in CBFV (205 ± 24 versus 169 ± 24%; P < 0.001) and CVCI (188 ± 30 versus 154 ± 19%; P < 0.001) were reduced during hypercapnia in AAs relative to CAs despite a similar increase in (change, 15 ± 3 versus 15 ± 3 mmHg; P = 0.65). In conclusion, these data indicate that AAs have attenuated cerebral vascular capacity to respond to hypercapnia when compared with CAs. PMID:25557729

  4. Effect of {beta}{sub 1} adrenergic receptor blockade on myocardial blood flow and vasodilatory capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Boettcher, M.; Czernin, J.; Sun, K.

    1997-03-01

    The {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade reduces cardiac work and may thereby lower myocardial blood flow (MBF) at rest. The effect of {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade on hyperemic MBF is unknown. To evaluate the effect of selective {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade on MBF at rest and during dipyridamole induced hyperemia, 10 healthy volunteers (8 men, 2 women, mean age 24 {+-} 5 yr) were studied using {sup 13}N-ammonia PET (two-compartment model) under control conditions and again during metoprolol (50 mg orally 12 hr and 1 hr before the study). The resting rate pressure product (6628 {+-} 504 versus 5225 {+-} 807) and heart rate (63 {+-} 6-54 {plus_minus} 5 bpm) declined during metoprolol (p < 0.05). Similarly, heart rate and rate pressure product declined from the baseline dipyridamole study to dipyridamole plus metoprolol (p < 0.05). Resting MBF declined in proportion to cardiac work by approximately 20% from 0.61 {+-} 0.09-0.51 {+-} 0.10 ml/g/min (p < 0.05). In contrast, hyperemic MBF increased when metoprolol was added to dipyridamole (1.86 {plus_minus} 0.27 {+-} 0.45 ml/g/min; p<0.05). The decrease in resting MBF together with the increase in hyperemic MBF resulted in a significant increase in the myocardial flow reserve during metoprolol (3.14 {+-} 0.80-4.61 {+-} 0.68; p<0.01). The {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade increases coronary vasodilatory capacity and myocardial flow reserve. However, the mechanisms accounting for this finding remain uncertain. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Local and systemic vasodilatory effects of low molecular weight S-nitrosothiols.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J; Wilson, Sean M; Terry, Michael H; Romero, Monica; Longo, Lawrence D; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2016-02-01

    S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) such as S-nitroso-L-cysteine (L-cysNO) are endogenous compounds with potent vasodilatory activity. During circulation in the blood, the NO moiety can be exchanged among various thiol-containing compounds by S-transnitrosylation, resulting in SNOs with differing capacities to enter the cell (membrane permeability). To determine whether the vasodilating potency of SNOs is dependent upon membrane permeability, membrane-permeable L-cysNO and impermeable S-nitroso-D-cysteine (D-cysNO) and S-nitroso-glutathione (GSNO) were infused into one femoral artery of anesthetized adult sheep while measuring bilateral femoral and systemic vascular conductances. L-cysNO induced vasodilation in the infused hind limb, whereas D-cysNO and GSNO did not. L-cysNO also increased intracellular NO in isolated arterial smooth muscle cells, whereas GSNO did not. The infused SNOs remained predominantly in a low molecular weight form during first-passage through the hind limb vasculature, but were converted into high molecular weight SNOs upon systemic recirculation. At systemic concentrations of ~0.6 μmol/L, all three SNOs reduced mean arterial blood pressure by ~50%, with pronounced vasodilation in the mesenteric bed. Pharmacokinetics of L-cysNO and GSNO were measured in vitro and in vivo and correlated with their hemodynamic effects, membrane permeability, and S-transnitrosylation. These results suggest local vasodilation by SNOs in the hind limb requires membrane permeation, whereas systemic vasodilation does not. The systemic hemodynamic effects of SNOs occur after equilibration of the NO moiety amongst the plasma thiols via S-transnitrosylation.

  6. Gas gun shock experiments with single-pulse x-ray phase contrast imaging and diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, S. N.; Jensen, B. J.; Hooks, D. E.; Fezzaa, K.; Ramos, K. J.; Yeager, J. D.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Shimada, T.

    2012-07-01

    The highly transient nature of shock loading and pronounced microstructure effects on dynamic materials response call for in situ, temporally and spatially resolved, x-ray-based diagnostics. Third-generation synchrotron x-ray sources are advantageous for x-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) and diffraction under dynamic loading, due to their high photon fluxes, high coherency, and high pulse repetition rates. The feasibility of bulk-scale gas gun shock experiments with dynamic x-ray PCI and diffraction measurements was investigated at the beamline 32ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source. The x-ray beam characteristics, experimental setup, x-ray diagnostics, and static and dynamic test results are described. We demonstrate ultrafast, multiframe, single-pulse PCI measurements with unprecedented temporal (<100 ps) and spatial (˜2 μm) resolutions for bulk-scale shock experiments, as well as single-pulse dynamic Laue diffraction. The results not only substantiate the potential of synchrotron-based experiments for addressing a variety of shock physics problems, but also allow us to identify the technical challenges related to image detection, x-ray source, and dynamic loading.

  7. Gas gun shock experiments with single-pulse x-ray phase contrast imaging and diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source.

    PubMed

    Luo, S N; Jensen, B J; Hooks, D E; Fezzaa, K; Ramos, K J; Yeager, J D; Kwiatkowski, K; Shimada, T

    2012-07-01

    The highly transient nature of shock loading and pronounced microstructure effects on dynamic materials response call for in situ, temporally and spatially resolved, x-ray-based diagnostics. Third-generation synchrotron x-ray sources are advantageous for x-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) and diffraction under dynamic loading, due to their high photon fluxes, high coherency, and high pulse repetition rates. The feasibility of bulk-scale gas gun shock experiments with dynamic x-ray PCI and diffraction measurements was investigated at the beamline 32ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source. The x-ray beam characteristics, experimental setup, x-ray diagnostics, and static and dynamic test results are described. We demonstrate ultrafast, multiframe, single-pulse PCI measurements with unprecedented temporal (<100 ps) and spatial (∼2 μm) resolutions for bulk-scale shock experiments, as well as single-pulse dynamic Laue diffraction. The results not only substantiate the potential of synchrotron-based experiments for addressing a variety of shock physics problems, but also allow us to identify the technical challenges related to image detection, x-ray source, and dynamic loading.

  8. Pharmacological inhibition of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase improves endothelial vasodilatory function in rats in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiumei; Sievers, Richard E.; Varga, Monika; Kharait, Sourabh; Haddad, Daniel J.; Patton, Aaron K.; Delany, Christopher S.; Mutka, Sarah C.; Blonder, Joan P.; Dubé, Gregory P.; Rosenthal, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) exerts a wide range of cellular effects in the cardiovascular system. NO is short lived, but S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) functions as a stable intracellular bioavailable NO pool. Accordingly, increased levels can facilitate NO-mediated processes, and conversely, catabolism of GSNO by the regulatory enzyme GSNO reductase (GSNOR) can impair these processes. Because dysregulated GSNOR can interfere with processes relevant to cardiovascular health, it follows that inhibition of GSNOR may be beneficial. However, the effect of GSNOR inhibition on vascular activity is unknown. To study the effects of GSNOR inhibition on endothelial function, we treated rats with a small-molecule inhibitor of GSNOR (N6338) that has vasodilatory effects on isolated aortic rings and assessed effects on arterial flow-mediated dilation (FMD), an NO-dependent process. GSNOR inhibition with a single intravenous dose of N6338 preserved FMD (15.3 ± 5.4 vs. 14.2 ± 6.3%, P = nonsignificant) under partial NO synthase inhibition that normally reduces FMD by roughly 50% (14.1 ± 2.9 vs. 7.6 ± 4.4%, P < 0.05). In hypertensive rats, daily oral administration of N6338 for 14 days reduced blood pressure (170.0 ± 5.3/122.7 ± 6.4 vs. 203.8 ± 1.9/143.7 ± 7.5 mmHg for vehicle, P < 0.001) and vascular resistance index (1.5 ± 0.4 vs. 3.2 ± 1.0 mmHg·min·l−1 for vehicle, P < 0.001), and restored FMD from an initially impaired state (7.4 ± 1.7%, day 0) to a level (13.0 ± 3.1%, day 14, P < 0.001) similar to that observed in normotensive rats. N6338 also reversed the pathological kidney changes exhibited by the hypertensive rats. GSNOR inhibition preserves FMD under conditions of impaired NO production and protects against both microvascular and conduit artery dysfunction in a model of hypertension. PMID:23349456

  9. Echocardiography in shock management.

    PubMed

    McLean, Anthony S

    2016-08-20

    Echocardiography is pivotal in the diagnosis and management of the shocked patient. Important characteristics in the setting of shock are that it is non-invasive and can be rapidly applied.In the acute situation a basic study often yields immediate results allowing for the initiation of therapy, while a follow-up advanced study brings the advantage of further refining the diagnosis and providing an in-depth hemodynamic assessment. Competency in basic critical care echocardiography is now regarded as a mandatory part of critical care training with clear guidelines available. The majority of pathologies found in shocked patients are readily identified using basic level 2D and M-mode echocardiography. A more comprehensive diagnosis can be achieved with advanced levels of competency, for which practice guidelines are also now available. Hemodynamic evaluation and ongoing monitoring are possible with advanced levels of competency, which includes the use of colour Doppler, spectral Doppler, and tissue Doppler imaging and occasionally the use of more recent technological advances such as 3D or speckled tracking.The four core types of shock-cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, and vasoplegic-can readily be identified by echocardiography. Even within each of the main headings contained in the shock classification, a variety of pathologies may be the cause and echocardiography will differentiate which of these is responsible. Increasingly, as a result of more complex and elderly patients, the shock may be multifactorial, such as a combination of cardiogenic and septic shock or hypovolemia and ventricular outflow obstruction.The diagnostic benefit of echocardiography in the shocked patient is obvious. The increasing prevalence of critical care physicians experienced in advanced techniques means echocardiography often supplants the need for more invasive hemodynamic assessment and monitoring in shock.

  10. Particle acceleration at collisionless shocks: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Zank, G.P.; Li Gang; Webb, G.M.; Le Roux, J.A.; Florinski, V.; Ao, X.; Rice, W.K.M.

    2005-08-01

    An overview of shock acceleration is presented, focusing primarily on interplanetary shocks and the termination shock as examples. An extended discussion of recent advances in modeling real solar energetic particle (SEP) and energetic storm particle (ESP) events is presented. When the energy of accelerated particles becomes very large, their back reaction on the flow can result in a shock that is significantly mediated, and as an example, we consider some results for the termination shock.

  11. Inotropic and coronary vasodilatory actions of the K-adenosine triphosphate channel modulator nicorandil in human tissue.

    PubMed

    Müller-Ehmsen, J; Brixius, K; Hoischen, S; Schwinger, R H

    1996-12-01

    The present study aimed to characterize the inotropic and vasodilatory properties of the K-ATP channel opener nicorandil (NIC) in isolated human cardiac tissue. For comparison, the Ca+2 channel blockers diltiazem (DIL) and nifedipine (NIF) have been studied. Concentration-dependent effects of NIC, DIL and NIF on the force of contraction (FOC) and the vascular tone have been studied on left ventricular papillary muscle strips (dilated cardiomyopathy, New York Heart Association Class IV, n = 20; nonfailing, donor hearts, n = 4), on right auricular trabeculae (nonfailing, n = 5) and on precontracted (prostaglandin F2 alpha: 0.3, 0.5 or 1 mumol/l) isolated human coronary artery rings (cardiac transplantation, n = 15). NIC, DIL and NIF concentration-dependently reduced the FOC of the papillary muscle preparations. However, the IC25 for the negative inotropic effect was significantly higher for NIC compared to DIL and NIF. The maximal negative inotropic effects of NIC, DIL and NIF (100 mumol/l) were -48.2 +/- 4.1, -92.9 +/- 0.9 and -93.4 +/- 1.4% of the basal FOC. The negative inotropic actions of NIC were similar in the human failing and the nonfailing ventricular and in the right atrial myocardium. Whereas pretreatment with methylene blue, an inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase, had no effect on the negative inotropic action of NIC, it was almost abolished by glibenclamide, a selective antagonist of the ATP-dependent K channels. NIC, DIL and NIF relaxed the coronary artery rings with 97.1 +/- 0.5, 90.7 +/- 0.9 and 96.4 +/- 0.7% of maximal relaxation (papaverine, 100 mumol/l). The rank order of vasodilatory potency was NIF > NIC > DIL. In conclusion, NIC is as effective as DIL and NIF in relaxing human coronary artery rings. However, NIC showed significantly lower negative inotropic effects when compared with the Ca+2 channel antagonists. The negative inotropic action of NIC is probably due to an interaction with the ATP-dependent K channels. In addition, activation of

  12. Influences of inflation rate and duration on vasodilatory effect by intermittent pneumatic compression in distant skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, K; Chen, L E; Seaber, A V; Urbaniak, J R

    1999-05-01

    Previous study has demonstrated that application of intermittent pneumatic compression on legs can cause vasodilation in distant skeletal muscle at the microcirculation level. This study evaluated the influence of inflation rate and peak-pressure duration on the vasodilatory effects of intermittent pneumatic compression. The cremaster muscles of 50 male rats were exposed and divided into five groups of 10 each. A specially designed intermittent pneumatic-compression device was applied in a medial-lateral fashion to both legs of all rats for 60 minutes, with an inflation rate and peak-pressure duration of 0.5 and 5 seconds, respectively, in group A, 5 and 0 seconds in group B, 5 and 5 seconds in group C, 10 and 0 seconds in group D, and 10 and 5 seconds in group E. Diameters of arterial segments were measured in vessels of three size categories (10-20, 21-40, and 41-70 microm) for 120 minutes. The results showed that the greatest increase in diameter was produced by intermittent pneumatic compression with the shortest inflation rate (0.5 seconds). A moderate increase resulted from compression with an inflation rate of 5 seconds, and no effective vasodilation occurred during compression with the longest inflation rate (10 seconds). When the groups with different inflation rates but the same peak-pressure duration were compared, there was a significant difference between any two groups among groups A, C, and E and between groups B and D. When the groups with different peak-pressure durations but the same inflation rate were compared, compression with a peak-pressure duration of 5 seconds caused a generally similar degree of diameter change as did compression without inflation at peak pressure. The findings suggest that inflation rate plays an important role in the modulation of distant microcirculation induced by intermittent pneumatic compression whereas peak-pressure duration does not significantly influence the vasodilatory effects of the compression. This may be

  13. Clinical Outcomes of Advanced Heart Failure Patients with Cardiogenic Shock Treated with Temporary Circulatory Support Before Durable LVAD Implant.

    PubMed

    Shah, Palak; Smith, Sara; Haft, Jonathan W; Desai, Shashank S; Burton, Nelson A; Romano, Matthew A; Aaronson, Keith D; Pagani, Francis D; Cowger, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Temporary circulatory support (TCS) is used to improve hemodynamics in patients with cardiogenic shock as a bridge to durable ventricular assist device (dVAD). Data from dVAD recipients with or without TCS (extracorporeal membranous oxygenation [ECMO], n = 14; TandemHeart [TH], n = 26) were evaluated. Clinical characteristics and hemodynamics were analyzed for patients before and after TCS and compared with profile 1 (n = 29) or profile 2-3 (n = 269) patients without TCS before dVAD. Extracorporeal membranous oxygenation patients had the highest use of preoperative mechanical ventilation, vasopressors, and the highest HeartMate II risk score before dVAD (p < 0.01). Patients receiving TCS before dVAD implant had hemodynamics comparable with patients in Profiles 2-3 and superior to that of Profile 1 patients without TCS. Operative survival after dVAD was lower in patients receiving ECMO (57%) compared with Profile 1 patients receiving TH (88%), Profile 1 without TCS (82%), or Profile 2-3 patients (97%; all p < 0.01). Despite improved clinical stability with TCS, patients bridged to a dVAD have event-free survival that parallels patients in profile 1 without TCS. Our data suggest that patients requiring TCS before dVAD implant should be still classified Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support profile 1.

  14. Antioxidant capacity and vasodilatory properties of Mediterranean food: the case of Cannonau wine, myrtle berries liqueur and strawberry-tree honey.

    PubMed

    Tuberoso, Carlo Ignazio Giovanni; Boban, Mladen; Bifulco, Ersilia; Budimir, Danijela; Pirisi, Filippo Maria

    2013-10-15

    The aim of this work was to use different assays to evaluate the antioxidant and vasodilatory properties of three typical food products from the Mediterranean area and to correlate these activities with their phenolic content. For this purpose, red wines Cannonau, liqueurs obtained by cold maceration of myrtle (Myrtus communis L.) berries and bitter honeys obtained from strawberry-tree flowers (Arbutus unedo L.) were analysed. The total phenolic (TP) content was measured spectrophotometrically with a modified Folin-Ciocalteau method and phenolic compounds were identified and dosed by HPLC-DAD and LC-MS/MS. Antioxidant activities were evaluated with DPPH, FRAP and ABTS assays and the in vitro vasodilatory effects were assessed using norepinephrine precontracted rat aortic rings. Cannonau wines and myrtle liqueurs showed high levels of TP (1978±279 and 1741±150mg GAE/L, respectively), linearly correlated to the results of FRAP, ABTS, and DPPH assays. Their maximal vasodilatory activity was 61.7±4.1% and 53.0±3.0%, respectively. Although strawberry-tree honey contained relatively high levels of phenolic compounds (922±38mg GAE/kg), it did not induce vasodilation, even at the highest dose tested (0.206g/L). These results indicate that foods with high levels of phenolic compounds should be studied using several different biological assays before being recommended to the general public as functional foods.

  15. Vasodilatory effects of homologous adrenomedullin 2 and adrenomedullin 5 on isolated blood vessels of two species of eel.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Melissa S; Nobata, Shigenori; Takei, Yoshio; Donald, John A

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, adrenomedullin (AM) is a potent vasodilator through signalling pathways that involve the endothelium. In teleost fishes, a family of five AMs are present (AM1/4, AM2/3 and AM5) with four homologous AMs (AM1, AM2/3 and AM5) recently cloned from the Japanese eel, Anguilla japonica. Both AM2 and AM5 have been shown to be strong in vivo vasodepressors in eel, but the mechanism of action of homologous AMs on isolated blood vessels has not been examined in teleost fish. In this study, both eel AM2 and AM5 caused a marked vasodilation of the dorsal aorta. However, only AM5 consistently dilated the small gonadal artery in contrast to AM2 that had no effect in most preparations. Neither AM2 nor AM5 had any effect when applied to the first afferent branchial artery; in contrast, eel ANP always caused a large vasodilation of the branchial artery. In the dorsal aorta, indomethacin significantly reduced the AM2 vasodilation, but had no effect on the AM5 vasodilation. In contrast, removal of the endothelium significantly enhanced the AM5 vasodilation only. In the gonadal artery, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) significantly reduced the AM5 vasodilation suggesting a role for soluble guanylyl cyclase in the dilation, but l-NNA and removal of the endothelium had no effect. The results of this study indicate that AM2 and AM5 have distinct vasodilatory effects that may be due to the peptides signalling via different receptors to regulate vascular tone in eel.

  16. The safety and efficacy of the use of vasopressin in sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Stephen J; Mehta, Saurabh S; Bellamy, Mark C

    2005-11-01

    Sepsis remains a significant problem and cause of morbidity and mortality in intensive care. Vasopressin infusions are currently used as rescue therapy for the treatment of vasodilatory, catecholamine-resistant septic shock. At present, there are no large randomised, controlled trials in the literature investigating vasopressin in this role, although two such studies are currently ongoing in Canada. This review outlines the pathophysiology of sepsis and that of vasopressin in sepsis and reviews the available evidence for the use of vasopressin in sepsis and septic shock. A review of the safety data for vasopressin in this indication is included. Recommendations for the use of vasopressin in septic shock, along with suggestions for the direction of further work in the field are presented.

  17. AOTV bow shock location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desautel, D.

    1985-01-01

    Hypersonic bow-shock location and geometry are of central importance to the aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTVs), but they are difficult to predict for a given vehicle configuration. This paper reports experimental measurements of shock standoff distance for the 70 deg cone AOTV configuration in shock-tunnel-test flows at Mach numbers of 3.8 to 7.9 and for angles of attack from 0 deg to 20 deg. The controlling parameter for hypersonic bow-shock standoff distance (for a given forebody shape) is the mean normal-shock density ratio. Values for this parameter in the tests reported are in the same range as those of the drag-brake AOTV perigee regime. Results for standoff distance are compared with those previously reported in the literature for this AOTV configuration. It is concluded that the AOTV shock standoff distance for the conical configuration, based on frustrum (base) radius, is equivalent to that of a sphere with a radius about 35 percent greater than that of the cone; the distance is, therefore, much less than reported in previous studies. Some reasons for the discrepancies between the present and previous are advanced. The smaller standoff distance determined here implies there will be less radiative heat transfer than was previously expected.

  18. In vitro vasodilatory activity and possible mechanisms of the crude extracts and fractions of Moringa stenopetala (Baker f.) Cufod. leaves in isolated thoracic aorta of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Geleta, Bekesho; Makonnen, Eyasu; Debella, Asfaw; Abebe, Abiy; Fekadu, Netsanet

    2016-01-01

    Moringa stenopetala, a plant belonging to the family of Moringaceae, is traditionally used for the treatment of hypertension and diabetes in Ethiopia. This study evaluates the in vitro vasodilatory effect of the extract of M. stenopetala leaves and the possible mechanisms in precontracted isolated thoracic aorta of guinea pigs. A guinea pig was sacrificed by gentle cervical dislocation, and the thoracic aortic ring was removed, cut spirally, and mounted in an organ bath containing Krebs-Henseleit physiological solution maintained at 37°C, and then the solution was aerated with carbogen (95% O2 and 5% CO2). The vasodilatory activity of cumulative doses of M. stenopetala extracts and fractions was evaluated on intact and denuded endothelium of isolated whole, spirally cut thoracic aortic strips of guinea pigs precontracted with potassium chloride (80 mM), epinephrine (1 μM), methylene blue (10 μM), and glibenclamide (10 μM) using polygraph. All extracts showed a relaxant effect in precontracted isolated whole, spirally cut thoracic aortic strips of guinea pigs in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the greater percentage of relaxant effect was shown with the addition of crude extracts in 80 mM of potassium chloride (99.10% and 95.56% for ethanol and aqueous crude extracts, respectively), and 1 μM of epinephrine (82.85% and 90.16% for ethanol and aqueous crude extracts, respectively) in precontracted isolated whole, spirally cut thoracic aortic strips of guinea pigs. Hence, the possible mechanism of relaxation might be mediated through the blockade of receptor-operated calcium influx and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels. The aqueous extract showed more significant in vitro vasodilatory effect than its fractions and 70% ethanol extract.

  19. In vitro vasodilatory activity and possible mechanisms of the crude extracts and fractions of Moringa stenopetala (Baker f.) Cufod. leaves in isolated thoracic aorta of guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Geleta, Bekesho; Makonnen, Eyasu; Debella, Asfaw; Abebe, Abiy; Fekadu, Netsanet

    2016-01-01

    Moringa stenopetala, a plant belonging to the family of Moringaceae, is traditionally used for the treatment of hypertension and diabetes in Ethiopia. This study evaluates the in vitro vasodilatory effect of the extract of M. stenopetala leaves and the possible mechanisms in precontracted isolated thoracic aorta of guinea pigs. A guinea pig was sacrificed by gentle cervical dislocation, and the thoracic aortic ring was removed, cut spirally, and mounted in an organ bath containing Krebs–Henseleit physiological solution maintained at 37°C, and then the solution was aerated with carbogen (95% O2 and 5% CO2). The vasodilatory activity of cumulative doses of M. stenopetala extracts and fractions was evaluated on intact and denuded endothelium of isolated whole, spirally cut thoracic aortic strips of guinea pigs precontracted with potassium chloride (80 mM), epinephrine (1 μM), methylene blue (10 μM), and glibenclamide (10 μM) using polygraph. All extracts showed a relaxant effect in precontracted isolated whole, spirally cut thoracic aortic strips of guinea pigs in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the greater percentage of relaxant effect was shown with the addition of crude extracts in 80 mM of potassium chloride (99.10% and 95.56% for ethanol and aqueous crude extracts, respectively), and 1 μM of epinephrine (82.85% and 90.16% for ethanol and aqueous crude extracts, respectively) in precontracted isolated whole, spirally cut thoracic aortic strips of guinea pigs. Hence, the possible mechanism of relaxation might be mediated through the blockade of receptor-operated calcium influx and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels. The aqueous extract showed more significant in vitro vasodilatory effect than its fractions and 70% ethanol extract. PMID:27785112

  20. Putative model for heat shock protein 70 complexation with receptor of advanced glycation end products through fluorescence proximity assays and normal mode analyses.

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Marcelo Sartori; Ligabue-Braun, Rodrigo; Souza, Cristiane Santos; Heimfarth, Luana; Verli, Hugo; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is recognized by receptors on the plasma membrane, such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TLR2, CD14, and CD40. This leads to activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, enhancement of the phagocytic activity of innate immune cells, and stimulation of antigen-specific responses. However, the specific characteristics of HSP70 binding are still unknown, and all HSP70 receptors have not yet been described. Putative models for HSP70 complexation to the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGEs), considering both ADP- and ATP-bound states of HSP70, were obtained through molecular docking and interaction energy calculations. This interaction was detected and visualized by a proximity fluorescence-based assay in A549 cells and further analyzed by normal mode analyses of the docking complexes. The interacting energy of the complexes showed that the most favored docking situation occurs between HSP70 ATP-bound and RAGE in its monomeric state. The fluorescence proximity assay presented a higher number of detected spots in the HSP70 ATP treatment, corroborating with the computational result. Normal-mode analyses showed no conformational deformability in the interacting interface of the complexes. Results were compared with previous findings in which oxidized HSP70 was shown to be responsible for the differential modulation of macrophage activation, which could result from a signaling pathway triggered by RAGE binding. Our data provide important insights into the characteristics of HSP70 binding and receptor interactions, as well as putative models with conserved residues on the interface area, which could be useful for future site-directed mutagenesis studies.

  1. Aging Reduces L-Type Calcium Channel Current and the Vasodilatory Response of Small Mesenteric Arteries to Calcium Channel Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Albarwani, Sulayma A.; Mansour, Fathi; Khan, Abdul Aleem; Al-Lawati, Intisar; Al-Kaabi, Abdulla; Al-Busaidi, Al-Manar; Al-Hadhrami, Safa; Al-Husseini, Isehaq; Al-Siyabi, Sultan; Tanira, Musbah O.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are widely used to treat cardiovascular disease (CVD) including hypertension. As aging is an independent risk factor for CVD, the use of CCBs increases with increasing age. Hence, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of aging on the sensitivity of small mesenteric arteries to L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (LTCC) blockers and also to investigate whether there was a concomitant change in calcium current density. Third order mesenteric arteries from male F344 rats, aged 2.5–3 months (young) and 22–26 months (old) were mounted on wire myograph to measure the tension during isometric contraction. Arteries were contracted with 100 mM KCl and were then relaxed in a cumulative concentration-response dependent manner with nifedipine (0.1 nM–1 μM), verapamil (0.1 nM–10 μM), or diltiazem (0.1 nM–10 μM). Relaxation-concentration response curves produced by cumulative concentrations of three different CCBs in arteries of old rats were shifted to the right with statistically significant IC50s. pIC50 ± s.e.m: (8.37 ± 0.06 vs. 8.04 ± 0.05, 7.40 ± 0.07 vs. 6.81 ± 0.04, and 6.58 ± 0.07 vs. 6.34 ± 0.06) in young vs. old. It was observed that the maximal contractions induced by phenylephrine and reversed by sodium nitroprusside were not different between young and old groups. However, Bay K 8644 (1 μM) increased resting tension by 23 ± 4.8% in young arteries and 4.7 ± 1.6% in old arteries. LTCC current density were also significantly lower in old arteries (−2.77 ± 0.45 pA/pF) compared to young arteries (−4.5 ± 0.40 pA/pF); with similar steady-state activation and inactivation curves. Parallel to this reduction, the expression of Cav1.2 protein was reduced by 57 ± 5% in arteries from old rats compared to those from young rats. In conclusion, our results suggest that aging reduces the response of small mesenteric arteries to the vasodilatory effect of the CCBs and this may be due to, at least in part, reduced

  2. Two weeks of muscle immobilization impairs functional sympatholysis but increases exercise hyperemia and the vasodilatory responsiveness to infused ATP.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, S P; Mørkeberg, J; Thaning, P; Hellsten, Y; Saltin, B

    2012-05-15

    is dependent on the training status of the muscle. Immobilization also increases the vasodilatory response to infused ATP.

  3. Influence of Prostaglandin Synthesis Inhibitors on Pulmonary Vasodilatory Effects of Hydralazine in Dogs with Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Lewis J.; Lazar, Jeffrey D.

    1981-01-01

    To determine whether hydralazine, a systemic vasodilator, exerted a similar effect on the pulmonary circulation, we studied the circulatory changes in dogs during three interventions: (a) the control state during room air ventilation; (b) during continuous hypoxic ventilation with 10% oxygen, and maintaining continuous hypoxic ventilation; and (c) after 1 mg/kg hydralazine intravenously. Ventilation with 10% oxygen caused the mean pulmonary artery pressure to increase from 10±1.2 to 23±2.4 mm Hg (P < 0.01) and the pulmonary arteriolar resistance to increase from 1.51±0.19 to 5.87±1.10 U (P < 0.01). Hydralazine significantly lowered the pulmonary artery pressure (23.0±2.4 to 14.3±1.5 mm Hg, P < 0.01) and the pulmonary arteriolar resistance (5.87±1.10 to 2.87±0.52 U, P < 0.01). Femoral artery pressure, pulmonary artery wedge pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output remained unchanged throughout. To ascertain the contribution of the prostaglandin system to the pulmonary vasodilator effects of hydralazine, we pretreated a group of dogs with the prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor, indomethacin, 5 mg/kg s.c., twice daily for 2 d. These animals then underwent identical studies. The pretreated dogs had comparable base-line and hypoxia hemodynamic data. However, hydralazine had no effect on pulmonary artery pressure (23.3±1.6 vs. 21.7±2.3 mm Hg, NS) or pulmonary arteriolar resistance (8.03±1.09 vs. 7.14±1.42, NS) during continuous hypoxic ventilation in the indomethacin-pretreated group. Pretreatment with indomethacin did not, however, block the pulmonary vasodilator effects of intravenous prostacyclin (PGI2). Pretreatment with meclofenamate, a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor structurally unrelated to indomethacin, also blocked the effects of hydralazine during hypoxic ventilation. These data suggest that hydralazine exerts a pulmonary vasodilatory effect during hypoxia-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction, and that this vasodilator effect may be mediated by

  4. Cellular Alterations in Shock and Ischemia and Their Correction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudry, Irshad H.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews recent advances in cellular alterations in shock to help physicians and physiologists keep abreast of current research. Specifically addresses changes occurring as a result of hemorrhagic shock and possible ways such lesions could be corrected. (DH)

  5. Study of the effect of thiols on the vasodilatory potency of S-nitrosothiols by using a modified aortic ring assay

    SciTech Connect

    Giustarini, Daniela; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Rossi, Ranieri

    2011-10-15

    Both low-molecular-mass thiols (LMM-SH) and protein thiols (P-SH) can modulate the biological activity of S-nitrosothiols (RSNO) via S-transnitrosation reactions. It has been difficult to evaluate the entity of this effect in blood circulation by in vitro assays with isolated aorta rings so far, because media rich in proteins cannot be used due to the foaming as a consequence of the needed gas bubbling. We have modified the original apparatus for organ bioassay in order to minimize foaming and to increase analytical performance. By using this modified bioassay we investigated the vasodilatory potency of various endogenous RSNOs in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of albumin and LMM-SH. Our results show that the sulfhydryl group of the cysteine moiety of albumin and LMM-SH has a dramatic effect on the vasodilatory potency of RSNO. Considering the equilibrium constants for S-transnitrosation reactions and the concentration of P-SH and LMM-SH we measured in healthy humans (aged 18-85 years), we infer that the age-dependency of hematic levels of LMM-SH may have a considerable impact in RSNO-mediated vasodilation. S-Nitrosoproteins such as S-nitrosoalbumin may constitute a relatively silent and constant amount of circulating RSNO. On the other hand, LMM-SH may mediate and control the biological actions of S-nitrosoproteins via S-transnitrosation reactions, by forming more potent nitric oxide-releasing LMM-S-nitrosothiols. Lifestyle habits, status of health and individual age are proven factors that, in turn, may influence the concentration of these compounds. These aspects should be taken into consideration when testing the vasodilatory effects of RSNO in pre-clinical studies. - Highlights: > A modification of the organ chamber apparatus for aortic ring bioassays is proposed. > The new apparatus can work in the presence of albumin at physiological concentrations. > Potency of RSNOs was studied in the presence of albumin and low molecular mass -SH

  6. A combination of genistein and magnesium enhances the vasodilatory effect via an eNOS pathway and BK(Ca) current amplification.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lina; Hou, Yunlong; Zhao, Tingting; Zhou, Shanshan; Wang, Xiaoran; Zhang, Liming; Yu, Guichun

    2015-04-01

    The phytoestrogen genistein (GST) and magnesium have been independently shown to regulate vascular tone; however, their individual vasodilatory effects are limited. The aim of this study was to examine the combined effects of GST plus magnesium on vascular tone in mesenteric arteries. The effects of pretreatment with GST (0-200 μmol/L), MgCl2 (0-4.8 mmol/L) and GST plus MgCl2 on 10 μmol/L phenylephrine (PE) precontracted mesenteric arteries in rats were assessed by measuring isometric force. BK(Ca) currents were detected by the patch clamp method. GST caused concentration- and partial endothelium-dependent relaxation. Magnesium resulted in dual adjustment of vascular tone. Magnesium-free solution eliminated the vasodilatation of GST in both endothelium-intact and denuded rings. GST (50 μmol/L) plus magnesium (4.8 mmol/L) caused stronger relaxation in both endothelium-intact and denuded rings. Pretreatment with the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-N-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 μmol/L) significantly inhibited the effects of GST, high magnesium, and the combination of GST and magnesium. BK(Ca) currents were amplified to a greater extent when GST (50 μmol/L) was combined with 4.8 versus 1.2 mmol/L Mg(2+). Our data suggest that GST plus magnesium provides enhanced vasodilatory effects in rat mesenteric arteries compared with that observed when either is used separately, which was related to an eNOS pathway and BK(Ca) current amplification.

  7. Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Lansing, Allan M.

    1963-01-01

    Septic shock may be defined as hypotension caused by bacteremia and accompanied by decreased peripheral blood flow, evidenced by oliguria. Clinically, a shaking chill is the warning signal. The immediate cause of hypotension is pooling of blood in the periphery, leading to decreased venous return: later, peripheral resistance falls and cardiac failure may occur. Irreversible shock is comparable to massive reactive hyperemia. Reticuloendothelial failure, histamine release, and toxic hypersensitivity may be factors in the pathogenesis of septic shock. Adrenal failure does not usually occur, but large doses of corticosteroid are employed therapeutically to counteract the effect of histamine release or hypersensitivity to endotoxin. The keys to successful therapy are time, antibiotics, vasopressors, cortisone and correction of acidosis. PMID:14063936

  8. Shock and Vibration Bulletin. No. 5

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1947-09-01

    The lack of basic knowledge on failures due to shock and vibration are discussed and some of the difficulties in obtaining such information are Pointed...cal phenomena involved in shock or vibra- tion has greatly outstripped advances in our basic knowledge of how and why the structures or components... excellent . "We, as well as many other sections in the Bureau, are particularly interested in shock effects on equipment aboard ship and to that end we

  9. Management of septic shock.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J D

    1993-01-01

    There have been important advances in the resuscitation of patients in septic shock in recent years. Survival can be improved by earlier recognition and therefore eradication of the sepsis combined with logical supportive measures. As with any acutely ill patient consultation with intensive care unit staff may be useful. Consultation with the intensive care unit does not necessarily imply the need for admission and mechanical ventilation; helpful advice may be forthcoming. Equally, referral to the intensive care unit does not mean an admission of failure but merely a recognition that additional skills and technical facilities are necessary for the patient's survival. PMID:8324438

  10. RGTA OTR 4120, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan mimetic, increases wound breaking strength and vasodilatory capability in healing rat full-thickness excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Tong, Miao; Zbinden, Mariken M; Hekking, Ineke J M; Vermeij, Marcel; Barritault, Denis; van Neck, Johan W

    2008-01-01

    ReGeneraTing Agents (RGTAs), a family of polymers engineered to protect and stabilize heparin-binding growth factors, have been shown to promote tissue repair and regeneration. In this study, the effects of one of these polymers, RGTA OTR4120, on healing of full-thickness excisional wounds in rats were investigated. Two 1.5 cm diameter circular full-thickness excisional wounds were created on the dorsum of a rat. After creation of the wounds, RGTA OTR4120 was applied. The progress of healing was assessed quantitatively by evaluating the wound closure rate, vasodilatory capability, and wound breaking strength. The results showed a triple increase of the local vascular response to heat provocation in the RGTA OTR4120-treated wounds as compared with vehicle-treated wounds. On days 14 and 79 after surgery, the wounds treated with RGTA OTR4120 gained skin strength 12% and 48% of the unwounded skin, respectively, and displayed a significantly increased gain in skin strength when compared with control animals. These results raise the possibility of efficacy of RGTA OTR4120 in accelerating surgically cutaneous wound healing by enhancing the wound breaking strength and improving the microcirculation.

  11. Multiple shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenker, Stephen H.; Stanford, Douglas

    2014-12-01

    Using gauge/gravity duality, we explore a class of states of two CFTs with a large degree of entanglement, but with very weak local two-sided correlation. These states are constructed by perturbing the thermofield double state with thermal-scale operators that are local at different times. Acting on the dual black hole geometry, these perturbations create an intersecting network of shock waves, supporting a very long wormhole. Chaotic CFT dynamics and the associated fast scrambling time play an essential role in determining the qualitative features of the resulting geometries.

  12. Shock Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The electrician pictured is installing a General Electric Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI), a device which provides protection against electrical shock in the home or in industrial facilities. Shocks due to defective wiring in home appliances or other electrical equipment can cause severe burns, even death. As a result, the National Electrical Code now requires GFIs in all new homes constructed. This particular type of GFI employs a sensing element which derives from technology acquired in space projects by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, producer of sensors for GE and other manufacturers of GFI equipment. The sensor is based on the company's experience in developing miniaturized circuitry for space telemetry and other spacecraft electrical systems; this experience enabled SCI to package interruptor circuitry in the extremely limited space available and to produce sensory devices at practicable cost. The tiny sensor measures the strength of the electrical current and detects current differentials that indicate a fault in the functioning of an electrical system. The sensing element then triggers a signal to a disconnect mechanism in the GFI, which cuts off the current in the faulty circuit.

  13. Geometrical shock dynamics of fast magnetohydrodynamic shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostert, Wouter; Pullin, Dale I.; Samtaney, Ravi; Wheatley, Vincent

    2016-11-01

    We extend the theory of geometrical shock dynamics (GSD, Whitham 1958), to two-dimensional fast magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks moving in the presence of nonuniform magnetic fields of general orientation and strength. The resulting generalized area-Mach number rule is adapted to MHD shocks moving in two spatial dimensions. A partially-spectral numerical scheme developed from that of Schwendeman (1993) is described. This is applied to the stability of plane MHD fast shocks moving into a quiescent medium containing a uniform magnetic field whose field lines are inclined to the plane-shock normal. In particular, we consider the time taken for an initially planar shock subject to an initial perturbed magnetosonic Mach number distribution, to first form shock-shocks. Supported by KAUST OCRF Award No. URF/1/2162-01.

  14. Supersonic jet shock noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Shock-cell noise is identified to be a potentially significant problem for advanced supersonic aircraft at takeoff. Therefore NASA conducted fundamental studies of the phenomena involved and model-scale experiments aimed at developing means of noise reduction. The results of a series of studies conducted to determine means by which supersonic jet shock noise can be reduced to acceptable levels for advanced supersonic cruise aircraft are reviewed. Theoretical studies were conducted on the shock associated noise of supersonic jets from convergent-divergent (C-D) nozzles. Laboratory studies were conducted on the influence of narrowband shock screech on broadband noise and on means of screech reduction. The usefulness of C-D nozzle passages was investigated at model scale for single-stream and dual-stream nozzles. The effect of off-design pressure ratio was determined under static and simulated flight conditions for jet temperatures up to 960 K. Annular and coannular flow passages with center plugs and multi-element suppressor nozzles were evaluated, and the effect of plug tip geometry was established. In addition to the far-field acoustic data, mean and turbulent velocity distributions were measured with a laser velocimeter, and shadowgraph images of the flow field were obtained.

  15. Mechanisms underlying the endothelium-dependent vasodilatory effect of an aqueous extract of Elaeis Guineensis Jacq. (Arecaceae) in porcine coronary artery rings.

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Mamadou; Anselm, Eric; Séne, Madièye; Diatta, Williams; Dièye, Amadou Moctar; Faye, Babacar; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2009-12-30

    This study was undertaken to investigate the vasodilatory effect of an aqueous extract of Elaeis guineensis Jacq (EGE) in the porcine coronary artery and elicit its possible mechanism(s) of action. Vascular effects of crude extract of dried and powdered leaves of Elaeis guineensis were evaluated on isolated coronary arteries on organ chambers. Determination of eNOS expression and the phosphorylation level of eNOS were determined by Western blot analysis. In the presence of indomethacin, EGE caused pronounced relaxations in endothelium-intact but not in endothelium-denuded coronary artery rings. Relaxations to EGE were significantly reduced by N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA, a competitive inhibitor of NO synthase), slightly but not significantly by charybdotoxin plus apamin (two potent inhibitors of EDHF-mediated responses) and abolished by the combination of L-NA and charybdotoxin plus apamin. Relaxations to EGE were abolished by the membrane permeant, SOD mimetic, MnTMPyP, and significantly reduced by wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3-kinase. Exposure of endothelial cells to EGE increased the phosphorylation level of eNOS at Ser1177 in a time and concentration-dependent manner. MnTMPyP abolished the EGE-induced phosphorylation of eNOS.In conclusion, the obtained data indicate that EGE induces pronounced endothelium-dependent relaxations of the porcine coronary artery, which involve predominantly NO. The stimulatory effect of EGE on eNOS involves the redox-sensitive phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177 most likely via the PI3-kinase pathway.

  16. Toxic Shock Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... burn to avoid getting a staph infection. Toxic shock syndrome treatment Because toxic shock syndrome gets worse quickly, you may be seriously ... toxic shock syndrome in a wound? Resources Toxic Shock Syndrome ... treatment, women's health Family Health, Women January 2017 Copyright © ...

  17. Shock waves and shock tubes; Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Symposium, Berkeley, CA, July 28-August 2, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bershader, D. (Editor); Hanson, R. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    A detailed survey is presented of shock tube experiments, theoretical developments, and applications being carried out worldwide. The discussions explore shock tube physics and the related chemical, physical and biological science and technology. Extensive attention is devoted to shock wave phenomena in dusty gases and other multiphase and heterogeneous systems, including chemically reactive mixtures. Consideration is given to techniques for measuring, visualizing and theoretically modeling flowfield, shock wave and rarefaction wave characteristics. Numerical modeling is explored in terms of the application of computational fluid dynamics techniques to describing flowfields in shock tubes. Shock interactions and propagation, in both solids, fluids, gases and mixed media are investigated, along with the behavior of shocks in condensed matter. Finally, chemical reactions that are initiated as the result of passage of a shock wave are discussed, together with methods of controlling the evolution of laminar separated flows at concave corners on advanced reentry vehicles.

  18. Radiative Shock Waves In Emerging Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul; Doss, F.; Visco, A.

    2011-05-01

    In laboratory experiments we produce radiative shock waves having dense, thin shells. These shocks are similar to shocks emerging from optically thick environments in astrophysics in that they are strongly radiative with optically thick shocked layers and optically thin or intermediate downstream layers through which radiation readily escapes. Examples include shocks breaking out of a Type II supernova (SN) and the radiative reverse shock during the early phases of the SN remnant produced by a red supergiant star. We produce these shocks by driving a low-Z plasma piston (Be) at > 100 km/s into Xe gas at 1.1 atm. pressure. The shocked Xe collapses to > 20 times its initial density. Measurements of structure by radiography and temperature by several methods confirm that the shock wave is strongly radiative. We observe small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces. We describe a variation of the Vishniac instability theory of decelerating shocks and an analysis of associated scaling relations to account for the growth of these perturbations, identify how they scale to astrophysical systems such as SN 1993J, and consider possible future experiments. Collaborators in this work have included H.F. Robey, J.P. Hughes, C.C. Kuranz, C.M. Huntington, S.H. Glenzer, T. Doeppner, D.H. Froula, M.J. Grosskopf, and D.C. Marion ________________________________ * Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  19. Simulations of collisionless shocks - Some implications for particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, D.

    1992-08-01

    The role of self-consistent plasma simulations is discussed with reference to collisionless shock structure and the extraction of thermal particles to supra-thermal energies. Examples are given from quasi-perpendicular and parallel shock geometries. The cyclic reformation behavior of the quasi-parallel shock, as revealed by simulations, is detailed, and some implications given. Finally, some recent advances are described in the techniques of simulation of strong particle acceleration.

  20. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Diagnosed? The first step in diagnosing cardiogenic shock ... is cardiogenic shock. Tests and Procedures To Diagnose Shock and Its Underlying Causes Blood Pressure Test Medical ...

  1. Toxic Shock Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... toxic shock syndrome results from toxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus (staph) bacteria, but the condition may also ... a skin or wound infection. Bacteria, most commonly Staphylococcus aureus (staph), causes toxic shock syndrome. It can ...

  2. Neptune inbound bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam; Lepping, Ronald P.

    1995-01-01

    Voyager 2 crossed the inbound or upstream Neptunian bow shock at 1430 spacecraft event time on August 24 in 1989 (Belcher et al., 1989). The plasma and magnetic field measurements allow us to study the solar wind interaction with the outermost gas giant. To fully utilize all of the spacecraft observations, an improved nonlinear least squares, 'Rankine-Hugoniot' magnetohydrodynamic shock-fitting technique has been developed (Szabo, 1994). This technique is applied to the Neptunian data set. We find that the upstream bow shock normal points nearly exactly toward the Sun consistent with any reasonable large-scale model of the bow shock for a near subsolar crossing. The shock was moving outward with a speed of 14 +/- 12 km/s. The shock can be characterized as a low beta, high Mach number, strong quasi-perpendicular shock. Finally, the shock microstructure features are resolved and found to scale well with theoretical expectations.

  3. Shock & Anaphylactic Shock. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hime, Kirsten

    This learning activity package on shock and anaphylactic shock is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics are…

  4. Biomass shock pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  5. Physiopathology of shock

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Fabrizio Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Shock syndromes are of three types: cardiogenic, hemorrhagic and inflammatory. Hemorrhagic shock has its initial deranged macro-hemodynamic variables in the blood volume and venous return. In cardiogenic shock there is a primary pump failure that has cardiac output/mean arterial pressure as initial deranged variables. In Inflammatory Shock it is the microcirculation that is mainly affected, while the initial deranged macrocirculation variable is the total peripheral resistance hit by systemic inflammatory response. PMID:21769210

  6. Shock front nonstationarity of supercritical perpendicular shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Tohru; Oonishi, Makiko; LembèGe, Bertrand; Savoini, Philippe

    2003-06-01

    The shock front nonstationarity of perpendicular shocks in super-critical regime is analyzed by examining the coupling between "incoming" and "reflected" ion populations. For a given set of parameters including the upstream Mach number (MA) and the fraction α of reflected to incoming ions, a self-consistent, time-stationary solution of the coupling between ion streams and the electromagnetic field is sought for. If such a solution is found, the shock is stationary; otherwise, the shock is nonstationary, leading to a self-reforming shock front often observed in full particle simulations of quasi-perpendicular shocks. A parametric study of this numerical model allows us to define a critical αcrit between stationary and nonstationary regimes. The shock can be nonstationary even for relatively low MA(2-5). For a moderate MA(5-10), the critical value αcrit is about 15 to 20%. For very high MA (>10), αcrit saturates around 20%. Moreover, present full simulations show that self-reformation of the shock front occurs for relatively low βi and disappears for high βi, where βi is the ratio of upstream ion plasma to magnetic field pressures. Results issued from the present theoretical model are found to be in good agreement with full particle simulations for low βi case; this agreement holds as long as the motion of reflected ions is coherent enough (narrow ion ring) to be described by a single population in the model. The present model reveals to be "at variance" with full particle simulations results for the high βi case. Present results are also compared with previous hybrid simulations.

  7. Advanced DAA Methods for Shock Response Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    57 7.7 MODIFIED CESARO SUMMATION FOR IMPROVED CONVERGENCE .............................. 58 vi TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) Section Page 7.8...infinite series through the first N+l terms, the Nth Cesaro sum, aN, of that series is the arithmetic mean of the first N+ 1 partial sums SN , i.e., N N = Y... Cesaro summation employs weights that decrease linearly from one for the first term to zero for xn+ I and beyond. Clearly, the filter characteristic

  8. Structure in Radiating Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, Forrest

    2010-11-01

    The basic radiative shock experiment is a shock launched into a gas of high-atomic-number material at high velocities, which fulfills the conditions for radiative losses to collapse the post-shock material to over 20 times the initial gas density. This has been accomplished using the OMEGA Laser Facility by illuminating a Be ablator for 1 ns with a total of 4 kJ, launching the requisite shock, faster than 100 km/sec, into a polyimide shock tube filled with Xe. The experiments have lateral dimensions of 600 μm and axial dimensions of 2-3 mm, and are diagnosed by x-ray backlighting. Repeatable structure beyond the one-dimensional picture of a shock as a planar discontinuity was discovered in the experimental data. One form this took was that of radial boundary effects near the tube walls, extended approximately seventy microns into the system. The cause of this effect - low density wall material which is heated by radiation transport ahead of the shock, launching a new converging shock ahead of the main shock - is apparently unique to high-energy-density experiments. Another form of structure is the appearance of small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces and creating regions of enhanced and diminished aerial density within the layer. The authors have applied an instability theory, a variation of the Vishniac instability of decelerating shocks, to describe the growth of these perturbations. We have also applied Bayesian statistical methods to better understand the uncertainties associated with measuring shocked layer thickness in the presence of tilt. Collaborators: R. P. Drake, H. F. Robey, C. C. Kuranz, C. M. Huntington, M. J. Grosskopf, D. C. Marion.

  9. New Developments in the Physical Chemistry of Shock Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlott, Dana D.

    2011-05-01

    This review discusses new developments in shock compression science with a focus on molecular media. Some basic features of shock and detonation waves, nonlinear excitations that can produce extreme states of high temperature and high pressure, are described. Methods of generating and detecting shock waves are reviewed, especially those using tabletop lasers that can be interfaced with advanced molecular diagnostics. Newer compression methods such as shockless compression and precompression shock that generate states of cold dense molecular matter are discussed. Shock compression creates a metallic form of hydrogen, melts diamond, and makes water a superionic liquid with unique catalytic properties. Our understanding of detonations at the molecular level has improved a great deal as a result of advanced nonequilibrium molecular simulations. Experimental measurements of detailed molecular behavior behind a detonation front might be available soon using femtosecond lasers to produce nanoscale simulated detonation fronts.

  10. Shock Initiation of Heterogeneous Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E

    2004-05-10

    The fundamental picture that shock initiation in heterogeneous explosives is caused by the linking of hot spots formed at inhomogeneities was put forward by several researchers in the 1950's and 1960's, and more recently. Our work uses the computer hardware and software developed in the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program of the U.S. Department of Energy to explicitly include heterogeneities at the scale of the explosive grains and to calculate the consequences of realistic although approximate models of explosive behavior. Our simulations are performed with ALE-3D, a three-dimensional, elastic-plastic-hydrodynamic Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler finite-difference program, which includes chemical kinetics and heat transfer, and which is under development at this laboratory. We developed the parameter values for a reactive-flow model to describe the non-ideal detonation behavior of an HMX-based explosive from the results of grain-scale simulations. In doing so, we reduced the number of free parameters that are inferred from comparison with experiment to a single one - the characteristic defect dimension. We also performed simulations of the run to detonation in small volumes of explosive. These simulations illustrate the development of the reaction zone and the acceleration of the shock front as the flame fronts start from hot spots, grow, and interact behind the shock front. In this way, our grain-scale simulations can also connect to continuum experiments directly.

  11. Collisionless shock waves mediated by Weibel Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseri, Neda; Ruan, Panpan; Zhang, Xi; Khudik, Vladimir; Shvets, Gennady

    2015-11-01

    Relativistic collisionless shocks are common events in astrophysical environments. They are thought to be responsible for generating ultra-high energy particles via the Fermi acceleration mechanism. It has been conjectured that the formation of collisionless shocks is mediated by the Weibel instability that takes place when two initially cold, unmagnetized plasma shells counter-propagate into each other with relativistic drift velocities. Using a PIC code, VLPL, which is modified to suppress numerical Cherenkov instabilities, we study the shock formation and evolution for asymmetric colliding shells with different densities in their own proper reference frame. Plasma instabilities in the region between the shock and the precursor are also investigated using a moving-window simulation that advances the computational domain at the shock's speed. This method helps both to save computation time and avoid severe numerical Cherenkov instabilities, and it allows us to study the shock evolution in a longer time period. Project is supported by US DOE grants DE-FG02-04ER41321 and DE-FG02-07ER54945.

  12. Shock absorber control system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Y.; Ohira, M.; Ushida, M.; Miyagawa, T.; Shimodaira, T.

    1987-01-13

    A shock absorber control system is described for controlling a dampening force of a shock absorber of a vehicle comprising: setting means for setting a desired dampening force changeable within a predetermined range; drive means for driving the shock absorber to change the dampening force of the shock absorber linearly; control means for controlling the drive means in accordance with the desired dampening force when the setting of the desired dampening force has been changed; detecting means for detecting an actual dampening force of the shock absorber; and correcting means for correcting the dampening force of the shock absorber by controlling the drive means in accordance with a difference between the desired dampening force and the detected actual dampening force.

  13. Observation of Two Slow Shocks Associated with Magnetic Reconnection Exhausts in the Interplanetary Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, HengQiang; Li, QiuHuan; Wang, JieMin; Zhao, GuoQing

    2017-04-01

    In the Petschek magnetic reconnection model, two groups of slow shocks play an important role in the energy release. In the past half century, a large number of slow shocks were observed in the geomagnetic tail, and many slow shocks were associated with magnetic reconnection events in the geomagnetic tail. Slow shocks in the interplanetary space are rarer than in the geomagnetic tail. We investigated whether slow shocks associated with interplanetary reconnection exhausts are rare. We examined the boundaries of 50 reconnection exhausts reported by Phan, Gosling, and Davis (Geophys. Res. Lett. 36:L09108, 2009) in interplanetary space to identify slow shocks by fitting the Rankine-Hugoniot relations. Two slow shocks associated with magnetic reconnection exhausts were found and evaluated using observations from Wind and the Advanced Composition Explorer. The observed slow shocks associated with interplanetary reconnection exhausts are rarer than the observed slow shocks associated with geomagnetic tail reconnection exhausts.

  14. When shock waves collide

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.; Hartigan, P.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Foster, J.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. Furthermore, the experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  15. When shock waves collide

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez, D.; Hartigan, P.; Frank, A.; ...

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed tomore » quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. Furthermore, the experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.« less

  16. Shock initiation of nitromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Holmes, N.C.

    1993-12-31

    The shock initiation processes of nitromethane have been examined by using a fast time-resolved emission spectroscopy at a two-stage gas gun. a broad, but strong emission has been observed in a spectral range between 350 and 700 nm from shocked nitromethane above 9 GPa. The temporal profile suggests that shocked nitromethane detonates through three characteristic periods, namely an induction period, a hock initiation period, and a thermal explosion period. This paper discusses temporal and chemical characteristics of these periods and present the temperature of the shock-detonating nitromethane at pressures between 9 and 15 GPa.

  17. Anti-Shock Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Ames Research Center developed a prototype pressure suit for hemophiliac children, based on research of astronauts' physiological responses in microgravity. Zoex Corporation picked up the design and patents and developed an anti-shock garment for paramedic use. Marketed by Dyna Med, the suit reverses the effect of shock on the body's blood distribution by applying counterpressure to the legs and abdomen, returning blood to vital organs and stabilizing body pressure until the patient reaches a hospital. The DMAST (Dyna Med Anti-Shock Trousers) employ lower pressure than other shock garments, and are non-inflatable.

  18. Vasodilatory responses of renal interlobular arteries to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids analog are not enhanced in Ren-2 transgenic hypertensive rats: evidence against a role of direct vascular effects of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids in progression of experimental heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sporková, A; Husková, Z; Škaroupková, P; Rami Reddy, N; Falck, J R; Sadowski, J; Červenka, L

    2017-03-31

    Pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of renal dysfunction and progression of congestive heart failure (CHF) remain poorly understood. Recent studies have revealed striking differences in the role of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), active products of cytochrome P-450-dependent epoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid, in the progression of aorto-caval fistula (ACF)-induced CHF between hypertensive Ren-2 renin transgenic rats (TGR) and transgene-negative normotensive Hannover Sprague-Dawley (HanSD) controls. Both ACF TGR and ACF HanSD strains exhibited marked intrarenal EETs deficiency and impairment of renal function, and in both strains chronic pharmacologic inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) (which normally degrades EETs) normalized EETs levels. However, the treatment improved the survival rate and attenuated renal function impairment in ACF TGR only. Here we aimed to establish if the reported improved renal function and attenuation of progression of CHF in ACF TGR observed after she blockade depends on increased vasodilatory responsiveness of renal resistance arteries to EETs. Therefore, we examined the responses of interlobar arteries from kidneys of ACF TGR and ACF HanSD rats to EET-A, a new stable 14,15-EET analog. We found that the arteries from ACF HanSD kidneys rats exhibited greater vasodilator responses when compared to the ACF TGR arteries. Hence, reduced renal vasodilatory responsiveness cannot be responsible for the lack of beneficial effects of chronic sEH inhibition on the development of renal dysfunction and progression of CHF in ACF HanSD rats.

  19. Cathodoluminescence characterization of experimentally shocked alkali feldspar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayama, M.; Nishido, H.; Sekine, T.; Ninagawa, K.

    2009-12-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy and microscopy provide important information to know the existence and distribution of defects and trace elements in materials. CL features of materials depend on varieties of luminescence centers, host chemical compositions and crystal fields, all of which are closely related to the genetic processes. Advanced investigations on CL of shock-induced silica minerals have been attempted to estimate their shock pressures, although very few studies have been reported for feldspars. In this study, CL and Raman spectra of experimentally shocked alkali feldspar were measured to evaluate the shock metamorphic effect. A single crystal of sanidine (Or81Ab19) from Eifel, Germany was selected as a starting material for shock recovery experiments at peak pressures of about 10, 20, 32 and 40 GPa by a propellant gun. Polished thin sections of recovered samples were used for CL and Raman measurements. CL was collected in the range from 300 to 800 nm by a secondary electron microscopy-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) system. CL spectra of unshocked sample consist of two emission bands at around 420 nm in blue region and 720 nm in red-IR region assigned to Al-O--Al defect and Fe3+ impurity center, respectively. There are three features between unshocked and shocked sanidine. (1) The blue emission is absent in the shocked samples. (2) The peak wavelength of the red-IR emission shifts to a short wavelength side with an increase in shock pressure up to 20 GPa, suggesting the alteration of the crystal field related to Fe3+ activator by shock metamorphic effect. The Raman spectrum of the unshocked sample exhibits pronounced peaks at around 180, 205, 290, 490 and 520 cm-1. The intensities of these peaks decrease with an increase in shock pressure. The shocked samples above 32 GPa show only two weak peaks at around 490 and 580 cm-1 which were also observed in maskelynite in Martian meteorites. Shock pressure causes partly breaking of the framework structure

  20. Blueberry shock virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberry shock disease first observed in Washington state in 1987 and initially confused with blueberry scorch caused by Blueberry scorch virus (BlScV). However, shock affected plants produced a second flush of leaves after flowering and the plants appeared normal by late summer except for the lac...

  1. What Is Cardiogenic Shock?

    MedlinePlus

    ... think that you or someone else is in shock, call 9–1–1 right away for emergency treatment. Prompt medical care can save your life and ... half of the people who go into cardiogenic shock survive. This is because of ... improved treatments, such as medicines and devices. These treatments can ...

  2. [Historical vision of shock].

    PubMed

    Dosne Pasqualini, C

    1998-01-01

    The concept of shock and its close relationship with that of stress dates back to the experiments of Hans Selye initiated in 1936 at McGill University in Montreal, with whom I collaborated between 1939 and 1942. It was demonstrated that the General Adaptation Syndrome begins with an Alarm Reaction, which consists of a Stage of Shock and one of Counter-Shock, followed by a Stage of Adaptation and finally a Stage of Exhaustion. My Ph.D. thesis concluded that shock was due to an adrenal insufficiency postulating that active metabolic processes drain the body of certain essential compounds the lack of which causes shock. My interest in the role of the glucose metabolism in shock led me to work with Bernardo Houssay in 1942 at the Institute of Physiology of the University of Buenos Aires and in 1944 with C.N.H. Long at Yale University. There I developed a method for the induction of hemorrhagic shock in the guinea pig with 94% lethality; curiously, the administration of 200 mg of ascorbic acid prevented death. Upon my return to Buenos Aires, these results were confirmed and moreover, it was demonstrated that the administration of cortisone led to 40% survival of the animals while desoxycorticosterone had no effect. At the time, no explanation was available but to-day, half a century later, this Symposium should be able to explain the mechanisms leading to death by hemorrhagic shock.

  3. Normal Shock Vortex Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    Figure 9: Breakdown map for normal-shock vortex-interaction. References [1] O. Thomer, W. Schroder and M. Meinke , Numerical Simulation of Normal...and Oblique-Shock Vortex Interaction, ZAMM Band 80, Sub. 1, pp. 181-184, 2000. [2] O. Thomer, E. Krause, W. Schroder and M. Meinke , Computational

  4. Pathophysiology of shock.

    PubMed

    Houston, M C

    1990-06-01

    Shock is an acute widespread reduction in effective tissue perfusion that invokes an imbalance of oxygen supply and demand, anaerobic metabolism, lactic acidosis, cellular and organ dysfunction, metabolic abnormalities, and, if prolonged, irreversible damage and death. The pathophysiologic events in the various types of shock are different and complex with hemodynamic and oxygenation changes, alterations in the composition of the fluid compartments, and various mediators. Shock results from a change in one or a combination of the following: intravascular volume, myocardial function, systemic vascular resistance, or distribution of blood flow. The clinical types of shock include hypovolemic, cardiogenic, distributive (septic), and obstructive. An understanding of the pathophysiologic changes, rapid diagnosis, appropriate monitoring, and appropriate therapy can reduce the high morbidity and mortality in shock states.

  5. Reflection of curved shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Shock curvatures are related to pressure gradients, streamline curvatures and vorticity in flows with planar and axial symmetry. Explicit expressions, in an influence coefficient format, are used to relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. Using higher order, von Neumann-type, compatibility conditions, curved shock theory is applied to calculate the flow near singly and doubly curved shocks on curved surfaces, in regular shock reflection and in Mach reflection. Theoretical curved shock shapes are in good agreement with computational fluid dynamics calculations and experiment.

  6. MEMS performance challenges: packaging and shock tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jiyoung; Yang, Chen; Zhang, Bin; Lin, Liwei

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes recent advances in the MEMS performance challenges with emphases on packaging and shock tests. In the packaging area, metal to metal bonding processes have been developed to overcome limitations of the glass frit bonding by means of two specific methods: (1) pre-reflow of solder for enhanced bonding adhesion, and (2) the insertion of thin metal layer between parent metal bonding materials. In the shock test area, multiscale analysis for a MEMS package system has been developed with experimental verifications to investigate dynamic responses under drop-shock tests. Structural deformation and stress distribution data are extracted and predicted for device fracture and in-operation stiction analyses for micro mechanical components in various MEMS sensors, including accelerometers and gyroscopes.

  7. Comparison of shock severity measures

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    In an effort to clarify the issues associated with quantifying shock severity, this paper compares the merits of two measures of shock severity. The first measure is the widely used absolute acceleration shock response spectrum (SAA). The second measure of shock severity is relatively new and is known as the shock intensity spectrum (SIS). Overall information content of SAA and SIS spectra are compared and discussed in the context of two shock excitations having known amplitude, duration, and frequency content. The first is a burst of band-limited white noise and the second is a classical haversine pulse. After describing both the SAA and SIS shock measures, numerous examples are described which emphasize the strengths and limitations of each shock characterization method. This discussion reveals how the use of different shock measures may alter an engineer's conclusions about relative shock severity between two shock environments. 8 refs., 15 figs.

  8. Storm Sudden Commencements Without Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Wooyeon; Lee, Jeongwoo; Yi, Yu; Ssessanga, Nicholas; Oh, Suyeon

    2015-09-01

    Storm sudden commencements (SSCs) occur due to a rapid compression of the Earth's magnetic field. This is generally believed to be caused by interplanetary (IP) shocks, but with exceptions. In this paper we explore possible causes of SSCs other than IP shocks through a statistical study of geomagnetic storms using SYM-H data provided by the World Data Center for Geomagnetism ? Kyoto and by applying a superposed epoch analysis to simultaneous solar wind parameters obtained with the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite. We select a total of 274 geomagnetic storms with minimum SYM-H of less than ?30nT during 1998-2008 and regard them as SSCs if SYM-H increases by more than 10 nT over 10 minutes. Under this criterion, we found 103 geomagnetic storms with both SSC and IP shocks and 28 storms with SSC not associated with IP shocks. Storms in the former group share the property that the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), proton density and proton velocity increase together with SYM-H, implying the action of IP shocks. During the storms in the latter group, only the proton density rises with SYM-H. We find that the density increase is associated with either high speed streams (HSSs) or interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), and suggest that HSSs and ICMEs may be alternative contributors to SSCs.

  9. Shock Bench Enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvet, B.; Dilhan, D.; Palladino, M.

    2014-06-01

    In 2008 a contract placed by CNES in partnership with ESA has led MECANO ID to develop a shock bench to qualify spacecraft equipment. A spacecraft shall withstand several shocks without degradation: launcher fairing or stages separation, spacecraft separation, the release of appendage (solar arrays, antenna reflectors, booms) and shocks generated when the pyrovalves of the propulsion system are fired.The Shock Response Spectrum (SRS) requirement, to be applied to the equipment, depends on its mass, its size and its location in the satellite. CNES has performed a survey of the pyroshock qualification requirements on CNES and ESA satellites. The outcome of the activity was the input for the bench development (Fig. 1). The design and sizing of the pyroshock bench started with non linear shock analysis with the help of the Dytran software.A lot of solutions have been compared: mono-plate, bi- plate, Hopkinson bar. The bi-plate was chosen thanks to its very rich frequency content. Also, the shock can be generated on one plate with the equipment mounted on the other, to avoid the direct transmission of the shock to the equipment basis.This study led to a 1000 mm x 650 mm steel bi-plate with a 300 mm aluminum cube fitted on one side. The equipment to test is mounted on the cube (Fig. 2 & 3).

  10. Shock formation of HCO/+/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitzur, M.

    1983-04-01

    It is shown that shocks propagating in dense molecular regions will lead to a decrease in HCO(+) relative abundance, in agreement with previous results by Iglesias and Silk (1978). The shock enhancement of HCO(+) detected in the supernova remnant IC 443 by Dickinson et al. (1980) is due to enhanced ionization in the shocked material. This is the result of the material penetrating the remnant cavity where it becomes exposed to the trapped cosmic rays. A similar enhancement appears to have been detected by Wootten in W28 and is explained by the same model.

  11. Sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Patrick J

    2013-08-01

    Early recognition of sepsis and septic shock in children relies on obtaining an attentive clinical history, accurate vital signs, and a physical examination focused on mental status, work of breathing, and circulatory status. Laboratory tests may support the diagnosis but are not reliable in isolation. The goal of septic shock management is reversal of tissue hypoperfusion. The therapeutic end point is shock reversal. Mortality is significantly better among children when managed appropriately. Every physician who cares for children must strive to have a high level of suspicion and keen clinical acumen for recognizing the rare but potentially seriously ill child.

  12. Shock effects in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, D.; Bischoff, A.; Buchwald, V.; Rubin, A. E.

    1988-01-01

    The impacts that can occur between objects on intersecting solar system orbits can generate shock-induced deformations and transformations, creating new mineral phases or melting old ones. These shock-metamorphic effects affect not only the petrography but the chemical and isotopic properties and the ages of primordial meteoritic materials. A fuller understanding of shock metamorphism and breccia formation in meteorites will be essential not only in the study of early accretion, differentiation, and regolith-evolution processes, but in the characterization of the primordial composition of the accreted material itself.

  13. Shocks near Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Leopoldo R.; Turner, Ari M.; van Hecke, Martin; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear sound is an extreme phenomenon typically observed in solids after violent explosions. But granular media are different. Right when they jam, these fragile and disordered solids exhibit a vanishing rigidity and sound speed, so that even tiny mechanical perturbations form supersonic shocks. Here, we perform simulations in which two-dimensional jammed granular packings are dynamically compressed and demonstrate that the elementary excitations are strongly nonlinear shocks, rather than ordinary phonons. We capture the full dependence of the shock speed on pressure and impact intensity by a surprisingly simple analytical model.

  14. Toxic shock syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock-like ... men. Risk factors include: Recent childbirth Infection with Staphylococcus aureus ( S aureus ), commonly called a Staph infection Foreign ...

  15. Development of an ultra-low-shock separation nut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woebkenberg, W.; Matteo, D. N.; Williams, V. D.

    1982-01-01

    The technical problems encountered in the development of an advanced separation nut design are described. The nut is capable of sustaining a large preload and releasing that load with a low level of induced pyrotechnic shock, while demonstrating a tolerance for extremely high shock imposed by other pyrotechnic devices. The analysis of the separation nut was performed to acquire additional understanding of the phenomena affecting operation of the nut and to provide quantitative evaluation of design modification for aerospace applications.

  16. Early Treatment in Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    jasminoides Ellis). It is com- monly sold in the United States as an herbal supplement . In terms of crocetin’s fundamental mode of action in host... supplementation 15 can be beneficial in ameliorating the tissue damage produced following experimental 16 hemorrhagic shock. In the present investigation...experimental rat model of hemorrhagic shock. Our studies were designed to test two 19 hypotheses. First, L-arginine supplementation during resuscitation will

  17. Shock Properties of Kimberlite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmott, G. R.; Proud, W. G.; Field, J. E.

    2004-07-01

    Plate impact experiments have been performed on the igneous diamond-bearing matrix kimberlite. Longitudinal and lateral stresses were measured in the uniaxial strain regime using manganin stress gauges. The shock Hugoniot of the kimberlite has been characterized at axial stresses between 1 and 9 GPa. The kimberlite has a low impedance response when compared with similar data for other geological materials. The data indicate that the rock behaves inelastically above shock stresses of 1 GPa.

  18. Fluid therapy in shock.

    PubMed

    Mandell, D C; King, L G

    1998-05-01

    The goal of treatment for all types of shock is the improvement of tissue perfusion and oxygenation. The mainstay of therapy for hypovolemic and septic shock is the expansion of the intravascular volume by fluid administration, including crystalloids, colloids, and blood products. Frequent physical examinations and monitoring enable the clinician to determine the adequacy of tissue oxygenation and thus the success of the fluid therapy.

  19. "Smart" Electromechanical Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, Lebarian; Glenn, Dean C.; Carroll, Monty B.

    1989-01-01

    Shock-absorbing apparatus includes electromechanical actuator and digital feedback control circuitry rather than springs and hydraulic damping as in conventional shock absorbers. Device not subject to leakage and requires little or no maintenance. Attenuator parameters adjusted in response to sensory feedback and predictive algorithms to obtain desired damping characteristic. Device programmed to decelerate slowly approaching vehicle or other large object according to prescribed damping characteristic.

  20. Early Treatment in Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    1471–2210/2/7. Accessed April 15, 2005. 20. Wang CJ, Lee MJ, Chang MC, Lin JK. Inhibition of tumor promotion in benzo [ a ] pyrene -initiated CD-1 mouse...model. Deliverable: A panel of genes that are reproducibly altered in white blood cells and in liver and muscle by shock and resuscitation. 1. To...Deliverable: Coordinated with objective #1, A panel of genes that are reproducibly altered in white blood cells and in liver and muscle by shock and

  1. Catecholamines in shock.

    PubMed

    Alho, A; Jäättelä, A; Lahdensuu, M; Rokkanen, P; Avikainen, V; Karaharju, E; Tervo, T; Lepistö, P

    1977-06-01

    The role of endogenous catecholamines in various clinical shock and stress states is reviewed; the effects, especially on the peripheral circulation, of catecholamine secretion are the same independent of the cause. Risks of using sympathomimetic agents in the treatment of shock are evaluated. A prolonged noradrenaline activity is to be expected in surgical stress states, e.g. multiple injuries, fat embolism syndrome, burns and infections; therapeutic approaches to minimize the sympathoadrenal activity are outlined.

  2. Electron Acceleration in Shock-Shock Interaction: Simulations and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, M.; Matsukiyo, S.; Mazelle, C. X.; Hada, T.

    2015-12-01

    Collisionless shock waves play a crucial role in producing high energy particles (cosmic rays) in space. While most of the past studies about particle acceleration assume the presence of a single shock, in space two shocks frequently come close to or even collide with each other. Hietala et al. [2011] observed the collision of an interplanetary shock and the earth's bow shock and the associated acceleration of energetic ions. The kinetic natures of a shock-shock collision has not been well understood. Only the work done by using hybrid simulation was reported by Cargill et al. [1986], in which they focus on a collision of two supercritical shocks and the resultant ion acceleration. We expect similarly that electron acceleration can also occur in shock-shock collision. To investigate the electron acceleration process in a shock-shock collision, we perform one-dimensional full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In the simulation energetic electrons are observed between the two approaching shocks before colliding. These energetic electrons are efficiently accelerated through multiple reflections at the two shocks (Fermi acceleration). The reflected electrons create a temperature anisotropy and excite large amplitude waves upstream via the electron fire hose instability. The large amplitude waves can scatter the energetic electrons in pitch angle so that some of them gain large pitch angles and are easily reflected when they encounter the shocks subsequently. The reflected electrons can sustain, or probably even strengthen, them. We further discuss observational results of an interaction of interplanetary shocks and the earth's bow shock by examining mainly Cluster data. We focus on whether or not electrons are accelerated in the shock-shock interaction.

  3. Shock Tunnel Studies of Scramjet Phenomena 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. G.; Paull, A.; Stalker, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    Reports by the research staff and graduate students of the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Queensland are collected and presented. These reports cover various studies related to the advancement of scramjet technology and the operation of advanced hypervelocity shock-expansion tubes. The report topics include the experimental studies of mixing and combustion in a scramjet flow path, the measurement of integrated thrust and skin friction, and the development of a free-piston-driven expansion tunnel capable of delivering a test gas at superorbital velocities.

  4. Shock/shock interference on a transpiration cooled hemispherical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Robert J.; Wieting, Allan R.; Holden, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which show the effectiveness of transpiration cooling in reducing the peak heat flux caused by an impinging shock on a bow shock of a hemispherical model. The 12-inch diameter hemispherical transpiration model with helium coolant was tested in the Calspan 48-inch Hypersonic Shock Tunnel at nominal Mach 12.1 and freestream unit Reynolds number of 0.33 x 10 to the 6th/ft. An incident shock wave, generated by a blunt flat-plate shock generator inclined at 10 deg to the freestream, intersected the bow shock of the model to produce shock/shock interference. The stagnation heat flux without coolant or shock/shock interference was about 1.6 times a smooth surface laminar prediction due to effective roughness of the coolant ejection slots. A coolant mass flux 31 percent of the freestream mass flux reduced the stagnation heat flux to zero without shock/shock interference. However, for the same coolant mass flux and with shock/shock interference the peak heat flux was only reduced 8.3 percent, even though the total integrated heat load was reduced.

  5. Shock tubes and waves; Proceedings of the Sixteenth International Symposium, Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule, Aachen, Federal Republic of Germany, July 26-31, 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenig, Hans

    Topics discussed in this volume include shock wave structure, propagation, and interaction; shocks in condensed matter, dusty gases, and multiphase media; chemical processes and related combustion and detonation phenomena; shock wave reflection, diffraction, and focusing; computational fluid dynamic code development and shock wave application; blast and detonation waves; advanced shock tube technology and measuring technique; and shock wave applications. Papers are presented on dust explosions, the dynamics of shock waves in certain dense gases, studies of condensation kinetics behind incident shock waves, the autoignition mechanism of n-butane behind a reflected shock wave, and a numerical simulation of the focusing process of reflected shock waves. Attention is also given to the equilibrium shock tube flow of real gases, blast waves generated by planar detonations, modern diagnostic methods for high-speed flows, and interaction between induced waves and electric discharge in a very high repetition rate excimer laser.

  6. BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES ON SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Jane A.; Long, C. N. H.; Wilhelmi, Alfred E.

    1944-01-01

    1. With increasing severity of shock following hemorrhage in fasted rats there is an increasing depression in the rate of oxygen uptake, in oxygen, of liver slices from the bled animals. The respiration of kidney tissue is only slightly depressed even in severe states of shock. 2. The rates of oxygen uptake of liver tissue from bled rats are nicely correlated with the increases in blood amino nitrogen that follow severe hemorrhage. 3. A supplement of coenzyme factors, in the form of a hot water extract of normal rat liver, increases the oxygen uptake of liver tissue from rats in mild shock, but is without effect on the respiration of liver slices from rats in moderate or severe shock. 4. The ability of rat liver to oxidize succinate is not impaired even in severe shock, but the extra oxygen uptake does not improve the basal rate of respiration of the tissue. 5. Effects on the rate of oxygen uptake of normal rat liver slices comparable to those seen after hemorrhage could be produced by exposing the tissue to an atmosphere of nitrogen for periods of 15 and 60 minutes. This treatment had more marked effects on the respiration of kidney slices than are found after hemorrhage, but the kidney, unlike the liver, exhibited a marked degree of recovery in the presence of glucose. 6. The significance of these findings is briefly discussed. PMID:19871349

  7. Shocks in fragile matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2012-02-01

    Non-linear sound is an extreme phenomenon typically observed in solids after violent explosions. But granular media are different. Right when they unjam, these fragile and disordered solids exhibit vanishing elastic moduli and sound speed, so that even tiny mechanical perturbations form supersonic shocks. Here, we perform simulations in which two-dimensional jammed granular packings are continuously compressed, and demonstrate that the resulting excitations are strongly nonlinear shocks, rather than linear waves. We capture the full dependence of the shock speed on pressure and compression speed by a surprisingly simple analytical model. We also treat shear shocks within a simplified viscoelastic model of nearly-isostatic random networks comprised of harmonic springs. In this case, anharmonicity does not originate locally from nonlinear interactions between particles, as in granular media; instead, it emerges from the global architecture of the network. As a result, the diverging width of the shear shocks bears a nonlinear signature of the diverging isostatic length associated with the loss of rigidity in these floppy networks.

  8. Shock Detector for SURF model

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2016-01-11

    SURF and its extension SURFplus are reactive burn models aimed at shock initiation and propagation of detonation waves in high explosives. A distinctive feature of these models is that the burn rate depends on the lead shock pressure. A key part of the models is an algorithm to detect the lead shock. Typically, shock capturing hydro algorithms have small oscillations behind a shock. Here we investigate how well the shock detection algorithm works for a nearly steady propagating detonation wave in one-dimension using the Eulerian xRage code.

  9. Shock-Induced Effect on Chathodoluminesence of Experimentally Shocked Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y.; Kayama, M.; Tajika, E.; Sekine, Y.; Sekine, T.; Nishido, H.; Kobayashi, T.

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a series of shock recovery experiments on single crystals of natural and synthetic quartz. In the presentation, we show the results of the variation of Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectral features with increasing shock pressure.

  10. Principles and application of shock-tubes and shock tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ried, R. C.; Clauss, H. G., Jr.

    1963-01-01

    The principles, theoretical flow equations, calculation techniques, limitations and practical performance characteristics of basic and high performance shock tubes and shock tunnels are presented. Selected operating curves are included.

  11. Shock compression of [001] single crystal silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, S.; Remington, B.; Hahn, E. N.; ...

    2016-03-14

    Silicon is ubiquitous in our advanced technological society, yet our current understanding of change to its mechanical response at extreme pressures and strain-rates is far from complete. This is due to its brittleness, making recovery experiments difficult. High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon (using impedance-matched momentum traps) unveiled remarkable structural changes observed by transmission electron microscopy. As laser energy increases, corresponding to an increase in peak shock pressure, the following plastic responses are are observed: surface cleavage along {111} planes, dislocations and stacking faults; bands of amorphized material initially forming on crystallographic orientations consistent withmore » dislocation slip; and coarse regions of amorphized material. Molecular dynamics simulations approach equivalent length and time scales to laser experiments and reveal the evolution of shock-induced partial dislocations and their crucial role in the preliminary stages of amorphization. Furthermore, application of coupled hydrostatic and shear stresses produce amorphization below the hydrostatically determined critical melting pressure under dynamic shock compression.« less

  12. Shock compression of [001] single crystal silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; Remington, B.; Hahn, E. N.; Kad, B.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-03-14

    Silicon is ubiquitous in our advanced technological society, yet our current understanding of change to its mechanical response at extreme pressures and strain-rates is far from complete. This is due to its brittleness, making recovery experiments difficult. High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon (using impedance-matched momentum traps) unveiled remarkable structural changes observed by transmission electron microscopy. As laser energy increases, corresponding to an increase in peak shock pressure, the following plastic responses are are observed: surface cleavage along {111} planes, dislocations and stacking faults; bands of amorphized material initially forming on crystallographic orientations consistent with dislocation slip; and coarse regions of amorphized material. Molecular dynamics simulations approach equivalent length and time scales to laser experiments and reveal the evolution of shock-induced partial dislocations and their crucial role in the preliminary stages of amorphization. Furthermore, application of coupled hydrostatic and shear stresses produce amorphization below the hydrostatically determined critical melting pressure under dynamic shock compression.

  13. Shock compression of [001] single crystal silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, S.; Hahn, E. N.; Kad, B.; Remington, B. A.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    Silicon is ubiquitous in our advanced technological society, yet our current understanding of change to its mechanical response at extreme pressures and strain-rates is far from complete. This is due to its brittleness, making recovery experiments difficult. High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon (using impedance-matched momentum traps) unveiled remarkable structural changes observed by transmission electron microscopy. As laser energy increases, corresponding to an increase in peak shock pressure, the following plastic responses are are observed: surface cleavage along {111} planes, dislocations and stacking faults; bands of amorphized material initially forming on crystallographic orientations consistent with dislocation slip; and coarse regions of amorphized material. Molecular dynamics simulations approach equivalent length and time scales to laser experiments and reveal the evolution of shock-induced partial dislocations and their crucial role in the preliminary stages of amorphization. Application of coupled hydrostatic and shear stresses produce amorphization below the hydrostatically determined critical melting pressure under dynamic shock compression.

  14. Dusty Termination Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, W.H.

    2004-09-15

    In astrophysical settings, termination shocks where strong stellar wind outflows interact with the surrounding environments tend to take place in dusty regions. Just to name a few, star formation regions, planetary nebulae, supernova remnants and active galactic nuclei are all good examples. Dynamics and evolution of the associated dust clouds could have important influences on the acceleration and composition of energetic particles resulting from the diffusive shock acceleration at the termination shocks. In this note we provide a brief review of previous work predating the recent detection of ACR Mg, Na, Si and S ions which might have originated from the Kuiper belt dust. Their compositional abundance might be diagnostic of the collisional history of the Kupier belt objects.

  15. TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES

    DOEpatents

    Tuck, J.L.

    1955-03-01

    This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

  16. Shock absorber servicing tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepler, Jack L. (Inventor); Hill, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A tool to assist in the servicing of a shock absorber wherein the shock absorber is constructed of a pair of aligned gas and liquid filled chambers. Each of the chambers is separated by a movable separator member. Maximum efficiency of the shock absorber is achieved in the locating of a precise volume of gas within the gas chamber and a precise volume of liquid within the liquid chamber. The servicing tool of this invention employs a rod which is to connect with the separator and by observation of the position of the rod with respect to the gauge body, the location of the separator is ascertained even though it is not directly observable.

  17. Culture shock and travelers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, L; Leggat, P A

    1998-06-01

    As travel has become easier and more affordable, the number of people traveling has risen sharply. People travel for many and varied reasons, from the business person on an overseas assignment to backpackers seeking new and exotic destinations. Others may take up residence in different regions, states or countries for family, business or political reasons. Other people are fleeing religious or political persecution. Wherever they go and for whatever reason they go, people take their culture with them. Culture, like language, is acquired innately in early childhood and is then reinforced through formal and complex informal social education into adulthood. Culture provides a framework for interpersonal and social interactions. Therefore, the contact with a new culture is often not the exciting or pleasurable experience anticipated. When immersed in a different culture, people no longer know how to act when faced with disparate value systems. Contact with the unfamiliar culture can lead to anxiety, stress, mental illness and, in extreme cases, physical illness and suicide. "Culture shock" is a term coined by the anthropologist Oberg. It is the shock of the new. It implies that the experience of the new culture is an unpleasant surprise or shock, partly because it is unexpected and partly because it can lead to a negative evaluation of one's own culture. It is also known as cross-cultural adjustment, being that period of anxiety and confusion experienced when entering a new culture. It affects people intellectually, emotionally, behaviorally and physically and is characterized by symptoms of psychological distress. Culture shock affects both adults and children. In travelers or workers who have prolonged sojourns in foreign countries, culture shock may occur not only as they enter the new culture, but also may occur on their return to their original culture. Children may also experience readjustment problems after returning from leading sheltered lives in expatriate

  18. Shock destruction armor system

    DOEpatents

    Froeschner, Kenneth E.

    1993-01-01

    A shock destruction armor system is constructed and arranged to destroy the force of impact of a projectile by shock hydrodynamics. The armor system is designed to comprise a plurality of superimposed armor plates each preferably having a thickness less than five times the projectile's diameter and are preferably separated one-from-another by a distance at least equal to one-half of the projectile's diameter. The armor plates are effective to hydrodynamically and sequentially destroy the projectile. The armor system is particularly adapted for use on various military vehicles, such as tanks, aircraft and ships.

  19. [Corticosteroids and septic shock].

    PubMed

    Bouletreau, P; Petit, P; Latarjet, J

    1976-01-01

    According to the data in the literature, the authors attempted to sum-up present attitudes on the value of corticoids in the treatment of septic shock. If their cardiovascular effects after a period of enthusiasm, are presently rather controversial, their cellular and sub-cellular actions, on the lysosomal membranes, capillary permeability and perhaps the intimate mechanisms of cellular oxygenation seem to be more real. However, the contra-indications which persist in the results of clinical works have resulted in the fact that the exact place of cortico-steroids in the therapeutic arsenal of septic shock still remains to be specified.

  20. Impact-shocked zircons: Discovery of shock-induced textures reflecting increasing degrees of shock metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohor, B. F.; Betterton, W. J.; Krogh, T. E.

    1993-01-01

    Textural effects specifically characteristic of shock metamorphism in zircons from impact environments have not been reported previously. However, planar deformation features (PDF) due to shock metamorphism are well documented in quartz and other mineral grains from these same environments. An etching technique was developed that allows scanning electron microscope (SEM) visualization of PDF and other probable shock-induced textural features, such as granular (polycrystalline) texture, in zircons from a variety of impact shock environments. These textural features in shocked zircons from K/T boundary distal ejecta form a series related to increasing degrees of shock that should correlate with proportionate resetting of the U-Pb isotopic system.

  1. Flow behind concave shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Curved shock theory is introduced and applied to calculate the flow behind concave shock waves. For sonic conditions, three characterizing types of flow are identified, based on the orientation of the sonic line, and it is shown that, depending on the ratio of shock curvatures, a continuously curving shock can exist with Type III flow, where the sonic line intercepts the reflected characteristics from the shock, thus preventing the formation of a reflected shock. The necessary shock curvature ratio for a Type III sonic point does not exist for a hyperbolic shock so that it will revert to Mach reflection for all Mach numbers. A demonstration is provided, by CFD calculations, at Mach 1.2 and 3.

  2. Shock waves data for minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Johnson, Mary L.

    1994-01-01

    Shock compression of the materials of planetary interiors yields data which upon comparison with density-pressure and density-sound velocity profiles constrain internal composition and temperature. Other important applications of shock wave data and related properties are found in the impact mechanics of terrestrial planets and solid satellites. Shock wave equation of state, shock-induced dynamic yielding and phase transitions, and shock temperature are discussed. In regions where a substantial phase change in the material does not occur, the relationship between the particle velocity, U(sub p), and the shock velocity, U(sub s), is given by U(sub s) = C(sub 0) + S U(sub p), where C(sub 0) is the shock velocity at infinitesimally small particle velocity, or the ambient pressure bulk sound velocity. Numerical values for the shock wave equation of state for minerals and related materials of the solar system are provided.

  3. Acceleration of 3HE and heavy ions at interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.; Dwyer, J. R.; Mazur, J. E.; Smith, C. W.; Koug, R. M.

    2001-08-01

    We have surveyed the 0.5-2.0 MeV nucleon-1 ion composition of 56 interplanetary shocks (IP) observed with the Ultra-Low-Energy Isotope Spectrometer (ULEIS) on board the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) from 1997 October 1 through 2000 November 30. Our results show the first ever measurement (25 cases) of 3 He ions being accelerated at IP shocks. The 3 He/4 He ratio at the 25 shocks exhibited a wide range of values between 0.00140.24; the ratios were enhanced between factors of ~3-600 over the solar wind value. During the survey period, the occurrence probability of 3 He-rich shocks increased with rising solar activity as measured in terms of the daily occurrence rates of sunspots and X-ray flares. The 3 He enhancements at IP shocks cannot be attributed to rigidity dependent acceleration of solar wind ions and are better explained if the shocks accelerate ions from multiple sources, one being remnant impulsive solar flare material enriched in 3 He ions. Our results also indicate that the contribution of impulsive flares to the seed population for IP shocks varies from event to event, and that the interplanetary medium is being replenished with impulsive material more frequently during periods of increased solar activity. 1. Introduction Enhancements in the intensities of energetic ions associated with transient interplanetary (IP) shocks have been observed routinely at 1 AU since the 1960's (e.g., Reames 1999). It is presently believed that the majority of such IP shocks are driven by fast coronal mass ejections or CMEs as they propagate through interplanetary space (e.g., Gosling 1993), and that the associated ion intensity enhancements are due to diffusive shock acceleration of solar wind ions (Lee 1983; Jones and Ellison 1991; Reames 1999). However, the putative solar wind origin of the IP-shock accelerated ions is based on composition measurements associated with a very limited number of individual IP shocks (Klecker et al. 1981; Hovestadt et al. 1982; Tan et

  4. Shock compression of polyvinyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-04-01

    This study presents shock compression simulation of atactic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) using ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics. The manuscript also identifies the limits of applicability of classical molecular dynamics based shock compression simulation for PVC. The mechanism of bond dissociation under shock loading and its progression is demonstrated in this manuscript using the density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations. The rate of dissociation of different bonds at different shock velocities is also presented in this manuscript.

  5. Maskelynite: Formation by Explosive Shock.

    PubMed

    Milton, D J; de Carli, P S

    1963-05-10

    When high pressure (250 to 300 kilobars) was applied suddenly (shock-loading) to gabbro, the plagioclase was transformed to a noncrystalline phase (maskelynite) by a solid-state reaction at a low temperature, while the proxene remained crystalline. The shock-loaded gabbro resembles meteorites of the shergottite class; this suggests that the latter formed as a result of shock. The shock-loading of gabbro at 600 to 800 kilobars raised the temperature above the melting range of the plagioclase.

  6. Maskelynite: Formation by explosive shock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milton, D.J.; De Carli, P. S.

    1963-01-01

    When high pressure (250 to 300 kilobars) was applied suddenly (shock-loading) to gabbro, the plagioclase was transformed to a noncrystalline phase (maskelynite) by a solid-state reaction at a low temperature, while the proxene remained crystalline. The shock-loaded gabbro resembles meteorites of the shergottite class; this suggests that the latter formed as a result of shock. The shock-loading of gabbro at 600 to 800 kilobars raised the temperature above the melting range of the plagioclase.

  7. Shock Energy in Merging Systems: The Elephant in the Room.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kewley, Lisa

    2011-10-01

    The relationship between shocks, star formation and the evolution of merging galaxies is not well understood. We are now poised to gain major insight in this area, thanks to the high resolution narrow-band imaging capabilities of WFC3 and recent major advances in theoretical shock and and photoionization models. Shocks and star formation in merging galaxies are regulated by fundamental physical properties of the ISM such as dust, gas density, ionized gas structure, and the presence of galactic winds and outflows. We aim to uncover the relationship between shocks, galactic winds, and the fundamental ISM properties in two famous mergers NGC 6240 and Arp 220. These two galaxies are currently transitioning from disk galaxies into spheroids and they are close enough to achieve the spatial scales required to resolve individual supernova remnants with WFC3 imaging. We propose to image NGC 6240 and Arp 220 in key shock and photoionization sensitive diagnostic lines [OII], [OIII], H-beta, [NII]+H-alpha, [SII], and {where possible} [OI] to {1} resolve the source of the ionizing radiation field {shocks versus photoionization by hot stars} at spatial scales of 25-35 pc, and {2} map the distribution of the star formation and ionized gas to search for links with merger-driven shocks and large-scale gas flows.

  8. STEREO interplanetary shocks and foreshocks

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Cano, X.; Kajdic, P.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2013-06-13

    We use STEREO data to study shocks driven by stream interactions and the waves associated with them. During the years of the extended solar minimum 2007-2010, stream interaction shocks have Mach numbers between 1.1-3.8 and {theta}{sub Bn}{approx}20-86 Degree-Sign . We find a variety of waves, including whistlers and low frequency fluctuations. Upstream whistler waves may be generated at the shock and upstream ultra low frequency (ULF) waves can be driven locally by ion instabilities. The downstream wave spectra can be formed by both, locally generated perturbations, and shock transmitted waves. We find that many quasiperpendicular shocks can be accompanied by ULF wave and ion foreshocks, which is in contrast to Earth's bow shock. Fluctuations downstream of quasi-parallel shocks tend to have larger amplitudes than waves downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. Proton foreshocks of shocks driven by stream interactions have extensions dr {<=}0.05 AU. This is smaller than foreshock extensions for ICME driven shocks. The difference in foreshock extensions is related to the fact that ICME driven shocks are formed closer to the Sun and therefore begin to accelerate particles very early in their existence, while stream interaction shocks form at {approx}1 AU and have been producing suprathermal particles for a shorter time.

  9. Culture Shock and Anthropological Fieldwork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, David Read

    The document reviews literature on the effects of culture shock and suggests reasons that anthropological writings seldom deal with the subject. Definitions of culture shock begin with the writings of anthropologist Kalvero Oberg, who first introduced the term in the mid 1950s. Oberg wrote that culture shock is precipitated by the anxiety that…

  10. Shock compression of nitrobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozu, Naoshi; Arai, Mitsuru; Tamura, Masamitsu; Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Aoki, Katsutoshi; Yoshida, Masatake; Kondo, Ken-Ichi

    1999-06-01

    The Hugoniot (4 - 30 GPa) and the isotherm (1 - 7 GPa) of nitrobenzene have been investigated by shock and static compression experiments. Nitrobenzene has the most basic structure of nitro aromatic compounds, which are widely used as energetic materials, but nitrobenzene has been considered not to explode in spite of the fact its calculated heat of detonation is similar to TNT, about 1 kcal/g. Explosive plane-wave generators and diamond anvil cell were used for shock and static compression, respectively. The obtained Hugoniot consists of two linear lines, and the kink exists around 10 GPa. The upper line agrees well with the Hugoniot of detonation products calculated by KHT code, so it is expected that nitrobenzene detonates in that area. Nitrobenzene solidifies under 1 GPa of static compression, and the isotherm of solid nitrobenzene was obtained by X-ray diffraction technique. Comparing the Hugoniot and the isotherm, nitrobenzene is in liquid phase under experimented shock condition. From the expected phase diagram, shocked nitrobenzene seems to remain metastable liquid in solid phase region on that diagram.

  11. A Shocking New Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Hydro Dynamics, Inc. received a technical helping hand from NASA that made their Hydrosonic Pump (HPump) a reality. Marshall engineers resolved a bearing problem in the rotor of the pump and recommended new bearings, housings and mounting hardware as a solution. The resulting HPump is able to heat liquids with greater energy efficiency using shock waves to generate heat.

  12. Detonation Shock Radius Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, David; Debes, Joshua; Stewart, Scott; Yoo, Sunhee

    2007-06-01

    A previous passover experiment [1] was designed to create a complex detonation transient used in validating a reduced, asymptotically derived description of detonation shock dynamics (DSD). An underlying question remained on determining the location of the initial detonation shock radius to start the DSD simulation with respect to the dynamical response of the initiation system coupling's to the main charge. This paper concentrates on determining the initial shock radius required of such DSD governed problems. `Cut-back' experiments of PBX-9501 were conducted using an initiation system that sought to optimize the transferred detonation to the desired constant radius, hemispherical shape. Streak camera techniques captured the breakout on three of the prism's surfaces for time-of-arrival data. The paper includes comparisons to simulations using constant volume explosion and high pressure hot spots. The results of the experiments and simulation efforts provide fundamental design considerations for actual explosive systems and verify necessary conditions from which the asymptotic theory of DSD may apply. [1] Lambert, D., Stewart, D. Scott and Yoo, S. and Wescott, B., ``Experimental Validation of Detonation Shock Dynamics in Condensed Explosives. J. of Fluid Mechs., Vol. 546, pp.227-253 (2006).

  13. Shock Absorbing Helmets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a description of helmets used by football players that offer three times the shock-absorbing capacity of earlier types. An interior padding for the helmets, composed of Temper Foam, first used by NASA's Ames Research Center in the design of aircraft seats is described.

  14. Teleconnected food supply shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bren d'Amour, Christopher; Wenz, Leonie; Kalkuhl, Matthias; Steckel, Jan Christoph; Creutzig, Felix

    2016-03-01

    The 2008-2010 food crisis might have been a harbinger of fundamental climate-induced food crises with geopolitical implications. Heat-wave-induced yield losses in Russia and resulting export restrictions led to increases in market prices for wheat across the Middle East, likely contributing to the Arab Spring. With ongoing climate change, temperatures and temperature variability will rise, leading to higher uncertainty in yields for major nutritional crops. Here we investigate which countries are most vulnerable to teleconnected supply-shocks, i.e. where diets strongly rely on the import of wheat, maize, or rice, and where a large share of the population is living in poverty. We find that the Middle East is most sensitive to teleconnected supply shocks in wheat, Central America to supply shocks in maize, and Western Africa to supply shocks in rice. Weighing with poverty levels, Sub-Saharan Africa is most affected. Altogether, a simultaneous 10% reduction in exports of wheat, rice, and maize would reduce caloric intake of 55 million people living in poverty by about 5%. Export bans in major producing regions would put up to 200 million people below the poverty line at risk, 90% of which live in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our results suggest that a region-specific combination of national increases in agricultural productivity and diversification of trade partners and diets can effectively decrease future food security risks.

  15. Heliospheric shocks: From low- to high-Mach numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedalin, Michael

    Collisionless shocks have been studied for more than five decades. From time to time it seems that most of the questions are answered and the shock physics is essentially understood. Each time this impression is broken due to the progress in observations and numerical simulations, which brings about the necessity to update our views and develop theory. Recent advances posed a number of new questions related to the transition from the low- to high-Mach number regime. These include the deviation of the shock front from planar shape (rippling), non-stationarity, and effects of high energy particles. The three issues are inter-connected and have a potential to change our understanding of how high-Mach number shocks work.

  16. Finite-Time Shock Acceleration of Energetic Storm Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channok, Chanruangrit; Ruffolo, David; Desai, Mihir I.; Mason, Glenn M.

    2005-11-01

    Energetic storm particles (ESPs) of various ion species have been shown to arise from suprathermal seed ions accelerated by traveling interplanetary (IP) shocks. The observed spectral rollovers at ~0.1-10 MeV nucleon-1 can be attributed to the finite time available for shock acceleration. Using the locally measured shock strength parameters as inputs, the finite-time shock acceleration model can successfully fit the energy spectra of carbon, oxygen, and iron ions measured by the Ultra Low Energy Isotope Spectrometer (ULEIS) on board the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) during three ESP events. The inferred scattering mean free path in the acceleration region ranges from a typical IP value for the weakest ESP event down to 3.0×10-3 AU for the strongest event. This is consistent with the idea that proton-amplified waves result from the very intense particle fluxes in major events.

  17. Forward modeling of shock-ramped tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Justin L.; Carpenter, John H.; Seagle, Christopher T.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic materials experiments on the Z-machine are beginning to reach a regime where traditional analysis techniques break down. Time dependent phenomena such as strength and phase transition kinetics often make the data obtained in these experiments difficult to interpret. We present an inverse analysis methodology to infer the equation of state (EOS) from velocimetry data in these types of experiments, building on recent advances in the propagation of uncertain EOS information through a hydrocode simulation. An example is given for a shock-ramp experiment in which tantalum was shock compressed to 40 GPa followed by a ramp to 80 GPa. The results are found to be consistent with isothermal compression and Hugoniot data in this regime.

  18. Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2003-04-01

    The process of diffusive acceleration of charged particles in shocked plasmas is widely invoked in astrophysics to account for the ubiquitous presence of signatures of non-thermal relativistic electrons and ions in the universe. This statistical energization mechanism, manifested in turbulent media, was first posited by Enrico Fermi in 1949 to explain the observed cosmic ray population, which exhibits an almost power-law distribution in rigidity. The absence of a momentum scale is a key characteristic of diffusive shock acceleration, and astrophysical systems generally only impose scales at the injection (low energy) and loss (high energy) ends of the particle spectrum. The existence of structure in the cosmic ray spectrum (the "knee") at around 3000 TeV has promoted contentions that there are at least two origins for cosmic rays, a galactic one supplying those up to the knee, and perhaps an extragalactic one that can explain even the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) seen at 1-300 EeV. Accounting for the UHECRs with familiar astrophysical sites of acceleration has historically proven difficult due to the need to assume high magnetic fields in order to reduce the shortest diffusive acceleration timescale, the ion gyroperiod, to meaningful values. Yet active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts remain strong and interesting candidate sources for UHECRs, turning the theoretical focus to relativistic shocks. This review summarizes properties of diffusive shock acceleration that are salient to the issue of UHECR generation. These include spectral indices, anisotropies, acceleration efficencies and timescales, as functions of the shock speed and mean field orientation, and also the degree of field turbulence. Astrophysical sites for UHECR production are also critiqued.

  19. Shock Surface Undulation and Particle Acceleration at Oblique Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Li, Y.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    Considering the average Parker spiral magnetic field configuration, CME-driven interplanetary (IP) shocks within 1 AU should have oblique portions over much of their domain. Indeed, CME-driven shocks observed close to Earth are often oblique. However, it is well known that the standard diffusive shock acceleration mechanism, which relies on self-consistent wave generation via upstream propagating ions and their scattering, becomes increasingly inefficient with greater shock normal angle. Not only is a higher threshold energy required for the ions to leave the shock upstream, but also, approximately-parallel propagating waves are more quickly convected back into the shock, and the growth rate for waves propagating normal to the shock (the ones with the largest convective growth) decreases. As a result, typical, small-scale hybrid simulations of oblique shocks only show a dilute upstream beam, similar to what is often observed at the oblique Earth's bow shock - and no scattered, highly-energized ions. On the other hand, there are many "energetic storm particle" (ESP) events associated with oblique shocks that have significant fluxes of energetic ions. Recently, we have found that when run for a long time, our hybrid simulations (kinetic ions, electron fluid) show that the initial, weak beam is sufficient to generate compressive, steepening upstream waves. These waves are capable of disturbing the shock surface, resulting in an undulation that is propagating along the surface and growing in amplitude over time. The process is akin to that of the well-known reformation occurring at sufficiently strong quasi-parallel shocks. However, here the perturbations require at least two dimensions, show a strong spatial correlation, and travel along the shock surface. This process not only leads to enhanced ion acceleration, but also means that the shock characteristics are difficult to pinpoint, observationally: both the local jumps and the shock normal angle are highly variable

  20. Shock induced dissociation of polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.E.; Loughran, E.D.; Mortensen, G.F.; Gray, G.T. III; Shaw, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    To identify the physical processes occurring on the Hugoniot, shock-recovery experiments were performed. Cylindrical recovery systems were used that enabled a wide range of single-shock Hugoniot states to be examined. Mass spectroscopy was used to examine the gaseous dissociation products. X-ray and TEM measurements were made to characterize the post-shock carbon structures. A dissociation product equation of state is presented to interpret the observed results. Polyethylene (PE) samples that were multiply shocked to their final states dissociated at much higher pressures than single-shocked samples. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Weak-shock reflection factors

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-09-07

    The purpose of this paper is to compare reflection factors for weak shocks from various surfaces, and to focus attention on some unsolved questions. Three different cases are considered: square-wave planar shock reflection from wedges; square-wave planar shock reflection from cylinders; and spherical blast wave reflection from a planar surface. We restrict ourselves to weak shocks. Shocks with a Mach number of M{sub O} < 1.56 in air or with an overpressure of {Delta}{sub PI} < 25 psi (1.66 bar) under normal ambient conditions are called weak.

  2. Shock detachment from curved wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Curved shock theory is used to show that the flow behind attached shocks on doubly curved wedges can have either positive or negative post-shock pressure gradients depending on the freestream Mach number, the wedge angle and the two wedge curvatures. Given enough wedge length, the flow near the leading edge can choke to force the shock to detach from the wedge. This local choking can preempt both the maximum deflection and the sonic criteria for shock detachment. Analytical predictions for detachment by local choking are supported by CFD results.

  3. Multipoint study of interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Kajdic, Primoz; Russell, Christopher T.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, Ernesto; Jian, Lan K.; Luhmann, Janet G.

    2016-04-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks are driven in the heliosphere by Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) and Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs). These shocks perturb the solar wind plasma, and play an active role in the acceleration of ions to suprathermal energies. Shock fronts evolve as they move from the Sun. Their surfaces can be far from uniform and be modulated by changes in the ambient solar wind (magnetic field orientation, flow velocity), shocks rippling, and perturbations upstream and downstream from the shocks, i.e., electromagnetic waves. In this work we use multipoint observations from STEREO, WIND, and MESSENGER missions to study shock characteristics at different helio-longitudes and determine the properties of the waves near them. We also determine shock longitudinal extensions and foreshock sizes. The variations of geometry along the shock surface can result in different extensions of the wave and ion foreshocks ahead of the shocks, and in different wave modes upstream and downtream of the shocks. We find that the ion foreshock can extend up to 0.2 AU ahead of the shock, and that the upstream region with modified solar wind/waves can be very asymmetric.

  4. Pathophysiologic characteristics of hypovolemic shock.

    PubMed

    Moore, K E; Murtaugh, R J

    2001-11-01

    In the late 1800s, while caring for a trauma victim, Warren characterized shock as "a momentary pause in the act of death." A great deal about shock has been discovered since this first description. Dorland's Medical Dictionary defines shock as a condition of profound hemodynamic and metabolic disturbance characterized by failure of the circulatory system to maintain adequate perfusion of vital organs. Shock is now being defined at the cellular level as the inadequate delivery of nutrients to the cells of the body. Because oxygen is the only nutrient that cells cannot store in any appreciable quantity, shock is also equivalent to inadequate oxygen delivery (DO2). Although there are many types of shock, this article concentrates on the pathophysiologic characteristics of hypovolemic shock.

  5. Shock metamorphism of deformed quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratz, Andrew J.; Christie, John; Tyburczy, James; Ahrens, Thomas; Pongratz, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The effect produced by shock loading (to peak pressures of 12 and 24) on deformed synthetic quartz containing a dislocation and abundant bubbles and small inclusions was investigated, and the relationships between preexisting dislocation density shock lamellae in the target material were examined. The resultant material was found to be inhomogeneously deformed and extremely fractured. Results of TEM examinations indicate that no change in dislocation density was caused by shock loading except in regions containing shock lamellae, where the dislocation density was lowered. The shock-induced defects tend to nucleate on and be controlled by preexisting stress concentrators; shock lamellae, glassy veins, and most curviplanar defects form in tension, presumably during release. An extremely mobile silica fluid is formed and injected into fractures during release, which forcibly removes crystalline fragments from vein walls. It is concluded that shock deformation in quartz is dominated by fracture and melting.

  6. Treatment of Renal Calculi with Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Eberwein, P. M.; Denstedt, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    In 12 years, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy has replaced other treatment techniques for most surgical calculi in the upper urinary tract. Worldwide clinical series have documented its efficacy. Technological advances and modifications have significantly expanded the clinical applications of this technique. Imagesp1673-aFigure 3 PMID:21221368

  7. Empiric antimicrobial therapy in severe sepsis and septic shock: optimizing pathogen clearance.

    PubMed

    Liang, Stephen Y; Kumar, Anand

    2015-07-01

    Mortality and morbidity in severe sepsis and septic shock remain high despite significant advances in critical care. Efforts to improve outcome in septic conditions have focused on targeted, quantitative resuscitation strategies utilizing intravenous fluids, vasopressors, inotropes, and blood transfusions to correct disease-associated circulatory dysfunction driven by immune-mediated systemic inflammation. This review explores an alternate paradigm of septic shock in which microbial burden is identified as the key driver of mortality and progression to irreversible shock. We propose that clinical outcomes in severe sepsis and septic shock hinge upon the optimized selection, dosing, and delivery of highly potent antimicrobial therapy.

  8. Empiric Antimicrobial Therapy in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: Optimizing Pathogen Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Stephen Y.

    2015-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity in severe sepsis and septic shock remain high despite significant advances in critical care. Efforts to improve outcome in septic conditions have focused on targeted, quantitative resuscitation strategies utilizing intravenous fluids, vasopressors, inotropes, and blood transfusions to correct disease-associated circulatory dysfunction driven by immune-mediated systemic inflammation. This review explores an alternate paradigm of septic shock in which microbial burden is identified as the key driver of mortality and progression to irreversible shock. We propose that clinical outcomes in severe sepsis and septic shock hinge upon the optimized selection, dosing, and delivery of highly potent antimicrobial therapy. PMID:26031965

  9. SUPERDIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G.

    2012-05-10

    The theory of diffusive shock acceleration is extended to the case of superdiffusive transport, i.e., when the mean square deviation grows proportionally to t{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} > 1. Superdiffusion can be described by a statistical process called Levy random walk, in which the propagator is not a Gaussian but it exhibits power-law tails. By using the propagator appropriate for Levy random walk, it is found that the indices of energy spectra of particles are harder than those obtained where a normal diffusion is envisaged, with the spectral index decreasing with the increase of {alpha}. A new scaling for the acceleration time is also found, allowing substantially shorter times than in the case of normal diffusion. Within this framework we can explain a number of observations of flat spectra in various astrophysical and heliospheric contexts, for instance, for the Crab Nebula and the termination shock of the solar wind.

  10. Landing-shock Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brevoort, M J

    1934-01-01

    A description of a special type of seismograph, called a "landing-shock recorder," to be used for measuring the acceleration during impacts such as are experienced in airplane landings, is given . The theory, together with the assumptions made, is discussed in its relation to calculating the acceleration experienced in impact. Calculations are given from records obtained for two impacts of known acceleration. In one case the impact was very severe and in the other it was only moderately severe.

  11. Clinical review: Hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Guillermo; Reines, H David; Wulf-Gutierrez, Marian E

    2004-01-01

    This review addresses the pathophysiology and treatment of hemorrhagic shock – a condition produced by rapid and significant loss of intravascular volume, which may lead sequentially to hemodynamic instability, decreases in oxygen delivery, decreased tissue perfusion, cellular hypoxia, organ damage, and death. Hemorrhagic shock can be rapidly fatal. The primary goals are to stop the bleeding and to restore circulating blood volume. Resuscitation may well depend on the estimated severity of hemorrhage. It now appears that patients with moderate hypotension from bleeding may benefit by delaying massive fluid resuscitation until they reach a definitive care facility. On the other hand, the use of intravenous fluids, crystalloids or colloids, and blood products can be life saving in those patients who are in severe hemorrhagic shock. The optimal method of resuscitation has not been clearly established. A hemoglobin level of 7–8 g/dl appears to be an appropriate threshold for transfusion in critically ill patients with no evidence of tissue hypoxia. However, maintaining a higher hemoglobin level of 10 g/dl is a reasonable goal in actively bleeding patients, the elderly, or individuals who are at risk for myocardial infarction. Moreover, hemoglobin concentration should not be the only therapeutic guide in actively bleeding patients. Instead, therapy should be aimed at restoring intravascular volume and adequate hemodynamic parameters. PMID:15469601

  12. Radiative effects in radiative shocks in shock tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. P.; Doss, F. W.; McClarren, R. G.; Adams, M. L.; Amato, N.; Bingham, D.; Chou, C. C.; DiStefano, C.; Fidkowski, K.; Fryxell, B.; Gombosi, T. I.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Holloway, J. P.; van der Holst, B.; Huntington, C. M.; Karni, S.; Krauland, C. M.; Kuranz, C. C.; Larsen, E.; van Leer, B.; Mallick, B.; Marion, D.; Martin, W.; Morel, J. E.; Myra, E. S.; Nair, V.; Powell, K. G.; Rauchwerger, L.; Roe, P.; Rutter, E.; Sokolov, I. V.; Stout, Q.; Torralva, B. R.; Toth, G.; Thornton, K.; Visco, A. J.

    2011-09-01

    Using modern high-energy-density facilities it is straightforward to produce radiative shock waves in which the transfer of energy by radiation controls the hydrodynamic structure of the system. Some of these experiments use shock tubes. This paper discusses such experiments, with an emphasis on the simple physical relations that determine the primary features of such shocks and on the details and impact of radiative energy transfer in such systems. Notable aspects include the creation of high-density shocked layers, the flow of radiative energy toward regions of higher energy density, and the creation of secondary shocks by ablation of the tube walls ahead of the primary shock front. Simulations of one such experimental system are also shown.

  13. Phase I study of the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor onalespib (AT13387) administered on a daily for 2 consecutive days per week dosing schedule in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Do, Khanh; Speranza, Giovanna; Chang, Lun-Ching; Polley, Eric C; Bishop, Rachel; Zhu, Weimin; Trepel, Jane B; Lee, Sunmin; Lee, Min-Jung; Kinders, Robert J; Phillips, Larry; Collins, Jerry; Lyons, John; Jeong, Woondong; Antony, Ramya; Chen, Alice P; Neckers, Len; Doroshow, James H; Kummar, Shivaani

    2015-08-01

    Inhibition of heat shock 90 (Hsp90) molecular chaperones allows targeting of multiple proteins involved in tumorigenesis. We investigated the safety, recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D), and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of onalespib (AT13387), a potent synthetic Hsp90 inhibitor, administered on days 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, and 16 of 28 day cycles (QDx2/week) in a phase I trial. This study followed an accelerated titration design with a starting dose of 20 mg/m(2)/dose and a standard 3 + 3 dose escalation design for dose level 4 (120 mg/m(2)/dose) and above. Additional patients were enrolled at the RP2D with mandatory paired tumor biopsies to assess modulation of 210 client proteins using reverse phase protein array analysis. Thirty-one patients were treated; RP2D was established at 160 mg/m(2)/dose on the QDx2/week schedule. Common toxicities were gastrointestinal, hepatic, and hematologic. Pharmacokinetic profile was linear and plasma levels increased proportionally with dose (T½ ~8 h). No responses were observed; eight patients had stable disease for > 2 cycles with one patient remaining on study for 6 cycles. Target engagement was demonstrated by transcriptional upregulation of Hsp70 and Hsp27 in PBMCs. Statistically significant modulation of client proteins was not achieved in the 9 paired tumor biopsies evaluated; however, hierarchical clustering revealed two subgroups of patients with differential patterns of protein expression. Further combination studies are needed in order to target prospective driver oncoproteins.

  14. Numerical studies of diffusive shock acceleration at spherical shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Jones, T. W.

    2006-05-01

    We have developed a cosmic ray (CR) shock code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with which the particle distribution, the gas flow and their nonlinear interaction can be followed numerically in a frame comoving with an expanding shock. In order to accommodate a very wide dynamic range of diffusion length scales in the CR shock problem, we have incorporated subzone shock tracking and adaptive mesh refinement techniques. We find the spatial grid resolution required for numerical convergence is less stringent in this code compared to typical, fixed-grid Eulerian codes. The improved convergence behavior derives from maintaining the shock discontinuity inside the same grid zone in the comoving code. That feature improves numerical estimates of the compression rate experienced by CRs crossing the subshock compared to codes that allow the subshock to drift on the grid. Using this code with a Bohm-like diffusion model we have calculated the CR acceleration and the nonlinear feedback at supernova remnant shocks during the Sedov-Taylor stage. Similarly to plane-parallel shocks, with an adopted thermal leakage injection model, about 10 -3 of the particles that pass through the shock and up to 60% of the explosion energy are transferred to the CR component. These results are in good agreement with previous nonlinear spherical CR shock calculations of Berezhko and collaborators.

  15. First ALMA Detection of a Galaxy Cluster Merger Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, K.; Sommer, M.; Erler, J.; Eckert, D.; Vazza, F.; Magnelli, B.; Bertoldi, F.; Tozzi, P.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the first ALMA measurement of a galaxy cluster merger shock, observed at the location of a radio relic in the famous El Gordo galaxy cluster at redshift z 0.9. Located at about half the current age of the Universe, this is also the most distant example of a directly measured astrophysical shock. ALMA Band 3 was utilised to measure the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect signature that confirms a small-scale change in pressure as expected from the passage of a shock in the intracluster medium. The results support a previous radio-based estimate of the shock Mach number and display similarities, and also some mild tensions, with the X-ray based results. Most importantly, these results show the potential of ALMA to detect galaxy cluster shocks, observations that will advance our knowledge of cluster formation, non-thermal particle acceleration and amplification of magnetic fields across the entire observable Universe where such relic shocks can be found.

  16. CMEs as a Shock Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz Martínez, Guadalupe; Becerril, Carlos; Lopez-Lopez, Jose Luis

    Interplanetary shocks are associated to approximately one third of the CMEs detected in the interplanetary medium. Even though they have been associated to fast CMEs (V>1000 km/s) it has been shown that some slow ones (V 300 km/s) presented shocks at 1 AU. The structure of the features observed in coronograph images can be hardly compared to the ones detected beyond the coronograph field of view, where the shock is clearly identify. For a few cases, the shock in front of the CME has been distinguish in white light images, but, is there a real visual difference between the CME itself and the considered shock? In this work we compare the optical characteristics of CMEs and some hydrodynamic parameters of ICMEs to show that the feature observed in white light images can be considered as a shock structure.

  17. Shock metamorphism of carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Edward R. D.; Keil, Klaus; Stoeffler, Dieter

    1992-01-01

    Shock effects were studied in 69 carbonaceous chondrites, including CM2, CO3, CV3, ungrouped C2-C4, and CK4-6 chondrites, using optical microscopy of thin sections. It is shown that the classification scheme of Stoeffler et al. (1991) for the progressive stages of shock metamorphism in ordinary chondrites is also applicable to carbonaceous chondrites. On the basis of shock effects in olivine, the 69 carbonaceous chondrites could be assigned to four shock stage, S1 to S4. The CM2 and CO3 groups were found to be the least shocked chondrite groups, whereas the CK4-6 and CV3 were the most strongly shocked groups.

  18. Anaphylactic shock in neuropsychoimmunological research.

    PubMed

    Marković, B M; Dimitrijević, M; Janković, B D

    1992-01-01

    Anaphylaxis appears to be an excellent experimental model for investigating the interactions between central nervous system (CNS) and immune system. Both afferent and efferent regulatory pathways of anaphylactic response are well characterized. The potent mediators of anaphylactic shock, such as histamine and serotonin, are at the same time neurotransmitters, acting in the CNS, and regulators/modulators of the immune system, since receptors for these substances exist on the membrane of the cells of the immune system. In this article the results of studies on the relationship between anaphylaxis and CNS, performed by both pioneers and contemporary investigators, are briefly reviewed. Recent experiments done in our laboratory are presented, which showed that (a) anaphylactic shock can be induced by intracerebroventricular administration of the shocking dose of antigen; (b) rats can learn to associate the induction of anaphylactic shock with neutral stimuli from the environment; and (c) stress in the form of electric tail-shocks reduces the intensity of anaphylactic shock.

  19. Particles Acceleration in Converged Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin

    2016-07-01

    Observations show that there is a proton spectral ``break" with E_{break} at 1-10MeV in some large CME-driven shocks. However, the understanding of this energy spectral ``break" from the diffusive shock acceleration theory still remains uncertain. Although previous numerical methods can hardly predict this ``break" from current theoretical models due to high computational expense, the present paper focuses on simulating this energy spectrum in converged two shocks by Monte Carlo numerical method. Considering the Dec 13 2006 CME-driven shock interaction with an Earth bow shock, we examine whether the energy spectral ``break" could occur on an interaction between two shocks. As result, we indeed obtain the maximum proton energy up to 10MeV, and we further find a proton spectral ``break" appears distinctly at the energy ˜5MeV.

  20. Physics of collisionless shocks: theory and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockem Novo, A.; Bret, A.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    Collisionless shocks occur in various fields of physics. In the context of space and astrophysics they have been investigated for many decades. However, a thorough understanding of shock formation and particle acceleration is still missing. Collisionless shocks can be distinguished into electromagnetic and electrostatic shocks. Electromagnetic shocks are of importance mainly in astrophysical environments and they are mediated by the Weibel or filamentation instability. In such shocks, charged particles gain energy by diffusive shock acceleration. Electrostatic shocks are characterized by a strong electrostatic field, which leads to electron trapping. Ions are accelerated by reflection from the electrostatic potential. Shock formation and particle acceleration will be discussed in theory and simulations.

  1. Flexible Multi-Shock Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Flexible multi-shock shield system and method are disclosed for defending against hypervelocity particles. The flexible multi-shock shield system and method may include a number of flexible bumpers or shield layers spaced apart by one or more resilient support layers, all of which may be encapsulated in a protective cover. Fasteners associated with the protective cover allow the flexible multi-shock shield to be secured to the surface of a structure to be protected.

  2. Shock and Awe Pedagogy!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lujan, Lujan; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Galen of Pergamon (130-200 A.D.) was an accomplished showman and scientist who made enormous advancements in the understanding of the heart, nervous system, and mechanics of breathing. These advancements were often achieved during impressive public "performances" of vivisection on Barbary apes and other living animals. These "shock…

  3. Martian bow shock - Phobos observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Lichtenegger, H.; Eroshenko, E.; Sauer, K.

    1990-01-01

    Data obtained with the Magma magnetometer on the subsolar passes of the Phobos spacecraft during its 3 elliptic orbits reveals a turbulent bow shock with a strong foot consistent with the reflection of solar wind protons. The bow shock lies at a subsolar distance of 1.47 + or - .03 R(M). The circular orbit phase of the mission reveals a bow shock with a highly varying location. The median terminator crossing lies at 2.72 Mars radii. The location of the bow shock in the terminator plane is sensitive to neither the EUV flux nor to planetary longitude.

  4. Martian bow shock: Phobos observations

    SciTech Connect

    Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Lichtenegger, H. ); Yeroshenko, Ye. ); Sauer, K. ); Luhmann, J.G.; Ong, M.; Russell, C.T. )

    1990-05-01

    Data obtained with the MAGMA magnetometer on the subsolar passes of the Phobos spacecraft during its 3 elliptic orbits reveals a turbulent bow shock with a strong foot consistent with the reflection of solar wind protons. The bow shock lies at a subsolar distance of 1.47 {plus minus} .03 R{sub M}. The circular orbit phase of the mission reveals a bow shock with a highly varying location. The median terminator crossing lies at 2.72 Mars radii. The location of the bow shock in the terminator plane is sensitive to neither the EUV flux nor to planetary longitude.

  5. Shock metamorphism of ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, Dieter; Keil, Klaus; Scott, Edward R. D.

    1991-01-01

    This study proposes a revised petrographic classification of progressive stages of shock metamorphism of 26 ordinary chondrites. Six stages of shock (S1 to S6) are defined on the basis of shock effects in olivine and plagioclase as recognized by thin section microscopy, and the characteristic shock effects of each shock stage are described. It is concluded that shock effects and the sequence of progressively increasing degrees of shock metamorphosis are very similar in H, L, and LL groups. Differences in the frequency distribution of shock stages are relatively minor. It is suggested that the collisional histories of the H, L, and LL parent bodies were similar. Petrologic type-3 chondrites are deficient in stages S4 and S6 and, with increasing petrologic type, the frequency of stages S4 to S6 increases. It is suggested that the more porous and volatile-rich Type-3 chondrites are subject to melting at a lower shock pressure than the nonporous chondrites of higher petrologic type. Stage S3 is the most abundant in nearly all petrologic types.

  6. Shock metamorphism in lunar samples.

    PubMed

    von Engelhardt, W; Arndt, J; Müller, W F; Stöffler, D

    1970-01-30

    Indications of shock metamorphism produced by pressures up to the megabar region have been observed in the fine material and the breccias, but very rarely in the coarser fragments of crystalline rocks. These indications are deformation structures in plagioclase and pyroxene, diaplectic plagioclase glasses, and glasses formed by shock-induced melting of lunar rocks. Two sources of shock waves have been distinguished: primary impact of meteorites and secondary impact of crater ejecta. There are two major chemical types of shock-induced melts. The differences in chemistry may be related to impact sites in mare and highland areas.

  7. Quasiperpendicular High Mach Number Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Burgess, D.; Fujimoto, M.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2015-09-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the Universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this Letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasiperpendicular shocks across 2 orders of magnitude in Alfvén Mach number (MA ) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted time scale of ˜0.3 τc , where τc is the ion gyroperiod. In addition, we experimentally reveal the relationship between reformation and MA and focus on the magnetic structure of such shocks to further show that for the same MA , a reforming shock exhibits stronger magnetic field amplification than a shock that is not reforming.

  8. Martian bow shock - PHOBOS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Lichtenegger, H.; Yeroshenko, Ye.; Sauer, K.; Luhmann, J. G.; Ong, M.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-05-01

    Data obtained with the Magma magnetometer on the subsolar passes of the Phobos spacecraft during its 3 elliptic orbits reveals a turbulent bow shock with a strong foot consistent with the reflection of solar wind protons. The bow shock lies at a subsolar distance of 1.47 + or - .03 R(M). The circular orbit phase of the mission reveals a bow shock with a highly varying location. The median terminator crossing lies at 2.72 Mars radii. The location of the bow shock in the terminator plane is sensitive to neither the EUV flux nor to planetary longitude.

  9. Endocrinology of shock.

    PubMed

    Woolf, P D

    1986-12-01

    The development of shock initiates a cascade of responses in an effort to reestablish homeostasis. Three of the most important hormonal and neurohumoral changes are the secretion of glucocorticoids, catecholamines, and vasopressin. Regulation of adrenal function is much more complex than originally thought. Hemorrhage is a potent stimulus for cortisol release, and both ACTH and ACTH-independent mechanisms have been described. The ACTH response to its releasing hormone, corticotropin releasing hormone (CRF), is itself amplified by vasopressin, which appears to have intrinsic CRF properties. Because ACTH is synthesized as part of a large precursor molecule (pro-opiomelanocortin) containing the amino acid sequences for several important proteins, stimulation of ACTH release has far-ranging effects, the specifics of which are just being clarified. Norepinephrine and epinephrine levels increase manyfold above baseline within minutes of the onset of hemorrhagic shock. Only patients experiencing cardiac arrest or the rare patient with a very active pheochromocytoma have higher concentrations. The levels reached are far in excess of those required to cause both cardiovascular and metabolic alterations. Because of the presence of the endogenous opiates leucine and methionine enkephalin in the neurosecretory granule, it is very likely that the enkephalins are coreleased with the catecholamines, modifying their cardiovascular effects and producing analgesia. Hypovolemia is also a potent stimulus for vasopressin secretion, which overrides hypotonicity, presenting a clinical picture quite compatible with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, from which it must be differentiated. Vasopressin also is released by pain, nausea, and hypoxia, all of which are likely to be present in the patient with shock.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Shock Absorbing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-01-01

    A lightweight, inexpensive shock-absorbing system, developed by Langley Research Center 20 years ago, is now in service as safety device for an automated railway at Duke University Medical Center. The transportation system travels at about 25 miles per hour, carrying patients, visitors, staff and cargo. At the end of each guideway of the system are "frangible," (breakable) tube "buffers." If a slowing car fails to make a complete stop at the terminal, it would bump and shatter the tubes, absorbing energy that might otherwise jolt the passengers or damage the vehicle.

  11. SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1957-12-17

    S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

  12. Characterization of Shocked Beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Cady, Carl M; Adams, Chris D; Hull, Lawrence M; Gray III, George T; Prime, Michael B; Addessio, Francis L; Wynn, Thomas A; Brown, Eric N

    2012-08-24

    Beryllium metal has many excellent structural properties in addition to its unique radiation characteristics, including: high elastic modulus, low Poisson's ratio, low density, and high melting point. However, it suffers from several major mechanical drawbacks: 1) high anisotropy - due to its hexagonal lattice structure and its susceptibility to crystallographic texturing; 2) susceptibility to impurity-induced fracture - due to grain boundary segregation; and 3) low intrinsic ductility at ambient temperatures thereby limiting fabricability. While large ductility results from deformation under the conditions of compression, the material can exhibit a brittle behavior under tension. Furthermore, there is a brittle to ductile transition at approximately 200 C under tensile conditions. While numerous studies have investigated the low-strain-rate constitutive response of beryllium, the combined influence of high strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of beryllium has received limited attention over the last 40 years. Prior studies have focused on tensile loading behavior, or limited conditions of dynamic strain rate and/or temperature. The beryllium used in this study was Grade S200-F (Brush Wellman, Inc., Elmore, OH) material. The work focused on high strain rate deformation and examine the validity of constitutive models in deformation rate regimes, including shock, the experiments were modeled using a Lagrangian hydrocode. Two constitutive strength (plasticity) models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) models, were calibrated using the same set of quasi-static and Hopkinson bar data taken at temperatures from 77K to 873K and strain rates from 0.001/sec to 4300/sec. In spite of being calibrated on the same data, the two models give noticeably different results when compared with the measured wave profiles. These high strain rate tests were conducted using both explosive drive and a gas gun to

  13. Hypovolemic shock resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Leslie; Costantini, Todd W; Coimbra, Raul

    2012-12-01

    Several changes in the way patients with hemorrhagic shock are resuscitated have occurred over the past decades, including permissive hypotension, minimal crystalloid resuscitation, earlier blood transfusion, and higher plasma and platelet-to-red cell ratios. Hemostatic adjuncts, such as tranexamic acid and prothrombin complex, and the use of new methods of assessing coagulopathy are also being incorporated into resuscitation of the bleeding patient. These ideas have been incorporated by many trauma centers into institutional massive transfusion protocols, and adoption of these protocols has resulted in improvements in mortality and morbidity. This article discusses each of these new resuscitation strategies and the evidence supporting their use.

  14. Toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Todd, J K

    1988-01-01

    In the past 10 years, we have learned much about TSS and S. aureus and its toxins. A number of important biologic principles have been reemphasized in this first decade of TSS research: S. aureus is a very complex organism, one not likely to yield quick answers; in vitro observations must always be confirmed in the patient; animal models may not always be reliable replicates of human disease; and epidemiologic associations cannot be equated with causation. Toxic shock is an intricate phenomenon with many interesting scientific facets. Unraveling its mysteries will undoubtedly teach us more about the complex interaction of patients and microorganisms. PMID:3069202

  15. Phase detonated shock tube (PFST)

    SciTech Connect

    Zerwekh, W.D.; Marsh, S.P.; Tan, Tai-Ho

    1993-07-01

    The simple, cylindrically imploding and axially driven fast shock tube (FST) has been a basic component in the high velocity penetrator (HVP) program. It is a powerful device capable of delivering a directed and very high pressure output that has been successfully employed to drive hypervelocity projectiles. The FST is configured from a hollow, high-explosive (HE) cylinder, a low-density Styrofoam core, and a one-point initiator at one end. A Mach stem is formed in the core as the forward-propagating, HE detonation wave intersects the reflected radial wave. This simple FST has been found to be a powerful pressure multiplier. Up to 1-Mbar output pressure can be obtained from this device. Further increase in the output pressure can be achieved by increasing the HE detonation velocity. The FST has been fine tuned to drive a thin plate to very high velocity under an impulse per unit area of about 1 Mbar{mu}s/cm{sup 2}. A 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel disk has been accelerated intact to 0.8 cm/{mu}s under a loading pressure rate of several Mbar/{mu}s. By making the plate curvature slightly convex at the loading side the authors have successfully accelerated it to almost 1.0 cm/{mu}s. The incorporation of a barrel at the end of the FST has been found to be important as confinement of the propellant gas by the barrel tends to accelerate the projectile to higher velocity. The desire to accelerate the plate above 1.0 cm/{mu}s provided the impetus to develop a more advanced fast shock tube to deliver a much higher output pressure. This report describes the investigation of a relatively simple air-lens phase-detonation system (PFST) with fifty percent higher phase-detonation velocity and a modest 2 Mbar output. Code calculations have shown that this PFST acceleration of a plate to about 1.2 cm/{mu}s can be achieved. The performance of these PFSTs has been evaluated and the details are discussed.

  16. Phase detonated shock tube (PFST)

    SciTech Connect

    Zerwekh, W.D.; Marsh, S.P.; Tan, Tai-Ho.

    1993-01-01

    The simple, cylindrically imploding and axially driven fast shock tube (FST) has been a basic component in the high velocity penetrator (HVP) program. It is a powerful device capable of delivering a directed and very high pressure output that has been successfully employed to drive hypervelocity projectiles. The FST is configured from a hollow, high-explosive (HE) cylinder, a low-density Styrofoam core, and a one-point initiator at one end. A Mach stem is formed in the core as the forward-propagating, HE detonation wave intersects the reflected radial wave. This simple FST has been found to be a powerful pressure multiplier. Up to 1-Mbar output pressure can be obtained from this device. Further increase in the output pressure can be achieved by increasing the HE detonation velocity. The FST has been fine tuned to drive a thin plate to very high velocity under an impulse per unit area of about 1 Mbar[mu]s/cm[sup 2]. A 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel disk has been accelerated intact to 0.8 cm/[mu]s under a loading pressure rate of several Mbar/[mu]s. By making the plate curvature slightly convex at the loading side the authors have successfully accelerated it to almost 1.0 cm/[mu]s. The incorporation of a barrel at the end of the FST has been found to be important as confinement of the propellant gas by the barrel tends to accelerate the projectile to higher velocity. The desire to accelerate the plate above 1.0 cm/[mu]s provided the impetus to develop a more advanced fast shock tube to deliver a much higher output pressure. This report describes the investigation of a relatively simple air-lens phase-detonation system (PFST) with fifty percent higher phase-detonation velocity and a modest 2 Mbar output. Code calculations have shown that this PFST acceleration of a plate to about 1.2 cm/[mu]s can be achieved. The performance of these PFSTs has been evaluated and the details are discussed.

  17. Simulations of Converging Shock Collisions for Shock Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauppe, Joshua; Dodd, Evan; Loomis, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Shock ignition (SI) has been proposed as an alternative to achieving high gain in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. A central hot spot below the ignition threshold is created by an initial compression pulse, and a second laser pulse drives a strong converging shock into the fuel. The collision between the rebounding shock from the compression pulse and the converging shock results in amplification of the converging shock and increases the hot spot pressure above the ignition threshold. We investigate shock collision in SI drive schemes for cylindrical targets with a polystyrene foam interior using radiation-hydrodynamics simulations with the RAGE code. The configuration is similar to previous targets fielded on the Omega laser. The CH interior results in a lower convergence ratio and the cylindrical geometry facilitates visualization of the shock transit using an axial X-ray backlighter, both of which are important for comparison to potential experimental measurements. One-dimensional simulations are used to determine shock timing, and the effects of low mode asymmetries in 2D computations are also quantified. LA-UR-16-24773.

  18. Dual Mode Shock-Expansion/Reflected-Shock Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdos, John I.; Bakos, Robert J.; Castrogiovanni, Anthony; Rogers, R. Clayton

    1998-01-01

    NASA s HYPULSE facility at GASL has been reconfigured to permit free jet testing of the Hyper-X flowpath at flight Mach numbers of 7 and 10. Among the required changes are addition of a converging-diverging nozzle to permit operation in a reflected shock tunnel mode, a 7 ft. diameter test cabin and a 30 in. diameter contoured nozzle. However, none of these changes were allowed to interfere with rapid recovery of the prior shock-expansion tunnel mode of operation, and indeed certain changes should enhance facility usefulness and productivity in either mode. A previously-developed shock-induced detonation mode of driving the facility has been successfully applied to both reflected shock tunnel operation at Mach 10 flight conditions, with tailored interface operation, and shock-expansion tunnel operation at flight conditions corresponding to Mach numbers from 12 to 25. Tailored interface operation at Mach 7 has been achieved with an unheated helium driver. In the present paper, the rationale for a dual mode shock expansion/reflected shock tunnel is discussed, and the capabilities and limitations for each mode are outlined. The physical changes in the HYPULSE facility to achieve dual mode capability are also described. Limited calibration data obtained to date in the new reflected shock tunnel mode are presented and the anticipated flight simulation map with dual mode operation is also outlined.

  19. Fast molecular shocks. II - Emission from fast dissociative shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Dalgarno, A.

    1989-01-01

    The line radiations emitted in the cooling gas behind a fast dissociative shock are studied. The intensities emitted in high rotational transitions of the neutral molecules CO, SiO, HCN, CN, NO, and SO are estimated, as well as in rovibrational transitions of the molecular ions HeH(+) and OH(+) in radio recombination lines of atomic hydrogen and in fine-structure transitions of C, C(+), O, and Si(+). The predictions are compared with the observed intensities of line emission from the Orion-KL region. For Orion-KL the observations do not exclude, but probably do not require, the presence of a fast dissociative shock. Emission from SiO in high-J rotational states and from vibrationally excited OH(+), HeH(+), HeH(+), and SO(+) may be detectable from dissociative shocks under suitable conditions of preshock density and shock velocity; such emission may prove to be a useful diagnostic probe of fast shock activity.

  20. Formation of Chondrules by Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, M. A.; Boley, A. C.

    2017-02-01

    We describe and assess current shock models for chondrule formation, particularly those driven by gravitational disk instabilities and bow shocks. We discuss predictions made by shock models and further work needed.

  1. IPShocks: Database of Interplanetary Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isavnin, Alexey; Lumme, Erkka; Kilpua, Emilia; Lotti, Mikko; Andreeova, Katerina; Koskinen, Hannu; Nikbakhsh, Shabnam

    2016-04-01

    Fast collisionless shocks are one of the key interplanetary structures, which have also paramount role for solar-terrestrial physics. In particular, coronal mass ejection driven shocks accelerate particles to high energies and turbulent post-shock flows may drive intense geomagnetic storms. We present comprehensive Heliospheric Shock Database (ipshocks.fi) developed and hosted at University of Helsinki. The database contains currently over 2000 fast forward and fast reverse shocks observed by Wind, ACE, STEREO, Helios, Ulysses and Cluster spacecraft. In addition, the database has search and sort tools based on the spacecraft, time range, and several key shock parameters (e.g., shock type, shock strength, shock angle), data plots for each shock and data download options. These features allow easy access to shocks and quick statistical analyses. All current shocks are identified visually and analysed using the same procedure.

  2. Floating shock fitting via Lagrangian adaptive meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanrosendale, John

    1995-01-01

    In recent work we have formulated a new approach to compressible flow simulation, combining the advantages of shock-fitting and shock-capturing. Using a cell-centered on Roe scheme discretization on unstructured meshes, we warp the mesh while marching to steady state, so that mesh edges align with shocks and other discontinuities. This new algorithm, the Shock-fitting Lagrangian Adaptive Method (SLAM), is, in effect, a reliable shock-capturing algorithm which yields shock-fitted accuracy at convergence.

  3. How Culture Shock Affects Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barna, LaRay M.

    The paper defines the term "culture shock" and discusses the changes that this state can make in a person's behavior. Culture shock refers to the emotional and physiological reaction of high activation that is brought about by sudden immersion in a new culture. Because one's own culture shields one from the unknown and reduces the need to make…

  4. [Management of pediatric septic shock].

    PubMed

    Llor, J; Parret, L; Stucki, P; Cotting, J

    2005-06-01

    Septic shock is a frequent admission cause in intensive care unit. In spite of the important progresses in the understanding of his physiopathology, mortality due to septic shock is about 20%. Recently, it has been demonstrated that an early goal-directed therapy permitted to improve the patient prognosis. With a good hemodynamic management and early antibiotherapy, mortality could be reduced.

  5. Molecular diagnostics of interstellar shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartquist, T. W.; Dalgarno, A.; Oppenheimer, M.

    1980-02-01

    The chemistry of molecules in shocked regions of the interstellar gas is considered and calculations are carried out for a region subjected to a shock at a velocity of 8 km/sec. Substantial enhancements are predicted in the concentrations of the molecules H2S, SO, and SiO compared to those anticipated in cold interstellar clouds.

  6. The Efficacy of Cognitive Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-21

    that allows military practitioners to operationalize cognitive shock against any given rival while experiencing diverse ecologies . 15. SUBJECT...operationalize cognitive shock against any given rival while experiencing diverse ecologies . iv Contents Acknowledgements...the emerging ecology rather than the more static concepts of force and control.8 This paper explores perception of depth and its potential

  7. Interpreting Shock Tube Ignition Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-01

    times only for high concentrations (of order 1% fuel or greater). The requirements of engine (IC, HCCI , CI and SI) modelers also present a different...Paper 03F-61 Interpreting Shock Tube Ignition Data D. F. Davidson and R. K. Hanson Mechanical Engineering ... Engineering Department Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305 Abstract Chemical kinetic modelers make extensive use of shock tube ignition data

  8. SPHERICAL SHOCK WAVES IN SOLIDS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Introduction-Reasons for Studying Spherical Shock Waves, Physics of Cavity Expansion due to Explosive Impact, General Nature of Shock Waves...Governing Differential Equation of Self-Similar Motion; Application of the Theory of Self-Similar Motion to the Problem of Expansion of a Spherical

  9. Pin puller impact shock attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auclair, G. F.; Leonard, B. S.; Robbins, R. E.; Proffitt, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    Design of a pin arresting mechanism for a pyrotechnically actuated pin puller is reviewed. The investigative approach is discussed and the impact shock test results for various candidate designs are presented. The selected pin arresting design reduced the peak value of the shock response spectrum by five to one.

  10. Molecular diagnostics of interstellar shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartquist, T. W.; Dalgarno, A.; Oppenheimer, M.

    1980-01-01

    The chemistry of molecules in shocked regions of the interstellar gas is considered and calculations are carried out for a region subjected to a shock at a velocity of 8 km/sec. Substantial enhancements are predicted in the concentrations of the molecules H2S, SO, and SiO compared to those anticipated in cold interstellar clouds.

  11. Shock temperatures in anorthite glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boslough, M. B.; Ahrens, T. J.; Mitchell, A. C.

    1983-01-01

    Temperatures of CaAl2Si2O8 (anorthite glass) shocked to pressures between 48 and 117 GPa were measured in the range from 2500 to 5600 K, using optical pyrometry techniques. The pressure dependence of the shock temperatures deviates significantly from predictions based on a single high pressure phase. At least three phase transitions, at pressures of about 55, 85, and 100 GPa and with transition energies of about 0.5 MJ/kg each (approximately 1.5 MJ/kg total) are required to explain the shock temperature data. The phase transition at 100 GPa can possibly be identified with the stishovite melting transition. Theoretical models of the time dependence of the thermal radiation from the shocked anorthite based on the geometry of the experiment and the absorptive properties of the shocked material yields good agreement with observations, indicating that it is not necessary to invoke intrinsic time dependences to explain the data in many cases.

  12. Shock waves in polycrystalline iron.

    PubMed

    Kadau, Kai; Germann, Timothy C; Lomdahl, Peter S; Albers, Robert C; Wark, Justin S; Higginbotham, Andrew; Holian, Brad Lee

    2007-03-30

    The propagation of shock waves through polycrystalline iron is explored by large-scale atomistic simulations. For large enough shock strengths the passage of the wave causes the body-centered-cubic phase to transform into a close-packed phase with most structure being isotropic hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) and, depending on shock strength and grain orientation, some fraction of face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure. The simulated shock Hugoniot is compared to experiments. By calculating the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) directly from the atomic configurations, a comparison to experimental EXAFS measurements of nanosecond-laser shocks shows that the experimental data is consistent with such a phase transformation. However, the atomistically simulated EXAFS spectra also show that an experimental distinction between the hcp or fcc phase is not possible based on the spectra alone.

  13. Frequency shift measurement in shock-compressed materials

    DOEpatents

    Moore, David S.; Schmidt, Stephen C.

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining molecular vibrational frequencies in shock-compressed transparent materials. A single laser beam pulse is directed into a sample material while the material is shock-compressed from a direction opposite that of the incident laser beam. A Stokes beam produced by stimulated Raman scattering is emitted back along the path of the incident laser beam, that is, in the opposite direction to that of the incident laser beam. The Stokes beam is separated from the incident beam and its frequency measured. The difference in frequency between the Stokes beam and the incident beam is representative of the characteristic frequency of the Raman active mode of the sample. Both the incident beam and the Stokes beam pass perpendicularly through the shock front advancing through the sample, thereby minimizing adverse effects of refraction.

  14. Vorticity interaction effects on blunt bodies. [hypersonic viscous shock layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Wilcox, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the viscous shock layer equations governing laminar and turbulent flows of a perfect gas and radiating and nonradiating mixtures of perfect gases in chemical equilibrium are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically blunted cones and hyperboloids. Turbulent properties are described in terms of the classical mixing length. Results are compared with boundary layer and inviscid flowfield solutions; agreement with inviscid flowfield data is satisfactory. Agreement with boundary layer solutions is good except in regions of strong vorticity interaction; in these flow regions, the viscous shock layer solutions appear to be more satisfactory than the boundary layer solutions. Boundary conditions suitable for hypersonic viscous shock layers are devised for an advanced turbulence theory.

  15. An Evaluation of the Compressive Properties of Helmet Pads Pre- and Post-Shock Wave Overpressure Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-14

    HELMET PADS HEAD (ANATOMY) TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY HELMETS SHOCK TUBES ACH(ADVANCED COMBAT HELMET) U.S...4 Figure 5. RED Head , manufactured by Humanetics and modified by UNL. ................................ 5 Figure 6...Surface pressure sensor locations on the RED Head . ..................................................... 5 Figure 7. External shock tube exit with RED

  16. Shock induced cavity collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, Jonathan; Doyle, Hugo; Tully, Brett; Betney, Matthew; Foster, Peta; Ringrose, Tim; Ramasamy, Rohan; Parkin, James; Edwards, Tom; Hawker, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Results from the experimental investigation of cavity collapse driven by a strong planar shock (>6km/s) are presented. Data from high speed framing cameras, laser backlit diagnostics and time-resolved pyromety are used to validate the results of hydrodynamic front-tracking simulations. As a code validation exercise, a 2-stage light gas gun was used to accelerate a 1g Polycarbonate projectile to velocities exceeding 6km/s; impact with a PMMA target containing a gas filled void results in the formation of a strong shockwave with pressures exceeding 1Mbar. The subsequent phenomena associated with the collapse of the void and excitation of the inert gas fill are recorded and compared to simulated data. Variation of the mass density and atomic number of the gas fill is used to alter the plasma parameters furthering the extent of the code validation.

  17. [Vasopressin use in shock].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; González-Salazar, Jorge A; Calvo-Carrillo, Benjamín

    2004-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (VP), also known as the antidiuretic hormone, is essential for water homeostasis. Its synthesis and liberation depends on regulation of osmotic, hypovolemic, hormonal, and nonosmotic stimuli. It has been demonstrated that it is key for maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis through vasomotor regulation, the determinant of systemic vascular resistance and mean arterial pressure, a process acting through V1 receptors. Shock state with refractory vasodilation seen in sepsis, systemic inflammatory response, hypovolemia, cardiac arrest, polytrauma, etc., is characterized by an initial phase of liberation and increased levels of VP followed by a second phase characterized by inappropriately low levels of this hormone that are associated with refractoriness to management with volume, inotropics, and vasopressors. It has been demonstrated in clinical and experimental studies that exogenous VP treatment under this condition increases systemic vascular resistance, perfusion pressure, and oxygen supply to peripheral tissues, which makes it possible to decrease and to suspend vasopressors and also to increase survival.

  18. Dengue shock syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sudulagunta, Sreenivasa Rao; Sodalagunta, Mahesh Babu; Sepehrar, Mona; Bangalore Raja, Shiva Kumar; Nataraju, Aravinda Settikere; Kumbhat, Mounica; Sathyanarayana, Deepak; Gummadi, Siddharth; Burra, Hemanth Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne arthropod-borne viral (arboviral) tropical disease in humans affecting 50–528 million people worldwide. The acute abdominal complications of dengue fever are acute appendicitis, acute pancreatitis, acute acalculous cholecystitis and non-specific peritonitis. Acute pancreatitis with new onset diabetes in dengue shock syndrome (DSS) is very rarely reported. We describe a case of 30-year-old man admitted in intensive care unit and was diagnosed with DSS with RT-PCR, NS1 antigen and dengue IgM antibody being positive. Abdominal ultrasound and computerized tomography confirmed acute pancreatitis. Patient required insulin after recovery. Diabetes mellitus caused by DSS is under-reported and lack of awareness may increase mortality and morbidity. PMID:28031845

  19. Diffusive shock acceleration - comparison of a unified shock model to bow shock observations

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, D.C.; Moebius, E.

    1987-07-01

    A comparison is made between recent AMPTE/IRM observations of diffuse ions detected upstream of the earth's bow shock when the interplanetary magnetic field was nearly parallel to the solar wind direction and a known collisionless quasi-parallel shock model. These observations, which provide the proton spectrum for all of velocity space, give a direct measure of the shock acceleration efficiency and show how thermal solar winds are injected into the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. The model accurately describes the proton spectrum; moreover, it predicts the shock structure, the complete particle spectrum, the relative velocity distributions of different ion species in the down stream region, and the enhancement of heavy ions over protons relative to the unshocked solar wind. 68 references.

  20. Diffusive shock acceleration - Comparison of a unified shock model to bow shock observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Moebius, Eberhard

    1987-01-01

    A comparison is made between recent AMPTE/IRM observations of diffuse ions detected upstream of the earth's bow shock when the interplanetary magnetic field was nearly parallel to the solar wind direction and a known collisionless quasi-parallel shock model. These observations, which provide the proton spectrum for all of velocity space, give a direct measure of the shock acceleration efficiency and show how thermal solar winds are injected into the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. The model accurately describes the proton spectrum; moreover, it predicts the shock structure, the complete particle spectrum, the relative velocity distributions of different ion species in the down stream region, and the enhancement of heavy ions over protons relative to the unshocked solar wind.

  1. [Septic shock in intensive care units. Current focus on treatment].

    PubMed

    Arriagada S, Daniela; Donoso F, Alejandro; Cruces R, Pablo; Díaz R, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Essential therapeutic principles in children with septic shock persist over time, although some new concepts have been recently incorporated, and fully awareness of pediatricians and intensivists is essential. Fluid resuscitation is a fundamental intervention, but the kind of ideal fluid has not been established yet, as each of these interventions has specific limitations and there is no evidence supportive of the superiority of one type of fluid. Should septic shock persists despite adequate fluid resuscitation, the use of inotropic medication and/or vasopressors is indicated. New vasoactive drugs can be used in refractory septic shock caused by vasopressors, and the use of hydrocortisone should be considered in children with suspected adrenal insufficiency, as it reduces the need for vasopressors. The indications for red blood cells transfusion or the optimal level of glycemia are still controversial, with no consensus on the threshold value for the use of these blood products or the initiation of insulin administration, respectively. Likewise, the use of high-volume hemofiltration is a controversial issue and further study is needed on the routine recommendation in the course of septic shock. Nutritional support is crucial, as malnutrition is a serious complication that should be properly prevented and treated. The aim of this paper is to provide update on the most recent advances as concerns the treatment of septic shock in the pediatric population.

  2. Simulations of Shock Wave Interaction with a Particle Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koneru, Rahul; Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S.'Bala'

    2016-11-01

    Simulations of a shock wave interacting with a cloud of particles are performed in an attempt to understand similar phenomena observed in dispersal of solid particles under such extreme environment as an explosion. We conduct numerical experiments in which a particle curtain fills only 87% of the shock tube from bottom to top. As such, the particle curtain upon interaction with the shock wave is expected to experience Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities. In this study, the initial volume fraction profile matches with that of Sandia Multiphase Shock Tube experiments, and the shock Mach number is limited to M =1.66. In these simulations we use a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach along with state-of-the-art point-particle force and heat transfer models. Measurements of particle dispersion are made at different initial volume fractions of the particle cloud. A detailed analysis of the evolution of the particle curtain with respect to the initial conditions is presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  3. Constraining the efficiency of cosmic ray acceleration by cluster shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazza, F.; Brüggen, M.; Wittor, D.; Gheller, C.; Eckert, D.; Stubbe, M.

    2016-06-01

    We study the acceleration of cosmic rays by collisionless structure formation shocks with ENZO grid simulations. Data from the Fermi satellite enable the use of galaxy clusters as a testbed for particle acceleration models. Based on advanced cosmological simulations that include different prescriptions for gas and cosmic rays physics, we use the predicted γ-ray emission to constrain the shock acceleration efficiency. We infer that the efficiency must be on average ≤10-3 for cosmic shocks, particularly for the M ˜ 2-5 merger shocks that are mostly responsible for the thermalization of the intracluster medium (ICM). These results emerge, both, from non-radiative and radiative runs including feedback from active galactic nuclei, as well as from zoomed resimulations of a cluster resembling MACSJ1752.0+0440. The limit on the acceleration efficiency we report is lower than what has been assumed in the literature so far. Combined with the information from radio emission in clusters, it appears that a revision of the present understanding of shock acceleration in the ICM is unavoidable.

  4. Chondrule Destruction in Nebular Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Thompson, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized silicate spherules ubiquitous in primitive meteorites, but whose origin remains mysterious. One of the main proposed mechanisms for producing them is melting of solids in shock waves in the gaseous protoplanetary disk. However, evidence is mounting that chondrule-forming regions were enriched in solids well above solar abundances. Given the high velocities involved in shock models, destructive collisions would be expected between differently sized grains after passage of the shock front as a result of differential drag. We investigate the probability and outcome of collisions of particles behind a one-dimensional shock using analytic methods as well as a full integration of the coupled mass, momentum, energy, and radiation equations. Destruction of protochondrules seems unavoidable for solid/gas ratios epsilon >~ 0.1, and possibly even for solar abundances because of "sandblasting" by finer dust. A flow with epsilon >~ 10 requires much smaller shock velocities (~2 versus 8 km s-1) in order to achieve chondrule-melting temperatures, and radiation trapping allows slow cooling of the shocked fragments. Initial destruction would still be extensive; although re-assembly of millimeter-sized particles would naturally occur by grain sticking afterward, the compositional heterogeneity of chondrules may be difficult to reproduce. We finally note that solids passing through small-scale bow shocks around few kilometer-sized planetesimals might experience partial melting and yet escape fragmentation.

  5. Slow shocks around the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1982-01-01

    It is inferred from this study that magnetohydrodynamic slow shocks can exist in the vicinity of the sun. The study uses a two-hole corona model, the sub-Alfvenic streams originating from the edge of the polar open-field regions are forced to turn towards equator in coronal space following the curved boundary of the closed field region. When the streamlines from the opposite poles merge at a neutral point, their directions become parallel to the neutral sheet. An oblique slow shock can develop near or at the neutral point, the shock extends polewards to form a surface of discontinuity around the sun.

  6. [Severe sepsis and septic shock].

    PubMed

    Tønnesen, Else; Larsen, Kim

    2014-07-07

    Sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock are syndromes. The incidence of sepsis is as high as 35% and with mortality rates in the intensive care unit from 27% to 54% in sepsis and septic shock, respectively. Many new treatments have been tested but only few have been implemented in clinical practise. The treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock is based on the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines developed by an international expert panel. Early diagnosis, optimization of haemodynamics, rapid identification of focus and adequate antibiotic treatment are the most important strategies.

  7. Is this septic shock? A rare case of distributive shock.

    PubMed

    Val-Flores, Luis Silva; Fior, Alberto; Santos, Ana; Reis, Luís; Bento, Luís

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of shock in a patient without significant clinical history, admitted to the intensive care unit for suspected septic shock. The patient was initially treated with fluid therapy without improvement. A hypothesis of systemic capillary leak syndrome was postulated following the confirmation of severe hypoalbuminemia, hypotension, and hemoconcentration--a combination of three symptoms typical of the disease. The authors discussed the differential diagnosis and also conducted a review of the diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

  8. Is this septic shock? A rare case of distributive shock

    PubMed Central

    Val-Flores, Luis Silva; Fior, Alberto; Santos, Ana; Reis, Luís; Bento, Luís

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of shock in a patient without significant clinical history, admitted to the intensive care unit for suspected septic shock. The patient was initially treated with fluid therapy without improvement. A hypothesis of systemic capillary leak syndrome was postulated following the confirmation of severe hypoalbuminemia, hypotension, and hemoconcentration - a combination of three symptoms typical of the disease. The authors discussed the differential diagnosis and also conducted a review of the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. PMID:25607273

  9. Quasilinear simulations of interplanetary shocks and Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus; Ganse, Urs; Vainio, Rami; Palmroth, Minna; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a new self-consistent Monte Carlo simulation model for particle acceleration in shocks. The model includes a prescribed large-scale magnetic field and plasma density, temperature and velocity profiles and a self-consistently computed incompressible ULF foreshock under the quasilinear approximation. Unlike previous analytical treatments, our model is time dependent and takes full account of the anisotropic particle distributions and scattering in the wave-particle interaction process. We apply the model to the problem of particle acceleration at traveling interplanetary (IP) shocks and Earth's bow shock and compare the results with hybrid-Vlasov simulations and spacecraft observations. A qualitative agreement in terms of spectral shape of the magnetic fluctuations and the polarization of the unstable mode is found between the models and the observations. We will quantify the differences of the models and explore the region of validity of the quasilinear approach in terms of shock parameters. We will also compare the modeled IP shocks and the bow shock, identifying the similarities and differences in the spectrum of accelerated particles and waves in these scenarios. The work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA). The Academy of Finland is thanked for financial support. We acknowledge the computational resources provided by CSC - IT Centre for Science Ltd., Espoo.

  10. Rarefaction shock in the near wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diebold, D.; Hershkowitz, N.; Eliezer, S.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory experiments and fluid theory find a stationary rarefaction shock in the near wake of an electrically grounded obstacle placed in a steady state, supersonic plasma flow. The shock is only found when two electron temperatures, differing by at least an order of magnitude, are present. These shocks are analogous to rarefaction shocks in plasma free expansions.

  11. An introduction to shaker shock simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    The use of shakers in shock testing is addressed. A brief review of the shock response spectrum is given with its applications to test specification. The capabilities and limitations of shaker shock simulations are discussed with regard to both classical pulses and transient vibration inputs. Methods for performing shaker shock simulations are presented. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle contracts Treat a heart attack Medical Devices Medical devices can help the heart pump and improve blood flow. Devices used to treat cardiogenic shock may include: An intra-aortic balloon pump. This device is placed in the aorta, ...

  13. Shocks in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pen, Ue-Li; Turok, Neil

    2016-09-01

    We point out a surprising consequence of the usually assumed initial conditions for cosmological perturbations. Namely, a spectrum of Gaussian, linear, adiabatic, scalar, growing mode perturbations not only creates acoustic oscillations of the kind observed on very large scales today, it also leads to the production of shocks in the radiation fluid of the very early Universe. Shocks cause departures from local thermal equilibrium as well as create vorticity and gravitational waves. For a scale-invariant spectrum and standard model physics, shocks form for temperatures 1 GeV shock formation and the consequent gravitational wave emission provide a signal detectable by current and planned gravitational wave experiments, allowing them to strongly constrain conditions present in the primordial Universe as early as 10-30 sec after the big bang.

  14. Shock Isolation on Planet Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletz, Bjorn T.; Melcher, Jorg

    2014-06-01

    In 2016 the 'InSight' mission will be launched towards planet Mars. Within parts of this mission, sensitive electronics have to be isolated for occurring shocks, as these components are hammered into the Martian soil. A mechanical shock isolation interface - that is based on patented double spiral springs - is integrated into the hammering structure to protect the integrated electronics from the harmful peak accelerations.This paper starts with introducing the theoretical background for the development of such devices and continues with the description and analysis of the actually implemented interface version. Additionally, this paper describes the used mechanism to protect the system during launch. Measurements during the hammering process and the penetration of Mars-like soil prove the effectiveness of the described shock isolation device in real conditions. Finally, this paper highlights the achieved extreme shock reduction performance that reduces the critical accelerations by factor 127 with this novel device.

  15. Shock compression of liquid hydrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, B.O.; Chavez, D.J.

    1996-05-01

    Liquid hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) is a propellant used for aerospace propulsion and power systems. Because the propellant modules can be subject to debris impacts during their use, the shock states that can occur in the hydrazine need to be characterized to safely predict its response. Several shock compression experiments have been conducted to investigate the shock detonability of liquid hydrazine; however, the experiments{close_quote} results disagree. Therefore, in this study, we reproduced each experiment numerically to evaluate in detail the shock wave profiles generated in the liquid hydrazine. This paper presents the results of each numerical simulation and compares the results to those obtained in experiment. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Rayleigh-Taylor Shock Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, B J; Cook, A W

    2007-08-30

    Beginning from a state of hydrostatic equilibrium, in which a heavy gas rests atop a light gas in a constant gravitational field, Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface will launch a shock wave into the upper fluid. The rising bubbles of lighter fluid act like pistons, compressing the heavier fluid ahead of the fronts and generating shocklets. These shocklets coalesce in multidimensional fashion into a strong normal shock, which increases in strength as it propagates upwards. Large-eddy simulations demonstrate that the shock Mach number increases faster in three dimensions than it does in two dimensions. The generation of shocks via Rayleigh-Taylor instability could have profound implications for astrophysical flows.

  17. Undercuts by Laser Shock Forming

    SciTech Connect

    Wielage, Hanna; Vollertsen, Frank

    2011-05-04

    In laser shock forming TEA-CO{sub 2}-laser induced shock waves are used to form metal foils, such as aluminum or copper. The process utilizes an initiated plasma shock wave on the target surface, which leads to a forming of the foil. A challenge in forming technologies is the manufacturing of undercuts. By conventional forming methods these special forms are not feasible. In this article, it is presented that undercuts in the micro range can be produced by laser shock deep drawing. Different drawing die diameters, drawing die depths and the material aluminum in the thicknesses 20 and 50 {mu}m were investigated. It will be presented that smaller die diameters facilitate undercuts compared to bigger die diameters. The phenomena can be explained by Barlow's formula. Furthermore, it is shown which maximum undercut depth at different die diameters can be reached. To this end, cross-sections of the different parameter combinations are displayed.

  18. Shocks in the Early Universe.

    PubMed

    Pen, Ue-Li; Turok, Neil

    2016-09-23

    We point out a surprising consequence of the usually assumed initial conditions for cosmological perturbations. Namely, a spectrum of Gaussian, linear, adiabatic, scalar, growing mode perturbations not only creates acoustic oscillations of the kind observed on very large scales today, it also leads to the production of shocks in the radiation fluid of the very early Universe. Shocks cause departures from local thermal equilibrium as well as create vorticity and gravitational waves. For a scale-invariant spectrum and standard model physics, shocks form for temperatures 1  GeVshock formation and the consequent gravitational wave emission provide a signal detectable by current and planned gravitational wave experiments, allowing them to strongly constrain conditions present in the primordial Universe as early as 10^{-30}  sec after the big bang.

  19. Stability of undercompressive shock profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Peter; Zumbrun, Kevin

    Using a simplified pointwise iteration scheme, we establish nonlinear phase-asymptotic orbital stability of large-amplitude Lax, undercompressive, overcompressive, and mixed under-overcompressive type shock profiles of strictly parabolic systems of conservation laws with respect to initial perturbations |u(x)|⩽E(1 in C, E sufficiently small, under the necessary conditions of spectral and hyperbolic stability together with transversality of the connecting profile. This completes the program initiated by Zumbrun and Howard in [K. Zumbrun, P. Howard, Pointwise semigroup methods and stability of viscous shock waves, Indiana Univ. Math. J. 47 (4) (1998) 741-871], extending to the general undercompressive case results obtained for Lax and overcompressive shock profiles in [A. Szepessy, Z. Xin, Nonlinear stability of viscous shock waves, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 122 (1993) 53-103; T.-P. Liu, Pointwise convergence to shock waves for viscous conservation laws, Comm. Pure Appl. Math. 50 (11) (1997) 1113-1182; K. Zumbrun, P. Howard, Pointwise semigroup methods and stability of viscous shock waves, Indiana Univ. Math. J. 47 (4) (1998) 741-871; K. Zumbrun, Refined wave-tracking and nonlinear stability of viscous Lax shocks, Methods Appl. Anal. 7 (2000) 747-768; M.-R. Raoofi, L-asymptotic behavior of perturbed viscous shock profiles, thesis, Indiana Univ., 2004; C. Mascia, K. Zumbrun, Pointwise Green's function bounds and stability of relaxation shocks, Indiana Univ. Math. J. 51 (4) (2002) 773-904; C. Mascia, K. Zumbrun, Stability of small-amplitude shock profiles of symmetric hyperbolic-parabolic systems, Comm. Pure Appl. Math. 57 (7) (2004) 841-876; C. Mascia, K. Zumbrun, Pointwise Green's function bounds for shock profiles with degenerate viscosity, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 169 (3) (2003) 177-263; C. Mascia, K. Zumbrun, Stability of large-amplitude shock profiles of hyperbolic-parabolic systems, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 172 (1) (2004) 93-131; C. Mascia, K. Zumbrun

  20. Dehydration kinetics of shocked serpentine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyburczy, James A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental rates of dehydration of shocked and unshocked serpentine were determined using a differential scanning calorimetric technique. Dehydration rates in shocked serpentine are enhanced by orders of magnitude over corresponding rates in unshocked material, even though the impact experiments were carried out under conditions that inhibited direct impact-induced devolatilization. Extrapolation to temperatures of the Martian surface indicates that dehydration of shocked material would occur 20 to 30 orders of magnitude more rapidly than for unshocked serpentine. The results indicate that impacted planetary surfaces and associated atmospheres would reach chemical equilibrium much more quickly than calculations based on unshocked material would indicate, even during the earliest, coldest stages of accretion. Furthermore, it is suggested that chemical weathering of shocked planetary surfaces by solid-gas reactions would be sufficiently rapid that true equilibrium mineral assemblages should form.

  1. 'Shocking' Obedience Found in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Describes a Stanley Milgram type obedience experiment conducted with 192 Jordanian children ages 6-16. Seventy-three percent of the children responded via administering supposed dangerous electrical shocks to test subjects. (SL)

  2. Shock metamorphism of granulated lunar basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaal, R. B.; Thompson, T. D.; Hoerz, F.; Bauer, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with an extensive series of shock-recovery experiments performed on both nonporous crystalline basalt and its granulated and sieved counterpart to study the role of porosity and grain size in shock motomorphic effects under otherwise identical conditions. Shocked samples are compared with unshocked starting material in terms of textural and mineralogical modifications attributable to shock. A comparative petrographic and chemical characterization is presented of pulverized and sieved lunar basalt 75035 shocked between 6 and 75 GPa in comparison with holocrystalline disks of the same basalts shocked in 10 earlier experiments. Specifically, a petrographic classification of shock features is given, along with an estimation of relative amounts of shock glasses and a chemical characterization of shock glasses in each shocked granular basalt.

  3. Turbulence in electrostatic ion acoustic shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Means, R. W.; Coroniti, F. V.; Wong, A. Y.; White, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Three types of collisionless electrostatic ion acoustic shocks are investigated using a double plasma (DP) device: (1) laminar shocks; (2) small amplitude turbulent shocks in which the turbulence is confined to be upstream of the shock potential jump; and (3) large amplitude turbulent shocks in which the wave turbulence occurs throughout the shock transition. The wave turbulence is generated by ions which are reflected from the shock potential; linear theory spatial growth increments agree with experimental values. The experimental relationship between the shock Mach number and the shock potential is shown to be inconsistent with theoretical shock models which assume that the electrons are isothermal. Theoretical calculations which assume a trapped electron equation of a state and a turbulently flattened velocity distrubution function for the reflected ions yields a Mach number vs potential relationship in agreement with experiment.

  4. Laser Diagnostics for Wire Array Z-Pinch Shock Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    ASAY,JAMES R.; BAILEY,JAMES E.; HALL,CLINT A.; KNUDSON,MARCUS D.; TROTT,WAYNE M.

    1999-09-01

    The Z Accelerator is a fast pulse power facility capable of performing high-pressure studies of the dynamic response of materials under loading conditions unachievable with other methods. A variety of advanced laser diagnostics have been implemented on the facility for shock physics experiments. These include multipoint laser velocity interferometry,line and full field velocity interferometry, time-resolved optical and uv spectroscopy, and both active and passive shock breakout.

  5. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 1. Summaries of Presented Papers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-01

    will be published in later parts. Several reasons exist for so doing: (1) The summaries in this part are delivered to registrants in advance of the...offered for publication in the bulletin. (4) Papers covering a very useful piece of work may fail to survive the refereeing procedure for reasons ...shock of 10g is considered reasonable for a very rough road surface. Consequently, the Highway Shock Index is based on a scale of 0 to 10g’s; the

  6. Shock waves show icebreaking promise

    SciTech Connect

    Wesley, R.H.; Stowell, W.R.

    1985-11-01

    State-of-the-art technology that is readily applicable in other offshore areas does not function adequately in Arctic regions. The common offshore problem in the Arctic, whether it be related to transportation, construction, drilling or production, is ice. Technology utilizing the phenomenal characteristics of the shock wave now exists that will allow relief from the ice problem in all of these categories. The feasibility of using shock waves for icebreaking is discussed.

  7. Shock phenomena in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.

    1972-01-01

    The performance of the solar wind near one astronomical unit is discussed. The solar wind is shown to act as a compressible, supersonic, magnetogasdynamic fluid. The creation of magnetogasdynamic shock waves by solar flares and other causes is analyzed. The observations of shock fronts and the flows behind these fronts are discussed and synoptic views of the observations are described. Theoretical concepts and models are summarized.

  8. Theoretical Insight into Shocked Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Leiding, Jeffery Allen

    2016-09-29

    I present the results of statistical mechanical calculations on shocked molecular gases. This work provides insight into the general behavior of shock Hugoniots of gas phase molecular targets with varying initial pressures. The dissociation behavior of the molecules is emphasized. Impedance matching calculations are performed to determine the maximum degree of dissociation accessible for a given flyer velocity as a function of initial gas pressure.

  9. Shock compression of precompressed deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M R; Crowhurst, J C; Zaug, J M; Bastea, S; Goncharov, A F; Militzer, B

    2011-07-31

    Here we report quasi-isentropic dynamic compression and thermodynamic characterization of solid, precompressed deuterium over an ultrafast time scale (< 100 ps) and a microscopic length scale (< 1 {micro}m). We further report a fast transition in shock wave compressed solid deuterium that is consistent with the ramp to shock transition, with a time scale of less than 10 ps. These results suggest that high-density dynamic compression of hydrogen may be possible on microscopic length scales.

  10. Shock Interaction with Random Spherical Particle Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Chris; Mehta, Yash; Salari, Kambiz; Jackson, Thomas L.; Balachandar, S. "Bala"; Thakur, Siddharth

    2016-11-01

    In this talk we present results on fully resolved simulations of shock interaction with randomly distributed bed of particles. Multiple simulations were carried out by varying the number of particles to isolate the effect of volume fraction. Major focus of these simulations was to understand 1) the effect of the shockwave and volume fraction on the forces experienced by the particles, 2) the effect of particles on the shock wave, and 3) fluid mediated particle-particle interactions. Peak drag force for particles at different volume fractions show a downward trend as the depth of the bed increased. This can be attributed to dissipation of energy as the shockwave travels through the bed of particles. One of the fascinating observations from these simulations was the fluctuations in different quantities due to presence of multiple particles and their random distribution. These are large simulations with hundreds of particles resulting in large amount of data. We present statistical analysis of the data and make relevant observations. Average pressure in the computational domain is computed to characterize the strengths of the reflected and transmitted waves. We also present flow field contour plots to support our observations. U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  11. San Antonio Vasopressin in Shock Symposium Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Keywords: Conference report Vasopressin Shock Cardiac arrest Traumatic brain injury Septic shock Haemorrhagic shock a b s t r a c t The...potential benefits of vasopressin use in shock. 2. Vasopressin deficiency states and shock While a vasopressin infusion has little vasopressor effect in...100pg/ml and restores arterial blood pressure by a direct vasopres- sor effect and by increasing sensitivity to pressor catecholamines. At low doses (1

  12. Management of Shock in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Bhat, B Vishnu; Plakkal, Nishad

    2015-10-01

    Shock is characterized by inadequate oxygen delivery to the tissues, and is more frequent in very low birth weight infants, especially in the first few days of life. Shock is an independent predictor of mortality, and the survivors are at a higher risk of neurologic impairment. Understanding the pathophysiology helps to recognize and classify shock in the early compensated phase and initiate appropriate treatment. Hypovolemia is rarely the primary cause of shock in neonates. Myocardial dysfunction is especially common in extremely preterm infants, and in term infants with perinatal asphyxia. Blood pressure measurements are easy, but correlate poorly with cerebral and systemic blood flows. Point-of-care cardiac ultrasound can help in individualized assessment of problems, selecting appropriate therapy and monitoring response, but may not always be available, and long-term benefits need to be demonstrated. The use of near-infrared spectroscopy to guide treatment of neonatal shock is currently experimental. In the absence of hypovolemia, excessive administration of fluid boluses is inappropriate therapy. Dobutamine and dopamine are the most common initial inotropes used in neonatal shock. Dobutamine has been shown to improve systemic blood flow, especially in very low birth weight infants, but dopamine is better at improving blood pressure in hypotensive infants. Newer inodilators including milrinone and levosimendan may be useful in selected settings. Data on long-term survival and neurologic outcomes following different management strategies are scarce and future research efforts should focus on this.

  13. Vascular Endothelium and Hypovolemic Shock.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Endothelium is a site of metabolic activity and has a major reservoir of multipotent stem cells. It plays a vital role in the vascular physiological, pathophysiological and reparative processes. Endothelial functions are significantly altered following hypovolemic shock due to ischemia of the endothelial cells and by reperfusion due to resuscitation with fluids. Activation of endothelial cells leads to release of vasoactive substances (nitric oxide, endothelin, platelet activating factor, prostacyclin, mitochondrial N-formyl peptide), mediators of inflammation (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukins, interferons) and thrombosis. Endothelial cell apoptosis is induced following hypovolemic shock due to deprivation of oxygen required by endothelial cell mitochondria; this lack of oxygen initiates an increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and release of apoptogenic proteins. The glycocalyx structure of endothelium is compromised which causes an impairment of the protective endothelial barrier resulting in increased permeability and leakage of fluids in to the tissue causing edema. Growth factors such as angiopoetins and vascular endothelial growth factors also contribute towards pathophysiology of hypovolemic shock. Endothelium is extremely active with numerous functions, understanding these functions will provide novel targets to design therapeutic agents for the acute management of hypovolemic shock. Hypovolemic shock also occurs in conditions such as dengue shock syndrome and Ebola hemorrhagic fever, defining the role of endothelium in the pathophysiology of these conditions will provide greater insight regarding the functions of endothelial cells in vascular regulation.

  14. Understanding sepsis: from SIRS to septic shock.

    PubMed

    Hynes-Gay, Patricia; Lalla, Patti; Leo, Maria; Merrill-Bell, Audrey; Nicholson, Marjorie; Villaruel, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Sepsis remains the leading cause of death in non-coronary ICU patients, despite improvements in supportive treatment modalities such as antimicrobial drugs and ventilation therapy. Further, the incidence of sepsis is projected to increase in years to come, related to factors including a rise in immunosuppressed patient populations and more widespread use of invasive lines and procedures. In this article, the authors seek to advance nurses' understanding of sepsis by reviewing the SIRS to septic shock paradigm and using a case study to illustrate how a patient progressed along the continuum. The role of the critical care nurse is an important aspect of the care of these patients. Early identification of patients at risk for, or who are developing, sepsis is crucial in order to improve patient outcomes.

  15. Shock Tunnel Studies of Scramjet Phenomena 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalker, R. J.; Bakos, R. J.; Morgan, R. G.; Porter, L.; Mee, D.; Paull, A.; Tuttle, S.; Simmons, J. M.; Wendt, M.; Skinner, K.

    1995-01-01

    Reports by the staff of the University of Queensland on various research studies related to the advancement of scramjet technology and hypervelocity pulse test facilities are presented. These reports document the tests conducted in the reflected shock tunnel T4 and supporting research facilities that have been used to study the injection, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen fuel in generic scramjets at flow conditions typical of hypersonic flight. In addition, topics include the development of instrumentation and measurement technology, such as combustor wall shear and stream composition in pulse facilities, and numerical studies and analyses of the scramjet combustor process and the test facility operation. This research activity is Supplement 10 under NASA Grant NAGw-674.

  16. Shock Tunnel Studies of Scramjet Phenomena 1995. Supplement 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. G.; Stalker, R. J.; Paull, A.

    1997-01-01

    Reports by the research staff and graduate students of the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Queensland are collected and presented. These reports cover various studies related to the advancement of scramjet technology and the operation of advanced hypervelocity shock-expansion tubes. The report topics include the experimental studies of mixing and combustion in a scramjet flow path, the measurement of integrated thrust and skin friction, and the development of a free-piston-driven expansion tunnel capable delivering a test gas at super orbital velocities.

  17. Pseudo-shock waves and their interactions in high-speed intakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnani, F.; Zare-Behtash, H.; Kontis, K.

    2016-04-01

    In an air-breathing engine the flow deceleration from supersonic to subsonic conditions takes places inside the isolator through a gradual compression consisting of a series of shock waves. The wave system, referred to as a pseudo-shock wave or shock train, establishes the combustion chamber entrance conditions, and therefore influences the performance of the entire propulsion system. The characteristics of the pseudo-shock depend on a number of variables which make this flow phenomenon particularly challenging to be analysed. Difficulties in experimentally obtaining accurate flow quantities at high speeds and discrepancies of numerical approaches with measured data have been readily reported. Understanding the flow physics in the presence of the interaction of numerous shock waves with the boundary layer in internal flows is essential to developing methods and control strategies. To counteract the negative effects of shock wave/boundary layer interactions, which are responsible for the engine unstart process, multiple flow control methodologies have been proposed. Improved analytical models, advanced experimental methodologies and numerical simulations have allowed a more in-depth analysis of the flow physics. The present paper aims to bring together the main results, on the shock train structure and its associated phenomena inside isolators, studied using the aforementioned tools. Several promising flow control techniques that have more recently been applied to manipulate the shock wave/boundary layer interaction are also examined in this review.

  18. The History of the APS Shock Compression of Condensed Matter Topical Group

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W

    2001-05-02

    In order to provide broader scientific recognition and to advance the science of shock compressed condensed matter, a group of American Physical Society (APS) members worked within the Society to make this field an active part of the APS. Individual papers were presented at APS meetings starting in the 1940's and shock wave sessions were organized starting with the 1967 Pasadena meeting. Shock wave topical conferences began in 1979 in Pullman, WA. Signatures were obtained on a petition in 1984 from a balanced cross-section of the shock wave community to form an APS Topical Group (TG). The APS Council officially accepted the formation of the Shock Compression of Condensed Matter (SCCM) TG at its October 1984 meeting. This action firmly aligned the shock wave field with a major physical science organization. Most early topical conferences were sanctioned by the APS while those held after 1992 were official APS meetings. The topical group organizes a shock wave topical conference in odd numbered years while participating in shock wave/high pressure sessions at APS general meetings in even numbered years.

  19. History of the APS Topical Group on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W

    2001-10-19

    In order to provide broader scientific recognition and to advance the science of shock compressed condensed matter, a group of American Physical Society (APS) members worked within the Society to make this field an active part of the APS. Individual papers were presented at APS meetings starting in the 1940's and shock wave sessions were organized starting with the 1967 Pasadena meeting. Shock wave topical conferences began in 1979 in Pullman, WA. Signatures were obtained on a petition in 1984 from a balanced cross-section of the shock wave community to form an APS Topical Group (TG). The APS Council officially accepted the formation of the Shock Compression of Condensed Matter (SCCM) TG at its October 1984 meeting. This action firmly aligned the shock wave field with a major physical science organization. Most early topical conferences were sanctioned by the APS while those held after 1992 were official APS meetings. The topical group organizes a shock wave topical conference in odd numbered years while participating in shock wavehigh pressure sessions at APS general meetings in even numbered years.

  20. Quasi-perpendicular shocks: Length scale of the cross-shock potential, shock reformation, and implication for shock surfing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholer, Manfred; Shinohara, Iku; Matsukiyo, Shuichi

    2003-01-01

    One-dimensional (1-D) full particle simulations of almost perpendicular supercritical collisionless shocks are presented. The ratio of electron plasma frequency ωpe to gyrofrequency Ωce, the ion to electron mass ratio, and the ion and electron β (β = plasma to magnetic field pressure) have been varied. Due to the accumulation of specularly reflected ions upstream of the shock, ramp shocks can reform on timescales of the gyroperiod in the ramp magnetic field. Self-reformation is not a low ωpe/Ωce process but occurs also in (ωpe/Ωce)2 ≫ 1, low β simulations. Self-reformation also occurs in low ion β runs with an ion to electron mass ratio mi/me = 1840. However, in the realistic mass ratio runs, an electromagnetic instability is excited in the foot of the shock, and the shock profile is considerably changed compared to lower mass ratio runs. Linear analysis based on three-fluid theory (incident ions, reflected ions, and electrons) indicates that the instability is a modified two-stream instability between the decelerated solar wind electrons and the solar wind ions on the whistler mode branch. In the reforming low ion β shocks, part of the potential drop occurs at times across the foot, and part of the potential (˜40%) occurs over a few (˜4) electron inertial lengths in the steepened up ramp. Self-reformation is a low ion β process and disappears for a Mach 4.5 shock at/or above βi ≈ 0.4. It is argued that the ion thermal velocity has to be an order of magnitude smaller than the shock velocity in order for reformation to occur. Since according to these simulations only part of the potential drop occurs for relatively short times over a few electron inertial lengths, it is concluded that coherent shock surfing is not an efficient acceleration mechanism for pickup ions at the low β heliospheric termination shock.

  1. Shock Interaction with Substrate in a Shock Induced Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozinski, Kevin

    To further the knowledge of the Shock Induced Spray Process (SISP), an experimental apparatus which simulates Centerline's Waverider thermal spray gun was created which uses an unsteady flow to propel solid particles onto a substrate by the use of a shock wave to produce a coating. Experiments were conducted at a variety of operating supply pressures, firing frequencies, and stand off distances. A qualitative analysis was done using a custom Schlieren system along with a high speed camera. Insight into the flow behaviour in the SISP was established with the definition of six distinct phases. The formation of a bow shock, which is known to be detrimental to the SISP operation, is shown to be more prominent in the cases with higher supply pressure and close proximity of the apparatus exit to the substrate than with changes in firing frequency.

  2. [Shock in obstetrics. Institutional experience].

    PubMed

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Ahued Ahued, R; García-Benítez, C Q; Bolaños Ancona, R; Callejos, T; Juárez García, L

    1997-04-01

    Shock is one of the most difficult problems an obstetrician can face. Hemorrhage is the main reason of shock. A descriptive and retrospective research was conducted at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, from January 1992 to May 1996, including all patients admitted to the intensive care unit with diagnosis of shock. There were found 90 cases with diagnosis of shock, 82 were hipovolemic, and 8 cases had the septic kind of shock. The average of age was 32.2 years, with a gestational age between 6.2 to 41.4 weeks . There were 71 healthy patients, hypertension was associated to pregnancy in 9 cases, infertility in two, myomatosis in 2, and diabetes in 2 more patients. Other 5 cases reported different pathologies. The most frequent cause for hipovolemic shock resulted to be placenta acreta (40 cases), followed by uterine tone alterations in 37 patients, ectopic pregnancy in 7, uterine rupture or perforation in 4, and vaginal or cervical lacerations in 2. The estimated blood loss varied from 2200 cc to 6500 cc, and the minimal arterial pressure registered during shock was between 40/20 mmHg to 90/60 mmHg. Medical initial assistance consisted in volume reposition with crystalloids, globular packages, and plasma expansors in 73 patients (81.1%). The rest of the patients received in addition coloids, platelets and cryoprecipitates. A total of 76 patients required surgical intervention consisting in total abdominal hysterectomy. In 5 cases the previous surgical procedure was done and ligation of hypogastric vessels was needed. Salpingectomy was performed in 5 patients, and rupture or perforation repair in 3. The average surgery time was 2 hours and 33 minutes. The observed complications were 7 cases with abscess of the cupula, consumption coagulopathy in 2, 1 vesical quirurgical injury, 1 intestinal occlusion, and 11 vesico-vaginal fistula. The average days of hospitalization resulted to be 5. The most frequent kind of shock seen by obstetricians is the hipovolemic type

  3. Transient shocks beyond the heliopause

    DOE PAGES

    Fermo, R. L.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2015-09-30

    The heliopause is a rich, dynamic surface affected by the time-dependent solar wind. Stream interactions due to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), corotating interaction regions (CIRs), and other transient phenomena are known to merge producing global merged interaction regions (GMIRs). Numerical simulations of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) show that GMIRs, as well other time-dependent structures in the solar wind, may produce compression/rarefaction waves and shocks in the LISM behind the heliopause. These shocks may initiate wave activity observed by the Voyager spacecraft. The magnetometer onboard Voyager 1 indeed observed a few structures that may bemore » interpreted as shocks. We present numerical simulations of such shocks in the year of 2000, when both Voyager spacecraft were in the supersonic solar wind region, and in 2012, when Voyager 1 observed traveling shocks. In the former case, Voyager observations themselves provide time- dependent boundary conditions in the solar wind. In the latter case, we use OMNI data at 1 AU to analyze the plasma and magnetic field behavior after Voyager 1 crossed the heliospheric boundary. Numerical results are compared with spacecraft observations.« less

  4. Transient shocks beyond the heliopause

    SciTech Connect

    Fermo, R. L.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2015-09-30

    The heliopause is a rich, dynamic surface affected by the time-dependent solar wind. Stream interactions due to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), corotating interaction regions (CIRs), and other transient phenomena are known to merge producing global merged interaction regions (GMIRs). Numerical simulations of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) show that GMIRs, as well other time-dependent structures in the solar wind, may produce compression/rarefaction waves and shocks in the LISM behind the heliopause. These shocks may initiate wave activity observed by the Voyager spacecraft. The magnetometer onboard Voyager 1 indeed observed a few structures that may be interpreted as shocks. We present numerical simulations of such shocks in the year of 2000, when both Voyager spacecraft were in the supersonic solar wind region, and in 2012, when Voyager 1 observed traveling shocks. In the former case, Voyager observations themselves provide time- dependent boundary conditions in the solar wind. In the latter case, we use OMNI data at 1 AU to analyze the plasma and magnetic field behavior after Voyager 1 crossed the heliospheric boundary. Numerical results are compared with spacecraft observations.

  5. [Shock: concepts for a definition].

    PubMed

    Poderoso, J J; Carreras, M C; Lisdero, C; Schöpfer, F; Riobó, N; Peralta, J

    1998-01-01

    The shock syndrome has been classically considered as a consequence of both decreased tissue perfusion and O2 supply; however, in some types of shock like septic or traumatic ones, regional blood flows may be increased. A decade ago, mitochondrial alterations consistent with uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation were reported in either endotoxemic or hemorrhagic experimental shock or in humans. Recently, the discovery of nitric oxide (NO) and its increase in the shock state, has opened new perspectives in the understanding of this problem. Nitric oxide produces vasodilatation and, at the same time, increases the mitochondrial production of O2 active species like superoxide anion. Both radicals react to form a strong oxidant that is able to nitrate the phenolic rings of proteins: peroxynitrite. This effect leads to the impairment of the activities of different mitochondrial enzymes like succinate dehydrogenase and ATPase and the mitochondrial function and finally, to decreased energy levels and to multiorgan failure. The increase in NO release is due to the effects of circulating peptides and of increased adhesion of neutrophils to the endothelium and to the positive effects of inflammatory mediators like TNF-alpha and cytokines on inducible NOS (iNOS) expression in endothelium and tissues. It is suggested that the shock state is the consequence of an imbalance between NO and O2 and their metabolites.

  6. Diagnostic of shock wave processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urtiew, P. A.

    1992-05-01

    Experimental measurements of high rate processes taking place in a shock wave dynamic environment require that the diagnostic systems have fast response and high resolution. This is not a trivial requirement considering the fact that under shock loading one can expect not only sudden changes of state across the shock discontinuity but also subsequent changes in pressure, temperature and volume due to chemical reaction, phase change and other transformations which may also take place behind the shock wave. Among the various parameters which provide direct ties to theoretical studies of the equation of state and at the same time yield to relatively accurate experimental measurements are shock velocity, particle velocity and pressure. Described here are the optical techniques VISAR and Fabry Perot interferometer for observing particle and free surface velocities in transparent media as well as in situ foil gauges for measuring pressure and particle velocity within the sample. Although these techniques are not new they have been continuously improved and upgraded at our facility to yield greater accuracy, reliability and state of the art performance. The emphasis in this paper is on the operational features of the measuring techniques, but examples of experimental results are also included.

  7. Shock wave-droplet interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi Khoshmehr, Hamed; Krechetnikov, Rouslan

    2016-11-01

    Disintegration of a liquid droplet under the action of a shock wave is experimentally investigated. The shock wave-pulse is electromagnetically generated by discharging a high voltage capacitor into a flat spiral coil, above which an isolated circular metal membrane is placed in a close proximity. The Lorentz force arising due to the eddy current induced in the membrane abruptly accelerates it away from the spiral coil thus generating a shock wave. The liquid droplet placed at the center of the membrane, where the maximum deflection occurs, is disintegrated in the process of interaction with the shock wave. The effects of droplet viscosity and surface tension on the droplet destruction are studied with high-speed photography. Water-glycerol solution at different concentrations is used for investigating the effect of viscosity and various concentrations of water-sugar and water-ethanol solution are used for studying the effect of surface tension. Here we report on how the metamorphoses, which a liquid drop undergoes in the process of interaction with a shock wave, are affected by varied viscosity and surface tension.

  8. Polarized radiation from inhomogeneous shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kinwah.

    1989-01-01

    Strongly polarized radiation from AM Herculis binaries is believed to be due to cyclotron emission from hot magnetized plasmas. The flat optically thin spectra and strong IR polarization observed in these binaries cannot be explained by models assuming a homogeneous emission region with a simple geometry. Therefore, the cyclotron emission from infinite plasma cylinders with uniform magnetic fields and temperatures was studied, but with a variety of axially symmetric electron density profiles and it was shown that such inhomogeneous plasmas are able to produce relatively flat spectra which cannot be produced by the homogeneous models. The polarization at low frequencies is shown to be stronger than that due to the homogeneous plasmas and the polarization at high frequencies is weaker. The steady state hydrodynamics was also studied of bremsstrahlung dominated shocks and the cyclotron emission was calculated from them. Three types of accretion rate profiles (uniform, axisymmetric and asymmetric) were considered. The shock-structure is planar for the uniform accretion rate case. The shock due to an axisymmetric accretion rate is a curved surface. For asymmetric accretion, the post-shock region is asymmetric and hence produces asymmetric light curves. All these inhomogeneous shocks produce flat optical/IR spectra and strong IR polarization.

  9. Electron heating at interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Asbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Zwickl, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    Data for 41 forward interplanetary shocks show that the ratio of downstream to upstream electron temperatures, T/sub e/(d/u) is variable in the range between 1.0 (isothermal) and 3.0. On average, (T/sub e/(d/u) = 1.5 with a standard deviation, sigma e = 0.5. This ratio is less than the average ratio of proton temperatures across the same shocks, (T/sub p/(d/u)) = 3.3 with sigma p = 2.5 as well as the average ratio of electron temperatures across the Earth's bow shock. Individual samples of T/sub e/(d/u) and T/sub p/(d/u) appear to be weakly correlated with the number density ratio. However the amounts of electron and proton heating are well correlated with each other as well as with the bulk velocity difference across each shock. The stronger shocks appear to heat the protons relatively more efficiently than they heat the electrons.

  10. Energetic ion acceleration at collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R. B.; Vlahos, L.

    1985-01-01

    An example is presented from a test particle simulation designed to study ion acceleration at oblique turbulent shocks. For conditions appropriate at interplanetary shocks near 1 AU, it is found that a shock with theta sub B n = 60 deg is capable of producing an energy spectrum extending from 10 keV to approx. 1 MeV in approx 1 hour. In this case total energy gains result primarily from several separate episodes of shock drift acceleration, each of which occurs when particles are scattered back to the shock by magnetic fluctuations in the shock vicinity.

  11. Clinical review: Vasopressin and terlipressin in septic shock patients

    PubMed Central

    Delmas, Anne; Leone, Marc; Rousseau, Sébastien; Albanèse, Jacques; Martin, Claude

    2005-01-01

    Vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone) is emerging as a potentially major advance in the treatment of septic shock. Terlipressin (tricyl-lysine-vasopressin) is the synthetic, long-acting analogue of vasopressin, and has comparable pharmacodynamic but different pharmacokinetic properties. Vasopressin mediates vasoconstriction via V1 receptor activation on vascular smooth muscle. Septic shock first causes a transient early increase in blood vasopressin concentrations; these concentrations subsequently decrease to very low levels as compared with those observed with other causes of hypotension. Infusions of 0.01–0.04 U/min vasopressin in septic shock patients increase plasma vasopressin concentrations. This increase is associated with reduced need for other vasopressors. Vasopressin has been shown to result in greater blood flow diversion from nonvital to vital organ beds compared with adrenaline (epinephrine). Of concern is a constant decrease in cardiac output and oxygen delivery, the consequences of which in terms of development of multiple organ failure are not yet known. Terlipressin (one or two boluses of 1 mg) has similar effects, but this drug has been used in far fewer patients. Large randomized clinical trials should be conducted to establish the utility of these drugs as therapeutic agents in patients with septic shock. PMID:15774080

  12. Shock Particle Interaction - Fully Resolved Simulations and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Yash; Neal, Chris; Jackson, Thomas L.; Balachandar, S. "Bala"; Thakur, Siddharth

    2016-11-01

    Currently there is a substantial lack of fully resolved data for shock interacting with multiple particles. In this talk we will fill this gap by presenting results of shock interaction with 1-D array and 3-D structured arrays of particles. Objectives of performing fully resolved simulations of shock propagation through packs of multiple particles are twofold, 1) To understand the complicated physical phenomena occurring during shock particle interaction, and 2) To translate the knowledge from microscale simulations in building next generation point-particle models for macroscale simulations that can better predict the motion (forces) and heat transfer for particles. We compare results from multiple particle simulations against the single particle simulations and make relevant observations. The drag history and flow field for multiple particle simulations are markedly different from those of single particle simluations, highlighting the effect of neighboring particles. We propose new models which capture this effect of neighboring particles. These models are called Pair-wise Interaction Extended Point Particle models (PIEP). Effect of multiple neighboring particles is broken down into pair-wise interactions, and these pair-wise interactions are superimposed to get the final model U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  13. Shock compression of simulated adobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braithwaite, C. H.; Church, P. D.; Gould, P. J.; Stewart, B.; Jardine, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    A series of plate impact experiments were conducted to investigate the shock response of a simulant for adobe, a traditional form of building material widely used around the world. Air dried bricks were sourced from the London brick company, dry machined and impacted at a range of velocities in a single stage gas gun. The shock Hugoniot was determined (Us =2.26up+0.37) as well as release information. The material was found to behave in a manner which was similar to that of loose sand and considerably less stiff than a weak porous sandstone. The effect of any cementing of the grains was examined by shocking powdered samples contained within a cell arrangement.

  14. Entropy shaping by shock decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piriz, A. R.; Sun, Y. B.; Tahir, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    A previous model [Piriz et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 032704 (2016)] developed for describing the evolution of a shock wave driven by an arbitrary pressure pulse, is shown to be suitable for calculating the entropy shaping induced by a shock of decaying intensity. It is also shown that by allowing a causal connection between the shock and the piston, the model results to be complementary to the well-known self-similar solution for the impulsive loading problem, which is valid in the asymptotic regime when both fronts become decoupled. As a consequence, the entropy distribution depends on the details of the driving pressure pulse. A comparison with the available numerical simulations is presented.

  15. Plasma Stratification by Planar Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Brett; Simakov, Andrei; Taitano, William; Chacon, Luis; Daughton, William

    2016-10-01

    A number of experimental observables in neutron yield and capsule compression in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments have been evading explanation by standard, single-fluid, hydrodynamic (hydro) numerical simulations. Fuel stratification - resulting from particle diffusion, multi-ion temperature separation (in the case of OMEGA experiments with gas filled capsules), and certain kinetic effects - is a likely culprit. As a preliminary step to elucidate these effects, we consider mass fraction and temperature stratification by shocks in plasmas with two ion species. We present an analytical solution valid for very weak shocks (M - 1 << 1). Employing the state-of-the-art Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code, iFP, we describe the stratification for shocks with arbitrary mach number, and we rigorously delineate the kinetic and hydrodynamic regimes in terms of Mach number, relative species concentration, and ion species mass ratio - thereby clarifying the conditions under which significant departure from single-fluid hydrodynamics may occur.

  16. Shock compression of liquid hydrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, B.O.; Chavez, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Liquid hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) is a propellant used by the Air Force and NASA for aerospace propulsion and power systems. Because the propellant modules that contain the hydrazine can be subject to debris impacts during their use, the shock states that can occur in the hydrazine need to be characterized to safely predict its response. Several shock compression experiments have been conducted in an attempt to investigate the detonability of liquid hydrazine; however, the experiments results disagree. Therefore, in this study, we reproduced each experiment numerically to evaluate in detail the shock wave profiles generated in the liquid hydrazine. This paper presents the results of each numerical simulation and compares the results to those obtained in experiment. We also present the methodology of our approach, which includes chemical kinetic experiments, chemical equilibrium calculations, and characterization of the equation of state of liquid hydrazine.

  17. Shock Initiation of Damaged Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-10-22

    Explosive and propellant charges are subjected to various mechanical and thermal insults that can increase their sensitivity over the course of their lifetimes. To quantify this effect, shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton by weight) and PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. We report the behavior of the HMX-based explosive LX-04 that was damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermally damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for long enough for the beta to delta solid - solid phase transition to occur, and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. Similarly, the insensitive explosive PBX 9502 was mechanically damaged using the same two techniques. Since PBX 9502 does not undergo a solid - solid phase transition but does undergo irreversible or 'rachet' growth when thermally cycled, thermal damage to PBX 9502 was induced by this procedure. As for LX-04, the thermally damaged PBX 9502 demonstrated a greater shock sensitivity than mechanically damaged PBX 9502. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model calculated the increased sensitivities by igniting more damaged LX-04 and PBX 9502 near the shock front based on the measured densities (porosities) of the damaged charges.

  18. Shock modelling of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, L.; Phillips, J. P.; Mampaso, A.

    1994-06-01

    The kinematics of Planetary Nebulae are analyzed in terms of the solutions to the equations of hydrodynamic equilibrium developed by J. Canto. We apply our analysis to the Planetary Nebulae NGC 6905 and NGC 6537. A detailed spectroscopic study of these objects reveals the existence of high nuclear velocities, together with complex kinematic structures and unusual emission line intensities. Shock ionization clearly plays a key role in these nebulae. Remarkably good agreement is obtained when comparing the synthetic maps and spectra resulting from the shock solutions with the observational data.

  19. Shock compaction of molybdenum powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Kostka, D.; Vreeland, T., Jr.; Schwarz, R. B.; Kasiraj, P.

    1983-01-01

    Shock recovery experiments which were carried out in the 9 to 12 GPa range on 1.4 distension Mo and appear adequate to compact to full density ( 45 (SIGMA)m) powders were examined. The stress levels, however, are below those calculated to be from 100 to approx. 22 GPa which a frictional heating model predicts are required to consolidate approx. 10 to 50 (SIGMA)m particles. The model predicts that powders that have a distension of m=1.6 shock pressures of 14 to 72 GPa are required to consolidate Mo powders in the 50 to 10 (SIGMA)m range.

  20. Method of making shock cells

    SciTech Connect

    Leblanc, R. F.; Cummins, W. T.

    1984-10-16

    A method of making an energy-absorbing shock cell for mounting bumper devices on legs of offshore oil rig structures having inner and outer metal tubes connected by an intervening vulcanized rubber sleeve maintained under compression adhesively bonded to the inner and outer metal tubes. The shock cell is made by a series of operations in which portions of the metal tubes are coated with adhesive material, and the rubber sleeve is bonded to the adhesive coated areas by vulcanization and post-vulcanized heating.

  1. A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkinson bar configuration. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

    1998-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil, rock, and ice penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact of 125 fps. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these more sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reaches the electronics contained in the various mechanical systems. As part of the investigation of packaging techniques, a two phase study of shock mitigating materials is being conducted. The purpose of the first phase reported here is to examine the performance of a joint that consists of shock mitigating material sandwiched in between steel and to compare the performance of the shock mitigating materials. A split Hopkinson bar experimental configuration simulates this joint and has been used to study the shock mitigating characteristics of seventeen, unconfined materials. The nominal input for these tests is an incident compressive wave with 50 fps peak (1,500 {micro}{var_epsilon} peak) amplitude and a 100 {micro}s duration (measured at 10% amplitude).

  2. Weak-shock theory for spherical shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, W.D.; Rosenkilde, C.E.; Yee, K.S.

    1982-03-01

    We develop weak shock theory in a form which would allow us to utilize output from a hydrodynamic code (e.g. KOVEC) as either an initial or boundary condition and then follow the wave evolution to much greater distances than the codes themselves can attain.

  3. Shock absorber operates over wide range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creasy, W. K.; Jones, J. C.

    1965-01-01

    Piston-type hydraulic shock absorber, with a metered damping system, operates over a wide range of kinetic energy loading rates. It is used for absorbing shock and vibration on mounted machinery and heavy earth-moving equipment.

  4. Shock State of Itokawa Regolith Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M.; Nishiizumi, K.; Mikouchi, T.; Chan, Q. H. S.; Martinez, J.; Caffee, M.

    2014-01-01

    One of the fundamental aspects of any astromaterial is its shock history, since this factor elucidates critical historical events, and also because shock metamorphism can alter primary mineralogical and petrographic features, and reset chronologies.

  5. Factors Affecting Shock Sensitivity of Energeticv Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Avic; Gifford, Michael John; Greenaway, Martin; Proud, William; Field, John

    2001-06-01

    An extensive study has been carried out into the relationships between the particle size of a charge, the density to which it is packed, the presence of inert additives and the sensitivity of the charge to different initiating shocks. The critical parameters for three different shock regimes have been found. The long duration shocks are provided by a commercial detonator, the medium duration shocks are provided by an electrically driven flyer-plate and the short duration shocks are imparted using laser-driven flyer plates. It has been shown that the order of sensitivity of charges to different shock regimes varies. In particular, ultrafine materials have been shown to relatively insensitive to long duration low pressure shocks and sensitive to short duration high pressure shocks. The materials that have been studied include HNS, RDX and PETN.

  6. Kinetic Simulations of Particle Acceleration at Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioli, Damiano; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-16

    Collisionless shocks are mediated by collective electromagnetic interactions and are sources of non-thermal particles and emission. The full particle-in-cell approach and a hybrid approach are sketched, simulations of collisionless shocks are shown using a multicolor presentation. Results for SN 1006, a case involving ion acceleration and B field amplification where the shock is parallel, are shown. Electron acceleration takes place in planetary bow shocks and galaxy clusters. It is concluded that acceleration at shocks can be efficient: >15%; CRs amplify B field via streaming instability; ion DSA is efficient at parallel, strong shocks; ions are injected via reflection and shock drift acceleration; and electron DSA is efficient at oblique shocks.

  7. Fresh look at floating shock fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwich, PETER-M.

    1990-01-01

    A fast implicit upwind procedure for the two-dimensional Euler equations is described that allows accurate computations of shocked flows on nonadapted meshes. Away from shocks, the second-order accurate upwinding is based on the split-coefficient-matrix (SCM) method. In the presence of shocks, the difference stencils are modified using a floating shock fitting technique. Rapid convergence to steady-state solutions is attained with a diagonalized approximate factorization (AF) algorithm. Results are presented for Riemann's problem, for a regular shock reflection at an inviscid wall, for supersonic flow past a cylinder, and for a transonic airfoil. All computed shocks are ideally sharp and in excellent agreement with other numerical results or 'exact' solutions. Most importantly, this has been accomplished on unusually crude meshes without any attempt to align grid lines with shock fronts or to cluster grid lines around shocks.

  8. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-15

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=√(μ{sub 0}/p{sub 0}) I/(2 π) where I is the current, μ{sub 0} is the permeability, and p{sub 0} is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The

  9. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=sqrt{μ _0/p_0} I/(2 π ) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field

  10. Suppressive and Facilitative Effects of Shock Intensity and Interresponse Times Followed by Shock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everly, Jessica B.; Perone, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Although response-dependent shock often suppresses responding, response facilitation can occur. In two experiments, we examined the suppressive and facilitative effects of shock by manipulating shock intensity and the interresponse times that produced shock. Rats' lever presses were reinforced on a variable-interval 40-s schedule of food…

  11. Entropy jump across an inviscid shock wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, Manuel D.; Iollo, Angelo

    1995-01-01

    The shock jump conditions for the Euler equations in their primitive form are derived by using generalized functions. The shock profiles for specific volume, speed, and pressure are shown to be the same, however density has a different shock profile. Careful study of the equations that govern the entropy shows that the inviscid entropy profile has a local maximum within the shock layer. We demonstrate that because of this phenomenon, the entropy, propagation equation cannot be used as a conservation law.

  12. Shock, Post-Shock Annealing, and Post-Annealing Shock in Ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal and shock histories of ureilites can be divided into four periods: 1) formation, 2) initial shock, 3) post-shock annealing, and 4) post-annealing shock. Period 1 occurred approx.4.55 Ga ago when ureilites formed by melting chondritic material. Impact events during period 2 caused silicate darkening, undulose to mosaic extinction in olivines, and the formation of diamond, lonsdaleite, and chaoite from indigenous carbonaceous material. Alkali-rich fine-grained silicates may have been introduced by impact injection into ureilites during this period. About 57% of the ureilites were unchanged after period 2. During period 3 events, impact-induced annealing caused previously mosaicized olivine grains to become aggregates of small unstrained crystals. Some ureilites experienced reduction as FeO at the edges of olivine grains reacted with C from the matrix. Annealing may also be responsible for coarsening of graphite in a few ureilites, forming euhedral-appearing, idioblastic crystals. Orthopyroxene in Meteorite Hills (MET) 78008 may have formed from pigeonite by annealing during this period. The Rb-Sr internal isochron age of approx.4.0 Ga for MET 78008 probably dates the annealing event. At this late date, impacts are the only viable heat source. About 36% of ureilites experienced period 3 events, but remained unchanged afterwards. During period 4, approx.7% of the ureilites were shocked again, as is evident in the polymict breccia, Elephant Moraine (EET) 83309. This rock contains annealed mosaicized olivine aggregates composed of small individual olivine crystals that exhibit undulose extinction. Ureilites may have formed by impact-melting chondritic material on a primitive body with heterogeneous O isotopes. Plagioclase was preferentially lost from the system due to its low impedance to shock compression. Brief melting and rapid burial minimized the escape of planetary-type noble gases from the ureilitic melts. Incomplete separation of metal from silicates

  13. Design and Construction of a Shock Tube Experiment for Multiphase Instability Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlebrooks, John; Black, Wolfgang; Avgoustopoulos, Constantine; Allen, Roy; Kathakapa, Raj; Guo, Qiwen; McFarland, Jacob

    2016-11-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities are important phenomena that have a wide range of practical applications in engineering and physics. One such instability, the shock driven multiphase instability (SDMI), arises when a shockwave accelerates an interface between two particle-gas mixtures with differing multiphase properties. The SDMI is present in high energy explosives, scramjets, and supernovae. A practical way of studying shock wave driven instabilities is through experimentation in a shock tube laboratory. This poster presentation will cover the design and data acquisition process of the University of Missouri's Fluid Mixing Shock Tube Laboratory. In the shock tube, a pressure generated shockwave is passed through a multiphase interface, creating the SDMI instability. This can be photographed for observation using high speed cameras, lasers, and advance imaging techniques. Important experimental parameters such as internal pressure and temperature, and mass flow rates of gases can be set and recorded by remotely controlled devices. The experimental facility provides the University of Missouri's Fluid Mixing Shock Tube Laboratory with the ability to validate simulated experiments and to conduct further inquiry into the field of shock driven multiphase hydrodynamic instabilities. Advisor.

  14. Probing combustion chemistry in a miniature shock tube with synchrotron VUV photo ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Patrick T; Troy, Tyler P; Ahmed, Musahid; Tranter, Robert S

    2015-02-17

    Tunable synchrotron-sourced photoionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PI-TOF-MS) is an important technique in combustion chemistry, complementing lab-scale electron impact and laser photoionization studies for a wide variety of reactors, typically at low pressure. For high-temperature and high-pressure chemical kinetics studies, the shock tube is the reactor of choice. Extending the benefits of shock tube/TOF-MS research to include synchrotron sourced PI-TOF-MS required a radical reconception of the shock tube. An automated, miniature, high-repetition-rate shock tube was developed and can be used to study high-pressure reactive systems (T > 600 K, P < 100 bar) behind reflected shock waves. In this paper, we present results of a PI-TOF-MS study at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dimethyl ether pyrolysis (2% CH3OCH3/Ar) was observed behind the reflected shock (1400 < T5 < 1700 K, 3 < P5 < 16 bar) with ionization energies between 10 and 13 eV. Individual experiments have extremely low signal levels. However, product species and radical intermediates are well-resolved when averaging over hundreds of shots, which is ordinarily impractical in conventional shock tube studies. The signal levels attained and data throughput rates with this technique are comparable to those with other synchrotron-based PI-TOF-MS reactors, and it is anticipated that this high pressure technique will greatly complement those lower pressure techniques.

  15. An interplanetary cause of large geomagnetic storms: Fast forward shock overtaking preceding magnetic cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. M.; Ye, P. Z.; Wang, S.; Xue, X. H.

    2003-07-01

    In the event that occurred during October 3-6, 2000, at least one magnetosonic wave and one fast forward shock advanced into the preceding magnetic cloud (MC). By using the field and plasma data from the ACE and WIND spacecraft, we analyze the evolution of this event, including the characteristics and changes of the magnetic fields and plasma. At the rear part of the cloud, a large southward magnetic field is caused by a shock compression. The shock intensified a preexisting southward magnetic field. This increased the geoeffectiveness of this event and produced an intense geomagnetic storm with Dst = -175 nT. We also describe another event with a shock overtaking a MC on Nov. 6, 2001. A great geomagnetic storm of intensity Dst = 292 nT resulted. These observations are used to argue that shock compression of magnetic cloud fields is an important interplanetary cause of large geomagnetic storms. Our analyses suggest that the geoeffectiveness is related to the direction of preexisting magnetic fields, the intensity of overtaking shock, and the amount of shock penetration into the preceding MC.

  16. Stability of shocks relating to the shock ignition inertial fusion energy scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Davie, C. J. Bush, I. A.; Evans, R. G.

    2014-08-15

    Motivated by the shock ignition approach to improve the performance of inertial fusion targets, we make a series of studies of the stability of shock waves in planar and converging geometries. We examine stability of shocks moving through distorted material and driving shocks with non-uniform pressure profiles. We then apply a fully 3D perturbation, following this spherically converging shock through collapse to a distorted plane, bounce and reflection into an outgoing perturbed, broadly spherical shock wave. We find broad shock stability even under quite extreme perturbation.

  17. A Study of Fundamental Shock Noise Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Kristine R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper investigates two mechanisms fundamental to sound generation in shocked flows: shock motion and shock deformation. Shock motion is modeled numerically by examining the interaction of a sound wave with a shock. This numerical approach is validated by comparison with results obtained by linear theory for a small-disturbance case. Analysis of the perturbation energy with Myers' energy corollary demonstrates that acoustic energy is generated by the interaction of acoustic disturbances with shocks. This analysis suggests that shock motion generates acoustic and entropy disturbance energy. Shock deformation is modeled numerically by examining the interaction of a vortex ring with a shock. These numerical simulations demonstrate the generation of both an acoustic wave and contact surfaces. The acoustic wave spreads cylindrically. The sound intensity is highly directional and the sound pressure increases with increasing shock strength. The numerically determined relationship between the sound pressure and the Mach number is found to be consistent with experimental observations of shock noise. This consistency implies that a dominant physical process in the generation of shock noise is modeled in this study.

  18. Understanding hypovolaemic, cardiogenic and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Garretson, Sharon; Malberti, Shelly

    Shock is a complex physiological syndrome. If it is not detected and treated promptly, it can lead to death. This article reviews and summarises the latest findings, treatment and nursing and medical interventions for three of the most common forms of shock, namely, hypovolaemic, cardiogenic and septic shock.

  19. Shock absorbing mount for electrical components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, R. F., Jr.; Mayne, R. C. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A shock mount for installing electrical components on circuit boards is described. The shock absorber is made of viscoelastic material which interconnects the electrical components. With this system, shocks imposed on one component of the circuit are not transmitted to other components. A diagram of a typical circuit is provided.

  20. 33 CFR 159.105 - Shock test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shock test. 159.105 Section 159... MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.105 Shock test. The device, with liquid... shocks that are ten times the force of gravity (10g) and have a duration of 20-25 milliseconds...

  1. Shock characterization of Diallyl Phthalate (DAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Weirick, L.J.

    1992-09-01

    This study involved the shock characterization of Diallyl Phthalate (DAP), in particular, the equation of state as measured by the shock Hugoniot. Tests were done between 1 and 11 GPa impact shock pressure. The Hugoniot parameters were determined to be: [rho][sub 0]= 1.743, C[sub 0] = 2.20, and S = 2.33.

  2. Heat shock in the springtime.

    PubMed

    Morano, Kevin A; Sistonen, Lea; Mezger, Valérie

    2014-11-01

    A collaborative workshop dedicated to the discussion of heat shock factors in stress response, development, and disease was held on April 22-24, 2014 at the Université Paris Diderot in Paris, France. Recent years have witnessed an explosion of interest in these highly conserved transcription factors, with biological roles ranging from environmental sensing to human development and cancer.

  3. Shock treatment of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Bond, Austin; Rughoonundun, Hema; Petersen, Eric; Holtzapple, Carol; Holtzapple, Mark

    2017-01-27

    Corn stover digestibility was enhanced via shock treatment. A slurry of lime-treated corn stover was placed in a partially filled closed vessel. From the ullage space, either a shotgun shell was fired into the slurry, or a gas mixture was detonated. Various conditions were tested (i.e., pressures, depth, solids concentrations, gas mixtures). A high pressurization rate (108,000 MPa/s shotgun shells; 4,160,000 MPa/s hydrogen/oxygen detonation) was the only parameter that improved enzymatic digestibility. Stoichiometric propane/air deflagration had a low pressurization rate (37.2 MPa/s) and did not enhance enzymatic digestibility. Without shock, enzymatic conversion of lime-treated corn stover was 0.80 g glucan digested/g glucan fed with an enzyme loading of 46.7 mg protein/g glucan. With shock, the enzyme loading was reduced by ∼2× while maintaining the same conversion. Detonations are extraordinarily fast; rapidly cycling three small vessels (0.575 m(3) each) every 7.5 s enables commercially relevant shock treatment (2,000 tone/day). © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2017.

  4. Cardiovascular failure and cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ankitkumar K; Hollenberg, Steven M

    2011-10-01

    Cardiovascular system failure is commonly faced by the intensivist. Heart failure can occur due to a host of predisposing cardiac disorders or as secondary effects of systemic illness. When the heart is unable to provide an adequate cardiac output to maintain adequate tissue perfusion, cardiogenic shock ensues. Without prompt diagnosis and appropriate management, these patients have significant morbidity and mortality, with in-hospital mortality approaching 60% for all age groups. Accurate and rapid identification of cardiogenic shock as a medical emergency, with expeditious implementation of appropriate therapy, can lead to improved clinical outcomes. In this review, we discuss optimal strategies for diagnosis and monitoring of cardiogenic shock. We discuss the diverse therapeutic strategies employed for cardiogenic shock, including pharmacological (e.g., vasoactive agents, fibrinolytic agents), mechanical (e.g., intraaortic balloon pumps, left ventricular assist devices, percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI]), and surgical approaches such as coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), valvular repair or replacement (e.g., for acute mitral regurgitation, ventricular septal rupture, or free wall rupture).

  5. Shock desensitizing of solid explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, William C

    2010-01-01

    Solid explosive can be desensitized by a shock wave too weak to initiate it promptly, and desensitized explosive does not react although its chemical composition is almost unchanged. A strong second shock does not cause reaction until it overtakes the first shock. The first shock, if it is strong enough, accelerates very slowly at first, and then more rapidly as detonation approaches. These facts suggest that there are two competing reactions. One is the usual explosive goes to products with the release of energy, and the other is explosive goes to dead explosive with no chemical change and no energy release. The first reaction rate is very sensitive to the local state, and the second is only weakly so. At low pressure very little energy is released and the change to dead explosive dominates. At high pressure, quite the other way, most of the explosive goes to products. Numerous experiments in both the initiation and the full detonation regimes are discussed and compared in testing these ideas.

  6. History of shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delius, Michael

    2000-07-01

    The first reports on the fragmentation of human calculi with ultrasound appeared in the fifties. Initial positive results with an extracorporeal approach with continuous wave ultrasound could, however, not be reproduced. A more promising result was found by generating the acoustic energy either in pulsed or continuous form directly at the stone surface. The method was applied clinically with success. Extracorporeal shock-wave generators unite the principle of using single ultrasonic pulses with the principle of generating the acoustic energy outside the body and focusing it through the skin and body wall onto the stone. Häusler and Kiefer reported the first successful contact-free kidney stone destruction by shock waves. They had put the stone in a water filled cylinder and generated a shock wave with a high speed water drop which was fired onto the water surface. To apply the new principle in medicine, both Häusler and Hoff's group at Dornier company constructed different shock wave generators for the stone destruction; the former used a torus-shaped reflector around an explosion wire, the latter the electrode-ellipsoid system. The former required open surgery to access the kidney stone, the latter did not. It was introduced into clinical practice after a series of experiments in Munich.

  7. 2-Shock layered tuning campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masse, Laurent; Dittrich, T.; Khan, S.; Kyrala, G.; Ma, T.; MacLaren, S.; Ralph, J.; Salmonson, J.; Tipton, R.; Los Alamos Natl Lab Team; Lawrence Livermore Natl Lab Team

    2016-10-01

    The 2-Shock platform has been developed to maintain shell sphericity throughout the compression phase of an indirect-drive target implosion and produce a stagnating hot spot in a quasi 1D-like manner. A sub-scale, 1700 _m outer diameter, and thick, 200 _m, uniformly Silicon doped, gas-filled plastic capsule is driven inside a nominal size 5750 _m diameter ignition hohlraum. The hohlraum fill is near vacuum to reduce back-scatter and improve laser/drive coupling. A two-shock pulse of about 1 MJ of laser energy drives the capsule. The thick capsule prevents ablation front feed-through to the imploded core. This platform has demonstrated its efficiency to tune a predictable and reproducible 1-D implosion with a nearly round shape. It has been shown that the high foot performance was dominated by the local defect growth due to the ablation front instability and by the hohlraum radiation asymmetries. The idea here is to take advantage of this 2-Shock platform to design a 1D-like layered implosion and eliminates the deleterious effects of radiation asymmetries and ablation front instability growth. We present the design work and our first experimental results of this near one-dimensional 2-Shock layered design. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Shock Propagation In Crustal Rock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-29

    Fritz, and W. J. Crater, The equation of state of solids from shock wave studies, in High-Velocity Impact Phenomena, edited by R. Kinslow , pp. 249-419...Boiling AFB Washington, DC 20332-6448 Mr. Alfred Lieberman Dr. Frank F. Pilotte ACDA/VI-OA’State Department Bldg HQ AFTAC/IT Room 5726 Patrick AFB, FL

  9. Shock characterization of TOAD pins

    SciTech Connect

    Weirick, L.J.; Navarro, N.J.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this program was to characterize Time Of Arrival Detectors (TOAD) pins response to shock loading with respect to risetime, amplitude, repeatability and consistency. TOAD pins were subjected to impacts of 35 to 420 kilobars amplitude and approximately 1 ms pulse width to investigate the timing spread of four pins and the voltage output profile of the individual pins. Sets of pins were also aged at 45{degrees}, 60{degrees}, and 80{degrees}C for approximately nine weeks before shock testing at 315 kilobars impact stress. Four sets of pins were heated to 50.2{degrees}C (125{degrees}F) for approximately two hours and then impacted at either 50 or 315 kilobars. Also, four sets of pins were aged at 60{degrees}C for nine weeks and then heated to 50.2{degrees}C before shock testing at 50 and 315 kilobars impact stress, respectively. Particle velocity measurements at the contact point between the stainless steel targets and TOAD pins were made using a Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) to monitor both the amplitude and profile of the shock waves.

  10. Shock characterization of toad pins

    SciTech Connect

    Weirick, L.J.; Navarro, M.J.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this program was to characterize Time Of Arrival Detectors (TOAD) pins response to shock loading with respect to risetime, amplitude, repeatability and consistency. TOAD pins were subjected to impacts of 35 to 420 kilobars amplitude and approximately 1 ms pulse width to investigate the timing spread of four pins and the voltage output profile of the individual pins. Sets of pins were also aged at 45{degree}, 60{degree} and 80{degree}C for approximately nine weeks before shock testing at 315 kilobars impact stress. Four sets of pins were heated to 50.2{degree}C (125{degree}F) for approximately two hours and then impacted at either 50 or 315 kilobars. Also, four sets of pins were aged at 60{degree}C for nine weeks and then heated to 50.2{degree}C before shock testing at 50 and 315 kilobars impact stress, respectively. Particle velocity measurements at the contact point between the stainless steel targets and TOAD pins were made using a Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) to monitor both the amplitude and profile of the shock waves. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. The shocking truth about meniscus.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Stephen; Shrive, Nigel; Ronsky, Janet

    2011-11-10

    The menisci of the knee are structures integral to the long term health of the knee joint. The primary function of these tissues is to distribute load across the tibiofemoral joint by increasing the congruency of the joint, thereby decreasing the resultant stress experienced by the articular cartilages. The menisci also play a secondary role in stabilizing the joint, particularly in the anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee, and also have roles in joint lubrication and proprioception. Also, an oft-cited role of this tissue is that of a shock absorber. We will review the literature supporting this shock absorption paradigm and describe the limitations and errors in the conclusions made by these studies. Consequently, we will show that the literature is inconclusive with no support for the shock absorption paradigm, which should therefore not be stated as a function of the menisci. We will describe how one of the three articles in support of this paradigm actually could be interpreted to the contrary and support the idea that the menisci may play no significant role in shock absorption at the knee at all, with the two remaining papers being inconclusive.

  12. MEMS reliability in shock environments

    SciTech Connect

    TANNER,DANELLE M.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; HELGESEN,KAREN SUE; IRWIN,LLOYD W.; BROWN,FREDERICK A.; SMITH,NORMAN F.; MASTERS,NATHAN

    2000-02-09

    In order to determine the susceptibility of the MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) devices to shock, tests were performed using haversine shock pulses with widths of 1 to 0.2 ms in the range from 500g to 40,000g. The authors chose a surface-micromachined microengine because it has all the components needed for evaluation: springs that flex, gears that are anchored, and clamps and spring stops to maintain alignment. The microengines, which were unpowered for the tests, performed quite well at most shock levels with a majority functioning after the impact. Debris from the die edges moved at levels greater than 4,000g causing shorts in the actuators and posing reliability concerns. The coupling agent used to prevent stiction in the MEMS release weakened the die-attach bond, which produced failures at 10,000g and above. At 20,000g the authors began to observe structural damage in some of the thin flexures and 2.5-micron diameter pin joints. The authors observed electrical failures caused by the movement of debris. Additionally, they observed a new failure mode where stationary comb fingers contact the ground plane resulting in electrical shorts. These new failure were observed in the control group indicating that they were not shock related.

  13. Economic Shocks, Wealth, and Welfare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Smith, James P.; Thomas, Duncan

    2003-01-01

    The immediate effects of the Asian crisis on the well-being of Indonesians are examined using the Indonesia Family Life Survey, an ongoing longitudinal household survey. There is tremendous diversity in the effect of the shock: for some households, it was devastating; for others it brought new opportunities. A wide array of mechanisms was adopted…

  14. On A Problem Of Propagation Of Shock Waves Generated By Explosive Volcanic Eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Gusev, V. A.; Sobissevitch, A. L.

    2008-06-24

    Interdisciplinary study of flows of matter and energy in geospheres has become one of the most significant advances in Earth sciences. It is carried out by means of direct quantitative estimations based on detailed analysis of geological and geophysical observations and experimental data. The actual contribution is the interdisciplinary study of nonlinear acoustics and physical volcanology dedicated to shock wave propagation in a viscous and inhomogeneous medium. The equations governing evolution of shock waves with an arbitrary initial profile and an arbitrary cross-section of a beam are obtained. For the case of low viscous medium, the asymptotic solution meant to calculate a profile of a shock wave in an arbitrary point has been derived. The analytical solution of the problem on propagation of shock pulses from atmosphere into a two-phase fluid-saturated geophysical medium is analysed. Quantitative estimations were carried out with respect to experimental results obtained in the course of real explosive volcanic eruptions.

  15. Frequency shift measurement in shock-compressed materials

    DOEpatents

    Moore, D.S.; Schmidt, S.C.

    1984-02-21

    A method is disclosed for determining molecular vibrational frequencies in shock-compressed transparent materials. A single laser beam pulse is directed into a sample material while the material is shock-compressed from a direction opposite that of the incident laser beam. A Stokes beam produced by stimulated Raman scattering is emitted back along the path of the incident laser beam, that is, in the opposite direction to that of the incident laser beam. The Stokes beam is separated from the incident beam and its frequency measured. The difference in frequency between the Stokes beam and the incident beam is representative of the characteristic frequency of the Raman active mode of the sample. Both the incident beam and the Stokes beam pass perpendicularly through the stock front advancing through the sample, thereby minimizing adverse effects of refraction.

  16. Connecting Shock Parameters to the Radiation Hazard from Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdichevsky, Daniel B.; Reames, Donald V.; Lepping, Ronald P.; Schwenn, Rainer W.

    2004-01-01

    We use data from Helios, IMP-8, and other spacecraft (e.g. ISEE) to systematically investigate solar energetic particle (SEP) events from different longitudes and distances in the heliosphere. The purpose of the project is to assess empirically the connection between the morphology of the travelling shock and strength with observed enhancements in the flow of energized particles in shock accelerated particle (SEP) events (also often identified as "gradual" solar energetic particle events). Activities during this first year centered on the organization of the SEPs events and their correlation with solar wind observations at multiple spacecraft locations. From an identified list of more than 30 SEPs events at multiple spacecraft locations, currently four single cases for detailed study were selected and are in an advance phase of preparation for publication. Preliminary results of these four cases were presented at AGU Spring and Fall 2003 meetings, and other meetings on SEPs.

  17. EASI - EQUILIBRIUM AIR SHOCK INTERFERENCE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    New research on hypersonic vehicles, such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP), has raised concerns about the effects of shock-wave interference on various structural components of the craft. State-of-the-art aerothermal analysis software is inadequate to predict local flow and heat flux in areas of extremely high heat transfer, such as the surface impingement of an Edney-type supersonic jet. EASI revives and updates older computational methods for calculating inviscid flow field and maximum heating from shock wave interference. The program expands these methods to solve problems involving the six shock-wave interference patterns on a two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge with an equilibrium chemically reacting gas mixture (representing, for example, the scramjet cowl of the NASP). The inclusion of gas chemistry allows for a more accurate prediction of the maximum pressure and heating loads by accounting for the effects of high temperature on the air mixture. Caloric imperfections and specie dissociation of high-temperature air cause shock-wave angles, flow deflection angles, and thermodynamic properties to differ from those calculated by a calorically perfect gas model. EASI contains pressure- and temperature-dependent thermodynamic and transport properties to determine heating rates, and uses either a calorically perfect air model or an 11-specie, 7-reaction reacting air model at equilibrium with temperatures up to 15,000 K for the inviscid flowfield calculations. EASI solves the flow field and the associated maximum surface pressure and heat flux for the six common types of shock wave interference. Depending on the type of interference, the program solves for shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction, expansion-fan/boundary-layer interaction, attaching shear layer or supersonic jet impingement. Heat flux predictions require a knowledge (from experimental data or relevant calculations) of a pertinent length scale of the interaction. Output files contain flow

  18. INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS LACKING TYPE II RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalswamy, N.; Kaiser, M. L.; Xie, H.; Maekelae, P.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Howard, R. A.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2010-02-20

    We report on the radio-emission characteristics of 222 interplanetary (IP) shocks detected by spacecraft at Sun-Earth L1 during solar cycle 23 (1996 to 2006, inclusive). A surprisingly large fraction of the IP shocks ({approx}34%) was radio quiet (RQ; i.e., the shocks lacked type II radio bursts). We examined the properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and soft X-ray flares associated with such RQ shocks and compared them with those of the radio-loud (RL) shocks. The CMEs associated with the RQ shocks were generally slow (average speed {approx}535 km s{sup -1}) and only {approx}40% of the CMEs were halos. The corresponding numbers for CMEs associated with RL shocks were 1237 km s{sup -1} and 72%, respectively. Thus, the CME kinetic energy seems to be the deciding factor in the radio-emission properties of shocks. The lower kinetic energy of CMEs associated with RQ shocks is also suggested by the lower peak soft X-ray flux of the associated flares (C3.4 versus M4.7 for RL shocks). CMEs associated with RQ CMEs were generally accelerating within the coronagraph field of view (average acceleration {approx}+6.8 m s{sup -2}), while those associated with RL shocks were decelerating (average acceleration {approx}-3.5 m s{sup -2}). This suggests that many of the RQ shocks formed at large distances from the Sun, typically beyond 10 Rs, consistent with the absence of metric and decameter-hectometric (DH) type II radio bursts. A small fraction of RL shocks had type II radio emission solely in the kilometric (km) wavelength domain. Interestingly, the kinematics of the CMEs associated with the km type II bursts is similar to those of RQ shocks, except that the former are slightly more energetic. Comparison of the shock Mach numbers at 1 AU shows that the RQ shocks are mostly subcritical, suggesting that they were not efficient in accelerating electrons. The Mach number values also indicate that most of these are quasi-perpendicular shocks. The radio-quietness is predominant

  19. Interplanetary Shocks Lacking Type 2 Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Maekela, P.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Kaiser, M. L.; Howard, R. A.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the radio-emission characteristics of 222 interplanetary (IP) shocks detected by spacecraft at Sun-Earth L1 during solar cycle 23 (1996 to 2006, inclusive). A surprisingly large fraction of the IP shocks (approximately 34%) was radio quiet (RQ; i.e., the shocks lacked type II radio bursts). We examined the properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and soft X-ray flares associated with such RQ shocks and compared them with those of the radio-loud (RL) shocks. The CMEs associated with the RQ shocks were generally slow (average speed approximately 535 km/s) and only approximately 40% of the CMEs were halos. The corresponding numbers for CMEs associated with RL shocks were 1237 km/s and 72%, respectively. Thus, the CME kinetic energy seems to be the deciding factor in the radio-emission properties of shocks. The lower kinetic energy of CMEs associated with RQ shocks is also suggested by the lower peak soft X-ray flux of the associated flares (C3.4 versus M4.7 for RL shocks). CMEs associated with RQ CMEs were generally accelerating within the coronagraph field of view (average acceleration approximately +6.8 m/s (exp 2)), while those associated with RL shocks were decelerating (average acceleration approximately 3.5 m/s (exp 2)). This suggests that many of the RQ shocks formed at large distances from the Sun, typically beyond 10 Rs, consistent with the absence of metric and decameter-hectometric (DH) type II radio bursts. A small fraction of RL shocks had type II radio emission solely in the kilometric (km) wavelength domain. Interestingly, the kinematics of the CMEs associated with the km type II bursts is similar to those of RQ shocks, except that the former are slightly more energetic. Comparison of the shock Mach numbers at 1 AU shows that the RQ shocks are mostly subcritical, suggesting that they were not efficient in accelerating electrons. The Mach number values also indicate that most of these are quasi-perpendicular shocks. The radio-quietness is

  20. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  1. Symmetry of spherically converging shock waves through reflection, relating to the shock ignition fusion energy scheme.

    PubMed

    Davie, C J; Evans, R G

    2013-05-03

    We examine the properties of perturbed spherically imploding shock waves in an ideal fluid through the collapse, bounce, and development into an outgoing shock wave. We find broad conservation of the size and shape of ingoing and outgoing perturbations when viewed at the same radius. The outgoing shock recovers the velocity of the unperturbed shock outside the strongly distorted core. The results are presented in the context of the robustness of the shock ignition approach to inertial fusion energy.

  2. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves.

    PubMed

    Marcowith, A; Bret, A; Bykov, A; Dieckman, M E; Drury, L O'C; Lembège, B; Lemoine, M; Morlino, G; Murphy, G; Pelletier, G; Plotnikov, I; Reville, B; Riquelme, M; Sironi, L; Novo, A Stockem

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics.

  3. Laboratory simulations of supernova shockwaves: Formation of a second shock ahead of a radiative shock

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.F.; Edwards, M.J.; Froula, D.; Gregori, G.; Edens, A.; Ditmire, T.

    2005-09-28

    Supernovae launch spherical shocks into the circumstellar medium (CSM). These shocks may interact with both the intergalactic magnetic field (IGM) and local mass accumulations (possibly with their own local magnetic fields). The latter interaction may trigger star formation. The shocks have high Mach numbers and may be radiative. We have created similar shocks in the laboratory by focusing laser pulses onto the tip of a solid pin surrounded by ambient gas; ablated material from the pin rapidly expands and launches a shock through the surrounding gas. The shock may then be allowed to interact with (a) mass accumulations, (b) magnetic fields, or (c) allowed to expand freely. We will present examples of each type of experiment, but mainly discuss a new phenomena observed first in (c); at the edge of the radiatively heated gas ahead of the shock, a second shock forms. The two expanding shocks are simultaneously visible for a time, until the original shock stalls from running into the heated gas. The second shock remains visible and continues to expand. A minimum condition for the formation of the second shock is that the original shock is super-critical, i.e., the temperature distribution ahead of the original shock has an inflexion point. In a non-radiative control experiment the second shock does not form.

  4. Laboratory simulations of supernova shockwaves: Formation of a second shock ahead of a radiative shock

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J F; Edwards, M J; Froula, D; Gregori, G; Edens, A; Ditmire, T

    2005-01-28

    Supernovae launch spherical shocks into the circumstellar medium (CSM). These shocks may interact with both the intergalactic magnetic field (IGM) and local mass accumulations (possibly with their own local magnetic fields). The latter interaction may trigger star formation. The shocks have high Mach numbers and may be radiative. We have created similar shocks in the laboratory by focusing laser pulses onto the tip of a solid pin surrounded by ambient gas; ablated material from the pin rapidly expands and launches a shock through the surrounding gas. The shock may then be allowed to interact with (a) mass accumulations, (b) magnetic fields, or (c) allowed to expand freely. We will present examples of each type of experiment, but mainly discuss a new phenomena observed first in (c); at the edge of the radiatively heated gas ahead of the shock, a second shock forms. The two expanding shocks are simultaneously visible for a time, until the original shock stalls from running into the heated gas. The second shock remains visible and continues to expand. A minimum condition for the formation of the second shock is that the original shock is super-critical, i.e., the temperature distribution ahead of the original shock has an inflexion point. In a non-radiative control experiment the second shock does not form.

  5. Effect of sequential heat and cold shocks on nuclear phenotypes of the blood-sucking insect, Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister) (Hemiptera, Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Garcia, Simone L; Pacheco, Raquel M; Rodrigues, Vera L C C; Mello, Maria Luiza S

    2002-12-01

    Thermal shocks induce changes in the nuclear phenotypes that correspond to survival (heterochromatin decondensation, nuclear fusion) or death (apoptosis, necrosis) responses in the Malpighian tubules of Panstrongylus megistus. Since thermal tolerance increased survival and molting rate in this species following sequential shocks, we investigated whether changes in nuclear phenotypes accompanied the insect survival response to sequential thermal shocks. Fifth instar nymphs were subjected to a single heat (35 or 40 degrees C, 1 h) or cold (5 or 0 degrees C, 1 h) shock and then subjected to a second shock for 12 h at 40 or 0 degrees C, respectively, after 8, 18, 24 and 72 h at 28 degrees C (control temperature). As with specimen survival, sequential heat and cold shocks induced changes in frequency of the mentioned nuclear phenotypes although their patterns differed. The heat shock tolerance involved decrease in apoptosis simultaneous to increase in cell survival responses. Sequential cold shocks did not involve cell/nuclear fusion and even elicited increase in necrosis with advancing time after shocks. The temperatures of 40 and 0 degrees C were more effective than the temperatures of 35 and 5 degrees C in eliciting the heat and cold shock tolerances, respectively, as shown by cytological analysis of the nuclear phenotypes. It is concluded that different sequential thermal shocks can trigger different mechanisms of cellular protection against stress in P. megistus, favoring the insect to adapt to various ecotopes.

  6. Calorimetric thermobarometry of experimentally shocked quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocker, Katherine D.; Gooding, James L.; Hoerz, Friedrich

    1994-01-01

    Structural damage in experimentally shock-metamorphosed, granular quartz is quantitatively measurable by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Shock-induced loss of crystallinity is witnessed by disappearance of the alpha/beta phase transformation and evolution of a broad endoenthalpic strain peak at 650-900 K. The strain-energy peak grows rapidly at less than 10 GPa but declines with increasing shock pressure; it approaches zero at 32 GPa where vitrification is extensive. Effects of grain size and post-shock thermal history must be better understood before calorimetric thermobarometry of naturally shocked samples becomes possible.

  7. On the simulation of ballistic shock loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollburg, Uwe

    1987-01-01

    Blast or penetrator-impact induced shocks are characterized by high acceleration levels, particularily in the higher frequency range and for a short time duration. These shocks are dangerous for the equipment of ships, combat vehicles, airplanes or spacecraft structures. As ballistic shock loads are insufficiently simulated by laboratory test machines, researchers designed a ballistic shock simulator. The impact induced shocks are simulated by an explosive and the vehicle to be bombarded is replaced by a simplified structure. This structure is suitable to accommodate any equipment which can be tested up to their load limits.

  8. Streptococcus agalactiae Toxic Shock-Like Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Al Akhrass, Fadi; Abdallah, Lina; Berger, Steven; Hanna, Rami; Reynolds, Nina; Thompson, Shellie; Hallit, Rabih; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We present 2 patients with Streptococcus agalactiae toxic shock-like syndrome and review another 11 well-reported cases from the literature. Streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome is a devastating illness with a high mortality rate, therefore we stress the importance of early supportive management, antimicrobial therapy, and surgical intervention. Toxic shock-like syndrome is likely to be underestimated in patients with invasive Streptococcus agalactiae infection who present with shock. Early diagnosis requires high suspicion of the illness, along with a thorough mucocutaneous examination. Streptococcus agalactiae produces uncharacterized pyrogenic toxins, which explains the ability of the organism to cause toxic shock-like syndrome. PMID:23263717

  9. The plasma physics of shock acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Frank C.; Ellison, Donald C.

    1991-01-01

    The history and theory of shock acceleration is reviewed, paying particular attention to theories of parallel shocks which include the backreaction of accelerated particles on the shock structure. The work that computer simulations, both plasma and Monte Carlo, are playing in revealing how thermal ions interact with shocks and how particle acceleration appears to be an inevitable and necessary part of the basic plasma physics that governs collisionless shocks is discussed. Some of the outstanding problems that still confront theorists and observers in this field are described.

  10. Shock-induced chemistry in organic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dattelbaum, Dana M; Sheffield, Steve; Engelke, Ray; Manner, Virginia; Chellappa, Raja; Yoo, Choong - Shik

    2011-01-20

    The combined 'extreme' environments of high pressure, temperature, and strain rates, encountered under shock loading, offer enormous potential for the discovery of new paradigms in chemical reactivity not possible under more benign conditions. All organic materials are expected to react under these conditions, yet we currently understand very little about the first bond-breaking steps behind the shock front, such as in the shock initiation of explosives, or shock-induced reactivity of other relevant materials. Here, I will present recent experimental results of shock-induced chemistry in a variety of organic materials under sustained shock conditions. A comparison between the reactivity of different structures is given, and a perspective on the kinetics of reaction completion under shock drives.

  11. Bow shock and magnetosheath waves at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Behannon, K. W.

    1975-01-01

    Mariner 10 measurements at the Mercury bow shock provide examples where the magnetic field is approximately parallel or perpendicular to the bow shock normal. Upstream of a broad irregular parallel shock, left hand circularly polarized waves are observed which cut off very sharply at approximately 4 Hz. Upstream of a perpendicular shock, right hand circularly polarized waves are observed which persist up to the Nyquist frequency of 12 Ha. Determination of the wave propagation vector as a function of frequency helps conclusively identify the waves as whistler mode waves propagating from the shock. The magnetosheath downstream of the parallel shock is disturbed more than that downstream of the perpendicular shock particularly below 1 Hz. In the latter case regular left hand polarized waves observed slightly above the proton gyrofrequency are identified as ion cyclotron waves with wavelength approximately 300 km which are Doppler shifted up to their observed frequency.

  12. Shock Wave Dynamics in Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the dynamics of shock waves in weakly ionized argon plasmas has been performed using a pressure ruptured shock tube. The velocity of the shock is observed to increase when the shock traverses the plasma. The observed increases cannot be accounted for by thermal effects alone. Possible mechanisms that could explain the anomalous behavior include a vibrational/translational relaxation in the nonequilibrium plasma, electron diffusion across the shock front resulting from high electron mobility, and the propagation of ion-acoustic waves generated at the shock front. Using a turbulence model based on reduced kinetic theory, analysis of the observed results suggest a role for turbulence in anomalous shock dynamics in weakly ionized media and plasma-induced hypersonic drag reduction.

  13. Kinetic simulaitons of astrophysical collisionless shocks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitkovsky, A.

    2009-12-01

    Nonthermal emission from a variety of astrophysical sources, including relativistic jets and supernova remnants, is often attributed to collisionless shocks. These shocks are inferred to accelerate particles and in some cases strongly amplify magnetic fields. How this happens remains to be clarified through both theory and observations. In this talk, I will present a summary of recent progress in kinetic modeling of collisionless shocks using particle-in-cell simulations. I will discuss the internal structure of relativistic and non-relativistic shocks, concentrating on the conditions necessary for particle acceleration. Large-scale shock simulations show ab-initio Fermi acceleration of particles from the thermal pool to power-law distributions and can set constraints on the shock acceleration efficiency and geometry. Other results that will be discussed include the amplification of magnetic fields by accelerated particles through streaming instabilities, and the electron-ion temperature equilibration in collisionless shocks.

  14. Factors Affecting Shock Sensitivity of Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, A.; Gifford, M. J.; Greenaway, M. W.; Proud, W. G.; Field, J. E.

    2002-07-01

    An extensive study has been carried out into the relationships between the particle size of a charge, the density to which it is packed, the presence of inert additives and the sensitivity of the charge to different initiating shocks. The critical parameters for two different shock regimes have been found. The long duration shocks are provided by a commercial detonator and the short duration shocks are imparted using laser-driven flyer plates. It has been shown that the order of sensitivity of charges to different shock regimes varies. In particular, ultrafine materials have been shown to be relatively insensitive to long duration low pressure shocks and sensitive to short duration high pressure shocks. The materials that have been studied include HNS, RDX and PETN.

  15. Optical carrier wave shocking: detection and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Kinsler, P; Radnor, S B P; Tyrrell, J C A; New, G H C

    2007-06-01

    Carrier wave shocking is studied using the pseudospectral spatial-domain (PSSD) technique. We describe the shock detection diagnostics necessary for this numerical study and verify them against theoretical shocking predictions for the dispersionless case. These predictions show a carrier envelope phase and pulse bandwidth sensitivity in the single-cycle regime. The flexible dispersion management offered by the PSSD enables us to independently control the linear and nonlinear dispersion. Customized dispersion profiles allow us to analyze the development of both carrier self-steepening and shocks. The results exhibit a marked asymmetry between normal and anomalous dispersion, both in the limits of the shocking regime and in the (near) shocked pulse wave forms. Combining these insights, we offer some suggestions on how carrier shocking (or at least extreme self-steepening) might be realized experimentally.

  16. High Energy-Density Materials with Fast Energy Release: Molecular Scale Shock Response of Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    ORGANIZATION. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information...Transient absorption spectroscopy of laser shocked explosives”, presented by S. D. McGrane 2012 LANL Advanced Thermometry Workshop, “Femtosecond...condensed phases using femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering”, presented by Nhan Dang Poster presentations: 2010 LANL Chemistry Capabilities

  17. SUPPRESSIVE AND FACILITATIVE EFFECTS OF SHOCK INTENSITY AND INTERRESPONSE TIMES FOLLOWED BY SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    Everly, Jessica B.; Perone, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Although response-dependent shock often suppresses responding, response facilitation can occur. In two experiments, we examined the suppressive and facilitative effects of shock by manipulating shock intensity and the interresponse times that produced shock. Rats' lever presses were reinforced on a variable-interval 40-s schedule of food presentation. Shock followed either long or short interresponse times. Shock intensity was raised from 0.05 mA to 0.4 mA or 0.8 mA. Overall, shock contingent on long interresponse times punished long interresponse times and increased response rates. Shock contingent on short interresponse times punished short interresponse times and decreased response rates. In Experiment 1, raising the range of interresponse times that produced shock enhanced these effects. In Experiment 2, the effects of shock intensity depended on the interresponse times that produced shock. When long interresponse times produced shock, low intensities increased response rates. High intensities decreased response rates. When short interresponse times produced shock, high shock intensities punished short interresponse times and decreased response rates more than low intensities. The results may explain why punishment procedures occasionally facilitate responding and establish parameters for future studies of punishment. PMID:23144508

  18. Sheehan's syndrome: Newer advances.

    PubMed

    Shivaprasad, C

    2011-09-01

    Sheehan's syndrome (SS) is postpartum hypopituitarism caused by necrosis of the pituitary gland. It is usually the result of severe hypotension or shock caused by massive hemorrhage during or after delivery. Patients with SS have varying degrees of anterior pituitary hormone deficiency. Its frequency is decreasing worldwide and it is a rare cause of hypopituitarism in developed countries owing to advances in obstetric care. However, it is still frequent in underdeveloped and developing countries. SS often evolves slowly and hence is diagnosed late. History of postpartum hemorrhage, failure to lactate and cessation of menses are important clues to the diagnosis. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are important to reduce morbidity and mortality of the patients.

  19. Water impact shock test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The basic objective was to design, manufacture, and install a shock test system which, in part, would have the ability to subject test articles weighing up to 1,000 pounds to both half sine and/or full sine pulses having peak levels of up to 50 G's with half sine pulse durations of 100 milliseconds or full sine period duration of 200 milliseconds. The tolerances associated with the aforementioned pulses were +20% and -10% for the peak levels and plus or minus 10% for the pulse durations. The subject shock test system was to be capable of accepting test article sizes of up to 4 feet by 4 feet mounting surface by 4 feet in length.

  20. Anaphylactic shock: mechanisms and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, A F

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the mechanisms of anaphylactic shock in terms of the immunoglobulin and non-immunoglobulin triggering events, and the cellular events based on the rise in intracellular cyclic AMP and calcium that release preformed granule-associated mediators and the rapidly formed, newly synthesized mediators predominantly based on arachidonic acid metabolism. These primary mediators recruit other cells with the release of secondary mediators that either potentiate or ultimately curtail the anaphylactic reaction. The roles of these mediators in the various causes of cardiovascular collapse are examined. The treatment of anaphylactic shock involves oxygen, adrenaline and fluids. The importance and safety of intravenous adrenaline are discussed. Combined H1 and H2 blocking antihistamines and steroids have a limited role. Glucagon and other adrenergic drugs are occasionally used, and several new experimental drugs are being developed. PMID:7582425

  1. Shock sensing dual mode warhead

    SciTech Connect

    Shamblen, M.; Walchak, M.T.; Richmond, L.

    1980-12-31

    A shock sensing dual mode warhead is provided for use against both soft and hard targets and is capable of sensing which type of target has been struck. The warhead comprises a casing made of a ductile material containing an explosive charge and a fuze assembly. The ductile warhead casing will mushroom upon striking a hard target while still confining the explosive. Proper ductility and confinement are necessary for fuze shock sensing. The fuze assembly contains a pair of parallel firing trains, one initiated only by dynamic pressure caused high impact deceleration and one initiated by low impact deceleration. The firing train actuated by high impact deceleration senses dynamic pressure transmitted, during deformation of the warhead, through the explosive filler which is employed as a fuzing signature. The firing train actuated by low impact deceleration contains a pyrotechnic delay to allow penetration of soft targets.

  2. MHD shocks in the ISM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, D. F.; Hollenbach, David J.; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers survey shock solutions of a partially ionized gas with a magnetic field. The gas is modeled by interacting neutral, ion, electron and charged grain components. They employ a small neutral-ion chemical network to follow the dissociation and ionization of the major species. Cooling by molecular hydrogen (rotational, vibrational and dissociation), grains and dipole molecules is included. There are three basic types of solutions (C, C asterisk, and J) and some more complicated flows involving combinations of the basic types. The initial preshock conditions cover hydrogen nuclei densities of 1 less than n less than 10(exp 10) cm(-3) and shock velocities of 5 less than v(sub s) less than 60 km/s. The magnetic field is varied over 5 decades and the sensitivity of the results to grain parameters, UV and cosmic ray fluxes is ascertained. The parameter space is quite complicated, but there exist some simple divisions. When the initial ionization fraction is small (chi sub i less than 10(-5)), there is a sharp transition between fully C solutions at low velocity and strong J solutions at high velocity. When the initial ionization fraction is larger, C asterisk and/or very weak J shocks are present at low velocities in addition to the C solutions. The flow again changes to strong J shocks at high velocities. When the ionization fraction is large and the flow is only slightly greater than the bulk Alfven velocity, there is a complicated mixture of C, C asterisk and J solutions.

  3. Scientific Evidence for Hydrostatic Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    device used to break up kidney stones with sonic pressure waves) produces no damage to soft tissues. Since a lithotriptor produces pressure waves...the Risk of Long-Term Complications in Shock Wave Lithotripsy , Nephron 78(1):1-8, 1998. 13. Lingeman JE, Kim SC, Keo RL, McAteer JA, Evan AP...Shockwave Lithotripsy : Anecdotes and Insights. Journal of Endourology 17(9):687-693; 2003. 14. Lokhandwalla M, Sturtevant B: Mechanical Haemolysis

  4. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 1. Welcome, Invited Papers, Shipboard Shock, Blast and Ground Shock, Shock Testing and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    Charles Moening. The Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA Pyrotechnic Shock I HE PRE-PULSE IN PYROSHOCK MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS A E. Galef, TRW...SESSION II G. Wasz. TRW, San Bernardino, CA A VIBROACOUSTIC DATABASE MAN’AGEMENT SYSTEM AND ITS APPLICATION FOR A PYROSHOCK DATABASE W. Henricks and...E. Morse, TRW Electronics and Defense, Redondo Beach, CA THE CONTROLLED RESPONSE OF RESONATING FIXTURES USED TO SIMULATE PYROSHOCK ENVIRONMENTS N

  5. New approach of assessing hypovolemic shock class 1 during acute emergencies: Ultrasonographic inferior vena cava and abdominal aorta diameter ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Rashidi; Kunji, Mohamad Iqhbal; Hj Abd Kareem, Meera Mohaideen; Halim, Shamimi A.

    2013-09-01

    In a patient with hypovolemic shock class 1, the vital signs and biochemical properties are almost normal. The alteration of hemodynamic parameters and biochemical values occurs mainly in advanced hypovolemia state (neuroendocrine response). The availability of ultrasound machine at healthcare centers makes the measurement of vascular calibre feasible and possible. Inspiration and expiration inferior vena cava diameter changes predict hypovolemic shock class 1 but in acute emergencies this method is impractical. The purpose of this study is to develop a new approach in identifying hypovolemic shock at early phase by measuring the inferior vena cava and aorta diameter ratio using bedside ultrasound machine.

  6. Proton Acceleration at Oblique Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinsky, V. L.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2011-06-01

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  7. Shock dynamics of phase diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, Antonio

    2014-04-15

    A thermodynamic phase transition denotes a drastic change of state of a physical system due to a continuous change of thermodynamic variables, as for instance pressure and temperature. The classical van der Waals equation of state is the simplest model that predicts the occurrence of a critical point associated with the gas–liquid phase transition. Nevertheless, below the critical temperature theoretical predictions of the van der Waals theory significantly depart from the observed physical behaviour. We develop a novel approach to classical thermodynamics based on the solution of Maxwell relations for a generalised family of nonlocal entropy functions. This theory provides an exact mathematical description of discontinuities of the order parameter within the phase transition region, it explains the universal form of the equations of state and the occurrence of triple points in terms of the dynamics of nonlinear shock wave fronts. -- Highlights: •A new generalisation of van der Waals equation of state. •Description of phase transitions in terms of shock dynamics of state curves. •Proof of the universality of equations of state for a general class of models. •Interpretation of triple points as confluence of classical shock waves. •Correspondence table between thermodynamics and nonlinear conservation laws.

  8. Shock desensitizing of solid explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, William C

    2010-01-01

    Solid explosive can be desensitized by a shockwave too weak to initiate it promptly, and desensitized explosive does not react although its chemical composition is almost unchanged. A strong second shock does not cause reaction until it overtakes the first shock. The first shock, if it is strong enough, accelerates very slowly at first, and then more rapidly as detonation approaches. These facts suggest that there are two competing reactions. One is the usual explosive goes to products with the release of energy, and the other is explosive goes to dead explosive with no chemical change and no energy release. The first reaction rate is very sensitive to the local state, and the second is only weakly so. At low pressure very little energy is released and the change to dead explosive dominates. At high pressure, quite the other way, most of the explosive goes to products. Numerous experiments in both the initiation and the full detonation regimes are discussed and compared in support of these ideas.

  9. Post electric shock reactive thrombocytosis.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Richa; Patne, Shashikant C U; Pankaj, Pranjal

    2015-04-01

    Thrombocytosis is defined as a platelet count greater than 400×10(9)/L. Electric shock may lead to tissue injury and marked thrombocytosis. We herein report a case of 45-year-old woman, who was hospitalized with progressively increasing weakness, tingling sensation, and numbness of the bilateral lower limbs. She had a history of receiving electric shock during household work, 15 days prior to her admission. Her laboratory investigations revealed a markedly increased platelet count (1,570×10(9)/L) along with increased level of serum uric acid (12 mg/dL), and mild increase in serum potassium (6.7 mmol/L), and serum alanine transaminase (50 U/L). She was treated with intravenous fluids, calcium, and multivitamins. Following hospitalization and treatment, condition of the patient improved, her symptoms resolved, and her platelet counts declined. We report this case because of rare presentation of marked thrombocytosis secondary to electric shock with a brief discussion on pathophysiology of this condition.

  10. PROTON ACCELERATION AT OBLIQUE SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Galinsky, V. L.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2011-06-20

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  11. Shock tunnel studies of scramjet phenomena, supplement 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendt, M.; Nettleton, M.; Morgan, R. G.; Skinner, K.; Casey, R.; Stalker, R.; Brescianini, C.; Paull, A.; Allen, G.; Smart, M.

    1993-01-01

    Reports by the staff of the University of Queensland on various research studies related to the advancement of scramjet technology are presented. These reports document the tests conducted in the reflected shock tunnel T4 and supporting research facilities that have been used to study the injection, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen fuel in generic scramjets at flow conditions typical of hypersonic flight. In addition, topics include the development of instrumentation and measurement technology, such as combustor wall shear and stream composition in pulse facilities, and numerical studies and analyses of the scramjet combustor process and the test facility operation.

  12. Shock tunnel studies of scramjet phenomena, supplement 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakos, R. J.; Morgan, R. G.; Tuttle, S. L.; Kelly, G. M.; Paull, A.; Simmons, J. M.; Stalker, R. J.; Pulsonetti, M. V.; Buttsworth, D.; Allen, G. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Reports by the staff of the University of Queensland on various research studies related to the advancement of scramjet technology are presented. These reports document the tests conducted in the reflected shock tunnel T4 and supporting research facilities that have been used to study the injection, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen fuel in generic scramjets at flow conditions typical of hypersonic flight. In addition, topics include the development of instrumentation and measurement technology, such as combustor wall shear and stream composition in pulse facilities, and numerical studies and analyses of the scramjet combustor process and the test facility operation. This research activity is Supplement 7 under NASA Grant NAGW-674.

  13. Percutaneous Mechanical Support in Cardiogenic Shock: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gilani, Fahad Syed; Farooqui, Sarah; Doddamani, Rajiv; Gruberg, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Cardiogenic shock (CS) is a life-threatening condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Pharmacological therapy is often the first line of treatment but mechanical support can provide substantial hemodynamic improvement in refractory CS. Percutaneous mechanical support devices are placed in a minimally invasive manner and provide life-saving assistance to the failing myocardium. We review the percutaneous devices currently available, the evidence behind their use, and the new advances in percutaneous technology being evaluated for the treatment of CS. PMID:26052235

  14. Shock tunnel studies of scramjet phenomena, supplement 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalker, R. J.; Hollis, P.; Allen, G. A.; Roberts, G. T.; Tuttle, S.; Bakos, R. J.; Morgan, R. G.; Pulsonetti, M. V.; Brescianini, C.; Buttsworth, D. R.

    1993-01-01

    Reports by the staff of the University of Oueensland on various research studies related to the advancement of scramjet technology are presented. These reports document the tests conducted in the reflected shock tunnel T4 and supporting research facilities that have been used to study the injection, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen fuel in generic scramjets at flow conditions typical of hypersonic flight. In addition, topics include the development of instrumentation and measurement technology, such as combustor wall shear and stream composition in pulse facilities, and numerical studies and analyses of the scramjet combustor process and the test facility operation. This research activity is Supplement 8 under NASA Grant NAGW-674.

  15. Warmup in free-operant avoidance as a function of the response-shock = shock-shock interval.

    PubMed

    Hineline, P N

    1978-11-01

    Warmup effects, the repeated within-session transitions from ineffective to effective avoidance, were examined with rats on free-operant shock-delay procedures. The shock-shock and response-shock intervals were kept equal as they were varied. As measured by both response rates and shock rates, the magnitude of within-session change in performance was inversely related to the size of the manipulated intervals. The duration of warmup tended to decrease as the intervals were increased. This finding, that increased shock frequencies do not shorten the warmup, appears to be inconsistent with all interpretations of the warmup that have been offered to date. Late-session performances replicated general features of prior experiments, but differed with respect to details of secondary conclusions in previous reports. These differences may stem from the selection of especially proficient avoiders for previous experiments.

  16. Impact of Shock Front Nonstationarity on the Acceleration of Heavy Ions by Perpendicular Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Lembege, B.; Lu, Q.

    2010-12-01

    Both hybrid /full particle simulations and recent experimental results have clearly evidenced that the front of a supercritical quasi-perpendicular shock can be nonstationary and corresponds to the self-reformation of the front itself being due to the accumulation of reflected ions. Not only the amplitude but also the spatial scales of fields components at the front (ramp and foot) are strongly varying within each cycle of the self- reformation. On the other hand, several studies have been made on the acceleration and heating of heavy ions but most have been restricted to a stationary shock profile only. Herein, one-dimensional test particle simulations with fields components issued from self-consistent 1D PIC simulation are performed in order to investigate the impact of shock front non-stationarity on heavy ion acceleration (He, O, Fe). Reflection and acceleration mechanisms of heavy ions with different initial thermal velocities and different charge-mass ratios interacting with a non-stationary shock front (self-reformation) are analyzed in detail. Present preliminary results show that: (i) the heavy ions suffer shock drift acceleration (SDA) and shock surfing acceleration (SSA) mechanisms and will be compared with previous works; (ii) the fraction of reflected heavy ions increases with initial kinetic energy, charge-mass ratio and decreasing shock front width at both stationary shock (situation equivalent to fixed shock regime) and non-stationary shocks (situation equivalent to a continously time-evolving shock regime); (iii) the shock front non-stationarity facilitates the reflection of heavy ions for broad (rather than narrow) shock profiles; (iv) high energy part of Fe/O ratio spectra at a non-stationary shock decreases with shock ramp width. The impact of the shock front non-stationarity on the heavy ions spectra within the shock front region and the downstream region will be also discussed.

  17. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 3. Shock Testing, Shock Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    unlari practice for a!-’ pyrotechnic shock ani 16. It. is ýf interest týý pxori;.e wand co- tezts because of bad expo-rlences with other %are the tr-u~ loi ...souid di;turbance over a measured dis- height, each charge weighing 1.5 lbs. nominally. tauce . Soil density and water content measure- Each charge was

  18. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 3. Invited Papers, Pyrotechnic Shock, Pyrotechnic Shock Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    Rocketdyne, Session II, San Bernardino, CA Canoga Park, CA Instrumentation, Data Acquisition, and Data Bank Wednesday Pyroshock Mr. Dan Powers, Mr. Robert...8217 CAO ul .1~ II PYROTECHNIC SHOCK THE PRE-PULSE IN PYROSHOCK MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS A. E. Galef I TRW Electronics and Defense Redondo Beach...resulting valid data on pyroshocks available. This would from the very short duration, small net impulse be an exaggeration of my position, since the of the

  19. Survival without sequelae after prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation after electric shock.

    PubMed

    Motawea, Mohamad; Al-Kenany, Al-Sayed; Hosny, Mostafa; Aglan, Omar; Samy, Mohamad; Al-Abd, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    "Electrical shock is the physiological reaction or injury caused by electric current passing through the human body. It occurs upon contact of a human body part with any source of electricity that causes a sufficient current through the skin, muscles, or hair causing undesirable effects ranging from simple burns to death." Ventricular fibrillation is believed to be the most common cause of death after electrical shock. "The ideal duration of cardiac resuscitation is unknown. Typically prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation is associated with poor neurologic outcomes and reduced long term survival. No consensus statement has been made and traditionally efforts are usually terminated after 15-30 minutes." The case under discussion seems worthy of the somewhat detailed description given. It is for a young man who survived after 65 minutes after electrical shock (ES) after prolonged high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), multiple defibrillations, and artificial ventilation without any sequelae. Early start of adequate chest compressions and close adherence to advanced cardiac life support protocols played a vital role in successful CPR.

  20. Geomagnetic avtivity triggered by interplanetary shocks: The shock impact angle as a controlling factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D. M.; Raeder, J.; Tsurutani, B.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    We study the influence of interplanetary (IP) shock impact angles in the shock geoeffectiveness focusing on simulations and observations. In our simulations, we use OpenGGCM simulations to study the magnetospheric and ionospheric responses to shock impacts. Three cases are presented here: two inclined shocks, with 3.7 and 7.4 Mach numbers, and a frontal shock, whose shock normal is along the Sun-Earth line, with Mach number of 7.4. We find that, in the two inclined cases, due to the north-south asymmetry, the magnetotail is deflected southward, leading to a mild compression. The geomagnetic activity observed in the nightside ionosphere is then weak. On the other hand, in the head-on case, the magnetotail is compressed from both sides symmetrically. This compression triggers a substorm. By comparing the strong inclined shock and the frontal shock, we find that, despite the inclined shock having a larger Mach number, the frontal shock leads to a larger geomagnetic response in the nightside ionosphere. As a result, we conclude that IP shocks with similar upstream conditions, such as Mach number, can have different geoeffectiveness, depending on their shock normal orientation. In our observational study, we present a survey of IP shocks at 1 AU using Wind and ACE satellite data from Jan 1995 to Dec 2013 to study the same shock-related effects. A shock list covering one and a half solar cycle is compiled. We use data from SuperMAG, a large chain with more than 300 geomagnetic stations, to study geoeffectiveness triggered by IP shocks. The SuperMAG SML index (enhanced AL index), is used to quantify substorm strength. The jumps of the SML index triggered by shock impacts is investigated in terms of shock orientation and speed. We find that, in general, strong and almost frontal shocks are more geoeffective than inclined shocks with low speed. The highest correlations (R = 0.78) occurs for fixed shock speed and varying the shock impact angle. We attribute this result

  1. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.; Hohenberger, M.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-02-15

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing.

  2. Transmitted, reflected, quasi-reflected, and multiply reflected ions in low-Mach number shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedalin, M.

    2016-11-01

    The dependence of ion dynamics on the cross-shock potential and upstream βi in low-Mach number marginally critical shocks is studied using advanced test particle analysis,. The directly transmitted ions provide the main contribution to the downstream ion pressure. The fraction of reflected ions increases with the increase of the cross-shock potential and βi. This fraction is small and their contribution to the downstream ion pressure is negligible in marginally critical shocks. A population of quasi-reflected ions is identified. These ions make a loop inside the ramp and do not appear upstream. They acquire energies comparable to the energies of the true reflected ions, are observed as a halo in the downstream ion distribution, and contribute significantly to the downstream pressure. Thus, the transmitted and quasi-reflected ions shape the downstream magnetic profile. At higher cross-shock potentials and βi the reflected ions cause formation of a magnetic dip just ahead of the ramp. A small fraction of ions are multiply reflected at the shock front. All these ions escape into the upstream region and all escaping ions are mutliply reflected.

  3. Shock metamorphism of lunar and terrestrial basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaal, R. B.; Hoerz, F.

    1977-01-01

    Lonar Crater (India) basalt and lunar basalt 75035 were shock loaded under controlled laboratory conditions up to 1000 kbar, generally in a CO/CO2 (1:1) environment evacuated to 10 to the minus seventh power torr. The Kieffer et al. (1976) classification scheme of progressive shock metamorphism is found to apply to lunar basalts. The major shock features of the five classes that span the range 0 to 1000 kbar are described. Only three out of 152 basalt specimens show shock effects in their natural state as severe as Class 2 features. The scarcity of shocked basalt hand samples in contrast to the abundance of shock-produced agglutinates and homogeneous glass spheres in the lunar regolith indicates the dominant role of micrometeorite impact in the evolution of the lunar regolith. The overall glass content in asteroidal and Mercurian regoliths is considered.

  4. Shock compression dynamics under a microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlott, Dana D.

    2017-01-01

    Our laboratory has developed a tabletop laser miniflyer launcher used for a wide variety of studies in the physical and chemical sciences. The flyers, typically 0.7 mm in diameter, can be used to shock microgram quantities of interesting materials. Frequently 100 shock experiments per day are performed. A microscope objective transmits the photon Doppler velocimeter (PDV) flyer plate diagnostic and various laser beams, and collects signals from the shocked materials that can be transmitted to video cameras, spectrographs, streak cameras, etc. In this paper I describe the flyer plate apparatus and then discuss three recent efforts: (1) Shock dissipation in nanoporous media; (2) Probing micropressures in shocked microstructured media; and (3) Shock initiation of nanotechnology reactive materials.

  5. Standing shocks in a rotating channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Tivon E.; Tabak, Esteban G.

    2004-10-01

    This paper discusses the stationary shallow water shocks occurring in a reentrant rotating channel with wind stress and topography. Asymptotic predictions for the shock location, strength, and associated energy dissipation are developed by taking the topographic perturbation to be small. It is shown that under appropriate conditions, a mean flow develops under the action of the wind stress, with a transverse profile determined by the need to support stationary shocks. The scaling arguments for the asymptotics are developed by demanding integrated energy and momentum balance, with the result that the free surface perturbation is of the order of the square root of the topographic perturbation. Shock formation requires that linear waves be nondispersive, which sets a solvability condition on the mean flow and which leads to a class of generalized Kelvin waves. Two-dimensional shock-resolving numerical simulations validate the asymptotic expressions and demonstrate the presence of stationary separated flow shocks in some cases.

  6. Remote shock sensing and notification system

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Britton, Charles L.; Pearce, James; Jagadish, Usha; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2008-11-11

    A low-power shock sensing system includes at least one shock sensor physically coupled to a chemical storage tank to be monitored for impacts, and an RF transmitter which is in a low-power idle state in the absence of a triggering signal. The system includes interference circuitry including or activated by the shock sensor, wherein an output of the interface circuitry is coupled to an input of the RF transmitter. The interface circuitry triggers the RF transmitting with the triggering signal to transmit an alarm message to at least one remote location when the sensor senses a shock greater than a predetermined threshold. In one embodiment the shock sensor is a shock switch which provides an open and a closed state, the open state being a low power idle state.

  7. Remote shock sensing and notification system

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Britton, Charles L [Alcoa, TN; Pearce, James [Lenoir City, TN; Jagadish, Usha [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod K [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-11-02

    A low-power shock sensing system includes at least one shock sensor physically coupled to a chemical storage tank to be monitored for impacts, and an RF transmitter which is in a low-power idle state in the absence of a triggering signal. The system includes interface circuitry including or activated by the shock sensor, wherein an output of the interface circuitry is coupled to an input of the RF transmitter. The interface circuitry triggers the RF transmitter with the triggering signal to transmit an alarm message to at least one remote location when the sensor senses a shock greater than a predetermined threshold. In one embodiment the shock sensor is a shock switch which provides an open and a closed state, the open state being a low power idle state.

  8. Shock metamorphic effects in lunar microcraters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaal, R. B.; Hoerz, F.; Gibbons, R. V.

    1976-01-01

    Detailed petrographic descriptions and results of electron microprobe analyses are presented for impact glasses as well as shocked and unshocked minerals associated with individual lunar microcraters (diameters of 0.4 to 4.4 mm). Rocks of four typical lunar lithologies are studied: anorthosite, anorthositic norite, ophitic basalt, and polymict breccia. Textures, mineralogies, and chemical compositions are examined along a radial traverse through each microcrater; i.e., across the impact glasses lining the crater wall, the shock-metamorphosed zone immediately underlying the glass liner, and the unshocked host rock. The microcraters are discussed in a sequence of increasing mineralogical complexity of the host rock (from anorthosite to polymict breccia) in order to distinguish shock effects among mineral types. The shock metamorphic features observed are found to be comparable to those reported in shocked basalt from Lonar Crater, India, and are categorized into five shock-intensity classes with pressures experimentally calibrated.

  9. Entropy Generation Across Earth's Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, George K.; McCarthy, Michael; Fu, Suiyan; Lee E. s; Cao, Jinbin; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Canu, Patrick; Dandouras, Iannis S.; Reme, Henri; Fazakerley, Andrew; Lin, Naiguo; Wilber, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Earth's bow shock is a transition layer that causes an irreversible change in the state of plasma that is stationary in time. Theories predict entropy increases across the bow shock but entropy has never been directly measured. Cluster and Double Star plasma experiments measure 3D plasma distributions upstream and downstream of the bow shock that allow calculation of Boltzmann's entropy function H and his famous H-theorem, dH/dt O. We present the first direct measurements of entropy density changes across Earth's bow shock. We will show that this entropy generation may be part of the processes that produce the non-thermal plasma distributions is consistent with a kinetic entropy flux model derived from the collisionless Boltzmann equation, giving strong support that solar wind's total entropy across the bow shock remains unchanged. As far as we know, our results are not explained by any existing shock models and should be of interests to theorists.

  10. Exhaust Nozzle Plume and Shock Wave Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the exhaust plume. Both the nozzle exhaust plume shape and the tail shock shape may be affected by an interaction that may alter the vehicle sonic boom signature. The plume and shock interaction was studied using Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation on two types of convergent-divergent nozzles and a simple wedge shock generator. The nozzle plume effects on the lower wedge compression region are evaluated for two- and three-dimensional nozzle plumes. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the deflected lower plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the wedge is modified by the presence of the plume, and the computational predictions show significant (8 to 15 percent) changes in shock amplitude.

  11. Effects of shock pressures on calcic plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, R. V.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Calcic plagioclase single crystals were subjected to shock loading up to a pressure of 496 kbar; optical and electron microscope studies were conducted to investigate the shock-induced effects on the mineral, which is found in terrestrial and lunar rocks and in meteorites. It was observed that up to 287 kbar pressure, the recovered samples are essentially crystalline, while samples subjected to pressures between 300 and 400 kbar are almost 100% diaplectic glasses, suggesting shock transformation in the solid state. Samples shock-loaded to pressures greater than 400 kbar yielded glasses with refractive indices similar to those of thermally fused glass. It is concluded that planar features, absent in all the specimens, may not be definitive shock indicators, but may be linked to local heterogeneous dynamic stresses experienced by plagioclase grains within shocked rocks.

  12. Advances in EBSD Technology: A Powerful Method for the Analysis of Impactites and Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasse, L.; Goran, D.; Schwager, T.; Berlin, J.; Salge, T.

    2012-09-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction is an analytical technique for assessing the petrographic texture of a rock and the crystallographic orientation of minerals. Recent advances in software and hardware can help to understand impact and shock processes.

  13. X-ray diffraction studies of shocked lunar analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanss, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The X-ray diffraction experiments on shocked rock and mineral analogs of particular significance to lunar geology are described. Materials naturally shocked by meteorite impact, nuclear-shocked, or artificially shocked in a flat plate accelerator were utilized. Four areas were outlined for investigation: powder diffractometer studies of shocked single crystal silicate minerals (quartz, orthoclase, oligoclase, pyroxene), powder diffractometer studies of shocked polycrystalline monomineralic samples (dunite), Debye-Scherrer studies of single grains of shocked granodiorite, and powder diffractometer studies of shocked whole rock samples. Quantitative interpretation of peak shock pressures experienced by materials found in lunar or terrestrial impact structures is presented.

  14. Dependence of the Spectrum of Shock-Accelerated Ions on the Dynamics at the Shock Crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedalin, M.; Dröge, W.; Kartavykh, Y. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of ions occurs due to pitch-angle diffusion in the upstream and downstream regions of the shock and multiple crossing of the shock by these ions. The classical DSA theory implies continuity of the distribution at the shock transition and predicts a universal spectrum of accelerated particles, depending only on the ratio of the upstream and downstream fluid speeds. However, the ion dynamics at the shock front occurs within a collision-free region and is gyrophase dependent. The ions fluxes have to be continuous at the shock front. The matching conditions for the gyrophase-averaged distribution functions at the shock transition are formulated in terms of the transition and reflection probabilities. These probabilities depend on the shock angle and the magnetic compression as does the power spectrum of accelerated ions. Their spectral index is expressed in terms of the reflectivity. The spectrum is typically harder than the spectrum predicted by the classical DSA theory.

  15. Compressible gas properties of UF/sub 6/ for isentropic, normal shock, and oblique shock conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Harloff, G.J.

    1984-11-01

    Isentropic, normal shock, and oblique shock tables are given for the real gas UF/sub 6/ for Mach numbers up to 22. An evaluation of the real gas effects is given. A computer program listing is included.

  16. Two-dimensional particle simulation of a perpendicular shock with a shock rest frame model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamao, M.; Umeda, T.; Yamazaki, R.; Ogino, T.

    2009-12-01

    A two-dimensional shock-rest-frame model for particle simulations is developed. This model does not need a huge simulation domain in the propagation direction of the shock wave as previous simulation models do. We performed a two-dimensional full particle simulation of a perpendicular collisionless shock and compared with one-dimensional simulation results. In both simulations, the excited shock waves show almost the same time evolution, periodically reforming at the timescale of the downstream ion gyro-period. In the two-dimensional simulation, electrons are thermalized along the transverse magnetic field, and electromagnetic whistler mode waves are excited in the shock front region. The amplitude of the exited whistler mode waves is not so strong and the shock magnetic field keeps almost one-dimensional structure. The two-dimensional simulation also shows the absence of electrostatic solitary structures in the shock foot region, which is necessary for electron shock surfing acceleration.

  17. Shock and Awe: A Widely Misunderstood Effect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    the collapse of the Soviet Union, America is now the only super power, unequalled in terms of defense spending and technology. It is arguable that no...destruction of the World Trade Center ( WTC ) which achieved complete shock at strategic, operational, and tactical levels, but was not exploited. Had the...Analysis of Shock This term [shock] is sometimes applied to an event of special force or significance that causes disruption or collapse of mental or

  18. Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies

    DOEpatents

    Benedick, W.B.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.

    1987-04-20

    A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolyte rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active. 2 figs.

  19. Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies

    DOEpatents

    Benedick, William B.; Graham, Robert A.; Morosin, Bruno

    1988-01-01

    A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolytes rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active.

  20. Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies

    DOEpatents

    Benedick, W.B.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.

    1988-11-08

    A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolytes rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active. 2 figs.

  1. Survival of carbon grains in shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seab, C. Gregory

    1990-01-01

    Supernova shocks play a significant part in the life of an interstellar grain. In a typical 10 to the 9th power year lifetime, a grain will be hit by an average of 10 shocks of 100 km s(sup -1) or greater velocity, and even more shocks of lower velocity. Evaluation of the results of this frequent shock processing is complicated by a number of uncertainties, but seems to give about 10 percent destruction of silicate grains and about half that for graphite grains. Because of the frequency of shocking, the mineralogy and sizes of the grain population is predominately determined by shock processing effects, and not by the initial grain nucleation and growth environment. One consequence of the significant role played by interstellar shocks is that a certain fraction (up to 5 percent) of the carbon should be transformed into the diamond phase. Diamond transformation is observed in the laboratory at threshold shock pressures easily obtainable in grain-grain collisions in supernova shocks. Yields for transforming graphite, amorphous carbon, glassy carbon, and other nearly pure carbon solids into diamond are quite high. Impurities up to at least the 10 percent level (for oxygen) are tolerated in the process. The typical size diamond expected from shock transformation agrees well with the observed sizes in the Lewis et al. findings in meteoritic material. Isotropic anomalies already contained in the grain are likely to be retained through the conversion process, while others may be implanted by the shock if the grain is close to the supernova. The meteoritic diamonds are likely to be the results of transformation of carbon grains in grain-grain collisions in supernova shock waves.

  2. The earth's foreshock, bow shock, and magnetosheath

    SciTech Connect

    Onsager, T.G.; Thomsen, M.F. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies directly pertaining to the earth's foreshock, bow shock, and magnetosheath are reviewed, and some comparisons are made with data on other planets. Topics considered in detail include the electron foreshock, the ion foreshock, the quasi-parallel shock, the quasi-perpendicular shock, and the magnetosheath. Information discussed spans a broad range of disciplines, from large-scale macroscopic plasma phenomena to small-scale microphysical interactions. 184 refs.

  3. Shock Tube Measurements of Ignition Processes and Spray-Shock Wave Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-06

    of species time-histories for OH radicals and alkanes; (4) ignition delay times of n-dodecane, jet fuel and diesel using the aerosol shock tube...of n-dodecane, jet fuel and diesel using the aerosol shock tube technique; and (5) improving shock tube performance and modeling. (a) Papers... Octane and n-Heptane Oxidation,” Proceedings of the Combustion Institute 31 (2007) 321-328. T. C. Hanson, D. F. Davidson, R. K. Hanson, “Shock Induced

  4. Transient absorption spectroscopy of laser shocked explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrane, Shawn D; Dang, Nhan C; Whitley, Von H; Bolome, Cindy A; Moore, D S

    2010-01-01

    Transient absorption spectra from 390-890 nm of laser shocked RDX, PETN, sapphire, and polyvinylnitrate (PVN) at sub-nanosecond time scales are reported. RDX shows a nearly linear increase in absorption with time after shock at {approx}23 GPa. PETN is similar, but with smaller total absorption. A broad visible absorption in sapphire begins nearly immediately upon shock loading but does not build over time. PVN exhibits thin film interference in the absorption spectra along with increased absorption with time. The absorptions in RDX and PETN are suggested to originate in chemical reactions happening on picosecond time scales at these shock stresses, although further diagnostics are required to prove this interpretation.

  5. Revisiting Shock Initiation Modeling of Homogeneous Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Yehuda

    2013-04-01

    Shock initiation of homogeneous explosives has been a subject of research since the 1960s, with neat and sensitized nitromethane as the main materials for experiments. A shock initiation model of homogeneous explosives was established in the early 1960s. It involves a thermal explosion event at the shock entrance boundary, which develops into a superdetonation that overtakes the initial shock. In recent years, Sheffield and his group, using accurate experimental tools, were able to observe details of buildup of the superdetonation. There are many papers on modeling shock initiation of heterogeneous explosives, but there are only a few papers on modeling shock initiation of homogeneous explosives. In this article, bulk reaction reactive flow equations are used to model homogeneous shock initiation in an attempt to reproduce experimental data of Sheffield and his group. It was possible to reproduce the main features of the shock initiation process, including thermal explosion, superdetonation, input shock overtake, overdriven detonation after overtake, and the beginning of decay toward Chapman-Jouget (CJ) detonation. The time to overtake (TTO) as function of input pressure was also calculated and compared to the experimental TTO.

  6. Viscous shock profiles and primitive formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karni, S.

    1990-01-01

    Weak solutions of hyperbolic systems in primitive (non-conservation) form for which a consistent conservation form exists are considered. It is shown that primitive formulations, shock relations are not uniquely defined by the states to either side of the shock but also depend on the viscous path connecting the two. Scheme-dependent high order correction terms are derived that enforce consistent viscous shock profiles. The resulting primitive algorithm is conservative to the order of approximation. One dimensional Euler calculations of flows containing strong shocks clearly show that conservation errors in primitive flow calculations are of comparable quality.

  7. Shock wave equation of state of muscovite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekine, Toshimori; Rubin, Allan M.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    Shock wave data were obtained between 20 and 140 GPa for natural muscovite obtained from Methuen Township (Ontario), in order to provide a shock-wave equation of state for this crustal hydrous mineral. The shock equation of state data could be fit by a linear shock velocity (Us) versus particle velocity (Up) relation Us = 4.62 + 1.27 Up (km/s). Third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state parameters were found to be K(OS) = 52 +/-4 GPa and K-prime(OS) = 3.2 +/-0.3 GPa. These parameters are comparable to those of other hydrous minerals such as brucite, serpentine, and tremolite.

  8. Accretion shock geometries in the magnetic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockman, H. S.

    1988-01-01

    The first self consistent shock models for the AM Herculis-type systems successfully identified the dominant physical processes and their signatures. These homogenous shock models predict unpolarized, Rayleigh-Jeans optical spectra with sharp cutoffs and rising polarizations as the shocks become optically thin in the ultraviolet. However, the observed energy distributions are generally flat with intermediate polarizations over a broad optical band. These and other observational evidence support a non-homogenous accretion profile which may extend over a considerable fraction of the stellar surface. Both the fundamental assumptions underlying the canonical 1-D shock model and the extension of this model to inhomogenous accretion shocks were identified, for both radial and linear structures. The observational evidence was also examined for tall shocks and little evidence was found for relative shock heights in excess of h/R(1) greater than or equal to 0.1. For several systems, upper limits to the shock height can be obtained from either x ray or optical data. These lie in the region h/R(1) is approximately 0.01 and are in general agreement with the current physical picture for these systems. The quasi-periodic optical variations observed in several magnetic variables may eventually prove to be a major aid in further understanding their accretion shock geometries.

  9. Sub-photospheric Shocks in Relativistic Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2017-04-01

    This paper examines the mechanism of internal shocks in opaque relativistic outflows, in particular in cosmological gamma-ray bursts. The shocks produce neutrino emission and affect the observed photospheric radiation from the explosion. They develop from internal compressive waves and can be of different types depending on the composition of the outflow. (1) Shocks in “photon gas,” with negligible plasma inertia, have a unique structure determined by the force-free condition—zero radiation flux in the plasma rest frame. Radiation dominance over plasma inertia suppresses the formation of collisionless shocks mediated by collective electromagnetic fields. (2) If the outflow is sufficiently magnetized, a strong collisionless subshock develops, which is embedded in a thicker radiation-mediated structure. (3) Waves in outflows with a free neutron component lead to dissipation through nuclear collisions. At large optical depths, shocks have a thickness comparable to the neutron free path, with embedded radiation-mediated and collisionless subshocks. The paper also presents first-principles simulations of magnetized flows filled with photons, demonstrating the formation of shocks and their structure. Simple estimates show that magnetized sub-photospheric shocks are efficient producers of photons and have a great impact on the observed photospheric radiation. The shock structure changes as the outflow expands toward its photosphere. The dissipation is accompanied by strong {e}+/- pair creation, and the {e}+/- -dressed shock carries the photosphere with it up to two decades in radius, emitting a strong pulse of nonthermal radiation.

  10. Basic Shock Physiology and Critical Care.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Brian K

    2016-05-01

    Veterinarians practicing emergency medicine and/or working with exotic animals must be well versed in the pathophysiology of shock because many exotic pets present with an acute crisis or an acute manifestation of a chronic process causing poor organ perfusion. This article discusses the pathophysiology of shock and the systemic inflammatory response syndrome, which may lead to organ dysfunction, organ failure, sepsis, and death. The physiology of perfusion, perfusion measurements, categories of shock, and altered function of the immune system, gastrointestinal barrier, and coagulation system are discussed. Veterinarians providing emergency care to patients with shock must also be aware of comorbidities.

  11. Dimension limit for thermal shock failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Y. F.; Liu, Q. N.; Tian, H. J.; Lin, Z. K.; Xu, X. H.; Song, F.

    2014-08-01

    We analytically present the characteristic dimensional limit below which the thermal shock failure of ceramics never occurs. This limit, together with the critical temperature difference, separates the state space of the ceramics under thermal shock into two parts - the cracked and the uncracked. Based on the water-quench tests of ceramics, we experimentally proved that when the states of ceramics are in the uncracked region, the ceramics do not produce any cracks during thermal shock. The results provide a guide to prevent thermal shock failure in ceramic.

  12. Reclassifying the spectrum of septic patients using lactate: severe sepsis, cryptic shock, vasoplegic shock and dysoxic shock

    PubMed Central

    Ranzani, Otavio Tavares; Monteiro, Mariana Barbosa; Ferreira, Elaine Maria; Santos, Sergio Ricardo; Machado, Flavia Ribeiro; Noritomi, Danilo Teixeira

    2013-01-01

    Objective The current definition of severe sepsis and septic shock includes a heterogeneous profile of patients. Although the prognostic value of hyperlactatemia is well established, hyperlactatemia is observed in patients with and without shock. The present study aimed to compare the prognosis of septic patients by stratifying them according to two factors: hyperlactatemia and persistent hypotension. Methods The present study is a secondary analysis of an observational study conducted in ten hospitals in Brazil (Rede Amil - SP). Septic patients with initial lactate measurements in the first 6 hours of diagnosis were included and divided into 4 groups according to hyperlactatemia (lactate >4mmol/L) and persistent hypotension: (1) severe sepsis (without both criteria); (2) cryptic shock (hyperlactatemia without persistent hypotension); (3) vasoplegic shock (persistent hypotension without hyperlactatemia); and (4) dysoxic shock (both criteria). Results In total, 1,948 patients were analyzed, and the sepsis group represented 52% of the patients, followed by 28% with vasoplegic shock, 12% with dysoxic shock and 8% with cryptic shock. Survival at 28 days differed among the groups (p<0.001). Survival was highest among the severe sepsis group (69%, p<0.001 versus others), similar in the cryptic and vasoplegic shock groups (53%, p=0.39), and lowest in the dysoxic shock group (38%, p<0.001 versus others). In the adjusted analysis, the survival at 28 days remained different among the groups (p<0.001) and the dysoxic shock group exhibited the highest hazard ratio (HR=2.99, 95%CI 2.21-4.05). Conclusion The definition of sepsis includes four different profiles if we consider the presence of hyperlactatemia. Further studies are needed to better characterize septic patients, to understand the etiology and to design adequate targeted treatments. PMID:24553507

  13. A thermochemical model for shock-induced reactions (heat detonations) in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boslough, Mark B.

    1990-02-01

    Recent advances in studies of shock-induced chemistry in reactive solids have led to the recognition of a new class of energetic materials which are unique in their response to shock waves. Experimental work has shown that chemical energy can be released on a time scale shorter than shock-transit times in laboratory samples. However, for many compositions, the reaction products remain in the condensed state upon release from high pressure, and no sudden expansion takes place. Nevertheless, if such a reaction is sufficiently rapid, it can be modeled as a type of detonation, termed ``heat detonation'' in the present paper. It is shown that unlike an explosive detonation, an unsupported heat detonation will decay to zero unless certain conditions are met. An example of such a reaction is Fe2 O3 +2Al+shock→Al2 O3 +2Fe (the standard thermite reaction). A shock-wave equation of state is determined from a mixture theory for reacted and unreacted porous thermite. The calculated shock temperatures are compared to experimentally measured shock temperatures, demonstrating that a shock-induced reaction takes place. Interpretation of the measured temperature history in the context of the thermochemical model implies that the principal rate-controlling kinetic mechanism is dynamic mixing at the shock front. Despite the similarity in thermochemical modeling of heat detonations to explosive detonations, the two processes are qualitatively very different in reaction mechanism as well as in the form the energy takes upon release, with explosives producing mostly work and heat detonations producing mostly heat.

  14. Energetic Particles Associated with the Interplanetary Shock of 23 May 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2003-04-01

    We report on the elemental abundances of energetic particles associated with an interplanetary shock which passed the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft at ˜ 10:15 UT on 23 May 2002. The shock occurred during a solar energetic particle event which began at the start of 22 May, slowly rose in intensity by ˜ 3 orders of magnitude over the course of the day, and then leveled off for two additional days. Heavy elements above 14 MeV/nucleon were observed to increase by a factor of 15 and then return to the existing event level all within a period of about two hours centered on the shock. Electrons in the range 0.18 - 0.31 MeV were observed by the Electron Proton Alpha Monitor on ACE to increase by a factor of about 100 in a similar spike lasting two hours surrounding the shock. This event is unlike most ESP events due to its short duration, which in turn may be due to the fact that the shock is a perpendicular shock. The abundances of elements from He to Fe relative to O before, during, and after the shock spike are approximately coronal, with the exception of Fe which dips to as low as 0.2 times the coronal value during the spike. We will discuss the origins of the solar particle event and of the interplanetary shock as well as consider what this event tells us about the particle acceleration process. This research was supported by NASA at the Goddard Space Flight Center, the California Institute of Technology (under Grant NAG5-6912), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  15. Bow Shock Leads the Way for a Speeding Hot Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    As hot Jupiters whip around their host stars, their speeds can exceed the speed of sound in the surrounding material, theoretically causing a shock to form ahead of them. Now, a study has reported the detection of such a shock ahead of transiting exoplanet HD 189733b, providing a potential indicator of the remarkably strong magnetic field of the planet.Rushing PlanetsDue to their proximity to their hosts, hot Jupiters move very quickly through the stellar wind and corona surrounding the star. When this motion is supersonic, the material ahead of the planet can be compressed by a bow shock and for a transiting hot Jupiter, this shock will cross the face of the host star in advance of the planets transit.In a recent study, a team of researchers by Wilson Cauley of Wesleyan University report evidence of just such a pre-transit. The teams target is exoplanet HD 189733b, one of the closest hot Jupiters to our solar system. When the authors examined high-resolution transmission spectra of this system, they found that prior to the optical transit of the planet, there was a large dip in the transmission of the first three hydrogen Balmer lines. This could well be the absorption of an optically-thick bow shock as it moves past the face of the star.Tremendous MagnetismOperating under this assumption, the authors create a model of the absorption expected from a hot Jupiter transiting with a bow shock ahead of it. Using this model, they show that a shock leading the planet at a distance of 12.75 times the planets radius reproduces the key features of the transmission spectrum.This stand-off distance is surprisingly large. Assuming that the location of the bow shock is set by the point where the planets magnetospheric pressure balances the pressure of the stellar wind or corona that it passes through, the planetary magnetic field would have to be at least 28 Gauss. This is seven times the strength of Jupiters magnetic field!Understanding the magnetic fields of exoplanets is

  16. [Effects of cold-shock on the growth and flower bud differentiation of tomato seedlings under high temperature stress].

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-li; Xia, Ya-zhen; Sun, Zhi-qiang

    2016-02-01

    In order to explore the effects of cold-shock on the growth and flower bud differentiation of tomato seedlings under high temperature, tomato seedlings were subjected to cold-shock treat- ments every day with 10 °C for 10 minutes in. an artificial climate chamber. Tomato seedlings were treated with cold-shock at the first true leaf stage and the treatment lasted for 15 days. Tomato seed- lings without cold-shock were used as control. At the fourth true leaf period of tomato seedlings, five plants were randomly sampled and the growth characteristics and the ultrastructure changes of meso- phyll cell of tomato seedlings were examined. The flower bud differentiation process of tomato seed- lings was observed at the periods of the second, fourth and sixth true leaves respectively. Flowering and fruiting of tomato seedlings were also investigated after transplanting. The results showed that the stem diameter and health index of tomato seedlings with cold-shock were enhanced by 7.2% and 55.5% compared with seedlings without cold-shock. Mesophyll cells of the seedlings with cold-shock arranged loosely and various organelles such as chloroplasts and mitochondria were morphologically integrated, while chloroplasts and mitochondria of seedlings mesophyll cells without cold-shock swelled up and thylakoids vacuolized apparently. The flower bud differentiation process of seedlings with cold-shock could be advanced significantly at the early seedling stage compared with the control and the advancement was weakened with the seedling growing. Fruit set number and percentage on the first and second inflorescence of tomato plants transplanted by seedlings with cold-shock were enhanced significantly compared with those of the control. These results indicated that the injury of membrane structure of various organelles, especially chloroplast and mitochondria could be allevia- ted by cold-shock treatment under high temperature tress. Cold-shock treatment could not only im- prove the

  17. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  18. [Traumatic shock--physiopathologic aspects].

    PubMed

    Fabiano, G; Pezzolla, A; Filograna, M A; Ferrarese, F

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic shock is a complex phenomenon that represents the culminating element of a series of events. It is, in fact, the outcome of an imbalance-decompensation of the organism's defence mechanisms, in which the oxygen supply to the mitochondria is hampered by a macro and/or microcirculation failure. Basically, it is a form of hypovolemic shock in which further factors have a role, including the activation of inflammation mediators. It should also be stressed that part of the cellular damage is caused by tissue reperfusion. Good hemodynamic compensation is maintained with loss of up to 30% of the circulation mass but, beyond this amount, a fall of the cardiac index, peripheral pO2, and an increase of blood lactates will ensue. Hypoxia causes capillary injury and increased permeability, resulting in the formation of edema and finally in loss of the self-regulating power of the microcirculation. Moreover, it strongly stimulates pro-inflammatory activation of the macrophages and the release of vasoactive substances, such as prostaglandins and thromboxanes. The inflammatory response is triggered by cascade systems (such as the complement, coagulation, kinins, fibrinolysis), cell elements (endothelium, leukocytes, macrophages, monocytes, mast cells) and the release of mediators (cytokines, proteolytic enzymes, histamine, etc.) and others interacting factors. In severe trauma, the inflammatory process extends beyond the local limits, maintaining and aggravating the state of shock and causing a Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS), with involvement and injury of healthy organs and tissues even at a distance from the site of trauma, raising a risk of onset of ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome), sepsis, MODS (Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome). Tissue reperfusion (reoxygenation) also induces the production of toxic metabolites, such as hydroxylated anions, superoxide, hydrogen peroxide: peroxidation of the phospholipid cell membranes alters the barrier

  19. Evidence for confinement of low-energy cosmic rays ahead of interplanetary shock waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmeira, R. A. R.; Allum, F. R.

    1973-01-01

    Short-lived (about 15 min), low-energy proton increases associated with the passage of interplanetary shock waves have been previously reported. In the present paper, we have examined in a fine time scale (about 1 min) the concurrent particle and magnetic field data, taken by detectors on Explorer 34, for four of these events. Our results further support the view that these impulsive events are due to confinement of the solar cosmic-ray particles in the region just ahead (about 1,000,000 km) of the advancing shock front.

  20. Culture-Shock and Reverse-Culture Shock: Implications for Juniors Abroad and Seniors at Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, John T.

    Thousands of college seniors who have returned from their junior year abroad may be enduring "reverse culture shock" or "reentry crisis." Social psychology and sociology, in the form of "sojourn research," has derived a developmental, stage specific model of culture shock and reverse culture shock, similar to the grieving process identified by…

  1. Investigation of shock focusing in a cavity with incident shock diffracted by an obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Chen, X.; He, L.-M.; Rong, K.; Deiterding, R.

    2017-03-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations were carried out in order to investigate the focusing of a shock wave in a test section after the incident shock has been diffracted by an obstacle. A conventional shock tube was used to generate the planar shock. Incident shock Mach numbers of 1.4 and 2.1 were tested. A high-speed camera was employed to obtain schlieren photos of the flow field in the experiments. In the numerical simulations, a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme of third-order accuracy supplemented with structured dynamic mesh adaptation was adopted to simulate the shock wave interaction. Good agreement between experiments and numerical results is observed. The configurations exhibit shock reflection phenomena, shock-vortex interaction and—in particular—shock focusing. The pressure history in the cavity apex was recorded and compared with the numerical results. A quantitative analysis of the numerically observed shock reflection configurations is also performed by employing a pseudo-steady shock transition boundary calculation technique. Regular reflection, single Mach reflection and transitional Mach reflection phenomena are observed and are found to correlate well with analytic predictions from shock reflection theory.

  2. Relativistic shock spectra: A prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. I.

    1994-01-01

    I argue that particles heated by relativistic shocks should assume an equilibrium energy distribution. This leads to a synchrotron spectrum F(sub nu) varies as nu(sup 1/3) up to approximately the critical frequency nu(sub 0) of an electron with the mean electron energy. Application to gamma ray bursts (GRB's) implies that a burst with 10(exp -5) erg/(sq cm s) of soft gamma-rays and h(nu(sub 0)) = 300 KeV should be about 18th magnitude in visible light and a few micro-Jy at 1 GHz (less if self-absorbed).

  3. Adaptive inertial shock-absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraj, Rami; Holnicki-Szulc, Jan; Knap, Lech; Seńko, Jarosław

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces and discusses a new concept of impact absorption by means of impact energy management and storage in dedicated rotating inertial discs. The effectiveness of the concept is demonstrated in a selected case-study involving spinning management, a recently developed novel impact-absorber. A specific control technique performed on this device is demonstrated to be the main source of significant improvement in the overall efficiency of impact damping process. The influence of various parameters on the performance of the shock-absorber is investigated. Design and manufacturing challenges and directions of further research are formulated.

  4. Self-Regulating Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J.

    1995-01-01

    Mechanical shock absorber keeps frictional damping force within tolerable limit. Its damping force does not increase with coefficient of friction between energy-absorbing components; rather, frictional damping force varies only slightly. Relatively insensitive to manufacturing variations and environmental conditions altering friction. Does not exhibit high breakaway friction and consequent sharp increase followed by sharp decrease in damping force at beginning of stroking. Damping force in absorber does not vary appreciably with speed of stroking. In addition, not vulnerable to leakage of hydraulic fluid.

  5. Advanced Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Mike; Nelms, Rick

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study that explores the depth and breadth of scientific facts, principles, and procedures which are required in the Advanced General National Vocational Qualifications (GNVQ) science through comparison with GCE Advanced level. The final report takes account of the updated 1996 version of GNVQ science. (DDR)

  6. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... How to Peform CPR Use “ICE” in Your Cell Phone Prepare for Disasters Communication With Your Family And ... the person unless he or she is in danger. Make sure the person is breathing and has ...

  7. Converging shocks in elastic-plastic solids.

    PubMed

    Ortega, A López; Lombardini, M; Hill, D J

    2011-11-01

    We present an approximate description of the behavior of an elastic-plastic material processed by a cylindrically or spherically symmetric converging shock, following Whitham's shock dynamics theory. Originally applied with success to various gas dynamics problems, this theory is presently derived for solid media, in both elastic and plastic regimes. The exact solutions of the shock dynamics equations obtained reproduce well the results obtained by high-resolution numerical simulations. The examined constitutive laws share a compressible neo-Hookean structure for the internal energy e=e(s)(I(1))+e(h)(ρ,ς), where e(s) accounts for shear through the first invariant of the Cauchy-Green tensor, and e(h) represents the hydrostatic contribution as a function of the density ρ and entropy ς. In the strong-shock limit, reached as the shock approaches the axis or origin r=0, we show that compression effects are dominant over shear deformations. For an isothermal constitutive law, i.e., e(h)=e(h)(ρ), with a power-law dependence e(h) is proportional to ρ(α), shock dynamics predicts that for a converging shock located at r=R(t) at time t, the Mach number increases as M is proportional to [log(1/R)](α), independently of the space index s, where s=2 in cylindrical geometry and 3 in spherical geometry. An alternative isothermal constitutive law with p(ρ) of the arctanh type, which enforces a finite density in the strong-shock limit, leads to M is proportional to R(-(s-1)) for strong shocks. A nonisothermal constitutive law, whose hydrostatic part e(h) is that of an ideal gas, is also tested, recovering the strong-shock limit M is proportional to R(-(s-1)/n(γ)) originally derived by Whitham for perfect gases, where γ is inherently related to the maximum compression ratio that the material can reach, (γ+1)/(γ-1). From these strong-shock limits, we also estimate analytically the density, radial velocity, pressure, and sound speed immediately behind the shock. While the

  8. Converging shocks in elastic-plastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ortega, A.; Lombardini, M.; Hill, D. J.

    2011-11-01

    We present an approximate description of the behavior of an elastic-plastic material processed by a cylindrically or spherically symmetric converging shock, following Whitham's shock dynamics theory. Originally applied with success to various gas dynamics problems, this theory is presently derived for solid media, in both elastic and plastic regimes. The exact solutions of the shock dynamics equations obtained reproduce well the results obtained by high-resolution numerical simulations. The examined constitutive laws share a compressible neo-Hookean structure for the internal energy e=es(I1)+eh(ρ,ς), where es accounts for shear through the first invariant of the Cauchy-Green tensor, and eh represents the hydrostatic contribution as a function of the density ρ and entropy ς. In the strong-shock limit, reached as the shock approaches the axis or origin r=0, we show that compression effects are dominant over shear deformations. For an isothermal constitutive law, i.e., eh=eh(ρ), with a power-law dependence eh∝ρα, shock dynamics predicts that for a converging shock located at r=R(t) at time t, the Mach number increases as M∝[log(1/R)]α, independently of the space index s, where s=2 in cylindrical geometry and 3 in spherical geometry. An alternative isothermal constitutive law with p(ρ) of the arctanh type, which enforces a finite density in the strong-shock limit, leads to M∝R-(s-1) for strong shocks. A nonisothermal constitutive law, whose hydrostatic part eh is that of an ideal gas, is also tested, recovering the strong-shock limit M∝R-(s-1)/n(γ) originally derived by Whitham for perfect gases, where γ is inherently related to the maximum compression ratio that the material can reach, (γ+1)/(γ-1). From these strong-shock limits, we also estimate analytically the density, radial velocity, pressure, and sound speed immediately behind the shock. While the hydrostatic part of the energy essentially commands the strong-shock behavior, the shear

  9. Laser-Driven Magnetized Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Derek

    2016-10-01

    Collisionless shocks - supersonic plasma flows in which the interaction length scale is much shorter than the collisional mean free path - are common phenomena in space and astrophysical systems, including the solar wind, coronal mass ejections, supernovae remnants, and the jets of active galactic nuclei. These systems have been studied for decades, and in many the shocks are believed to efficiently accelerate particles to some of the highest observed energies. Only recently, however, have laser and diagnostic capabilities evolved sufficiently to allow the detailed study in the laboratory of the microphysics of collisionless shocks over a large parameter regime. We present experiments that demonstrate the formation of collisionless shocks utilizing the Phoenix laser laboratory and the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. We also show recent observations of magnetized collisionless shocks on the Omega EP laser facility that extend the LAPD results to higher laser energy, background magnetic field, and ambient plasma density, and that may be relevant to recent experiments on strongly driven magnetic reconnection. Lastly, we discuss a new experimental regime for shocks with results from high-repetition (1 Hz), volumetric laser-driven measurements on the LAPD. These large parameter scales allow us to probe the formation physics of collisionless shocks over several Alfvénic Mach numbers (MA), from shock precursors (magnetosonic solitons with MA < 1) to subcritical (MA < 3) and supercritical (MA > 3) shocks. The results show that collisionless shocks can be generated using a laser-driven magnetic piston, and agree well with both 2D and 3D hybrid and PIC simulations. Additionally, using radiation-hydrodynamic modeling and measurements from multiple diagnostics, the different shock regimes are characterized with dimensionless formation parameters, allowing us to place disparate experiments in a common and predictive framework.

  10. Acceleration of positrons in supernova shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.

    1992-01-01

    During this project we investigated the acceleration of leptons (electrons and positrons) in collisionless shock waves. In particular, we were interested in how leptons are accelerated in the blast waves existing in the remnants of supernova explosions. Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been considered as the most likely source of galactic cosmic rays but no definite connection between SNRs and the cosmic rays seen at earth can be made. Only by understanding lepton acceleration in shocks can the rich SNR data base be properly used to understand cosmic ray origins. Our project was directed at the neglected aspects of lepton acceleration. We showed that the efficiency of lepton acceleration depended critically on the lepton injection energy. We showed that, even when infection effects are not important, that proton and lepton distribution functions produced by shocks are quite different in the critical energy range for producing the observed synchrotron emission. We also showed that transrelativistic effects produced proton spectra that were not in agreement with standard results from radio observations, but that the lepton spectra were, in fact, consistent with observations. We performed simulations of relativistic shocks (shocks where the flow speed is a sizable fraction of the speed of light) and discovered some interesting effects. We first demonstrated the power of the Monte Carlo technique by determining the shock jump conditions in relativistic shocks. We then proceeded to determine how relativistic shocks accelerate particles. We found that nonlinear relativistic shocks treat protons and leptons even more differently than nonrelativistic shocks. The transrelativistic effects on the shock structure from the heavy ion component reduces the lepton acceleration to a tiny fraction of the ion acceleration. This effect is dramatic even if high energy leptons (many times thermal energy) are injected, and was totally unexpected. Our results have important

  11. Shock Wave Technology and Application: An Update☆

    PubMed Central

    Rassweiler, Jens J.; Knoll, Thomas; Köhrmann, Kai-Uwe; McAteer, James A.; Lingeman, James E.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Bailey, Michael R.; Chaussy, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Context The introduction of new lithotripters has increased problems associated with shock wave application. Recent studies concerning mechanisms of stone disintegration, shock wave focusing, coupling, and application have appeared that may address some of these problems. Objective To present a consensus with respect to the physics and techniques used by urologists, physicists, and representatives of European lithotripter companies. Evidence acquisition We reviewed recent literature (PubMed, Embase, Medline) that focused on the physics of shock waves, theories of stone disintegration, and studies on optimising shock wave application. In addition, we used relevant information from a consensus meeting of the German Society of Shock Wave Lithotripsy. Evidence synthesis Besides established mechanisms describing initial fragmentation (tear and shear forces, spallation, cavitation, quasi-static squeezing), the model of dynamic squeezing offers new insight in stone comminution. Manufacturers have modified sources to either enlarge the focal zone or offer different focal sizes. The efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) can be increased by lowering the pulse rate to 60–80 shock waves/min and by ramping the shock wave energy. With the water cushion, the quality of coupling has become a critical factor that depends on the amount, viscosity, and temperature of the gel. Fluoroscopy time can be reduced by automated localisation or the use of optical and acoustic tracking systems. There is a trend towards larger focal zones and lower shock wave pressures. Conclusions New theories for stone disintegration favour the use of shock wave sources with larger focal zones. Use of slower pulse rates, ramping strategies, and adequate coupling of the shock wave head can significantly increase the efficacy and safety of ESWL. PMID:21354696

  12. Shock finding on a moving-mesh - II. Hydrodynamic shocks in the Illustris universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, Kevin; Springel, Volker; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Pfrommer, Christoph; Nelson, Dylan; Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Pillepich, Annalisa; Sijacki, Debora; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-10-01

    Hydrodynamical shocks are a manifestation of the non-linearity of the Euler equations and play a fundamental role in cosmological gas dynamics. In this work, we identify and analyse shocks in the Illustris simulation, and contrast the results with those of non-radiative runs. We show that simulations with more comprehensive physical models of galaxy formation pose new challenges for shock finding algorithms due to radiative cooling and star-forming processes, prompting us to develop a number of methodology improvements. We find in Illustris a total shock surface area which is about 1.4 times larger at the present epoch compared to non-radiative runs, and an energy dissipation rate at shocks which is higher by a factor of around 7. Remarkably, shocks with Mach numbers above and below mathcal {M}≈ 10 contribute about equally to the total dissipation across cosmic time. This is in sharp contrast to non-radiative simulations, and we demonstrate that a large part of the difference arises due to strong black hole radio-mode feedback in Illustris. We also provide an overview of the large diversity of shock morphologies, which includes complex networks of halo-internal shocks, shocks on to cosmic sheets, feedback shocks due to black holes and galactic winds, as well as ubiquitous accretion shocks. In high-redshift systems more massive than 1012 M⊙, we discover the existence of a double accretion shock pattern in haloes. They are created when gas streams along filaments without being shocked at the outer accretion shock, but then forms a second, roughly spherical accretion shock further inside.

  13. Shear shocks in fragile networks.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Stephan; Upadhyaya, Nitin; van Opheusden, Bas; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2013-12-24

    A minimal model for studying the mechanical properties of amorphous solids is a disordered network of point masses connected by unbreakable springs. At a critical value of its mean connectivity, such a network becomes fragile: it undergoes a rigidity transition signaled by a vanishing shear modulus and transverse sound speed. We investigate analytically and numerically the linear and nonlinear visco-elastic response of these fragile solids by probing how shear fronts propagate through them. Our approach, which we tentatively label shear front rheology, provides an alternative route to standard oscillatory rheology. In the linear regime, we observe at late times a diffusive broadening of the fronts controlled by an effective shear viscosity that diverges at the critical point. No matter how small the microscopic coefficient of dissipation, strongly disordered networks behave as if they were overdamped because energy is irreversibly leaked into diverging nonaffine fluctuations. Close to the transition, the regime of linear response becomes vanishingly small: the tiniest shear strains generate strongly nonlinear shear shock waves qualitatively different from their compressional counterparts in granular media. The inherent nonlinearities trigger an energy cascade from low to high frequency components that keep the network away from attaining the quasi-static limit. This mechanism, reminiscent of acoustic turbulence, causes a superdiffusive broadening of the shock width.

  14. Very low shock release pyromechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulier, Grégory; Gaechter, J. Pierre

    2003-09-01

    Pyromechanisms have long been used in space for launchers and satellites applications, particularly for release or separation purposes, such as bolt cutters, release nuts, pyrovalves, etc. They offer a great variety of uses, a high potential between the power supplied and the weight on board with, at the same time, a high reliability. However, they also feature a drawback due to the high dynamics generated by their functioning. Pyroshocks levels may damage adjacent sensible equipments (eg electronic boxes, reaction wheels,...) and require to design damping systems or to remove those equipments from the shock source. In a mechanism using standard pyrodevices, shock generation comes from three sources: 1. Pyrotechnic reaction. 2. Energy from internal parts in motion. 3. The release of structural constraints. Devices developed by E. LACROIX have the objectives to avoid the two last ones by: Using heat and gas generated by pyrotechnic effects. Reducing speed of parts in motion. Reducing release speed of mechanical constraints. In this paper, LACROIX presents two products named "PYROSOFT" and "VIROSOFT " designed by LACROIX and supported by CNES Toulouse (French Space Agency). R&T contracts.

  15. Cavitation in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Evan, Andrew P.; McAteer, James A.; Colonius, Tim; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2003-10-01

    A case is presented for the important role of cavitation in stone comminution and tissue injury in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). Confocal hydrophones and a coincidence algorithm were used to detect cavitation in kidney parenchyma. Elevated hydrostatic pressure dissolved cavitation nuclei and suppressed cell injury and stone comminution in vitro. A low-insertion-loss, thin, mylar film nearly eliminated stone erosion and crack formation only when in direct contact with the stone. This result indicates not only that cavitation is important in both cracking and erosion but also that bubbles act at the surface. Time inversion of the shock wave by use of a pressure-release reflector reduced the calculated pressure at bubble collapse and the measured depth of bubble-induced pits in aluminum. Correspondingly tissue injury in vivo was nearly eliminated. Cavitation was localized and intensified by the use of synchronously triggered, facing lithotripters. This dual pulse lithotripter enhanced comminution at its focus and reduced lysis in surrounding blood samples. The enhancement of comminution was lost when stones were placed in glycerol, which retarded bubble implosion. Thus, cavitation is important in comminution and injury and can be controlled to optimize efficacy and safety. [Work supported by NIH DK43381, DK55674, and FIRCA.

  16. Shock compression profiles in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Moody, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    An investigation of the shock compression properties of high-strength ceramics has been performed using controlled planar impact techniques. In a typical experimental configuration, a ceramic target disc is held stationary, and it is struck by plates of either a similar ceramic or by plates of a well-characterized metal. All tests were performed using either a single-stage propellant gun or a two-stage light-gas gun. Particle velocity histories were measured with laser velocity interferometry (VISAR) at the interface between the back of the target ceramic and a calibrated VISAR window material. Peak impact stresses achieved in these experiments range from about 3 to 70 GPa. Ceramics tested under shock impact loading include: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. This report compiles the VISAR wave profiles and experimental impact parameters within a database-useful for response model development, computational model validation studies, and independent assessment of the physics of dynamic deformation on high-strength, brittle solids.

  17. Optical observation of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in high intensity laser-induced shock processes.

    PubMed

    Martí-López, L; Ocaña, R; Porro, J A; Morales, M; Ocaña, J L

    2009-07-01

    We report an experimental study of the temporal and spatial dynamics of shock waves, cavitation bubbles, and sound waves generated in water during laser shock processing by single Nd:YAG laser pulses of nanosecond duration. A fast ICCD camera (2 ns gate time) was employed to record false schlieren photographs, schlieren photographs, and Mach-Zehnder interferograms of the zone surrounding the laser spot site on the target, an aluminum alloy sample. We recorded hemispherical shock fronts, cylindrical shock fronts, plane shock fronts, cavitation bubbles, and phase disturbance tracks.

  18. Development of a shock noise prediction code for high-speed helicopters - The subsonically moving shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadghighi, H.; Holz, R.; Farassat, F.; Lee, Yung-Jang

    1991-01-01

    A previously defined airfoil subsonic shock-noise prediction formula whose result depends on a mapping of the time-dependent shock surface to a time-independent computational domain is presently coded and incorporated in the NASA-Langley rotor-noise prediction code, WOPWOP. The structure and algorithms used in the shock-noise prediction code are presented; special care has been taken to reduce computation time while maintaining accuracy. Numerical examples of shock-noise prediction are presented for hover and forward flight. It is confirmed that shock noise is an important component of the quadrupole source.

  19. Optical observation of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in high intensity laser-induced shock processes

    SciTech Connect

    Marti-Lopez, L.; Ocana, R.; Porro, J. A.; Morales, M.; Ocana, J. L.

    2009-07-01

    We report an experimental study of the temporal and spatial dynamics of shock waves, cavitation bubbles, and sound waves generated in water during laser shock processing by single Nd:YAG laser pulses of nanosecond duration. A fast ICCD camera (2 ns gate time) was employed to record false schlieren photographs, schlieren photographs, and Mach-Zehnder interferograms of the zone surrounding the laser spot site on the target, an aluminum alloy sample. We recorded hemispherical shock fronts, cylindrical shock fronts, plane shock fronts, cavitation bubbles, and phase disturbance tracks.

  20. Plasma Shock Wave Modification Experiments in a Temperature Compensated Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vine, Frances J.; Mankowski, John J.; Saeks, Richard E.; Chow, Alan S.

    2003-01-01

    A number of researchers have observed that the intensity of a shock wave is reduced when it passes through a weakly ionized plasma. While there is little doubt that the intensity of a shock is reduced when it propagates through a weakly ionized plasma, the major question associated with the research is whether the reduction in shock wave intensity is due to the plasma or the concomitant heating of the flow by the plasma generator. The goal of this paper is to describe a temperature compensated experiment in a "large" diameter shock tube with an external heating source, used to control the temperature in the shock tube independently of the plasma density.

  1. Biological Effects of Shock Waves on Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Janardhanraj, S.; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; Gopalan, Jagadeesh

    Shock waves have been successfully used for disintegrating kidney stones[1], noninvasive angiogenic approach[2] and for the treatment of osteoporosis[3]. Recently shock waves have been used to treat different medical conditions including intestinal anastomosis[4], wound healing[5], Kienböck's disease[6] and articular cartilage defects[7].

  2. Collisionless Electrostatic Shock Modeling and Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-21

    effects difficult for theoretical prediction, • Wave Dispersion • Wave-Particle Interaction • Various Wave Dissipation Mechanisms – Shock structure is an...unlimited. PA#16490 Details on Shock Physics Sources of Collisionless Wave Dissipation – Landau Damping: ● A form of wave-particle resonance. Resonant

  3. Benjamin Franklin and Shock-Induced Amnesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finger, Stanley; Zaromb, Franklin

    2006-01-01

    Shock-induced amnesia received considerable attention after Cerletti popularized electroconvulsive shock therapy in the late 1930s. Yet, often overlooked is the fact that Benjamin Franklin recognized that passing electricity through the head could affect memory for the traumatic event. Franklin described his findings on himself and others in…

  4. Resuscitation of traumatic shock: a hemodynamic review.

    PubMed

    Cottingham, Christine A

    2006-01-01

    Shock, or tissue hypoperfusion, is a frequent complication from traumatic injury. Despite the etiology of the shock state, there is always some component of hypovolemia. The body's innate ability to compensate for impaired perfusion may mask clinical signs, leading to delays in treatment. This article presents an overview of these compensatory mechanisms and resuscitation strategies from the vantage point of routine hemodynamic monitoring.

  5. Shock wave interactions with liquid sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, H.; Eliasson, V.

    2017-04-01

    Shock wave interactions with a liquid sheet are investigated by impacting planar liquid sheets of varying thicknesses with a planar shock wave. A square frame was designed to hold a rectangular liquid sheet, with a thickness of 5 or 10 mm, using plastic membranes and cotton wires to maintain the planar shape and minimize bulge. The flat liquid sheet, consisting of either water or a cornstarch and water mixture, was suspended in the test section of a shock tube. Incident shock waves with Mach numbers of M_s = 1.34 and 1.46 were considered. A schlieren technique with a high-speed camera was used to visualize the shock wave interaction with the liquid sheets. High-frequency pressure sensors were used to measure wave speed, overpressure, and impulse both upstream and downstream of the liquid sheet. Results showed that no transmitted shock wave could be observed through the liquid sheets, but compression waves induced by the shock-accelerated liquid coalesced into a shock wave farther downstream. A thicker liquid sheet resulted in a lower peak overpressure and impulse, and a cornstarch suspension sheet showed a higher attenuation factor compared to a water sheet.

  6. 33 CFR 159.105 - Shock test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Shock test. 159.105 Section 159.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.105 Shock test. The device, with...

  7. 33 CFR 159.105 - Shock test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Shock test. 159.105 Section 159.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.105 Shock test. The device, with...

  8. Vibrational energy transfer in shocked molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Joe

    2010-01-07

    We consider the process of establishing thermal equilibrium behind an ideal shock front in molecular crystals and its possible role in initiating chemical reaction at high shock pressures. A new theory of equilibration via multiphonon energy transfer is developed to treat the scattering of shock-induced phonons into internal molecular vibrations. Simple analytic forms are derived for the change in this energy transfer at different Hugoniot end states following shock compression. The total time required for thermal equilibration is found to be an order of magnitude or faster than proposed in previous work; in materials representative of explosive molecular crystals, equilibration is predicted to occur within a few picoseconds following the passage of an ideal shock wave. Recent molecular dynamics calculations are consistent with these time scales. The possibility of defect-induced temperature localization due purely to nonequilibrium phonon processes is studied by means of a simple model of the strain field around an inhomogeneity. The specific case of immobile straight dislocations is studied, and a region of enhanced energy transfer on the order of 5 nm is found. Due to the rapid establishment of thermal equilibrium, these regions are unrelated to the shock sensitivity of a material but may allow temperature localization at high shock pressures. Results also suggest that if any decomposition due to molecular collisions is occurring within the shock front itself, these collisions are not enhanced by any nonequilibrium thermal state.

  9. Slow shocks in coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that slow-mode shock compression may produce at least some of the increased brightness observed at the leading edge of coronal mass ejections is investigated. Among the reasons given for the possible existence of slow shocks are the following: (1) transient velocities are often greater than the upstream sound speed but less than the Alfven speed, (2) the presence of a slow shock is consistent with the flat top observed in some transients, and (3) the lateral extension of slow shocks may be responsible for distributing adjacent structures as also seen on the observations. It is shown that there may be some difficulties with this suggestion for transients originating inside the closed-field region at the base of a preexisting coronal streamer. First of all, slow mode characteristics have difficulty emerging from the closed-field region at the streamer base so they can merge to form a slow shock, unless a preceding, large-amplitude disturbance opens the field lines. In addition, a slow shock cannot exist at the center of the streamer current sheet. Finally, numerical simulations demonstrate that at least the last two (and possibly all) of the above reasons for slow shocks can be satisfied by a disturbance whose leading edge propagates at the local fast-mode speed without any shocks. The leading portion of the transient that would be seen in white-light coronagraphs propagates at a speed either less than or equal to the fast-mode speed.

  10. 33 CFR 159.105 - Shock test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Shock test. 159.105 Section 159.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.105 Shock test. The device, with...

  11. RECOLLIMATION SHOCKS IN MAGNETIZED RELATIVISTIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Rezzolla, Luciano; Gómez, Jose L.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Meli, Athina; Hardee, Philip E.

    2015-08-10

    We have performed two-dimensional special-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of non-equilibrium over-pressured relativistic jets in cylindrical geometry. Multiple stationary recollimation shock and rarefaction structures are produced along the jet by the nonlinear interaction of shocks and rarefaction waves excited at the interface between the jet and the surrounding ambient medium. Although initially the jet is kinematically dominated, we have considered axial, toroidal, and helical magnetic fields to investigate the effects of different magnetic-field topologies and strengths on the recollimation structures. We find that an axial field introduces a larger effective gas pressure and leads to stronger recollimation shocks and rarefactions, resulting in larger flow variations. The jet boost grows quadratically with the initial magnetic field. On the other hand, a toroidal field leads to weaker recollimation shocks and rarefactions, significantly modifying the jet structure after the first recollimation rarefaction and shock. The jet boost decreases systematically. For a helical field, instead, the behavior depends on the magnetic pitch, with a phenomenology that ranges between the one seen for axial and toroidal magnetic fields, respectively. In general, however, a helical magnetic field yields a more complex shock and rarefaction substructure close to the inlet that significantly modifies the jet structure. The differences in shock structure resulting from different field configurations and strengths may have observable consequences for disturbances propagating through a stationary recollimation shock.

  12. 33 CFR 159.105 - Shock test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Shock test. 159.105 Section 159.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.105 Shock test. The device, with...

  13. Reformation and Microinstabilities at Perpendicular Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, T.; Kidani, Y.; Matsukiyo, S.; Yamazaki, R.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale two-dimensional (2D) full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are carried out for studying the relationship between the dynamics of a perpendicular shock and microinstabilities generated at the shock foot. The structure and dynamics of collisionless shocks are generally determined by Alfven Mach number and plasma beta, while microinstabilities at the shock foot are controlled by the ratio of the upstream bulk velocity to the electron thermal velocity and the ratio of the plasma-to-cyclotron frequency. With a fixed Alfven Mach number and plasma beta, the ratio of the upstream bulk velocity to the electron thermal velocity is given as a function of the ion-to-electron mass ratio. The present 2D full PIC simulations with a relatively low Alfven Mach number (MA ˜ 6) show that the modified two-stream instability is dominant with higher ion-to-electron mass ratios. It is also confirmed that waves propagating downstream are more enhanced at the shock foot near the shock ramp as the mass ratio becomes higher. The result suggests that these waves play a role in the modification of the dynamics of collisionless shocks through the interaction with shock front ripples.

  14. Shock-induced melting and rapid solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Gourdin, W.H.; Maple, M.B.

    1987-08-01

    Model calculations are presented to estimate that approx.50 GPa is required to completely shock melt metal powders with quenching at rates up to 10/sup 8/ K/s. Experiments are discussed for powders of a Cu-Zr alloy compacted in the usual way at 16 GPa and melted by shocking to 60 GPa. 12 refs.

  15. Recollimation Shocks in Magnetized Relativistic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Gómez, Jose L.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Meli, Athina; Hardee, Philip E.; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2015-08-01

    We have performed two-dimensional special-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of non-equilibrium over-pressured relativistic jets in cylindrical geometry. Multiple stationary recollimation shock and rarefaction structures are produced along the jet by the nonlinear interaction of shocks and rarefaction waves excited at the interface between the jet and the surrounding ambient medium. Although initially the jet is kinematically dominated, we have considered axial, toroidal, and helical magnetic fields to investigate the effects of different magnetic-field topologies and strengths on the recollimation structures. We find that an axial field introduces a larger effective gas pressure and leads to stronger recollimation shocks and rarefactions, resulting in larger flow variations. The jet boost grows quadratically with the initial magnetic field. On the other hand, a toroidal field leads to weaker recollimation shocks and rarefactions, significantly modifying the jet structure after the first recollimation rarefaction and shock. The jet boost decreases systematically. For a helical field, instead, the behavior depends on the magnetic pitch, with a phenomenology that ranges between the one seen for axial and toroidal magnetic fields, respectively. In general, however, a helical magnetic field yields a more complex shock and rarefaction substructure close to the inlet that significantly modifies the jet structure. The differences in shock structure resulting from different field configurations and strengths may have observable consequences for disturbances propagating through a stationary recollimation shock.

  16. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Gaseous Argon Shock Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Daniel; Dattelbaum, Dana; Goodwin, Peter; Morris, John; Sheffield, Stephen; Burkett, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The lack of published Argon gas shock data motivated an evaluation of the Argon Equation of State (EOS) in gas phase initial density regimes never before reached. In particular, these regimes include initial pressures in the range of 200-500 psi (0.025 - 0.056 g/cc) and initial shock velocities around 0.2 cm/ μs. The objective of the numerical evaluation was to develop a physical understanding of the EOS behavior of shocked and subsequently multiply re-shocked Argon gas initially pressurized to 200-500 psi through Pagosa numerical hydrodynamic simulations utilizing the SESAME equation of state. Pagosa is a Los Alamos National Laboratory 2-D and 3-D Eulerian hydrocode capable of modeling high velocity compressible flow with multiple materials. The approach involved the use of gas gun experiments to evaluate the shock and multiple re-shock behavior of pressurized Argon gas to validate Pagosa simulations and the SESAME EOS. Additionally, the diagnostic capability within the experiments allowed for the EOS to be fully constrained with measured shock velocity, particle velocity and temperature. The simulations demonstrate excellent agreement with the experiments in the shock velocity/particle velocity space, but note unanticipated differences in the ionization front temperatures.

  17. Mechanochemistry for shock wave energy dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, William L.; Ren, Yi; Moore, Jeffrey S.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2017-01-01

    Using a laser-driven flyer-plate apparatus to launch 75 μm thick Al flyers up to 2.8 km/s, we developed a technique for detecting the attenuation of shock waves by mechanically-driven chemical reactions. The attenuating sample was spread on an ultrathin Au mirror deposited onto a glass window having a known Hugoniot. As shock energy exited the sample and passed through the mirror, into the glass, photonic Doppler velocimetry monitored the velocity profile of the ultrathin mirror. Knowing the window Hugoniot, the velocity profile could be quantitatively converted into a shock energy flux or fluence. The flux gave the temporal profile of the shock front, and showed how the shock front was reshaped by passing through the dissipative medium. The fluence, the time-integrated flux, showed how much shock energy was transmitted through the sample. Samples consisted of microgram quantities of carefully engineered organic compounds selected for their potential to undergo negative-volume chemistry. Post mortem analytical methods were used to confirm that shock dissipation was associated with shock-induced chemical reactions.

  18. Existence Regions of Shock Wave Triple Configurations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulat, Pavel V.; Chernyshev, Mikhail V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research is to create the classification for shock wave triple configurations and their existence regions of various types: type 1, type 2, type 3. Analytical solutions for limit Mach numbers and passing shock intensity that define existence region of every type of triple configuration have been acquired. The ratios that conjugate…

  19. PRECURSORS TO INTERSTELLAR SHOCKS OF SOLAR ORIGIN

    SciTech Connect

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Stone, E. C.; Cummings, A. C.; Krimigis, S. M.; Decker, R. B.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2015-08-20

    On or about 2012 August 25, the Voyager 1 spacecraft crossed the heliopause into the nearby interstellar plasma. In the nearly three years that the spacecraft has been in interstellar space, three notable particle and field disturbances have been observed, each apparently associated with a shock wave propagating outward from the Sun. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the third and most impressive of these disturbances, with brief comparisons to the two previous events, both of which have been previously reported. The shock responsible for the third event was first detected on 2014 February 17 by the onset of narrowband radio emissions from the approaching shock, followed on 2014 May 13 by the abrupt appearance of intense electron plasma oscillations generated by electrons streaming outward ahead of the shock. Finally, the shock arrived on 2014 August 25, as indicated by a jump in the magnetic field strength and the plasma density. Various disturbances in the intensity and anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays were also observed ahead of the shock, some of which are believed to be caused by the reflection and acceleration of cosmic rays by the magnetic field jump at the shock, and/or by interactions with upstream plasma waves. Comparisons to the two previous weaker events show somewhat similar precursor effects, although differing in certain details. Many of these effects are very similar to those observed in the region called the “foreshock” that occurs upstream of planetary bow shocks, only on a vastly larger spatial scale.

  20. Floating shock fitting via Lagrangian adaptive meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanrosendale, John

    1994-01-01

    In recent works we have formulated a new approach to compressible flow simulation, combining the advantages of shock-fitting and shock-capturing. Using a cell-centered Roe scheme discretization on unstructured meshes, we warp the mesh while marching to steady state, so that mesh edges align with shocks and other discontinuities. This new algorithm, the Shock-fitting Lagrangian Adaptive Method (SLAM) is, in effect, a reliable shock-capturing algorithm which yields shock-fitted accuracy at convergence. Shock-capturing algorithms like this, which warp the mesh to yield shock-fitted accuracy, are new and relatively untried. However, their potential is clear. In the context of sonic booms, accurate calculation of near-field sonic boom signatures is critical to the design of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). SLAM should allow computation of accurate N-wave pressure signatures on comparatively coarse meshes, significantly enhancing our ability to design low-boom configurations for high-speed aircraft.

  1. Shock-induced arrhythmogenesis in the myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trayanova, Natalia; Eason, James

    2002-09-01

    The focus of this article is the investigation of the electrical behavior of the normal myocardium following the delivery of high-strength defibrillation shocks. To achieve its goal, the study employs a complex three-dimensional defibrillation model of a slice of the canine heart characterized with realistic geometry and fiber architecture. Defibrillation shocks of various strengths and electrode configurations are delivered to the model preparation in which a sustained ventricular tachycardia is induced. Instead of analyzing the post-shock electrical events as progressions of transmembrane potential maps, the study examines the evolution of the postshock phase singularities (PSs) which represent the organizing centers of reentry. The simulation results demonstrate that the shock induces numerous PSs the majority of which vanish before the reentrant wavefronts associated with them complete half of a single rotation. Failed shocks are characterized with one or more PSs that survive the initial period of PS annihilation to establish a new postshock arrhythmia. The increase in shock strength results in an overall decrease of the number of PSs that survive over 200 ms after the end of the shock; however, the exact behavior of the PSs is strongly dependent on the shock electrode configuration.

  2. Post-shock relaxation in crystalline nitromethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Rivera, Luis A.; Sewell, Thomas D.; Thompson, Donald L.

    2013-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of shocked (100)-oriented crystalline nitromethane were carried out to determine the rates of relaxation behind the shock wave. The forces were described by the fully flexible non-reactive Sorescu-Rice-Thompson force field [D. C. Sorescu, B. M. Rice, and D. L. Thompson, J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8406 (2000)], 10.1021/jp000942q. The time scales for local and overall thermal equilibration in the shocked crystal were determined. The molecular center-of-mass and atomic kinetic energy distributions rapidly reach substantially different local temperatures. Several picoseconds are required for the two distributions to converge, corresponding to establishment of thermal equilibrium in the shocked crystal. The decrease of the molecular center-of-mass temperature and the increase of the atomic temperature behind the shock front exhibit essentially exponential dependence on time. Analysis of covalent bond distance distributions ahead of, immediately behind, and well behind the shock front showed that the effective bond stretching potentials are essentially harmonic. Effective force constants for the C-N, C-H, and N-O bonds immediately behind the shock front are larger by factors of 1.6, 2.5, and 2.0, respectively, than in the unshocked crystal; and by factors of 1.2, 2.2, and 1.7, respectively, compared to material sufficiently far behind the shock front to be essentially at thermal equilibrium.

  3. Heat Shock Proteins: Mediators of Atherosclerotic Development.

    PubMed

    Deniset, Justin F; Pierce, Grant N

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins play important housekeeping roles in a variety of cells within the body during normal control conditions. The many different functions for heat shock proteins in the cell depend upon the specific heat shock protein involved. Each protein is nominally differentiated based upon its molecular size. However, in addition to their role in normal cell function, heat shock proteins may play an even more important role as pro-survival proteins conserved through evolution to protect the cell from a variety of stresses. The ability of a cell to withstand these environmental stresses is critical to its capacity to adapt and remain viable. Loss of this ability may lead to pathological states. Abnormal localization, structure or function of the heat shock proteins has been associated with many pathologies, including those involving heart disease. Heat shock proteins like HSP60 and HSP70 in particular have been identified as playing important roles in inflammation and immune reactions. Inflammation has been identified recently as an important pathological risk factor for heart disease. It is perhaps not surprising therefore, that heat shock protein family has been increasingly identified as an important intracellular pathway associated with inflammatory-mediated heart conditions including atherosclerosis. This paper reviews the evidence in support of a role for heat shock proteins in cardiovascular disease and the potential to target these proteins to alter the progression of atherosclerotic disease.

  4. The influence of incident shock Mach number on radial incident shock wave focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Tan, Sheng; He, Liming; Rong, Kang; Zhang, Qiang; Zhu, Xiaobin

    2016-04-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations were carried out to investigate radial incident shock focusing on a test section where the planar incident shock wave was divided into two identical ones. A conventional shock tube was used to generate the planar shock. Incident shock Mach number of 1.51, 1.84 and 2.18 were tested. CCD camera was used to obtain the schlieren photos of the flow field. Third-order, three step strong-stability-preserving (SSP) Runge-Kutta method, third-order weighed essential non-oscillation (WENO) scheme and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm were adopted to simulate the complicated flow fields characterized by shock wave interaction. Good agreement between experimental and numerical results was observed. Complex shock wave configurations and interactions (such as shock reflection, shock-vortex interaction and shock focusing) were observed in both the experiments and numerical results. Some new features were observed and discussed. The differences of structure of flow field and the variation trends of pressure were compared and analyzed under the condition of different Mach numbers while shock wave focusing.

  5. Intense shock waves and shock-compressed gas flows in the channels of rail accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobashev, S. V.; Zhukov, B. G.; Kurakin, R. O.; Ponyaev, S. A.; Reznikov, B. I.; Tverdokhlebov, K. V.

    2015-01-01

    Shock wave generation and shock-compressed gas flows attendant on the acceleration of an striker-free plasma piston in the channels of electromagnetic rail accelerators (railguns) are studied. Experiments are carried out in channels filled with helium or argon to an initial pressure of 25-500 Torr. At a pressure of 25 Torr, Mach numbers equal 32 in argon and 16 in helium. It is found that with the initial currents and gas initial densities in the channels being the same, the shock wave velocities in both gases almost coincide. Unlike standard shock tubes, a high electric field (up to 300 V/cm) present in the channel governs the motion of a shock-compressed layer. Once the charged particle concentration behind the shock wave becomes sufficiently high, the field causes part of the discharge current to pass through the shock-compressed layer. As a result, the glow of the layer becomes much more intense.

  6. Development of microcapsules for shock wave DDS and angiogenesis using shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamagawa, M.; Yamanoi, I.; Iwakura, S.

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes the trial of making microcapsules including a bubble for shock wave drug delivery systems, evaluation of their mechanical properties and angiogenesis using plane shock waves. We have proposed drug delivery systems (DDS) using shock waves. In this system, a microcapsule including a gas bubble is flown in the blood vessel, and finally broken by shock induced microjet, then drug is reached to the affected part. In this paper, the mechanism for deformation and disintegration of capsules in our previous works is reviewed, and the trials of making special microcapsules are discussed. To determine Young's modulus of capsule membrane, the membrane is deformed by the aspiration device and compared with computational result by FEM. As for angiogenesis using shock wave, the effects of shock waves under 0.4 MPa on cell growth rate is investigated. It is found that increasing rate of cell population by working shock waves is faster than the control cells.

  7. Whistler Waves Associated with Weak Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velez, J. C. Ramirez; Blanco-Cano, X.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Kajdic, P.; Jian,, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of 98 weak interplanetary shocks measured by the dual STEREO spacecraft over approximately 3 years during the past solar minimum. We study the occurrence of whistler waves associated with these shocks, which on average are high beta shocks (0.2 < Beta < 10). We have compared the waves properties upstream and downstream of the shocks. In the upstream region the waves are mainly circularly polarized, and in most of the cases (approx. 75%) they propagate almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field (<30 deg.). In contrast, the propagation angle with respect to the shock normal varies in a broad range of values (20 deg. to 90 deg.), suggesting that they are not phase standing. We find that the whistler waves can extend up to 100,000 km in the upstream region but in most cases (88%) are contained in a distance within 30,000 km from the shock. This corresponds to a larger region with upstream whistlers associated with IP shocks than previously reported in the literature. The maximum amplitudes of the waves are observed next to the shock interface, and they decrease as the distance to the shock increases. In most cases the wave propagation direction becomes more aligned with the magnetic field as the distance to the shock increases. These two facts suggest that most of the waves in the upstream region are Landau damping as they move away from the shock. From the analysis we also conclude that it is likely that the generation mechanism of the upstream whistler waves is taking place at the shock interface. In the downstream region, the waves are irregularly polarized, and the fluctuations are very compressive; that is, the compressive component of the wave clearly dominates over the transverse one. The majority of waves in the downstream region (95%) propagate at oblique angles with respect to the ambient magnetic field (>60 deg.). The wave propagation with respect to the shock-normal direction has no preferred direction and varies similarly to

  8. Physics of Bacteria During Osmotic Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Jordan; Klug, William

    Bacteria combat hypoosmotic shocks by opening mechanosensitive ion channels located within the inner membrane. These channels are believed to act as ``emergency release valves,'' reducing transient pressure during the shock by regulating solute and water flux. Recent experiments have shown that cell survivability depends strongly on channel populations and the rate of osmotic shock. However, the understanding of the physical mechanisms behind osmotic protection remains unclear. We investigate how channel deletions, variations in shock rate, and cell envelope mechanics affect survivability by constructing theoretical elasticity and transport models. We find that reducing the number of channels and applying faster shocks significantly increases the time-dependent stress of the cell membrane and wall. This result provides insight into physical mechanisms that govern cell failure, including membrane rupture and wall fracture.

  9. Shock Timing Technique for the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, D.H.; Celliers, P.M.; Collins, G.W.; Gold, D.M.; DaSilva, L.B.; Haan, S.W.; Cauble, R.C.; Hammel, B.A.; Hsing, W.W.

    2000-10-03

    Among the final shots at the Nova laser was a series testing the VISAR technique that will be the primary diagnostic for timing the shocks in a NIF ignition capsule. At Nova, the VISAR technique worked over the range of shock strengths and with the precision required for the NIF shock timing job--shock velocities in liquid D{sub 2} from 12 {micro}m/ns to 65 {micro}m/ns with better than 2% accuracy. VISAR images showed stronger shocks overtaking weaker ones, which is the basis of the plan for setting the pulse shape for the NIF ignition campaign. The technique is so precise that VISAR measurements may also play a role in certifying beam-to-beam and shot-to-shot repeatability of NIF laser pulses.

  10. Classical MHD shocks: theory and numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, Nikolai V.

    2005-08-01

    Recent results are surveyed in the investigation of the behavior of shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and corresponding structures in dissipative/resistive plasma flows. In contrast to evolutionary shocks, a solution of the problem of the nonevolutionary shock interaction with small perturbations is either nonunique or does not exist. The peculiarity of non-ideal MHD is in that some nonevolutionary shocks have dissipative structures. Since this structure is always non-plane, it can reveal itself in problems where transverse perturbations do not exist due to symmetries restrictions. We discuss the numerical behavior of nonevolutionary shocks and argue that they necessarily disappear once the problem is solved in a genuinely three-dimensional statement.

  11. Shock-produced olivine glass: First observation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jeanloz, R.; Ahrens, T.J.; Lally, J.S.; Nord, G.L.; Christie, J.M.; Heuer, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations of an experimentally shock-deformed single crystal of natural peridot, (Mg0.88Fe 0.12SiO4 recovered from peak pressures of about 56 ?? 109 pascals revealed the presence of amorphous zones located within crystalline regions with a high density of tangled dislocations. This is the first reported observation ofolivine glass. The shocked sample exhibits a wide variation in the degree of shock deformation on a small scale, and the glass appears to be intimately associated with the highest density of dislocations. This study suggests that olivine glass may be formed as a result of shock at pressures above about 50 to 55 ?? 109 pascals and that further TEM observations of naturally shocked olivines may demonstrate the presence of glass.

  12. Barrier experiment: Shock initiation under complex loading

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2016-01-12

    The barrier experiments are a variant of the gap test; a detonation wave in a donor HE impacts a barrier and drives a shock wave into an acceptor HE. The question we ask is: What is the trade-off between the barrier material and threshold barrier thickness to prevent the acceptor from detonating. This can be viewed from the perspective of shock initiation of the acceptor subject to a complex pressure drive condition. Here we consider key factors which affect whether or not the acceptor undergoes a shock-to-detonation transition. These include the following: shock impedance matches for the donor detonation wave into the barrier and then the barrier shock into the acceptor, the pressure gradient behind the donor detonation wave, and the curvature of detonation front in the donor. Numerical simulations are used to illustrate how these factors affect the reaction in the acceptor.

  13. Probing shock models of CH(+) formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, Isabel; Craig, Nahide

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution, high SNR observations of CH and CH(+) toward Zeta Oph, Xi Per, and P Cyg are used to test several predictions of shock models of molecule formation. The predicted differences between the CH and HCH(+) heliocentric velocities of the magnitude produced by the shock theories are not found in any of the three stars. toward Zeta Oph and Xi Per, no difference is found, based on high-quality data, between the observed CH(+) lie profiles and a Gaussian function which would be expected as a result of shock structure. Gaussian line width parameters of CH(+) lines toward Zeta Oph and Xi Per are broad as predicted by shock models are consistent with previous measurements. These observations yield only weak evidence in favor of the predictions of shock models of molecule formation.

  14. Distant Bow Shock Observations by Explorer 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihalov, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Locations, orientations and magnetic field changes are given for 135 bow shock crossings at distances downstream from earth between 84 and 117 earth radii. The shock locations are dependent on the spacecraft trajectory and agree with locations calculated for the hypersonic analogue for a Mach number of 3.8. The shock normal vectors have been calculated using magnetic coplanarity. The average normal vectors have a greater inclination by approximately 17 + or - 5 deg from the symmetry axis than the Dryer and Heckman shock orientations for a 3.8 Mach number. Over a range of downstream distances from 60 to 115 earth radii, the median magnetic field magnitude jump across the shock changes from 1.90 to 1.70 times.

  15. Organic synthesis in experimental impact shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, C. P.; Borucki, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory simulations of shocks created with a high-energy laser demonstrate that the efficacy of organic production depends on the molecular, not just the elemental composition of the shocked gas. In a methane-rich mixture that simulates a low-temperature equilibrium mixture of cometary material, hydrogen cyanide and acetylene were produced with yields of 5 x 10(17) molecules per joule. Repeated shocking of the methane-rich mixture produced amine groups, suggesting the possible synthesis of amino acids. No organic molecules were produced in a carbon dioxide-rich mixture, which is at odds with thermodynamic equilibrium approaches to shock chemistry and has implications for the modeling of shock-produced organic molecules on early Earth.

  16. Shock-induced devolatilization of calcite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boslough, M. B.; Ahrens, T. J.; Vizgirda, J.; Becker, R. H.; Epstein, S.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the release adiabats by Vizgirda (1981) indicate that substantial vaporization takes place upon release from shock pressures of 37 GPa for calcite and 14 GPa for aragonite. The present investigation includes the first controlled partial vaporization experiments on calcite. The experiments were conducted to test the predictions of the release adiabat experiments. The quantities of the gaseous species produced from shocked calcite and their carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions were determined, and the shock-induced effect on the Mn(2+) electron spin resonance spectrum in the shock-recovered calcite was observed. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that shock stresses at the 17-18 GPa level give rise to volatilization of 0.03-0.3 (mole) percent of calcite to CO2 and CO. The devolatilization of calcite occurs at low pressure at significantly lower entropy densities than predicted on the basis of thermodynamic continuum models.

  17. Lacticacidosis: A Clinically Significant Aspect of Shock

    PubMed Central

    Peretz, Dwight I.; McGregor, Maurice; Dossetor, John B.

    1964-01-01

    A study was made of the metabolic acidosis of hypotensive shock in 25 patients in an attempt to elucidate its etiology and to determine if the degree of acidosis might be a good parameter for the evaluation of treatment and prognosis. Blood lactate was elevated (> 1.3 mEq./l.) in 24 of 25 patients in hypotensive shock. There was a good correlation (r= 0.83, p < 0.01) between rising blood lactate and decrease in serum bicarbonate and arterial pH, early in shock. These data indicate that the metabolic acidosis of early shock is largely due to lactate ion. Evidence is presented that high blood lactate levels early in shock are indicative of poor prognosis. ImagesFig. 3 PMID:14127378

  18. Advances in Ureteral Stent Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denstedt, John D.

    2007-04-01

    Ureteral stents are commonly used in urolithiasis patients for relief of obstruction or in association with stone treatments such as ureteroscopy and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. There are currently many different bulk materials and coatings available for the manufacture of ureteral stents, however the ideal material has yet to be discovered. All potential biomaterials must undergo rigorous physical and biocompatibility testing before commercialization and use in humans. Despite significant advances in basic science research involving biocompatibility issues and biofilm formation, infection and encrustation remain associated with the use of biomaterials in the urinary tract. There have been many significant advances in the design of ureteral stents in recent years and these will be highlighted along with a discussion of future aspects of biomaterials and use of stents in association with urolithiasis.

  19. Molecular shock response of explosives: electronic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrne, Shawn D; Moore, David S; Whitley, Von H; Bolme, Cindy A; Eakins, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the question of the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference from the shock front as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation hypotheses and the need for time dependent absorption data (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  20. Recognition and management of shock in the pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Tuite, P K

    1997-05-01

    Shock continues to be a challenge for health care professionals because shock is not a single pathologic process but a complex series of interrelated events. After respiratory failure, shock is the second most common cause of death in children. The etiology of shock can be classified into three major categories: hypovolemic, cardiogenic, and distributive shock (septic shock). Despite the etiology of the shock state, if left untreated, the overwhelming response of the body to the inadequate perfusion is death. The key to successful management and treatment of shock is early recognition and rapid intervention.

  1. Should the norepinephrine maximal dosage rate be greatly increased in late shock?

    PubMed

    Stefanou, Christos; Palazis, Lakis; Loizou, Areti; Timiliotou, Chrystalla

    2016-03-04

    Any advanced shock eventually degenerates into vasoplegia, which responds weakly to vasopressors. The highest reported norepinephrine flow rate is 3 μg/kg/min. We present the case of a young explosion victim, who was transferred in late haemorrhagic shock. Apart from usual treatment (hydration, mass transfusion protocol), single-agent norepinephrine was used to maintain a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of >60-65 mm Hg. For several hours, norepinephrine flow was 7-10 times the aforementioned (highest reported) in order to achieve our goal; during which, further hydration or transfusion would not contribute to MAP elevation. Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) severity score was 18 (expected mortality >99%). The patient survived without underperfusion-related damage. We conclude that norepinephrine dosages could potentially be greatly increased in late shock. We must resist giving up flow escalation based on its numerical value.

  2. Recognition of hypovolemic shock: using base deficit to think outside of the ATLS box.

    PubMed

    Privette, Alicia R; Dicker, Rochelle A

    2013-03-13

    Base deficit has frequently been utilized as an informal adjunct in the initial evaluation of trauma patients to assess the extent of their physiologic derangements. However, the current Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) classification system for hypovolemic shock does not include base-deficit measurements and relies primarily on alterations in vital signs (heart rate, systolic blood pressure) and mental status (Glasgow Coma Scale) to estimate blood loss. The authors of this paper propose that the current ATLS system may not accurately reflect the degree of hypovolemic shock in many patients and that base-deficit measurements should be used in its place. The proposed system showed a greater correlation with transfusion requirements, need for massive transfusion, and mortality when compared with the ATLS classification system. Based on these findings, base-deficit measurement should be strongly considered during the initial trauma evaluation to identify the presence of hypovolemic shock and to guide blood product administration.

  3. A shock wave capability for the improved Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, G. R.; Dang, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    The Two Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) computer program is a primary tool in applying the JANNAF liquid rocket engine performance prediction procedures. The purpose of this contract has been to improve the TDK computer program so that it can be applied to rocket engine designs of advanced type. In particular, future orbit transfer vehicles (OTV) will require rocket engines that operate at high expansion ratio, i.e., in excess of 200:1. Because only a limited length is available in the space shuttle bay, it is possible that OTV nozzles will be designed with both relatively short length and high expansion ratio. In this case, a shock wave may be present in the flow. The TDK computer program was modified to include the simulation of shock waves in the supersonic nozzle flow field. The shocks induced by the wall contour can produce strong perturbations of the flow, affecting downstream conditions which need to be considered for thrust chamber performance calculations.

  4. Combining Observations of Shock-induced Minerals with Calculations to Constrain the Shock History of Meteorites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carli, P. S.; Xie, Z.; Sharp, T. G.

    2007-12-01

    All available evidence from shock Hugoniot and release adiabat measurements and from shock recovery experiments supports the hypothesis that the conditions for shock-induced phase transitions are similar to the conditions under which quasistatic phase transitions are observed. Transitions that require high temperatures under quasistatic pressures require high temperatures under shock pressures. The high-pressure phases found in shocked meteorites are almost invariably associated with shock melt veins. A shock melt vein is analogous to a pseudotachylite, a sheet of locally melted material that was quenched by conduction to surrounding cooler material. The mechanism by which shock melt veins form is not known; possible mechanisms include shock collisions, shock interactions with cracks and pores, and adiabatic shear. If one assumes that the phases within the vein crystallized in their stability fields, then available static high-pressure data constrain the shock pressure range over which the vein solidified. Since the veins have a sheet-like geometry, one may use one-dimensional heat flow calculations to constrain the cooling and crystallization history of the veins (Langenhorst and Poirier, 2000). Although the formation mechanism of a melt vein may involve transient pressure excursions, pressure equilibration of a mm-wide vein will be complete within about a microsecond, whereas thermal equilibration will require seconds. Some of our melt vein studies have indicated that the highly-shocked L chondrite meteorites were exposed to a narrow range of shock pressures, e.g., 18-25 GPa, over a minimum duration of the order of a second. We have used the Autodyn(TM) wave propagation code to calculate details of plausible impacts on the L-chondrite parent body for a variety of possible parent body stratigraphies. We infer that some meteorites probably represent material that was shocked at a depth of >10 km in their parent bodies.

  5. Acceleration of heavy ions by perpendicular collisionless shocks: Impact of the shock front nonstationarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z. W.; LembèGe, B.; Lu, Q. M.

    2011-10-01

    Both hybrid/full particle simulations and recent experimental results have clearly evidenced that the front of a supercritical quasi-perpendicular shock can be nonstationary. One responsible mechanism proposed for this nonstationarity is the self-reformation of the front itself being due to the accumulation of reflected ions. Important consequences of this nonstationarity are that not only the amplitude but also the spatial scales of fields components at the shock front (ramp and foot) are strongly varying within each cycle of the self-reformation. On the other hand, several studies have been made on the acceleration and heating of heavy ions but most have been restricted to a stationary shock profile only. Herein, one-dimensional test particle simulations based on shock profiles fields produced in PIC simulation are performed in order to investigate the impact of the shock front nonstationarity on heavy ion acceleration (He, O, Fe). Reflection and acceleration mechanisms of heavy ions (with different initial thermal velocities and different charge-mass ratios) interacting with a nonstationary shock front (self-reformation) are analyzed in detail. Present preliminary results show that: (1) the heavy ions suffer both shock drift acceleration (SDA) and shock surfing acceleration (SSA) mechanisms; (2) the fraction of reflected heavy ions increases with initial thermal velocity, charge-mass ratio and decreasing shock front width at both stationary shocks (situation equivalent to fixed shock cases) and nonstationary shocks (situation equivalent to continuously time-evolving shock cases); (3) the shock front nonstationarity (time-evolving shock case) facilitates the reflection of heavy ions; (4) a striking feature is the formation of an injected monoenergetic heavy ions population which persists in the shock front spectrum for different initial thermal velocities and ions species. The impact of the shock front nonstationarity on the heavy ions spectra within the shock

  6. Heat shock induces barotolerance in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Hayman, Melinda M; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C; Knabel, Stephen J

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of heat shock on the resistance of Listeria monocytogenes to high pressure processing (HPP). L. monocytogenes ATCC 19115 was grown to stationary phase at 15 degrees C and inoculated into whole ultrahigh-temperature milk at approximately 10(7) CFU/ml. Milk samples (5 ml) were placed into plastic transfer pipettes, which were heat sealed and then heated in a water bath at 48 degrees C for 10 min. Immediately after heat shock, the milk was cooled in water (20 degrees C) for 25 min and then placed on ice. The samples were high pressure processed at ambient temperature (approximately 23 degrees C) at 400 MPa for various times up to 150 s. Following HPP, the samples were spread plated on tryptic soy agar supplemented with yeast extract. Heat shock significantly increased the D400 MPa-value of L. monocytogenes from 35 s in non-heat-shocked cells to 127 s in heat-shocked cells (P < 0.05). Addition of chloramphenicol before heat shock eliminated the protective effect of heat shock (P < 0.05). Heat shock for 5, 10, 15, or 30 min at 48 degrees C resulted in maximal barotolerance (P < 0.05); increasing the time to 60 min significantly decreased survival compared with that at 5, 10, 15, or 30 min (P < 0.05). These results indicate that prior heat shock significantly increases the barotolerance of L. monocytogenes and that de novo protein synthesis during heat shock is required for this enhanced barotolerance.

  7. [Diagnostic apparatus in the shock trauma room].

    PubMed

    Beck, A; Bischoff, M; Gebhard, F; Huber-Lang, M; Kinzl, L; Schmelz, A

    2004-10-01

    Opinions vary with regard to the equipment and structural furnishings required for adequate management of the trauma patient in the dedicated shock suite. In order to assess the current situation in Germany, we conducted a survey of the 76 centers participating in the Polytrauma Registry of the DGU. Fifty-one questionnaires were returned by centers representing all levels of care. Responses revealed, for example, that not all centers possess capabilities for conventional radiography in the shock suite (7/51). Only 20 centers had a fixed table; the remaining 24 hospitals used either an image converter or a mobile X-ray unit. A dedicated ultrasound scanner was provided for the shock suite in 39 of 51 centers responding. Dedicated computed tomography scanners were provided for the shock suite in only eight centers (one dedicated trauma center, three level 3 centers, four university hospitals). All eight scanners use helical CT technology; at least three of the units are 8- or 16-slice. Of 51 shock suites, 12 are air-conditioned in compliance with sterile criteria (and are officially designated as surgical suites), while the remaining 39 are not. In acute cases, emergency surgeries can be performed in the shock suite in 37 centers, but not in the remaining 14 shock suites. According to the survey, slightly less than half of the hospitals responding are un-satisfied with the shock suite infrastructure ( n=24) and, of these, 13 centers are actively planning changes (the necessary financial resources have been guaranteed in 10 centers). Fourteen centers desire changes but do not currently have the required money. Information provided by Philips and Siemens suggests that the cost of furnishing a new shock suite ranges between 1.4 and 1.7 million euros. Responses to our survey show that a large gap remains between wishes and reality in the technical infrastructure in many shock suites in Germany.

  8. Shock Propagation Modeling in Heterogeneous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haill, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Shock compression of foams is an intriguing research area that challenges our abilities to model experiments using computer simulations that span 9 orders of magnitude in spatial scales from the atomistic scale through the mesoscale and up to the continuum levels. Experiments test shock compression of dense polymers, polymer foams, and high-Z doped foams. Random distributions of polymer fibers, variations in pore size, and non-uniformities in the bulk properties of the foam (such as mean density) lead to spread in the experimental data. Adding dopants to foams introduces new complexities and the effect of the distribution and sizes of dopant particles must be characterized and understood. Therefore we turn to computer simulation to illumine the intricacies of the experiments that cannot be directly measured. This paper overviews of our range of methods to model pure and platinum-doped poly-methyl-pentene (PMP) foams. At the nanometer scale, hydrodynamic simulations compare favorably to classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of porous foams, verifying models of foam vaporization under strong shock conditions. Inhomogeneous mesoscale and homogenized continuum simulations present contrasting pictures of shocked foams. Mesoscale simulations at the micron scale have diffuse shock widths that depend upon the pore size, and post-shock vorticity results in fluctuations about the mean post-shock state and lower mean pressures and temperatures. Homogenized simulations, in the limit of zero pore size, have narrow shock widths, steady post-shock states, and higher mean pressures and temperature that compare favorably with 1D analysis of experiments. We reconcile the contrasting mesoscale and continuum views using theoretical turbulent corrections to the Hugoniot jump condition to show a consistent picture of shocked foams over 9 orders of spatial scale. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned

  9. Laser Light Scattering by Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Adamovsky, G.

    1995-01-01

    Scattering of coherent light as it propagates parallel to a shock wave, formed in front of a bluff cylindrical body placed in a supersonic stream, is studied experimentally and numerically. Two incident optical fields are considered. First, a large diameter collimated beam is allowed to pass through the shock containing flow. The light intensity distribution in the resultant shadowgraph image, measured by a low light CCD camera, shows well-defined fringes upstream and downstream of the shadow cast by the shock. In the second situation, a narrow laser beam is brought to a grazing incidence on the shock and the scattered light, which appears as a diverging sheet from the point of interaction, is visualized and measured on a screen placed normal to the laser path. Experiments are conducted on shocks formed at various free-stream Mach numbers, M, and total pressures, P(sub 0). It is found that the widths of the shock shadows in a shadowgraph image become independent of M and P(sub 0) when plotted against the jump in the refractive index, (Delta)n, created across the shock. The total scattered light measured from the narrow laser beam and shock interaction also follows the same trend. In the numerical part of the study, the shock is assumed to be a 'phase object', which introduces phase difference between the upstream and downstream propagating parts of the light disturbances. For a given shape and (Delta)n of the bow shock the phase and amplitude modulations are first calculated by ray tracing. The wave front is then propagated to the screen using the Fresnet diffraction equation. The calculated intensity distribution, for both of the incident optical fields, shows good agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Advanced Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This video looks at a spinoff application of the technology from advanced microsensors -- those that monitor and determine conditions of spacecraft like the Space Shuttle. The application featured is concerned with the monitoring of the health of premature babies.

  11. Converging shocks for DSD modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matignon, Christophe

    2013-06-01

    Modelling of pyrotechnic systems requires both, a good understanding and precise prediction capabilities of the dynamics of detonation. When using insensitive high explosives IHE (such as TATB-based explosives) the interaction of the detonation front with the confinement can lead to very different detonation velocities. One of the most popular engineering tools used to model this behaviour is the Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD). In the DSD assumption, the detonation front propagates at a normal shock velocity (Dn) which depends only on its local curvature (κ). For divergent detonations, the DSD limit is very well established both experimentally and theoretically and one can easily propose a model (which obeys the 1D quasi-steady weakly curved detonation theory) to reproduce this behavior. We propose to extend the DSD theory to slightly convergent detonation fronts and to validate it against experimental data. Two series of experiments were carried out. The first series was designed to collect precise information regarding converging detonation. Usually, in such configurations, the detonation is non steady, making precise and simultaneous measurements of velocity and curvature difficult to achieve. The originality of the proposed setup is to drive a self similar convergent detonation at constant speed in an IHE rod by an external explosive tube of greater detonation velocity (allowing an accurate recording of both velocity and curvature). A wide range EOS/reaction rate model (inspired from previous works of Wescott et al.) was then calibrated to reproduce both the strong shock initiation and the newly extended (Dn- κ) law. This model can be used to perform either direct numerical simulation (DNS) on fine resolved mesh grid, or its reduced PZR model (DSD based) on a much coarser grid. This model was then successfully validated against the second series of experiments involving a detonation propagating around an obstacle and exhibiting a non steady converging front

  12. Current topics in shock waves; Proceedings of the International Symposium on Shock Waves and Shock Tubes, 17th, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA, July 17-21, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.W.

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on shock waves are presented. The general topics addressed include: shock formation, focusing, and implosion; shock reflection and diffraction; turbulence; laser-produced plasmas and waves; ionization and shock-plasma interaction; chemical kinetics, pyrolysis, and soot formation; experimental facilities, techniques, and applications; ignition of detonation and combustion; particle entrainment and shock propagation through particle suspension; boundary layers and blast simulation; computational methods and numerical simulation.

  13. Current topics in shock waves; Proceedings of the International Symposium on Shock Waves and Shock Tubes, 17th, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA, July 17-21, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong W.

    Various papers on shock waves are presented. The general topics addressed include: shock formation, focusing, and implosion; shock reflection and diffraction; turbulence; laser-produced plasmas and waves; ionization and shock-plasma interaction; chemical kinetics, pyrolysis, and soot formation; experimental facilities, techniques, and applications; ignition of detonation and combustion; particle entrainment and shock propagation through particle suspension; boundary layers and blast simulation; computational methods and numerical simulation.

  14. Advanced ceramics for environmental protection

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    Advanced ceramic materials offer significant thermodynamic efficiency advantages over metals and alloys because of their higher use temperatures. Using ceramic components results in higher temperature industrial processes which convert fuels to energy more efficiently, reducing environmental emissions. Ceramics have always offered high temperature strength and superior corrosion and erosion resistance. However, brittleness, poor thermal stock resistance and catastrophic failure have slowed industrial adoptions of ceramics in environmental applications. This paper will focus on environmental applications of three new advanced ceramic materials that are overcoming these barriers to industrial utilization through improved toughness, reliability, and thermal shock performance. PRD-66, a layered oxide ceramic with outstanding thermal shock resistance and high use temperature with utility in catalyst support, insulation, and hot gas filtration applications, is discussed. Tough silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) and carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) ceramic composites made by chemical vapor infiltration, and silicon carbide particulate reinforced alumina (SiC{sub p}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) composites made through Lanxide Corporation`s DIMOX{trademark} directed metal oxidation process are described. Applications of these materials to pollution reduction and energy efficiency in medical and municipal waste incineration, heat management, aluminum remelting, pyrolysis, coal combustion and gasification, catalytic pollution control, and hot gas filtration, will be discussed.

  15. Observational Signatures of Ion Acceleration Near CME-Driven Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.; Lee, M. A.; Smith, C. W.; Mason, G. M.; Kasper, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejection- or CME-driven interplanetary (IP) shocks are responsible for causing the so-called energetic storm particle (ESP) events observed at Earth. However, despite recent observational and theoretical advances, many important questions regarding such CME-associated particle events remain unanswered. This is because ESP events occur due to a confluence of numerous poorly understood physical effects all of whose contributions can vary with time and location. These include: the origin, structure, and obliquity of the shocks, the nature of wave-particle interactions and the type of turbulence that is present near the shocks, the distribution and composition of the seed populations, and the type of injection and acceleration processes involved. In this paper, we combine observations of ~0.1-0.5 MeV/nucleon O and Fe ions with that of the magnetic field near 17 CME-driven IP shocks observed at the Advanced Composition Explorer and Wind spacecraft to study the temporal evolution of (1) O and Fe intensities, (2) power-law spectral indices of O, (3) the Fe/O ratios, and (4) the magnetic field power spectrum. In particular, we identify unique signatures that differentiate between shocks where the seed population is dominated by low-energy (<100 keV/nucleon) suprathermal ions and those events where it is dominated by suprathermal-through-energetic seed ions with spectra extending at least up to ~0.5 MeV/nucleon. Such observational signatures may also be useful in modeling the properties of the so-called large gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events that are primarily accelerated by CME shocks near the Sun.

  16. Observational Signatures of Thermal and Suprathermal Ion Acceleration at CME-Driven Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, M. I.; Smith, C. W.; Lee, M. A.; Dayeh, M. A.; Mason, G. M.

    2009-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejection- or CME-driven interplanetary (IP) shocks are responsible for causing the so-called energetic storm particle (ESP) events observed at Earth. However, despite recent observational and theoretical advances, many important questions regarding such CME-associated particle events remain unanswered. This is because ESP events occur due to a confluence of numerous poorly understood physical effects all of whose contributions can vary with time and location. These effects include: the origin, structure, and obliquity of the shocks, the nature of wave-particle interactions and the type of turbulence that is present near the shocks, the distribution and composition of the seed populations, and the type of injection and acceleration processes involved. In this paper, we combine observations of ~0.1-0.5 MeV/nucleon O and Fe ions with that of the magnetic field near four CME-driven IP shocks observed at the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft to differentiate between shocks where the seed population is most likely dominated by thermal solar wind ions and those events where it is dominated by pre-existing suprathermal ions. In particular, we use the temporal evolution of (1) O and Fe intensities, (2) power-law spectral indices of O, (3) the Fe/O and C/O ratios, and (4) the magnetic field power spectrum to identify unique signatures that provide strong clues regarding the origin of the seed population. Such observational signatures may also be useful in modeling the properties of the so-called large gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events that are primarily accelerated by CME shocks near the Sun.

  17. Experimental Studies of Shock Effects on Magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, M.; Gattacceca, J.; Tikoo, S. M.

    2013-05-01

    In lunar and meteorite paleomagnetism shock effects from impacts are critically important, and have led to a reexamination of shock remanent magnetism (SRM) and shock demagnetization at higher shock levels than formerly. Shock effects can be divided into direct effects of shock on magnetization and shock induced phase transitions that affect magnetization. The latter have been studied in iron (e.g. Wasilewski, 1974), pyrrhotite (e.g. Rochette et al., 2003,) and magnetite (e.g. Ding et al., 2008). For direct effects in the low shock range, where deformation is elastic, piezoremanent magnetism (PRM) is a good guide and the strength of SRM depends similarly upon the ratio of the magnetoelastic energy to other energy terms, the strength of the shock, and the ambient field. One aspect of SRM emphasized in the early studies and confirmed by many later workers is the enhancement of its intensity by repeated shocks. The acquisition of SRM and the demagnetization of remanence by shock, depending upon the presence of an ambient field, are both dominantly in the lowest microcoercivity ranges and correspondingly stronger in multidomain samples than in finer grained carriers. In this range of relatively low shock <5GPa, field (AF) demagnetization may be used to identify and eliminate SRM. SRM will be removed at lower AF fields (typically by 10-20 mT) than thermal remanent magnetization (TRM) or saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (IRMs), which occupy the entire range of coercivities in a sample. Thermal methods are not ideal for removing SRM overprints in Fe-Ni bearing samples because SRM may be carried in grains which have low coercivity, but high blocking temperatures (up to ~500°C) (Tikoo et al., 2013). Shock waves in the range of 0.6-1.5 GPa were produced in regions a few mm in diameter with pulsed lasers and acquisition of SRM was shown to record the ambient field linearly and with an efficiency somewhat weaker than TRM (Gattacceca et al., 2008). Using penthrite

  18. VIBRATION DAMPING AND SHOCK MOUNT

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, D.J.; Forman, G.W.

    1963-12-10

    A shock absorbing mount in which vibrations are damped by an interference fit between relatively movable parts of the mount is described. A pair of generally cup-shaped parts or members have skirt portions disposed in an oppositely facing nesting relationship with the skirt of one member frictionally engaging the skirt of the other. The outermost skirt may be slotted to provide spring-like segments which embrace the inner skirt for effecting the interference fit. Belleville washers between the members provide yieldable support for a load carried by the mount. When a resonant frequency of vibration forces acting upon the moumt attains a certain level the kinetic energy of these forces is absorbed by sliding friction between the parts. (AEC)

  19. Thermal shock resistance ceramic insulator

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Chester S.; Johnson, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal shock resistant cermet insulators containing 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase. The insulators are prepared by a process comprising the steps of (a) providing a first solid phase mixture of a ceramic powder and a metal precursor; (b) heating the first solid phase mixture above the minimum decomposition temperature of the metal precursor for no longer than 30 minutes and to a temperature sufficiently above the decomposition temperature to cause the selective decomposition of the metal precursor to the metal to provide a second solid phase mixture comprising particles of ceramic having discrete metal particles adhering to their surfaces, said metal particles having a mean diameter no more than 1/2 the mean diameter of the ceramic particles, and (c) densifying the second solid phase mixture to provide a cermet insulator having 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase.

  20. The Shocked POststarburst Galaxy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatalo, Katherine A.; SPOGS Team

    2017-01-01

    Modern day galaxies are found to be in a bimodal distribution, both in terms of their morphologies, and in terms of their colors, and these properties are inter-related. In color space, there is a genuine dearth of intermediate colored galaxies, which has been taken to mean that the transition a galaxy undergoes to transform must be rapid. Given that this transformation is largely one-way (at z=0), identifying all initial conditions that catalyze it becomes essential. The Shocked POststarburst Galaxy Survey (http://www.spogs.org) is able to pinpoint transitioning galaxies at an earlier stage of transition than other traditional searches, possibly opening a new door to identifying new pathways over which galaxies transform from blue spirals to red ellipticals.

  1. The Phage Shock Protein Response.

    PubMed

    Flores-Kim, Josué; Darwin, Andrew J

    2016-09-08

    The phage shock protein (Psp) system was identified as a response to phage infection in Escherichia coli, but rather than being a specific response to a phage, it detects and mitigates various problems that could increase inner-membrane (IM) permeability. Interest in the Psp system has increased significantly in recent years due to appreciation that Psp-like proteins are found in all three domains of life and because the bacterial Psp response has been linked to virulence and other important phenotypes. In this article, we summarize our current understanding of what the Psp system detects and how it detects it, how four core Psp proteins form a signal transduction cascade between the IM and the cytoplasm, and current ideas that explain how the Psp response keeps bacterial cells alive. Although recent studies have significantly improved our understanding of this system, it is an understanding that is still far from complete.

  2. Shock following a cat scratch.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Umpei; Kunita, Mutsumi; Mohri, Masahiro

    2013-01-11

    A 49-year-old man with fever, pain in both legs, purpuras and cyanosis was admitted to hospital. He was a heavy drinker, but did not have diabetes or other immunosuppressive disease. On admission, he was in shock, with haematological findings suggestive of disseminated intravascular coagulation, and liver and kidney failure. The presence of a scratch wound on his face caused by a cat, and linear, Gram-negative rods phagocytosed by polynuclear leucocytes on peripheral blood smear suggested Capnocytophaga canimorsus infection. On day 1, antibiotics (ampicillin/sulbactam) and catecholamines were initiated. The patient required haemodialysis three times per week for 3 weeks. His toes became necrotic but improved and amputation was not necessary. On day 52, he was discharged from hospital with only mild sensory impairment of the legs.

  3. Screech Tones from Rectangular Jets with Spanwise Oblique Shock-Cell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh

    1996-01-01

    Understanding screech is especially important for the design of advanced aircraft because screech can cause sonic fatigue failure of aircraft structures. Although the connection between shock-cell spacing and screech frequency is well understood, the relation between non-uniformities in the shock-cell structures and the resulting amplitude, mode, and steadiness of screech have remained unexplored. This paper addresses the above issues by intentionally producing spanwise (larger nozzle dimension) variations in the shock-cell structures and studying the resulting spanwise screech mode. The spanwise oblique shock-cell structures were produced using imperfectly expanded convergent-divergent rectangular nozzles (aspect ratio = 5) with nonuniform exit geometries. Three geometries were studied: (a) a nozzle with a spanwise uniform edge, (b) a nozzle with a spanwise oblique (single bevelled) edge, and (c) a nozzle that had two spanwise oblique (double bevelled) cuts to form an arrowhead-shaped nozzle. For all nozzles considered, the screech mode was antisymmetric in the transverse (smaller nozzle dimension) direction allowing focus on changes in the spanwise direction. Three types of spanwise modes were observed: symmetric (1), antisymmetric (2), and oblique (3). The following significant results emerged: (1) for all cases the screech mode corresponds with the spanwise shock-cell structure, (2) when multiple screech modes are present, the technique presented here makes it possible to distinguish between coexisting and mutually exclusive modes, (3) the strength of shocks 3 and 4 influences the screech source amplitude and determines whether screech is unsteady. The results presented here offer hope for a better understanding of screech and for tailoring shock-containing jets to minimize fatigue failure of aircraft components.

  4. Enhancement of Solar Energetic Particles During a Shock Magnetic Cloud Interacting Complex Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chenglong; Wang, Yuming; Ye, Pinzhong; Wang, S.

    2008-11-01

    The behavior of solar energetic particles (SEPs) in a shock magnetic cloud interacting complex structure observed by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft on 5 November 2001 is analyzed. A strong shock causing magnetic field strength and solar wind speed increases of about 41 nT and 300 km s-1, respectively, propagated within a preceding magnetic cloud (MC). It is found that an extraordinary SEP enhancement appeared at the high-energy (≥10 MeV) proton intensities and extended over and only over the entire period of the shock MC structure passing through the spacecraft. Such SEP behavior is much different from the usual picture that the SEPs are depressed in MCs. The comparison of this event with other top SEP events of solar cycle 23 (2000 Bastille Day and 2003 Halloween events) shows that such an enhancement resulted from the effects of the shock MC complex structure leading to the highest ≥10 MeV proton intensity of solar cycle 23. Our analysis suggests that the relatively isolated magnetic field configuration of MCs combined with an embedded strong shock could significantly enhance the SEP intensity; SEPs are accelerated by the shock and confined into the MC. Further, we find that the SEP enhancement at lower energies happened not only within the shock MC structure but also after it, probably owing to the presence of a following MC-like structure. This is consistent with the picture that SEP fluxes could be enhanced in the magnetic topology between two MCs, which was proposed based on numerical simulations by Kallenrode and Cliver ( Proc. 27th ICRC 8, 3318, 2001b).

  5. Avoidance based on shock intensity reduction with no change in shock probability.

    PubMed

    Bersh, P J; Alloy, L B

    1978-11-01

    Rats were trained on a free-operant avoidance procedure in which shock intensity was controlled by interresponse time. Shocks were random at a density of about 10 shocks per minute. Shock probability was response independent. As long as interresponse times remained less than the limit in effect, any shocks received were at the lower of two intensities (0.75 mA). Whenever interresponse times exceeded the limit, any shocks received were at the higher intensity (1.6 mA). The initial limit of 15 seconds was decreased in 3-second steps to either 6 or 3 seconds. All animals lever pressed to avoid higher intensity shock. As the interresponse time limit was reduced, the response rate during the lower intensity shock and the proportion of brief interresponse times increased. Substantial warmup effects were evident, particularly at the shorter interresponse-time limits. Shock intensity reduction without change in shock probability was effective in the acquisition and maintenance of avoidance responding, as well as in differentiation of interresponse times. This research suggests limitations on the generality of a safety signal interpretation of avoidance conditioning.

  6. Interplanetary shock-bow shock interaction: Comparison of a global MHD model and observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, O.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.

    2015-09-01

    A fast forward shock passing through the bow shock would generate a train of new discontinuities that differ with the distance from the Sun-Earth line. However, interplanetary (IP) shocks are often followed by a rotation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) over a large angle and a presence of this rotation can modify the interaction process. The present paper analyzes in detail one IP shock where data measured by Wind are used as an input to a global BATS-R-US MHD model and the model prediction is compared with Geotail magnetosheath observations. The study is based on three runs of the global MHD model that use different modifications of upstream conditions. We have found that (1) about 45% of IP shocks is followed by a significant IMF rotation within 15 min after the shock ramp; (2) the IMF rotation modifies the dynamics of the magnetospheric response to the IP shock arrival; (3) a train of new discontinuities created by an interaction of the IP shock with bow shock can be identified in MHD simulations as well as in the experimental data; and (4) a new discontinuity is created by the interaction of the IMF rotation with the bow shock.

  7. Hemodynamic Analysis of Pediatric Septic Shock and Cardiogenic Shock Using Transpulmonary Thermodilution

    PubMed Central

    Lee, En-Pei; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Lin, Jainn-Jim; Chan, Oi-Wa; Lee, Jung; Lin, Chia-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Septic shock and cardiogenic shock are the two most common types of shock in children admitted to pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). The aim of the study was to investigate which hemodynamic variables were associated with mortality in children with shock. We retrospectively analyzed 50 children with shock (37 septic shock cases and 13 cardiogenic shock cases) in the PICU and monitored their hemodynamics using transpulmonary thermodilution from 2003 to 2016. Clinical factors were analyzed between the patients with septic and cardiogenic shock. In addition, hemodynamic parameters associated with mortality were analyzed. The 28-day mortality was significantly higher in the septic group than in the cardiogenic group (p = 0.016). Initially, the parameters of cardiac output and cardiac contractility were higher in the septic group (p < 0.05) while the parameters of preload and afterload were all higher in the cardiogenic group (p < 0.05). Cardiac index was significantly lower in the nonsurvivors of cardiogenic shock at the time of initial admission and after the first 24 hours (both p < 0.05), while systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) was significantly lower in the nonsurvivors of septic shock (p < 0.001). Therefore, during the first 24 hours after intensive care, SVRI and cardiac index are the most important hemodynamic parameters associated with mortality.

  8. Analysis of shock-wave propagation in aqueous foams using shock tube experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, G.; Mariani, C.; Houas, L.; Chinnayya, A.; Hadjadj, A.; Del Prete, E.; Haas, J.-F.; Rambert, N.; Counilh, D.; Faure, S.

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports experimental results of planar shock waves interacting with aqueous foams in a horizontal conventional shock tube. Four incident shock wave Mach numbers are considered, ranging from 1.07 to 1.8, with two different foam columns of one meter thickness and expansion ratios of 30 and 80. High-speed flow visualizations are used along with pressure measurements to analyse the main physical mechanisms that govern shock wave mitigation in foams. During the shock/foam interaction, a precursor leading pressure jump was identified as the trace of the liquid film destruction stage in the foam fragmentation process. The corresponding pressure threshold is found to be invariant for a given foam. Regarding the mitigation effect, the results show that the speed of the shock is drastically reduced and that wetter is the foam, slower are the transmitted waves. The presence of the foam barrier attenuates the induced pressure impulse behind the transmitted shock, while the driest foam appears to be more effective, as it limits the pressure induced by the reflected shock off the foam front. Finally, it was found that the pressure histories in the two-phase gas-liquid mixture are different from those previously obtained within a cloud of droplets. The observed behavior is attributed to the process of foam fragmentation and to the modification of the flow topology past the shock. These physical phenomena occurring during the shock/foam interaction should be properly accounted for when elaborating new physical models.

  9. Global Aeroheating Measurements of Shock-Shock Interactions on a Swept Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Michelle L.; Berry, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of fin leading-edge radius and sweep angle on peak heating rates due to shock-shock interactions were investigated in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. The cylindrical leading-edge fin models, with radii varied from 0.25 to 0.75 inches, represent wings or struts on hypersonic vehicles. A 9deg wedge generated a planar oblique shock at 16.7deg. to the flow that intersected the fin bow shock, producing a shock-shock interaction that impinged on the fin leading edge. The fin sweep angle was varied from 0deg (normal to the free-stream) to 15deg and 25deg swept forward. These cases were chosen to explore three characterized shock-shock interaction types. Global temperature data were obtained from the surface of the fused silica fins using phosphor thermography. Metal oil flow models with the same geometries as the fused silica models were used to visualize the streamline patterns for each angle of attack. High-speed zoom-schlieren videos were recorded to show the features and any temporal unsteadiness of the shock-shock interactions. The temperature data were analyzed using a one-dimensional semi-infinite method, as well as one- and two-dimensional finite-volume methods. These results were compared to determine the proper heat transfer analysis approach to minimize errors from lateral heat conduction due to the presence of strong surface temperature gradients induced by the shock interactions. The general trends in the leading-edge heat transfer behavior were similar for each explored shock-shock interaction type regardless of the leading-edge radius. However, the dimensional peak heat transfer coefficient augmentation increased with decreasing leading-edge radius. The dimensional peak heat transfer output from the two-dimensional code was about 20% higher than the value from a standard, semi-infinite one-dimensional method.

  10. Integrated modeling/analyses of thermal-shock effects in SNS targets

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Haines, J.

    1996-06-01

    In a spallation neutron source (SNS), extremely rapid energy pulses are introduced in target materials such as mercury, lead, tungsten, uranium, etc. Shock phenomena in such systems may possibly lead to structural material damage beyond the design basis. As expected, the progression of shock waves and interaction with surrounding materials for liquid targets can be quite different from that in solid targets. The purpose of this paper is to describe ORNL`s modeling framework for `integrated` assessment of thermal-shock issues in liquid and solid target designs. This modeling framework is being developed based upon expertise developed from past reactor safety studies, especially those related to the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project. Unlike previous separate-effects modeling approaches employed (for evaluating target behavior when subjected to thermal shocks), the present approach treats the overall problem in a coupled manner using state-of-the-art equations of state for materials of interest (viz., mercury, tungsten and uranium). That is, the modeling framework simultaneously accounts for localized (and distributed) compression pressure pulse generation due to transient heat deposition, the transport of this shock wave outwards, interaction with surrounding boundaries, feedback to mercury from structures, multi-dimensional reflection patterns & stress induced (possible) breakup or fracture.

  11. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for wound healing: technology, mechanisms, and clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Mittermayr, Rainer; Antonic, Vlado; Hartinger, Joachim; Kaufmann, Hanna; Redl, Heinz; Téot, Luc; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Schaden, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    For almost 30 years, extracorporeal shock wave therapy has been clinically implemented as an effective treatment to disintegrate urinary stones. This technology has also emerged as an effective noninvasive treatment modality for several orthopedic and traumatic indications including problematic soft tissue wounds. Delayed/nonhealing or chronic wounds constitute a burden for each patient affected, significantly impairing quality of life. Intensive wound care is required, and this places an enormous burden on society in terms of lost productivity and healthcare costs. Therefore, cost-effective, noninvasive, and efficacious treatments are imperative to achieve both (accelerated and complete) healing of problematic wounds and reduce treatment-related costs. Several experimental and clinical studies show efficacy for extracorporeal shock wave therapy as means to accelerate tissue repair and regeneration in various wounds. However, the biomolecular mechanism by which this treatment modality exerts its therapeutic effects remains unclear. Potential mechanisms, which are discussed herein, include initial neovascularization with ensuing durable and functional angiogenesis. Furthermore, recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells, stimulated cell proliferation and differentiation, and anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects as well as suppression of nociception are considered important facets of the biological responses to therapeutic shock waves. This review aims to provide an overview of shock wave therapy, its history and development as well as its current place in clinical practice. Recent research advances are discussed emphasizing the role of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in soft tissue wound healing.

  12. Mesenteric lymph drainage alleviates acute kidney injury induced by hemorrhagic shock without resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-Gang; Zhu, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Li-Min; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Niu, Chun-Yu

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of mesenteric lymph drainage on the acute kidney injury induced by hemorrhagic shock without resuscitation. Eighteen male Wistar rats were randomly divided into sham, shock, and drainage groups. The hemorrhagic shock model (40 mmHg, 3 h) was established in shock and drainage groups; mesenteric lymph drainage was performed from 1 h to 3 h of hypotension in the drainage group. The results showed that renal tissue damage occurred; the levels of urea, creatinine, and trypsin in the plasma as well as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), receptor of advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), malondialdehyde (MDA), lactic acid (LA), and 2,3-DPG in the renal tissue were increased in the shock group after 3 h of hypotension. Mesenteric lymph drainage lessened the following: renal tissue damage; urea and trypsin concentrations in the plasma; ICAM-1, RAGE, TNF-α, MDA, and LA levels in the renal tissue. By contrast, mesenteric lymph drainage increased the 2,3-DPG level in the renal tissue. These findings indicated that mesenteric lymph drainage could relieve kidney injury caused by sustained hypotension, and its mechanisms involve the decrease in trypsin activity, suppression of inflammation, alleviation of free radical injury, and improvement of energy metabolism.

  13. Molecular modeling of transmembrane delivery of paclitaxel by shock waves with nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xue-mei; Yuan, Bing; Zhang, Xian-ren; Yang, Kai; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2017-01-01

    The development of advanced delivery strategies for anticancer drugs that can permeate through cellular membranes is urgently required for biomedical applications. In this work, we investigated the dynamic transmembrane behavior of paclitaxel (PTX), a powerful anticancer drug, under the combined impact of shock waves and nanobubbles, by using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Our simulations show that the PTX molecule experiences complicated motion modes during the action process with the membrane, as a consequence of its interplay with the lipid bilayer and water, under the joint effect of the shock wave and nanobubble. Moreover, it was found that the transmembrane movement of PTX is closely associated with the conformation changes of PTX, as well as the structural changes of the membrane (e.g., compression and poration in membrane). The nanobubble collapse induced by the shock wave, the proper PTX location with respect to the nanobubble, and a suitable nanobubble size and shock impulse are all necessary for the delivery of PTX into the cell. This work provides a molecular understanding of the interaction mechanism between drug molecules and cell membranes under the influence of shock waves and nanobubbles, and paves the way for exploiting targeted drug delivery systems that combine nanobubbles and ultrasound.

  14. Cold Osmotic Shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Patching, J. W.; Rose, A. H.

    1971-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC 366 is susceptible to cold osmotic shock. Exponentially growing cells from batch cultures grown in defined medium at 30 C, after being suspended in 0.8 m mannitol containing 10 mm ethylenedia-minetetraacetic acid and then resuspended in ice-cold 0.5 mm MgCl2, accumulated the nonmetabolizable solutes d-glucosamine-hydrochloride and 2-aminoisobutyrate at slower rates than unshocked cells; shocked cells retained their viability. Storage of unshocked batch-grown cells in buffer at 10 C led to an increase in ability to accumulate glucosamine, and further experiments were confined to cells grown in a chemostat under conditions of glucose limitation, thereby obviating the need for storing cells before use. A study was made of the effect of the different stages in the cold osmotic shock procedure, including the osmotic stress, the chelating agent, and the cold Mg2+-containing diluent, on viability and solute-accumulating ability. Growth of shocked cells in defined medium resembled that of unshocked cells; however, in malt extract-yeast extract-glucose-peptone medium, the shocked cells had a longer lag phase of growth and initially grew at a slower rate. Cold osmotic shock caused the release of low-molecular-weight compounds and about 6 to 8% of the cell protein. Neither the cell envelope enzymes, invertase, acid phosphatase and l-leucine-β-naphthylamidase, nor the cytoplasmic enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, were released when yeast cells were subjected to cold osmotic shock. PMID:5001201

  15. Shock-free turbomachinery blade design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beauchamp, P. P.; Seebass, A. R.

    1985-01-01

    A computational method for designing shock-free, quasi-three-dimensional, transonic, turbomachinery blades is described. Shock-free designs are found by implementing Sobieczky's fictitious gas principle in the analysis of a baseline shape, resulting in an elliptic solution that is incorrect in the supersonic domain. Shock-free designs are obtained by combining the subsonic portion of this solution with a characteristic calculation of the correct supersonic flow using the sonic line data from the fictitious elliptic solution. This provides a new, shock-free blade design. Examples presented include the removal of shocks from two blades in quasi-three-dimensional flow and the development of a series of shock-free two-dimensional stators. The new designs all include modifications to the upper surface of an experimental stator blade developed at NASA Lewis Research Center. While the designs presented here are for inviscid flow, the same concepts have been successfully applied to the shock-free design of airfoils and three-dimensional wings with viscous effects. The extension of the present method to viscous flows is straightforward given a suitable analysis algorithm for the flow.

  16. Impact angle control of interplanetary shock geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D. M.; Raeder, J.

    2014-10-01

    We use Open Geospace General Circulation Model global MHD simulations to study the nightside magnetospheric, magnetotail, and ionospheric responses to interplanetary (IP) fast forward shocks. Three cases are presented in this study: two inclined oblique shocks, hereafter IOS-1 and IOS-2, where the latter has a Mach number twice stronger than the former. Both shocks have impact angles of 30° in relation to the Sun-Earth line. Lastly, we choose a frontal perpendicular shock, FPS, whose shock normal is along the Sun-Earth line, with the same Mach number as IOS-1. We find that, in the IOS-1 case, due to the north-south asymmetry, the magnetotail is deflected southward, leading to a mild compression. The geomagnetic activity observed in the nightside ionosphere is then weak. On the other hand, in the head-on case, the FPS compresses the magnetotail from both sides symmetrically. This compression triggers a substorm allowing a larger amount of stored energy in the magnetotail to be released to the nightside ionosphere, resulting in stronger geomagnetic activity. By comparing IOS-2 and FPS, we find that, despite the IOS-2 having a larger Mach number, the FPS leads to a larger geomagnetic response in the nightside ionosphere. As a result, we conclude that IP shocks with similar upstream conditions, such as magnetic field, speed, density, and Mach number, can have different geoeffectiveness, depending on their shock normal orientation.

  17. Impact Angle Control of Interplanetary Shock Geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D.; Raeder, J.

    2014-12-01

    We use OpenGGCM global MHD simulations to study the nightside magnetospheric/ magnetotail/ ionospheric responses to interplanetary (IP) fast foward shocks. Three cases are presented in this study: two inclined oblique shocks, hereafter IOS-1 and IOS-2, where the latter has a Mach number twice stronger than the former. Both shocks have impact angles of 30o in relation to the Sun-Earth line. Lastly, we choose a frontal perpendicular shock, FPS, whose shock normal is along th Sun-Earth line, with the same Mach number as IOS-1. We find that, in the IOS-1 case, due to the north-south asymmetry, the magnetotail is deflected southward, leading to a mild compression. The geomagnetic activity observed in the nightside ionosphere is then weak. On the other hand, in the head-on case, the FPS compresses the magnetotail on both sides symmetrically. This compression triggers a substorm allowing a larger amount of stored energy in the magnetotail to be released to the nightside ionosphere, resulting in a larger geomagnetic activity there. By comparing IOS-2 and FPS, we find that, despite the IOS-2 having a larger Mach number, the FPS leads to larger geomagnetic responses in the ionosphere nightside. As a result, we conclude that IP shocks with similar upstream conditions, such as magnetic field, speed, density, and even Mach number, can be differently geoeffective, depending on their shock normal orientation.

  18. Modeling nonthermal emission from stellar bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, V.; López-Santiago, J.; Miceli, M.; Bonito, R.; de Castro, E.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Runaway O- and early B-type stars passing through the interstellar medium at supersonic velocities and characterized by strong stellar winds may produce bow shocks that can serve as particle acceleration sites. Previous theoretical models predict the production of high-energy photons by nonthermal radiative processes, but their efficiency is still debated. Aims: We aim to test and explain the possibility of emission from the bow shocks formed by runaway stars traveling through the interstellar medium by using previous theoretical models. Methods: We applied our model to AE Aurigae, the first reported star with an X-ray detected bow shock, to BD+43 3654, in which the observations failed in detecting high-energy emission, and to the transition phase of a supergiant star in the late stages of its life. Results: From our analysis, we confirm that the X-ray emission from the bow shock produced by AE Aurigae can be explained by inverse Compton processes involving the infrared photons of the heated dust. We also predict low high-energy flux emission from the bow shock produced by BD+43 3654, and the possibility of high-energy emission from the bow shock formed by a supergiant star during the transition phase from blue to red supergiant. Conclusions: Bow shocks formed by different types of runaway stars are revealed as a new possible source of high-energy photons in our neighborhood.

  19. Overview of shock waves in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Robin O.

    2003-10-01

    A brief overview of three applications of shock waves is presented. Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) has been in clinical use for more than 20 years. In the United States it is used to treat more than 80% of kidney stone cases and has wide acceptance with patients because it is a noninvasive procedure. Despite SWLs enormous success there is no agreement on how shock waves comminute stones. There is also a general acceptance that shock waves lead to trauma to the soft tissue of the kidney. Yet there has been little forward progress in developing lithotripters which provide comminution with less side-effects, indeed the original machine is still considered the gold standard. The last decade has seen the advent of new shock wave devices for treating principally musculoskeletal indications, such as plantar fasciitis, tennis elbow, and bone fractures that do not heal. This is referred to as shock wave therapy (SWT). The mechanisms by which SWT works are even less well understood than SWL and the consequences of bioeffects have also not been studied in detail. Shock waves have also been shown to be effective at enhancing drug delivery into cells and assisting with gene transfection. [Work partially supported by NIH.

  20. Where are all the Strongly Shocked Meteorites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carli, P. S.; Xie, Z.; Sharp, T. G.

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies of high pressure minerals in melt veins have shown that the S6 shock stage, designating the most strongly shocked chondriticmeteorites, corresponds to a peak shock pressure of about 25 GPa and an effective shock pressure duration of the order of one second. (Sharp and De Carli 2006) Calculations of the probability distribution of asteroid-asteroid impact velocities in the early solar system indicate a broad peak over the range of 2-7 km/s with a mean of 5.29 km/s. (Bottke et al 1994) The peak pressure at the point of impact between two bodies of chondritic composition would be about 25 GPa for a 2 km/s impact. For a 7 km/s impact, the peak pressure would be about 100 GPa. We would therefore expect to find a substantial population of meteorites showing evidence of having been shocked to pressures over the range between 25 and 100 GPa. In fact, there are very few chondrites that appear to have been shocked to pressures above 25 GPa. Here we present the results of Autodyn (TM) hydrocode calculations of asteroid-asteroid impacts over the velocity range of 2-7 km/s to provide a measure of the range of expected shock effects in meteorites