Science.gov

Sample records for advanced very-high resolution

  1. Advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer development program is considered. The program covered the design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was also developed for use on the program.

  2. AVHRR/1-FM Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer is discussed. The program covers design, construction, and test of a breadboard model, engineering model, protoflight model, mechanical/structural model, and a life test model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was developed for use on the program. The flight model program objectives were to fabricate, assemble and test four of the advanced very high resolution radiometers along with a bench cooler and collimator.

  3. Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Composites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is a broad-band scanner with four to six bands, depending on the model. The AVHRR senses in the visible, near-, middle-, and thermal- infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. This sensor is carried on a series of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), beginning with the Television InfraRed Observation Satellite (TIROS-N) in 1978. Since 1989, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) has been mapping the vegetation condition of the United States and Alaska using satellite information from the AVHRR sensor. The vegetation condition composites, more commonly called greenness maps, are produced every week using the latest information on the growth and condition of the vegetation. One of the most important aspects of USGS greenness mapping is the historical archive of information dating back to 1989. This historical stretch of information has allowed the USGS to determine a 'normal' vegetation condition. As a result, it is possible to compare the current week's vegetation condition with normal vegetation conditions. An above normal condition could indicate wetter or warmer than normal conditions, while a below normal condition could indicate colder or dryer than normal conditions. The interpretation of departure from normal will depend on the season and geography of a region.

  4. Advanced very high resolution radiometer, Mod 2 engineering report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Advanced High Resolution Radiometer, Mod 2 (AVHRR/2) is a modification of the original AVHRR (AVHRR/1) to expand the number of channels from four to five and provide additional sensing in the infrared region. A comparison of the spectral regions employed in the two instruments is given. Three of the channels are the same on both instruments. The difference in instruments is in the long wave IR region where a single channel was replaced by two channels. The modification from AVHRR/1 to AVHRR/2 was done with a minimum of changes. The areas of change are highlighted and the modifications by module are summarized. It is seen that the primary changes are in the relay optics and in the cooler. In this development program only two models are involved. The first model, the Optical Test Model was constructed and tested to prove the performance and structural integrity of the optical system and the modified cooler. The second model constructed is the Protoflight. Only the areas of the AVHRR/2 which were modified from the AVHRR/1 design are discussed.

  5. Determining coniferous forest cover and forest fragmentation with NOAA-9 advanced very high resolution radiometer data

    SciTech Connect

    Ripple, W.J.

    1994-05-01

    NOAA-9 satellite data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) were used in conjunction with Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) data to determine the proportion of closed canopy conifer forest cover in the Cascade Range of Oregon. A closed canopy conifer map, as determined from the MSS, was registered with AVHRR pixels. Regression was used to relate closed canopy conifer forest cover to AVHRR spectral data. A two-variable (band) regression model accounted for more variance in conifer cover than the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). The spectral signatures of various conifer successional stages were also examined. A map of Oregon was produced showing the proportion of closed canopy conifer cover for each AVHRR pixel. The AVHRR was responsive to both the percentage of closed canopy conifer cover and the successional stage in these temperate coniferous forests in this experiment.

  6. Determining coniferous forest cover and forest fragmentation with NOAA-9 advanced very high resolution radiometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripple, William J.

    1995-01-01

    NOAA-9 satellite data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) were used in conjunction with Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) data to determine the proportion of closed canopy conifer forest cover in the Cascade Range of Oregon. A closed canopy conifer map, as determined from the MSS, was registered with AVHRR pixels. Regression was used to relate closed canopy conifer forest cover to AVHRR spectral data. A two-variable (band) regression model accounted for more variance in conifer cover than the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). The spectral signatures of various conifer successional stages were also examined. A map of Oregon was produced showing the proportion of closed canopy conifer cover for each AVHRR pixel. The AVHRR was responsive to both the percentage of closed canopy conifer cover and the successional stage in these temperate coniferous forests in this experiment.

  7. North American vegetation patterns observed with the NOAA-7 advanced very high resolution radiometer. [North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goward, S. N.; Tucker, C. J.; Dye, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    Spectral vegetation index measurements derived from remotely sensed observations show great promise as a means to improve knowledge of land vegetation patterns. The daily, global observations acquired by the advanced very high resolution radiometer, a sensor on the current series of U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration meteorological satellites, may be particularly well suited for global studies of vegetation. Preliminary results from analysis of North American observations, extending from April to November 1982, show that the vegetation index patterns observed correspond to the known seasonality of North American natural and cultivated vegetation. Integration of the observations over the growing season produced measurements that are related to net primary productivity patterns of the major North American natural vegetation formations. Regions of intense cultivation were observed as anomalous areas in the integrated growing season measurements. Significant information on seasonality, annual extent and interannual variability of vegetation photosynthetic activity at continental and global scales can be derived from these satellite observations.

  8. Compression of regions in the global advanced very high resolution radiometer 1-km data set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kess, Barbara L.; Steinwand, Daniel R.; Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    1994-01-01

    The global advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) 1-km data set is a 10-band image produced at USGS' EROS Data Center for the study of the world's land surfaces. The image contains masked regions for non-land areas which are identical in each band but vary between data sets. They comprise over 75 percent of this 9.7 gigabyte image. The mask is compressed once and stored separately from the land data which is compressed for each of the 10 bands. The mask is stored in a hierarchical format for multi-resolution decompression of geographic subwindows of the image. The land for each band is compressed by modifying a method that ignores fill values. This multi-spectral region compression efficiently compresses the region data and precludes fill values from interfering with land compression statistics. Results show that the masked regions in a one-byte test image (6.5 Gigabytes) compress to 0.2 percent of the 557,756,146 bytes they occupy in the original image, resulting in a compression ratio of 89.9 percent for the entire image.

  9. Advances In very high resolution satellite imagery analysis for Monitoring human settlements

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju; Cheriyadat, Anil M; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2014-01-01

    The high rate of urbanization, political conflicts and ensuing internal displacement of population, and increased poverty in the 20th century has resulted in rapid increase of informal settlements. These unplanned, unauthorized, and/or unstructured homes, known as informal settlements, shantytowns, barrios, or slums, pose several challenges to the nations, as these settlements are often located in most hazardous regions and lack basic services. Though several World Bank and United Nations sponsored studies stress the importance of poverty maps in designing better policies and interventions, mapping slums of the world is a daunting and challenging task. In this paper, we summarize our ongoing research on settlement mapping through the utilization of Very high resolution (VHR) remote sensing imagery. Most existing approaches used to classify VHR images are single instance (or pixel-based) learning algorithms, which are inadequate for analyzing VHR imagery, as single pixels do not contain sufficient contextual information (see Figure 1). However, much needed spatial contextual information can be captured via feature extraction and/or through newer machine learning algorithms in order to extract complex spatial patterns that distinguish informal settlements from formal ones. In recent years, we made significant progress in advancing the state of art in both directions. This paper summarizes these results.

  10. Contrast enhancing and adjusting advanced very high resolution radiometer scenes for solar illumination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zokaites, David M.

    1993-01-01

    The AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) satellite sensors provide daily coverage of the entire Earth. As a result, individual scenes cover broad geographic areas (roughly 3000 km by 5000 km) and can contain varying levels of solar illumination. Mosaics of AVHRR scenes can be created for large (continental and global) study areas. As the north-south extent of such mosaics increases, the lightness variability within the mosaic increases. AVHRR channels one and two of multiple daytime scenes were histogrammed to find a relationship between solar zenith and scene lightness as described by brightness value distribution. This relationship was used to determine look-up tables (luts) which removed effects of varying solar illumination. These luts were combined with a contrast enhancing lut and stored online. For individual scenes, one precomputed composite lut was applied to the entire scene based on the solar zenith at scene center. For mosaicked scenes, each pixel was adjusted based on the solar zenith at that pixel location. These procedures reduce lightness variability within and between scenes and enhance scene contrast to provide visually pleasing imagery.

  11. Sensitivity and information content of aerosol retrievals from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer: radiometric factors.

    PubMed

    Ignatov, Alexander

    2002-02-20

    The sensitivity of aerosol optical depths tau1 and tau2 derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) channels 1 and 2, centered at lambda1 = 0.63 and lambda2 = 0.83 microm, respectively, and of an effective Angstrom exponent alpha, derived therefrom as alpha = -ln(tau1/tau2)/ln(lambda1/lambda2), to calibration uncertainties, radiometric noise, and digitization is estimated. Analyses are made both empirically (by introduction of perturbations into the measured radiances and estimation of the respective partial derivatives) and theoretically (by use of a decoupled form of the single-scattering approximation of the radiative transfer equation). The two results are in close agreement. The errors, deltataui and deltaalphai, are parameterized empirically as functions of taui, radiometric errors, and Sun and view geometry. In particular, the alpha errors change in approximately inverse proportion to tau and are comparable with, or even exceed, typical alpha signals over oceans when tau < 0.25. Their detrimental effect on the information content of the AVHRR-derived size parameter gradually weakens as tau increases.

  12. Arctic sea ice leads from advanced very high resolution radiometer images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, R. W.; Rothrock, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    A large number of advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) images from throughout 1989 are analyzed to determine lead characteristics. The units of analysis are square 200-km cells, and there are 270 such cells in the data set. Clouds are masked manually. Leads determine from images of the potential open water delta, a scaled version of the surface temperature or albedo that weights thin ice by its thermal or brightness impact. The lead fraction is determined as the mean delta, the monthly mean lead fraction ranges from 0.02 in winter to 0.06 in summer in the central Arctic and is near 0.08 in the winter in the peripheral seas. A method of accounting for lead width sampling errors due to the finite sample areas is introduced. In the central Arctic the observed mean lead width for a threshold of delta = 0.1 ranges from 2 or 3 km (near the resolution of the instrument) in the winter to 6 km in the summer. In the peripheral seas it is about 5 km in the winter. Width distributions are often more heavily weighted in the tail than exponential distributions and are well approximated by a power law. The along-track, number density power law N = aw(exp -6) has a mean exponent of b = 1.60 (standard deviation 0.18) and shows some seasonal variability. Mean floe widths in the central Arctic are 40 to 50 km in the winter, dropping to about 10 km in the summer. For floes the power law has a mean exponent of 0.93 and exhibits a clearer annual cycle. Lead orientation is determined with a method based on the direction of maximum extent.

  13. Probabilistic approach to cloud and snow detection on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musial, J. P.; Hüsler, F.; Sütterlin, M.; Neuhaus, C.; Wunderle, S.

    2014-03-01

    Derivation of probability estimates complementary to geophysical data sets has gained special attention over the last years. Information about a confidence level of provided physical quantities is required to construct an error budget of higher-level products and to correctly interpret final results of a particular analysis. Regarding the generation of products based on satellite data a common input consists of a cloud mask which allows discrimination between surface and cloud signals. Further the surface information is divided between snow and snow-free components. At any step of this discrimination process a misclassification in a cloud/snow mask propagates to higher-level products and may alter their usability. Within this scope a novel probabilistic cloud mask (PCM) algorithm suited for the 1 km × 1 km Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data is proposed which provides three types of probability estimates between: cloudy/clear-sky, cloudy/snow and clear-sky/snow conditions. As opposed to the majority of available techniques which are usually based on the decision-tree approach in the PCM algorithm all spectral, angular and ancillary information is used in a single step to retrieve probability estimates from the precomputed look-up tables (LUTs). Moreover, the issue of derivation of a single threshold value for a spectral test was overcome by the concept of multidimensional information space which is divided into small bins by an extensive set of intervals. The discrimination between snow and ice clouds and detection of broken, thin clouds was enhanced by means of the invariant coordinate system (ICS) transformation. The study area covers a wide range of environmental conditions spanning from Iceland through central Europe to northern parts of Africa which exhibit diverse difficulties for cloud/snow masking algorithms. The retrieved PCM cloud classification was compared to the Polar Platform System (PPS) version 2012 and Moderate Resolution Imaging

  14. PC-SEAPAK - ANALYSIS OF COASTAL ZONE COLOR SCANNER AND ADVANCED VERY HIGH RESOLUTION RADIOMETER DATA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    PC-SEAPAK is a user-interactive satellite data analysis software package specifically developed for oceanographic research. The program is used to process and interpret data obtained from the Nimbus-7/Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS), and the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). PC-SEAPAK is a set of independent microcomputer-based image analysis programs that provide the user with a flexible, user-friendly, standardized interface, and facilitates relatively low-cost analysis of oceanographic satellite data. Version 4.0 includes 114 programs. PC-SEAPAK programs are organized into categories which include CZCS and AVHRR level-1 ingest, level-2 analyses, statistical analyses, data extraction, remapping to standard projections, graphics manipulation, image board memory manipulation, hardcopy output support and general utilities. Most programs allow user interaction through menu and command modes and also by the use of a mouse. Most programs also provide for ASCII file generation for further analysis in spreadsheets, graphics packages, etc. The CZCS scanning radiometer aboard the NIMBUS-7 satellite was designed to measure the concentration of photosynthetic pigments and their degradation products in the ocean. AVHRR data is used to compute sea surface temperatures and is supported for the NOAA 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 satellites. The CZCS operated from November 1978 to June 1986. CZCS data may be obtained free of charge from the CZCS archive at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. AVHRR data may be purchased through NOAA's Satellite Data Service Division. Ordering information is included in the PC-SEAPAK documentation. Although PC-SEAPAK was developed on a COMPAQ Deskpro 386/20, it can be run on most 386-compatible computers with an AT bus, EGA controller, Intel 80387 coprocessor, and MS-DOS 3.3 or higher. A Matrox MVP-AT image board with appropriate monitor and cables is also required. Note that the authors have received some reports of

  15. Environmental remote sensing using the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR). (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the acquisition, processing, and applications of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) used on polar satellites operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for the Department of Commerce. AVHRR provides global visible and infrared imagery. The cited reports contain information on calibration, registration, and image processing of AVHRR data. Included are reports on AHVRR use in the study of aerosols, atmospheric circulation, agriculture, forest fires, deforestation, sun glint, sedimentation, cloud classification, sea ice, snowmelts, ocean productivity, sea surface temperatures, and vegetation. (Contains a minimum of 120 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. Estimating root-zone moisture and evapotranspiration with AVHRR data[Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Wesely, M. L.

    1999-10-08

    The parameterized subgrid-scale surface fluxes (PASS) model uses satellite data and limited surface observations to infer root-zone available moisture content and evapotranspiration rate with moderate spatial resolution over extended terrestrial areas. The ultimate goal of this work is to produce estimates of water loss by evapotranspiration, for application in hydrological models. The major advantage to the method is that it can be applied to areas having diverse surface characteristics where direct surface flux measurements either do not exist or are not feasible and where meteorological data are available from only a limited number of ground stations. The emphasis of this work with the PASS model is on improving (1) methods of using satellite remote sensing data to derive the essential parameters for individual types of surfaces over large areas, (2) algorithms for describing the interactions of near-surface atmospheric conditions with surface processes, and (3) algorithms for computing surface energy and water vapor flux at a scale close to the size of a satellite-derived image pixel. The PASS approach is being developed and tested further with observations from the 1997 Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97) at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) site in the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), an area of about 5,000 km{sup 2} in southern Kansas. Here the authors describe some of the progress made since the previous report.

  17. Application of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer vegetation index to study atmosphere-biosphere exchange of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, I. Y.; Tucker, C. J.; Prentice, K. C.

    1987-01-01

    Normalized difference vegetation indices derived from radiances measured by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer were used to prescribe the phasing of terrestrial photosynthesis. The satellite data were combined with field data on soil respiration and a global map of net primary productivity to obtain the seasonal exchange of CO2 between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. The monthly fluxes of CO2 thus obtained were employed as source/sink functions in a global three-dimensional atmospheric tracer transport model to simulate the annual oscillations of CO2 in the atmosphere. The results demonstrate that satellite data of high spatial and temporal resolution can be used to provide quantitative information about seasonal and longer-term variations of photosynthetic activity on a global scale.

  18. Application of advanced very high resolution radiometer vegetation index to study atmosphere-biosphere exchange of CO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, I.Y.; Tucker, C.J.; Prentice, K.C.

    1987-03-20

    Normalized difference vegetation indices derived from radiances measured by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer aboard the NOAA 7 polar-orbiting satellite were used to prescribe the phasing of terrestrial photosynthesis. The satellite data were combined with field data on soil respiration and a global map of net primary productivity to obtain the seasonal exchange of CO/sub 2/ between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. The monthly fluxes of CO/sub 2/ thus obtained were employed as source/sink functions in a global three-dimensional atmospheric tracer transport model to simulate the annual oscillations of CO/sub 2/ in the atmosphere. Reasonable agreement was found between the simulated and observed annual cycles of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ at the locations of the remote monitoring stations. The results demonstrate that satellite data of high spatial and temporal resolution can be used to provide quantitative information about seasonal and longer-term variations of photosynthetic activity on a global scale. Atmospheric CO/sub 2/ observations and a three-dimensional atmospheric model have been used to validate the translation of the nondimensional satellite data into dimensional carbon fluxes. Direct calibration will require extensive ground truth and field measurements at ecosystem scales.

  19. Calibration of the Visible and Near-Infrared Channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) After Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, C. R. Nagaraja; Chen, Jianhua

    1993-01-01

    The relative degradation in time of the visible(channel 1: approx.0.58-0.6 microns) and near-infrared(channel 2: approx. O.72-1.1 microns) channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer(AVHRR), onboard the NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites(POES), has been determined, using the southeastern Libyan desert(21-23 deg N latitude; 28- 29 deg E longitude) as a time-invariant calibration target. A statistical procedure was used on the reflectance data for the two channels from the B3 data of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project(ISCCP) to obtain the degradation rates for the AVERRs on NOAA-7, -9, and -11 spacecraft. The degradation rates per year for channels 1 and 2 are respectively: 3.6% and 4.3%(NOAA-7); 5.9% and 3.5%(NOAA-9); and 1.2% and 2.0%(NOAA-11). The use of the degradation rates thus determined, in conjunction with 'absolute' calibrations obtained from congruent aircraft and satellite measurements, in the development of correction algorithms is illustrated with the AVHRR on the NOAA-9 spacecraft.

  20. Characteristics of the Alaskan 1-Km Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data sets used for analysis of vegetation biophysical properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markon, Carl J.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, data characteristics for composited, multitemporal Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data sets for Alaska were assessed for a 7- year period from 1991 to 1997. This involved consideration of the satellite sensors used, data processing performed, and data set compilation, along with an analysis of acquisition date, solar zenith angle, satellite viewing angle, presence of clouds, and registration accuracy for each year. Each year?s worth of data are available on CD-ROM in byte format. All data sets have an initial start date of April 1, but had varying ending dates (mid-September to late October) because of satellite sensor malfunction or the presence of clouds or snow; no data set extended beyond October 31. Satellite scan angles were summarized in seven categories: data obtained at nadir, data within 30, 40, and 55 degrees of nadir, data greater than 55 degrees off nadir, and proportions of the data representing east or west look angles. Minimum, maximum, and average solar zenith angles were provided for each period. Estimates of cloud cover for each period were based on three tests: reflectance gross cloud test, channel 3 minus channel 4, and channel 4 minus channel 5. Registration accuracy was estimated using a gray-level autocorrelation technique. Results of this investigation indicate that the composited data available on CD-ROM should be useful for a number of different regional assessments of Earth cover properties. However, caution is advised when using these data because (1) loss in precision from the conversion to a byte format, (2) low sun angles and high viewing angles in the September and October data, and (3) registration inaccuracies of 2 to 8 pixels.

  1. Arctic sea ice concentrations from special sensor microwave imager and advanced very high resolution radiometer satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, W. J.; Fowler, C.; Maslanik, J.

    1994-01-01

    Nearly coincident data from the special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) and the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) are used to compute and compare Arctic sea ice concentrations for different regions and times of the year. To help determine overall accuracies and to highlight sources of differences between passive microwave, optical wavelength, and thermal wavelength data, ice concentrations are estimated using two operational SSM/I ice concentration algorithms and with visible- and thermal-infrared wavelength AVHRR data. All algorithms capture the seasonal patterns of ice growth and melt. The ranges of differences fall within the general levels of uncertainty expected for each method and are similar to previous accuracy estimates. The estimated ice concentrations are all highly correlated, with uniform biases, although differences between individual pairs of observations can be large. On average, the NASA Team algorithm yielded 5% higher ice concentrations than the Bootstrap algorithm, while during nonmelt periods the two SSM/I algorithms agree to within 0.5%. These seasonal differences are consistent with the ways that the 19-GHz and 37-GHz microwave channels are used in the algorithms. When compared to the AVHRR-derived ice concentrations, the Team-algorithm results are more similar on average in terms of correlation and mean differences. However, the Team algorithm underestimates concentrations relative to the AVHRR output by 6% during cold months and overestimates by 3% during summer. Little seasonal difference exists between the Bootstrap and AVHRR results, with a mean difference of about 5%. Although the mean differences are less between the SSM/I-derived concentrations and concentrations estimated using AVHRR channel 1, the correlations appear substantially better between the SSM/I data and concentrations derived from AVHRR channel 4, particularly for the Team algorithm output.

  2. Advances in the Two Source Energy Balance (TSEB) model using very high resolution remote sensing data in vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto Solana, H.; Kustas, W. P.; Torres-Rua, A. F.; ELarab, M.; Song, L.; Alfieri, J. G.; Prueger, J. H.; McKee, L.; Anderson, M. C.; Alsina, M. M.; Jensen, A.; McKee, M.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal-based Two Source Energy Balance (TSEB) model partitions the water and energy fluxes from vegetation and soil components providing thus the ability for estimating soil evaporation (E) and canopy transpiration (T) separately. However, it is crucial for ET partitioning to retrieve reliable estimates of canopy and soil temperatures as well as the net radiation partitioning (ΔRn), as the latter determines the available energy for water and heat exchange from soil and canopy sources. These two factors become especially relevant in agricultural areas, with vegetation clumped along rows and hence only partially covering the soil surface for much of the growing season. The effects on radiation and temperature partitioning is extreme for vineyards and orchards, where there is often significant separation between plants, resulting in strongly clumped vegetation with significant fraction of bare soil/substrate. To better understand the effects of strongly clumped vegetation on radiation and Land Surface Temperature (LST) partitioning very high spatial resolution remote sensing data acquired from an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) were collected over vineyards in Califronia, as part of the Grape Remote sensing and Atmospheric Profile and Evapotranspiration eXperiment (GRAPEX).The multi-temporal observations from the UAS and very high pixel resolution permitted the estimation of reliable soil and leaf temperatures using a contextual algorithm based on the inverse relationship between LST and a vegetation index. An improvement in the algorithm estimating the effective leaf area index explicitly developed for vine rows and ΔRn using the 4SAIL Radiative Transfer Model is as well developed. The revisions to the TSEB model are evaluated with in situ measurements of energy fluxes and transmitted solar radiation. Results show that the modifications to the TSEB resulted in closer agreement with the flux tower measurements compared to the original TSEB model formulations. The

  3. METSAT information content: Cloud screening and solar correction investigations on the influence of NOAA-6 advanced very high resolution radiometer derived vegetation assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The development of the cloud indicator index (CII) for use with METSAT's advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) is described. The CII is very effective at identification of clouds. Also, explored are different solar correction and standard techniques and the impact of these corrections have on the information content of AVHRR data.

  4. Comparative Very-High-Resolution VUV Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. R.; Gibson, S. T.; Baldwin, K. G. H.; Dooley, P. M.; Waring, K.

    Despite their importance to the photochemistry of the terrestrial atmosphere, and many experimental studies, previous characterization of the Schumann-Runge (SR) bands of O2, B3 Σ u- <- X3 Σ_g^- (v, 0) (1750-2050 Å) has been limited by poor experimental resolution. In addition, our understanding of the SR spectrum is incomplete, many rovibrational transitions in the perturbed region of the spectrum [B(v > 15)] remaining unassigned. We review new very-high-resolution measurements of the O2 photoabsorption cross section in the SR bands. Tunable, narrow-bandwidth background vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation for the measurements ( 7 × 105 resolving power) was generated by the two-photon-resonant difference-frequency four-wave mixing in Xe of excimer-pumped dye-laser radiation. With the aid of these cross-section measurements, rovibrational and line-shape analyses have led to new insights into the molecular structure and predissociation dynamics of O2. The current VUV laser-spectroscopic measurements are shown to compare favourably with results from two other very-high-resolution experimental techniques, namely laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and VUV Fourier-transform spectroscopy, the latter performed using a synchrotron source.

  5. Quality and compatibility analyses of global aerosol products derived from the advanced very high resolution radiometer and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Li, Zhanqing; Chu, D. Allen; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2005-05-01

    There exist numerous global aerosol products derived from various satellite sensors, but little insight has been gained about their compatibility and quality. This study presents a comparison of two prominent global aerosol products derived over oceans from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) under the Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP) (Mishchenko et al., 1999) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) (Tanré et al., 1997). The comparisons are for monthly mean aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and Ångström exponent (α) at a spatial resolution of 1 × 1 degree. The two monthly AOT products showed substantial discrepancies, with a tendency of higher values from MODIS than from GACP/AVHRR, especially near the coasts of major aerosol outbreak regions. Individual monthly AOT values have poor correlation, but their regional means are moderately correlated (correlation coefficient 0.5 < R < 1.0). While cloud screening has often been argued to be a major factor explaining large discrepancies, this study shows that differences in aerosol models in the two retrieval algorithms can lead to large discrepancies. Contributions of the size distribution are more significant than the refractive index. The noisiness of the GACP/AVHRR aerosol retrievals seem to be partially influenced by radiometric uncertainties in the AVHRR system, but it is unlikely a major factor to explain the observed systematic discrepancies between the MODIS and GACP/AVHRR AOTs. For α, correlations between MODIS and GACP/AVHRR are lower (0.2 < R < 0.7) than AOT. The MODIS α shows a well-behaved dependence on the AOT contingent upon the aerosol type, while the GACP/AVHRR α has little correlation with the AOT. The high sensitivity in the selection of aerosol models to radiometric errors may be a primary reason for the worse comparison of α. Part of the discrepancies in α is attributed to different aerosol size distributions.

  6. Classification of simulated and actual NOAA-6 AVHRR data for hydrologic land-surface feature definition. [Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsby, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    An examination of the possibilities of using Landsat data to simulate NOAA-6 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data on two channels, as well as using actual NOAA-6 imagery, for large-scale hydrological studies is presented. A running average was obtained of 18 consecutive pixels of 1 km resolution taken by the Landsat scanners were scaled up to 8-bit data and investigated for different gray levels. AVHRR data comprising five channels of 10-bit, band-interleaved information covering 10 deg latitude were analyzed and a suitable pixel grid was chosen for comparison with the Landsat data in a supervised classification format, an unsupervised mode, and with ground truth. Landcover delineation was explored by removing snow, water, and cloud features from the cluster analysis, and resulted in less than 10% difference. Low resolution large-scale data was determined useful for characterizing some landcover features if weekly and/or monthly updates are maintained.

  7. Advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The program covered the design, construction, and test of a Breadboard Model, Engineering Model, Protoflight Model, Mechanical/Structural Model, and a Life Test Model. Special bench test and calibration equipment was also developed for use on the program. Initially, the instrument was to operate from a 906 n.mi. orbit and be thermally isolated from the spacecraft. The Breadboard Model and the Mechanical/Structural Model were designed and built to these requirements. The spacecraft altitude was changed to 450 n.mi., IFOVs and spectral characteristics were modified, and spacecraft interfaces were changed. The final spacecraft design provided a temperature-controlled Instrument Mounting Platform (IMP) to carry the AVHRR and other instruments. The design of the AVHRR was modified to these new requirements and the modifications were incorporated in the Engineering Model. The Protoflight Model and the Flight Models conform to this design.

  8. Estimation of surface energy balance from radiant surface temperature and NOAA AVHRR sensor reflectances over agricultural and native vegetation. [AVHRR (advanced very high resolution radiometer)

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xinmei; Lyons, T.J. ); Smith, R.C.G. ); Hacker, J.M.; Schwerdtfeger, P. )

    1993-08-01

    A model is developed to evaluate surface heat flux densities using the radiant surface temperature and red and near-infrared reflectances from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer sensor. Net radiation is calculated from an empirical formulation and albedo estimated from satellite observations. Infrared surface temperature is corrected to aerodynamic surface temperature in estimating the sensible heat flux and the latent flux is evaluated as the residual of the surface energy balance. When applied to relatively homogeneous agricultural and native vegetation, the model yields realistic estimates of sensible and latent heat flux density in the surface layer for cases where either the sensible or latent flux dominates. 29 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Improved method for calibrating the visible and near-infrared channels of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer.

    PubMed

    Che, N; Price, J C

    1993-12-20

    Two procedures are used to establish calibration of the visible and near-infrared channels of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-11 (NOAA-II) Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). The first procedure for visible spectra, uses satellite data, ground measurements of atmospheric conditions during satellite overpass, and historical surface reflectance values at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) in New Mexico. The second procedure, for the near-infrared, uses knowledge of the reflective properties at the WSMR and of a low-reflectance area, as determined from the first method, that yields satellite-gain values without a requirement for ground measurements of atmospheric conditions. The accuracy of gain values is estimated at ±7% for the two methods. The WSMR combines accessibility, a wide range of surface reflectances, and generally good observing conditions, making it a desirable location for satellite calibration.

  10. Effects of atmosphere and view and illumination geometry on visible and near infrared radiance data from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Fraser, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Dave's models to evaluate satellite off-nadir remote sensing of green vegetation cover types by simulating the visible and near-infrared advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) NOAA-6 and NOAA-7 radiances for three green-leaf biomass levels and bare soil. Ground measurements of surface reflectances were used. The simulations were done along a scan line at 30 deg latitude during the summer solstice, equinox, and winter solstice. The simulation models are described and the effect of atmosphere over moderately vegetated surfaces is discussed. The results show that sensor response to atmospheric path length can be substantial for the AVHRR visible and near-infrared channels and normalized difference values, but they can be minimized by high sun and clear atmospheric viewing. The results indicate that AVHRR data would be most useful for monitoring low green leaf biomas canopies.

  11. Remote sensing of cirrus cloud parameters using advanced very-high-resolution radiometer 3.7- and 1 O.9-microm channels.

    PubMed

    Ou, S C; Liou, K N; Gooch, W M; Takano, Y

    1993-04-20

    We develop a retrieval scheme by using advanced very-high-resolution radiometer (AVHRR) 3.7- and 10.9-microm data to compute simultaneously the temperature, optical depth, and mean effective ice-crystal size for cirrus clouds. The methodology involves the numerical solution of a set of nonlinear algebraic equations derived from the theory of radiative transfer. The solution requires the correlation of emissivities of two channels in terms of the effective extinction ratio. The dependence of this ratio on ice-crystal size distribution is examined by using an adding-doubling radiative transfer program. Investigation of the effects of cirrus parameters on upwelling radiances reveals that the brightnesstemperature difference between the two channels becomes larger for colder cirrus and smaller ice-crystal sizes. We apply the current retrieval scheme to satellite data collected at 0930 UTC, 28 October 1986, over the region of the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment CirrusIntesive Field Observation. We select the data over an area (~ 44 degrees N, 92 degrees W) near Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, for analysis. The retrieved cirrus heights compare reasonably well with lidar measurements taken at Fort McCoy 2 h after a satellite overpass at the target region. The retrieved mean effective crystal size is close to that derived from in situ aircraft measurements over Madison, Wisconsin, six hours after a satellite overpass.

  12. Linkages Between Global Vegetation and Climate: An Analysis Based on NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Data. Degree awarded by Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Los, Sietse Oene

    1998-01-01

    A monthly global 1 degree by 1 degree data set from 1982 until 1990 was derived from data collected by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on board the NOAA 7, 9, and 11 satellites. This data set was used to study the interactions between variations in climate and variations in the "greenness" of vegetation. Studies with the Colorado State University atmospheric general circulation model coupled to the Simple Biosphere model showed a large sensitivity of the hydrological balance to changes in vegetation at low latitudes. The depletion of soil moisture as a result of increased vegetation density provided a negative feedback in an otherwise positive association between increased vegetation, increased evaporation, and increased precipitation proposed by Charney and coworkers. Analysis of climate data showed, at temperate to high latitudes, a positive association between variation in land surface temperature, sea surface temperature and vegetation greenness. At low latitudes the data indicated a positive association between variations in sea surface temperature, rainfall and vegetation greenness. The variations in mid- to high latitude temperatures affected the global average greenness and this could provide an explanation for the increased carbon uptake by the terrestrial surface over the past couple of decades.

  13. Quality, compatibility, and synergy analyses of global aerosol products derived from the advanced very high resolution radiometer and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Li, Zhanqing

    2005-05-01

    A number of global aerosol products of varying quality, strengths, and weaknesses have been generated. Presented here are synthetic analyses with regard to the quality, compatibility, and synergy of two long-term global (1983-2000) aerosol products derived from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) and the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). Four essential aerosol parameters, namely, aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from AVHRR under the Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP), TOMS AOT, Ångström exponent (AE) from AVHRR, and TOMS aerosol index (AI) are analyzed together with various ancillary data sets on meteorological fields, ocean color, and ground-based AOT measurements. While the two satellite products reveal some common features, significant discrepancies exist. Reflectances measured at ultraviolet and visible wavelengths from the two sensors are incompatible in terms of the magnitude of AE computed from AOT derived from the two channels. The spatial distributions of the aerosol products from AVHRR and TOMS are complimentary in revealing different aspects of aerosol characteristics. In-depth analyses were carried out over several regions under the influence of different types of aerosols such as biomass burning, dust, sea salt, air pollution, and their mixtures. A classification algorithm was developed to identify dominant types of aerosols around the globe using aerosol products from the two instruments. Aerosol type information is used to develop and apply relationships between the AVHRR AOT and the TOMS AOT. The latter was used to extend the AOT at 0.55 μm over land around the globe. Comparisons of monthly mean AOTs with AERONET monthly mean AOTs showed a general agreement to within an estimated error range of ±0.08 ± 0.20τ. Finally, a comparison between the estimated AOT with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOT over land showed good agreement in terms of magnitude and seasonality, suggesting a means of

  14. The classification of the Arctic Sea ice types and the determination of surface temperature using advanced very high resolution radiometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massom, Robert; Comiso, Josefino C.

    1994-01-01

    The accurate quantification of new ice and open water areas and surface temperatures within the sea ice packs is a key to the realistic parameterization of heat, moisture, and turbulence fluxes between ocean and atmosphere in the polar regions. Multispectral NOAA advanced very high resolution radiometer/2 (AVHRR/2) satellite images are analyzed to evaluate how effectively the data can be used to characterize sea ice in the Bering and Greenland seas, both in terms of surface type and physical temperature. The basis of the classification algorithm, which is developed using a late wintertime Bering Sea ice cover data, is that frequency distributions of 10.8- micrometers radiances provide four distinct peaks, represeting open water, new ice, young ice, and thick ice with a snow cover. The results are found to be spatially and temporally consistent. Possible sources of ambiguity, especially associated with wider temporal and spatial application of the technique, are discussed. An ice surface temperature algorithm is developed for the same study area by regressing thermal infrared data from 10.8- and 12.0- micrometers channels against station air temperatures, which are assumed to approximate the skin temperatures of adjacent snow and ice. The standard deviations of the results when compared with in situ data are about 0.5 K over leads and polynyas to about 0.5-1.5 K over thick ice. This study is based upon a set of in situ data limited in scope and coverage. Cloud masks are applied using a thresholding technique that utilizes 3.74- and 10.8- micrometers channel data. The temperature maps produced show coherence with surface features like new ice and leads, and consistency with corresponding surface type maps. Further studies are needed to better understand the effects of both the spatial and temporal variability in emissivity, aerosol and precipitable atmospheric ice particle distribution, and atmospheric temperature inversions.

  15. Time scales of pattern evolution from cross-spectrum analysis of advanced very high resolution radiometer and coastal zone color scanner imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, Kenneth L.; Abbott, Mark R.

    1994-01-01

    We have selected square subareas (110 km on a side) from coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) and advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) images for 1981 in the California Current region off northern California for which we could identify sequences of cloud-free data over periods of days to weeks. We applied a two-dimensional fast Fourier transformation to images after median filtering, (x, y) plane removal, and cosine tapering. We formed autospectra and coherence spectra as functions of a scalar wavenumber. Coherence estimates between pairs of images were plotted against time separation between images for several wide wavenumber bands to provide a temporal lagged coherence function. The temporal rate of loss of correlation (decorrelation time scale) in surface patterns provides a measure of the rate of pattern change or evolution as a function of spatial dimension. We found that patterns evolved (or lost correlation) approximately twice as rapidly in upwelling jets as in the 'quieter' regions between jets. The rapid evolution of pigment patterns (lifetime of about 1 week or less for scales of 50-100 km) ought to hinder biomass transfer to zooplankton predators compared with phytoplankton patches that persist for longer times. We found no significant differences between the statistics of CZCS and AVHRR images (spectral shape or rate of decorrelation). In addition, in two of the three areas studied, the peak correlation between AVHRR and CZCS images from the same area occurred at zero lag, indicating that the patterns evolved simutaneously. In the third area, maximum coherence between thermal and pigment patterns occurred when pigment images lagged thermal images by 1-2 days, mirroring the expected lag of high pigment behind low temperatures (and high nutrients) in recently upwelled water. We conclude that in dynamic areas such as coastal upwelling systems, the phytoplankton cells (identified by pigment color patterns) behave largely as passive scalars at the

  16. Lake surface water temperatures of European Alpine lakes (1989-2013) based on the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) 1 km data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffler, M.; Lieberherr, G.; Wunderle, S.

    2015-02-01

    Lake water temperature (LWT) is an important driver of lake ecosystems and it has been identified as an indicator of climate change. Consequently, the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) lists LWT as an essential climate variable. Although for some European lakes long in situ time series of LWT do exist, many lakes are not observed or only on a non-regular basis making these observations insufficient for climate monitoring. Satellite data can provide the information needed. However, only few satellite sensors offer the possibility to analyse time series which cover 25 years or more. The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is among these and has been flown as a heritage instrument for almost 35 years. It will be carried on for at least ten more years, offering a unique opportunity for satellite-based climate studies. Herein we present a satellite-based lake surface water temperature (LSWT) data set for European water bodies in or near the Alps based on the extensive AVHRR 1 km data record (1989-2013) of the Remote Sensing Research Group at the University of Bern. It has been compiled out of AVHRR/2 (NOAA-07, -09, -11, -14) and AVHRR/3 (NOAA-16, -17, -18, -19 and MetOp-A) data. The high accuracy needed for climate related studies requires careful pre-processing and consideration of the atmospheric state. The LSWT retrieval is based on a simulation-based scheme making use of the Radiative Transfer for TOVS (RTTOV) Version 10 together with ERA-interim reanalysis data from the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts. The resulting LSWTs were extensively compared with in situ measurements from lakes with various sizes between 14 and 580 km2 and the resulting biases and RMSEs were found to be within the range of -0.5 to 0.6 K and 1.0 to 1.6 K, respectively. The upper limits of the reported errors could be rather attributed to uncertainties in the data comparison between in situ and satellite observations than inaccuracies of the satellite

  17. Techniques for Facilitating the Registration and Rectification of Satellite Data with Examples Using Data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer and the Landsat Multispectral Scanner.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Ladson

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis describes work relating to the mapping of digital satellite image data from its inherent geometry to the geometry of a different reference system. The reference system chosen may correspond to that of a different satellite image, or a map projection. The advantage of this process is that the information contained in the satellite image data may be related to a known reference. Use of information from the Advanced High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the TIROS-N series of polar-orbiting meteorological satellites for the provision of land cover information is reviewed. The data derived from this satellite is available every day. Attention is given to the use of vegetation indices derived from various combinations of the red and near infrared wavelengths of the AVHRR and the AVHRR is compared with the Landsat Multi-Spectral Scanner (MSS) which has been the instrument commonly associated with land cover studies employing satellite information. Results are provided of direct comparisons of AVHRR and Landsat data gathered over parts of Scotland and Africa. These comparisons represent an attempt to evaluate the utility of AVHRR data for the provision of land cover information over large areas, ground sampling not being possible. Special attention is given to the normalised difference vegetation index. An attempt at mapping within the intertidal zone of the Tay Estuary, Scotland is described as an example of rectifying a series of satellite images to a common projection. The land-water interface was identified in five Landsat MSS scenes, each corresponding to a different state of the tide, and was mapped to provide a bathymetric impression of the intertidal zone. Automation of the procedures for the registration and rectification of satellite data is described. The variable geometry of AVHRR data presents special problems to the automation of this process particularly if optimal

  18. Progressive display of very high resolution images using wavelets.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya; Wang, James Z.

    2002-01-01

    Digital or digitized biomedical images often have very high resolutions', which make them difficult or impossible to display on computer screens. Therefore, it is desirable to develop a multiresolution display method with which users can freely browse the contents of those high resolution images. In this paper, we present an improved wavelet-based progressive image display algorithm by stressing on the encoding and decoding process. The encoder, which dynamically determines levels of transform and partition of coefficients, is based on a modified Haar wavelet transform. The decoder retrieves the necessary data and reconstructs the requested region at a scale specified by the user. A prototype system, which enables virtually any size of images to be displayed progressively, has been implemented based on this algorithm. The system has low computational complexity for both encoding and decoding process. Images Figure 2 PMID:12476909

  19. A Very High Spatial Resolution Detector for Small Animal PET

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai Shah, M.S.

    2007-03-06

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an in vivo analog of autoradiography and has the potential to become a powerful new tool in imaging biological processes in small laboratory animals. PET imaging of small animals can provide unique information that can help in advancement of human disease models as well as drug development. Clinical PET scanners used for human imaging are bulky, expensive and do not have adequate spatial resolution for small animal studies. Hence, dedicated, low cost instruments are required for conducting small animal studies with higher spatial resolution than what is currently achieved with clinical as well as dedicated small animal PET scanners. The goal of the proposed project is to investigate a new all solid-state detector design for small animal PET imaging. Exceptionally high spatial resolution, good timing resolution, and excellent energy resolution are expected from the proposed detector design. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance solid-state detectors that provide high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and timing characteristics. Energy resolution characteristics of the new detector were also investigated. The goal of the Phase II project is to advance the promising solid-state detector technology for small animal PET and determine its full potential. Detectors modules will be built and characterized and finally, a bench-top small animal PET system will be assembled and evaluated.

  20. Precision Viticulture from Multitemporal, Multispectral Very High Resolution Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandylakis, Z.; Karantzalos, K.

    2016-06-01

    In order to exploit efficiently very high resolution satellite multispectral data for precision agriculture applications, validated methodologies should be established which link the observed reflectance spectra with certain crop/plant/fruit biophysical and biochemical quality parameters. To this end, based on concurrent satellite and field campaigns during the veraison period, satellite and in-situ data were collected, along with several grape samples, at specific locations during the harvesting period. These data were collected for a period of three years in two viticultural areas in Northern Greece. After the required data pre-processing, canopy reflectance observations, through the combination of several vegetation indices were correlated with the quantitative results from the grape/must analysis of grape sampling. Results appear quite promising, indicating that certain key quality parameters (like brix levels, total phenolic content, brix to total acidity, anthocyanin levels) which describe the oenological potential, phenolic composition and chromatic characteristics can be efficiently estimated from the satellite data.

  1. Lineshape spectroscopy with a very high resolution, very high signal-to-noise crystal spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E W; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Emig, J; Hell, N; Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Allan, P; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Hoarty, D J; Hobbs, L M R; James, S F

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for measuring the shapes of spectral lines produced from laser-irradiated targets on the Orion laser facility. The instrument utilizes a spherically bent crystal geometry to spatially focus and spectrally analyze photons from foil or microdot targets. The high photon collection efficiency resulting from its imaging properties allows the instrument to be mounted outside the Orion chamber, where it is far less sensitive to particles, hard x-rays, or electromagnetic pulses than instruments housed close to the target chamber center in ten-inch manipulators. Moreover, Bragg angles above 50° are possible, which provide greatly improved spectral resolution compared to radially viewing, near grazing-incidence crystal spectrometers. These properties make the new instrument an ideal lineshape diagnostic for determining plasma temperature and density. We describe its calibration on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility and present spectral data of the K-shell emission from highly charged sulfur produced by long-pulse as well as short-pulse beams on the Orion laser in the United Kingdom. PMID:27370448

  2. Lineshape spectroscopy with a very high resolution, very high signal-to-noise crystal spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E W; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Emig, J; Hell, N; Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Allan, P; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Hoarty, D J; Hobbs, L M R; James, S F

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for measuring the shapes of spectral lines produced from laser-irradiated targets on the Orion laser facility. The instrument utilizes a spherically bent crystal geometry to spatially focus and spectrally analyze photons from foil or microdot targets. The high photon collection efficiency resulting from its imaging properties allows the instrument to be mounted outside the Orion chamber, where it is far less sensitive to particles, hard x-rays, or electromagnetic pulses than instruments housed close to the target chamber center in ten-inch manipulators. Moreover, Bragg angles above 50° are possible, which provide greatly improved spectral resolution compared to radially viewing, near grazing-incidence crystal spectrometers. These properties make the new instrument an ideal lineshape diagnostic for determining plasma temperature and density. We describe its calibration on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility and present spectral data of the K-shell emission from highly charged sulfur produced by long-pulse as well as short-pulse beams on the Orion laser in the United Kingdom.

  3. Lineshape spectroscopy with a very high resolution, very high signal-to-noise crystal spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Chen, H.; Emig, J.; Hell, N.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Allan, P.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Hoarty, D. J.; Hobbs, L. M. R.; James, S. F.

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for measuring the shapes of spectral lines produced from laser-irradiated targets on the Orion laser facility. The instrument utilizes a spherically bent crystal geometry to spatially focus and spectrally analyze photons from foil or microdot targets. The high photon collection efficiency resulting from its imaging properties allows the instrument to be mounted outside the Orion chamber, where it is far less sensitive to particles, hard x-rays, or electromagnetic pulses than instruments housed close to the target chamber center in ten-inch manipulators. Moreover, Bragg angles above 50° are possible, which provide greatly improved spectral resolution compared to radially viewing, near grazing-incidence crystal spectrometers. These properties make the new instrument an ideal lineshape diagnostic for determining plasma temperature and density. We describe its calibration on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility and present spectral data of the K-shell emission from highly charged sulfur produced by long-pulse as well as short-pulse beams on the Orion laser in the United Kingdom.

  4. Very High Resolution Simulations of Compressible, Turbulent Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, P R; Porter, D H; Sytine, I; Anderson, S E; Mirin, A A; Curtis, B C; Cohen, R H; Dannevik, W P; Dimits, A M; Eliason, D E; Winkler, K-H; Hodson, S W

    2001-04-26

    The steadily increasing power of supercomputing systems is enabling very high resolution simulations of compressible, turbulent flows in the high Reynolds number limit, which is of interest in astrophysics as well as in several other fluid dynamical applications. This paper discusses two such simulations, using grids of up to 8 billion cells. In each type of flow, convergence in a statistical sense is observed as the mesh is refined. The behavior of the convergent sequences indicates how a subgrid-scale model of turbulence could improve the treatment of these flows by high-resolution Euler schemes like PPM. The best resolved case, a simulation of a Richtmyer-Meshkov mixing layer in a shock tube experiment, also points the way toward such a subgrid-scale model. Analysis of the results of that simulation indicates a proportionality relationship between the energy transfer rate from large to small motions and the determinant of the deviatoric symmetric strain as well as the divergence of the velocity for the large-scale field.

  5. Very High Resolution Image of Icy Cliffs on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This image, taken by the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft, is a very high resolution view of the Conamara Chaos region on Jupiter's moon Europa. It shows an area where icy plates have been broken apart and moved around laterally. The top of this image is dominated by corrugated plateaus ending in icy cliffs over a hundred meters (a few hundred feet) high. Debris piled at the base of the cliffs can be resolved down to blocks the size of a house. A fracture that runs horizontally across and just below the center of the Europa image is about the width of a freeway.

    North is to the top right of the image, and the sun illuminates the surface from the east. The image is centered at approximately 9 degrees north latitude and 274 degrees west longitude. The image covers an area approximately 1.7 kilometers by 4 kilometers (1 mile by 2.5 miles). The resolution is 9 meters (30 feet) per picture element. This image was taken on December 16, 1997 at a range of 900 kilometers (540 miles) by Galileo's solid state imaging system.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  6. Volume Based DTM Generation from Very High Resolution Photogrammetric Dsms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piltz, B.; Bayer, S.; Poznanska, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose a new algorithm for digital terrain (DTM) model reconstruction from very high spatial resolution digital surface models (DSMs). It represents a combination of multi-directional filtering with a new metric which we call normalized volume above ground to create an above-ground mask containing buildings and elevated vegetation. This mask can be used to interpolate a ground-only DTM. The presented algorithm works fully automatically, requiring only the processing parameters minimum height and maximum width in metric units. Since slope and breaklines are not decisive criteria, low and smooth and even very extensive flat objects are recognized and masked. The algorithm was developed with the goal to generate the normalized DSM for automatic 3D building reconstruction and works reliably also in environments with distinct hillsides or terrace-shaped terrain where conventional methods would fail. A quantitative comparison with the ISPRS data sets Potsdam and Vaihingen show that 98-99% of all building data points are identified and can be removed, while enough ground data points (~66%) are kept to be able to reconstruct the ground surface. Additionally, we discuss the concept of size dependent height thresholds and present an efficient scheme for pyramidal processing of data sets reducing time complexity to linear to the number of pixels, O(WH).

  7. Automatic Crowd Analysis from Very High Resolution Satellite Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirmacek, B.; Reinartz, P.

    2011-04-01

    Recently automatic detection of people crowds from images became a very important research field, since it can provide crucial information especially for police departments and crisis management teams. Due to the importance of the topic, many researchers tried to solve this problem using street cameras. However, these cameras cannot be used to monitor very large outdoor public events. In order to bring a solution to the problem, herein we propose a novel approach to detect crowds automatically from remotely sensed images, and especially from very high resolution satellite images. To do so, we use a local feature based probabilistic framework. We extract local features from color components of the input image. In order to eliminate redundant local features coming from other objects in given scene, we apply a feature selection method. For feature selection purposes, we benefit from three different type of information; digital elevation model (DEM) of the region which is automatically generated using stereo satellite images, possible street segment which is obtained by segmentation, and shadow information. After eliminating redundant local features, remaining features are used to detect individual persons. Those local feature coordinates are also assumed as observations of the probability density function (pdf) of the crowds to be estimated. Using an adaptive kernel density estimation method, we estimate the corresponding pdf which gives us information about dense crowd and people locations. We test our algorithm usingWorldview-2 satellite images over Cairo and Munich cities. Besides, we also provide test results on airborne images for comparison of the detection accuracy. Our experimental results indicate the possible usage of the proposed approach in real-life mass events.

  8. Building identification from very high-resolution satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhomme, Stephane

    Urbanisation still remains one of the main problems worldwide. The extent and rapidity of the urban growth induce a number of socio-economic and environmental conflicts everywhere. In order to reduce these problems, urban planners need to integrate spatial information in planning tools. Actually high expectations are made on Very High Spatial Resolution imagery (VHSR). These high-spatial resolution images are available at a reasonable price and due to short revisit periods, they offer a high degree of actuality. However, interpretation methods seem not to be adapted to this new type of images. The aim of our study is to develop a new method for semi-automatic building extraction with VHSR. The different steps performed to achieve our objective are each presented in a chapter. In the first chapter, the general context of our research is described with the definition of our objective. After a short historical review of urbanisation, we focus on urban growth and associated problems. In the following we discuss the possible contributions of geography to reduce these problems. After discussing concepts, theories and methodologies of geographical analysis in urban areas, we present existing general urban planning tools. Finally, we show the special interest of our study that is due to a growing need to integrate spatial information in these decision support tools. In the second chapter we verify the possibility of reaching our objective by analysing the technical characteristics of the images, the noise and the distortions which affect the images. Quality and interpretability of the studied image is analysed in order to show the capacity of these image to represent urban objects as close to reality as possible. The results confirm the potential of VHSR Imagery for urban objects analysis. The third chapter deal with the preliminary steps necessary for the elaboration of our method of building extraction. First, we evaluate the quality of the Sherbrooke Ikonos image

  9. Geostatistics and remote sensing using NOAA-AVHRR satellite imagery as predictive tools in tick distribution and habitat suitability estimations for Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) in South America. National Oceanographic and Atmosphere Administration-Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Peña, A

    1999-02-01

    Remote sensing based on NOAA (National Oceanographic and Atmosphere Administration) satellite imagery was used, together with geostatistics (cokriging) to model the correlation between the temperature and vegetation variables and the distribution of the cattle tick, Boophilus microplus (Canestrini), in the Neotropical region. The results were used to map the B. microplus habitat suitability on a continental scale. A database of B. microplus capture localities was used, which was tabulated with the AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) images from the NOAA satellite series. They were obtained at 10 days intervals between 1983 and 1994, with an 8 km resolution. A cokriging system was generated to extrapolate the results. The data for habitat suitability obtained through two vegetation and four temperature variables were strongly correlated with the known distribution of B. microplus (sensitivity 0.91; specificity 0.88) and provide a good estimation of the tick habitat suitability. This model could be used as a guide to the correct interpretation of the distribution limits of B. microplus. It can be also used to prepare eradication campaigns or to make predictions about the effects of global change on the distribution of the parasite.

  10. Very High Resolution Climate Modelling in Northern Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stendel, M.; Christensen, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    Simulations with global climate models (GCMs) clearly indicate that major climate changes for the Arctic can be expected during the 21st century. Already now, there are substantial changes in sea-ice extent and thickness and a considerable increase in air temperature in several regions. Contemporary GCMs are unable to give a realistic representation of the climate and climate change in regions with steep orography, due to their coarse resolution. But even relatively high resolution regional climate models (RCMs) fail in this respect. We have therefore conducted a transient simulation with the newest version of the HIRHAM RCM, covering the period 1958-2001 over a region in northeast European Russia, including the Ural Mountains, with the unprecedented horizontal resolution of 4 km. For this simulation, a double downscaling procedure was applied. Average and extreme values will be discussed, and a comparison of subsurface temperatures to a set of observations from the region will be presented.

  11. Comparative Assessment of Very High Resolution Satellite and Aerial Orthoimagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrafiotis, P.; Georgopoulos, A.

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims to assess the accuracy and radiometric quality of orthorectified high resolution satellite imagery from Pleiades-1B satellites through a comparative evaluation of their quantitative and qualitative properties. A Pleiades-B1 stereopair of high resolution images taken in 2013, two adjacent GeoEye-1 stereopairs from 2011 and aerial orthomosaic (LSO) provided by NCMA S.A (Hellenic Cadastre) from 2007 have been used for the comparison tests. As control dataset orthomosaic from aerial imagery provided also by NCMA S.A (0.25m GSD) from 2012 was selected. The process for DSM and orthoimage production was performed using commercial digital photogrammetric workstations. The two resulting orthoimages and the aerial orthomosaic (LSO) were relatively and absolutely evaluated for their quantitative and qualitative properties. Test measurements were performed using the same check points in order to establish their accuracy both as far as the single point coordinates as well as their distances are concerned. Check points were distributed according to JRC Guidelines for Best Practice and Quality Checking of Ortho Imagery and NSSDA standards while areas with different terrain relief and land cover were also included. The tests performed were based also on JRC and NSSDA accuracy standards. Finally, tests were carried out in order to assess the radiometric quality of the orthoimagery. The results are presented with a statistical analysis and they are evaluated in order to present the merits and demerits of the imaging sensors involved for orthoimage production. The results also serve for a critical approach for the usability and cost efficiency of satellite imagery for the production of Large Scale Orthophotos.

  12. Inter-Satellite Calibration Linkages for the Visible and Near-Infrared Channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on the NOAA-7, -9, and -11 Spacecraft. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    NagarajaRao, C. R.; Chen, J.

    1996-01-01

    The post-launch degradation of the visible (channel 1: 0.58- 068 microns) and near-infrared (channel 2: approx. 0.72 - l.l microns) channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the NOAA-7, -9, and -11 Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) was estimated using the south-eastern part of the Libyan Desert as a radiometrically stable calibration target. The relative annual degradation rates, in per cent, for the two channels are, respectively: 3.6 and 4.3 (NOAA-7); 5.9 and 3.5 (NOAA-9); and 1.2 and 2.0 (NOAA-11). Using the relative degradation rates thus determined, in conjunction with absolute calibrations based on congruent path aircraft/satellite radiance measurements over White Sands, New Mexico (USA), the variation in time of the absolute gain or slope of the AVHRR on NOAA-9 was evaluated. Inter-satellite calibration linkages were established, using the AVHRR on NOAA-9 as a normalization standard. Formulae for the calculation of calibrated radiances and albedos (AVHRR usage), based on these interlinkages, are given for the three AVHRRs.

  13. New very high resolution radar studies of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Campbell, Bruce

    1987-01-01

    As part of an effort to further understand the geologic utility of radar studies of the terrestrial planets, investigators at the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics are collaborating with NEROC Haystack Observatory, MIT and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in the analysis of existing 3.8 and 70 cm radar images of the Moon, and in the acquisition of new data for selected lunar targets. The intent is to obtain multi-polarization radar images at resolutions approaching 75 meters (3.8 cm wavelength) and 400 meters (70 cm wavelength) for the Apollo landing sites (thereby exploiting available ground truth) or regions covered by the metric camera and geochemical experiments onboard the command modules of Apollos 15, 16 and 17. These data were collected in both like- and cross-polarizations, and, in the case of the 70 cm data, permit the phase records to be used to assess the scattering properties of the surface. The distribution of surface units on the Moon that show a mismatch between the surface implied by like- and cross-polarized scattering data is being analyzed, based on the scattering models of Evans and Hagfors.

  14. Chaotic Terrain on Europa in Very High Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This view of the Conamara Chaos region on Jupiter's moon Europa taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft shows an area where the icy surface has been broken into many separate plates that have moved laterally and rotated. These plates are surrounded by a topographically lower matrix. This matrix material may have been emplaced as water, slush, or warm flowing ice, which rose up from below the surface. One of the plates is seen as a flat, lineated area in the upper portion of the image. Below this plate, a tall twin-peaked mountain of ice rises from the matrix to a height of more than 250 meters (800 feet). The matrix in this area appears to consist of a jumble of many different sized chunks of ice. Though the matrix may have consisted of a loose jumble of ice blocks while it was forming, the large fracture running vertically along the left side of the image shows that the matrix later became a hardened crust, and is frozen today. The Brooklyn Bridge in New York City would be just large enough to span this fracture.

    North is to the top right of the picture, and the sun illuminates the surface from the east. This image, centered at approximately 8 degrees north latitude and 274 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 4 kilometers by 7 kilometers (2.5 miles by 4 miles). The resolution is 9 meters (30 feet) per picture element. This image was taken on December 16, 1997 at a range of 900 kilometers (540 miles) by Galileo's solid state imaging system.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  15. Multipath sparse coding for scene classification in very high resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jiayuan; Tan, Hui Li; Lu, Shijian

    2015-10-01

    With the rapid development of various satellite sensors, automatic and advanced scene classification technique is urgently needed to process a huge amount of satellite image data. Recently, a few of research works start to implant the sparse coding for feature learning in aerial scene classification. However, these previous research works use the single-layer sparse coding in their system and their performances are highly related with multiple low-level features, such as scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) and saliency. Motivated by the importance of feature learning through multiple layers, we propose a new unsupervised feature learning approach for scene classification on very high resolution satellite imagery. The proposed unsupervised feature learning utilizes multipath sparse coding architecture in order to capture multiple aspects of discriminative structures within complex satellite scene images. In addition, the dense low-level features are extracted from the raw satellite data by using different image patches with varying size at different layers, and this approach is not limited to a particularly designed feature descriptors compared with the other related works. The proposed technique has been evaluated on two challenging high-resolution datasets, including the UC Merced dataset containing 21 different aerial scene categories with a 1 foot resolution and the Singapore dataset containing 5 land-use categories with a 0.5m spatial resolution. Experimental results show that it outperforms the state-of-the-art that uses the single-layer sparse coding. The major contributions of this proposed technique include (1) a new unsupervised feature learning approach to generate feature representation for very high-resolution satellite imagery, (2) the first multipath sparse coding that is used for scene classification in very high-resolution satellite imagery, (3) a simple low-level feature descriptor instead of many particularly designed low-level descriptor

  16. Climatic controls of vegetation vigor in four contrasting forest types of India--evaluation from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer datasets (1990-2000).

    PubMed

    Prasad, V Krishna; Anuradha, E; Badarinath, K V S

    2005-09-01

    Ten-day advanced very high resolution radiometer images from 1990 to 2000 were used to examine spatial patterns in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and their relationships with climatic variables for four contrasting forest types in India. The NDVI signal has been extracted from homogeneous vegetation patches and has been found to be distinct for deciduous and evergreen forest types, although the mixed-deciduous signal was close to the deciduous ones. To examine the decadal response of the satellite-measured vegetation phenology to climate variability, seven different NDVI metrics were calculated using the 11-year NDVI data. Results suggested strong spatial variability in forest NDVI metrics. Among the forest types studied, wet evergreen forests of north-east India had highest mean NDVI (0.692) followed by evergreen forests of the Western Ghats (0.529), mixed deciduous forests (0.519) and finally dry deciduous forests (0.421). The sum of NDVI (SNDVI) and the time-integrated NDVI followed a similar pattern, although the values for mixed deciduous forests were closer to those for evergreen forests of the Western Ghats. Dry deciduous forests had higher values of inter-annual range (RNDVI) and low mean NDVI, also coinciding with a high SD and thus a high coefficient of variation (CV) in NDVI (CVNDVI). SNDVI has been found to be high for wet evergreen forests of north-east India, followed by evergreen forests of the Western Ghats, mixed deciduous forests and dry deciduous forests. Further, the maximum NDVI values of wet evergreen forests of north-east India (0.624) coincided with relatively high annual total precipitation (2,238.9 mm). The time lags had a strong influence in the correlation coefficients between annual total rainfall and NDVI. The correlation coefficients were found to be comparatively high (R2=0.635) for dry deciduous forests than for evergreen forests and mixed deciduous forests, when the precipitation data with a lag of 30 days was

  17. Very High Resolution Mapping of Tree Cover Using Scalable Deep Learning Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ganguly, sangram; basu, saikat; nemani, ramakrishna; mukhopadhyay, supratik; michaelis, andrew; votava, petr; saatchi, sassan

    2016-04-01

    Several studies to date have provided an extensive knowledge base for estimating forest aboveground biomass (AGB) and recent advances in space-based modeling of the 3-D canopy structure, combined with canopy reflectance measured by passive optical sensors and radar backscatter, are providing improved satellite-derived AGB density mapping for large scale carbon monitoring applications. A key limitation in forest AGB estimation from remote sensing, however, is the large uncertainty in forest cover estimates from the coarse-to-medium resolution satellite-derived land cover maps (present resolution is limited to 30-m of the USGS NLCD Program). As part of our NASA Carbon Monitoring System Phase II activities, we have demonstrated that uncertainties in forest cover estimates at the Landsat scale result in high uncertainties in AGB estimation, predominantly in heterogeneous forest and urban landscapes. We have successfully tested an approach using scalable deep learning architectures (Feature-enhanced Deep Belief Networks and Semantic Segmentation using Convolutional Neural Networks) and High-Performance Computing with NAIP air-borne imagery data for mapping tree cover at 1-m over California and Maryland. Our first high resolution satellite training label dataset from the NAIP data can be found here at http://csc.lsu.edu/~saikat/deepsat/ . In a comparison with high resolution LiDAR data available over selected regions in the two states, we found our results to be promising both in terms of accuracy as well as our ability to scale nationally. In this project, we propose to estimate very high resolution forest cover for the continental US at spatial resolution of 1-m in support of reducing uncertainties in the AGB estimation. The proposed work will substantially contribute to filling the gaps in ongoing carbon monitoring research and help quantifying the errors and uncertainties in related carbon products.

  18. The observation of Martian dune migration using very high resolution image analysis and photogrammetric data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungrack; Yun, Hyewon; Kim, Younghwi; Baik, Hyunseob

    2016-04-01

    Although the origins and processes of Martian aeolian features, especially dunes, have not been fully identified yet, it has been better understood by the orbital observation method which has led to the identification of Martian dune migration such as a case in Nili Patera (Bridges, 2012), and the numerical model employing advanced computational fluid dynamics (Jackson et al., 2015). Specifically, the recent introduction of very high-resolution image products, such as 25 cm-resolution HiRISE imagery and its precise photogrammetric processor, allows us to trace the estimated, although tiny, dune migration over the Martian surface. In this study, we attempted to improve the accuracy of active dune migration measurements by 1) the introduction of very high resolution ortho images and stereo analysis based on the hierarchical geodetic control (Kim and Muller, 2009) for better initial point settings; 2) positioning error removal throughout polynomial image control; and 3) the improved sub-pixel co-registration algorithms using optical flow with a refinement stage conducted on a pyramidal grid processor and a blunder classifier. Consequently, this scheme not only measured Martian dune migration more precisely, but it will further achieve the extension of 3D observations combining stereo analysis and photoclinometry. The established algorithms have been tested using the HiRISE time series images over several dune fields, such as the Kaiser, Procter, and Wirtz craters, which were reported by the Mars Global Digital Dune Database (Hayward et al., 2013). The detected dune migrations were significantly larger than previously reported values and slightly correlated with the wind directions estimated by Martian Climate Database (Bingham et al., 2003). The outcomes in our study will be demonstrated with the quantified values in 2D and volumetric direction. In the future, the method will be further applied to the dune fields in the Mars Global dune database comprehensively and

  19. Very high resolution time-lapse photography for plant and ecosystems research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Very high resolution gigapixel photography increasingly is being used to support a broad range of ecosystem and physical process research because it offers an inexpensive means of simultaneously collecting information at a range of spatial scales. Recently, methods have been developed to incorporate...

  20. New Design Approach for a Very-High Resolution Spectrograph for the VLT Combined Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanò, Paolo; Dekker, Hans

    To achieve very-high spectral resolution (R>100 000) with large telescopes (D>8 m) new solutions have been investigated, like anamorphic pupil slicing, elliptical pupils, slanted VPH gratings, starting from the initial design of CODEX, as proposed by B. Delabre.

  1. Information content capabilities of very high resolution optical space imagery for updating GIS database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkan, Mehmet; Jacobsen, Karsten

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays, the number and capacity of very high resolution optical satellites grows permanently, so the access to very high resolution space images is not any more a problem. The use of Geographic Information Systems (GISs) together with Remote Sensing became important. With the increased ground resolution a competition to aerial images exist. For the generation of topographic maps, today available as GIS, the accuracy and the information content - what elements can be identified in the image - are important. Both may limit the presentation scale of topographic maps. As horizontal accuracy 0.25mm up to 0.3mm in the map scale are accepted. The required information content is more complicate. The object details to be presented in topographic maps vary from area to area which is based on the planned and unplanned areas. In this study, images from IRS-1C, Kompsat-1, SPOT 5, OrbView-3, IKONOS, QuickBird and WorldView-1 have been used for topographic mapping. For this reason, Zonguldak test fields are an important area for applications of the high resolution imageries. The details which can be identified in the space images dominantly depends upon the ground resolution, available as ground sampling distance (GSD). In this study, high resolution imageries have been tested depending on the GSD and corresponding to the map scales for updating GIS database.

  2. Emission features in the spectrum of NGC 7027 near 3. 3 microns at very high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, R.P.; Moorhead, J.M.; Wehlau, W.H.; Maillard, J.P. CNRS, Institut d'Astrophysique, Paris )

    1991-02-01

    A very high resolution spectrum is presented of the planetary nebula NGC 7027 over a 200/cm interval centered at 2950/cm, and the features found are described: (1) nebular continuum, (2) atomic recombination lines of H and He II, and (3) three broader emission features of uncertain origin. For the latter the first evidence is presented that the 3.46 micron feature and possibly the 3.40 micron feature are resolvable into a sequence of narrower features. The interpretation of the broader features is discussed in terms of the hypothesis of identification with emission by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. 18 refs.

  3. Very High Resolution Simulation of Compressible Turbulence on the IBM-SP System

    SciTech Connect

    Mirin, A.A.; Cohen, R.H.; Curtis, B.C.; Dannevik, W.P.; Dimits, A.M.; Duchaineau, M.A.; Eliason, D.E.; Schikore, D.R.; Anderson, S.E.; Woodward, P.R.; Shieh, L.J.; White, S.W.; Porter, D.H.

    1999-08-05

    Understanding turbulence and mix in compressible flows is of fundamental importance to real-world applications such as chemical combustion and supernova evolution. The ability to run in three dimensions and at very high resolution is required for the simulation to accurately represent the interaction of the various length scales, and consequently, the reactivity of the intermixing species. Toward this end, we have carried out a very high resolution (over 8 billion zones) 3-D simulation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and turbulent mixing on the IBM Sustained Stewardship TeraOp (SST) system, developed under the auspices of the Department of Energy (DOE) Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) and located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We have also undertaken an even higher resolution proof-of-principle calculation (over 24 billion zones) on 5832 processors of the IBM, which executed for over an hour at a sustained rate of 1.05 Tflop/s, as well as a short calculation with a modified algorithm that achieved a sustained rate of 1.18 Tflop/s. The full production scientific simulation, using a further modified algorithm, ran for 27,000 timesteps in slightly over a week of n-all time using 3840 processors of the IBM system, clocking a sustained throughput of roughly 0.6 teraflop per second. Nearly 300,000 graphics files comprising over three terabytes of data were produced and post-processed. The capability of running in 3-D at high resolution enabled us to get a more accurate and detailed picture of the fluid-flow structure--in particular, to simulate the development of fine scale structures from the interactions of long- and short-wavelength phenomena, to elucidate differences between two-dimensional and three-dimensional turbulence, to explore a conjecture regarding the transition from unstable flow to fully developed turbulence with increasing Reynolds number, and to ascertain convergence of the computed solution with respect to mesh

  4. The Optimized Block-Regression Fusion Algorithm for Pansharpening of Very High Resolution Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. X.; Yang, J. H.; Reinartz, P.

    2016-06-01

    Pan-sharpening of very high resolution remotely sensed imagery need enhancing spatial details while preserving spectral characteristics, and adjusting the sharpened results to realize the different emphases between the two abilities. In order to meet the requirements, this paper is aimed at providing an innovative solution. The block-regression-based algorithm (BR), which was previously presented for fusion of SAR and optical imagery, is firstly applied to sharpen the very high resolution satellite imagery, and the important parameter for adjustment of fusion result, i.e., block size, is optimized according to the two experiments for Worldview-2 and QuickBird datasets in which the optimal block size is selected through the quantitative comparison of the fusion results of different block sizes. Compared to five fusion algorithms (i.e., PC, CN, AWT, Ehlers, BDF) in fusion effects by means of quantitative analysis, BR is reliable for different data sources and can maximize enhancement of spatial details at the expense of a minimum spectral distortion.

  5. A prototype of very high resolution small animal PET scanner using silicon pad detectors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-June; Leslie Rogers, W.; Huh, Sam; Kagan, Harris; Honscheid, Klaus; Burdette, Don; Chesi, Enrico; Lacasta, Carlos; Llosa, Gabriela; Mikuz, Marko; Studen, Andrej; Weilhammer, Peter; Clinthorne, Neal H.

    2007-01-01

    A very high resolution small animal positron emission tomograph (PET) which can achieve sub-millimeter spatial resolution is being developed using silicon pad detectors. The prototype PET for a single slice instrument consists of two 1 mm thick silicon pad detectors, each containing a 32 × 16 array of 1.4 mm × 1.4 mm pads read out with four VATAGP3 chips which have 128 channels low-noise self triggering ASIC in each chip, coincidence units, a source turntable and tungsten slice collimator. The silicon detectors were located edgewise on opposite sides of a 4 cm field-of-view to maximize efficiency. Energy resolution is dominated by electronic noise, which is 0.98% (1.38 keV) FWHM at 140.5 keV. Coincidence timing resolution is 82.1 ns FWHM and coincidence efficiency was measured to be 1.04 × 10-3 % from two silicon detectors with annihilation photons of 18F source Image data were acquired and reconstructed using conventional 2-D filtered-back projection (FBP) and a maximum likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) method. Image resolution of approximately 1.45 mm FWHM is obtained from 1-D profile of 1.1 mm diameter 18F line source image. Even better resolution can be obtained with smaller detector element sizes. While many challenges remain in scaling up the instrument to useful efficiency including densely packed detectors and significantly improved timing resolution, performance of the test setup in terms of easily achieving submillimeter resolution is compelling. PMID:18084629

  6. DEIMOS-2: cost-effective, very-high resolution multispectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirondini, Fabrizio; López, Julio; González, Enrique; González, José Antonio

    2014-10-01

    ELECNOR DEIMOS is a private Spanish company, part of the Elecnor industrial group, which owns and operates DEIMOS-1, the first Spanish Earth Observation satellite. DEIMOS-1, launched in 2009, is among the world leading sources of high resolution data. On June 19th, 2014 ELECNOR DEIMOS launched its second satellite, DEIMOS-2, which is a very-high resolution, agile satellite capable of providing 75-cm pan-sharpened imagery, with a 12kmwide swath. The DEIMOS-2 camera delivers multispectral imagery in 5 bands: Panchromatic, G, R, B and NIR. DEIMOS-2 is the first European satellite completely owned by private capital, which is capable of providing submetric multispectral imagery. The whole end-to-end DEIMOS-2 system is designed to provide a cost-effective, dependable and highly responsive service to cope with the increasing need of fast access to very-high resolution imagery. The same 24/7 commercial service which is now available for DEIMOS-1, including tasking, download, processing and delivery, will become available for DEIMOS-2 as well, as soon as the satellite enters into commercial operations, at the end of its in-orbit commissioning. The DEIMOS-2 satellite has been co-developed by ELECNOR DEIMOS and SATREC-I (South Korea), and it has been integrated and tested in the new ELECNOR DEIMOS Satellite Systems premises in Puertollano (Spain). The DEIMOS-2 ground segment, which includes four receiving/commanding ground stations in Spain, Sweden and Canada, has been completely developed in-house by ELECNOR DEIMOS, based on its Ground Segment for Earth Observation (gs4EO®) suite. In this paper we describe the main features of the DEIMOS-2 system, with emphasis on its initial operations and the quality of the initial imagery, and provide updated information on its mission status.

  7. Damage assessment framework for landslide disaster based on very high-resolution images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Xu, Qihua; He, Jun; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Ying; Ge, Fengxiang

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that rapid building damage assessment is necessary for postdisaster emergency relief and recovery. Based on an analysis of very high-resolution remote-sensing images, we propose an automatic building damage assessment framework for rainfall- or earthquake-induced landslide disasters. The framework consists of two parts that implement landslide detection and the damage classification of buildings, respectively. In this framework, an approach based on modified object-based sparse representation classification and morphological processing is used for automatic landslide detection. Moreover, we propose a building damage classification model, which is a classification strategy designed for affected buildings based on the spectral characteristics of the landslide disaster and the morphological characteristics of building damage. The effectiveness of the proposed framework was verified by applying it to remote-sensing images from Wenchuan County, China, in 2008, in the aftermath of an earthquake. It can be useful for decision makers, disaster management agencies, and scientific research organizations.

  8. Probabilistic Change Detection Framework for Analyzing Settlement Dynamics Using Very High-resolution Satellite Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju; Graesser, Jordan B

    2012-01-01

    Global human population growth and an increasingly urbanizing world have led to rapid changes in human settlement landscapes and patterns. Timely monitoring and assessment of these changes and dissemination of accurate information is important for policy makers, city planners, and humanitarian relief workers. Satellite imagery provides useful data for the aforementioned applications, and remote sensing can be used to identify and quantify change areas. We explore a probabilistic framework to identify changes in human settlements using very high-resolution satellite imagery. As compared to predominantly pixel-based change detection systems which are highly sensitive to image registration errors, our grid (block) based approach is more robust to registration errors. The presented framework is an automated change detection system applicable to both panchromatic and multi-spectral imagery. The detection system provides comprehensible information about change areas, and minimizes the post-detection thresholding procedure often needed in traditional change detection algorithms.

  9. Using very high resolution remote sensing for the management of coral reef fisheries: review and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Mélanie A; Andréfouët, Serge

    2010-09-01

    Coral reef fisheries are critical for food security and as a source of income in developing and developed countries, but they are collapsing in many areas. Following the emergence and routine availability of commercial very high spatial resolution (0.6-10 m) multispectral satellite images, we reviewed the use of these new high-quality remote sensing data and products for coral reef fisheries management. The availability of habitats maps improves management by guiding sampling strategies, mapping resources, involving local communities, identifying conservation areas, and facilitating Ecosystem Based Fishery Management (EBFM) approaches. However, despite their potential, very little use of products designed specifically for fishery management can be reported, likely due to high costs, inherent technology limitations and lack of awareness on the possibilities. Given the theoretical benefits brought by relevant habitat maps in EBFM frameworks, we advocate the use of adequate remote sensing products that integrate fishery technical services demands and local requirements. PMID:20659750

  10. Using very high resolution remote sensing for the management of coral reef fisheries: review and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Mélanie A; Andréfouët, Serge

    2010-09-01

    Coral reef fisheries are critical for food security and as a source of income in developing and developed countries, but they are collapsing in many areas. Following the emergence and routine availability of commercial very high spatial resolution (0.6-10 m) multispectral satellite images, we reviewed the use of these new high-quality remote sensing data and products for coral reef fisheries management. The availability of habitats maps improves management by guiding sampling strategies, mapping resources, involving local communities, identifying conservation areas, and facilitating Ecosystem Based Fishery Management (EBFM) approaches. However, despite their potential, very little use of products designed specifically for fishery management can be reported, likely due to high costs, inherent technology limitations and lack of awareness on the possibilities. Given the theoretical benefits brought by relevant habitat maps in EBFM frameworks, we advocate the use of adequate remote sensing products that integrate fishery technical services demands and local requirements.

  11. Building Change Detection in Very High Resolution Satellite Stereo Image Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, J.; Qin, R.; Cerra, D.; Reinartz, P.

    2016-06-01

    There is an increasing demand for robust methods on urban sprawl monitoring. The steadily increasing number of high resolution and multi-view sensors allows producing datasets with high temporal and spatial resolution; however, less effort has been dedicated to employ very high resolution (VHR) satellite image time series (SITS) to monitor the changes in buildings with higher accuracy. In addition, these VHR data are often acquired from different sensors. The objective of this research is to propose a robust time-series data analysis method for VHR stereo imagery. Firstly, the spatial-temporal information of the stereo imagery and the Digital Surface Models (DSMs) generated from them are combined, and building probability maps (BPM) are calculated for all acquisition dates. In the second step, an object-based change analysis is performed based on the derivative features of the BPM sets. The change consistence between object-level and pixel-level are checked to remove any outlier pixels. Results are assessed on six pairs of VHR satellite images acquired within a time span of 7 years. The evaluation results have proved the efficiency of the proposed method.

  12. Comparing carbon storage of Siberian tundra and taiga permafrost ecosystems at very high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewert, Matthias B.; Hanisch, Jessica; Weiss, Niels; Kuhry, Peter; Maximov, Trofim C.; Hugelius, Gustaf

    2015-10-01

    Permafrost-affected ecosystems are important components in the global carbon (C) cycle that, despite being vulnerable to disturbances under climate change, remain poorly understood. This study investigates ecosystem carbon storage in two contrasting continuous permafrost areas of NE and East Siberia. Detailed partitioning of soil organic carbon (SOC) and phytomass carbon (PC) is analyzed for one tundra (Kytalyk) and one taiga (Spasskaya Pad/Neleger) study area. In total, 57 individual field sites (24 and 33 in the respective areas) have been sampled for PC and SOC, including the upper permafrost. Landscape partitioning of ecosystem C storage was derived from thematic upscaling of field observations using a land cover classification from very high resolution (2 × 2 m) satellite imagery. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling was used to explore patterns in C distribution. In both environments the ecosystem C is mostly stored in the soil (≥86%). At the landscape scale C stocks are primarily controlled by the presence of thermokarst depressions (alases). In the tundra landscape, site-scale variability of C is controlled by periglacial geomorphological features, while in the taiga, local differences in catenary position, soil texture, and forest successions are more important. Very high resolution remote sensing is highly beneficial to the quantification of C storage. Detailed knowledge of ecosystem C storage and ground ice distribution is needed to predict permafrost landscape vulnerability to projected climatic changes. We argue that vegetation dynamics are unlikely to offset mineralization of thawed permafrost C and that landscape-scale reworking of SOC represents the largest potential changes to C cycling.

  13. Forest Stand Segmentation Using Airborne LIDAR Data and Very High Resolution Multispectral Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechesne, Clément; Mallet, Clément; Le Bris, Arnaud; Gouet, Valérie; Hervieu, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Forest stands are the basic units for forest inventory and mapping. Stands are large forested areas (e.g., ≥ 2 ha) of homogeneous tree species composition. The accurate delineation of forest stands is usually performed by visual analysis of human operators on very high resolution (VHR) optical images. This work is highly time consuming and should be automated for scalability purposes. In this paper, a method based on the fusion of airborne laser scanning data (or lidar) and very high resolution multispectral imagery for automatic forest stand delineation and forest land-cover database update is proposed. The multispectral images give access to the tree species whereas 3D lidar point clouds provide geometric information on the trees. Therefore, multi-modal features are computed, both at pixel and object levels. The objects are individual trees extracted from lidar data. A supervised classification is performed at the object level on the computed features in order to coarsely discriminate the existing tree species in the area of interest. The analysis at tree level is particularly relevant since it significantly improves the tree species classification. A probability map is generated through the tree species classification and inserted with the pixel-based features map in an energetical framework. The proposed energy is then minimized using a standard graph-cut method (namely QPBO with α-expansion) in order to produce a segmentation map with a controlled level of details. Comparison with an existing forest land cover database shows that our method provides satisfactory results both in terms of stand labelling and delineation (matching ranges between 94% and 99%).

  14. The precipitation forecast sensitivity to data assimilation on a very high resolution domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamarchuk, Iuliia; Ivanov, Sergiy; Ruban, Igor

    2016-04-01

    Last developments in computing technologies allow the implementation of a very high resolution in numerical weather prediction models. Due to that fact, simulation and quantitative analysis of mesoscale processes with a horizontal scale of few kilometers become available. This is crucially important in studies of precipitation including their life-cycle. However, new opportunities generate prerequisites to revising existing knowledge, both in meteorology and numerics. The latter associates, in particular, with formulation of the initial conditions involving the data assimilation. Depending on applied techniques, observational data types and spatial resolution the precipitation prediction appears quite sensitive. The impact of the data assimilation on resulting fields is presented using the Harmonie-38h1.2 model with the AROME physical package. The numerical experiments were performed for the Finland domain with the horizontal grid of 2.5 km and 65 vertical levels for the August 2010 period covering the BaltRad experiment. The initial conditions formulation included downscaling from the MARS archive and involving observations through 3DVAR data assimilation. The treatment of both conventional and radar observations in numerical experiments was used. The earlier included the SYNOP, SHIP, PILOT, TEMP, AIREP and DRIBU types. The background error covariances required for the variational assimilation have already been computed from the ensemble perturbed analysis with the purely statistical balance by the HIRLAM community. Deviations among the model runs started from the MARS, conventional and radar data assimilation were complex. In the focus therefore is to know how the model system reacts on involvement of observations. The contribution from observed variables included in the control vector, such as humidity and temperature, was expected to be largest. Nevertheless, revealing of such impact is not so straightforward task. Major changes occur within the lower 3-km

  15. Agricultural land-use mapping using very high resolution satellite images in Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrador Garcia, Mauricio; Arbelo, Manuel; Evora Brondo, Juan Antonio; Hernandez-Leal, Pedro A.; Alonso-Benito, Alfonso

    Crop maps are a basic tool for rural planning and a way to asses the impact of politics and infrastructures in the rural environment. Thus, they must be accurate and updated. Because of the small size of the land fields in Canary Islands, until now the crop maps have been made by means of an intense and expensive field work. The tiny crop terraces do not allow the use of traditional medium-size resolution satellite images. The launch of several satellites with sub-meter spatial resolutions in the last years provides an opportunity to update land use maps in these fragmented areas. SATELMAC is a project financed by the PCT-MAC 2007-2013 (FEDER funds). One of the main objectives of this project is to develop a methodology that allows the use of very high resolution satellite images to automate as much as possible the updating of agricultural land use maps. The study was carried out in 3 different areas of the two main islands of the Canarian Archipelago, Tenerife and Gran Canaria. The total area is about 550 km2 , which includes both urban and rural areas. Multitemporal images from Geo-Eye 1 were acquired during a whole agricultural season to extract information about annual and perennial crops. The work includes a detailed geographic correction of the images and dealing with many adverse factors like cloud shadows, variability of atmospheric conditions and the heterogeneity of the land uses within the study area. Different classification methods, including traditional pixel-based methods and object-oriented approach, were compared in order to obtain the best accuracy. An intensive field work was carried out to obtain the ground truth, which is the base for the classification procedures and the validation of the results. The final results will be integrated into a cadastral vector layer.

  16. 3D Cryo-Imaging: A Very High-Resolution View of the Whole Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Debashish; Steyer, Grant J.; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Stone, Meredith E.; Wilson, David L.

    2009-01-01

    We developed the Case Cryo-imaging system that provides information rich, very high-resolution, color brightfield, and molecular fluorescence images of a whole mouse using a section-and-image block-face imaging technology. The system consists of a mouse-sized, motorized cryo-microtome with special features for imaging, a modified, brightfield/ fluorescence microscope, and a robotic xyz imaging system positioner, all of which is fully automated by a control system. Using the robotic system, we acquired microscopic tiled images at a pixel size of 15.6 µm over the block face of a whole mouse sectioned at 40 µm, with a total data volume of 55 GB. Viewing 2D images at multiple resolutions, we identified small structures such as cardiac vessels, muscle layers, villi of the small intestine, the optic nerve, and layers of the eye. Cryo-imaging was also suitable for imaging embryo mutants in 3D. A mouse, in which enhanced green fluorescent protein was expressed under gamma actin promoter in smooth muscle cells, gave clear 3D views of smooth muscle in the urogenital and gastrointestinal tracts. With cryo-imaging, we could obtain 3D vasculature down to 10 µm, over very large regions of mouse brain. Software is fully automated with fully programmable imaging/sectioning protocols, email notifications, and automatic volume visualization. With a unique combination of field-of-view, depth of field, contrast, and resolution, the Case Cryo-imaging system fills the gap between whole animal in vivo imaging and histology. PMID:19248166

  17. Using very high resolution satellite images to identify coastal zone dynamics at North Western Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florin Zoran, Liviu; Ionescu Golovanov, Carmen; Zoran, Maria

    2010-05-01

    The availability of updated information about the extension and characteristics of land cover is a crucial issue in the perspective of a correct landscape planning and management of marine coastal zones. Satellite remote sensing data can provide accurate information about land coverage at different scales and the recent availability of very high resolution images definitely improved the precision of coastal zone spatio-temporal changes. The Romanian North Western coastal and shelf zones of the Black Sea and Danube delta are a mosaic of complex, interacting ecosystems, rich natural resources and socio-economic activity. Dramatic changes in the Black Sea's ecosystem and resources are due to natural and anthropogenic causes (increase in the nutrient and pollutant load of rivers input, industrial and municipal wastewater pollution along the coast, and dumping on the open sea). A scientific management system for protection, conservation and restoration must be based on reliable information on bio-geophysical and geomorphologic processes, coastal erosion, sedimentation dynamics, mapping of macrophyte fields, water quality, and climatic change effects. Use of satellite images is of great help for coastal zone monitoring and environmental impact assessment. Synergetic use of in situ measurements with multisensors satellite data could provide a complex assessment of spatio-temporal changes. In this study was developed a method for extracting coastal zone features information as well as landcover dynamics from IKONOS, very high resolution images for North-Western Black Sea marine coastal zone. The main objective was obtaining reliable data about the spatio-temporal coastal zone changes in two study areas located in Constanta urban area and Danube Delta area. We used an object-oriented approach based on preliminary segmentation and classification of the resulting object. First of all, segmentation parameters were tested and selected comparing segmented polygons with

  18. Urban Building Collapse Detection Using Very High Resolution Imagery and Airborne LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Li, P.

    2013-07-01

    The increasing availability of very high resolution (VHR) remotely sensed images makes it possible to detect and assess urban building damages in the aftermath of earthquake disasters by using these data. However, the accuracy obtained using spectral features from VHR data alone is comparatively low, since both undamaged and collapsed buildings are spectrally similar. The height information provided by airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) data is complementary to VHR imagery. Thus, combination of these two datasets will be beneficial to the automatic and accurate extraction of building collapse. In this study, a hierarchical multi-level method of building collapse detection using bi-temporal (pre- and post-earthquake) VHR images and postevent airborne LiDAR data was proposed. First, buildings, bare ground, vegetation and shadows were extracted using post-event image and LiDAR data and masked out. Then building collapse was extracted using the bi-temporal VHR images of the remaining area with a one-class classifier. The proposed method was evaluated using bi-temporal VHR images and LiDAR data of Port au Prince, Haiti, which was heavily hit by an earthquake in January 2010. The method was also compared with some existing methods. The results showed that the method proposed in this study significantly outperformed the existing methods, with improvement range of 47.6% in kappa coefficient. The proposed method provided a fast and reliable way of detecting urban building collapse, which can also be applied to relevant applications.

  19. Very-high-resolution time-lapse photography for plant and ecosystems research1

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Mary H.; Steven, Janet C.; Sargent, Randy; Dille, Paul; Schapiro, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Traditional photography is a compromise between image detail and area covered. We report a new method for creating time-lapse sequences of very-high-resolution photographs to produce zoomable images that facilitate observation across a range of spatial and temporal scales. • Methods and Results: A robotic camera mount and software were used to capture images of the growth and movement in Brassica rapa every 15 s in the laboratory. The resultant time-lapse sequence (http://timemachine.gigapan.org/wiki/Plant_Growth) captures growth detail such as circumnutation. A modified, solar-powered system was deployed at a remote field site in southern Arizona. Images were collected every 2 h over a 3-mo period to capture the response of vegetation to monsoon season rainfall (http://timemachine.gigapan.org/wiki/Arizona_Grasslands). • Conclusions: A technique for observing time sequences of both individual plant and ecosystem response at a range of spatial scales is available for use in the laboratory and in the field. PMID:25202588

  20. Robust Change Vector Analysis (RCVA) for multi-sensor very high resolution optical satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thonfeld, Frank; Feilhauer, Hannes; Braun, Matthias; Menz, Gunter

    2016-08-01

    The analysis of rapid land cover/land use changes by means of remote sensing is often based on data acquired under varying and occasionally unfavorable conditions. In addition, such analyses frequently use data acquired by different sensor systems. These acquisitions often differ with respect to sun position and sensor viewing geometry which lead to characteristic effects in each image. These differences may have a negative impact on reliable change detection. Here, we propose an approach called Robust Change Vector Analysis (RCVA), aiming to mitigate these effects. RCVA is an improvement of the widely-used Change Vector Analysis (CVA), developed to account for pixel neighborhood effects. We used a RapidEye and Kompsat-2 cross-sensor change detection test to demonstrate the efficiency of RCVA. Our analysis showed that RCVA results in fewer false negatives as well as false positives when compared to CVA under similar test conditions. We conclude that RCVA is a powerful technique which can be utilized to reduce spurious changes in bi-temporal change detection analyses based on high- or very-high spatial resolution imagery.

  1. Automated metric characterization of urban structure using building decomposition from very high resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, Johannes; Kemper, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Classification approaches for urban areas are mostly of qualitative and semantic nature. They produce interpreted classes similar to those from land cover and land use classifications. As a complement to those classes, quantitative measures directly derived from the image could lead to a metric characterization of the urban area. While these metrics lack of qualitative interpretation they are able to provide objective measure of the urban structures. Such quantitative measures are especially important in rapidly growing cities since, beside of the growth in area, they can provide structural information for specific areas and detect changes. Rustenburg, which serves as test area for the present study, is amongst the fastest growing cities in South Africa. It reveals a heterogeneous face of housing and building structures reflecting social and/or economic differences often linked to the spatial distribution of industrial and local mining sites. Up to date coverage with aerial photographs is provided by aerial surveys in regular intervals. Also recent satellite systems provide imagery with suitable resolution. Using such set of very high resolution images a fully automated algorithm has been developed which outputs metric classes by systematically combining important measures of building structure. The measurements are gained by decomposition of buildings directly from the imagery and by using methods from mathematical morphology. The decomposed building objects serve as basis for the computation of grid statistics. Finally a systematic combination of the single features leads to combined metrical classes. For the dominant urban structures verification results indicate an overall accuracy of at least 80% on the single feature level and 70% for the combined classes.

  2. Benchmarking Deep Learning Frameworks for the Classification of Very High Resolution Satellite Multispectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadomanolaki, M.; Vakalopoulou, M.; Zagoruyko, S.; Karantzalos, K.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we evaluated deep-learning frameworks based on Convolutional Neural Networks for the accurate classification of multispectral remote sensing data. Certain state-of-the-art models have been tested on the publicly available SAT-4 and SAT-6 high resolution satellite multispectral datasets. In particular, the performed benchmark included the AlexNet, AlexNet-small and VGG models which had been trained and applied to both datasets exploiting all the available spectral information. Deep Belief Networks, Autoencoders and other semi-supervised frameworks have been, also, compared. The high level features that were calculated from the tested models managed to classify the different land cover classes with significantly high accuracy rates i.e., above 99.9%. The experimental results demonstrate the great potentials of advanced deep-learning frameworks for the supervised classification of high resolution multispectral remote sensing data.

  3. The investigation of active Martian dune fields using very high resolution photogrammetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungrack; Kim, Younghwi; Park, Minseong

    2016-10-01

    At the present time, arguments continue regarding the migration speeds of Martian dune fields and their correlation with atmospheric circulation. However, precisely measuring the spatial translation of Martian dunes has succeeded only a very few times—for example, in the Nili Patera study (Bridges et al. 2012) using change-detection algorithms and orbital imagery. Therefore, in this study, we developed a generic procedure to precisely measure the migration of dune fields with recently introduced 25-cm resolution orbital imagery specifically using a high-accuracy photogrammetric processor. The processor was designed to trace estimated dune migration, albeit slight, over the Martian surface by 1) the introduction of very high resolution ortho images and stereo analysis based on hierarchical geodetic control for better initial point settings; 2) positioning error removal throughout the sensor model refinement with a non-rigorous bundle block adjustment, which makes possible the co-alignment of all images in a time series; and 3) improved sub-pixel co-registration algorithms using optical flow with a refinement stage conducted on a pyramidal grid processor and a blunder classifier. Moreover, volumetric changes of Martian dunes were additionally traced by means of stereo analysis and photoclinometry. The established algorithms have been tested using high-resolution HIRISE time-series images over several Martian dune fields. Dune migrations were iteratively processed both spatially and volumetrically, and the results were integrated to be compared to the Martian climate model. Migrations over well-known crater dune fields appeared to be almost static for the considerable temporal periods and were weakly correlated with wind directions estimated by the Mars Climate Database (Millour et al. 2015). As a result, a number of measurements over dune fields in the Mars Global Dune Database (Hayward et al. 2014) covering polar areas and mid-latitude will be demonstrated

  4. 3D-information fusion from very high resolution satellite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, T.; d'Angelo, P.; Kuschk, G.; Tian, J.; Partovi, T.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we show the pre-processing and potential for environmental applications of very high resolution (VHR) satellite stereo imagery like these from WorldView-2 or Pl'eiades with ground sampling distances (GSD) of half a metre to a metre. To process such data first a dense digital surface model (DSM) has to be generated. Afterwards from this a digital terrain model (DTM) representing the ground and a so called normalized digital elevation model (nDEM) representing off-ground objects are derived. Combining these elevation based data with a spectral classification allows detection and extraction of objects from the satellite scenes. Beside the object extraction also the DSM and DTM can directly be used for simulation and monitoring of environmental issues. Examples are the simulation of floodings, building-volume and people estimation, simulation of noise from roads, wave-propagation for cellphones, wind and light for estimating renewable energy sources, 3D change detection, earthquake preparedness and crisis relief, urban development and sprawl of informal settlements and much more. Also outside of urban areas volume information brings literally a new dimension to earth oberservation tasks like the volume estimations of forests and illegal logging, volume of (illegal) open pit mining activities, estimation of flooding or tsunami risks, dike planning, etc. In this paper we present the preprocessing from the original level-1 satellite data to digital surface models (DSMs), corresponding VHR ortho images and derived digital terrain models (DTMs). From these components we present how a monitoring and decision fusion based 3D change detection can be realized by using different acquisitions. The results are analyzed and assessed to derive quality parameters for the presented method. Finally the usability of 3D information fusion from VHR satellite imagery is discussed and evaluated.

  5. Improved coastal wetland mapping using very-high 2-meter spatial resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Matthew J.; Merton, Elizabeth J.; Muller-Karger, Frank E.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate wetland maps are a fundamental requirement for land use management and for wetland restoration planning. Several wetland map products are available today; most of them based on remote sensing images, but their different data sources and mapping methods lead to substantially different estimations of wetland location and extent. We used two very high-resolution (2 m) WorldView-2 satellite images and one (30 m) Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) image to assess wetland coverage in two coastal areas of Tampa Bay (Florida): Fort De Soto State Park and Weedon Island Preserve. An initial unsupervised classification derived from WorldView-2 was more accurate at identifying wetlands based on ground truth data collected in the field than the classification derived from Landsat 8 OLI (82% vs. 46% accuracy). The WorldView-2 data was then used to define the parameters of a simple and efficient decision tree with four nodes for a more exacting classification. The criteria for the decision tree were derived by extracting radiance spectra at 1500 separate pixels from the WorldView-2 data within field-validated regions. Results for both study areas showed high accuracy in both wetland (82% at Fort De Soto State Park, and 94% at Weedon Island Preserve) and non-wetland vegetation classes (90% and 83%, respectively). Historical, published land-use maps overestimate wetland surface cover by factors of 2-10 in the study areas. The proposed methods improve speed and efficiency of wetland map production, allow semi-annual monitoring through repeat satellite passes, and improve the accuracy and precision with which wetlands are identified.

  6. Very High Resolution Image of Icy Cliffs on Europa and Similar Scales on Earth (Providence, RI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The top image is a very high resolution view of the Conamara Chaos region on Jupiter's moon Europa, showing an area where icy plates have been broken apart and moved around laterally. The top of this image is dominated by corrugated plateaus ending in icy cliffs over a hundred meters (a few hundred feet) high. Debris piled at the base of the cliffs. The bottom image is an aerial photograph of downtown Providence, Rhode Island at the same scale. The bright white circular feature in the top center of the Providence image is an indoor hockey rink, and one can find many craters in the Europa image about the same size. Blocks of debris which have fallen from the cliffs on the Europa image are about the same size as houses seen in the Providence image, and the largest blocks are almost as large as the Rhode Island state capitol building (large white building in upper left of Providence image). A fracture that runs horizontally across the center of the Europa image is about the same width as the freeway which runs along the bottom of the Providence image.

    North is to the top right of the Europa image, and the sun illuminates the surface from the east. The Europa image is centered at approximately 9 degrees north latitude and 274 degrees west longitude. The images each cover an area approximately 1.7 kilometers by 4 kilometers (1 mile by 2.5 miles). The resolution is 9 meters (30 feet) per picture element. The Europa image was taken on December 16, 1997 at a range of 900 kilometers (540 miles) by the solid state imaging system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  7. The investigation of moving dunes over Mars using very high resolution topography and sub pixel co-registration method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Baik, H.; Seol, H.

    2015-12-01

    Although the origins and processes of Martian aeolian features, especially dunes, have not been fully identified yet, it has been better understood by the orbital observation method which has led to the identification of Martian dune migration such as a case in Nili Patera (Bridges, 2012), and the numerical model employing advanced computational fluid dynamics. Specifically, the recent introduction of very high-resolution image products, such as 25 cm-resolution HiRISE imagery and its precise photogrammetric processor, allows us to trace the estimated, although tiny, dune migration over the Martian surface. In this study, we attempted to improve the accuracy of active dune migration measurements by 1) the introduction of very high resolution ortho images and stereo analysis based on the hierarchical geodetic control (Kim and Muller, 2009) for better initial point settings; and 2) the improved sub-pixel co-registration algorithms using optical flow with a refinement stage based on a least squares correlation conducted on a pyramidal processor. Consequently, this scheme not only measured Martian dune migration more precisely, but it also achieved the extension of 3D observations combining stereo analysis and photoclinometry. The established algorithms have been tested using the HiRISE time series images over several dune fields, such as the Kaiser, Procter, and Rabe craters, which were reported by the Mars Global Digital Dune Database (Hayward et al., 2013). The detected dune migrations were significantly larger than previously reported values. The outcomes in our study will be demonstrated with the quantified values in 2D and volumetric direction. In the future, the method will be further applied to the dune fields in the Mars Global dune database comprehensively and can be compared with the improved General Circulation Model and the numerical simulation.

  8. Comparing supervised and unsupervised multiresolution segmentation approaches for extracting buildings from very high resolution imagery.

    PubMed

    Belgiu, Mariana; Dr Guţ, Lucian

    2014-10-01

    Although multiresolution segmentation (MRS) is a powerful technique for dealing with very high resolution imagery, some of the image objects that it generates do not match the geometries of the target objects, which reduces the classification accuracy. MRS can, however, be guided to produce results that approach the desired object geometry using either supervised or unsupervised approaches. Although some studies have suggested that a supervised approach is preferable, there has been no comparative evaluation of these two approaches. Therefore, in this study, we have compared supervised and unsupervised approaches to MRS. One supervised and two unsupervised segmentation methods were tested on three areas using QuickBird and WorldView-2 satellite imagery. The results were assessed using both segmentation evaluation methods and an accuracy assessment of the resulting building classifications. Thus, differences in the geometries of the image objects and in the potential to achieve satisfactory thematic accuracies were evaluated. The two approaches yielded remarkably similar classification results, with overall accuracies ranging from 82% to 86%. The performance of one of the unsupervised methods was unexpectedly similar to that of the supervised method; they identified almost identical scale parameters as being optimal for segmenting buildings, resulting in very similar geometries for the resulting image objects. The second unsupervised method produced very different image objects from the supervised method, but their classification accuracies were still very similar. The latter result was unexpected because, contrary to previously published findings, it suggests a high degree of independence between the segmentation results and classification accuracy. The results of this study have two important implications. The first is that object-based image analysis can be automated without sacrificing classification accuracy, and the second is that the previously accepted idea

  9. Comparing supervised and unsupervised multiresolution segmentation approaches for extracting buildings from very high resolution imagery

    PubMed Central

    Belgiu, Mariana; Drǎguţ, Lucian

    2014-01-01

    Although multiresolution segmentation (MRS) is a powerful technique for dealing with very high resolution imagery, some of the image objects that it generates do not match the geometries of the target objects, which reduces the classification accuracy. MRS can, however, be guided to produce results that approach the desired object geometry using either supervised or unsupervised approaches. Although some studies have suggested that a supervised approach is preferable, there has been no comparative evaluation of these two approaches. Therefore, in this study, we have compared supervised and unsupervised approaches to MRS. One supervised and two unsupervised segmentation methods were tested on three areas using QuickBird and WorldView-2 satellite imagery. The results were assessed using both segmentation evaluation methods and an accuracy assessment of the resulting building classifications. Thus, differences in the geometries of the image objects and in the potential to achieve satisfactory thematic accuracies were evaluated. The two approaches yielded remarkably similar classification results, with overall accuracies ranging from 82% to 86%. The performance of one of the unsupervised methods was unexpectedly similar to that of the supervised method; they identified almost identical scale parameters as being optimal for segmenting buildings, resulting in very similar geometries for the resulting image objects. The second unsupervised method produced very different image objects from the supervised method, but their classification accuracies were still very similar. The latter result was unexpected because, contrary to previously published findings, it suggests a high degree of independence between the segmentation results and classification accuracy. The results of this study have two important implications. The first is that object-based image analysis can be automated without sacrificing classification accuracy, and the second is that the previously accepted idea

  10. Characterization of laboratory analogs of interstellar/cometary organic residues using very high resolution mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danger, G.; Orthous-Daunay, F.-R.; de Marcellus, P.; Modica, P.; Vuitton, V.; Duvernay, F.; Flandinet, L.; Le Sergeant d'Hendecourt, L.; Thissen, R.; Chiavassa, T.

    2013-10-01

    Studying the chemical composition of organic matter in astrophysical environments is an important means to improve our understanding of its origin and evolution. This organic matter evolves from molecular clouds to protoplanetary disks, and as a final destination, takes part in the formation of many objects of our solar system, such as primitive chondritic material, planetesimals and finally planets. In this contribution, we perform experimental simulations based on the VUV irradiation and warming-up of primitive interstellar ice analogs (CH3OH:NH3:H2O), and characterize, for the first time, the resulting refractory residue, using very high resolution mass spectrometry (VHRMS) with an LTQ-orbitrap-XL instrument. An electrospray source allows ionizing all the molecules having proton donor or acceptor chemical functions, while limiting as much as possible their damages. Thus, this method provides the analysis of the whole ionizable molecules making up the residue. The analysis of the spectra shows that these residues contain a large number of molecules formed of CHNO elements, including macromolecular entities beyond 4000 Da. The average elemental composition of the residue is of H/C = 1.5, N/C = 0.4, O/C = 0.4. These first results are tentatively compared to VHRMS analyses of the soluble organic matter (SOM) present in the Murchison’s meteorite, a primitive chondrite of the CM class. The molecular richness observed can be considered as the “first step” of the complex abiotic organic matter in extraterrestrial media. This initial matter, that may be rather universal, could then evolve toward more processed materials in parent bodies, such as comets and asteroids, materials that are then observed and subsequently analyzed in meteorites found on Earth. In addition to providing some insight on the mixture complexity, VHRMS allows for the search of specific molecules. For instance, hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and some of its derivatives are identified in these

  11. Retrieving Forest Structure Variables from Very High Resolution Satellite Images Using AN Automatic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beguet, B.; Chehata, N.; Boukir, S.; Guyon, D.

    2012-07-01

    The main goal of this study is to define a method to describe the forest structure of maritime pine stands from Very High Resolution satellite imagery. The emphasis is placed on the automatisation of the process to identify the most relevant image features, exploiting both spectral and spatial information. Our approach is based on linear regressions between the forest structure variables to be estimated and various spectral and Haralick's texture features (derived from Grey Level Co-occurrence Matrix). The main drawback of this well- known texture representation is the underlying parameters (window size, displacement length, orientation and quantification level) which are extremely difficult to set due to the spatial complexity of forest structure. To tackle this major issue, probably the main cause of poor texture analysis in practice, we propose an automatic feature selection process whose originality lies on the use of image test frames of adequate forest samples whose forest structure variables were measured at ground. This method, inspired by camera calibration protocols, selects the best image features via statistical modelling, exploring a wide range of parameter values. Hence, just a few samples are required to build up the test frames but allow a fast assessment of thousands of descriptors, given the large number of tested combinations of parameters values. This method was developed and tested on Quickbird panchromatic and multispectral images. It has been successfully applied to the modelling of 7 typical forest structure variables (age, tree height, crown diameter, diameter at breast height, basal area, density and tree spacing). The coefficient of correlation, R2, of the best single models for 6 of the forest variables of interest, estimated from the test frames, ranges from 0.89 to 0.97. Only the basal area was weakly correlated to the considered image features (0.64). To improve the results, combinations of panchromatic and or multi-spectral features

  12. Optimizing Object-Based Classification in Urban Environments Using Very High Resolution GEOEYE-1 Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, M. A.; Vicente, R.; Aguilar, F. J.; Fernández, A.; Saldaña, M. M.

    2012-07-01

    The latest breed of very high resolution (VHR) commercial satellites opens new possibilities for cartographic and remote sensing applications. In fact, one of the most common applications of remote sensing images is the extraction of land cover information for digital image base maps by means of classification techniques. When VHR satellite images are used, an object-based classification strategy can potentially improve classification accuracy compared to pixel based classification. The aim of this work is to carry out an accuracy assessment test on the classification accuracy in urban environments using pansharpened and panchromatic GeoEye-1 orthoimages. In this work, the influence on object-based supervised classification accuracy is evaluated with regard to the sets of image object (IO) features used for classification of the land cover classes selected. For the classification phase the nearest neighbour classifier and the eCognition v. 8 software were used, using seven sets of IO features, including texture, geometry and the principal layer values features. The IOs were attained by eCognition using a multiresolution segmentation approach that is a bottom-up regionmerging technique starting with one-pixel. Four different sets or repetitions of training samples, always representing a 10% for each classes were extracted from IOs while the remaining objects were used for accuracy validation. A statistical test was carried out in order to strengthen the conclusions. An overall accuracy of 79.4% was attained with the panchromatic, red, blue, green and near infrared (NIR) bands from the panchromatic and pansharpened orthoimages, the brightness computed for the red, blue, green and infrared bands, the Maximum Difference, a mean of soil-adjusted vegetation index (SAVI), and, finally the normalized Digital Surface Model or Object Model (nDSM), computed from LiDAR data. For buildings classification, nDSM was the most important feature attaining producer and user

  13. 4D very high-resolution topography monitoring of surface deformation using UAV-SfM framework.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapuyt, François; Vanacker, Veerle; Schlunegger, Fritz; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-04-01

    During the last years, exploratory research has shown that UAV-based image acquisition is suitable for environmental remote sensing and monitoring. Image acquisition with cameras mounted on an UAV can be performed at very-high spatial resolution and high temporal frequency in the most dynamic environments. Combined with Structure-from-Motion algorithm, the UAV-SfM framework is capable of providing digital surface models (DSM) which are highly accurate when compared to other very-high resolution topographic datasets and highly reproducible for repeated measurements over the same study area. In this study, we aim at assessing (1) differential movement of the Earth's surface and (2) the sediment budget of a complex earthflow located in the Central Swiss Alps based on three topographic datasets acquired over a period of 2 years. For three time steps, we acquired aerial photographs with a standard reflex camera mounted on a low-cost and lightweight UAV. Image datasets were then processed with the Structure-from-Motion algorithm in order to reconstruct a 3D dense point cloud representing the topography. Georeferencing of outputs has been achieved based on the ground control point (GCP) extraction method, previously surveyed on the field with a RTK GPS. Finally, digital elevation model of differences (DOD) has been computed to assess the topographic changes between the three acquisition dates while surface displacements have been quantified by using image correlation techniques. Our results show that the digital elevation model of topographic differences is able to capture surface deformation at cm-scale resolution. The mean annual displacement of the earthflow is about 3.6 m while the forefront of the landslide has advanced by ca. 30 meters over a period of 18 months. The 4D analysis permits to identify the direction and velocity of Earth movement. Stable topographic ridges condition the direction of the flow with highest downslope movement on steep slopes, and diffuse

  14. Very high resolution UV and X-ray spectroscopy and imagery of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M.; Brown, W. A.; Haisch, B. M.

    1987-01-01

    A scientific investigation of the physics of the solar atmosphere, which uses the techniques of high resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy and high resolution UV imagery, is described. The experiments were conducted during a series of three sounding rocket flights. All three flights yielded excellent images in the UV range, showing unprecedented spatial resolution. The second flight recorded the X-ray spectrum of a solar flare, and the third that of an active region. A normal incidence multi-layer mirror was used during the third flight to make the first astronomical X-ray observations using this new technique.

  15. Low-cost camera modifications and methodologies for very-high-resolution digital images

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerial color and color-infrared photography are usually acquired at high altitude so the ground resolution of the photographs is < 1 m. Moreover, current color-infrared cameras and manned aircraft flight time are expensive, so the objective is the development of alternative methods for obtaining ve...

  16. A system for optically controlling neural circuits with very high spatial and temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Pandarinath, Chethan; Carlson, Eric T.; Nirenberg, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics offers a powerful new approach for controlling neural circuits. It has a vast array of applications in both basic and clinical science. For basic science, it opens the door to unraveling circuit operations, since one can perturb specific circuit components with high spatial (single cell) and high temporal (millisecond) resolution. For clinical applications, it allows new kinds of selective treatments, because it provides a method to inactivate or activate specific components in a malfunctioning circuit and bring it back into a normal operating range [1–3]. To harness the power of optogenetics, though, one needs stimulating tools that work with the same high spatial and temporal resolution as the molecules themselves, the channelrhodopsins. To date, most stimulating tools require a tradeoff between spatial and temporal precision and are prohibitively expensive to integrate into a stimulating/recording setup in a laboratory or a device in a clinical setting [4, 5]. Here we describe a Digital Light Processing (DLP)-based system capable of extremely high temporal resolution (sub-millisecond), without sacrificing spatial resolution. Furthermore, it is constructed using off-the-shelf components, making it feasible for a broad range of biology and bioengineering labs. Using transgenic mice that express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), we demonstrate the system’s capability for stimulating channelrhodopsin-expressing neurons in tissue with single cell and sub-millisecond precision. PMID:25699292

  17. Development of ALARO-Climate regional climate model for a very high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalak, Petr; Farda, Ales; Brozkova, Radmila; Masek, Jan

    2014-05-01

    ALARO-Climate is a new regional climate model (RCM) derived from the ALADIN LAM model family. It is based on the numerical weather prediction model ALARO and developed at the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute. The model is expected to able to work in the so called "grey zone" physics (horizontal resolution of 4 - 7 km) and at the same time retain its ability to be operated in resolutions in between 20 and 50 km, which are typical for contemporary generation of regional climate models. Here we present the main results of the RCM ALARO-Climate model simulations in 25 and 6.25 km resolutions on the longer time-scale (1961-1990). The model was driven by the ERA-40 re-analyses and run on the integration domain of ~ 2500 x 2500 km size covering the central Europe. The simulated model climate was compared with the gridded observation of air temperature (mean, maximum, minimum) and precipitation from the E-OBS version dataset 8. Other simulated parameters (e.g., cloudiness, radiation or components of water cycle) were compared to the ERA-40 re-analyses. The validation of the first ERA-40 simulation in both, 25 km and 6.25 km resolutions, revealed significant cold biases in all seasons and overestimation of precipitation in the selected Central Europe target area (0° - 30° eastern longitude ; 40° - 60° northern latitude). The differences between these simulations were small and thus revealed a robustness of the model's physical parameterization on the resolution change. The series of 25 km resolution simulations with several model adaptations was carried out to study their effect on the simulated properties of climate variables and thus possibly identify a source of major errors in the simulated climate. The current investigation suggests the main reason for biases is related to the model physic. Acknowledgements: This study was performed within the frame of projects ALARO (project P209/11/2405 sponsored by the Czech Science Foundation) and CzechGlobe Centre (CZ.1

  18. Very High Resolution Solar X-ray Imaging Using Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Skinner, G. K.; Li, M. J.; Shih, A. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of X-ray diffractive optics for imaging solar flares with better than 0.1 arcsec angular resolution. X-ray images with this resolution of the greater than or equal to 10 MK plasma in solar active regions and solar flares would allow the cross-sectional area of magnetic loops to be resolved and the coronal flare energy release region itself to be probed. The objective of this work is to obtain X-ray images in the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV observed during solar flares with an angular resolution as fine as 0.1 arcsec - over an order of magnitude finer than is now possible. This line emission is from highly ionized iron atoms, primarily Fe xxv, in the hottest flare plasma at temperatures in excess of approximately equal to 10 MK. It provides information on the flare morphology, the iron abundance, and the distribution of the hot plasma. Studying how this plasma is heated to such high temperatures in such short times during solar flares is of critical importance in understanding these powerful transient events, one of the major objectives of solar physics.We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of phase zone plate X-ray lenses with focal lengths of approximately equal to 100 m at these energies that would be capable of achieving these objectives. We show how such lenses could be included on a two-spacecraft formation-flying mission with the lenses on the spacecraft closest to the Sun and an X-ray imaging array on the second spacecraft in the focal plane approximately equal to 100 m away. High resolution X-ray images could be obtained when the two spacecraft are aligned with the region of interest on the Sun. Requirements and constraints for the control of the two spacecraft are discussed together with the overall feasibility of such a formation-flying mission.

  19. Applications of very high-resolution imagery in the study and conservation of large predators in the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Larue, Michelle A; Knight, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean is one of the most rapidly changing ecosystems on the planet due to the effects of climate change and commercial fishing for ecologically important krill and fish. Because sea ice loss is expected to be accompanied by declines in krill and fish predators, decoupling the effects of climate and anthropogenic changes on these predator populations is crucial for ecosystem-based management of the Southern Ocean. We reviewed research published from 2007 to 2014 that incorporated very high-resolution satellite imagery to assess distribution, abundance, and effects of climate and other anthropogenic changes on populations of predators in polar regions. Very high-resolution imagery has been used to study 7 species of polar animals in 13 papers, many of which provide methods through which further research can be conducted. Use of very high-resolution imagery in the Southern Ocean can provide a broader understanding of climate and anthropogenic forces on populations and inform management and conservation recommendations. We recommend that conservation biologists continue to integrate high-resolution remote sensing into broad-scale biodiversity and population studies in remote areas, where it can provide much needed detail.

  20. Applications of very high-resolution imagery in the study and conservation of large predators in the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Larue, Michelle A; Knight, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean is one of the most rapidly changing ecosystems on the planet due to the effects of climate change and commercial fishing for ecologically important krill and fish. Because sea ice loss is expected to be accompanied by declines in krill and fish predators, decoupling the effects of climate and anthropogenic changes on these predator populations is crucial for ecosystem-based management of the Southern Ocean. We reviewed research published from 2007 to 2014 that incorporated very high-resolution satellite imagery to assess distribution, abundance, and effects of climate and other anthropogenic changes on populations of predators in polar regions. Very high-resolution imagery has been used to study 7 species of polar animals in 13 papers, many of which provide methods through which further research can be conducted. Use of very high-resolution imagery in the Southern Ocean can provide a broader understanding of climate and anthropogenic forces on populations and inform management and conservation recommendations. We recommend that conservation biologists continue to integrate high-resolution remote sensing into broad-scale biodiversity and population studies in remote areas, where it can provide much needed detail. PMID:25103277

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of a very high resolution thermal neutron detector composed of glass scintillator microfibers.

    PubMed

    Song, Yushou; Conner, Joseph; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    In order to develop a high spatial resolution (micron level) thermal neutron detector, a detector assembly composed of cerium doped lithium glass microfibers, each with a diameter of 1 μm, is proposed, where the neutron absorption location is reconstructed from the observed charged particle products that result from neutron absorption. To suppress the cross talk of the scintillation light, each scintillating fiber is surrounded by air-filled glass capillaries with the same diameter as the fiber. This pattern is repeated to form a bulk microfiber detector. On one end, the surface of the detector is painted with a thin optical reflector to increase the light collection efficiency at the other end. Then the scintillation light emitted by any neutron interaction is transmitted to one end, magnified, and recorded by an intensified CCD camera. A simulation based on the Geant4 toolkit was developed to model this detector. All the relevant physics processes including neutron interaction, scintillation, and optical boundary behaviors are simulated. This simulation was first validated through measurements of neutron response from lithium glass cylinders. With good expected light collection, an algorithm based upon the features inherent to alpha and triton particle tracks is proposed to reconstruct the neutron reaction position in the glass fiber array. Given a 1 μm fiber diameter and 0.1mm detector thickness, the neutron spatial resolution is expected to reach σ∼1 μm with a Gaussian fit in each lateral dimension. The detection efficiency was estimated to be 3.7% for a glass fiber assembly with thickness of 0.1mm. When the detector thickness increases from 0.1mm to 1mm, the position resolution is not expected to vary much, while the detection efficiency is expected to increase by about a factor of ten.

  2. Anechoic Sphere Phantoms for Estimating 3-D Resolution of Very High Frequency Ultrasound Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Ernest L.; Frank, Gary R.; McCormick, Matthew M.; Deaner, Meagan E.; Stiles, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Two phantoms have been constructed for assessing the performance of high frequency ultrasound imagers. They also allow for periodic quality assurance tests. The phantoms contain eight blocks of tissue-mimicking material where each block contains a spatially random distribution of suitably small anechoic spheres having a small distribution of diameters. The eight mean sphere diameters are distributed from 0.10 to 1.09 mm. The two phantoms differ primarily in terms of the backscatter coefficient of the background material in which the spheres are suspended. The mean scatterer diameter for one phantom is larger than that for the other phantom resulting in a lesser increase in backscatter coefficient for the second phantom; however, the backscatter curves cross at about 35 MHz. Since spheres have no preferred orientation, all three (spatial) dimensions of resolution contribute to sphere detection on an equal basis; thus, the resolution is termed 3-D. Two high frequency scanners are compared. One employs single-element (fixed focus) transducers, and the other employs variable focus linear arrays. The nominal frequency for the single element transducers were 25 and 55 MHz and for the linear array transducers were 20, 30 and 40 MHz. The depth range for detection of spheres of each size is determined corresponding to determination of 3-D resolution as a function of depth. As expected, the single-element transducers are severely limited in useful imaging depth ranges compared with the linear arrays. Note that these phantoms could also be useful for training technicians in using higher frequency scanners. PMID:20889416

  3. High accuracy heat capacity measurements through the lambda transition of helium with very high temperature resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbanks, W. M.; Lipa, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A measurement of the heat capacity singularity of helium at the lambda transition was performed with the aim of improving tests of the Renormalization Group (RG) predictions for the static thermodynamic behavior near the singularity. The goal was to approach as closely as possible to the lambda-point while making heat capacity measurements of high accuracy. To do this, a new temperature sensor capable of unprecedented resolution near the lambda-point, and two thermal control systems were used. A short description of the theoretical background and motivation is given. The initial apparatus and results are also described.

  4. Gaussian Multiple Instance Learning Approach for Mapping the Slums of the World Using Very High Resolution Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a computationally efficient algo- rithm based on multiple instance learning for mapping infor- mal settlements (slums) using very high-resolution remote sensing imagery. From remote sensing perspective, infor- mal settlements share unique spatial characteristics that dis- tinguish them from other urban structures like industrial, commercial, and formal residential settlements. However, regular pattern recognition and machine learning methods, which are predominantly single-instance or per-pixel classi- fiers, often fail to accurately map the informal settlements as they do not capture the complex spatial patterns. To overcome these limitations we employed a multiple instance based machine learning approach, where groups of contigu- ous pixels (image patches) are modeled as generated by a Gaussian distribution. We have conducted several experi- ments on very high-resolution satellite imagery, represent- ing four unique geographic regions across the world. Our method showed consistent improvement in accurately iden- tifying informal settlements.

  5. Satellite-based monitoring of particulate matter pollution at very high resolution: the HOTBAR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robin; Milton, Edward; Nield, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    Particulate matter air pollution is a major health risk, and is responsible for millions of premature deaths each year. Concentrations tend to be highest in urban areas - particularly in the mega-cities of rapidly industrialising countries, where there are limited ground monitoring networks. Satellite-based monitoring has been used for many years to assess regional-scale trends in air quality, but currently available satellite products produce data at 1-10km resolution: too coarse to discern the small-scale patterns of sources and sinks seen in urban areas. Higher-resolution satellite products are required to provide accurate assessments of particulate matter concentrations in these areas, and to allow analysis of localised air quality effects on health. The Haze Optimized Transform-based Aerosol Retrieval (HOTBAR) method is a novel method which provides estimates of PM2.5 concentrations from high-resolution (approximately 30m) satellite imagery. This method is designed to work over a wide range of land covers and performs well over the complex land-cover mosaic found in urban areas. It requires only standard visible and near-infrared data, making it applicable to a range of data from sensors such as Landsat, SPOT and Sentinel-2. The method is based upon an extension of the Haze Optimized Transform (HOT), which was originally designed for assessing areas of thick haze in satellite imagery. This was done by calculating a 'haziness' value for each pixel in an image as the distance from a 'Clear Line' in feature space, defined by the high correlation between visible bands. Here, we adapt the HOT method and use it to estimate Aerosol Optical Thickness (a measure of the column-integrated haziness of the atmosphere) instead, from which PM2.5 concentrations can then be estimated. Significant extensions to the original HOT method include Monte Carlo estimation of the 'Clear Line', object-based correction for land cover, and estimation of AOT from the haziness values

  6. Rotation in Jets from Young Stars: investigating NUV lines with very high Spectral Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacciotti, Francesca

    2003-07-01

    Optical STIS spectra of the jets from DG Tau, RW Aur, TH 28 and LkHa 231 obtained by us {prop IDs. 7311, 9435} show systematic transverse radial velocity shifts in the region where the flow has just been accelerated and collimated {Bacciotti et al, 2002}, i.e. within about 100 AU from the source. We interpret such shifts as evidence for jet rotation. Whether YSO jets rotate is a fundamental question in star formation because it has been suggested that jets might be the way excess angular momentum is removed from the star/disk system, thereby allowing the star to accrete. In particular it is important to know if observed toroidal velocities are in agreement with predictions of magneto-centrifugal jet launching models. The limited spatial and spectral resolution of STIS in the optical however, only allows one to say qualitatively that the observed rotational velocities are in rough agreement with theory. Moreover only the resolved peripheral regions of the flow can be studied. We are proposing here to exploit the higher spatial and spectral resolution of STIS in the NUV to measure transverse jet velocity profiles.This is a task which can only be undertaken by the HST and which is ideally suited to the STIS. To measure the velocity profiles, we will observe the Mg II doublet at 2800 Angstrom {using the E230M echelle and the 6 X 0.2 slit transverse to the flow}. In comparison to the optical, the NUV affords us double the spatial resolution and we will be able to detect velocity differences across the jet down to 2 km/s. Not only should we be able to determine for the first time the detailed rotational velocity profile across a jet but we also expect to spatially resolve the high velocity axial core of the jet in the NUV. Finally we add that as very few NUV observations of the initial jet beam of YSO jets are available, our datasets should be a valuable contribution to the HST archive.

  7. Reconstruction of the Abydos ROSETTA/Philae landing site at very high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capanna, Claire; Jorda, Laurent; Lamy, Philippe L.; Gaskell, Robert W.; FAURY, Guillaume; DELMAS, Cédric; DURAND, Joelle; GAUDON, Philippe; GARMIER, Romain; JURADO, Eric; OSIRIS Team

    2016-10-01

    The Rosetta/Philae module landed in a very uneven area called Abydos. The landing site has beenidentified on images of this region acquired by the OSIRIS imaging system aboard the orbiterbefore (Oct. 2014) and after (Dec. 2014) the landing (Lamy et al., in prep.).Abydos exhibits a complex topography including numerous cliffs, several overhangs and lots ofboulders (Lucchetti et al. A&A 585, L1, 2016). This makes its reconstruction a challenging taskfor 3D reconstruction techniques.We use a very carefully selected set of high-resolution OSIRIS images acquired betweenMarch 2016 and August 2016 to reconstruct the detailed topography of the Abydos neighborhoodusing a method called ``multiresolution photoclinometry by deformation'' (MPCD, Capanna et al.,The Visual Computer, 29(6-8): 825-835, 2013). We also check the compatibility of the local DTMcomparing the panoramic images obtained by the CIVA-P instrument aboard PHILAE with syntheticimages created with the DTM, and we compute the distances, incidence and emission angles duringthe acquisition of these images.

  8. Geomorphic evidence for ancient seas in west Deuteronilus Mensae, Mars-2: From very high resolution Viking Orbiter images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Timothy J.; Schneeberger, Dale M.; Pieri, David C.; Saunders, R. Stephen

    1987-01-01

    Very high resolution Viking Orbiter images of the Martian surface, though rare, make it possible to examine specific areas at image scales approaching those of high altitude terrestrial aerial photographs. Twenty three clear images lie within west Deuteronilus Mensae. The northernmost images which constitute an almost unbroken mosaic of the west wall of a long fingerlike canyon are examined. Morphological details on the plateau surface within zone B, not detectable at low resolution, make it possible to divide the zone into two distinct subzones separated by an east-west escarpment. The morphology of the canyon floor is described in detail.

  9. Mapping Sub-Antarctic Cushion Plants Using Random Forests to Combine Very High Resolution Satellite Imagery and Terrain Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Bricher, Phillippa K.; Lucieer, Arko; Shaw, Justine; Terauds, Aleks; Bergstrom, Dana M.

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring changes in the distribution and density of plant species often requires accurate and high-resolution baseline maps of those species. Detecting such change at the landscape scale is often problematic, particularly in remote areas. We examine a new technique to improve accuracy and objectivity in mapping vegetation, combining species distribution modelling and satellite image classification on a remote sub-Antarctic island. In this study, we combine spectral data from very high resolution WorldView-2 satellite imagery and terrain variables from a high resolution digital elevation model to improve mapping accuracy, in both pixel- and object-based classifications. Random forest classification was used to explore the effectiveness of these approaches on mapping the distribution of the critically endangered cushion plant Azorellamacquariensis Orchard (Apiaceae) on sub-Antarctic Macquarie Island. Both pixel- and object-based classifications of the distribution of Azorella achieved very high overall validation accuracies (91.6–96.3%, κ = 0.849–0.924). Both two-class and three-class classifications were able to accurately and consistently identify the areas where Azorella was absent, indicating that these maps provide a suitable baseline for monitoring expected change in the distribution of the cushion plants. Detecting such change is critical given the threats this species is currently facing under altering environmental conditions. The method presented here has applications to monitoring a range of species, particularly in remote and isolated environments. PMID:23940805

  10. Very high resolution measurement of the penetration depth of superconductors by a novel single-coil inductance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauzzi, A.; Le Cochec, J.; Lamura, G.; Jönsson, B. J.; Gasparov, V. A.; Ladan, F. R.; Plaçais, B.; Probst, P. A.; Pavuna, D.; Bok, J.

    2000-05-01

    We describe a novel single-coil mutual inductance technique for measuring the magnetic penetration depth λ of superconductors at 2-4 MHz as a function of temperature in the 4-100 K range. We combine a single-coil configuration with a high-stability marginal oscillator; this enables us to measure the absolute value of λ on both bulk samples and thin films with very high resolution (δλ=10 pm) and a precision of 30 nm. As example of application, we report measurements on NbTi bulk samples and Nb films. This contactless technique is suited for probing the superconducting properties of samples over large surfaces.

  11. A change detection approach to flood mapping in urban areas using very high-resolution microwave remote sensing imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustarini, L.; Hostache, R.; Matgen, P.; Schumann, G.; Bates, P. D.; Mason, D. C.

    2012-04-01

    Very high-resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar sensors represent an alternative to aerial photography for delineating floods in built-up environments where flood risk is highest. However, even with currently available SAR image resolutions of 3 m and higher, signal returns from man-made structures hamper the accurate mapping of flooded areas. Enhanced image processing algorithms and a better exploitation of image archives are required to facilitate the use of microwave remote sensing data for monitoring flood dynamics in urban areas. This work presents a new way to efficiently process SAR data for enhanced flood detection. The purpose is to develop a fully automatic image classification method based on image statistics that can be applied to all existing SAR data sets and to different types of flooded regions, including urban settlements. A hybrid methodology combining radiometric thresholding, region growing and change detection is introduced as an approach enabling the automated, objective and reliable flood extent extraction from very high-resolution urban SAR images. The method is based on the calibration of a statistical distribution of "open water" backscatter values inferred from SAR images of floods. SAR images acquired during dry conditions enable the identification of i) areas that are located in "shadow" regions and are therefore not visible to the sensor and ii) areas that systematically behave as specular reflectors (e.g. smooth tarmac, permanent water bodies). Change detection with respect to a pre-flood reference image thereby reduces over-detection of inundated areas. A case study of the July 2007 Severn River flood (UK) observed by the very high-resolution SAR sensor on board TerraSAR-X as well as airborne photography highlights advantages and limitations of the proposed method. We conclude that the fully automated SAR-based flood mapping technique overcomes some limitations of state-of-the-art methods normally used. However, further technological

  12. Identifying landscape features associated with Rift Valley fever virus transmission, Ferlo region, Senegal, using very high spatial resolution satellite imagery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Dynamics of most of vector-borne diseases are strongly linked to global and local environmental changes. Landscape changes are indicators of human activities or natural processes that are likely to modify the ecology of the diseases. Here, a landscape approach developed at a local scale is proposed for extracting mosquito favourable biotopes, and for testing ecological parameters when identifying risk areas of Rift Valley fever (RVF) transmission. The study was carried out around Barkedji village, Ferlo region, Senegal. Methods In order to test whether pond characteristics may influence the density and the dispersal behaviour of RVF vectors, and thus the spatial variation in RVFV transmission, we used a very high spatial resolution remote sensing image (2.4 m resolution) provided by the Quickbird sensor to produce a detailed land-cover map of the study area. Based on knowledge of vector and disease ecology, seven landscape attributes were defined at the pond level and computed from the land-cover map. Then, the relationships between landscape attributes and RVF serologic incidence rates in small ruminants were analyzed through a beta-binomial regression. Finally, the best statistical model according to the Akaike Information Criterion corrected for small samples (AICC), was used to map areas at risk for RVF. Results Among the derived landscape variables, the vegetation density index (VDI) computed within a 500 m buffer around ponds was positively correlated with serologic incidence (p<0.001), suggesting that the risk of RVF transmission was higher in the vicinity of ponds surrounded by a dense vegetation cover. The final risk map of RVF transmission displays a heterogeneous spatial distribution, corroborating previous findings from the same area. Conclusions Our results highlight the potential of very high spatial resolution remote sensing data for identifying environmental risk factors and mapping RVF risk areas at a local scale. PMID:23452759

  13. Investigation of the Chromosphere-Corona Interface with the Upgraded Very High Angular Resolution Ultraviolet Telescope (VAULT2.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourlidas, Angelos; Beltran, Samuel Tun; Chintzoglou, Georgios; Eisenhower, Kevin; Korendyke, Clarence; Feldman, Ronen; Moser, John; Shea, John; Johnson-Rambert, Mary; McMullin, Don; Stenborg, Guillermo; Shepler, Ed; Roberts, David

    2016-03-01

    Very high angular resolution ultraviolet telescope (VAULT2.0) is a Lyman-alpha (Lyα; 1216Å) spectroheliograph designed to observe the upper chromospheric region of the solar atmosphere with high spatial (<0.5‧‧) and temporal (8s) resolution. Besides being the brightest line in the solar spectrum, Lyα emission arises at the temperature interface between coronal and chromospheric plasmas and may, hence, hold important clues about the transfer of mass and energy to the solar corona. VAULT2.0 is an upgrade of the previously flown VAULT rocket and was launched successfully on September 30, 2014 from White Sands Missile Range (WSMR). The target was AR12172 midway toward the southwestern limb. We obtained 33 images at 8s cadence at arc second resolution due to hardware problems. The science campaign was a resounding success, with all space and ground-based instruments obtaining high-resolution data at the same location within the AR. We discuss the science rationale, instrument upgrades, and performance during the first flight and present some preliminary science results.

  14. A joint compressed-sensing and super-resolution approach for very high-resolution diffusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Ning, Lipeng; Setsompop, Kawin; Michailovich, Oleg; Makris, Nikos; Shenton, Martha E; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Rathi, Yogesh

    2016-01-15

    Diffusion MRI (dMRI) can provide invaluable information about the structure of different tissue types in the brain. Standard dMRI acquisitions facilitate a proper analysis (e.g. tracing) of medium-to-large white matter bundles. However, smaller fiber bundles connecting very small cortical or sub-cortical regions cannot be traced accurately in images with large voxel sizes. Yet, the ability to trace such fiber bundles is critical for several applications such as deep brain stimulation and neurosurgery. In this work, we propose a novel acquisition and reconstruction scheme for obtaining high spatial resolution dMRI images using multiple low resolution (LR) images, which is effective in reducing acquisition time while improving the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The proposed method called compressed-sensing super resolution reconstruction (CS-SRR), uses multiple overlapping thick-slice dMRI volumes that are under-sampled in q-space to reconstruct diffusion signal with complex orientations. The proposed method combines the twin concepts of compressed sensing and super-resolution to model the diffusion signal (at a given b-value) in a basis of spherical ridgelets with total-variation (TV) regularization to account for signal correlation in neighboring voxels. A computationally efficient algorithm based on the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) is introduced for solving the CS-SRR problem. The performance of the proposed method is quantitatively evaluated on several in-vivo human data sets including a true SRR scenario. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can be used for reconstructing sub-millimeter super resolution dMRI data with very good data fidelity in clinically feasible acquisition time.

  15. Joint Processing of Uav Imagery and Terrestrial Mobile Mapping System Data for Very High Resolution City Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruen, A.; Huang, X.; Qin, R.; Du, T.; Fang, W.; Boavida, J.; Oliveira, A.

    2013-08-01

    Both unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology and Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS) are important techniques for surveying and mapping. In recent years, the UAV technology has seen tremendous interest, both in the mapping community and in many other fields of application. Carrying off-the shelf digital cameras, the UAV can collect high quality aerial optical images for city modeling using photogrammetric techniques. In addition, a MMS can acquire high density point clouds of ground objects along the roads. The UAV, if operated in an aerial mode, has difficulties in acquiring information of ground objects under the trees and along façades of buildings. On the contrary, the MMS collects accurate point clouds of objects from the ground, together with stereo images, but it suffers from system errors due to loss of GPS signals, and also lacks the information of the roofs. Therefore, both technologies are complementary. This paper focuses on the integration of UAV images, MMS point cloud data and terrestrial images to build very high resolution 3D city models. The work we will show is a practical modeling project of the National University of Singapore (NUS) campus, which includes buildings, some of them very high, roads and other man-made objects, dense tropical vegetation and DTM. This is an intermediate report. We present work in progress.

  16. Analysis of displacements and fissure structures on a slow-moving landslide through very high-resolution orthophoto mosaicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothmund, Sabrina; Joswig, Manfred; Niethammer, Uwe; Malet, Jean-Philippe

    2010-05-01

    Very high-resolution multi-temporal images with a ground resolution of a few centimeters allowed to detect and analyze displacements and fissure patterns of the Super-Sauze landslide (Southern French Alps). Images taken by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) during a flight campaign in October 2008 have been used to produce a very high-resolution orthophoto-mosaic of the landslide. In this study, a set of 59 of a total of 1486 images was selected and photogrammetrically processed using different non-parametric rectification approaches (projective transformation, piecewise affine transformation and polynomial transformations of the second and third order). The generated orthophoto-mosaic covers the entire landslide area of 0.09 km² with a ground resolution of 3 to 8 cm. The comparison of this UAV-based orthophoto-mosaic with an orthophotograph from May 2007 (ground resolution of 20 cm) allowed the characterization of the horizontal displacements of the landslide. Displacement vectors were estimated by visually inspecting the images to identify distinct features (rocks, boulders and vegetation patches) in the two orthophotographs. This approach was chosen because of the high dynamics of the landslide and the disadvantageous long period between the repeated image acquisitions. Displacements between 7.1 and 55.4 m in varying directions have been detected and areas of different dynamics could be distinguished for the period between May 2007 and October 2008. Various structures, in particular fissures of different distributions and orientations, could be resolved in the UAV-based orthophoto-mosaic. The similarity of the observed fissures with glacial crevasses is striking and suggests a similar genesis. The identified longitudinal, transverse and cross-shaped fissures are linked to abrupt changes of in-situ crest orientation in the shallow subsurface. The observed shear fissures occur at the lateral boundary of emerging in-situ crests. The fissure genesis could be traced

  17. Very high spatial resolution optical and radar imagery in tracking water level fluctuations of a small inland reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, R. N.; Tormos, T.; Danis, P.-A.

    2015-06-01

    Tracking water level fluctuations in small lakes and reservoirs is important in order to better understand and manage these ecosystems. A geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) method using very high spatial and temporal resolution optical (Pléiades) and radar (COSMO-SkyMed and TerraSAR-X) remote sensing imagery is presented here which (1) tracks water level fluctuations via variations in water surface area and (2) avoids common difficulties found in using single-band radar images for water-land image classification. Results are robust, with over 98% of image surface area correctly classified into land or water, R2 = 0.963 and RMSE = 0.42 m for a total water level fluctuation range of 5.94 m. Multispectral optical imagery is found to be more straightforward in producing results than single-band radar imagery, but the latter crucially increase temporal resolution to the point where fluctuations can be satisfactorily tracked in time. Moreover, an analysis suggests that high and medium spatial resolution imagery is sufficient, in at least some cases, in tracking the water level fluctuations of small inland reservoirs. Finally, limitations of the methodology presented here are briefly discussed along with potential solutions to overcome them.

  18. Co-seismic surface effects from very high resolution panchromatic images: the case of the 2005 Kashmir (Pakistan) earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, M.; Cinti, F. R.; Stramondo, S.

    2011-03-01

    The use of Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite panchromatic image is nowadays an effective tool to detect and investigate surface effects of natural disasters. We specifically examined the capabilities of VHR images to analyse earthquake features and detect changes based on the combination of visual inspection and automatic classification tools. In particular, we have used Quickbird (0.6 m spatial resolution) images for detecting the three main co-seismic surface features: damages, ruptures and landslides. The present approach has been applied to the 8 October 2005, Mw7.6 Kashmir, Pakistan, earthquake. We have focused our study in and around the main urban areas hit by the above earthquake specifically at Muzaffarabad and Balakot towns. The automatic classification techniques provided the best results wherever dealing with the damage to man-made structures and landslides. On the other hand, the visual inspection method demonstrated in addressing the identification of rupture traces and associated features. The synoptic view (concerning landslide, more than 190 millions of pixels have been automatically classified), the spatiotemporal sampling and the fast automatic damage detection using satellite images provided a reliable contribution to the prompt response during natural disaster and for the evaluation of seismic hazard as well.

  19. High-resolution spectroscopic diagnostics of very high-temperature plasmas in the hard x-ray regime

    SciTech Connect

    Widmann, K

    1999-12-06

    Motivated by the need for establishing a reliable database useful for the application of x-ray spectroscopic tools for the diagnostic of very high temperature plasmas, high-resolution crystal spectrometer measurements have been performed investigating the characteristic K-shell radiation of highly charged krypton and xenon. The measurements, which have been performed at the Electron-Beam-Ion-Trap (EBIT) facility of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, include the investigation of the n = 2 {yields} 1 transitions in heliumlike krypton (Kr{sup 34+}) and innershell excited lithiumlike krypton (Kr{sup 33+}) utilizing a conventional reflection-type crystal spectrometer of von Hamos geometry. The electron-excitation-energy selective measurements map the contribution of the dielectronic recombination lines providing the means of accurate interpretation of the line profiles of the characteristic K{alpha} x-ray emission of plasmas. The high-resolution measurements of the n = 2 {yields} 1 transitions in heliumlike xenon (Xe{sup 52+}) and hydrogenlike xenon (Xe{sup 53+}) were based on a new transmission-type crystal spectrometer of DuMond geometry. The resolving power of the developed spectrometer was sufficient for charge state specific observation allowing the determination of the electron-impact excitation cross section for the hydrogen- and heliumlike K{alpha} transitions. The disagreement with theoretically predicted values is a measure of the magnitude of the Breit interaction for the highly charged high-Z ions.

  20. a Kernel Method Based on Topic Model for Very High Spatial Resolution (vhsr) Remote Sensing Image Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Linmei; Shen, Li; Li, Zhipeng

    2016-06-01

    A kernel-based method for very high spatial resolution remote sensing image classification is proposed in this article. The new kernel method is based on spectral-spatial information and structure information as well, which is acquired from topic model, Latent Dirichlet Allocation model. The final kernel function is defined as K = u1Kspec + u2Kspat + u3Kstru, in which Kspec, Kspat, Kstru are radial basis function (RBF) and u1 + u2 + u3 = 1. In the experiment, comparison with three other kernel methods, including the spectral-based, the spectral- and spatial-based and the spectral- and structure-based method, is provided for a panchromatic QuickBird image of a suburban area with a size of 900 × 900 pixels and spatial resolution of 0.6 m. The result shows that the overall accuracy of the spectral- and structure-based kernel method is 80 %, which is higher than the spectral-based kernel method, as well as the spectral- and spatial-based which accuracy respectively is 67 % and 74 %. What's more, the accuracy of the proposed composite kernel method that jointly uses the spectral, spatial, and structure information is highest among the four methods which is increased to 83 %. On the other hand, the result of the experiment also verifies the validity of the expression of structure information about the remote sensing image.

  1. Analysis of very-high-resolution Galileo images of Europa: Implications for small-scale structure and surface evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, E. J.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Yin, A.; Prockter, L. M.; Patthoff, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Galileo Solid State Imager (SSI) recorded nine very high-resolution frames (8 at 12 m/pixel and 1 at 6 m/pixel) during the E12 flyby of Europa in Dec. 1997. To understand the implications for the small-scale structure and evolution of Europa, we mosaicked these frames (observations 12ESMOTTLE01 and 02, incidence ≈18°, emission ≈77°) into their regional context (part of observation 11ESREGMAP01, 220 m/pixel, incidence ≈74°, emission ≈23°), despite their very different viewing and lighting conditions. We created a map of geological units based on morphology, structure, and albedo along with stereoscopic images where the frames overlapped. The highly diverse units range from: high albedo sub-parallel ridge and grooved terrain; to variegated-albedo hummocky terrain; to low albedo and relatively smooth terrain. We classified and analyzed the diverse units solely based on the high-resolution image mosaic, prior to comparison to the context image, to obtain an in-depth look at possible surface evolution and underlying formational processes. We infer that some of these units represent different stages and forms of resurfacing, including cryovolcanic and tectonic resurfacing. However, significant morphological variation among units in the region indicates that there are different degrees of resurfacing at work. We have created candidate morphological sequences that provide insight into the conversion of ridged plains to chaotic terrain—generally, a process of subduing formerly sharp features through tectonic modification and/or cryovolcanism. When the map of the high-resolution area is compared to the regional context, features that appear to be one unit at regional resolution are comprised of several distinct units at high resolution, and features that appear to be smooth in the context image are found to show distinct textures. Moreover, in the context image, transitions from ridged units to disrupted units appear to be gradual; however the high-resolution

  2. Development of indicators of urban quality of life through very high spatial resolution remote sensing: A case study of Hanoi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Thi Thanh Hien

    In studies of urban quality of life, the information that can be extracted from satellite images is limited by image resolution and by the standard method of pixel classification. Recently, very high spatial resolution (VHSR) satellite images have allowed the development of new remote sensing application, especially for complex urban areas. Despite of the numerous advantages of the object-oriented approach for VHSR image processing, the parameters used to carry it out, especially at the object creation stage, are not very well documented. Moreover, the evaluation of urban quality of life has never considered the perception of inhabitants of the zones under study. This dissertation therefore addresses these two issues and aims 1) at testing a systematic ways of achieving the best parameters for object-oriented classification with the software Definiens and 2) at quantifying the relation between objective indicators and perceived satisfaction. Hoan Kiem district, in Hanoi, Vietnam, was chosen as our zone of interest. The image used for this study is a 0,7m spatial resolution Quickbird image. In the first part of the dissertation, we identify eight land occupation classes on the image: lakes, river, parks, groups of trees along streets, isolated trees, large road and residential blocks. Using these classes and additional cartographic information, we calculate nine quality of life indicators that correspond to two central aspects of urban life: commodity (urban services) and amenity (urban landscape). For each group of indicators, we carried out a principal components analysis to obtain non-correlated components. We then conducted a survey with eight city planning experts who live and work in the zone under study to Obtain an assessment of the satisfaction of inhabitants towards their area of residence. The weight of each component in the determination of quality of life was achieved through an ordinal regression whose independent variables are the components and the

  3. Adjusting spectral indices for spectral response function differences of very high spatial resolution sensors simulated from field spectra.

    PubMed

    Cundill, Sharon L; van der Werff, Harald M A; van der Meijde, Mark

    2015-03-13

    The use of data from multiple sensors is often required to ensure data coverage and continuity, but differences in the spectral characteristics of sensors result in spectral index values being different. This study investigates spectral response function effects on 48 spectral indices for cultivated grasslands using simulated data of 10 very high spatial resolution sensors, convolved from field reflectance spectra of a grass covered dike (with varying vegetation condition). Index values for 48 indices were calculated for original narrow-band spectra and convolved data sets, and then compared. The indices Difference Vegetation Index (DVI), Global Environmental Monitoring Index (GEMI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Modified Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI2) and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), which include the difference between the near-infrared and red bands, have values most similar to those of the original spectra across all 10 sensors (1:1 line mean 1:1R2 > 0.960 and linear trend mean ccR2 > 0.997). Additionally, relationships between the indices' values and two quality indicators for grass covered dikes were compared to those of the original spectra. For the soil moisture indicator, indices that ratio bands performed better across sensors than those that difference bands, while for the dike cover quality indicator, both the choice of bands and their formulation are important.

  4. Monitoring the invasion of Spartina alterniflora using very high resolution unmanned aerial vehicle imagery in Beihai, Guangxi (China).

    PubMed

    Wan, Huawei; Wang, Qiao; Jiang, Dong; Fu, Jingying; Yang, Yipeng; Liu, Xiaoman

    2014-01-01

    Spartina alterniflora was introduced to Beihai, Guangxi (China), for ecological engineering purposes in 1979. However, the exceptional adaptability and reproductive ability of this species have led to its extensive dispersal into other habitats, where it has had a negative impact on native species and threatens the local mangrove and mudflat ecosystems. To obtain the distribution and spread of Spartina alterniflora, we collected HJ-1 CCD imagery from 2009 and 2011 and very high resolution (VHR) imagery from the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The invasion area of Spartina alterniflora was 357.2 ha in 2011, which increased by 19.07% compared with the area in 2009. A field survey was conducted for verification and the total accuracy was 94.0%. The results of this paper show that VHR imagery can provide details on distribution, progress, and early detection of Spartina alterniflora invasion. OBIA, object based image analysis for remote sensing (RS) detection method, can enable control measures to be more effective, accurate, and less expensive than a field survey of the invasive population.

  5. Genetic Particle Swarm Optimization-Based Feature Selection for Very-High-Resolution Remotely Sensed Imagery Object Change Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Yunhao; Jiang, Weiguo

    2016-07-30

    In the field of multiple features Object-Based Change Detection (OBCD) for very-high-resolution remotely sensed images, image objects have abundant features and feature selection affects the precision and efficiency of OBCD. Through object-based image analysis, this paper proposes a Genetic Particle Swarm Optimization (GPSO)-based feature selection algorithm to solve the optimization problem of feature selection in multiple features OBCD. We select the Ratio of Mean to Variance (RMV) as the fitness function of GPSO, and apply the proposed algorithm to the object-based hybrid multivariate alternative detection model. Two experiment cases on Worldview-2/3 images confirm that GPSO can significantly improve the speed of convergence, and effectively avoid the problem of premature convergence, relative to other feature selection algorithms. According to the accuracy evaluation of OBCD, GPSO is superior at overall accuracy (84.17% and 83.59%) and Kappa coefficient (0.6771 and 0.6314) than other algorithms. Moreover, the sensitivity analysis results show that the proposed algorithm is not easily influenced by the initial parameters, but the number of features to be selected and the size of the particle swarm would affect the algorithm. The comparison experiment results reveal that RMV is more suitable than other functions as the fitness function of GPSO-based feature selection algorithm.

  6. Monitoring the invasion of Spartina alterniflora using very high resolution unmanned aerial vehicle imagery in Beihai, Guangxi (China).

    PubMed

    Wan, Huawei; Wang, Qiao; Jiang, Dong; Fu, Jingying; Yang, Yipeng; Liu, Xiaoman

    2014-01-01

    Spartina alterniflora was introduced to Beihai, Guangxi (China), for ecological engineering purposes in 1979. However, the exceptional adaptability and reproductive ability of this species have led to its extensive dispersal into other habitats, where it has had a negative impact on native species and threatens the local mangrove and mudflat ecosystems. To obtain the distribution and spread of Spartina alterniflora, we collected HJ-1 CCD imagery from 2009 and 2011 and very high resolution (VHR) imagery from the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The invasion area of Spartina alterniflora was 357.2 ha in 2011, which increased by 19.07% compared with the area in 2009. A field survey was conducted for verification and the total accuracy was 94.0%. The results of this paper show that VHR imagery can provide details on distribution, progress, and early detection of Spartina alterniflora invasion. OBIA, object based image analysis for remote sensing (RS) detection method, can enable control measures to be more effective, accurate, and less expensive than a field survey of the invasive population. PMID:24892066

  7. Adjusting Spectral Indices for Spectral Response Function Differences of Very High Spatial Resolution Sensors Simulated from Field Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cundill, Sharon L.; van der Werff, Harald M. A.; van der Meijde, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The use of data from multiple sensors is often required to ensure data coverage and continuity, but differences in the spectral characteristics of sensors result in spectral index values being different. This study investigates spectral response function effects on 48 spectral indices for cultivated grasslands using simulated data of 10 very high spatial resolution sensors, convolved from field reflectance spectra of a grass covered dike (with varying vegetation condition). Index values for 48 indices were calculated for original narrow-band spectra and convolved data sets, and then compared. The indices Difference Vegetation Index (DVI), Global Environmental Monitoring Index (GEMI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Modified Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI2) and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), which include the difference between the near-infrared and red bands, have values most similar to those of the original spectra across all 10 sensors (1:1 line mean 1:1R2 > 0.960 and linear trend mean ccR2 > 0.997). Additionally, relationships between the indices’ values and two quality indicators for grass covered dikes were compared to those of the original spectra. For the soil moisture indicator, indices that ratio bands performed better across sensors than those that difference bands, while for the dike cover quality indicator, both the choice of bands and their formulation are important. PMID:25781511

  8. Use of Very High-Resolution Airborne Images to Analyse 3d Canopy Architecture of a Vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos, S.; Mota, M.; Noll, D.; Cannelle, B.

    2015-08-01

    Differencing between green cover and grape canopy is a challenge for vigour status evaluation in viticulture. This paper presents the acquisition methodology of very high-resolution images (4 cm), using a Sensefly Swinglet CAM unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and their processing to construct a 3D digital surface model (DSM) for the creation of precise digital terrain models (DTM). The DTM was obtained using python processing libraries. The DTM was then subtracted to the DSM in order to obtain a differential digital model (DDM) of a vineyard. In the DDM, the vine pixels were then obtained by selecting all pixels with an elevation higher than 50 [cm] above the ground level. The results show that it was possible to separate pixels from the green cover and the vine rows. The DDM showed values between -0.1 and + 1.5 [m]. A manually delineation of polygons based on the RGB image belonging to the green cover and to the vine rows gave a highly significant differences with an average value of 1.23 [m] and 0.08 [m] for the vine and the ground respectively. The vine rows elevation is in good accordance with the topping height of the vines 1.35 [m] measured on the field. This mask could be used to analyse images of the same plot taken at different times. The extraction of only vine pixels will facilitate subsequent analyses, for example, a supervised classification of these pixels.

  9. Genetic Particle Swarm Optimization-Based Feature Selection for Very-High-Resolution Remotely Sensed Imagery Object Change Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Yunhao; Jiang, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    In the field of multiple features Object-Based Change Detection (OBCD) for very-high-resolution remotely sensed images, image objects have abundant features and feature selection affects the precision and efficiency of OBCD. Through object-based image analysis, this paper proposes a Genetic Particle Swarm Optimization (GPSO)-based feature selection algorithm to solve the optimization problem of feature selection in multiple features OBCD. We select the Ratio of Mean to Variance (RMV) as the fitness function of GPSO, and apply the proposed algorithm to the object-based hybrid multivariate alternative detection model. Two experiment cases on Worldview-2/3 images confirm that GPSO can significantly improve the speed of convergence, and effectively avoid the problem of premature convergence, relative to other feature selection algorithms. According to the accuracy evaluation of OBCD, GPSO is superior at overall accuracy (84.17% and 83.59%) and Kappa coefficient (0.6771 and 0.6314) than other algorithms. Moreover, the sensitivity analysis results show that the proposed algorithm is not easily influenced by the initial parameters, but the number of features to be selected and the size of the particle swarm would affect the algorithm. The comparison experiment results reveal that RMV is more suitable than other functions as the fitness function of GPSO-based feature selection algorithm. PMID:27483285

  10. Genetic Particle Swarm Optimization–Based Feature Selection for Very-High-Resolution Remotely Sensed Imagery Object Change Detection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Yunhao; Jiang, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    In the field of multiple features Object-Based Change Detection (OBCD) for very-high-resolution remotely sensed images, image objects have abundant features and feature selection affects the precision and efficiency of OBCD. Through object-based image analysis, this paper proposes a Genetic Particle Swarm Optimization (GPSO)-based feature selection algorithm to solve the optimization problem of feature selection in multiple features OBCD. We select the Ratio of Mean to Variance (RMV) as the fitness function of GPSO, and apply the proposed algorithm to the object-based hybrid multivariate alternative detection model. Two experiment cases on Worldview-2/3 images confirm that GPSO can significantly improve the speed of convergence, and effectively avoid the problem of premature convergence, relative to other feature selection algorithms. According to the accuracy evaluation of OBCD, GPSO is superior at overall accuracy (84.17% and 83.59%) and Kappa coefficient (0.6771 and 0.6314) than other algorithms. Moreover, the sensitivity analysis results show that the proposed algorithm is not easily influenced by the initial parameters, but the number of features to be selected and the size of the particle swarm would affect the algorithm. The comparison experiment results reveal that RMV is more suitable than other functions as the fitness function of GPSO-based feature selection algorithm. PMID:27483285

  11. Comparison of sampling strategies for object-based classification of urban vegetation from Very High Resolution satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougier, Simon; Puissant, Anne; Stumpf, André; Lachiche, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    Vegetation monitoring is becoming a major issue in the urban environment due to the services they procure and necessitates an accurate and up to date mapping. Very High Resolution satellite images enable a detailed mapping of the urban tree and herbaceous vegetation. Several supervised classifications with statistical learning techniques have provided good results for the detection of urban vegetation but necessitate a large amount of training data. In this context, this study proposes to investigate the performances of different sampling strategies in order to reduce the number of examples needed. Two windows based active learning algorithms from state-of-art are compared to a classical stratified random sampling and a third combining active learning and stratified strategies is proposed. The efficiency of these strategies is evaluated on two medium size French cities, Strasbourg and Rennes, associated to different datasets. Results demonstrate that classical stratified random sampling can in some cases be just as effective as active learning methods and that it should be used more frequently to evaluate new active learning methods. Moreover, the active learning strategies proposed in this work enables to reduce the computational runtime by selecting multiple windows at each iteration without increasing the number of windows needed.

  12. Monitoring the Invasion of Spartina alterniflora Using Very High Resolution Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Imagery in Beihai, Guangxi (China)

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Huawei; Wang, Qiao; Jiang, Dong; Yang, Yipeng; Liu, Xiaoman

    2014-01-01

    Spartina alterniflora was introduced to Beihai, Guangxi (China), for ecological engineering purposes in 1979. However, the exceptional adaptability and reproductive ability of this species have led to its extensive dispersal into other habitats, where it has had a negative impact on native species and threatens the local mangrove and mudflat ecosystems. To obtain the distribution and spread of Spartina alterniflora, we collected HJ-1 CCD imagery from 2009 and 2011 and very high resolution (VHR) imagery from the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The invasion area of Spartina alterniflora was 357.2 ha in 2011, which increased by 19.07% compared with the area in 2009. A field survey was conducted for verification and the total accuracy was 94.0%. The results of this paper show that VHR imagery can provide details on distribution, progress, and early detection of Spartina alterniflora invasion. OBIA, object based image analysis for remote sensing (RS) detection method, can enable control measures to be more effective, accurate, and less expensive than a field survey of the invasive population. PMID:24892066

  13. Design and performance of a new generation, compact, low cost, very high Doppler precision and resolution optical spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; Zhao, Bo; Powell, Scott; Wang, Ji; Fletcher, Adam; Chang, Liang; Groot, John; Wan, Xiaoke; Jakeman, Hali; Myers, Derek; Grafer, Elliot; Liu, Jian; Varosi, Frank; Schofield, Sidney; Moore, Alexandria; van Olphen, Maria-Ines; Katz, Jordan; Barnes, Rory

    2012-09-01

    This paper is to report the design and performance of a very high Doppler precision cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph, EXtremely high Precision ExtrasolaR planet Tracker III (EXPERT-III), as part of a global Exoplanet Tracker (ET) network. The ET network is designed to hunt low mass planets, especially habitable rocky planets, around GKM dwarfs. It has an extremely high spectral resolution (EHR) mode of R=110,000 and a high resolution (HR) mode of R=56,000 and can simultaneously cover 0.38-0.9 μm with a 4kx4k back-illuminated Fairchild CCD detector with a single exposure. EXPERT-III is optimized for high throughput by using two-prisms cross-disperser and a large core diameter fiber (2 arcsec on sky, or 80 μm at f/4) to collect photons from the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) 2.1m telescope. The average overall detection efficiency is ~6% from above the atmosphere to the detector for the EHR Mode and about 11% for the HR mode. The extremely high spectral resolution in a compact design (the spectrograph dimension, 1.34x0.8x0.48 m) is realized by coupling the single input 80 μm telescope fiber into four 40 μm fibers and re-arranging the four small core diameter fibers into a linear fiber slit array (a one-to-four fiber image slicer). EXPERT-III is operated in a vacuum chamber with temperature controlled to ~2 milli-Kelvin rms for an extended period of time. The radial velocity (RV) drift is controlled to within 10 meters/second (m/s) over a month. EXPERT-III can reach a photon noise limited RV measurement precision of ~0.3 m/s for a V=8 mag GKM type dwarf with small rotation (vsini =2 km/s) in a 15 min exposure. EXPERT-III's RV measurement uncertainties for bright stars are primarily limited by the Thorium-Argon (ThAr) calibration source (~0.5 m/s). EXPERT-III will serve as an excellent public accessible high resolution optical spectroscope facility at the KPNO 2.1m telescope.

  14. Fine-scale mapping of vector habitats using very high resolution satellite imagery: a liver fluke case-study.

    PubMed

    De Roeck, Els; Van Coillie, Frieke; De Wulf, Robert; Soenen, Karen; Charlier, Johannes; Vercruysse, Jozef; Hantson, Wouter; Ducheyne, Els; Hendrickx, Guy

    2014-01-01

    The visualization of vector occurrence in space and time is an important aspect of studying vector-borne diseases. Detailed maps of possible vector habitats provide valuable information for the prediction of infection risk zones but are currently lacking for most parts of the world. Nonetheless, monitoring vector habitats from the finest scales up to farm level is of key importance to refine currently existing broad-scale infection risk models. Using Fasciola hepatica, a parasite liver fluke, as a case in point, this study illustrates the potential of very high resolution (VHR) optical satellite imagery to efficiently and semi-automatically detect detailed vector habitats. A WorldView2 satellite image capable of <5m resolution was acquired in the spring of 2013 for the area around Bruges, Belgium, a region where dairy farms suffer from liver fluke infections transmitted by freshwater snails. The vector thrives in small water bodies (SWBs), such as ponds, ditches and other humid areas consisting of open water, aquatic vegetation and/or inundated grass. These water bodies can be as small as a few m2 and are most often not present on existing land cover maps because of their small size. We present a classification procedure based on object-based image analysis (OBIA) that proved valuable to detect SWBs at a fine scale in an operational and semi-automated way. The classification results were compared to field and other reference data such as existing broad-scale maps and expert knowledge. Overall, the SWB detection accuracy reached up to 87%. The resulting fine-scale SWB map can be used as input for spatial distribution modelling of the liver fluke snail vector to enable development of improved infection risk mapping and management advice adapted to specific, local farm situations.

  15. Automatic change detection of buildings in urban environment from very high spatial resolution images using existing geodatabase and prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouziani, Mourad; Goïta, Kalifa; He, Dong-Chen

    2010-01-01

    The updating of geodatabases (GDB) in urban environments is a difficult and expensive task. It may be facilitated by an automatic change detection method. Several methods have been developed for medium and low spatial resolution images. This study proposes a new method for change detection of buildings in urban environments from very high spatial resolution images (VHSR) and using existing digital cartographic data. The proposed methodology is composed of several stages. The existing knowledge on the buildings and the other urban objects are first modelled and saved in a knowledge base. Some change detection rules are defined at this stage. Then, the image is segmented. The parameters of segmentation are computed thanks to the integration between the image and the geodatabase. Thereafter, the segmented image is analyzed using the knowledge base to localize the segments where the change of building is likely to occur. The change detection rules are then applied on these segments to identify the segments that represent the changes of buildings. These changes represent the updates of buildings to be added to the geodatabase. The data used in this research concern the city of Sherbrooke (Quebec, Canada) and the city of Rabat (Morocco). For Sherbrooke, we used an Ikonos image acquired in October 2006 and a GDB at the scale of 1:20,000. For Rabat, a QuickBird image acquired in August 2006 has been used with a GDB at the scale of 1:10,000. The rate of good detection is 90%. The proposed method presents some limitations on the detection of the exact contours of the buildings. It could be improved by including a shape post-analysis of detected buildings. The proposed method could be integrated into a cartographic update process or as a method for the quality assessment of a geodatabase. It could be also be used to identify illegal building work or to monitor urban growth.

  16. Very high resolution Earth observation features for monitoring plant and animal community structure across multiple spatial scales in protected areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mairota, Paola; Cafarelli, Barbara; Labadessa, Rocco; Lovergine, Francesco; Tarantino, Cristina; Lucas, Richard M.; Nagendra, Harini; Didham, Raphael K.

    2015-05-01

    Monitoring the status and future trends in biodiversity can be prohibitively expensive using ground-based surveys. Consequently, significant effort is being invested in the use of satellite remote sensing to represent aspects of the proximate mechanisms (e.g., resource availability) that can be related to biodiversity surrogates (BS) such as species community descriptors. We explored the potential of very high resolution (VHR) satellite Earth observation (EO) features as proxies for habitat structural attributes that influence spatial variation in habitat quality and biodiversity change. In a semi-natural grassland mosaic of conservation concern in southern Italy, we employed a hierarchical nested sampling strategy to collect field and VHR-EO data across three spatial extent levels (landscape, patch and plot). Species incidence and abundance data were collected at the plot level for plant, insect and bird functional groups. Spectral and textural VHR-EO image features were derived from a Worldview-2 image. Three window sizes (grains) were tested for analysis and computation of textural features, guided by the perception limits of different organisms. The modelled relationships between VHR-EO features and BS responses differed across scales, suggesting that landscape, patch and plot levels are respectively most appropriate when dealing with birds, plants and insects. This research demonstrates the potential of VHR-EO for biodiversity mapping and habitat modelling, and highlights the importance of identifying the appropriate scale of analysis for specific taxonomic groups of interest. Further, textural features are important in the modelling of functional group-specific indices which represent BS in high conservation value habitat types, and provide a more direct link to species interaction networks and ecosystem functioning, than provided by traditional taxonomic diversity indices.

  17. Very-high-resolution seismic and magnetic investigations of a chemical munition dumpsite in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missiaen, Tine; Feller, Pascal

    2008-09-01

    Very-high-resolution (VHR) seismic and magnetic investigations were carried out over a chemical munition dumpsite in the Bornholm Basin, south-western Baltic Sea. The main goal of the investigations was to image the shallow internal structure of the dumpsite and to map the lateral and vertical distribution of the dumped war material. The shallow geology was imaged in great detail on the seismic data. Seven seismic-stratigraphic units were identified, related to different stages in the Holocene and late-glacial history. A large number of diapir-like features were observed that most likely represent fluid expulsion phenomena. Four shipwrecks were identified in the dumpsite area. The wrecks have partly sunk into the soft upper sediments, their height above the sea floor reaching no more than 2 m. Seismic and magnetic data indicate the presence of a large number of buried objects. In most cases there is a good correlation between the seismic and magnetic data sets. The objects are generally buried no deeper than 1 to 2 m. Their size varies between 1.5 and 5 m, occasionally up to 10 m. Shallow pits in the sea bed are likely due to the impact of dumping. The data confirm the wide variety of dumped war material ranging from bombs and shells to encasements and containers. The distribution of the buried objects seems rather heterogeneous, with locally high object concentrations surrounded by areas of lower object density. The results of this case study demonstrate the benefit of complementary, concurrent geophysical investigations for munition dumpsite research. Finally this will yield a better assessment of the current status of the dumpsite and the possible ecological risks related to the dumped war material.

  18. Very high resolution Earth Observation features for testing the direct and indirect effects of landscape structure on local habitat quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mairota, Paola; Cafarelli, Barbara; Labadessa, Rocco; Lovergine, Francesco P.; Tarantino, Cristina; Nagendra, Harini; Didham, Raphael K.

    2015-02-01

    Modelling the empirical relationships between habitat quality and species distribution patterns is the first step to understanding human impacts on biodiversity. It is important to build on this understanding to develop a broader conceptual appreciation of the influence of surrounding landscape structure on local habitat quality, across multiple spatial scales. Traditional models which report that 'habitat amount' in the landscape is sufficient to explain patterns of biodiversity, irrespective of habitat configuration or spatial variation in habitat quality at edges, implicitly treat each unit of habitat as interchangeable and ignore the high degree of interdependence between spatial components of land-use change. Here, we test the contrasting hypothesis, that local habitat units are not interchangeable in their habitat attributes, but are instead dependent on variation in surrounding habitat structure at both patch- and landscape levels. As the statistical approaches needed to implement such hierarchical causal models are observation-intensive, we utilise very high resolution (VHR) Earth Observation (EO) images to rapidly generate fine-grained measures of habitat patch internal heterogeneities over large spatial extents. We use linear mixed-effects models to test whether these remotely-sensed proxies for habitat quality were influenced by surrounding patch or landscape structure. The results demonstrate the significant influence of surrounding patch and landscape context on local habitat quality. They further indicate that such an influence can be direct, when a landscape variable alone influences the habitat structure variable, and/or indirect when the landscape and patch attributes have a conjoined effect on the response variable. We conclude that a substantial degree of interaction among spatial configuration effects is likely to be the norm in determining the ecological consequences of habitat fragmentation, thus corroborating the notion of the spatial context

  19. The Impact II, a Very High-Resolution Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Instrument (QTOF) for Deep Shotgun Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Beck, Scarlet; Michalski, Annette; Raether, Oliver; Lubeck, Markus; Kaspar, Stephanie; Goedecke, Niels; Baessmann, Carsten; Hornburg, Daniel; Meier, Florian; Paron, Igor; Kulak, Nils A; Cox, Juergen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    Hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry is one of the two major principles used in proteomics. Although based on simple fundamentals, it has over the last decades greatly evolved in terms of achievable resolution, mass accuracy, and dynamic range. The Bruker impact platform of QTOF instruments takes advantage of these developments and here we develop and evaluate the impact II for shotgun proteomics applications. Adaption of our heated liquid chromatography system achieved very narrow peptide elution peaks. The impact II is equipped with a new collision cell with both axial and radial ion ejection, more than doubling ion extraction at high tandem MS frequencies. The new reflectron and detector improve resolving power compared with the previous model up to 80%, i.e. to 40,000 at m/z 1222. We analyzed the ion current from the inlet capillary and found very high transmission (>80%) up to the collision cell. Simulation and measurement indicated 60% transfer into the flight tube. We adapted MaxQuant for QTOF data, improving absolute average mass deviations to better than 1.45 ppm. More than 4800 proteins can be identified in a single run of HeLa digest in a 90 min gradient. The workflow achieved high technical reproducibility (R2 > 0.99) and accurate fold change determination in spike-in experiments in complex mixtures. Using label-free quantification we rapidly quantified haploid against diploid yeast and characterized overall proteome differences in mouse cell lines originating from different tissues. Finally, after high pH reversed-phase fractionation we identified 9515 proteins in a triplicate measurement of HeLa peptide mixture and 11,257 proteins in single measurements of cerebellum-the highest proteome coverage reported with a QTOF instrument so far.

  20. Exploration of very high spatial resolution data for vegetation mapping using cartographic ontologies: Identifying life forms to mapping formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Gallegos, Hugo Benigno

    Vegetation mapping is often considered the process of identifying landscape patterns of individuals or clusters of species or life forms (LF). At the landscape scale, the larger pattern represented by individuals or clusters represents the conceptualization of "vegetation mapping" and can be used as a building block to describe an ecosystem. To represent these building blocks or LF a "common entity (CE)" concept is introduced to represent the components of Formations as described by the National Vegetation Classification (NVC) system. The NVC has established protocols to consistently represent plant communities and promote coordinated management, particularly across jurisdictional boundaries. However, it is not a universal standard and the methods of producing detailed maps of vegetation CE from very high spatial resolution (VHR) remote sensing data are important research questions. This research addressed how best to understand and represent plant cover in arid regions, the most effective methods of mapping vegetation cover using high spatial resolution data, how to assess the accuracy of these maps, and their value in establishing more standardized mapping protocols across ecosystems. Utilizing VHR products from the IKONOS and QuickBird sensors the study focused on the Coronado National Memorial and Chiricahua National Monument in Arizona and Los Ajos and Pinacate - Grand Desierto Biosphere Reserves in Mexico. Individual CE were semi-automatically mapped incorporating spectral, textural and geostatistical variables. The results were evaluated across sensors, study sites, and input variables. In addition, multiple methods of acquiring field data for accuracy assessment were evaluated and then an evaluation was made of a semi-automatic determination of Formation based on CE. The results of the study suggest consistency across study sites using the IKONOS data. A comparison between VHR products from the same place is feasible but sensor spectral differences may

  1. Very high resolution crop surface models (CSMs) from UAV-based stereo images for rice growth monitoring In Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendig, J.; Willkomm, M.; Tilly, N.; Gnyp, M. L.; Bennertz, S.; Qiang, C.; Miao, Y.; Lenz-Wiedemann, V. I. S.; Bareth, G.

    2013-08-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) became popular platforms for the collection of remotely sensed geodata in the last years (Hardin & Jensen 2011). Various applications in numerous fields of research like archaeology (Hendrickx et al., 2011), forestry or geomorphology evolved (Martinsanz, 2012). This contribution deals with the generation of multi-temporal crop surface models (CSMs) with very high resolution by means of low-cost equipment. The concept of the generation of multi-temporal CSMs using Terrestrial Laserscanning (TLS) has already been introduced by Hoffmeister et al. (2010). For this study, data acquisition was performed with a low-cost and low-weight Mini-UAV (< 5 kg). UAVs in general and especially smaller ones, like the system presented here, close a gap in small scale remote sensing (Berni et al., 2009; Watts et al., 2012). In precision agriculture frequent remote sensing on such scales during the vegetation period provides important spatial information on the crop status. Crop growth variability can be detected by comparison of the CSMs in different phenological stages. Here, the focus is on the detection of this variability and its dependency on cultivar and plant treatment. The method has been tested for data acquired on a barley experiment field in Germany. In this contribution, it is applied to a different crop in a different environment. The study area is an experiment field for rice in Northeast China (Sanjiang Plain). Three replications of the cultivars Kongyu131 and Longjing21 were planted in plots that were treated with different amounts of N-fertilizer. In July 2012 three UAV-campaigns were carried out. Establishment of ground control points (GCPs) allowed for ground truth. Additionally, further destructive and non-destructive field data were collected. The UAV-system is an MK-Okto by Hisystems (http://www.mikrokopter.de) which was equipped with the high resolution Panasonic Lumix GF3 12

  2. A spectral-structural bag-of-features scene classifier for very high spatial resolution remote sensing imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bei; Zhong, Yanfei; Zhang, Liangpei

    2016-06-01

    Land-use classification of very high spatial resolution remote sensing (VHSR) imagery is one of the most challenging tasks in the field of remote sensing image processing. However, the land-use classification is hard to be addressed by the land-cover classification techniques, due to the complexity of the land-use scenes. Scene classification is considered to be one of the expected ways to address the land-use classification issue. The commonly used scene classification methods of VHSR imagery are all derived from the computer vision community that mainly deal with terrestrial image recognition. Differing from terrestrial images, VHSR images are taken by looking down with airborne and spaceborne sensors, which leads to the distinct light conditions and spatial configuration of land cover in VHSR imagery. Considering the distinct characteristics, two questions should be answered: (1) Which type or combination of information is suitable for the VHSR imagery scene classification? (2) Which scene classification algorithm is best for VHSR imagery? In this paper, an efficient spectral-structural bag-of-features scene classifier (SSBFC) is proposed to combine the spectral and structural information of VHSR imagery. SSBFC utilizes the first- and second-order statistics (the mean and standard deviation values, MeanStd) as the statistical spectral descriptor for the spectral information of the VHSR imagery, and uses dense scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) as the structural feature descriptor. From the experimental results, the spectral information works better than the structural information, while the combination of the spectral and structural information is better than any single type of information. Taking the characteristic of the spatial configuration into consideration, SSBFC uses the whole image scene as the scope of the pooling operator, instead of the scope generated by a spatial pyramid (SP) commonly used in terrestrial image classification. The experimental

  3. Evaluation of Surface Energy Balance models for mapping evapotranspiration using very high resolution airborne remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, George

    Agriculture is the largest (90%) consumer of all fresh water in the world. The consumptive use of water by vegetation represented by the process evapotranspiration (ET) has a vital role in the dynamics of water, carbon and energy fluxes of the biosphere. Consequently, mapping ET is essential for making water a sustainable resource and also for monitoring ecosystem response to water stress and changing climate. Over the past three decades, numerous thermal remote sensing based ET mapping algorithms were developed and these have brought a significant theoretical and technical advancement in the spatial modeling of ET. Though these algorithms provided a robust, economical, and efficient tool for ET estimations at field and regional scales, yet the uncertainties in flux estimations were large, making evaluation a difficult task. The main objective of this study was to evaluate and improve the performance of widely used remote sensing based energy balance models, namely: the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution and with Internalized Calibration (METRIC), and Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS). Data used in this study was collected as part of a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional field campaign BEAREX (Bushland Evapotranspiration and Agricultural Remote Sensing Experiment) that was conducted during 2007 and 2008 summer cropping seasons at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory (CPRL) in Bushland, Texas. Seventeen high resolution remote sensing images taken from multispectral sensors onboard aircraft and field measurements of the agro-meteorological variables from the campaign were used for model evaluation and improvement. Overall relative error measured in terms of mean absolute percent difference (MAPD) for instantaneous ET (mm h -1) were 22.7%, 23.2%, and 12.6% for SEBAL, METRIC, and SEBS, respectively. SEBAL and METRIC performances for irrigated fields representing higher ET

  4. Quantification of gully volume using very high resolution DSM generated through 3D reconstruction from airborne and field digital imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Carlos; Zarco-Tejada, Pablo; Laredo, Mario; Gómez, Jose Alfonso

    2013-04-01

    Major advances have been made recently in automatic 3D photo-reconstruction techniques using uncalibrated and non-metric cameras (James and Robson, 2012). However, its application on soil conservation studies and landscape feature identification is currently at the outset. The aim of this work is to compare the performance of a remote sensing technique using a digital camera mounted on an airborne platform, with 3D photo-reconstruction, a method already validated for gully erosion assessment purposes (Castillo et al., 2012). A field survey was conducted in November 2012 in a 250 m-long gully located in field crops on a Vertisol in Cordoba (Spain). The airborne campaign was conducted with a 4000x3000 digital camera installed onboard an aircraft flying at 300 m above ground level to acquire 6 cm resolution imagery. A total of 990 images were acquired over the area ensuring a large overlap in the across- and along-track direction of the aircraft. An ortho-mosaic and the digital surface model (DSM) were obtained through automatic aerial triangulation and camera calibration methods. For the field-level photo-reconstruction technique, the gully was divided in several reaches to allow appropriate reconstruction (about 150 pictures taken per reach) and, finally, the resulting point clouds were merged into a unique mesh. A centimetric-accuracy GPS provided a benchmark dataset for gully perimeter and distinguishable reference points in order to allow the assessment of measurement errors of the airborne technique and the georeferenciation of the photo-reconstruction 3D model. The uncertainty on the gully limits definition was explicitly addressed by comparison of several criteria obtained by 3D models (slope and second derivative) with the outer perimeter obtained by the GPS operator identifying visually the change in slope at the top of the gully walls. In this study we discussed the magnitude of planimetric and altimetric errors and the differences observed between the

  5. Push-Broom-Type Very High-Resolution Satellite Sensor Data Correction Using Combined Wavelet-Fourier and Multiscale Non-Local Means Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wonseok; Yu, Soohwan; Seo, Doochun; Jeong, Jaeheon; Paik, Joonki

    2015-01-01

    In very high-resolution (VHR) push-broom-type satellite sensor data, both destriping and denoising methods have become chronic problems and attracted major research advances in the remote sensing fields. Since the estimation of the original image from a noisy input is an ill-posed problem, a simple noise removal algorithm cannot preserve the radiometric integrity of satellite data. To solve these problems, we present a novel method to correct VHR data acquired by a push-broom-type sensor by combining wavelet-Fourier and multiscale non-local means (NLM) filters. After the wavelet-Fourier filter separates the stripe noise from the mixed noise in the wavelet low- and selected high-frequency sub-bands, random noise is removed using the multiscale NLM filter in both low- and high-frequency sub-bands without loss of image detail. The performance of the proposed method is compared to various existing methods on a set of push-broom-type sensor data acquired by Korean Multi-Purpose Satellite 3 (KOMPSAT-3) with severe stripe and random noise, and the results of the proposed method show significantly improved enhancement results over existing state-of-the-art methods in terms of both qualitative and quantitative assessments. PMID:26378532

  6. Very high resolution surface mass balance over Greenland modeled by the regional climate model MAR with a downscaling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, Christoph; Lang, Charlotte; Agosta, Cécile; Prignon, Maxime; Fettweis, Xavier; Erpicum, Michel

    2016-04-01

    This study presents surface mass balance (SMB) results at 5 km resolution with the regional climate MAR model over the Greenland ice sheet. Here, we use the last MAR version (v3.6) where the land-ice module (SISVAT) using a high resolution grid (5km) for surface variables is fully coupled while the MAR atmospheric module running at a lower resolution of 10km. This online downscaling technique enables to correct near-surface temperature and humidity from MAR by a gradient based on elevation before forcing SISVAT. The 10 km precipitation is not corrected. Corrections are stronger over the ablation zone where topography presents more variations. The model has been force by ERA-Interim between 1979 and 2014. We will show the advantages of using an online SMB downscaling technique in respect to an offline downscaling extrapolation based on local SMB vertical gradients. Results at 5 km show a better agreement with the PROMICE surface mass balance data base than the extrapolated 10 km MAR SMB results.

  7. Comparison of Different Vegetation Indices for Very High-Resolution Images, Specific Case Ultracam-D Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzegar, M.; Ebadi, H.; Kiani, A.

    2015-12-01

    Today digital aerial images acquired with UltraCam sensor are known to be a valuable resource for producing high resolution information of land covers. In this research, different methods for extracting vegetation from semi-urban and agricultural regions were studied and their results were compared in terms of overall accuracy and Kappa statistic. To do this, several vegetation indices were first tested on three image datasets with different object-based classifications in terms of presence or absence of sample data, defining other features and also more classes. The effects of all these cases were evaluated on final results. After it, pixel-based classification was performed on each dataset and their accuracies were compared to optimum object-based classification. The importance of this research is to test different indices in several cases (about 75 cases) and to find the quantitative and qualitative effects of increasing or decreasing auxiliary data. This way, researchers who intent to work with such high resolution data are given an insight on the whole procedure of detecting vegetation species as one of the outstanding and common features from such images. Results showed that DVI index can better detect vegetation regions in test images. Also, the object-based classification with average 93.6% overall accuracy and 86.5% Kappa was more suitable for extracting vegetation rather than the pixel-based classification with average 81.2% overall accuracy and 59.7% Kappa.

  8. Very High Resolution Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of a Chemically Peculiar Star: Results of the chi LUPI Pathfinder Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckrone, David S.; Proffitt, Charles R.; Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Johansson, Sveneric G.; Brage, Tomas

    1999-03-01

    We summarize here the results of a major eight-year investigation of the extraordinarily detailed UV spectrum of the sharp-lined, nonmagnetic, main-sequence, chemically peculiar star chi Lupi (B9.5p HgMn + A2 Vm). The UV observations are composed of 345 Å of the spectrum acquired with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope at an average resolution of 0.023 Å. The complete set of echelle spectrograms is presented as an atlas in a companion paper. These data were supplemented by optical-wavelength spectra obtained at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. Quantitatively accurate analysis and theoretical interpretation of these data required major improvements in the accuracy and completeness of available atomic data-wavelengths, transition probabilities, hyperfine structure, and isotope shifts-for the lowest ionization states of many elements. A large, international group of theoretical and experimental atomic physicists has collaborated in this investigation, and their results are summarized or referenced in this paper. In turn, the GHRS observations of chi Lupi have become a useful source of data for atomic spectroscopy, displaying many transitions that are difficult to observe in a laboratory setting. Measured abundances or upper limits are presented for 72 ions of 51 chemical elements, spanning the periodic table. We have confirmed and refined previously identified isotopic abundance anomalies in mercury and platinum and have discovered similar isotopic anomalies in thallium and, tentatively, in lead. Large discrepancies among the LTE abundances derived, using a chemically homogeneous model atmosphere, from two or three ionization states of the same element are found to be common. In some cases these are due to departures from LTE in the ionization equilibria, but the largest such discrepancies probably result from chemical stratification within the photosphere. We find qualitative trends in the abundances of the elements

  9. Identification of damage in buildings based on gaps in 3D point clouds from very high resolution oblique airborne images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrivel, Anand; Gerke, Markus; Kerle, Norman; Vosselman, George

    2015-07-01

    Point clouds generated from airborne oblique images have become a suitable source for detailed building damage assessment after a disaster event, since they provide the essential geometric and radiometric features of both roof and façades of the building. However, they often contain gaps that result either from physical damage or from a range of image artefacts or data acquisition conditions. A clear understanding of those reasons, and accurate classification of gap-type, are critical for 3D geometry-based damage assessment. In this study, a methodology was developed to delineate buildings from a point cloud and classify the present gaps. The building delineation process was carried out by identifying and merging the roof segments of single buildings from the pre-segmented 3D point cloud. This approach detected 96% of the buildings from a point cloud generated using airborne oblique images. The gap detection and classification methods were tested using two other data sets obtained with Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) images with a ground resolution of around 1-2 cm. The methods detected all significant gaps and correctly identified the gaps due to damage. The gaps due to damage were identified based on the surrounding damage pattern, applying Gabor wavelets and a histogram of gradient orientation features. Two learning algorithms - SVM and Random Forests were tested for mapping the damaged regions based on radiometric descriptors. The learning model based on Gabor features with Random Forests performed best, identifying 95% of the damaged regions. The generalization performance of the supervised model, however, was less successful: quality measures decreased by around 15-30%.

  10. Constraining Volcano Source Rheology and Mechanisms: 3D Full Wavefield Simulations and Very High Resolution Observations From Mt Etna.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, C. J.; O'Brien, G.; de Barros, L.; Murphy, S.; Lokmer, I.; Saccorotti, G.; Patane, D.; Metaxian, J.

    2009-05-01

    Recent field observation and laboratory experiments have demonstrated a broad range of deformation mechanisms in volcanic rocks, and a juxtaposition of brittle and ductile deformation in both space and time. On the other hand seismological observations of transient deformation at volcanoes yield an equally wide variety of signal types including Volcano Tectonic (VT), Long Period (LP), Very Long Period (VLP) and tremor. A clear goal is to find robust connections between these independent sets of observations, linking detailed field studies, well controlled laboratory experiments and volcano seismology. In volcano seismology VT events are usually interpreted as the brittle response of the edifice to stressing whereas LP and VLP events are thought to result from fluid-filled conduit dynamics. However, strong wave propagation path effects and a large number of possible source mechanisms make it difficult to find a quantitative interpretation of mechanism/rheology. Numerical simulations have a key role to play in making the connection between well-controlled laboratory experiments and the field. Furthermore, many of the features seen in real volcano seismograms can be reproduced in 3D full wavefield simulations of both wet (coupled multi phase fluids and solids) and dry (rupture propagation) models. Even in simulated data the underlying rheology/source mechanisms are difficult to determine from an inversion of the synthetic seismograms, especially for sparse data with poor velocity control. With this in mind a detailed field experiment was undertaken on Mt Etna in June 2008, comprising 30+ stations in the summit area. Aided by simulated data in realistic velocity models, this has given us an unprecedented picture of shallow LP activity on Etna. These high resolution observations will be compared with recent results from laboratory experiments and with numerical simulations in an effort to better constrain the rheology/mechanism of the sources.

  11. The absolute radiometric calibration of the advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.; Teillet, P. M.; Ding, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The measurement conditions are described for an intensive field campaign at White Sands Missile Range for the calibration of the AVHRRs on NOAA-9, NOAA-10 and NOAA-11, LANDSAT-4 TM and SPOT. Three different methods for calibration of AVHRRs by reference to a ground surface site are reported, and results from these methods are compared. Significant degradations in NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 AVHRR responsivities occurred since prelaunch calibrations were completed. As of February 1988, degradations in NOAA-9 AVHRR responsivities were on the order of 37 percent in channel and 41 percent in channel 2, and for the NOAA-10 AVHRR these degradations were 42 and 59 percent in channels 1 and 2, respectively.

  12. The absolute radiometric calibration of the advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.; Teillet, P. M.; Mao, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The early results of an absolute radiometric calibration of the NOAA-9 AVHRR sensor indicate significant degradations in the response of bands 1 and 2 compared to prelaunch values. The results are currently in the process of being verified and it may be that refinements of the methodology will be in order as additional data sets are analyzed. The LANDSAT TM calibration used in this approach is known to be very precise and the Herman radiative transfer code, supplemented by the 5-S code for gaseous transmission, is reliable as well. The extent to which other steps in the analysis procedure give rise to uncertainties in the results is currently under investigation. Particular attention is being given to the geometric matching of the AVHRR and TM imagery, as well as to the spectral redistribution procedure. By taking advantage of a reasonably precise calibration of TM imagery acquired on the same day as the AVHRR data at White Sands, a promising approach to the in-orbit calibration of AVHRR sensors is being developed. Current efforts involve primarily the examination of additional test cases and the investigation of possible simplifications in the procedure through judicious use of atmospheric models.

  13. The absolute radiometric calibration of the advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, P. N.; Teillet, P. M.; Mao, Y.

    1987-09-01

    The early results of an absolute radiometric calibration of the NOAA-9 AVHRR sensor indicate significant degradations in the response of bands 1 and 2 compared to prelaunch values. The results are currently in the process of being verified and it may be that refinements of the methodology will be in order as additional data sets are analyzed. The LANDSAT TM calibration used in this approach is known to be very precise and the Herman radiative transfer code, supplemented by the 5-S code for gaseous transmission, is reliable as well. The extent to which other steps in the analysis procedure give rise to uncertainties in the results is currently under investigation. Particular attention is being given to the geometric matching of the AVHRR and TM imagery, as well as to the spectral redistribution procedure. By taking advantage of a reasonably precise calibration of TM imagery acquired on the same day as the AVHRR data at White Sands, a promising approach to the in-orbit calibration of AVHRR sensors is being developed. Current efforts involve primarily the examination of additional test cases and the investigation of possible simplifications in the procedure through judicious use of atmospheric models.

  14. An evaluation of atmospheric corrections to advanced very high resolution radiometer data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, David; Hood, Joy J.

    1993-01-01

    A data set compiled to analyze vegetation indices is used to evaluate the effect of atmospheric correction to AVHRR measurement in the solar spectrum. Such corrections include cloud screening and "clear sky" corrections. We used the "clouds from AVHRR" (CLAVR) method for cloud detection and evaluated its performance over vegetated targets. Clear sky corrections, designed to reduce the effects of molecular scattering and absorption due to ozone, water vapor, carbon dioxide, and molecular oxygen, were applied to data values determine to be cloud free. Generally, it was found that the screening and correction of the AVHRR data did not affect the maximum NDVI compositing process adversely, while at the same time improving estimates of the land-surface radiances over a compositing period.

  15. An Advanced Integrated Diffusion/Transport Method for the Design, Analysis and Optimization of the Very-High-Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Farzad Rahnema; Dingkang Zhang; Abderrafi Ougouag; Frederick Gleicher

    2011-04-04

    The main objective of this research is to develop an integrated diffusion/transport (IDT) method to substantially improve the accuracy of nodal diffusion methods for the design and analysis of Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). Because of the presence of control rods in the reflector regions in the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR-VHTR), traditional nodal diffusion methods do not accurately model these regions, within which diffusion theory breaks down in the vicinity of high neutron absorption and steep flux gradients. The IDT method uses a local transport solver based on a new incident flux response expansion method in the controlled nodes. Diffusion theory is used in the rest of the core. This approach improves the accuracy of the core solution by generating transport solutions of controlled nodes while maintaining computational efficiency by using diffusion solutions in nodes where such a treatment is sufficient. The transport method is initially developed and coupled to the reformulated 3-D nodal diffusion model in the CYNOD code for PBR core design and fuel cycle analysis. This method is also extended to the prismatic VHTR. The new method accurately captures transport effects in highly heterogeneous regions with steep flux gradients. The calculations of these nodes with transport theory avoid errors associated with spatial homogenization commonly used in diffusion methods in reactor core simulators

  16. Automatic vehicle detection based on automatic histogram-based fuzzy C-means algorithm and perceptual grouping using very high-resolution aerial imagery and road vector data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffarian, Saman; Gökaşar, Ilgın

    2016-01-01

    This study presents an approach for the automatic detection of vehicles using very high-resolution images and road vector data. Initially, road vector data and aerial images are integrated to extract road regions. Then, the extracted road/street region is clustered using an automatic histogram-based fuzzy C-means algorithm, and edge pixels are detected using the Canny edge detector. In order to automatically detect vehicles, we developed a local perceptual grouping approach based on fusion of edge detection and clustering outputs. To provide the locality, an ellipse is generated using characteristics of the candidate clusters individually. Then, ratio of edge pixels to nonedge pixels in the corresponding ellipse is computed to distinguish the vehicles. Finally, a point-merging rule is conducted to merge the points that satisfy a predefined threshold and are supposed to denote the same vehicles. The experimental validation of the proposed method was carried out on six very high-resolution aerial images that illustrate two highways, two shadowed roads, a crowded narrow street, and a street in a dense urban area with crowded parked vehicles. The evaluation of the results shows that our proposed method performed 86% and 83% in overall correctness and completeness, respectively.

  17. Using Very High Resolution Remotely Sensed Imagery to Estimate Agricultural Production: A comparison of food insecure and secure growing areas in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grace, K.; Husak, G. J.; Bogle, S.

    2013-12-01

    Determining the amount of food produced in a food insecure, isolated, subsistence farming community can be used to help identify households or communities who may be in need of additional food resources. Measuring annual food production in developing countries, much less at a sub-national level, is complicated by lack of data. It can be difficult and costly to access all of the farming households engaged in subsistence farming. However, recent research has focused on the use of remotely sensed data to aid in the estimation of area under cultivation and because food production is the measure of yield (production per hectare) multiplied by area (number of hectares), we can use the area measure to reduce uncertainty in food production estimates. One strategy for estimating cultivated area relies on a fairly time intensive manual interpretation of very high resolution data. Due to the availability of very high resolution data it is possible to construct estimates of cultivated area, even in communities where fields are small. While this strategy has been used to effectively estimate cultivated area in a timely manner, questions remain about the spatial and temporal generalizability of this approach. The purpose of this paper is to produce and compare estimates of cultivated area in two very different agricultural areas of Kenya, a highly food insecure country in East Africa, during two different agricultural seasons. The areas selected represent two different livelihood zones: a marginal growing area where poor farmers rely on inconsistent rainfall and a lush growing area near the mountainous region of the middle-West area of the country where rainfall is consistent and therefore more suited to cultivation. The overarching goal is to determine the effectiveness of very high resolution remotely sensed imagery in calculating estimates of cultivated area in areas where food production strategies are different. Additionally the results of this research will explore the

  18. Structure from motion, a low cost, very high resolution method for surveying glaciers using GoPros and opportunistic helicopter flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girod, L.; Nuth, C.; Schellenberger, T.

    2014-12-01

    The capability of structure from motion techniques to survey glaciers with a very high spatial and temporal resolution is a promising tool for better understanding the dynamic changes of glaciers. Modern software and computing power allow us to produce accurate data sets from low cost surveys, thus improving the observational capabilities on a wider range of glaciers and glacial processes. In particular, highly accurate glacier volume change monitoring and 3D movement computations will be possible Taking advantage of the helicopter flight needed to survey the ice stakes on Kronenbreen, NW Svalbard, we acquired high resolution photogrammetric data over the well-studied Midre Lovénbreen in September 2013. GoPro Hero 2 cameras were attached to the landing gear of the helicopter, acquiring two images per second. A C/A code based GPS was used for registering the stereoscopic model. Camera clock calibration is obtained through fitting together the shapes of the flight given by both the GPS logger and the relative orientation of the images. A DEM and an ortho-image are generated at 30cm resolution from 300 images collected. The comparison with a 2005 LiDAR DEM (5 meters resolution) shows an absolute error in the direct registration of about 6±3m in 3D which could be easily reduced to 1,5±1m by using fine point cloud alignment algorithms on stable ground. Due to the different nature of the acquisition method, it was not possible to use tie point based co-registration. A combination of the DEM and ortho-image is shown with the point cloud in figure below. A second photogrammetric data set will be acquired in September 2014 to survey the annual volume change and movement. These measurements will then be compared to the annual resolution glaciological stake mass balance and velocity measurements to assess the precision of the method to monitor at an annual resolution.

  19. Comparison of performance of object-based image analysis techniques available in open source software (Spring and Orfeo Toolbox/Monteverdi) considering very high spatial resolution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodoro, Ana C.; Araujo, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for remote sensing applications is becoming more frequent. However, this type of information can result in several software problems related to the huge amount of data available. Object-based image analysis (OBIA) has proven to be superior to pixel-based analysis for very high-resolution images. The main objective of this work was to explore the potentialities of the OBIA methods available in two different open source software applications, Spring and OTB/Monteverdi, in order to generate an urban land cover map. An orthomosaic derived from UAVs was considered, 10 different regions of interest were selected, and two different approaches were followed. The first one (Spring) uses the region growing segmentation algorithm followed by the Bhattacharya classifier. The second approach (OTB/Monteverdi) uses the mean shift segmentation algorithm followed by the support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Two strategies were followed: four classes were considered using Spring and thereafter seven classes were considered for OTB/Monteverdi. The SVM classifier produces slightly better results and presents a shorter processing time. However, the poor spectral resolution of the data (only RGB bands) is an important factor that limits the performance of the classifiers applied.

  20. High Performance Computing-based Assessment of the Impacts of Climate Change on the Santa Cruz and San Pedro River Basin at Very High Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Morua, A.; Vivoni, E. R.; Rivera-Fernandez, E. R.; Dominguez, F.; Meixner, T.

    2012-12-01

    -sensed imagery and government databases. For the historical period, we build confidence in the model simulations through comparisons with streamflow estimates in the region. We also evaluate the WRF forcing outcomes with respect to meteorological inputs from ground rain gauges and the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). We then analyze the high-resolution spatiotemporal predictions of soil moisture, evapotranspiration, runoff generation and recharge under past conditions and for the climate change scenario. A comparison with the historical period will yield a first-of-its-kind assessment at very high spatiotemporal resolution on the impacts of climate change on the hydrologic response of two large semiarid river basins of the southwestern United States.

  1. Evaluation of Different Change Detection Techniques in Forestry for Improvement of Spatial Objects Extraction Algorithms by Very High Resolution Remote Sensing Digital Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, N.

    2013-09-01

    Earth observations which are being useable by spatial analysis ability play an important role in detecting, management and solving environmental problems such as climate changes, deforestation, disasters, land use, water resource and carbon cycle. Remote sensing technology in combination with geospatial information system (GIS) can render reliable information on vegetation cover. Satellite Remote sensed data and GIS for land cover/use with its changes is a key to many diverse applications such as Forestry. Change detection can be defined as the process of identifying differences in the state of an object or phenomenon by observing it at different times. The analysis of the spatial extent and temporal change of vegetation cover (Forest) by using remotely sensed data is critically importance to natural resource management sciences. The main aim of this review paper is to go through the different change detection methods and algorithms based on very high resolution remote sensing imagery data, evaluate the quality of the spatial individual crown cover extraction in forests with high density, analyse, compare the results by optimized performance of control data for the same objects to provide the improvement in technique for detection and improve the mathematical sides of the change detection algorithms for high dense forests regions with different boundaries.

  2. An automated, open-source pipeline for mass production of digital elevation models (DEMs) from very-high-resolution commercial stereo satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shean, David E.; Alexandrov, Oleg; Moratto, Zachary M.; Smith, Benjamin E.; Joughin, Ian R.; Porter, Claire; Morin, Paul

    2016-06-01

    We adapted the automated, open source NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP) to generate digital elevation models (DEMs) and orthoimages from very-high-resolution (VHR) commercial imagery of the Earth. These modifications include support for rigorous and rational polynomial coefficient (RPC) sensor models, sensor geometry correction, bundle adjustment, point cloud co-registration, and significant improvements to the ASP code base. We outline a processing workflow for ∼0.5 m ground sample distance (GSD) DigitalGlobe WorldView-1 and WorldView-2 along-track stereo image data, with an overview of ASP capabilities, an evaluation of ASP correlator options, benchmark test results, and two case studies of DEM accuracy. Output DEM products are posted at ∼2 m with direct geolocation accuracy of <5.0 m CE90/LE90. An automated iterative closest-point (ICP) co-registration tool reduces absolute vertical and horizontal error to <0.5 m where appropriate ground-control data are available, with observed standard deviation of ∼0.1-0.5 m for overlapping, co-registered DEMs (n = 14, 17). While ASP can be used to process individual stereo pairs on a local workstation, the methods presented here were developed for large-scale batch processing in a high-performance computing environment. We are leveraging these resources to produce dense time series and regional mosaics for the Earth's polar regions.

  3. Very High Resolution Optical Images for Detecting Co-seismic Surface Effects: the Cases of the 2005 Kashmir (Pakistan) and the 2003 Bam (Iran) Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, M.; Cinti, F. R.; Stramondo, S.

    2008-12-01

    Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite panchromatic image has revealed to be a reliable tool to detect surface effects of natural disasters. This is particularly true whereas the hit territory is a remote land and/or with logistic and security problems. Data from this kind of sensor have a potential for more exhaustive and accurate mapping of the environment with details of sub-meter ground resolution. We show two large earthquake case studies, the 2005 Mw 7.6 Kashmir and the 2003 Mw 6.6 Bam events, both producing significant surface effects as ruptures, landslides and building damages. In order to test the capability of VHR images to recognize and evaluate such features we used panchromatic QuickBird imagery (0.6 m spatial resolution) acquired before and after the events (kindly provided by DigitalGlobe). Concerning the Pakistan we focus on the Muzaffarabad and Balakot areas, both crossed by the earthquake fault and experiencing edifice collapses. Same sort of analysis is performed for the ancient town of Bam. We proceed with: 1. identification on the images of the main rupture trace and of major landslides; 2. generation of a detailed spatial distribution of damage and collapses through a single building automatic classification approach; 3. cross-comparison of the different surface effects. The QuickBird panchromatic images provide a view of the co-seismic features at large scale, revealing complex geometric pattern of the cracks and compressional deformation features. It is possible to detect the lateral sense of movement, and based on the sun shade projection in the images, we infer the facing of the scarp, thus the uplifted side. Regarding point two, if in one hand the use of QuickBird images leads to detect very small details, on the other hand buildings become rather complex structures. Furthermore they may be surrounded by scattering objects making less evident the contrast between the roofs and the ground, thus increasing the difficulties in the

  4. A comparison of selected classification algorithms for mapping bamboo patches in lower Gangetic plains using very high resolution WorldView 2 imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aniruddha; Joshi, P. K.

    2014-02-01

    Bamboo is used by different communities in India to develop indigenous products, maintain livelihood and sustain life. Indian National Bamboo Mission focuses on evaluation, monitoring and development of bamboo as an important plant resource. Knowledge of spatial distribution of bamboo therefore becomes necessary in this context. The present study attempts to map bamboo patches using very high resolution (VHR) WorldView 2 (WV 2) imagery in parts of South 24 Parganas, West Bengal, India using both pixel and object-based approaches. A combined layer of pan-sharpened multi-spectral (MS) bands, first 3 principal components (PC) of these bands and seven second order texture measures based Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrices (GLCM) of first three PC were used as input variables. For pixel-based image analysis (PBIA), recursive feature elimination (RFE) based feature selection was carried out to identify the most important input variables. Results of the feature selection indicate that the 10 most important variables include PC 1, PC 2 and their GLCM mean along with 6 MS bands. Three different sets of predictor variables (5 and 10 most important variables and all 32 variables) were classified with Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Random Forest (RF) algorithms. Producer accuracy of bamboo was found to be highest when 10 most important variables selected from RFE were classified with SVM (82%). However object-based image analysis (OBIA) achieved higher classification accuracy than PBIA using the same 32 variables, but with less number of training samples. Using object-based SVM classifier, the producer accuracy of bamboo reached 94%. The significance of this study is that the present framework is capable of accurately identifying bamboo patches as well as detecting other tree species in a tropical region with heterogeneous land use land cover (LULC), which could further aid the mandate of National Bamboo Mission and related programs.

  5. Very high-resolution seismics as a tool for sequence stratigraphy applied to outcrop scale-examples for Eastern Tyrrhenian margin holocene/pleistocene deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Chiocci, F.L. )

    1994-03-01

    Three Eastern Tyrrhenian continental margin areas with very different depositional and tectonic settings were analyzed using single-channel very high-resolution reflection seismics coupled with sea-floor sampling. Fourth-and fifth-order depositional sequences derived from Quarternary glacio-eustatic processes are now buried at shallow depths within the continental shelf. The sequences have been reconstructed in detail with great lateral continuity. The tectonic setting did not influence the development of high-order sequences, which are probably synchronous at a global scale. Within these sequences, it has been possible to recognize all the systems tracts hypothesized by sequence stratigraphy models, confirming that this method does not depend upon time or scale. The geometry of depositional sequences is strongly dependent on sedimentation rate, i.e., on the distance from sources. Local factors must also be considered because they play an important role in the geometrical development of depositional sequences. In high-order depositional sequences, lowstand systems tracts are volumetrically predominant. High-stand and transgressive systems tracts seem to be linked to point sources because they have a three-dimensional (3-D) geometry. On the contrary, lowstand systems tracts are related to linear sources parallel to the shelf break; they cause the progradation of the whole margin so that they form the margin structure almost entirely. Offshore single channel reflection seismic surveys are generally conducted in prospecting, during planning and construction of civil engineering works and during surveys for oil-drilling sites. However, VHRS profiles also contain a large amount of data on large-scale sedimentary structures, chronostratigraphic surfaces, possible textural variations, and mutual spatial relationships between sedimentary bodies. 60 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Influence of Scale Effect and Model Performance in Downscaling ASTER Land Surface Temperatures to a Very High Spatial Resolution in an Agricultural Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Li, G.; Liu, S.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, X.

    2015-12-01

    At present land surface temperatures (LSTs) can be generated from thermal infrared remote sensing with spatial resolutions from ~100 m to tens of kilometers. However, LSTs with high spatial resolution, e.g. tens of meters, are still lack. The purpose of LST downscaling is to generate LSTs with finer spatial resolutions than their native spatial resolutions. The statistical linear or nonlinear regression models are most frequently used for LST downscaling. The basic assumption of these models is the scale-invariant relationships between LST and its descriptors, which is questioned but rare researches have been reported. In addition, few researches can be found for downscaling satellite LST or TIR data to a high spatial resolution, i.e. better than 100 m or even finer. The lack of LST with high spatial resolution cannot satisfy the requirements of applications such as evapotranspiration mapping at the field scale. By selecting a dynamically developing agricultural oasis as the study area, the aim of this study is to downscale the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) LSTs to 15 m, to satisfy the requirement of evapotranspiration mapping at the field scale. Twelve ASTER images from May to September in 2012, covering the entire growth stage of maize, were selected. Four statistical models were evaluated, including one global model, one piecewise model, and two local models. The influence from scale effect in downscaling LST was quantified. The downscaled LSTs are evaluated from accuracy and image quality. Results demonstrate that the influence from scale effect varies according to models and the maize growth stage. Significant influence about -4 K to 6 K existed at the early stage and weaker influence existed in the middle stage. When compared with the ground measured LSTs, the downscaled LSTs resulted from the global and local models yielded higher accuracies and better image qualities than the local models. In addition to the

  7. A Very High-Resolution Deep-Towed Multichannel Seismic Survey in the Yaquina Basin off Peru - First Data Processing Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitzke, M.; Bialas, J.; Kostrov, A.

    2002-12-01

    which might act as pathways for fluid flow. In the second area a small 3D grid of deep tow profile lines was recorded to get a very high resolution image of several outcropping and buried chemoherms detected during the former RV Sonne cruise SO146 as well.

  8. Peak capacity, peak-capacity production rate, and boiling point resolution for temperature-programmed GC with very high programming rates

    PubMed

    Grall; Leonard; Sacks

    2000-02-01

    Recent advances in column heating technology have made possible very fast linear temperature programming for high-speed gas chromatography. A fused-silica capillary column is contained in a tubular metal jacket, which is resistively heated by a precision power supply. With very rapid column heating, the rate of peak-capacity production is significantly enhanced, but the total peak capacity and the boiling-point resolution (minimum boiling-point difference required for the separation of two nonpolar compounds on a nonpolar column) are reduced relative to more conventional heating rates used with convection-oven instruments. As temperature-programming rates increase, elution temperatures also increase with the result that retention may become insignificant prior to elution. This results in inefficient utilization of the down-stream end of the column and causes a loss in the rate of peak-capacity production. The rate of peak-capacity production is increased by the use of shorter columns and higher carrier gas velocities. With high programming rates (100-600 degrees C/min), column lengths of 6-12 m and average linear carrier gas velocities in the 100-150 cm/s range are satisfactory. In this study, the rate of peak-capacity production, the total peak capacity, and the boiling point resolution are determined for C10-C28 n-alkanes using 6-18 m long columns, 50-200 cm/s average carrier gas velocities, and 60-600 degrees C/min programming rates. It was found that with a 6-meter-long, 0.25-mm i.d. column programmed at a rate of 600 degrees C/min, a maximum peak-capacity production rate of 6.1 peaks/s was obtained. A total peak capacity of about 75 peaks was produced in a 37-s long separation spanning a boiling-point range from n-C10 (174 degrees C) to n-C28 (432 degrees C).

  9. Advanced Monte Carlo methods for analysis of very high temperature reactors: On-the-fly Doppler broadening and deterministic/Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilyurt, Gokhan

    Two of the primary challenges associated with the neutronic analysis of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) are accounting for resonance self-shielding in the particle fuel (contributing to the double heterogeneity) and accounting for temperature feedback due to Doppler broadening. The double heterogeneity challenge is addressed by defining a "double heterogeneity factor" (DHF) that allows conventional light water reactor (LWR) lattice physics codes to analyze VHTR configurations. The challenge of treating Doppler broadening is addressed by a new "on-the-fly" methodology that is applied during the random walk process with negligible impact on computational efficiency. Although this methodology was motivated by the need to treat temperature feedback in a VHTR, it is applicable to any reactor design. The on-the-fly Doppler methodology is based on a combination of Taylor and asymptotic series expansions. The type of series representation was determined by investigating the temperature dependence of U238 resonance cross sections in three regions: near the resonance peaks, mid-resonance, and the resonance wings. The coefficients for these series expansions were determined by regressions over the energy and temperature range of interest. The comparison of the broadened cross sections using this methodology with the NJOY cross sections was excellent. A Monte Carlo code was implemented to apply the combined regression model and used to estimate the additional computing cost which was found to be less than 1%. The DHF accounts for the effect of the particle heterogeneity on resonance absorption in particle fuel. The first level heterogeneity posed by the VHTR fuel particles is a unique characteristic that cannot be accounted for by conventional LWR lattice physics codes. On the other hand, Monte Carlo codes can take into account the detailed geometry of the VHTR including resolution of individual fuel particles without performing any type of resonance approximation

  10. Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data evaluation for use in monitoring vegetation. Volume 1: Channels 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, N. C.; Gray, T. I.; Mccrary, D. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite system (NOAA-6 satellite) were analyzed to study their nonmeteorological uses. A file of charts, graphs, and tables was created form the products generated. It was found that the most useful data lie between pixel numbers 400 and 2000 on a given scan line. The analysis of the generated products indicates that the Gray-McCrary Index can discern vegetation and associated daily and seasonal changes. The solar zenith-angle correction used in previous studies was found to be a useful adjustment to the index. The METSAT system seems best suited for providing large-area analyses of surface features on a daily basis.

  11. Cloud cover analysis with Arctic Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data. II - Classification with spectral and textural measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, J.

    1990-01-01

    The spectral and textural characteristics of polar clouds and surfaces for a 7-day summer series of AVHRR data in two Arctic locations are examined, and the results used in the development of a cloud classification procedure for polar satellite data. Since spatial coherence and texture sensitivity tests indicate that a joint spectral-textural analysis based on the same cell size is inappropriate, cloud detection with AVHRR data and surface identification with passive microwave data are first done on the pixel level as described by Key and Barry (1989). Next, cloud patterns within 250-sq-km regions are described, then the spectral and local textural characteristics of cloud patterns in the image are determined and each cloud pixel is classified by statistical methods. Results indicate that both spectral and textural features can be utilized in the classification of cloudy pixels, although spectral features are most useful for the discrimination between cloud classes.

  12. Advances in the Two Source Energy Balance (TSEB) model using very high resolution remote sensing data in vineyards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The thermal-based Two Source Energy Balance (TSEB) model partitions the water and energy fluxes from vegetation and soil components providing thus the ability for estimating soil evaporation (E) and canopy transpiration (T) separately. However, it is crucial for ET partitioning to retrieve reliable ...

  13. Very high resolution Digital Terrain and Marine Model for Lipari island: flooding scenario induced by land subsidence and sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzidei, Marco; Bosman, Alessandro; Carluccio, Roberto; Carmisciano, Cosmo; Casalbore, Daniele; Chiappini, Massimo; Latino Chiocci, Francesco; D'Ajello Caracciolo, Francesca; Esposito, Alessandra; Fabris, Massimo; Muccini, Filippo; Nicolosi, Iacopo; Pietrantonio, Grazia; Sepe, Vincenzo

    2015-04-01

    Multibeam bathymetry combined with aerial digital photogrammetry, play a crucial role in the generation of ultra-high resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) of land and submarine areas. Integrating these survey techniques can be realized accurate and homogeneous DTMs along narrow coastal zones that often cannot be adequately surveyed owing to logistical limitations on collecting bathymetric data in very shallow water. Here we show results from the merging of high resolution multibeam bathymetry and aerial photogrammetric surveys, the latter also performed locally by drone surveys, integrated in the same reference system, to generate the first 3D high resolution Digital Terrain and Marine Model (DTMM) of the Lipari island (Aeolian islands, Italy). This active volcanic area is located between the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea back arc basin (Marsili basin) and the Calabrian Arc, an orogenic belt affected by a Late Quaternary extensional tectonics and uplift. In this tectonic and volcanic framework, at Lipari geodetic and archeological data show a continuous rapid land subsidence at velocities >10 mm/yr, which is the highest value among the Aeolian island. The obtained DTMM at the average resolution of 0.5 m and locally at about 0.1 m, will significantly improve geophysical and geomorphological studies of this volcanic island. Particularly, it will assist in reducing future hazards related to flooding scenario, due to the combined effect of continuous land subsidence and sea level rise. Relative sea level rise at Lipari is already causing a diffuse submersion of the coast and by the year 2100 is expected a significant flooding of the land with large impacts on the environment and the coastal installation, representing a significant hazard factor for the local population living near the shore.

  14. Very high resolution long-baseline water-tube tiltmeter to record small signals from Earth free oscillations up to secular tilts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Oreye, Nicolas F.; Zürn, Walter

    2005-02-01

    A 43m long floatless water-tube tiltmeter has been in operation since 1997 at the Walferdange Underground Laboratory for Geodynamics in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. The absence of moving parts makes this instrument particularly simple but does not prevent it from measuring some very small geophysical signals such as the Earth tides with a very favorable signal-to-noise ratio or the successive passages of Love waves circling the globe after major Earthquakes. Its very low noise level and its high resolution up to the long-period seismic band (where for instance the resolution is better than 5×10-12rad) also allows the successful recording of rarely observed grave toroidal and spheroidal free oscillations of the Earth excited by major earthquakes. In the environmental conditions of its installation (in a gypsum mine at 100m depth), the instrument shows a high degree of reliability and a very low drift rate (<0.005microrad/month). The analytical tilt and horizontal displacement transfer functions computed for this instrument and its sensors can be used to calculate the best geometrical characteristics for the construction of prototypes which should respond to specific requirements for applications in geophysics or geotechnics.

  15. The use of very high resolution DSMs for the investigation of gully evolution in the Souss Basin, Morocco derived from UAV missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Oleire-Oltmanns, S.; Marzolff, I.; Schrott, L.

    2012-04-01

    For the analysis of gullies as one type of landform this work presents an approach using small format aerial photographs derived from field campaigns with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) in the Souss Basin, Morocco. Since many existing gullies are neighboring agro-industrial as well as settlement areas the investigation of current gully development is important. We used aerial photographs to create Digital Surface Models (DSMs) which allows detailed analysis of gully development. Depending on the flying height DSMs resolution ranges between a few centimeters and approx. 0.5 m. Challenges and uncertainties relate to mismatches of objects such as vegetation (i.e. bushes, trees) and built-up areas (i.e. greenhouses). The analysis of high resolution DSMs allows also the identification of specific geomorphological properties of gullies. Identifying unique landform properties may then allow the transfer of those properties onto satellite data. This in turn enables object-based image analysis on large-scale gully distribution. This is necessary to provide the greater spatial context within the study area.

  16. Automatic identification of agricultural terraces through object-oriented analysis of very high resolution DSMs and multispectral imagery obtained from an unmanned aerial vehicle.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Varela, R A; Zarco-Tejada, P J; Angileri, V; Loudjani, P

    2014-02-15

    Agricultural terraces are features that provide a number of ecosystem services. As a result, their maintenance is supported by measures established by the European Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). In the framework of CAP implementation and monitoring, there is a current and future need for the development of robust, repeatable and cost-effective methodologies for the automatic identification and monitoring of these features at farm scale. This is a complex task, particularly when terraces are associated to complex vegetation cover patterns, as happens with permanent crops (e.g. olive trees). In this study we present a novel methodology for automatic and cost-efficient identification of terraces using only imagery from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) cameras on board unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Using state-of-the-art computer vision techniques, we generated orthoimagery and digital surface models (DSMs) at 11 cm spatial resolution with low user intervention. In a second stage, these data were used to identify terraces using a multi-scale object-oriented classification method. Results show the potential of this method even in highly complex agricultural areas, both regarding DSM reconstruction and image classification. The UAV-derived DSM had a root mean square error (RMSE) lower than 0.5 m when the height of the terraces was assessed against field GPS data. The subsequent automated terrace classification yielded an overall accuracy of 90% based exclusively on spectral and elevation data derived from the UAV imagery.

  17. Automatic identification of agricultural terraces through object-oriented analysis of very high resolution DSMs and multispectral imagery obtained from an unmanned aerial vehicle.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Varela, R A; Zarco-Tejada, P J; Angileri, V; Loudjani, P

    2014-02-15

    Agricultural terraces are features that provide a number of ecosystem services. As a result, their maintenance is supported by measures established by the European Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). In the framework of CAP implementation and monitoring, there is a current and future need for the development of robust, repeatable and cost-effective methodologies for the automatic identification and monitoring of these features at farm scale. This is a complex task, particularly when terraces are associated to complex vegetation cover patterns, as happens with permanent crops (e.g. olive trees). In this study we present a novel methodology for automatic and cost-efficient identification of terraces using only imagery from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) cameras on board unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Using state-of-the-art computer vision techniques, we generated orthoimagery and digital surface models (DSMs) at 11 cm spatial resolution with low user intervention. In a second stage, these data were used to identify terraces using a multi-scale object-oriented classification method. Results show the potential of this method even in highly complex agricultural areas, both regarding DSM reconstruction and image classification. The UAV-derived DSM had a root mean square error (RMSE) lower than 0.5 m when the height of the terraces was assessed against field GPS data. The subsequent automated terrace classification yielded an overall accuracy of 90% based exclusively on spectral and elevation data derived from the UAV imagery. PMID:24473345

  18. Improved mapping of flood extent and flood depth using space based SAR data in combination with very high resolution digital elevation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwenzner, H.

    2009-04-01

    Due to their capability to present a synoptic view of the spatial extent of floods, remote sensing technology, and especially synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems, have been successfully applied for flood mapping and monitoring applications during the past decades. However, the quality and accuracy of the flood masks and derived flood parameters highly depend on the geometric precision of the satellite data as well as on the classification accuracy of the derived water mask. The incorporation of high resolution elevation data from LiDAR measurements for example can help to improve the plausibility and reliability of the flood masks. On the basis of the improved flood masks more sophisticated parameters such as inundation depth can be derived. A cross section approach is presented that allows the dynamic fitting of the position of the flood mask profiles according to the underlying terrain information from the DEM. The method was tested on the River Severn (UK), for which TerraSAR-X stripmap data with 3 meters pixel spacing acquired during the 2007 summer flood are used in combination with a LiDAR DEM of 2 meters pixel size. Initially, the cross sections were established perpendicularly to the major flow direction along the 7 km reach of the River Severn. The profile spacing was set to 50 meters. For each cross section profile the water level was extracted at the position of the left and the right border of the flood. On the basis of the longitudinal profile, which contains the sequence of all cross section profiles, a moving average was applied on the water levels in order to get a smooth water surface and to reduce single outliers. However, in case of obvious irregularities in the water levels illustrated in the longitudinal profile and caused by misclassification the respective cross-sections had to be excluded from further analysis. It must be taken into account, that the approach is mainly affected by possible classification errors in the dimension of more

  19. Achieving quasi-adiabatic thermal environment to maximize resolution power in very high-pressure liquid chromatography: Theory, models, and experiments.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Gilar, Martin; Jarrell, Joseph A

    2016-04-29

    A cylindrical vacuum chamber (inner diameter 5 cm) housing a narrow-bore 2.1 mm×100 mm column packed with 1.8 μm HSS-T3 fully porous particles was built in order to isolate thermally the chromatographic column from the external air environment. Consistent with statistical physics and the mean free path of air molecules, the experimental results show that natural air convection and conduction are fully eliminated for housing air pressures smaller than 10(-4) Torr. Heat radiation is minimized by wrapping up the column with low-emissivity aluminum-tape (emissivity coefficient ϵ=0.03 vs. 0.28 for polished stainless steel 316). Overall, the heat flux at the column wall is reduced by 96% with respect to standard still-air ovens. From a practical viewpoint, the efficiency of the column run at a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min at a constant 13,000 psi pressure drop (the viscous heat power is around 9 W/m) is improved by up to 35% irrespective of the analyte retention. Models of heat and mass transfer reveal that (1) the amplitude of the radial temperature gradient is significantly reduced from 0.30 to 0.01 K and (2) the observed improvement in resolution power stems from a more uniform distribution of the flow velocity across the column diameter. The eddy dispersion term in the van Deemter equation is reduced by 0.8±0.1 reduced plate height unit, a significant gain in column performance.

  20. Achieving quasi-adiabatic thermal environment to maximize resolution power in very high-pressure liquid chromatography: Theory, models, and experiments.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Gilar, Martin; Jarrell, Joseph A

    2016-04-29

    A cylindrical vacuum chamber (inner diameter 5 cm) housing a narrow-bore 2.1 mm×100 mm column packed with 1.8 μm HSS-T3 fully porous particles was built in order to isolate thermally the chromatographic column from the external air environment. Consistent with statistical physics and the mean free path of air molecules, the experimental results show that natural air convection and conduction are fully eliminated for housing air pressures smaller than 10(-4) Torr. Heat radiation is minimized by wrapping up the column with low-emissivity aluminum-tape (emissivity coefficient ϵ=0.03 vs. 0.28 for polished stainless steel 316). Overall, the heat flux at the column wall is reduced by 96% with respect to standard still-air ovens. From a practical viewpoint, the efficiency of the column run at a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min at a constant 13,000 psi pressure drop (the viscous heat power is around 9 W/m) is improved by up to 35% irrespective of the analyte retention. Models of heat and mass transfer reveal that (1) the amplitude of the radial temperature gradient is significantly reduced from 0.30 to 0.01 K and (2) the observed improvement in resolution power stems from a more uniform distribution of the flow velocity across the column diameter. The eddy dispersion term in the van Deemter equation is reduced by 0.8±0.1 reduced plate height unit, a significant gain in column performance. PMID:27040511

  1. A Very High Resolution, Deep-Towed Multichannel Seismic Survey in the Yaquina Basin off Peru ? Technical Design of the new Deep-Tow Streamer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, J.; Breitzke, M.

    2002-12-01

    Within the project INGGAS a new deep towed acoustic profiling instrument consisting of a side scan sonar fish and a 26 channel seismic streamer has been developed for operation in full ocean depth. The digital channels are build by single hydrophones and three engineering nodes (EN) which are connected either by 1 m or 6.5 m long cable segments. Together with high frequent surface sources (e.g. GI gun) this hybrid system allows to complete surveys with target resolutions of higher frequency content than from complete surface based configurations. Consequently special effort has been addressed to positioning information of the submerged towed instrument. Ultra Short Base Line (USBL) navigation of the tow fish allows precise coordinate evaluation even with more than 7 km of tow cable. Specially designed engineering nodes comprise a single hydrophone with compass, depth, pitch and roll sensors. Optional extension of the streamer up to 96 hydrophone nodes and 75 engineering nodes is possible. A telemetry device allows up- and downlink transmission of all system parameters and all recorded data from the tow fish in real time. Signals from the streamer and the various side scan sensors are multiplexed along the deep-sea cable. Within the telemetry system coaxial and fiber optic connectors are available and can be chosen according to the ships needs. In case of small bandwidth only selected portions of data are transmitted onboard to provide full online quality control while a copy of the complete data set is stored within the submerged systems. Onboard the record strings of side scan and streamer are demultiplexed and distributed to the quality control (QC) systems by Ethernet. A standard marine multichannel control system is used to display shot gather, spectra and noise monitoring of the streamer channels as well as data storage in SEG format. Precise navigation post processing includes all available positioning information from the vessel (DGPS), the USBL, the

  2. The Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hans D. Gougar; David A. Petti

    2011-06-01

    The High Temperature Reactor (HTR) and Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) are types of nuclear power plants that, as the names imply, operate at temperatures above those of the conventional nuclear power plants that currently generate electricity in the US and other countries. Like existing nuclear plants, heat generated from the fission of uranium or plutonium atoms is carried off by a working fluid and can be used generate electricity. The very hot working fluid also enables the VHTR to drive other industrial processes that require high temperatures not achievable by conventional nuclear plants (Figure 1). For this reason, the VHTR is being considered for non-electrical energy applications. The reactor and power conversion system are constructed using special materials that make a core meltdown virtually impossible.

  3. Gamma Rays at Very High Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonian, Felix

    This chapter presents the elaborated lecture notes on Gamma Rays at Very High Energies given by Felix Aharonian at the 40th Saas-Fee Advanced Course on "Astrophysics at Very High Energies". Any coherent description and interpretation of phenomena related to gammarays requires deep knowledge of many disciplines of physics like nuclear and particle physics, quantum and classical electrodynamics, special and general relativity, plasma physics, magnetohydrodynamics, etc. After giving an introduction to gamma-ray astronomy the author discusses the astrophysical potential of ground-based detectors, radiation mechanisms, supernova remnants and origin of the galactic cosmic rays, TeV emission of young supernova remnants, gamma-emission from the Galactic center, pulsars, pulsar winds, pulsar wind nebulae, and gamma-ray loud binaries.

  4. Evaluation of Advanced Bionics high resolution mode.

    PubMed

    Buechner, Andreas; Frohne-Buechner, Carolin; Gaertner, Lutz; Lesinski-Schiedat, Anke; Battmer, Rolf-Dieter; Lenarz, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the advantages of the Advanced Bionic high resolution mode for speech perception, through a retrospective analysis. Forty-five adult subjects were selected who had a minimum experience of three months' standard mode (mean of 10 months) before switching to high resolution mode. Speech perception was tested in standard mode immediately before fitting with high resolution mode, and again after a maximum of six months high resolution mode usage (mean of two months). A significant improvement was found, between 11 and 17%, depending on the test material. The standard mode preference does not give any indication about the improvement when switching to high resolution. Users who are converted within any study achieve a higher performance improvement than those converted in the clinical routine. This analysis proves the significant benefits of high resolution mode for users, and also indicates the need for guidelines for individual optimization of parameter settings in a high resolution mode program.

  5. Very high-pressure orogenic garnet peridotites

    PubMed Central

    Liou, J. G.; Zhang, R. Y.; Ernst, W. G.

    2007-01-01

    Mantle-derived garnet peridotites are a minor component in many very high-pressure metamorphic terranes that formed during continental subduction and collision. Some of these mantle rocks contain trace amounts of zircon and micrometer-sized inclusions. The constituent minerals exhibit pre- and postsubduction microstructures, including polymorphic transformation and mineral exsolution. Experimental, mineralogical, petrochemical, and geochronological characterizations using novel techniques with high spatial, temporal, and energy resolutions are resulting in unexpected discoveries of new phases, providing better constraints on deep mantle processes. PMID:17519341

  6. Modelling to very high strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bons, P. D.; Jessell, M. W.; Griera, A.; Evans, L. A.; Wilson, C. J. L.

    2009-04-01

    development of very high-strain structures. Jessell, M.W., Bons, P.D., Evans, L., Barr, T., Stüwe, K. 2001. Elle: a micro-process approach to the simulation of microstructures. Computers & Geosciences 27, 17-30. Houseman, G., Barr, T., Evans, L. 2008. Basil: stress and deformation in a viscous material. In: P.D. Bons, D. Koehn & M.W.Jessell (Eds.) Microdynamics Simulation. Lecture Notes in Earth Sciences 106, Springer, Berlin, 405p.

  7. Automated Approach to Very High-Order Aeroacoustic Computations. Revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Goodrich, John W.

    2001-01-01

    Computational aeroacoustics requires efficient, high-resolution simulation tools. For smooth problems, this is best accomplished with very high-order in space and time methods on small stencils. However, the complexity of highly accurate numerical methods can inhibit their practical application, especially in irregular geometries. This complexity is reduced by using a special form of Hermite divided-difference spatial interpolation on Cartesian grids, and a Cauchy-Kowalewski recursion procedure for time advancement. In addition, a stencil constraint tree reduces the complexity of interpolating grid points that am located near wall boundaries. These procedures are used to develop automatically and to implement very high-order methods (> 15) for solving the linearized Euler equations that can achieve less than one grid point per wavelength resolution away from boundaries by including spatial derivatives of the primitive variables at each grid point. The accuracy of stable surface treatments is currently limited to 11th order for grid aligned boundaries and to 2nd order for irregular boundaries.

  8. Retrospective farm scale spatial analysis of viticultural terroir fertility using a 70 y-aerial photograph time series, soil survey and very high resolution Pléiades and EM38 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudour, Emmanuelle; Leclercq, Léa; Gilliot, Jean-Marc; Chaignon, Benoît

    2016-04-01

    In order to elaborate adequate and sustainable practices while better controlling harvest composition at farm scale, the detailed spatial assessment of terroir units is needed. Although such assessment is made in the present time, it reflects vine behaviour and soil quality according to cumulated past choices in vineyard management. in addition to demarcate homogeneous within-vineyard zones, there is a need, in cases where the winegrower starts up its activities, to retrace the behaviour of these zones in the past, so as to consolidate the diagnosis of vine fertility, and determine further adoption of new soil and vineyard management practices that are likely to favour a long-term preservation of quality production together with soil ecosystem functions. In this study we aimed at performing such historical and spatial tracing using a long term time-series of aerial survey images, in combination with a set of very high resolution data: resistivity EM38 measurements and very high resolution Pléiades satellite images. This study was conducted over a 6 ha-farm mainly planted with rainfed black Grenache and Syrah varieties in the Southern Rhone Valley. In a previous study carried out at regional scale, soil landscape and potential terroir units had been characterized. A new field survey carried out in January 2015 considered a total of 98 topsoil sampling sites in addition to 14 soil pits, the horizons of which were described and sampled. Physico-chemical analyses were made for all soil samples, and for those horizons having the highest root development, additional analytical parameters such as copper, active lime and mineral nutrients contents were determined. Along with soil parameters, soil surface condition, vine biological parameters including vigour, presence of diseases, stock-unearthing were collected. A total of 25 aerial photographs in digitized format from the French National Institute of Geographic and Forest Information (IGN) were examined over the 1947

  9. Comparison of data from the Scanning Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) with data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) for terrestrial environmental monitoring - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townshend, J. R. G.; Choudhury, B. J.; Tucker, C. J.; Giddings, L.; Justice, C. O.

    1989-01-01

    Comparison between the microwave polarized difference temperature (MPDT) derived from 37 GHz band data and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) derived from near-infrared and red bands, from several empirical investigations are summarized. These indicate the complementary character of the two measures in environmental monitoring. Overall the NDVI is more sensitive to green leaf activity, whereas the MPDT appears also to be related to other elements of the above-ground biomass. Monitoring of hydrological phenomena is carried out much more effectively by the MPDT. Further work is needed to explain spectral and temporal variation in MPDT both through modelling and field experiments.

  10. Solution methods for very highly integrated circuits.

    SciTech Connect

    Nong, Ryan; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Chen, Yao; Mei, Ting; Santarelli, Keith R.; Tuminaro, Raymond Stephen

    2010-12-01

    While advances in manufacturing enable the fabrication of integrated circuits containing tens-to-hundreds of millions of devices, the time-sensitive modeling and simulation necessary to design these circuits poses a significant computational challenge. This is especially true for mixed-signal integrated circuits where detailed performance analyses are necessary for the individual analog/digital circuit components as well as the full system. When the integrated circuit has millions of devices, performing a full system simulation is practically infeasible using currently available Electrical Design Automation (EDA) tools. The principal reason for this is the time required for the nonlinear solver to compute the solutions of large linearized systems during the simulation of these circuits. The research presented in this report aims to address the computational difficulties introduced by these large linearized systems by using Model Order Reduction (MOR) to (i) generate specialized preconditioners that accelerate the computation of the linear system solution and (ii) reduce the overall dynamical system size. MOR techniques attempt to produce macromodels that capture the desired input-output behavior of larger dynamical systems and enable substantial speedups in simulation time. Several MOR techniques that have been developed under the LDRD on 'Solution Methods for Very Highly Integrated Circuits' will be presented in this report. Among those presented are techniques for linear time-invariant dynamical systems that either extend current approaches or improve the time-domain performance of the reduced model using novel error bounds and a new approach for linear time-varying dynamical systems that guarantees dimension reduction, which has not been proven before. Progress on preconditioning power grid systems using multi-grid techniques will be presented as well as a framework for delivering MOR techniques to the user community using Trilinos and the Xyce circuit simulator

  11. Very High Spatial Resolution Isotope and Elemental Imaging of Pre-Solar SiC Grains: Topographic and Imaging Artefacts that may lead to Apparent, but Spurious, Heterogeneity Within Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, I. C.; Clarke, A.; Henkel, T.; Moore, K. L.; McMahon, G.

    2016-08-01

    This study acquired high spatial resolution NanoSIMS elemental and isotopic imaging of pre-solar SiC grains, both of acid-residue grains and in situ in meteorite thin sections. Artefacts that can create spurious heterogeneity were studied.

  12. A very high-resolution (1km×1 km) global fossil fuel CO2 emission inventory derived using a point source database and satellite observations of nighttime lights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, T.; Maksyutov, S.

    2011-01-01

    Emissions of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion are a critical quantity that must be accurately given in established flux inversion frameworks. Work with emerging satellite-based inversions requires spatiotemporally-detailed inventories that permit analysis of regional natural sources and sinks. Conventional approaches for disaggregating national emissions beyond the country and city levels based on population distribution have certain difficulties in their application. We developed a global 1 km×1 km annual fossil fuel CO2 emission inventory for the years 1980-2007 by combining a worldwide point source database and satellite observations of the global nightlight distribution. In addition to estimating the national emissions using global energy consumption statistics, emissions from point sources were estimated separately and were spatially allocated to exact locations indicated by the point source database. Emissions from other sources were distributed using a special nightlight dataset that had fewer saturated pixels compared with regular nightlight datasets. The resulting spatial distributions differed in several ways from those derived using conventional population-based approaches. Because of the inherent characteristics of the nightlight distribution, source regions corresponding to human settlements and land transportation were well articulated. Our distributions showed good agreement with a high-resolution inventory across the US at spatial resolutions that were adequate for regional flux inversions. The inventory can be extended to the future using updated data, and is expected to be incorporated into models for operational flux inversions that use observational data from the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT).

  13. Manufacturing Diamond Under Very High Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    A process for manufacturing bulk diamond has been made practical by the invention of the High Pressure and Temperature Apparatus capable of applying the combination of very high temperature and high pressure needed to melt carbon in a sufficiently large volume. The apparatus includes a reaction cell wherein a controlled static pressure as high as 20 GPa and a controlled temperature as high as 5,000 C can be maintained.

  14. The Very High Speed Integrated Circuit Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, C. G.

    The DOD's Very High Speed Integrated Circuits (VHSIC) Program was established in order to gain and maintain a lead over adversaries in the military field of high density signal processing microelectronic subsystems. The advantages anticipated for VHSIC systems include order-of-magnitude reductions in signal processor size, weight and power requirements, as well as improvements in system performance capabilities, reliability, logistics support, and radiation hardness. VHSIC will be applied to systems involved in communications, intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and missile guidance and control.

  15. Very high gain Nd:YLF amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Knights, M.G.; Thomas, M.D.; Chicklis, E.P.; Rines, G.A.; Seka, W.

    1988-05-01

    The authors report on high gain Nd:YLF rod amplifiers in which single-pass, small signal gains of over 1700 have been obtained along with stored energy densitiesgreater than or equal to0.4J/cm/sup 3/. The ability of Nd:YLF amplifiers to support such gains is a result of high parasitic oscillation thresholds, due primarily to the low refractive index of the material. These results suggest that Nd:YLF is an excellent candidate for amplifiers where high specific stored energies and/or very high gains are required.

  16. Very High Efficiency Solar Cell Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, A.; Kirkpatrick, D.; Honsberg, C.; Moore, D.; Wanlass, M.; Emery, K.; Schwartz, R.; Carlson, D.; Bowden, S.; Aiken, D.; Gray, A.; Kurtz, S.; Kazmerski, L., et al

    2009-01-01

    The Very High Efficiency Solar Cell (VHESC) program is developing integrated optical system - PV modules for portable applications that operate at greater than 50% efficiency. We are integrating the optical design with the solar cell design, and have entered previously unoccupied design space. Our approach is driven by proven quantitative models for the solar cell design, the optical design, and the integration of these designs. Optical systems efficiency with an optical efficiency of 93% and solar cell device results under ideal dichroic splitting optics summing to 42.7 {+-} 2.5% are described.

  17. Change detection in very high resolution multisensor optical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano Correa, Yady T.; Bovolo, Francesca; Bruzzone, Lorenzo

    2014-10-01

    This work aims at developing an approach to the detection of changes in multisensor multitemporal VHR optical images. The main steps of the proposed method are: i) multisensor data homogenization; and ii) change detection in multisensor multitemporal VHR optical images. The proposed approach takes advantage of: the conversion to physical quantities suggested by Pacifici et. al.1 , the framework for the design of systems for change detection in VHR images presented by Bruzzone and Bovolo2 and the framework for unsupervised change detection presented by Bovolo and Bruzzone3. Multisensor data homogenization is achieved during pre-processing by taking into account differences in both radiometric and geometric dimensions. Whereas change detection was approached by extracting proper features from multisensor images such that they result to be comparable (at a given level of abstraction) even if extracted from images acquired by different sensors. In order to illustrate the results, a data set made up of a QuickBird and a WorldView-2 images - acquired in 2006 and 2010 respectively - over an area located in the Trentino region of Italy were used. However, the proposed approach is thought to be exportable to multitemporal images coming from passive sensors other than the two mentioned above. The experimental results obtained on the QuickBird and WorlView-2 image pair are accurate. Thus opening to further experiments on multitemporal images acquired by other sensors.

  18. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO{sub 2} or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures.

  19. Very high numerical aperture light transmitting device

    DOEpatents

    Allison, Stephen W.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Sales, Brian C.

    1998-01-01

    A new light-transmitting device using a SCIN glass core and a novel calcium sodium cladding has been developed. The very high index of refraction, radiation hardness, similar solubility for rare earths and similar melt and viscosity characteristics of core and cladding materials makes them attractive for several applications such as high-numerical-aperture optical fibers and specialty lenses. Optical fibers up to 60 m in length have been drawn, and several simple lenses have been designed, ground, and polished. Preliminary results on the ability to directly cast optical components of lead-indium phosphate glass are also discussed as well as the suitability of these glasses as a host medium for rare-earth ion lasers and amplifiers.

  20. Parametric nanomechanical amplification at very high frequency.

    PubMed

    Karabalin, R B; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L

    2009-09-01

    Parametric resonance and amplification are important in both fundamental physics and technological applications. Here we report very high frequency (VHF) parametric resonators and mechanical-domain amplifiers based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Compound mechanical nanostructures patterned by multilayer, top-down nanofabrication are read out by a novel scheme that parametrically modulates longitudinal stress in doubly clamped beam NEMS resonators. Parametric pumping and signal amplification are demonstrated for VHF resonators up to approximately 130 MHz and provide useful enhancement of both resonance signal amplitude and quality factor. We find that Joule heating and reduced thermal conductance in these nanostructures ultimately impose an upper limit to device performance. We develop a theoretical model to account for both the parametric response and nonequilibrium thermal transport in these composite nanostructures. The results closely conform to our experimental observations, elucidate the frequency and threshold-voltage scaling in parametric VHF NEMS resonators and sensors, and establish the ultimate sensitivity limits of this approach. PMID:19736969

  1. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO{sub 2} or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures.

  2. Parametric nanomechanical amplification at very high frequency.

    PubMed

    Karabalin, R B; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L

    2009-09-01

    Parametric resonance and amplification are important in both fundamental physics and technological applications. Here we report very high frequency (VHF) parametric resonators and mechanical-domain amplifiers based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Compound mechanical nanostructures patterned by multilayer, top-down nanofabrication are read out by a novel scheme that parametrically modulates longitudinal stress in doubly clamped beam NEMS resonators. Parametric pumping and signal amplification are demonstrated for VHF resonators up to approximately 130 MHz and provide useful enhancement of both resonance signal amplitude and quality factor. We find that Joule heating and reduced thermal conductance in these nanostructures ultimately impose an upper limit to device performance. We develop a theoretical model to account for both the parametric response and nonequilibrium thermal transport in these composite nanostructures. The results closely conform to our experimental observations, elucidate the frequency and threshold-voltage scaling in parametric VHF NEMS resonators and sensors, and establish the ultimate sensitivity limits of this approach.

  3. Urania vapor composition at very high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Pflieger, Rachel; Colle, Jean-Yves; Iosilevskiy, Igor; Sheindlin, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Due to the chemically unstable nature of uranium dioxide its vapor composition at very high temperatures is, presently, not sufficiently studied though more experimental knowledge is needed for risk assessment of nuclear reactors. We used laser vaporization coupled to mass spectrometry of the produced vapor to study urania vapor composition at temperatures in the vicinity of its melting point and higher. The very good agreement between measured melting and freezing temperatures and between partial pressures measured on the temperature increase and decrease indicated that the change in stoichiometry during laser heating was very limited. The evolutions with temperature (in the range 2800-3400 K) of the partial pressures of the main vapor species (UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 3}, and UO{sub 2}{sup +}) were compared with theoretically predicted evolutions for equilibrium noncongruent gas-liquid and gas-solid phase coexistences and showed very good agreement. The measured main relative partial pressure ratios around 3300 K all agree with calculated values for total equilibrium between condensed and vapor phases. It is the first time the three main partial pressure ratios above stoichiometric liquid urania have been measured at the same temperature under conditions close to equilibrium noncongruent gas-liquid phase coexistence.

  4. An Automated Approach to Very High Order Aeroacoustic Computations in Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Goodrich, John W.

    2000-01-01

    Computational aeroacoustics requires efficient, high-resolution simulation tools. And for smooth problems, this is best accomplished with very high order in space and time methods on small stencils. But the complexity of highly accurate numerical methods can inhibit their practical application, especially in irregular geometries. This complexity is reduced by using a special form of Hermite divided-difference spatial interpolation on Cartesian grids, and a Cauchy-Kowalewslci recursion procedure for time advancement. In addition, a stencil constraint tree reduces the complexity of interpolating grid points that are located near wall boundaries. These procedures are used to automatically develop and implement very high order methods (>15) for solving the linearized Euler equations that can achieve less than one grid point per wavelength resolution away from boundaries by including spatial derivatives of the primitive variables at each grid point. The accuracy of stable surface treatments is currently limited to 11th order for grid aligned boundaries and to 2nd order for irregular boundaries.

  5. Propulsion system assessment for very high UAV under ERAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bettner, James L.; Blandford, Craig S.; Rezy, Bernie J.

    1995-01-01

    A series of propulsion systems were configured to power a sensor platform to very high altitudes under the Experimental Research Advanced Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. The unmanned aircraft was required to carry a 100 kg instrument package to 90,000 ft altitude, collect samples and make scientific measurements for 4 hr, and then return to base. A performance screening evaluation of 11 propulsion systems for this high altitude mission was conducted. Engine configurations ranged from turboprop, spark ignition, two- and four-stroke diesel, rotary, and fuel cell concepts. Turbo and non-turbo-compounded, recuperated and nonrecuperated arrangements, along with regular JP and hydrogen fuels were interrogated. Each configuration was carried through a preliminary design where all turbomachinery, heat exchangers, and engine core concepts were sized and weighed for near-optimum design point performance. Mission analysis, which sized the aircraft for each of the propulsion systems investigated, was conducted. From the array of configurations investigated, the propulsion system for each of three different technology levels (i.e., state of the art, near term, and far term) that was best suited for this very high altitude mission was identified and recommended for further study.

  6. RAPHAEL: The European Union's (Very) High Temperature Reactor Technology Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fuetterer, Michael A.; Besson, D.; Bogusch, E.; Carluec, B.; Hittner, D.; Verrier, D.; Billot, Ph.; Phelip, M.; Buckthorpe, D.; Casalta, S.; Chauvet, V.; Van Heek, A.; Von Lensa, W.; Pirson, J.; Scheuermann, W.

    2006-07-01

    Since the late 1990, the European Union (EU) was conducting work on High Temperature Reactors (HTR) confirming their high potential in terms of safety (inherent safety features), environmental impact (robust fuel with no significant radioactive release), sustainability (high efficiency, potential suitability for various fuel cycles), and economics (simplifications arising from safety features). In April 2005, the EU Commission has started a new 4-year Integrated Project on Very High Temperature Reactors (RAPHAEL: Reactor for Process Heat And Electricity) as part of its 6{sup th} Framework Programme. The European Commission and the 33 partners from industry, R and D organizations and academia finance the project together. After the successful performance of earlier HTR-related EU projects which included the recovery of some earlier German experience and the re-establishment of strategically important R and D capabilities in Europe, RAPHAEL focuses now on key technologies required for an industrial VHTR deployment, both specific to very high temperature and generic to all types of modular HTR with emphasis on combined process heat and electricity generation. Advanced technologies are explored in order to meet the performance challenges required for a VHTR (900-1000 deg C, up to 200 GWd/tHM). To facilitate the planned sharing of significant parts of RAPHAEL results with the signatories of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) VHTR projects, RAPHAEL is structured in a similar way as the corresponding GIF VHTR projects. (authors)

  7. Advanced Remote-Sensing Imaging Emission Spectrometer (ARIES): AIRS Spectral Resolution with MODIS Spatial Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; OCallaghan, Fred

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Remote-sensing Imaging Emission Spectrometer (ARIES) will measure a wide range of earth quantities fundamental to the study of global climate change. It will build upon the success of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instruments currently flying on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft. Both instruments are facility instruments for NASA providing data to thousands of scientists investigating land, ocean and atmospheric Earth System processes. ARIES will meet all the requirements of AIRS and MODIS in a single compact instrument, while providing the next-generation capability of improved spatial resolution for AIRS and improved spectral resolution for MODIS.

  8. Deformation Experiments at Very High Pressure: What Would Goetze Think?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, W. B.

    2002-12-01

    New deformation machines such as the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) and rotational Drickamer apparatus (RDA), which operate at confining pressures well in excess of 5 GPa, hold the promise of directly characterizing rock rheology well into the transition zone. Until a few years ago, a sense of rock strength at such depths could be reached only by very large extrapolations based on tenuous measurements of activation volume. The D-DIA and RDA owe their creation directly to the development of bright synchrotron x radiation as an analytical tool for measuring stress and plastic strain inside pressure vessels, replacing traditional load cells and displacement transducers. The D-DIA is a 6-anvil device with the capability of independent movement of certain anvils such that pressure and maximum stress can be controlled independently. It is not unlike cubic deformation devices developed earlier (e.g., Griggs' cubic anvil [Carter et al., J. Geol., 72, 687-733, 1964]), except that it is based on the more stable single-actuator hydrostatic DIA design and therefore capable of reaching pressures of 15 GPa, sufficient to cover the full pressure stability range of olivine, for example. The RDA is also an adaptation, of the 25-GPa, 2-anvil hydrostatic Drickamer cell, wherein rotary deformation is imparted by twisting one of the anvils about its axis. Both differ from all other multi-anvil, Bridgman-anvil, and diamond-anvil cells in that they are generically deformation machines: they impart strain without changing confining pressure. The D-DIA geometry is suited for measuring the state of stress in a sample; the RDA will be able to impart very high strains and will thus allow us to study the effect of pressure on fabric and texture development in the mantle. Goetze had an eye for expeditious measurement and high-quality, high-impact data, a sure recipe for advancement of science when it can be achieved. His are probably the best standards for gauging the success of the new machines. Both

  9. Very high coercivity magnetic stripes produced by particle rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, R.B.

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes a current research program at Sandia National Laboratories whereby magnetic stripes are produced through the use of a new particle rotation technology. This new process allows the stripes to be produced in bulk and then held in a latent state so that they may be encoded at a later date. Since particle rotation is less dependent on the type of magnetic particle used, very high coercivity particles could provide a way to increase both magnetic tamper-resistance and accidental erasure protection. This research was initially funded by the Department of Energy, Office of Safeguard and Security as a portion of their Science and Technology Base Development, Advanced Security Concepts program. Current program funding is being provided by Sandia National Laboratories as part of their Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

  10. Spectral Resolution and Coverage Impact on Advanced Sounder Information Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global measurements of the Earth s atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Achieving such measurement improvements requires instrument system advancements. This presentation focuses on the impact of spectral resolution and coverage changes on remote sensing system information content, with a specific emphasis on thermodynamic state and trace species variables obtainable from advanced atmospheric sounders such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) systems on the MetOp and NPP/NPOESS series of satellites. Key words: remote sensing, advanced sounders, information content, IASI, CrIS

  11. Advances toward high spectral resolution quantum X-ray calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Kelley, R. L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Mccammon, D.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal detectors for X-ray spectroscopy combining high spectral resolution and quantum efficiency have been developed. These microcalorimeters measure the energy released in the absorption of a single photon by sensing the rise in temperature of a small absorbing structure. The ultimate energy resolution of such a device is limited by the thermodynamic power fluctuations in the thermal link between the calorimeter and isothermal bath and can in principle be made as low as 1 eV. The performance of a real device is degraded due to noise contributions such as excess 1/f noise in the thermistor and incomplete conversion of energy into phonons. The authors report some recent advances in thermometry, X-ray absorption and thermalization, fabrication techniques, and detector optimization in the presence of noise. These improvements have resulted in a device with a spectral resolution of 17 eV FWHM, measured at 6 keV.

  12. A Very High Order, Adaptable MESA Implementation for Aeroacoustic Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dydson, Roger W.; Goodrich, John W.

    2000-01-01

    Since computational efficiency and wave resolution scale with accuracy, the ideal would be infinitely high accuracy for problems with widely varying wavelength scales. Currently, many of the computational aeroacoustics methods are limited to 4th order accurate Runge-Kutta methods in time which limits their resolution and efficiency. However, a new procedure for implementing the Modified Expansion Solution Approximation (MESA) schemes, based upon Hermitian divided differences, is presented which extends the effective accuracy of the MESA schemes to 57th order in space and time when using 128 bit floating point precision. This new approach has the advantages of reducing round-off error, being easy to program. and is more computationally efficient when compared to previous approaches. Its accuracy is limited only by the floating point hardware. The advantages of this new approach are demonstrated by solving the linearized Euler equations in an open bi-periodic domain. A 500th order MESA scheme can now be created in seconds, making these schemes ideally suited for the next generation of high performance 256-bit (double quadruple) or higher precision computers. This ease of creation makes it possible to adapt the algorithm to the mesh in time instead of its converse: this is ideal for resolving varying wavelength scales which occur in noise generation simulations. And finally, the sources of round-off error which effect the very high order methods are examined and remedies provided that effectively increase the accuracy of the MESA schemes while using current computer technology.

  13. The Cherenkov Telescope Array For Very High-Energy Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    2015-08-01

    The field of very high energy (VHE) astrophysics had been revolutionized by the results from ground-based gamma-ray telescopes, including the current imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope (IACT) arrays: HESS, MAGIC and VERITAS. A worldwide consortium of scientists from 29 countries has formed to propose the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) that will capitalize on the power of this technique to greatly expand the scientific reach of ground-based gamma-ray telescopes. CTA science will include key topics such as the origin of cosmic rays and cosmic particle acceleration, understanding extreme environments in regions close to neutron stars and black holes, and exploring physics frontiers through, e.g., the search for WIMP dark matter, axion-like particles and Lorentz invariance violation. CTA is envisioned to consist of two large arrays of Cherenkov telescopes, one in the southern hemisphere and one in the north. Each array will contain telescopes of different sizes to provide a balance between cost and array performance over an energy range from below 100 GeV to above 100 TeV. Compared to the existing IACT arrays, CTA will have substantially better angular resolution and energy resolution, will cover a much wider energy range, and will have up to an order of magnitude better sensitivity. CTA will also be operated as an open observatory and high-level CTA data will be placed into the public domain; these aspects will enable broad participation in CTA science from the worldwide scientific community to fully capitalize on CTA's potential. This talk will: 1) review the scientific motivation and capabilities of CTA, 2) provide an overview of the technical design and the status of prototype development, and 3) summarize the current status of the project in terms of its proposed organization and timeline. The plans for access to CTA data and opportunities to propose for CTA observing time will be highlighed.Presented on behalf of the CTA Consortium.

  14. Experimental Summary: Very High Energy Cosmic Rays and their Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampert, Karl-Heinz

    2013-06-01

    The XVII International Symposium on Very High Energy Cosmic Ray Interactions, held in August of 2012 in Berlin, was the first one in the history of the Symposium,where a plethora of high precision LHC data with relevance for cosmic ray physics was presented. This report aims at giving a brief summary of those measurements andit discusses their relevance for observations of high energy cosmic rays. Enormous progress has been made also in air shower observations and in direct measurements of cosmic rays, exhibiting many more structure in the cosmic ray energy spectrum than just a simple power law with a knee and an ankle. At the highest energy, the flux suppression may not be dominated by the GZK-effect but by the limiting energy of a nearby source or source population. New projects and application of new technologies promise further advances also in the near future. We shall discuss the experimental and theoretical progress in the field and its prospects for coming years.

  15. Advancing Cyberinfrastructure to support high resolution water resources modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarboton, D. G.; Ogden, F. L.; Jones, N.; Horsburgh, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Addressing the problem of how the availability and quality of water resources at large scales are sensitive to climate variability, watershed alterations and management activities requires computational resources that combine data from multiple sources and support integrated modeling. Related cyberinfrastructure challenges include: 1) how can we best structure data and computer models to address this scientific problem through the use of high-performance and data-intensive computing, and 2) how can we do this in a way that discipline scientists without extensive computational and algorithmic knowledge and experience can take advantage of advances in cyberinfrastructure? This presentation will describe a new system called CI-WATER that is being developed to address these challenges and advance high resolution water resources modeling in the Western U.S. We are building on existing tools that enable collaboration to develop model and data interfaces that link integrated system models running within an HPC environment to multiple data sources. Our goal is to enhance the use of computational simulation and data-intensive modeling to better understand water resources. Addressing water resource problems in the Western U.S. requires simulation of natural and engineered systems, as well as representation of legal (water rights) and institutional constraints alongside the representation of physical processes. We are establishing data services to represent the engineered infrastructure and legal and institutional systems in a way that they can be used with high resolution multi-physics watershed modeling at high spatial resolution. These services will enable incorporation of location-specific information on water management infrastructure and systems into the assessment of regional water availability in the face of growing demands, uncertain future meteorological forcings, and existing prior-appropriations water rights. This presentation will discuss the informatics

  16. Research at Very High Pressures and High Temperatures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Francis P.

    1977-01-01

    Reviews research and apparatus utilized in the study of the states and characteristics of materials at very high temperatures and pressures. Includes three examples of the research being conducted. (SL)

  17. Very high temperature silicon on silicon pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Anthony D.; Nunn, Timothy A.; Briggs, Stephen A.; Ned, Alexander

    1992-01-01

    A silicon on silicon pressure sensor has been developed for use at very high temperatures (1000 F). The design principles used to fabricate the pressure sensor are outlined and results are presented of its high temperature performance.

  18. Recent technical advancements enabled atomic resolution CryoEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xueming, Li

    2016-01-01

    With recent breakthroughs in camera and image processing technologies single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (CryoEM) has suddenly gained the attention of structural biologists as a powerful tool able to solve the atomic structures of biological complexes and assemblies. Compared with x-ray crystallography, CryoEM can be applied to partially flexible structures in solution and without the necessity of crystallization, which is especially important for large complexes and assemblies. This review briefly explains several key bottlenecks for atomic resolution CryoEM, and describes the corresponding solutions for these bottlenecks based on the recent technical advancements. The review also aims to provide an overview about the technical differences between its applications in biology and those in material science. Project supported by Tsinghua-Peking Joint Center for Life Sciences, China.

  19. Homogenous BSCCO-2212 Round Wires for Very High Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Scott Campbell Dr. Terry Holesinger Dr. Ybing Huang

    2012-06-30

    the very significant advantage of an extremely high H{sub c2}. For this reason, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (Bi-2212, or 2212) in the form of a multifilamentary Ag alloy matrix composite is beginning to attract the interest of the magnet community for future extremely high-field magnets or magnet-insert coils for 4.2K operation. Fig. 1 shows an example of excellent JE (engineering current density) in Bi-2212 round wire at fields up to 45 T, demonstrating the potential for high field applications of this material. For comparison, the Nb{sub 3}Sn wires used in magnets in the 16-18 T range typically perform with J{sub E} in the range 200-500 A/mm{sup 2}; the Bi-2212 wire retains this level of performance to fields at least as high as 45 T, and probably significantly higher. Bi-2212 conductors have in fact been used to generate a 25 T field in a superconducting insert magnet. These two factors- the very high field critical current performance of Bi-2212, and the already demonstrated capability of this material for high field magnets up to 25 T, strongly suggest this material as a leading contender for the next generation high field superconducting (HFS) wire. This potential was recognized by the US Academy of Science's Committee on Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science. Their report of the same name specifically calls out the high field potential for this material, and suggests that 30 T magnets appear feasible based on the performance of 2212. There are several requirements for HFS conductors. The most obvious is J{sub E} (B, T), the engineering current density at the field and temperature of operation. As shown in Fig. 1, Bi-2212 excels in this regard. Stability requirements for magnets dictate that the effective filament diameter should be less than 30 micrometers, something that Bi-2212 multifilamentary wire can uniquely satisfy among the HFS superconducting wire technologies. Additional requirements include mechanical properties that prevent stress

  20. Mesoscale oceanic response to wind events off central California in spring 1989: CTD surveys and AVHRR imagery. [Conductivity/temperature/depth surveys; Selected Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer satellite imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schwing, F.B.; Husby, D.M. ); Garfield, N.; Tracy, D.E. )

    1991-11-01

    Analysis of hydrographic data obtained during juvenile groundfish surveys, in relation to local wind forcing and AVHRR sea-surface temperature imagery, reveals that the oceanic region off central California between Point Reyes and Point Sur in spring 1989 was characterized by complex circulation patterns and considerable temporal and mesoscale variability. The 'spring transition' to upwelling-favorable winds is most clearly evidenced by rapid, large decreases in SST (up to 4-5C) measured at four meteorological buoys. Daily-averaged winds are spatially coherent and oscillate between upwelling-favorable and relaxation conditions at 3-10-day intervals. Persistent upwelling centers near Point Reyes and Point Ano Nuevo were characterized by relatively cool, salty (8-10C, 33.6-34.0 psu) water in the upper 50 m, which is derived from offshore water at depths of 50-100 m. Water-mass analysis reveals that upwelled water is advected equatorward from its source. Some upwelled water is transported into shallow coastal areas and warmed. Alongshelf fronts between relatively warm, low-salinity ([gt]13C, [lt]33.5 psu) offshore water and cool, higher-salinity upwelled water are advected onshore in response to wind relaxation or reversal events: frontal gradients intensify at these times. AVHRR imagery verifies the spatial patterns and complex mesoscale variability of the near-surface patterns observed in the CTD survey data. Eddylike hydrographic features are noted with horizontal scales on the order of the station spacing (10 km). How the complex circulation patterns and intense mesoscale spatial and temporal variability affect the survival and subsequent recruitment of juvenile groundfish is discussed.

  1. New regimes of plastic flow at very high pressures and strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, Bruce

    2015-06-01

    Recent progress in understanding solid-state plastic flow at very high pressures and strain rates for high energy density (HED) science will be described. These results are relevant to hypervelocity impacts, space hardware durability, planetary formation dynamics, advanced designs for inertial confinement fusion, and basic HED science. We use high power lasers to study the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov hydrodynamic instability evolution in the solid state plastic flow regime on the Janus, Omega, and NIF lasers, spanning peak pressures from 10 - 500 GPa (0.1 - 5 Mbar). We are pursuing time resolved diffraction experiments to understand the lattice level dynamics resulting from high rate compression of samples. EXAFS experiments probe the atomic level structure and phase, and provide a volume-averaged temperature. We use the very bright, high time resolution x-ray probe at LCLS to examine the detailed lattice response and time evolution right behind the shock front. And finally, shock driven samples are recovered so that the residual microstructure caused by the shock can be examined by SEM, TEM, and other characterization techniques. An overview of these recent results, with comparisons to theory and simulations, will be given. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. The very-high-energy gamma-ray sky.

    PubMed

    Aharonian, Felix

    2007-01-01

    Over the past few years, very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy has emerged as a truly observational discipline, with many detected sources representing different galactic and extragalactic source populations-supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebulae, giant molecular clouds, star formation regions, compact binary systems, and active galactic nuclei. It is expected that observations with the next generation of stereoscopic arrays of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes over a very broad energy range from 10(10) to 10(15) electron volts will dramatically increase the number of very-high-energy gamma-ray sources, thus having a huge impact on the development of astrophysics, cosmology, and particle astrophysics. PMID:17204642

  3. Very high ratio compression by liquid conical implosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianguo; Lei, Yian

    2015-11-01

    A conical implosion device is designed to achieve very high ratio compression, up to 109 or even higher. The compressing liquid has very low vapor pressure. A novel method is used to prepare the initial pure and thin gas. Some preliminary results proved the concept. The device can produce high energy density (HED) states in a near thermal equilibrium state, heat a gas continuously from very low (a few K) to very high temperature (~100,000 K), or do magnetized target fusion (MTF) with a proper external pulse current or magnetic field.

  4. The very-high-energy gamma-ray sky.

    PubMed

    Aharonian, Felix

    2007-01-01

    Over the past few years, very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy has emerged as a truly observational discipline, with many detected sources representing different galactic and extragalactic source populations-supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebulae, giant molecular clouds, star formation regions, compact binary systems, and active galactic nuclei. It is expected that observations with the next generation of stereoscopic arrays of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes over a very broad energy range from 10(10) to 10(15) electron volts will dramatically increase the number of very-high-energy gamma-ray sources, thus having a huge impact on the development of astrophysics, cosmology, and particle astrophysics.

  5. Photovoltaic (PV) Impact Assessment for Very High Penetration Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Danling; Mather, Barry A.; Seguin, Richard; Hambrick, Joshua; Broadwater, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a granular approach for investigating the impacts of very high photovoltaic (PV) generation penetration. Studies on two real-world distribution feeders connected to PV plants are presented. The studies include both steady-state and time-series power flow analyses, which include the effects of solar variability. The goal of the study is to predict the effects of increasing levels of PV generation as it reaches very high penetration levels. The loss and return of generation with and without regulation is simulated to capture short-term problems such as voltage fluctuations. Impact results from the analyses are described along with potential mitigations.

  6. An Inexpensive, Very High Impedance Digital Voltmeter for Selective Electrodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caceci, Marco S.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a compact, digital voltmeter which exceeds, both in accuracy and input impedance, most commercial pH meters and potentiometers. The instrument consists of two parts: a very high impedance hybrid operational amplifier used as a voltage follower (ICH8500/A, Intersil) and a four and one-half digits LED display panel meter (RP-4500,…

  7. Applicability of explicit congestion notification in very high speed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laalaoua, Rachid; Dotaro, Emmanuel; Atmaca, Tulin

    1999-11-01

    Congestion control avoidance in computer networks is still a major unresolved image. The applicability of previous congestion control mechanisms has to be demonstrated taking into account today's constraints. In this work, several schemes are studied in order to support differentiated services in a wide area, very high speed network.

  8. Experiments on few-electron very high-Z ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, H.; Munger, C.

    1986-07-01

    The measurement of the Lamb shift in heliumlike uranium and outlines future experimental tests of QED using few-electron very high atomic number (Z) ions are presented. A discussion of the possibility of using ultrarelativistic atomic collisions to produce very heavy leptons is also presented. 38 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. 12 CFR 611.1210 - Advance notices-commencement resolution and notice to equity holders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advance notices-commencement resolution and notice to equity holders. 611.1210 Section 611.1210 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM ORGANIZATION Termination of System Institution Status § 611.1210 Advance notices—commencement resolution and notice to equity holders....

  10. Heat transfer with very high free stream turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffat, Robert J.; Maciejewski, Paul K.

    1985-01-01

    Stanton numbers as much as 350 percent above the accepted correlations for flat plate turbulent boundary layer heat transfer have been found in experiments on a low velocity air flow with very high turbulence (up to 50 percent). These effects are far larger that have been previously reported and the data do not correlate as well in boundary layer coordinates (Stanton number and Reynolds number) as they do in simpler coordinates: h vs. X. The very high relative turbulence levels were achieved by placing the test plate in different positions in the margin of a large diameter free jet. The large increases may be due to organized structures of large scale which are present in the marginal flowfield around a free jet.

  11. Very high energy gamma ray observations of southern hemisphere AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, P. M.; Lyons, K.; McComb, T. J. L.; Orford, K. J.; Osborne, J. L.; Rayner, S. M.; Shaw, S. E.; Turver, K. E.

    2001-12-01

    A range of AGNs visible from the Southern hemisphere has been observed with the University of Durham Mark 6 very high energy gamma ray telescope. Results of observations of 1ES 0323+022, PKS 0829+046, 1ES 1101-232, Cen A, PKS 1514-24, RKJ 10578-275, 1ES 2316-423, PKS 2005-489 and PKS 0548-322 are presented. .

  12. Enzyme-Substrate Reactions in Very High Magnetic Fields. I

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovitch, B.; Maling, J. E.; Weissbluth, M.

    1967-01-01

    The availability of very high magnetic fields of up to 170,000 gauss made it worthwhile to pursue the search for a critical change in the rate of four enzyme substrate reactions. The four enzymes were ribonuclease, polyphenol oxidase, peroxidase, and aldolase. The experiments showed that, to within ±3%, no detectable change was observable in the rate of reaction of any of the systems for periods of exposure to the magnetic field of up to 20 min. PMID:6048870

  13. Very high pressure Moessbauer spectroscopy using diamond anvil cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, M.P.; Taylor, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    The technique of generating very high pressure by means of Diamond Anvil Cells (DAC) for Mossbauer Effect applications is outlined. A comprehensive description is presented of the principles of DAC, modification for the use in M/umlt o/ssbauer Spectroscopy (MS), the Merrill--Bassett and Bassett cells, of pressure measurements, of gasketing and collimation, and of hydrostatic media. Examples of /sup 151/Eu, /sup 119/Sn and /sup 129/I are given showing the feasibility of DAC applications in MS. Other isotopes with potential use for high pressure MS using DAC are suggested. 27 refs., 9 figs.

  14. Optimization of Smith-Purcell radiation at very high energies.

    PubMed

    Trotz, S R; Brownell, J H; Walsh, J E; Doucas, G

    2000-06-01

    A theoretical analysis of Smith-Purcell radiation at very high energies is presented. The energy per unit frequency and solid angle is expressed in closed form as a function of the grating geometry, beam energy, and viewing angles. A certain choice of grating geometry is shown to optimize the output energy for a particular order of radiation. Scaling laws are derived for the energy emitted into all orders of radiation in the relativistic limit. It is shown that the total energy emitted into each order scales as the three-halves power of the beam voltage. PMID:11088402

  15. Very-high-level neutral-beam control system

    SciTech Connect

    Elischer, V.; Jacobson, V.; Theil, E.

    1981-10-01

    As increasing numbers of neutral beams are added to fusion machines, their operation can consume a significant fraction of a facility's total resources. LBL has developed a very high level control system that allows a neutral beam injector to be treated as a black box with just 2 controls: one to set the beam power and one to set the pulse duration. This 2 knob view allows simple operation and provides a natural base for implementing even higher level controls such as automatic source conditioning.

  16. A future very-high-energy view of our Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Hinton, J. A.; Hermann, G.; Digel, S.

    2008-12-24

    The survey of the inner Galaxy with H.E.S.S. [1, 2] was remarkably successful in detecting a wide range of new very-high-energy gamma-ray sources. New TeV gamma-ray emitting source classes were established, although several of the sources remain unidentified, and progress has been made in understanding particle acceleration in astrophysical sources. In this work, we constructed a model of a population of such very-high-energy gamma-ray emitters and normalised the flux and size distribution of this population model to the H.E.S.S.-discovered sources. Extrapolating that population of objects to lower flux levels we investigate what a future array of imaging atmospheric telescopes (IACTs) such as AGIS or CTA might detect in a survey of the Inner Galaxy with an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity. The sheer number of sources detected together with the improved resolving power will likely result in a huge improvement in our understanding of the populations of galactic gamma-ray sources. A deep survey of the inner Milky Way would also support studies of the interstellar diffuse gamma-ray emission in regions of high cosmic-ray density. In the final section of this paper we investigate the science potential for the Galactic Centre region for studying energy-dependent diffusion with such a future array.

  17. Very high temperature chemistry: Science justification for containerless experimentation in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmeister, William H.; Nordine, Paul

    1990-01-01

    A summary is presented of the justification for application of containerless processing in space to high temperature science. Low earth orbit offers a gravitational environment that allows samples to be positioned in an experimental apparatus by very small forces. Well controlled experiments become possible on reactive materials at high temperatures in a reasonably quiescent state and without container contamination. This provides an opportunity to advance the science of high temperature chemistry that can only be realized with a commitment by NASA to provide advanced facilities for in-space containerless study of materials at very high temperature.

  18. EXTRAGALACTIC VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAY BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Neronov, A.; Semikoz, D. V.

    2012-09-20

    We study the origin of the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background using the data from the Fermi telescope. To estimate the background level, we count photons at high Galactic latitudes |b| > 60 Degree-Sign . Subtracting photons associated with known sources and the residual cosmic-ray and Galactic diffuse backgrounds, we estimate the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) flux. We find that the spectrum of EGB in the very high energy band above 30 GeV follows the stacked spectrum of BL Lac objects. Large Area Telescope data reveal the positive (1 + z) {sup k}, 1 < k < 4 cosmological evolution of the BL Lac source population consistent with that of their parent population, Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies. We show that EGB at E > 30 GeV could be completely explained by emission from unresolved BL Lac objects if k {approx_equal} 3.

  19. Delivery of very high bandwidth with ATM switches and SONET

    SciTech Connect

    Gossage, S.A.

    1993-08-01

    To deliver high bandwidth, a ubiquitous inter-/intra-building cable plant consisting of single mode and multimode fiber as well as twisted pair copper is required. The selection of the ``glue`` to transport and interconnect distributed LANs with central facility resources over a pervasive cable plant is the focus of this paper. A description of the traditional problems that must be overcome to provide very high bandwidth beyond the narrow confines of a computer center is given. The applicability of Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switching (interconnection) and Synchronous Optical NETwork (SONET) (transport) for high bandwidth delivery is described using the environment and requirements of Sandia National Laboratories. Other methods for distributing high data rates are compared and contrasted. Sandia is implementing a standards based foundation utilizing a pervasive single mode fiber cable plant, SONET transport, and ATM switching to meet the goals of gigabit networking.

  20. Pulsars at very high energies with HESS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giavitto, Gianluca

    Pulsed gamma-rays above 100 GeV, recently discovered from the Crab pulsar by the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) VERITAS and MAGIC, have demonstrated the possibility of detecting pulsars at very high energies (VHE). In order to clarify the many questions that this unexpected discovery has opened, the detection of more VHE pulsars is now of paramount importance. With an expected threshold below 50 GeV and being the only operating IACT in the Southern Hemisphere, the new 28 m class H.E.S.S. II telescope is in a unique position to observe the pulsar population visible from the Southern Hemisphere. Indeed, several pulsars are promising candidates for VHE emission based on theoretical expectations and on the extrapolation of their Fermi-LAT measured gamma-ray spectra. The selection criteria for candidate pulsars, including the prospects of detection by HESS-II, will be discussed.

  1. Gamma-ray bursts at high and very high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piron, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are extra-galactic and extremely energetic transient emissions of gamma rays, which are thought to be associated with the death of massive stars or the merger of compact objects in binary systems. Their huge luminosities involve the presence of a newborn stellar-mass black hole emitting a relativistic collimated outflow, which accelerates particles and produces non-thermal emissions from the radio domain to the highest energies. In this article, I review recent progresses in the understanding of GRB jet physics above 100 MeV, based on Fermi observations of bright GRBs. I discuss the physical implications of these observations and their impact on GRB modeling, and I present some prospects for GRB observation at very high energies in the near future. xml:lang="fr"

  2. ON THE VERY HIGH ENERGY SPECTRUM OF THE CRAB PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Chkheidze, N.; Machabeli, G.; Osmanov, Z.

    2011-04-01

    In the present paper, we construct a self-consistent theory interpreting the observations from the MAGIC Cherenkov Telescope of the very high energy (VHE) pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar. In particular, on the basis of Vlasov's kinetic equation, we study the process of quasi-linear diffusion (QLD) developed by means of the cyclotron instability. This mechanism provides simultaneous generation of low (radio) and VHE (0.01-25 GeV) emission on light cylinder scales in one location of the pulsar magnetosphere. A different approach to the synchrotron emission is considered, giving the spectral index of the VHE emission ({beta} = 2) and the exponential cutoff energy (23 GeV) in good agreement with the observational data.

  3. PROSPECTS FOR A VERY HIGH POWER CW SRF LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer

    2010-06-01

    Steady development in SRF accelerator technology combined with the success of large scale installations such as CEBAF at Jefferson Laboratory and the SNS Linac at ORNL gives credibility to the concept of very high average power CW machines for light sources or Proton drivers. Such machines would be powerful tools for discovery science in themselves but could also pave the way to reliable cost effective drivers for such applications as neutrino factories, an energy-frontier muon collider, nuclear waste transmutation or accelerator driven subcritical reactors for energy production. In contrast to machines such as ILC that need maximum accelerating gradient, the challenges in these machines are mainly in efficiency, reliability, beam stability, beam loss and of course cost. In this paper the present state of the art is briefly reviewed and options for a multi-GeV, multi-MW CW linac are discussed.

  4. Very high potassium (VHK) basalt - Complications in mare basalt petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, J. W.; Taylor, L. A.; Laul, J. C.; Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The first comprehensive report on the petrology and geochemistry of Apollo 14 VHK (Very High Potassium) basalts and their implications for lunar evolution is presented. The reported data are most consistent with the hypothesis that VHK basalts formed through the partial assimilation of granite by a normal low-Ti, high-Al mare basalt magma. Assimilation was preceded by the diffusion-controlled exchange of alkalis and Ba between basalt magma and the low-temperature melt fraction of the granite. Hypotheses involving volatile/nonvolatile fractionations or long-term enrichment of the source regions in K are inconsistent with the suprachondritic Ba/La ratios and low initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios of VHK basalt. An important implication of this conclusion is that granite should be a significant component of the lunar crust at the Apollo 14 site.

  5. Black phosphorus nanoelectromechanical resonators vibrating at very high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zenghui; Jia, Hao; Zheng, Xuqian; Yang, Rui; Wang, Zefang; Ye, G J; Chen, X H; Shan, Jie; Feng, Philip X-L

    2015-01-21

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a new type of nanoelectromechanical resonator based on black phosphorus crystals. Facilitated by a highly efficient dry transfer technique, crystalline black phosphorus flakes are harnessed to enable drumhead resonators vibrating at high and very high frequencies (HF and VHF bands, up to ∼100 MHz). We investigate the resonant vibrational responses from the black phosphorus crystals by devising both electrical and optical excitation schemes, in addition to measuring the undriven thermomechanical motions in these suspended nanostructures. Flakes with thicknesses from ∼200 nm down to ∼20 nm clearly exhibit elastic characteristics transitioning from the plate to the membrane regime. Both frequency- and time-domain measurements of the nanomechanical resonances show that very thin black phosphorus crystals hold interesting potential for moveable and vibratory devices and for semiconductor transducers where high-speed mechanical motions could be coupled to the attractive electronic and optoelectronic properties of black phosphorus.

  6. Very high Mach number shocks - Theory. [in space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quest, Kevin B.

    1986-01-01

    The theory and simulation of collisionless perpendicular supercritical shock structure is reviewed, with major emphasis on recent research results. The primary tool of investigation is the hybrid simulation method, in which the Newtonian orbits of a large number of ion macroparticles are followed numerically, and in which the electrons are treated as a charge neutralizing fluid. The principal results include the following: (1) electron resistivity is not required to explain the observed quasi-stationarity of the earth's bow shock, (2) the structure of the perpendicular shock at very high Mach numbers depends sensitively on the upstream value of beta (the ratio of the thermal to magnetic pressure) and electron resistivity, (3) two-dimensional turbulence will become increasingly important as the Mach number is increased, and (4) nonadiabatic bulk electron heating will result when a thermal electron cannot complete a gyrorbit while transiting the shock.

  7. Black phosphorus nanoelectromechanical resonators vibrating at very high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zenghui; Jia, Hao; Zheng, Xuqian; Yang, Rui; Wang, Zefang; Ye, G J; Chen, X H; Shan, Jie; Feng, Philip X-L

    2015-01-21

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a new type of nanoelectromechanical resonator based on black phosphorus crystals. Facilitated by a highly efficient dry transfer technique, crystalline black phosphorus flakes are harnessed to enable drumhead resonators vibrating at high and very high frequencies (HF and VHF bands, up to ∼100 MHz). We investigate the resonant vibrational responses from the black phosphorus crystals by devising both electrical and optical excitation schemes, in addition to measuring the undriven thermomechanical motions in these suspended nanostructures. Flakes with thicknesses from ∼200 nm down to ∼20 nm clearly exhibit elastic characteristics transitioning from the plate to the membrane regime. Both frequency- and time-domain measurements of the nanomechanical resonances show that very thin black phosphorus crystals hold interesting potential for moveable and vibratory devices and for semiconductor transducers where high-speed mechanical motions could be coupled to the attractive electronic and optoelectronic properties of black phosphorus. PMID:25385657

  8. Thermal Hydraulics of the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh; Eung Kim; Richard Schultz; Mike Patterson; Davie Petti

    2009-10-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core will be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during reactor core-accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, perform research and development (R&D) that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: • High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior • High temperature materials qualification • Design methods development and validation • Hydrogen production technologies • Energy conversion. This paper presents current R&D work that addresses fundamental thermal hydraulics issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs.

  9. High-resolution electron microscopy of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.E.; Kung, H.H.; Sickafus, K.E.; Gray, G.T. III; Field, R.D.; Smith, J.F.

    1997-11-01

    This final report chronicles a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Facility has doubled in size and tripled in quality since the beginning of the three-year period. The facility now includes a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a 100 kV field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM), a 300 kV field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscope (FE-HRTEM), and a 300 kV analytical transmission electron microscope. A new orientation imaging microscope is being installed. X-ray energy dispersive spectrometers for chemical analysis are available on all four microscopes; parallel electron energy loss spectrometers are operational on the FE-STEM and FE-HRTEM. These systems enable evaluation of local atomic bonding, as well as chemical composition in nanometer-scale regions. The FE-HRTEM has a point-to-point resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}, but the resolution can be pushed to its information limit of 1 {angstrom} by computer reconstruction of a focal series of images. HRTEM has been used to image the atomic structure of defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and interfaces in a variety of materials from superconductors and ferroelectrics to structural ceramics and intermetallics.

  10. 12 CFR 611.1210 - Advance notices-commencement resolution and notice to equity holders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... notice to equity holders. 611.1210 Section 611.1210 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM...—commencement resolution and notice to equity holders. (a) Adoption of commencement resolution. Your board of... advance notice to all equity holders stating you are taking steps to terminate System status....

  11. 12 CFR 611.1210 - Advance notices-commencement resolution and notice to equity holders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... notice to equity holders. 611.1210 Section 611.1210 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM...—commencement resolution and notice to equity holders. (a) Adoption of commencement resolution. Your board of... advance notice to all equity holders stating you are taking steps to terminate System status....

  12. 12 CFR 611.1210 - Advance notices-commencement resolution and notice to equity holders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... resolution, send a certified copy by overnight mail to us and to the Farm Credit System Insurance Corporation... days after adopting the commencement resolution, you must: (1) Send us copies of all contracts and... certificates under paragraph (f) of this section. (ii) Send us a draft of the advance notice by facsimile...

  13. High performance carbon fibers from very high molecular weight polyacrylonitrile precursors

    DOE PAGES

    Morris, E. Ashley; Weisenberger, Matthew C.; Abdallah, Mohamed G.; Vautard, Frederic; Grappe, Hippolyte A.; Ozcan, Soydan; Paulauskas, Felix L.; Eberle, Cliff; Jackson, David C.; Mecham, Sue J.; et al

    2016-02-02

    In this study, carbon fibers are unique reinforcing agents for lightweight composite materials due to their outstanding mechanical properties and low density. Current technologies are capable of producing carbon fibers with 90-95% of the modulus of perfect graphite (~1025 GPa). However, these same carbon fibers possess less than 10% of the theoretical carbon fiber strength, estimated to be about 100 GPa.[1] Indeed, attempts to increase carbon fiber rigidity results in lower breaking strength. To develop advanced carbon fibers with both very high strength and modulus demands a new manufacturing methodology. Here, we report a method of manufacturing high strength, verymore » high modulus carbon fibers from a very high molecular weight (VHMW) polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor without the use of nanomaterial additives such as nucleating or structure-templating agents, as have been used by others.[2,3]« less

  14. Life cycle cost model for very high speed integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, E. A.

    1984-09-01

    The Very High Speed Integrated Circuit (VHSIC) technology program is forecast to have a profound impact on performance, reliability, and cost of future avionics systems. An important question is: how do VHSIC design fabrication and support concepts impact life cycle cost (LCC) of a host system? To answer this question, an insertion model representative of future avionics systems is selected and LCCs are obtained for various chip designs and layout configurations which implement this model. This thesis then examines five factors affecting VHSIC chips with respect to LCC of a digital synthetic aperture radar processor. These factors are: (1) chip technology and design; (2) fabrication yields; (3) substrate type; (4) the degree to which computer-aided-design (CAD) methods are used; and (5) maintenance level. Of these factors, the greatest impact to LCC is chip fabrication yields. The least effect on LCC is the degree to which CAD methods are used. The remaining factors fall between these two. Originator-supplied keywords include: semiconductors, microcircuits and Chips(Electronics).

  15. Very high energy outburst of Markarian 501 in May 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Barnacka, A.; Behera, B.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Böttcher, M.; Bouvier, A.; Buchovecky, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Cardenzana, J. V.; Cerruti, M.; Cesarini, A.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dumm, J.; Eisch, J. D.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Griffiths, S. T.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hütten, M.; Håkansson, N.; Holder, J.; Hughes, G.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kelley-Hoskins, N.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Orr, M.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Park, N.; Pelassa, V.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rousselle, J.; Rovero, A. C.; Saxon, D. B.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Sheidaei, F.; Skole, C.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Theiling, M.; Todd, N. W.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weiner, O. M.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.

    2016-10-01

    The very high energy (VHE; E> 100 GeV) blazar Markarian 501 was observed between April 17 and May 5 (MJD 54 938-54 956), 2009, as part of an extensive multi-wavelength campaign from radio to VHE. Strong VHE γ-ray activity was detected on May 1st with Whipple and VERITAS, when the flux (E> 400 GeV) increased to 10 times the pre-flare baseline flux (3.9 × 10-11 ph cm-2 s-1), reaching five times the flux of the Crab Nebula. This coincided with a decrease in the optical polarization and a rotation of the polarization angle by 15°. This VHE flare showed a fast flux variation with an increase of a factor ~4 in 25 min, and a falling time of ~50 min. We present the observations of the quiescent state previous to the flare and of the high state after the flare, focusing on the flux and spectral variability from Whipple, VERITAS, Fermi-LAT, RXTE, and Swift combined with optical and radio data.

  16. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon; Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram

    2016-11-01

    Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al2O3 were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al2O3 shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al2O3, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al2O3 on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  17. Very High Frequency (Beyond 100 MHz) PZT Kerfless Linear Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Da-Wei; Zhou, Qifa; Geng, Xuecang; Liu, Chang-Geng; Djuth, Frank; Shung, K. Kirk

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and measurements of very high frequency kerfless linear arrays prepared from PZT film and PZT bulk material. A 12-µm PZT thick film fabricated from PZT-5H powder/solution composite and a piece of 15-µm PZT-5H sheet were used to fabricate 32-element kerfless high-frequency linear arrays with photolithography. The PZT thick film was prepared by spin-coating of PZT sol-gel composite solution. The thin PZT-5H sheet sample was prepared by lapping a PZT-5H ceramic with a precision lapping machine. The measured results of the 2 arrays were compared. The PZT film array had a center frequency of 120 MHz, a bandwidth of 60% with a parylene matching layer, and an insertion loss of 41 dB. The PZT ceramic sheet array was found to have a center frequency of 128 MHz with a poorer bandwidth (40% with a parylene matching layer) but a better sensitivity (28 dB insertion loss). PMID:19942516

  18. PlanetPol: A Very High Sensitivity Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hough, J. H.; Lucas, P. W.; Bailey, J. A.; Tamura, M.; Hirst, E.; Harrison, D.; Bartholomew-Biggs, M.

    2006-09-01

    We have built and used on several occasions an optical broadband stellar polarimeter, PlanetPol, which employs photoelastic modulators and avalanche photodiodes and achieves a photon-noise-limited sensitivity of at least 1 in 106 in fractional polarization. Observations of a number of polarized standards taken from the literature show that the accuracy of polarization measurements is ~1%. We have developed a method for accurately measuring the polarization of altitude-azimuth mounted telescopes by observing bright nearby stars at different parallactic angles, and we find that the on-axis polarization of the William Herschel Telescope is typically ~15 × 10-6, measured with an accuracy of a few parts in 107. The nearby stars (distance less than 32 pc) are found to have very low polarizations, typically a few ×10-6, indicating that very little interstellar polarization is produced close to the Sun and that their intrinsic polarization is also low. Although the polarimeter can be used for a wide range of astronomy, the very high sensitivity was set by the goal of detecting the polarization signature of unresolved extrasolar planets.

  19. Strong environmental tolerance of moss Venturiella under very high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, F.; Mori, Y.; Takarabe, K.; Nishihira, N.; Shindo, A.; Saigusa, M.; Matsushima, Y.; Saini, N. L.; Yamashita, M.

    2010-03-01

    It was shown by the present authors group that tardigrade can survive under high pressure of 7.5 GPa. In the case of land plants, however, no result of such experiment has been reported. We have extended our experiments to moss searching for lives under very high pressure. Spore placentas of moss Venturiella were sealed in a small Teflon capsule together with a liquid pressure medium. The capsule was put in the center of a pyrophillite cube, and the maximum pressure of 7.5 GPa was applied using a two-stage cubic anvil press. The pressure was kept constant at the maximum pressure for12, 24, 72 and 144 hours. After the pressure was released, the spores were seeded on a ager medium, and incubated for one week and more longer at 25°C with white light of 2000 lux. It was proved that 70-90% of the spores were alive and germinated after exposed to the maximum pressure of 7.5 GPa for up to 72 hours. However, after exposed to 7.5 GPa for 6 days, only 4 individuals in a hundred were germinated. The pressure tolerance of moss Venturiella is found to be stronger than a small animal, tardigrade.

  20. Strongly Interacting Matter at Very High Energy Density

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, L.

    2011-06-05

    The authors discuss the study of matter at very high energy density. In particular: what are the scientific questions; what are the opportunities to makes significant progress in the study of such matter and what facilities are now or might be available in the future to answer the scientific questions? The theoretical and experimental study of new forms of high energy density matter is still very much a 'wild west' field. There is much freedom for developing new concepts which can have order one effects on the way we think about such matter. It is also a largely 'lawless' field, in that concepts and methods are being developed as new information is generated. There is also great possibility for new experimental discovery. Most of the exciting results from RHIC experiments were unanticipated. The methods used for studying various effects like flow, jet quenching, the ridge, two particle correlations etc. were developed as experiments evolved. I believe this will continue to be the case at LHC and as we use existing and proposed accelerators to turn theoretical conjecture into tangible reality. At some point this will no doubt evolve into a precision science, and that will make the field more respectable, but for my taste, the 'wild west' times are the most fun.

  1. Protection Circuits for Very High Frequency Ultrasound Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shung, K. Kirk

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of protection circuits in ultrasound applications is to block noise signals from the transmitter from reaching the transducer and also to prevent unwanted high voltage signals from reaching the receiver. The protection circuit using a resistor and diode pair is widely used due to its simple architecture, however, it may not be suitable for very high frequency (VHF) ultrasound transducer applications (>100 MHz) because of its limited bandwidth. Therefore, a protection circuit using MOSFET devices with unique structure is proposed in this paper. The performance of the designed protection circuit was compared with that of other traditional protection schemes. The performance characteristics measured were the insertion loss (IL), total harmonic distortion (THD) and transient response time (TRT). The new protection scheme offers the lowest IL (−1.0 dB), THD (−69.8 dB) and TRT (78 ns) at 120 MHz. The pulse-echo response using a 120 MHz LiNbO3 transducer with each protection circuit was measured to validate the feasibility of the protection circuits in VHF ultrasound applications. The sensitivity and bandwidth of the transducer using the new protection circuit improved by 252.1 and 50.9 %, respectively with respect to the protection circuit using a resistor and diode pair. These results demonstrated that the new protection circuit design minimizes the IL, THD and TRT for VHF ultrasound transducer applications. PMID:24682684

  2. The Framatome ANP Indirect-Cycle Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Copsey, Bernie; Lecomte, Michel; Brinkmann, Gerd; Capitaine, Alain; Deberne, Nicolas

    2004-07-01

    Framatome ANP is developing a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design, relying on its previous experience with high temperature reactor designs, from its participation in the MODUL and the GT-MHR designs. The Framatome ANP VHTR design is based on an indirect cycle coupled to an 'off-the-shelf' combined cycle gas turbine. Although direct cycle HTR's are being promoted for their high efficiency, preliminary evaluations show that the Framatome ANP design efficiency is on par with a direct cycle while avoiding PGS (Power Generation System) developments and keeping the PGS contamination free. This concept was independently evaluated with sensitivity analysis by EDF. Moreover, the nuclear heat source of the indirect cycle could also be used to qualify the direct cycle components without risk of contamination behind the IHX, thus assisting in the preparation for the later introduction of that technology. Relying to the maximum extent on available technology, the Framatome ANP VHTR plant can demonstrate high-efficiency electricity generation and carbon-free hydrogen production. (authors)

  3. Particle Filters for Very High-Dimensional Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Nonlinear data assimilation for high-dimensional geophysical systems is a rapidly evolving field. Particle filters seem to be the most promising methods as they do not require long chains of model runs to start sampling the posterior probability density function (pdf). Up to very recently developments in particle filtering has been hampered by the 'curse of dimensionality', roughly meaning that the number of particles needed to avoid weight collapse growths exponentially with the dimension of the system. However it has been realised that for particle filtering it is not the dimension of the state vector but the number of independent observations that is the problem. Furthermore, proposal densities that ensure better positioning of the particles in state space before observations are encountered lead to much better performance. Recently particle filters have been proposed that do not suffer from weight collapse by construction. In this talk I will present several of these new filters, including the equivalent-weights particle filters, new combinations with the implicit particle filter, and filters using large-deviation theory. I will present basic ideas and applications to very high-dimensional systems, including a full climate model. Emphasis will be on the fruitful forward directions and on areas that still need attention, as we haven't solved the problem yet.

  4. Catchment Very-High Frequency Hydrochemistry: the Critex Chemical House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floury, P.; Gaillardet, J.; Tallec, G.; Blanchouin, A.; Ansart, P.

    2015-12-01

    Exploring the variations of river quality at very high frequency is still a big challenge that has fundamental implications both for understanding catchment ecosystems and for water quality monitoring. Within the French Critical Zone program CRITEX, we have proposed to develop a prototype called "Chemical House", applying the "lab on field" concept to one of the stream of the Orgeval Critical Zone Observatory. The Orgeval catchment (45 km2) is part of the Critical Zone RBV ("Réseau des bassins versants") network. It is a typical temperate agricultural catchment that has been intensively monitored for the last 50 years for hydrology and nutrient chemistry. Agricultural inputs and land use are also finely monitored making Orgeval an ideal basin to test the response of the Critical Zone to agricultural forcing. Geology consists of a typical sedimentary basin of Cenozoic age with horizontal layers of limestones, silcrete and marls, covered by a thin loamy layer. Two main aquifers are present within the catchment: the Brie and the Champigny aquifers. Mean runoff is 780 mm/yr. The Chemical House is a fully automated lab and installed directly along the river, which performs measurement of all major dissolved elements such as Na, Cl, Mg, Ca, NO3, SO4 and K every half hour. It also records all physical parameters (Temperature, pH, conductivity, O2 dissolved, Turbidity) of the water every minute. Orgeval Chemical House started to measure river chemistry on June 12, 2015 and has successfully now recorded several months of data. We will present the architecture of the Chemical House and the first reproducibility and accuracy tests made during the summer drought 2015 period. Preliminary results show that the chemical house is recoding significant nychtemeral (day/night) cycles for each element. We also observe that each element has its own behaviour along a day. First results open great prospects.

  5. Advanced Remote-sensing Imaging Emission Spectrometer (ARIES): AIRS Spectral Resolution with MODIS Spatial Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; OCallaghan, Fred G.; Broberg, Steve E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a space based instrument concept that will provide scientists with data needed to support key ongoing and future Earth System Science investigations. The measurement approach builds on the observations made by AIRS and MODIS and exceeds their capability with improved spatial and spectral resolution. This paper describes the expected products and the instrument concept that can meet those requirements.

  6. Stagnation Region Heat Transfer Augmentation at Very High Turbulence Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, Forrest; Kingery, Joseph E.

    2015-06-17

    A database for stagnation region heat transfer has been extended to include heat transfer measurements acquired downstream from a new high intensity turbulence generator. This work was motivated by gas turbine industry heat transfer designers who deal with heat transfer environments with increasing Reynolds numbers and very high turbulence levels. The new mock aero-combustor turbulence generator produces turbulence levels which average 17.4%, which is 37% higher than the older turbulence generator. The increased level of turbulence is caused by the reduced contraction ratio from the liner to the exit. Heat transfer measurements were acquired on two large cylindrical leading edge test surfaces having a four to one range in leading edge diameter (40.64 cm and 10.16 cm). Gandvarapu and Ames [1] previously acquired heat transfer measurements for six turbulence conditions including three grid conditions, two lower turbulence aero-combustor conditions, and a low turbulence condition. The data are documented and tabulated for an eight to one range in Reynolds numbers for each test surface with Reynolds numbers ranging from 62,500 to 500,000 for the large leading edge and 15,625 to 125,000 for the smaller leading edge. The data show augmentation levels of up to 136% in the stagnation region for the large leading edge. This heat transfer rate is an increase over the previous aero-combustor turbulence generator which had augmentation levels up to 110%. Note, the rate of increase in heat transfer augmentation decreases for the large cylindrical leading edge inferring only a limited level of turbulence intensification in the stagnation region. The smaller cylindrical leading edge shows more consistency with earlier stagnation region heat transfer results correlated on the TRL (Turbulence, Reynolds number, Length scale) parameter. The downstream regions of both test surfaces continue to accelerate the flow but at a much lower rate than the leading edge. Bypass transition occurs

  7. The dynamic solar chromosphere: recent advances from high resolution telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, Konstantinos; Tsiropoula, Georgia

    This review focuses on the solar chromosphere, a very inhomogeneous and dynamic layer that exhibits phenomena on a large range of spatial and temporal scales. High-resolution observa-tions from existing telescopes (DST, SST, DOT), as well as long-duration observations with Hinode's SOT employing lines such as the Ca II infrared lines, the Ca II HK and above all the Hα line reveal an incredibly rich, dynamic and highly structured environment, both in quiet and active regions. The fine-structure chromosphere, is mainly constituted by fibrilar features that connect various parts of active regions or span across network cell interiors. We discuss this highly dynamical solar chromosphere, especially below the magnetic canopy, which is gov-erned by flows reflecting both the complex geometry and dynamics of the magnetic field and the propagation and dissipation of waves in the different atmospheric layers. A comprehensive view of the fine-structure chromosphere requires deep understanding of the physical processes involved, investigation of the intricate link with structures/processes at lower photospheric lev-els and analysis of its impact on the mass and energy transport to higher atmospheric layers through flows resulting from different physical processes such as magnetic reconnection and waves. Furthermore, we assess the challenges facing theory and numerical modelling which require the inclusion of several physical ingredients, such as non-LTE and three-dimensional numerical simulations.

  8. Very-High-Energy Astrophysics with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Reshmi

    2016-04-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be a new gamma-ray observatory in the energy band ~30 GeV to ~100 TeV, designed to achieve an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over the currently operating imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. CTA will probe known sources with unprecedented sensitivity, angular resolution, and spectral coverage, with the potential of detecting hundreds of new sources. The CTA Consortium will also conduct a number of Key Science Projects, including a Galactic Plane survey and a survey of one quarter of the extragalactic sky. Data taken by CTA will be accessible by members of the wider astronomical community, for the first time in this energy band. This presentation will give an overview of CTA, and its proposed key science program.Submitted with the CTA Consortium

  9. Advances in high-resolution imaging – techniques for three-dimensional imaging of cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Lidke, Diane S.; Lidke, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental goal in biology is to determine how cellular organization is coupled to function. To achieve this goal, a better understanding of organelle composition and structure is needed. Although visualization of cellular organelles using fluorescence or electron microscopy (EM) has become a common tool for the cell biologist, recent advances are providing a clearer picture of the cell than ever before. In particular, advanced light-microscopy techniques are achieving resolutions below the diffraction limit and EM tomography provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) images of cellular structures. The ability to perform both fluorescence and electron microscopy on the same sample (correlative light and electron microscopy, CLEM) makes it possible to identify where a fluorescently labeled protein is located with respect to organelle structures visualized by EM. Here, we review the current state of the art in 3D biological imaging techniques with a focus on recent advances in electron microscopy and fluorescence super-resolution techniques. PMID:22685332

  10. Prediction of Very High Reynolds Number Compressible Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, John R.

    1998-01-01

    Flat plate skin friction calculations over a range of Mach numbers from 0.4 to 3.5 at Reynolds numbers from 16 million to 492 million using a Navier Stokes method with advanced turbulence modeling are compared with incompressible skin friction coefficient correlations. The semi-empirical correlation theories of van Driest; Cope; Winkler and Cha; and Sommer and Short T' are used to transform the predicted skin friction coefficients of solutions using two algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence models in the Navier-Stokes method PAB3D. In general, the predicted skin friction coefficients scaled well with each reference temperature theory though, overall the theory by Sommer and Short appeared to best collapse the predicted coefficients. At the lower Reynolds number 3 to 30 million, both the Girimaji and Shih, Zhu and Lumley turbulence models predicted skin-friction coefficients within 2% of the semi-empirical correlation skin friction coefficients. At the higher Reynolds numbers of 100 to 500 million, the turbulence models by Shih, Zhu and Lumley and Girimaji predicted coefficients that were 6% less and 10% greater, respectively, than the semi-empirical coefficients.

  11. Very high-resolution heat-capacity measurements near the lambda point of helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, J. A.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1983-01-01

    New measurements of the heat capacity of a sample of helium 3-mm high are reported, which extend to within 5 x 10 to the -8th deg of the lambda transition at the vapor pressure. From an analysis of the results allowing for the effect of gravity, the values -0.0127 + or - 0.0026 (2 sigma) for the exponent alpha (= alpha-prime) and 1,058 + or - 0.004 for the leading singularity ratio A/A-prime are obtained. These values are in closer agreement with the theoretical predictions than those reported previously.

  12. Use of Kendall's coefficient of concordance to assess agreement among observers of very high resolution imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ground-based vegetation monitoring methods are expensive, time-consuming, and limited in sample-size. Aerial imagery is appealing to managers because of the reduced time and expense and the increase in sample size. One challenge of aerial imagery is detecting differences among observers of the sam...

  13. Very High Resolution Panoramic Photography to Improve Conventional Rangeland Monitoring 1994

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rangeland monitoring often includes repeat photographs as a basis for documentation and although photographic equipment and electronics have been evolving rapidly, basic rangeland photo monitoring methods have changed little over time. Ground based digital photography is underutilized, especially s...

  14. Object based change detection of Central Asian Tugai vegetation with very high spatial resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gärtner, Philipp; Förster, Michael; Kurban, Alishir; Kleinschmit, Birgit

    2014-09-01

    Ecological restoration of degraded riparian Tugai forests in north-western China is a key driver to combat desertification in this region. Recent restoration efforts attempt to recover the forest along with its most dominant tree species, Populus euphratica. The present research observed the response of natural vegetation using an object based change detection method on QuickBird (2005) and WorldView2 (2011) data. We applied the region growing approach to derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values in order to identify single P. euphratica trees, delineate tree crown areas and quantify crown diameter changes. Results were compared to 59 reference trees. The findings confirmed a positive tree crown growth and suggest a crown diameter increase of 1.14 m, on average. On a single tree basis, tree crown diameters of larger crowns were generally underestimated. Small crowns were slightly underestimated in QuickBird and overestimated in Worldview2 images. The results of the automated tree crown delineation show a moderate relation to field reference data with R20052: 0.36 and R20112: 0.48. The object based image analysis (OBIA) method proved to be applicable in sparse riparian Tugai forests and showed great suitability to evaluate ecological restoration efforts in an endangered ecosystem.

  15. Use of Kendall's coefficient of concordance to assess agreement among observers of very high resolution imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of remotely-sensed imagery can replace expensive and time-consuming field collection of vegetation survey data. There are often discrepancies, however, in how different observers characterize the same objects within images. The goal of this study was to determine if different observers of the sa...

  16. Monitoring Land Cover Dynamics at Varying Spatial Scales Using High to Very High Resolution Optical Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavender, S. J.

    2016-06-01

    Activities have focused on using the Landsat time-series and Sentinel-2 datasets to monitor land cover dynamics across the United Kingdom, with mapping of specific areas including missions such as Worldview and Kompsat. This short conference paper shows some of the preliminary results from the Landsat Operational Land Imager, Thematic Mapper and Enhanced Thematic Mapper data processing that has included the development of a pre-processing system that includes cloud masking and an atmospheric correction. The results are promising, but further research is needed.

  17. Dedicated High-Resolution Powder Diffraction Beamline at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Peter L.; Beno, Mark A.; Shu Deming; Ramanathan, Mohan; Mitchell, John F.; Jorgensen, James D.; Von Dreele, Robert B.

    2004-05-12

    A high-resolution x-ray powder diffraction beamline that exploits the high flux, high energy resolution, and precise energy tuning of the third-generation synchrotron source will be built at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The goal is to establish a high-resolution high-throughput dedicated powder instrument at the APS to serve the powder community. We describe design of the instrument that is able to measure a complete high-resolution powder pattern in one hour or less, uses automation to optimize throughput, has the ability to readily tune over a wide range of x-ray energies quickly and easily covering important absorption edges for resonant data measurements, and has the ability to accommodate various environmental devices for high-temperature, low-temperature or time-resolved data collection.

  18. Multivariate curve resolution: a review of advanced and tailored applications and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ruckebusch, C; Blanchet, L

    2013-02-26

    Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) is a widespread methodology for the analysis of process data in many different application fields. This article intends to propose a critical review of the recently published works. Particular attention will be paid to situations requiring advanced and tailored applications of multivariate curve resolution, dealing with improvements in preprocessing methods, multi-set data arrangements, tailored constraints, issues related to non-ideal noise structure and deviation to linearity. These analytical issues are tackling the limits of applicability of MCR methods and, therefore, they can be considered as the most challenging ones. PMID:23410623

  19. Structural analysis of advanced polymeric foams by means of high resolution X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacucchi, M.; De Pascalis, F.; Scatto, M.; Capodieci, L.; Albertoni, R.

    2016-06-01

    Advanced polymeric foams with enhanced thermal insulation and mechanical properties are used in a wide range of industrial applications. The properties of a foam strongly depend upon its cell structure. Traditionally, their microstructure has been studied using 2D imaging systems based on optical or electron microscopy, with the obvious disadvantage that only the surface of the sample can be analysed. To overcome this shortcoming, the adoption of X-ray micro-tomography imaging is here suggested to allow for a complete 3D, non-destructive analysis of advanced polymeric foams. Unlike metallic foams, the resolution of the reconstructed structural features is hampered by the low contrast in the images due to weak X-ray absorption in the polymer. In this work an advanced methodology based on high-resolution and low-contrast techniques is used to perform quantitative analyses on both closed and open cells foams. Local structural features of individual cells such as equivalent diameter, sphericity, anisotropy and orientation are statistically evaluated. In addition, thickness and length of the struts are determined, underlining the key role played by the achieved resolution. In perspective, the quantitative description of these structural features will be used to evaluate the results of in situ mechanical and thermal test on foam samples.

  20. High Resolution Traction Force Microscopy Based on Experimental and Computational Advances

    PubMed Central

    Sabass, Benedikt; Gardel, Margaret L.; Waterman, Clare M.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration crucially depend on the transmission of actomyosin-generated forces through sites of focal adhesion to the extracellular matrix. Here we report experimental and computational advances in improving the resolution and reliability of traction force microscopy. First, we introduce the use of two differently colored nanobeads as fiducial markers in polyacrylamide gels and explain how the displacement field can be computationally extracted from the fluorescence data. Second, we present different improvements regarding standard methods for force reconstruction from the displacement field, which are the boundary element method, Fourier-transform traction cytometry, and traction reconstruction with point forces. Using extensive data simulation, we show that the spatial resolution of the boundary element method can be improved considerably by splitting the elastic field into near, intermediate, and far field. Fourier-transform traction cytometry requires considerably less computer time, but can achieve a comparable resolution only when combined with Wiener filtering or appropriate regularization schemes. Both methods tend to underestimate forces, especially at small adhesion sites. Traction reconstruction with point forces does not suffer from this limitation, but is only applicable with stationary and well-developed adhesion sites. Third, we combine these advances and for the first time reconstruct fibroblast traction with a spatial resolution of ∼1 μm. PMID:17827246

  1. Recent advances in very highly nonlinear chalcogenide photonic crystal fibers and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méchin, David; Brilland, Laurent; Troles, Johann; Chartier, Thierry; Besnard, Pascal; Canat, Guillaume; Renversez, Gilles

    2012-02-01

    Perfos and the laboratory Glasses and Ceramics Group of University of Rennes 1 have worked together to develop a new fabrication technique for chalcogenide preforms based on the glass-casting process. Various fiber profiles have been designed by the Fresnel Institute and fiber losses have been significantly improved, approaching those of the material losses. Using this technology, we have manufactured an AsSe CPCF exhibiting a nonlinear coefficient γ of 46 000 W-1km-1. Self-phase modulation, Raman effect, Brillouin effect, Four-Wave Mixing have been observed leading to the demonstration of various optical functions such four-wave mixing based wavelength conversion at 1.55 μm by FOTON, the demonstration of Raman Shifts and the generation of a mid-IR supercontinuum source by ONERA and the demonstration of a Brillouin fiber laser by FOTON.

  2. Development of GAMMA Code and Evaluation for a Very High Temperature gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Chang H; Lim, H.S.; Kim, E.S.; NO, H.C.

    2007-06-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of toxic gasses (CO and CO2) and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. This paper will also include what improvements will be made in the Gamma code for the VHTR.

  3. Validation of a mapping and prediction model for human fasciolosis transmission in Andean very high altitude endemic areas using remote sensing data.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, M V; Malone, J B; Mas-Coma, S

    2001-04-27

    The present paper aims to validate the usefulness of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) obtained by satellite remote sensing for the development of local maps of risk and for prediction of human fasciolosis in the Northern Bolivian Altiplano. The endemic area, which is located at very high altitudes (3800-4100 m) between Lake Titicaca and the valley of the city of La Paz, presents the highest prevalences and intensities of fasciolosis known in humans. NDVI images of 1.1 km resolution from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensor on board the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) series of environmental satellites appear to provide adequate information for a study area such as that of the Northern Bolivian Altiplano. The predictive value of the remotely sensed map based on NDVI data appears to be better than that from forecast indices based only on climatic data. A close correspondence was observed between real ranges of human fasciolosis prevalence at 13 localities of known prevalence rates and the predicted ranges of fasciolosis prevalence using NDVI maps. However, results based on NDVI map data predicted zones as risk areas where, in fact, field studies have demonstrated the absence of lymnaeid populations during snail surveys, corroborated by the absence of the parasite in humans and livestock. NDVI data maps represent a useful data component in long-term efforts to develop a comprehensive geographical information system control program model that accurately fits real epidemiological and transmission situations of human fasciolosis in high altitude endemic areas in Andean countries.

  4. High-resolution VUV spectroscopy: New results from the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, F.; Bozek, J.

    1996-06-01

    Third-generation synchrotron light sources are providing photon beams of unprecedented brightness for researchers in atomic and molecular physics. Beamline 9.0.1, an undulator beamline at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), produces a beam in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region of the spectrum with exceptional flux and spectral resolution. Exciting new results from experiments in atomic and molecular VUV spectroscopy of doubly excited autoionizing states of helium, hollow lithium, and photoelectron spectroscopy of small molecules using Beamline 9.0.1 at the ALS are reported.

  5. 10 CFR 20.1602 - Control of access to very high radiation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Control of access to very high radiation areas. 20.1602 Section 20.1602 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Control of Exposure From External Sources in Restricted Areas § 20.1602 Control of access to very high radiation...

  6. 10 CFR 20.1602 - Control of access to very high radiation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Control of access to very high radiation areas. 20.1602 Section 20.1602 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Control of Exposure From External Sources in Restricted Areas § 20.1602 Control of access to very high radiation...

  7. 10 CFR 20.1602 - Control of access to very high radiation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Control of access to very high radiation areas. 20.1602 Section 20.1602 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Control of Exposure From External Sources in Restricted Areas § 20.1602 Control of access to very high radiation...

  8. 10 CFR 20.1602 - Control of access to very high radiation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Control of access to very high radiation areas. 20.1602 Section 20.1602 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Control of Exposure From External Sources in Restricted Areas § 20.1602 Control of access to very high radiation...

  9. 10 CFR 20.1602 - Control of access to very high radiation areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Control of access to very high radiation areas. 20.1602 Section 20.1602 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Control of Exposure From External Sources in Restricted Areas § 20.1602 Control of access to very high radiation...

  10. Very Happy Youths: Benefits of Very High Life Satisfaction among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Carmel; Linley, P. Alex; Maltby, John

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of adolescents reporting very high levels of life satisfaction. Participants (N = 410) were divided into three life satisfaction groups: very high (top 10%), average (middle 25%), and very low (lowest 10%). Results revealed that very happy youths had significantly higher mean scores on all included…

  11. [Study on the Advanced Czerny-Turner Imaging Spectrometer with High Resolution in Broadband].

    PubMed

    Yan, Ling-wei

    2015-06-01

    This paper studies the Czerny-Turner optical structure which is used for the application in imaging spectrometers. To obtain the perfect astigmatism-corrected condition, the Czerny-Turner system has been analyzed and advanced. The basic structure of optical system is still as the traditional form which is composed by the spherical collimating mirror, the plane grating and the spherical focusing mirror. However, an off-the-shelf cylindrical lens is added after the focusing mirror to remove astigmatism differences between the tangential direction and the sagittaI direction. It makes the advanced optical system presents high resolution over the full bandwidth and decreases the cost. An example of the imaging spectrum system in the waveband of 380-760 nm has been designed to prove our theory. A system owns that NA equals to 0.05, and the modulation transfer functions (MTF) of all fields of view are more than 0.59 over the broadband under the required Nyquist frequency (20 lp x mm(-1)). It certificates that the optical system theory can be applied to the small scale imaging spectrometer with high resolution in spectral broadband.

  12. [Study on the Advanced Czerny-Turner Imaging Spectrometer with High Resolution in Broadband].

    PubMed

    Yan, Ling-wei

    2015-06-01

    This paper studies the Czerny-Turner optical structure which is used for the application in imaging spectrometers. To obtain the perfect astigmatism-corrected condition, the Czerny-Turner system has been analyzed and advanced. The basic structure of optical system is still as the traditional form which is composed by the spherical collimating mirror, the plane grating and the spherical focusing mirror. However, an off-the-shelf cylindrical lens is added after the focusing mirror to remove astigmatism differences between the tangential direction and the sagittaI direction. It makes the advanced optical system presents high resolution over the full bandwidth and decreases the cost. An example of the imaging spectrum system in the waveband of 380-760 nm has been designed to prove our theory. A system owns that NA equals to 0.05, and the modulation transfer functions (MTF) of all fields of view are more than 0.59 over the broadband under the required Nyquist frequency (20 lp x mm(-1)). It certificates that the optical system theory can be applied to the small scale imaging spectrometer with high resolution in spectral broadband. PMID:26601404

  13. Advances in high-resolution RIXS for the study of excitation spectra under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungho

    2016-07-01

    Hard X-ray resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) is a promising X-ray spectroscopic tool for measuring low-energy excitation spectra from complex materials under high pressure. In the past, these measurements have been stymied by technical difficulties inherent in measuring a tiny sample, held at high pressure, inside a diamond anvil cell. Now, due to substantial advances in X-ray instrumentation, high-resolution (? meV) RIXS spectrometers at third-generation synchrotron radiation sources have started to successfully address these samples in their extreme environment. However, compared to elastic X-ray scattering and X-ray emission spectroscopy, RIXS is a very photon hungry technique and high-resolution RIXS for samples under high pressure is in its infancy. In this review, the fundamentals of the high-resolution RIXS and associated instrumentation are presented, as well as technical details of diamond anvil cells, sample preparation, and the measurement geometry. Experimental data from measurements of 3d- and 5d-transition metal oxides are shown and future improvements of the RIXS technique in the context of high pressure are discussed.

  14. Identification and Resolution of Safety Issues for the Advanced Integral Type PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woong Sik; Jo, Jong Chull; Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Hho Jung

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents the interim results of a study on the identification and resolution of safety issues for the AIPWR licensing. The safety issues discussed in this paper include (1) policy issues for which decision-makings are needed for the procedural requirements of licensing system in the regulatory policy point of view, (2) technical issues for which either development of new requirements or amendment of some existing requirements is needed, or (3) other technical issues for which safety verifications are required. The study covers (a) the assessment of applicability of the issues identified from the previous studies to the case of the AIPWR, (b) identification of safety issues through analysis of the international experiences in the design and licensing of advanced reactors, and technical review of the AIPWR design, and (c) development of the resolutions of safety issues, and application of the resolutions to the amendment of regulatory requirements and the licensing review of the AIPWR. As the results of this study, a total of twenty eight safety issues was identified: fourteen issues from the previous studies, including the establishment of design safety goals; four issues from the foreign practices and experiences, including the risk-informed licensing; and ten issues by the AIPWR design review, including reliability of passive safety systems. Ten issues of them have been already resolved and the succeeding study is under way to resolve the remaining ones. (authors)

  15. Recent advances in the determination of a high spatial resolution geopotential model using chronometric geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, Guillaume; Guerlin, Christine; Bize, Sébastien; Wolf, Peter; Delva, Pacôme; Panet, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    Current methods to determine the geopotential are mainly based on indirect approaches using gravimetric, gradiometric and topographic data. Satellite missions (GRACE, GOCE) have contributed significantly to improve the knowledge of the Earth's gravity field with a spatial resolution of about 90 km, but it is not enough to access, for example, to the geoid variation in hilly regions. While airborne and ground-based gravimeters provide the high resolution, the problem of these technics is that the accuracy is hampered by the heterogeneous coverage of gravity data (ground and offshore). Recent technological advances in atomic clocks are opening new perspectives in the determination of the geopotential. To date, the best of them reach a stability of 1.6×10-18 (NIST, RIKEN + Univ. Tokyo) in just 7 hours of integration, an accuracy of 2.0×10-18 (JILA). Using the relation of the relativistic gravitational redshift, this corresponds to a determination of geopotential differences at the 0.1 m²/s² level (or 1 cm in geoid height). In this context, the present work aims at evaluating the contribution of optical atomic clocks for the determination of the geopotential at high spatial resolution. To do that, we have studied a test area surrounding the Massif Central in the middle of southern of France. This region, consists in low mountain ranges and plateaus, is interesting because, the gravitational field strength varies greatly from place to place at high resolution due to the relief. Here, we present the synthetic tests methodology: generation of synthetic gravity and potential data, then estimation of the potential from these data using the least-squares collocation and assessment of the clocks contribution. We shall see how the coverage of the data points (realistic or not) can affect the results, and discuss how to quantify the trade-off between the noise level and the number of data points used.

  16. Controlling secondary flows in very highly-loaded low-pressure turbine cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevici, Daniel C.

    This thesis documents experimental and computational results of a research program investigating the aerodynamic losses generated by extremely highly loaded low-pressure turbine blades, with particular focus on the three-dimensional flow near the endwall. The study identifies the physical mechanisms associated with loss generation and documents changes in the flow field that result from the application of passive flow control techniques. The experimental study was conducted in Carleton University's low-speed, linear cascade wind tunnel. Quantitative results include seven-hole pneumatic probe pressure measurements downstream of the cascade to assess blade row losses, as well as detailed measurements within the blade passage to track the development of flow structures. Qualitative results in the form of oil surface flow visualization on the endwall and blade suction surface are used to assist in the interpretation of the physics. The complementary computational studies were performed using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations, providing detailed resolution of the various vortical structures comprising the endwall flow. The work examined two passive flow control techniques for mitigating endwall loss. The techniques were applied to very high-lift, low-pressure turbine airfoils with the goal of expanding the design space. The airfoils and both flow control techniques were designed by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft (PWA) using proprietary tools. It was found that endwall loss could be significantly reduced and the mechanisms of loss reduction were identified. The loss measurements have allowed plausible limits to be defined for a high-lift replacement of the baseline airfoil used in the study.

  17. A Project Management and Systems Engineering Structure for a Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ed Gorski; Dennis Harrell; Finis Southworth

    2004-09-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) will be an advanced, very high temperature (approximately 1000o C. coolant outlet temperature), gas cooled nuclear reactor and is the nearest term of six Generation IV reactor technologies for nuclear assisted hydrogen production. In 2001, the Generation IV International Forum (GIF), a ten nation international forum working together with the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), agreed to proceed with the development of a technology roadmap and identified the next generation of nuclear reactor systems for producing new sources of power. Since a new reactor has not been licensed in the United States since the 1970s, the risks are too large for a single utility to assume in the development of an unprecedented Generation IV reactor. The government must sponsor and invest in the research to resolve major first of a kind (FOAK) issues through a full-scale demonstration prior to industry implementation. DOE’s primary mission for the VHTR is to demonstrate nuclear reactor assisted cogeneration of electricity and hydrogen while meeting the Generation IV goals for safety, sustainability, proliferation resistance and physical security and economics. The successful deployment of the VHTR as a demonstration project will aid in restarting the now atrophied U.S. nuclear power industry infrastructure. It is envisioned that VHTR project participants will include DOE Laboratories, industry partners such as designers, constructors, manufacturers, utilities, and Generation IV international countries. To effectively mange R&D, engineering, procurement, construction, and operation for this multi-organizational and technologically complex project, systems engineering will be used extensively to ensure delivery of the final product. Although the VHTR is an unprecedented FOAK system, the R&D, when assessed using the Office of Science and Technology Gate Model, falls primarily in the 3rd - Exploratory

  18. Shadow Detection from Very High Resoluton Satellite Image Using Grabcut Segmentation and Ratio-Band Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadhim, N. M. S. M.; Mourshed, M.; Bray, M. T.

    2015-03-01

    Very-High-Resolution (VHR) satellite imagery is a powerful source of data for detecting and extracting information about urban constructions. Shadow in the VHR satellite imageries provides vital information on urban construction forms, illumination direction, and the spatial distribution of the objects that can help to further understanding of the built environment. However, to extract shadows, the automated detection of shadows from images must be accurate. This paper reviews current automatic approaches that have been used for shadow detection from VHR satellite images and comprises two main parts. In the first part, shadow concepts are presented in terms of shadow appearance in the VHR satellite imageries, current shadow detection methods, and the usefulness of shadow detection in urban environments. In the second part, we adopted two approaches which are considered current state-of-the-art shadow detection, and segmentation algorithms using WorldView-3 and Quickbird images. In the first approach, the ratios between the NIR and visible bands were computed on a pixel-by-pixel basis, which allows for disambiguation between shadows and dark objects. To obtain an accurate shadow candidate map, we further refine the shadow map after applying the ratio algorithm on the Quickbird image. The second selected approach is the GrabCut segmentation approach for examining its performance in detecting the shadow regions of urban objects using the true colour image from WorldView-3. Further refinement was applied to attain a segmented shadow map. Although the detection of shadow regions is a very difficult task when they are derived from a VHR satellite image that comprises a visible spectrum range (RGB true colour), the results demonstrate that the detection of shadow regions in the WorldView-3 image is a reasonable separation from other objects by applying the GrabCut algorithm. In addition, the derived shadow map from the Quickbird image indicates significant performance of

  19. KiwiSpec - an advanced spectrograph for high resolution spectroscopy: prototype design and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Steve; Barnes, Stuart I.; Hearnshaw, John; Nield, Kathryn; Cochrane, Dave; Grobler, Deon

    2012-09-01

    A new advanced high resolution spectrograph has been developed by Kiwistar Optics of Industrial Research Ltd., New Zealand. The instrument, KiwiSpec R4-100, is bench-mounted, bre-fed, compact (0.75m by 1.5m footprint), and is well-suited for small to medium-sized telescopes. The instrument makes use of several advanced concepts in high resolution spectrograph design. The basic design follows the classical white pupil concept in an asymmetric implementation and employs an R4 echelle grating illuminated by a 100mm diameter collimated beam for primary dispersion. A volume phase holographic grating (VPH) based grism is used for cross-dispersion. The design also allows for up to four camera and detector channels to allow for extended wavelength coverage at high eciency. A single channel prototype of the instrument has been built and successfully tested with a 1m telescope. Targets included various spectrophotometric standard stars and several radial velocity standard stars to measure the instrument's light throughput and radial velocity capabilities. The prototype uses a 725 lines/mm VPH grism, an off-the-shelf camera objective, and a 2k×2k CCD. As such, it covers the wavelength range from 420nm to 660nm and has a resolving power of R ≍ 40,000. Spectrophotometric and precision radial velocity results from the on-sky testing period will be reported, as well as results of laboratory-based measurements. The optical design of KiwiSpec, and the various multi-channel design options, will be presented elsewhere in these proceedings.

  20. SIEMENS ADVANCED QUANTRA FTICR MASS SPECTROMETER FOR ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION AT LOW MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, W; Laura Tovo, L

    2008-07-08

    The Siemens Advanced Quantra Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer was evaluated as an alternative instrument to large double focusing mass spectrometers for gas analysis. High resolution mass spectrometers capable of resolving the common mass isomers of the hydrogen isotopes are used to provide data for accurate loading of reservoirs and to monitor separation of tritium, deuterium, and helium. Conventional double focusing magnetic sector instruments have a resolution that is limited to about 5000. The Siemens FTICR instrument achieves resolution beyond 400,000 and could possibly resolve the tritium ion from the helium-3 ion, which differ by the weight of an electron, 0.00549 amu. Working with Y-12 and LANL, SRNL requested Siemens to modify their commercial Quantra system for low mass analysis. To achieve the required performance, Siemens had to increase the available waveform operating frequency from 5 MHz to 40 MHz and completely redesign the control electronics and software. However, they were able to use the previous ion trap, magnet, passive pump, and piezo-electric pulsed inlet valve design. NNSA invested $1M in this project and acquired four systems, two for Y-12 and one each for SRNL and LANL. Siemens claimed a $10M investment in the Quantra systems. The new Siemens Advanced Quantra demonstrated phenomenal resolution in the low mass range. Resolution greater than 400,000 was achieved for mass 2. The new spectrometer had a useful working mass range to 500 Daltons. However, experiments found that a continuous single scan from low mass to high was not possible. Two useful working ranges were established covering masses 1 to 6 and masses 12 to 500 for our studies. A compromise performance condition enabled masses 1 to 45 to be surveyed. The instrument was found to have a dynamic range of about three orders of magnitude and quantitative analysis is expected to be limited to around 5 percent without using complex fitting algorithms

  1. Advances in liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry for quantitative and qualitative environmental analysis.

    PubMed

    Aceña, Jaume; Stampachiacchiere, Serena; Pérez, Sandra; Barceló, Damià

    2015-08-01

    This review summarizes the advances in environmental analysis by liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) during the last decade and discusses different aspects of their application. LC-HRMS has become a powerful tool for simultaneous quantitative and qualitative analysis of organic pollutants, enabling their quantitation and the search for metabolites and transformation products or the detection of unknown compounds. LC-HRMS provides more information than low-resolution (LR) MS for each sample because it can accurately determine the mass of the molecular ion and its fragment ions if it can be used for MS-MS. Another advantage is that the data can be processed using either target analysis, suspect screening, retrospective analysis, or non-target screening. With the growing popularity and acceptance of HRMS analysis, current guidelines for compound confirmation need to be revised for quantitative and qualitative purposes. Furthermore, new commercial software and user-built libraries are required to mine data in an efficient and comprehensive way. The scope of this critical review is not to provide a comprehensive overview of the many studies performed with LC-HRMS in the field of environmental analysis, but to reveal its advantages and limitations using different workflows. PMID:26138893

  2. Advances in liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry for quantitative and qualitative environmental analysis.

    PubMed

    Aceña, Jaume; Stampachiacchiere, Serena; Pérez, Sandra; Barceló, Damià

    2015-08-01

    This review summarizes the advances in environmental analysis by liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) during the last decade and discusses different aspects of their application. LC-HRMS has become a powerful tool for simultaneous quantitative and qualitative analysis of organic pollutants, enabling their quantitation and the search for metabolites and transformation products or the detection of unknown compounds. LC-HRMS provides more information than low-resolution (LR) MS for each sample because it can accurately determine the mass of the molecular ion and its fragment ions if it can be used for MS-MS. Another advantage is that the data can be processed using either target analysis, suspect screening, retrospective analysis, or non-target screening. With the growing popularity and acceptance of HRMS analysis, current guidelines for compound confirmation need to be revised for quantitative and qualitative purposes. Furthermore, new commercial software and user-built libraries are required to mine data in an efficient and comprehensive way. The scope of this critical review is not to provide a comprehensive overview of the many studies performed with LC-HRMS in the field of environmental analysis, but to reveal its advantages and limitations using different workflows.

  3. Advances in high-resolution mass spectrometry based on metabolomics studies for food--a review.

    PubMed

    Rubert, Josep; Zachariasova, Milena; Hajslova, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Food authenticity becomes a necessity for global food policies, since food placed in the market without fail has to be authentic. It has always been a challenge, since in the past minor components, called also markers, have been mainly monitored by chromatographic methods in order to authenticate the food. Nevertheless, nowadays, advanced analytical methods have allowed food fingerprints to be achieved. At the same time they have been also combined with chemometrics, which uses statistical methods in order to verify food and to provide maximum information by analysing chemical data. These sophisticated methods based on different separation techniques or stand alone have been recently coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) in order to verify the authenticity of food. The new generation of HRMS detectors have experienced significant advances in resolving power, sensitivity, robustness, extended dynamic range, easier mass calibration and tandem mass capabilities, making HRMS more attractive and useful to the food metabolomics community, therefore becoming a reliable tool for food authenticity. The purpose of this review is to summarise and describe the most recent metabolomics approaches in the area of food metabolomics, and to discuss the strengths and drawbacks of the HRMS analytical platforms combined with chemometrics.

  4. New Generation of High Resolution Ultrasonic Imaging Technique for Advanced Material Characterization: Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maev, R. Gr.

    The role of non-destructive material characterization and NDT is changing at a rapid rate, continuing to evolve alongside the dramatic development of novel techniques based on the principles of high-resolution imaging. The modern use of advanced optical, thermal, ultrasonic, laser-ultrasound, acoustic emission, vibration, electro-magnetic, and X-ray techniques, etc., as well as refined measurement and signal/data processing devices, allows for continuous generation of on-line information. As a result real-time process monitoring can be achieved, leading to the more effective and efficient control of numerous processes, greatly improving manufacturing as a whole. Indeed, concurrent quality inspection has become an attainable reality. With the advent of new materials for use in various structures, joints, and parts, however, innovative applications of modern NDT imaging techniques are necessary to monitor as many stages of manufacturing as possible. Simply put, intelligent advance manufacturing is impossible without actively integrating modern non-destructive evaluation into the production system.

  5. Advances in high-resolution mass spectrometry based on metabolomics studies for food--a review.

    PubMed

    Rubert, Josep; Zachariasova, Milena; Hajslova, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Food authenticity becomes a necessity for global food policies, since food placed in the market without fail has to be authentic. It has always been a challenge, since in the past minor components, called also markers, have been mainly monitored by chromatographic methods in order to authenticate the food. Nevertheless, nowadays, advanced analytical methods have allowed food fingerprints to be achieved. At the same time they have been also combined with chemometrics, which uses statistical methods in order to verify food and to provide maximum information by analysing chemical data. These sophisticated methods based on different separation techniques or stand alone have been recently coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) in order to verify the authenticity of food. The new generation of HRMS detectors have experienced significant advances in resolving power, sensitivity, robustness, extended dynamic range, easier mass calibration and tandem mass capabilities, making HRMS more attractive and useful to the food metabolomics community, therefore becoming a reliable tool for food authenticity. The purpose of this review is to summarise and describe the most recent metabolomics approaches in the area of food metabolomics, and to discuss the strengths and drawbacks of the HRMS analytical platforms combined with chemometrics. PMID:26365870

  6. Very High-Speed Digital Video Capability for In-Flight Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corda, Stephen; Tseng, Ting; Reaves, Matthew; Mauldin, Kendall; Whiteman, Donald

    2006-01-01

    digital video camera system has been qualified for use in flight on the NASA supersonic F-15B Research Testbed aircraft. This system is capable of very-high-speed color digital imaging at flight speeds up to Mach 2. The components of this system have been ruggedized and shock-mounted in the aircraft to survive the severe pressure, temperature, and vibration of the flight environment. The system includes two synchronized camera subsystems installed in fuselage-mounted camera pods (see Figure 1). Each camera subsystem comprises a camera controller/recorder unit and a camera head. The two camera subsystems are synchronized by use of an MHub(TradeMark) synchronization unit. Each camera subsystem is capable of recording at a rate up to 10,000 pictures per second (pps). A state-of-the-art complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) sensor in the camera head has a maximum resolution of 1,280 1,024 pixels at 1,000 pps. Exposure times of the electronic shutter of the camera range from 1/200,000 of a second to full open. The recorded images are captured in a dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) and can be downloaded directly to a personal computer or saved on a compact flash memory card. In addition to the high-rate recording of images, the system can display images in real time at 30 pps. Inter Range Instrumentation Group (IRIG) time code can be inserted into the individual camera controllers or into the M-Hub unit. The video data could also be used to obtain quantitative, three-dimensional trajectory information. The first use of this system was in support of the Space Shuttle Return to Flight effort. Data were needed to help in understanding how thermally insulating foam is shed from a space shuttle external fuel tank during launch. The cameras captured images of simulated external tank debris ejected from a fixture mounted under the centerline of the F-15B aircraft. Digital video was obtained at subsonic and supersonic flight conditions, including speeds up to Mach 2

  7. A new population of very high energy gamma-ray sources in the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Aye, K-M; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Berghaus, P; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borgmeier, C; Braun, I; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Gordo, J Bussons; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L-M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Djannati-Ataï, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Ergin, T; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fleury, P; Fontaine, G; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Gillessen, S; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; de Jager, O C; Jung, I; Khélifi, B; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemière, A; Lemoine, M; Leroy, N; Lohse, T; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; de Naurois, M; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Raux, J; Rayner, S M; Redondo, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V; Saugé, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Sol, H; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Tavernet, J-P; Terrier, R; Théoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; van der Walt, D J; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Visser, B; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J

    2005-03-25

    Very high energy gamma-rays probe the long-standing mystery of the origin of cosmic rays. Produced in the interactions of accelerated particles in astrophysical objects, they can be used to image cosmic particle accelerators. A first sensitive survey of the inner part of the Milky Way with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) reveals a population of eight previously unknown firmly detected sources of very high energy gamma-rays. At least two have no known radio or x-ray counterpart and may be representative of a new class of "dark" nucleonic cosmic ray sources.

  8. KiwiSpec - an advanced spectrograph for high resolution spectroscopy: optical design and variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Stuart I.; Gibson, Steve; Nield, Kathryn; Cochrane, Dave

    2012-09-01

    The KiwiSpec R4-100 is an advanced high resolution spectrograph developed by KiwiStar Optics, Industrial Research Ltd, New Zealand. The instrument is based around an R4 echelle grating and a 100mm collimated beam diameter. The optical design employs a highly asymmetric white pupil design, whereby the transfer collimator has a focal length only 1/3 that of the primary collimator. This allows the cross-dispersers (VPH gratings) and camera optics to be small and low cost while also ensuring a very compact instrument. The KiwiSpec instrument will be bre-fed and is designed to be contained in both thermal and/or vacuum enclosures. The instrument concept is highly exible in order to ensure that the same basic design can be used for a wide variety of science cases. Options include the possibility of splitting the wavelength coverage into 2 to 4 separate channels allowing each channel to be highly optimized for maximum eciency. CCDs ranging from smaller than 2K2K to larger than 4K4K can be accommodated. This allows good (3-4 pixel) sampling of resolving powers ranging from below 50,000 to greater than 100,000. Among the specic design options presented here will be a two-channel concept optimized for precision radial velocities, and a four-channel concept developed for the Gemini High- Resolution Optical Spectrograph (GHOST). The design and performance of a single-channel prototype will be presented elsewhere in these proceedings.

  9. Institutional Review Boards at Very High Research Activity Universities: An Opportunity for Social Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Clare; Buttell, Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated to what degree social work was represented in the position of chair of social-behavioral institutional review boards (IRBs) at very high research activity (VHRA) universities in the United States. Method: We collected data on IRB rosters for all 108 schools designated by the Carnegie Foundation as VHRAs in the…

  10. Tuition Trends at High and Very High Public Research Universities, 1999-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micceri, Theodore

    2010-01-01

    Historically, Florida has emphasized access for citizens in setting undergraduate resident tuition for the State University System (SUS). Figure 3 and Figure 6 depict the long-term effects of this, as Florida's undergraduate resident tuition and required fees, among high (RUH) and very high (RUVH) public research universities, have remained second…

  11. Selection of respiratory protection devices for use in very high concentrations of airborne plutonium.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, C J

    2000-08-01

    This paper focuses on the proper selection of respiratory protection devices for use in very high concentrations of airborne plutonium. Special attention is given to the determination of levels at which airborne plutonium presents a hazard that is immediately dangerous to life or health. PMID:10910403

  12. Nacnac(Bn)CuOiPr: a strained geometry resulting in very high lactide polymerization activity.

    PubMed

    Whitehorne, Todd J J; Schaper, Frank

    2012-10-25

    N,N'-Dibenzyl diketiminate copper isopropanolate, (nacnac(Bn)CuOiPr)(2), polymerizes rac- and S,S-lactide in the presence or absence of isopropanol as a chain-transfer reagent with very high activity (k(2) = 32 M(-1) s(-1)), narrow polydispersities and without evidence of side reactions such as transesterification, epimerization or catalyst decomposition. PMID:22968601

  13. [Study on the advanced Schwarzschild imaging spectrometer with high resolution in broadband].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Fang

    2013-08-01

    The Schwarzschild optical structure was studied for the application of imaging spectrometer. The perfect astigmatism-corrected condition was obtained based on the analysis of the astigmatism of the Schwarzschild structure. The structure was advanced in the paper. The Schwarzschild imaging spectrum system is composed of two Schwarzschild structures, which are the collimating mirror-convex mirror and the convex mirror-focusing mirror. The calculation was given to present the parameters of the imaging spectrum system. An example of the imaging spectrum system in the waveband of 340-500 nm was designed and proved our design theory. The solution of the initial optimum structure was designed by our theory and simulated. A system with NA 1.25, of which the modulation transfer functions (MTF) of all fields of view are more than 0.58 in the waveband in the required Nyquist frequency (20 lp x mm(-1)), is presented in the paper. The form of the design structure can be changed as C-T system, Ebert-Fastie system and Offner system. The result also certificated that the optical system theory can be applied to the small scale imaging spectrometer with high resolution and spectral broadband.

  14. Upgrades of the high resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, B.; Wang, F.; Fu, J.; Li, Y.; Wan, B.; Shi, Y.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Lee, S. G.

    2012-10-15

    Two imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers, the so-called 'poloidal' and 'tangential' spectrometers, were recently implemented on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) to provide spatially and temporally resolved impurity ion temperature (T{sub i}), electron temperature (T{sub e}) and rotation velocity profiles. They are derived from Doppler width of W line for Ti, the intensity ratio of Li-like satellites to W line for Te, and Doppler shift of W line for rotation. Each spectrometer originally consisted of a spherically curved crystal and a two-dimensional multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) detector. Both spectrometers have now been upgraded. The layout of the tangential spectrometer was modified, since it had to be moved to a different port, and the spectrometer was equipped with two high count rate Pilatus detectors (Model 100 K) to overcome the count rate limitation of the MWPC and to improve its time resolution. The poloidal spectrometer was equipped with two spherically bent crystals to record the spectra of He-like and H-like argon simultaneously and side by side on the original MWPC. These upgrades are described, and new results from the latest EAST experimental campaign are presented.

  15. Auxotrophic Mutations Reduce Tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Very High Levels of Ethanol Stress

    PubMed Central

    Swinnen, Steve; Goovaerts, Annelies; Schaerlaekens, Kristien; Dumortier, Françoise; Verdyck, Pieter; Souvereyns, Kris; Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Foulquié-Moreno, María R.

    2015-01-01

    Very high ethanol tolerance is a distinctive trait of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with notable ecological and industrial importance. Although many genes have been shown to be required for moderate ethanol tolerance (i.e., 6 to 12%) in laboratory strains, little is known of the much higher ethanol tolerance (i.e., 16 to 20%) in natural and industrial strains. We have analyzed the genetic basis of very high ethanol tolerance in a Brazilian bioethanol production strain by genetic mapping with laboratory strains containing artificially inserted oligonucleotide markers. The first locus contained the ura3Δ0 mutation of the laboratory strain as the causative mutation. Analysis of other auxotrophies also revealed significant linkage for LYS2, LEU2, HIS3, and MET15. Tolerance to only very high ethanol concentrations was reduced by auxotrophies, while the effect was reversed at lower concentrations. Evaluation of other stress conditions showed that the link with auxotrophy is dependent on the type of stress and the type of auxotrophy. When the concentration of the auxotrophic nutrient is close to that limiting growth, more stress factors can inhibit growth of an auxotrophic strain. We show that very high ethanol concentrations inhibit the uptake of leucine more than that of uracil, but the 500-fold-lower uracil uptake activity may explain the strong linkage between uracil auxotrophy and ethanol sensitivity compared to leucine auxotrophy. Since very high concentrations of ethanol inhibit the uptake of auxotrophic nutrients, the active uptake of scarce nutrients may be a major limiting factor for growth under conditions of ethanol stress. PMID:26116212

  16. Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan: Focus on Very High Temperature Reactor Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, William R; Burchell, Timothy D; Katoh, Yutai; McGreevy, Timothy E; Nanstad, Randy K; Ren, Weiju; Snead, Lance Lewis; Wilson, Dane F

    2008-08-01

    Since 2002, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems (Gen IV) Program has addressed the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. The six most promising systems identified for next-generation nuclear energy are described within this roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor-SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor-VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor-GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor-LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor-SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. At the inception of DOE's Gen IV program, it was decided to significantly pursue five of the six concepts identified in the Gen IV roadmap to determine which of them was most appropriate to meet the needs of future U.S. nuclear power generation. In particular, evaluation of the highly efficient thermal SCWR and VHTR reactors was initiated primarily for energy production, and evaluation of the three fast reactor concepts, SFR, LFR, and GFR, was begun to assess viability for both energy production and their potential contribution to closing the fuel cycle. Within the Gen IV Program itself, only the VHTR class of reactors was selected for continued development. Hence, this document will address the multiple activities under the Gen IV program that contribute to the development of the VHTR. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural

  17. Science requirements and feasibility/design studies of a very-high-altitude aircraft for atmospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Lux, David P.; Reed, R. Dale; Loewenstein, Max; Wegener, Steven

    1991-01-01

    The advantages and shortcomings of currently available aircraft for use in very high altitude missions to study such problems as polar ozone or stratosphere-troposphere exchange pose the question of whether to develop advanced aircraft for atmospheric research. To answer this question, NASA conducted a workshop to determine science needs and feasibility/design studies to assess whether and how those needs could be met. It was determined that there was a need for an aircraft that could cruise at an altitude of 30 km with a range of 6,000 miles with vertical profiling down to 10 km and back at remote points and carry a payload of 3,000 lbs.

  18. STUDY ON AIR INGRESS MITIGATION METHODS IN THE VERY HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS COOLED REACTOR (VHTR)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh

    2011-03-01

    An air-ingress accident followed by a pipe break is considered as a critical event for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR). Following helium depressurization, it is anticipated that unless countermeasures are taken, air will enter the core through the break leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure. Thus, without mitigation features, this accident might lead to severe exothermic chemical reactions of graphite and oxygen. Under extreme circumstances, a loss of core structural integrity may occur along with excessive release of radiological inventory. Idaho National Laboratory under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy is performing research and development (R&D) that focuses on key phenomena important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the VHTR. Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) studies to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important (Oh et al. 2006, Schultz et al. 2006). Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation (V&V) requirements are part of the experimental validation plan. This paper discusses about various air-ingress mitigation concepts applicable for the VHTRs. The study begins with identifying important factors (or phenomena) associated with the air-ingress accident by using a root-cause analysis. By preventing main causes of the important events identified in the root-cause diagram, the basic air-ingress mitigation ideas can be conceptually derived. The main concepts include (1) preventing structural degradation of graphite supporters; (2) preventing local stress concentration in the supporter; (3) preventing graphite oxidation; (4) preventing air ingress; (5) preventing density gradient driven flow; (4) preventing fluid density gradient; (5) preventing fluid temperature gradient; (6) preventing high temperature. Based on the basic concepts listed above, various air

  19. Development of safety analysis codes and experimental validation for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh

    2006-03-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of toxic gasses (CO and CO2) and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. Research Objectives As described above, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release in the VHTR. The objectives of this Korean/United States collaboration were to develop and validate advanced computational methods for VHTR safety analysis. The methods that have been developed are now

  20. [Very high gravity ethanol fermentation with cassava flour and sugarcane juice].

    PubMed

    Shen, Naikun; Zhang, Hongyan; Wang, Qingyan; Qin, Yan; Liao, Siming; Wang, Chenghua; Huang, Ribo

    2010-09-01

    We optimized the conditions of mixed fermentation of very high gravity ethanol with cassava flour and sugarcane juice. Based on the single factor experiment, we screened the important parameters for very high gravity ethanol fermentation with cassava flour and sugarcane juice by the Plackeet-burman design. Then, we obtained the optimum values of the important parameters by the orthogonal experiments: the mixing ratio of cassava flour to sugarcane juice, 1:5; initial pH of fermentation, 4.0-4.5; the concentrations of urea and MgSO4, 0.25% and 0.04% (W/W), respectively. Finally, we used a gradient temperature control strategy with the optimized conditions, and ethanol concentration of 17.84% (V/V) and fermentation efficiency of 91.82% were achieved, correspondingly.

  1. Very-high-energy gamma rays from a distant quasar: how transparent is the universe?

    PubMed

    Albert, J; Aliu, E; Anderhub, H; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Baixeras, C; Barrio, J A; Bartko, H; Bastieri, D; Becker, J K; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Bock, R K; Bonnoli, G; Bordas, P; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bretz, T; Britvitch, I; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Chilingarian, A; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Covino, S; Curtef, V; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Cea Del Pozo, E; de Los Reyes, R; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Mendez, C Delgado; Dominguez, A; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Errando, M; Fagiolini, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Galante, N; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Goebel, F; Hayashida, M; Herrero, A; Höhne, D; Hose, J; Hsu, C C; Huber, S; Jogler, T; Kneiske, T M; Kranich, D; La Barbera, A; Laille, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Meyer, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Mizobuchi, S; Moles, M; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Otte, N; Oya, I; Panniello, M; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R G; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Piccioli, A; Prada, F; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Raymers, A; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sartori, P; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schmitt, R; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shinozaki, K; Shore, S N; Sidro, N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tluczykont, M; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Venturini, A; Vitale, V; Wagner, R M; Wittek, W; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Zapatero, J

    2008-06-27

    The atmospheric Cherenkov gamma-ray telescope MAGIC, designed for a low-energy threshold, has detected very-high-energy gamma rays from a giant flare of the distant Quasi-Stellar Radio Source (in short: radio quasar) 3C 279, at a distance of more than 5 billion light-years (a redshift of 0.536). No quasar has been observed previously in very-high-energy gamma radiation, and this is also the most distant object detected emitting gamma rays above 50 gigaelectron volts. Because high-energy gamma rays may be stopped by interacting with the diffuse background light in the universe, the observations by MAGIC imply a low amount for such light, consistent with that known from galaxy counts.

  2. The use of a very high temperature nuclear reactor in the manufacture of synthetic fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farbman, G. H.; Brecher, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    The three parts of a program directed toward creating a cost-effective nuclear hydrogen production system are described. The discussion covers the development of a very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR) as a nuclear heat and power source capable of producing the high temperature needed for hydrogen production and other processes; the development of a hydrogen generation process based on water decomposition, which can utilize the outputs of the VHTR and be integrated with many different ultimate hydrogen consuming processes; and the evaluation of the process applications of the nuclear hydrogen systems to assess the merits and potential payoffs. It is shown that the use of VHTR for the manufacture of synthetic fuels appears to have a very high probability of making a positive contribution to meeting the nation's energy needs in the future.

  3. Very-high-energy gamma rays from a distant quasar: how transparent is the universe?

    PubMed

    Albert, J; Aliu, E; Anderhub, H; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Baixeras, C; Barrio, J A; Bartko, H; Bastieri, D; Becker, J K; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Bock, R K; Bonnoli, G; Bordas, P; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bretz, T; Britvitch, I; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Chilingarian, A; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Covino, S; Curtef, V; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Cea Del Pozo, E; de Los Reyes, R; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Mendez, C Delgado; Dominguez, A; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Errando, M; Fagiolini, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Galante, N; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Goebel, F; Hayashida, M; Herrero, A; Höhne, D; Hose, J; Hsu, C C; Huber, S; Jogler, T; Kneiske, T M; Kranich, D; La Barbera, A; Laille, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Meyer, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Mizobuchi, S; Moles, M; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Otte, N; Oya, I; Panniello, M; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R G; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Piccioli, A; Prada, F; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Raymers, A; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sartori, P; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schmitt, R; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shinozaki, K; Shore, S N; Sidro, N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tluczykont, M; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Venturini, A; Vitale, V; Wagner, R M; Wittek, W; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Zapatero, J

    2008-06-27

    The atmospheric Cherenkov gamma-ray telescope MAGIC, designed for a low-energy threshold, has detected very-high-energy gamma rays from a giant flare of the distant Quasi-Stellar Radio Source (in short: radio quasar) 3C 279, at a distance of more than 5 billion light-years (a redshift of 0.536). No quasar has been observed previously in very-high-energy gamma radiation, and this is also the most distant object detected emitting gamma rays above 50 gigaelectron volts. Because high-energy gamma rays may be stopped by interacting with the diffuse background light in the universe, the observations by MAGIC imply a low amount for such light, consistent with that known from galaxy counts. PMID:18583607

  4. An investigation of very high level languages and their implementation on a Forth language microprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, H.G.; Dress, W.B.; Loffman, R.S.

    1987-11-01

    The potential for using a Forth language microprocessor to implement very high level languages (VHLLs) in Artificial Intelligence research was investigated by surveying the current state-of-the-art of VHLLs, by benchmarking several computers and microcomputers against a customized Forth Language microprocessor, and by extrapolating the results to draw conclusions about implementing expert systems on the Forth language microprocessor. 20 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Importance of lunar granite and KREEP in very high potassium (VHK) basalt petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Clive R.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of five very high potassium (VHK) basalts from Apollo 14 breccia 14303 shows the presence of a KREEP component. An assimilation and fractional crystallization model is presented to describe the basalt evolution. The influence of granite assimilation on the basalt evolution is discussed. The presence of VHK basalts containing only a granite signature and those with both granite and KREEP signatures suggests that there are at least two different VHK basalt flows at the Apollo 14 site.

  6. Novel electroforming-free nanoscaffold memristor with very high uniformity, tunability, and density.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shinbuhm; Sangle, Abhijeet; Lu, Ping; Chen, Aiping; Zhang, Wenrui; Lee, Jae Sung; Wang, Haiyan; Jia, Quanxi; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L

    2014-09-01

    A novel device structure is developed, which uses easy-to-grow nano scaffold films to localize oxygen vacancies at vertical heterointerfaces. The strategy is to design vertical interfaces using two structurally incompatible oxides, which are likely to generate a high-concentration oxygen vacancy. Non-linear electroresistance at room temperature is demonstrated using these nano scaffold devices. The resistance variations exceed two orders of magnitude with very high uniformity and tunability.

  7. SST-GATE: an innovative telescope for very high energy astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporte, Philippe; Dournaux, Jean-Laurent; Sol, Hélène; Blake, Simon; Boisson, Catherine; Chadwick, Paula; Dumas, Delphine; Fasola, Gilles; de Frondat, Fatima; Greenshaw, Tim; Hervet, Olivier; Hinton, James; Horville, David; Huet, Jean-Michel; Jégouzo, Isabelle; Schmoll, Jürgen; White, Richard; Zech, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is an international collaboration that aims to create the world's largest (ever) Very High Energy gamma-ray telescope array, consisting of more than 100 telescopes covering an area of several square kilometers to observe the electromagnetic showers generated by incoming cosmic gamma-rays with very high energies (from a few tens of GeV up to over 100 TeV). Observing such sources requires - amongst many other things - a large FoV (Field of View). In the framework of CTA, SST-GATE (Small Size Telescope - GAmma-ray Telescope Elements) aims to investigate and to build one of the two first CTA prototypes based on the Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) optical design that delivers a FoV close to 10 degrees in diameter. To achieve the required performance per unit cost, many improvements in mirror manufacturing and in other technologies are required. We present in this paper the current status of our project. After a brief introduction of the very high energy context, we present the opto-mechanical design, discuss the technological tradeoffs and explain the electronics philosophy that will ensure the telescopes cost is minimised without limiting its capabilities. We then describe the software nedeed to operate the telescope and conclude by presenting the expected telescope performance and some management considerations.

  8. Impact of the column hardware volume on resolution in very high pressure liquid chromatography non-invasive investigations.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; McDonald, Thomas; Gilar, Martin

    2015-11-13

    The impact of the column hardware volume (≃ 1.7 μL) on the optimum reduced plate heights of a series of short 2.1 mm × 50 mm columns (hold-up volume ≃ 80-90 μL) packed with 1.8 μm HSS-T3, 1.7 μm BEH-C18, 1.7 μm CSH-C18, 1.6 μm CORTECS-C18+, and 1.7 μm BEH-C4 particles was investigated. A rapid and non-invasive method based on the reduction of the system dispersion (to only 0.15 μL(2)) of an I-class Acquity system and on the corrected plate heights (for system dispersion) of five weakly retained n-alkanophenones in RPLC was proposed. Evidence for sample dispersion through the column hardware volume was also revealed from the experimental plot of the peak capacities for smooth linear gradients versus the corrected efficiency of a weakly retained alkanophenone (isocratic runs). The plot is built for a constant gradient steepness irrespective of the applied flow rates (0.01-0.30 mL/min) and column lengths (2, 3, 5, and 10 cm). The volume variance caused by column endfittings and frits was estimated in between 0.1 and 0.7 μL(2) depending on the applied flow rate. After correction for system and hardware dispersion, the minimum reduced plate heights of short (5 cm) and narrow-bore (2.1mm i.d.) beds packed with sub-2 μm fully and superficially porous particles were found close to 1.5 and 0.7, respectively, instead of the classical h values of 2.0 and 1.4 for the whole column assembly.

  9. Cotton yield estimation using very high-resolution digital images acquired on a low-cost miniature unmanned aerial vehicle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yield estimation is a critical task in crop management. A number of traditional methods are available for crop yield estimation but they are costly, time-consuming and difficult to expand to a relatively large field. Remote sensing provides techniques to develop quick coverage over a field at any sc...

  10. An advanced high resolution x-ray imager for laser-plasma interaction observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennetiere, D.; Troussel, Ph.; Courtois, C.; Wrobel, R.; Audebert, P.

    2013-11-01

    We present here the latest results obtained with our high resolution broadband X-ray microscope. These results, both spatial and spectral, were obtained in several facilities such as Berlin's synchrotron Bessy II and LULI's laser ELFIE 100TW. The results show clearly the opportunity in high resolution microscopy that offer mirror based diagnostics.

  11. Very high cycle fatigue behavior of nickel-based superalloy Rene 88 DT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Jiashi

    The fatigue behavior of the polycrystalline nickel-based superalloy Rene 88 DT has been investigated at 593°C up to the very high cycle fatigue regime using ultrasonic fatigue techniques. Conventional damage tolerant methods failed to predict the fatigue life nor the large fatigue life viability of two orders of magnitude observed in the very high cycle regime. Fatigue crack initiation rather than fatigue crack growth is the life determining process in this alloy in the very high cycle regime. At 593°C, all fatigue failures have subsurface origins. Most fatigue crack initiation sites consist of a large crystallographic facet or a cluster of several large crystallographic facets. By combining electron backscatter diffraction, metallographic serial sectioning and SEM-stereo-image-based quantitative fractographic analysis, critical microstructure features associated with subsurface crystallographic fatigue crack initiation were identified. Subsurface fatigue cracks formed by the localization of cyclic plastic deformation on {111} slip planes in the region close to and parallel to twin boundaries in favorably oriented large grains. The facet plane in the crack initiation grain is parallel to the slip plane with the highest resolved shear stresses. Analytical calculations show that twin boundary elastic incompatibility stresses contribute to the onset of cyclic plastic strain localization in the fatigue crack initiation grains. Favorably oriented neighbor grains also can assist with fatigue crack initiation and especially early small crack propagation. Environment may play an important role in the shift of fatigue crack initiation sites from surface to subsurface at elevated temperature. The fatigue behavior of Rene 88 DT was also investigated under fully reversed loading at room temperature using ultrasonic fatigue techniques. Cyclic plastic strain localization and microcrack formation on specimen surfaces were quantitatively studied by EBSD. All microcracks examined

  12. Biochemical recurrence risk factors in surgically treated high and very high-risk prostate tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bañuelos, Beatriz; Díez, Jesús; Alonso-Dorrego, Jose María; Cisneros, Jesus; Peña, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Introduction High and very high-risk prostate cancers are tumors that display great variation in their progression, making their behaviour and consequent prognosis difficult to predict. We analyse preoperative and postoperative risk factors that could influence biochemical recurrence of these tumors. Material and methods We carried out univariate and multivariate analyses in an attempt to establish statistically significant preoperative (age, rectal examination, PSA, biopsy Gleason score, uni/bilateral tumor, affected cylinder percentage) and postoperative (pT stage, pN lymph node affectation, Gleason score, positive surgical margins, percentage of tumor affectation, perineural infiltration) risk factors, as well as their relationship with biochemical recurrence (PSA >0.2 ng/mL). Results We analysed 276 patients with high and very high-risk prostate cancer that were treated with laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) between 2003-2007, with a mean follow-up of 84 months. Incidence of biochemical recurrence is 37.3%. Preoperative factors with the greatest impact on recurrence are suspicious rectal exam (OR 2.2) and the bilateralism of the tumor in the biopsy (OR 1.8). Among the postoperative factors, the presence of a LRP positive surgical margins (OR 3.4) showed the greatest impact, followed by the first grade of the Gleason score (OR 3.3). Conclusions The factor with the greatest influence on biochemical recurrence when it comes to surgery and high and very high-risk prostate cancer is the presence of a positive margin, followed by the Gleason score. Preoperative factors (PSA, biopsy Gleason score, rectal examination, number of affected cylinders) offered no guidance concerning the incidence of BCR. PMID:26568870

  13. Accelerator physics and technology challenges of very high energy hadron colliders

    DOE PAGES

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D.

    2015-08-20

    High energy hadron colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present, international particle physics community considers several options for a 100 TeV proton–proton collider as a possible post-LHC energy frontier facility. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This article briefly reviews the accelerator physics and technology challenges of the future very high energy colliders and outlines the areas of required research and development towards their technical and financial feasibility.

  14. Very high average power solid-state lasers pumped by remotely located nuclear-driven fluorescers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boody, F. P.; Prelas, M. A.

    A total system efficiency of 3 percent is calculated for very high average power active mirror solid-state laser amplifiers of Nd,Cr:GSGG, pumped by remotely generated visible nuclear-driven alkali metal excimer fluorescence. The fluorescence is transported around a radiation shield, separating the fluorescer and the laser, by a large diameter-to-length ratio hollow lightpipe. Parameters are presented for a system producing 1-ms-long 12 MW pulses at 1 Hz, for an average power output of 12 kW.

  15. Very high energy observations of the Galactic Centre: recent results and perspectives with CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrier, Regis

    2016-07-01

    The central 300 pc of our Galaxy are a major laboratory for high energy astrophysics. They harbor the closest supermassive black hole (SMBH) and are the site of a sustained star formation activity. The energy released by the supernovae on the ambient medium must be very strong. Similarly, albeit extremely faint nowadays, the SMBH must have experienced episodes of intense activity in the past which can influence significantly the central regions and beyond, e.g. powering the Fermi bubbles. I review observational results at very high energies from the central region and discuss their implications and the questions they leave open. I discuss the perspectives CTA offers for Galactic Centre astrophysics.

  16. Strongly Interacting Matter Matter at Very High Energy Density: 3 Lectures in Zakopane

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, L.

    2010-06-09

    These lectures concern the properties of strongly interacting matter at very high energy density. I begin with the Color Glass Condensate and the Glasma, matter that controls the earliest times in hadronic collisions. I then describe the Quark Gluon Plasma, matter produced from the thermalized remnants of the Glasma. Finally, I describe high density baryonic matter, in particular Quarkyonic matter. The discussion will be intuitive and based on simple structural aspects of QCD. There will be some discussion of experimental tests of these ideas.

  17. Very high-energy gamma rays from gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Paula M

    2007-05-15

    Very high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy has undergone a transformation in the last few years, with telescopes of unprecedented sensitivity having greatly expanded the source catalogue. Such progress makes the detection of a gamma-ray burst at the highest energies much more likely than previously. This paper describes the facilities currently operating and their chances for detecting gamma-ray bursts, and reviews predictions for VHE gamma-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts. Results to date are summarized.

  18. A parallel plate chamber with pixel read-out for very high data rate

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.; Massai, M.; Torquati, M.R.

    1989-02-01

    The authors report the preliminary test results on the performance of a device specially designed for the imaging of X rays at a very high data rate. A prototype having 256 read-out channels has been built and tested in our lab. The detector is a two step parallel plate chamber. The anode is made up of a chess-board of pads, onto which a thin germanium layer is evaporated to restore the electrical continuity. Each individual pad can be read out independently on the back of the board.

  19. Simplified Design Criteria for Very High Temperature Applications in Generation IV Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    McGreevy, TE

    2004-12-15

    The goal of this activity is to provide simplified criteria which can be used in rapid feasibility assessments of the structural viability of very high temperature components in conceptual and early preliminary design phases for Generation IV reactors. The current criteria in ASME Code Section III, Subsection NH, hereafter referred to as NH, (and Code Case N-201 for core support structures) are difficult and require a complex deconstruction of finite element analysis results for their implementation. Further, and most important, times, temperatures and some materials of interest to the very high temperature Generation IV components are not covered by the current provisions of NH. Future revisions to NH are anticipated that will address very high temperature Generation IV components and materials requirements but, until that occurs interim guidance is required for design activities to proceed. These simplified criteria are for design guidance and are not necessarily in rigorous compliance with NH methodology. Rather, the objective is for criteria which address the early design needs of very high temperature Generation IV components and materials. The intent is to provide simplified but not overly conservative design methods. When more rigorous criteria and methods are incorporated in NH, the degree of conservatism should obviously be reduced. These criteria are based on currently available information. Although engineering judgments have been made in the formulation of these criteria they are not intended to require additional development or testing prior to implementation as a tool for use in conceptual and early preliminary design. Appendices are provided herein that contain useful information. The simplified methods were developed specifically with Alloy 617 in mind; however, they could be applied for the same intended purpose for other materials such as 9Cr-1Mo, Alloy 800H, etc. However, supporting design curves, stress allowables, and isochronous curves may

  20. Calculated Neutron and Gamma-ray Spectra across the Prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Sterbentz

    2008-05-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray flux spectra are calculated using the MCNP5 computer code and a one-sixth core model of a prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor based on the General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor. Spectra are calculated in the five inner reflector graphite block rings, three annular active core fuel rings, three outer graphite reflector block rings, and the core barrel. The neutron spectra are block and fuel pin averages and are calculated as a function of temperature and burnup. Also provided are the total, fast, and thermal radial profile fluxes and core barrel dpa rates.

  1. Steam Generator Component Model in a Combined Cycle of Power Conversion Unit for Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Chang H; Han, James; Barner, Robert; Sherman, Steven R

    2007-06-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. A combined cycle is considered as one of the power conversion units to be coupled to the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR). The combined cycle configuration consists of a Brayton top cycle coupled to a Rankine bottoming cycle by means of a steam generator. A detailed sizing and pressure drop model of a steam generator is not available in the HYSYS processes code. Therefore a four region model was developed for implementation into HYSYS. The focus of this study was the validation of a HYSYS steam generator model of two phase flow correlations. The correlations calculated the size and heat exchange of the steam generator. To assess the model, those calculations were input into a RELAP5 model and its results were compared with HYSYS results. The comparison showed many differences in parameters such as the heat transfer coefficients and revealed the different methods used by the codes. Despite differences in approach, the overall results of heat transfer were in good agreement.

  2. VHEeP: a very high energy electron-proton collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, A.; Wing, M.

    2016-08-01

    Based on current CERN infrastructure, an electron-proton collider is proposed at a centre-of-mass energy of about 9 TeV. A 7 TeV LHC bunch is used as the proton driver to create a plasma wakefield which then accelerates electrons to 3 TeV, these then colliding with the other 7 TeV LHC proton beam. Although of very high energy, the collider has a modest projected integrated luminosity of 10-100 pb^{-1}. For such a collider, with a centre-of-mass energy 30 times greater than HERA, parton momentum fractions, x, down to about 10^{-8} are accessible for photon virtualities, Q^2, of 1 GeV^2. The energy dependence of hadronic cross sections at high energies, such as the total photon-proton cross section, which has synergy with cosmic-ray physics, can be measured and QCD and the structure of matter better understood in a region where the effects are completely unknown. Searches at high Q^2 for physics beyond the Standard Model will be possible, in particular the significantly increased sensitivity to the production of leptoquarks. These and other physics highlights of a very high energy electron-proton collider are outlined.

  3. Strong tolerance of blue-green alga Microcystis flos-aquae to very high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, F.; Nishihira, N.; Hada, Y.; Mori, Y.; Takarabe, K.; Saigusa, M.; Matsushima, Y.; Yamazaki, D.; Ito, E.

    2015-09-01

    It was shown in our previous reports that a few spores of moss Venturiella could tolerate the very high pressure of 20 GPa for 30 min and germinated a protonema to the length of 30 μm. However, these spores did not grow any further, and disappeared at around 30 days of incubation after seeded. On the other hand, colonies of blue-green alga Microcystis flos-aquae came to appear about 76 days after the moss spores were seeded. Many of these colonies appeared at the places where the moss spores had disappeared. These colonies were formed by the algae that had adhered to the spore cases of the moss and survived after exposure to the very high pressure of 20 GPa. Though the appearance of the colonies of high pressure exposed algae was delayed by about 50 days compared with that of the control group which was not exposed to high pressure, there seems no difference in their shape and color from those of the control group. The pressure tolerance of blue-green alga is found to be enormously strong, and it can survive after exposure to the high pressure which corresponds to the depth of about 550-600 km from the surface of the Earth, just above the lower mantle.

  4. High temperature measurement using very high shutter speed to avoid image saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Zhen; Zhang, Yang

    2014-04-11

    This paper explores the adaptation of the two-colour principle to develop a high-speed colour temperature correlation system, which is able to cover a range of temperature that is challenging to achieve before. A colour digital camera has built in RGB filters. It is possible to measure the temperature from the ratio of intensity of the green and red pixels using the two-colour principle based on the expansion of the Plank’s radiation law. In this study, experiments were carried out using a temperature calibrated tungsten ribbon lamp which can be tuned to vary from 1300 to 2200°C. Using very high shutter speed and small aperture, the high-speed camera successfully captured the tungsten ribbon without image saturation at the full temperature scale. Tests have been carried out at different temperature and camera settings. The sensitivity and errors have been analysed, and experiment results demonstrate the potential of using very high shutter speed is available for measuring the temperature even beyond 2200°C.

  5. Feasibility Tests on Concrete with Very-High-Volume Supplementary Cementitious Materials

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Jeon, Yong-Su

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the compressive strength and durability of very high-volume SCM concrete. The prepared 36 concrete specimens were classified into two groups according to their designed 28-day compressive strength. For the high-volume SCM, the FA level was fixed at a weight ratio of 0.4 and the GGBS level varied between the weight ratio of 0.3 and 0.5, which resulted in 70–90% replacement of OPC. To enhance the compressive strength of very high-volume SCM concrete at an early age, the unit water content was controlled to be less than 150 kg/m3, and a specially modified polycarboxylate-based water-reducing agent was added. Test results showed that as SCM ratio (RSCM) increased, the strength gain ratio at an early age relative to the 28-day strength tended to decrease, whereas that at a long-term age increased up to RSCM of 0.8, beyond which it decreased. In addition, the beneficial effect of SCMs on the freezing-and-thawing and chloride resistances of the concrete decreased at RSCM of 0.9. Hence, it is recommended that RSCM needs to be restricted to less than 0.8–0.85 in order to obtain a consistent positive influence on the compressive strength and durability of SCM concrete. PMID:25162049

  6. Plasma uniformity and phase-controlled etching in a very high frequency capacitive discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Dougyong; Woo, Jehun; Lim, Kyungchun; Kim, Kyungsun; Volynets, Vladimir; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2009-07-15

    The influence of controlled phase shift between very high frequency (100 MHz) voltages applied to the powered electrodes on the plasma uniformity and etch rate was studied in a capacitive triode-type reactor. Radial profiles of plasma optical emission were measured as a function of the phase shift in process (C{sub 4}F{sub 8}/O{sub 2}/Ar) plasma with the low frequency bias power both turned off and on. Radial profiles of KrF photoresist etch rate over a 300 mm wafer were obtained in the same conditions (with the bias power turned on). Besides, plasma density at the wafer center and edge was measured versus the phase shift in pure Ar plasma. It occurred that all measured characteristics strongly depend on the phase shift and correlate with each other. It has been shown that the phase-shift control can considerably improve both the plasma and etch-rate uniformity in very high-frequency capacitive reactors.

  7. Discovery of very High Energy γ-Rays from the Blazar S5 0716+714

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderhub, H.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Baixeras, C.; Balestra, S.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Becker, J. K.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Bock, R. K.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Bose, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Britzger, D.; Camara, M.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Commichau, S.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Costado, M. T.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; de Cea del Pozo, E.; De los Reyes, R.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, M.; De Sabata, F.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Errando, M.; Ferenc, D.; Fernández, E.; Firpo, R.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Galante, N.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Godinovic, N.; Goebel, F.; Hadasch, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hsu, C. C.; Jogler, T.; Klepser, S.; Kranich, D.; La Barbera, A.; Laille, A.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moles, M.; Moralejo, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Ninkovic, J.; Orito, R.; Oya, I.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Pasanen, M.; Pascoli, D.; Pauss, F.; Pegna, R. G.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Prada, F.; Prandini, E.; Puchades, N.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rissi, M.; Robert, A.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Sainio, J.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamerra, A.; Stark, L. S.; Suric, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Turini, N.; Vankov, H.; Wagner, R. M.; Villforth, C.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; Zapatero, J.

    2009-10-01

    The MAGIC Collaboration reports the detection of the blazar S5 0716+714 (z = 0.31 ± 0.08) in very high energy gamma rays. The observations were performed in 2007 November and in 2008 April, and were triggered by the Kungliga Vetenskapliga Akademi telescope due to the high optical state of the object. An overall significance of the signal accounts to S = 5.8σ for 13.1 hr of data. Most of the signal (S = 6.9σ) comes from the 2008 April data sample during a higher optical state of the object suggesting a possible correlation between the Very High Energy γ-ray and optical emissions. The differential energy spectrum of the 2008 data sample follows a power law with a photon index of Γ = 3.45 ± 0.54stat ± 0.2syst, and the integral flux above 400 GeV is at the level of (7.5 ± 2.2stat ± 2.3syst) × 10-12 cm-2 s-1, corresponding to a 9% Crab Nebula flux. Modeling of the broadband spectral energy distribution indicates that a structured jet model appears to be more promising in describing the available data than a simple one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model.

  8. Micro radiography and tomography for high resolution NDT of advanced materials and microstructural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisl, M.; Reiter, H.; Hoeller, P.

    The application of microradiography and microcomputed tomography for the NDT of high strength ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites is discussed. Radiography with microfocal X-ray tubes provides high-resolution radiographs using the direct projection technique. Tomography produces high-contrast images of sections of an object, and results are presented using a tomographic unit with a resolution of the order of magnitude of 20 microns.

  9. Technical note: Improving the AWAT filter with interpolation schemes for advanced processing of high resolution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Andre; Nehls, Thomas; Wessolek, Gerd

    2016-06-01

    Weighing lysimeters with appropriate data filtering yield the most precise and unbiased information for precipitation (P) and evapotranspiration (ET). A recently introduced filter scheme for such data is the AWAT (Adaptive Window and Adaptive Threshold) filter (Peters et al., 2014). The filter applies an adaptive threshold to separate significant from insignificant mass changes, guaranteeing that P and ET are not overestimated, and uses a step interpolation between the significant mass changes. In this contribution we show that the step interpolation scheme, which reflects the resolution of the measuring system, can lead to unrealistic prediction of P and ET, especially if they are required in high temporal resolution. We introduce linear and spline interpolation schemes to overcome these problems. To guarantee that medium to strong precipitation events abruptly following low or zero fluxes are not smoothed in an unfavourable way, a simple heuristic selection criterion is used, which attributes such precipitations to the step interpolation. The three interpolation schemes (step, linear and spline) are tested and compared using a data set from a grass-reference lysimeter with 1 min resolution, ranging from 1 January to 5 August 2014. The selected output resolutions for P and ET prediction are 1 day, 1 h and 10 min. As expected, the step scheme yielded reasonable flux rates only for a resolution of 1 day, whereas the other two schemes are well able to yield reasonable results for any resolution. The spline scheme returned slightly better results than the linear scheme concerning the differences between filtered values and raw data. Moreover, this scheme allows continuous differentiability of filtered data so that any output resolution for the fluxes is sound. Since computational burden is not problematic for any of the interpolation schemes, we suggest always using the spline scheme.

  10. Fatigue of Austempered Ductile Iron with Two Strength Grades in Very High Cycle Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiwang; Li, Wei; Song, Qingpeng; Zhang, Ning; Lu, Liantao

    2016-03-01

    In this study, Austempered ductile irons (ADIs) with two different strength grades were produced and the fatigue properties were measured at 109 cycles. The results show that the S-N curves give a typical step-wise shape and there is no fatigue limit in the very high cycle fatigue regime. The two grades ADI have the similar fracture behaviors and fatigue failure can initiate from defects at specimen surface and subsurface zone. On the fracture surfaces of some specimens, the `granular-bright-facet' area with rich carbon distribution is observed in the vicinity of the defect. The microstructure affects the crack behaviors at the early propagation stage. The ADI with upper and lower bainite shows higher fatigue strength compared with the ADI with coarse upper bainite.

  11. Conceptual Reactor Design Study of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with Prismatic-Type Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Masaaki; Tsuji, Nobumasa; Tazawa, Yujiro

    The preliminary conceptual design study of prismatic-type Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) has been performed with 950°C outlet coolant temperature for higher efficient hydrogen and electricity production. First, the core internals that enable higher outlet temperature are considered in the viewpoint of reduction of core bypass flow. Three-dimensional thermal and hydraulic analyses are carried out and show that the 950°C outlet temperature requires approximately 90% fuel flow fraction and it can be achieved with the installation of the seals in bottom blocks, the coolant tubes in the permanent side reflectors and the core restraint devices. Next, the core and fission product (FP) release analyses are performed. The analysis methods that have been developed for the pin-in-block fuel, one type of prismatic VHTR cores, can be applied to multi-hole fuel, another type of the cores, with some adjustments of the analytical models.

  12. New III-V cell design approaches for very high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, M.S.; Melloch, M.R.; Lush, G.B.; Patkar, M.P.; Young, M.P. )

    1993-04-01

    This report describes to examine new solar cell desip approaches for achieving very high conversion efficiencies. The program consists of two elements. The first centers on exploring new thin-film approaches specifically designed for M-III semiconductors. Substantial efficiency gains may be possible by employing light trapping techniques to confine the incident photons, as well as the photons emitted by radiative recombination. The thin-film approach is a promising route for achieving substantial performance improvements in the already high-efficiency, single-junction, III-V cell. The second element of the research involves exploring desip approaches for achieving high conversion efficiencies without requiring extremely high-quality material. This work has applications to multiple-junction cells, for which the selection of a component cell often involves a compromise between optimum band pp and optimum material quality. It could also be a benefit manufacturing environment by making the cell's efficiency less dependent on materialquality.

  13. Analysis of very high frequency propagation in sediments: Experimental results and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, Richard; Page, Sarah; Heald, Gary; Leighton, Tim; Simpson, Matt; Dix, Justin

    2002-11-01

    A current QinetiQ study is investigating the propagation of sound waves into sediment at frequencies higher than 300 kHz. Previous work has found notable discrepancies between model predictions and experimental results and comparisons are inconsistent and unreliable. This new work package investigates the development of new scattering theories for frequencies ranging from 300 kHz to 1 MHz. In particular, the application of a pseudospectral time difference approached is analyzed. The model originally developed for lower frequency applications, is set up in various geometrical scenarios and for varying very high frequencies. Results show the received simulated pulses obtained for hydrophones placed within the sediment and source colocated. Furthermore, simulations are compared in tank experimental data. The controlled tank experiments were conducted by Southampton University and data are analyzed and discussed for various conditions and frequencies.

  14. First-line treatment patterns and lipid target levels attainment in very high cardiovascular risk outpatients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Previous studies have demonstrated gaps in achievement of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) goals among patients at very high cardiovascular risk. We aimed to investigate lipid treatment patterns, rates and predictors of lipid targets attainment, in such outpatients in an urban area of Greece. Methods This was a prospective observational study, conducted in 19 outpatient clinics of Western Greece. We recruited patients with established cardiovascular disease (CVD) and/or diabetes mellitus (DM), previously (at least 3 months before baseline assessment) untreated with any lipid lowering medication. Lipid profile assessment was performed at baseline (prior to lipid-lowering treatment initiation) and at follow-up. Lipid lowering treatment choice was at physicians’ discretion and was kept constant until follow-up. Results We recruited 712 patients with a mean age 61.4 ± 10.4 years, 68.0% males, 43.0% with DM, 64.7% with prior coronary artery disease-CAD. In total, 237/712 (33.3%) of prescribed regimens were of high or very high LDL-C lowering efficacy and out of them 113/237 (47.7%) comprised a combination of statin and ezetimibe. At follow-up the primary target of LDL-C < 70 mg/dL (1.8 mmol/L) was achieved in 71(10.0%) patients. The secondary target of non-HDL-C < 100 mg/dL (2.6 mmol/L) in the subgroup of patients with DM or increased triglycerides levels (>150 mg/dl or 1.7 mmol/L) was achieved in 45(11.6%) of patients. In multivariate logistic regression analysis (AUC = 0.71, 95% CIs 0.65-0.77, p < 0.001) male gender, smoking, baseline LDL-C and very high potency LDL-C lowering regimen emerged as independent predictors of LDL-C goal attainment (OR = 1.88, 95% CIs 1.03-3.44, p = 0.04, OR = 0.57, 95% CIs 0.33-0.96, p = 0.04, OR = 0.98, 95% CIs 0.98-0.99, p < 0.001 and OR = 2.21, 95% CIs 1.15-4.24, p = 0.02 respectively). Conclusions First-line management of dyslipidemia among very-high

  15. Physics perspectives of heavy-ion collisions at very high energy

    DOE PAGES

    Chang, Ning-bo; Cao, ShanShan; Chen, Bao-yi; Chen, Shi-yong; Chen, Zhen-yu; Ding, Heng-Tong; He, Min; Liu, Zhi-quan; Pang, Long-gang; Qin, Guang-you; et al

    2016-01-15

    We expect heavy-ion collisions at very high colliding energies to produce a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at the highest temperature obtainable in a laboratory setting. Experimental studies of these reactions can provide an unprecedented range of information on properties of the QGP at high temperatures. We also report theoretical investigations of the physics perspectives of heavy-ion collisions at a future high-energy collider. These include initial parton production, collective expansion of the dense medium, jet quenching, heavy-quark transport, dissociation and regeneration of quarkonia, photon and dilepton production. Here, we illustrate the potential of future experimental studies of the initial particle production andmore » formation of QGP at the highest temperature to provide constraints on properties of strongly interaction matter.« less

  16. Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts using Milagro

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.

    2007-07-12

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been detected at GeV energies by EGRET and models predict emission at > 100 GeV. Milagro is a wide field (2 sr) high duty cycle (> 90%) ground based water Cherenkov detector that records extensive air showers in the energy range 100 GeV to 100 TeV. We have searched for very high energy emission from a sample of 106 gamma-ray bursts (GRB) detected since the beginning of 2000 by BATSE, BeppoSax, HETE-2, INTEGRAL, Swift or the IPN. No evidence for emission from any of the bursts has been found and we present upper limits from these bursts.

  17. New III-V cell design approaches for very high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, M.S.; Melloch, M.R.; Lush, G.B.; O'Bradovich, G.J.; Young, M.P. )

    1993-01-01

    This report describes progress during the first year of a three-year project. The objective of the research is to examine new design approaches for achieving very high conversion efficiencies. The program is divided into two areas. The first centers on exploring new thin-film approaches specifically designed for III-V semiconductors. The second area centers on exploring design approaches for achieving high conversion efficiencies without requiring extremely high quality material. Research activities consisted of an experimental study of minority carrier recombination in n-type, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-deposited GaAs, an assessment of the minority carrier lifetimes in n-GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy, and developing a high-efficiency cell fabrication process.

  18. Axion-Like Particle Imprint in Cosmological Very-High-Energy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, A.; Sanchez-Conde, M.A.; Prada, F.; /IAA, Granada

    2012-06-13

    Discoveries of very high energy (VHE) photons from distant blazars suggest that, after correction by extragalactic background light (EBL) absorption, there is a flatness or even a turn-up in their spectra at the highest energies that cannot be easily explained by the standard framework. Here, it is shown that a possible solution to this problem is achieved by assuming the existence of axion-like particles (ALPs) with masses {approx} 1 neV. The ALP scenario is tested making use of observations of the highest redshift blazars known in the VHE energy regime, namely 3C 279, 3C 66A, PKS 1222+216 and PG 1553+113. In all cases, better fits to the observed spectra are found when including ALPs rather than considering EBL only. Interestingly, quite similar critical energies for photon/ALP conversions are also derived, independently of the source considered.

  19. Discovery of Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Rbs 0723 with the Magic Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, Razmik

    2014-01-01

    The MAGIC collaboration reports the discovery of very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) gamma-ray emission from RBS 0723 (RA: 08:47:12.9 DEC: +11:33:50, J2000.0) RBS 0723 is a BL Lac object at redshift z=0.198. The source has been detected by Fermi-LAT, in the Second Fermi-LAT source Catalogue (2FGL; Nolan et al. 2012) with F(>1 GeV) = (5.3+-1.2)e-10 cm^-2 s^-1 and with photon index 1.48+-0.16. It also belongs to the first Fermi-LAT catalog of >10 GeV sources (1FHL; Ackermann et al, 2013), showing a hard (photon index = 1.4 +- 0.4) and bright (photon flux = 9.6e-11 ph cm^-2 s^-1) emission above 10 GeV, and identified as a good candidate for VHE detection.

  20. Axion-like particle imprint in cosmological very-high-energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Domínguez, A.; Sánchez-Conde, M.A.; Prada, F. E-mail: masc@stanford.edu

    2011-11-01

    Discoveries of very high energy (VHE) photons from distant blazars suggest that, after correction by extragalactic background light (EBL) absorption, there is a flatness or even a turn-up in their spectra at the highest energies that cannot be easily explained by the standard framework. Here, it is shown that a possible solution to this problem is achieved by assuming the existence of axion-like particles (ALPs) with masses ∼ 1 neV. The ALP scenario is tested making use of observations of the highest redshift blazars known in the VHE energy regime, namely 3C 279, 3C 66A, PKS 1222+216 and PG 1553+113. In all cases, better fits to the observed spectra are found when including ALPs rather than considering EBL only. Interestingly, quite similar critical energies for photon/ALP conversions are also derived, independently of the source considered.

  1. Tritium permeation characterization of materials for fusion and generation IV very high temperature reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, S.; Pilatzke, K.; McCrimmon, K.; Castillo, I.; Suppiah, S.

    2015-03-15

    The objective of this work is to establish the tritium-permeation properties of structural alloys considered for Fusion systems and very high temperature reactors (VHTR). A description of the work performed to set up an apparatus to measure permeation rates of hydrogen and tritium in 304L stainless steel is presented. Following successful commissioning with hydrogen, the test apparatus was commissioned with tritium. Commissioning tests with tritium suggest the need for a reduction step that is capable of removing the oxide layer from the test sample surfaces before accurate tritium-permeation data can be obtained. Work is also on-going to clearly establish the temperature profile of the sample to correctly estimate the tritium-permeability data.

  2. THE SYNCHROTRON EMISSION MECHANISM IN THE RECENTLY DETECTED VERY HIGH ENERGY RADIATION FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    George, Machabeli; Zaza, Osmanov E-mail: z.osmanov@astro-ge.org

    2009-08-01

    Interpretation of the recently discovered very high energy (VHE) pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar is presented. By taking into account the fact that Crab pulsar's radiation for the optical and VHE spectrum peak at the same phases, we argue that the source of this broadband emission is spatially localized. It is shown that the only mechanism providing the results of the MAGIC Cherenkov telescope should be synchrotron radiation. We find that in the magnetospheric electron-positron plasma, due to the cyclotron instability, the pitch angle becomes non-vanishing, which leads to an efficient synchrotron mechanism, intensifying on the light cylinder length scales. We also estimate the VHE radiation spectral index to be equal to -1/2.

  3. Under utilization of MCH services--the major factor for very high IMR in rural Rajasthan.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, B; Mandowara, S L; Kumar, A; Agarwal, D

    1989-03-01

    Infant mortality rate (IMR) and its relation to the utilization of health services was studied in twelve villages of ICDS block Rajsamand, Rajasthan from 1st April, 1985 to 31st March, 1986. The total number of births and infant deaths were 386 and 74, respectively during one year, computing 37.44 as birth rate and 191.70 as IMR. Neonatal deaths contributed 51.4%, the most common causes of which were septicemia (28.9%), birth asphyxia (23.6%), extreme prematurity (18.4%) and tetanus neonatorum (13.1%). The common causes of deaths in post-neonatal period were pneumonia (36.1%), diarrhea (25.0%), complications of measles (16.7%) and that of pertussis (8.3%). Extreme under utilization of preventive, promotive and curative MCH services was found to be one of the major factors for very high IMR prevailing in the region. PMID:2753549

  4. Discovery of very-high-energy gamma-rays from the Galactic Centre ridge.

    PubMed

    Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L-M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fontaine, G; Fuchs, Y; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Gillessen, S; Glicenstein, J F; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Khélifi, B; Klages, S; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Leroy, N; Lohse, T; Marcowith, A; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; de Naurois, M; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Raux, J; Rayner, S M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V; Saugé, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Tavernet, J-P; Terrier, R; Théoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J

    2006-02-01

    The source of Galactic cosmic rays (with energies up to 10(15) eV) remains unclear, although it is widely believed that they originate in the shock waves of expanding supernova remnants. At present the best way to investigate their acceleration and propagation is by observing the gamma-rays produced when cosmic rays interact with interstellar gas. Here we report observations of an extended region of very-high-energy (> 10(11) eV) gamma-ray emission correlated spatially with a complex of giant molecular clouds in the central 200 parsecs of the Milky Way. The hardness of the gamma-ray spectrum and the conditions in those molecular clouds indicate that the cosmic rays giving rise to the gamma-rays are likely to be protons and nuclei rather than electrons. The energy associated with the cosmic rays could have come from a single supernova explosion around 10(4) years ago.

  5. Lagrangian Structures in Very High-Frequency Radar Data and Optimal Pollution Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekien, Francois; Coulliette, Chad; Marsden, Jerry

    2003-08-01

    Very High-frequency (VHF) radar technology produces detailed surface velocity maps near the surface of coastal waters. The use of measured velocity data in environmental prediction, however, has remained unexplored. In this paper, we uncover a striking flow structure in coastal radar observations along the coast of Florida. This structure governs the spread of organic contaminants or passive drifters released in the area. We compute the Lyapunov exponents of the VHF radar data to determine optimal release windows in which contaminants are advected efficiently away from the coast and we show that a VHF radar-based pollution release scheme using the hidden flow structure reduces the effect of industrial pollution in the coastal environment.

  6. Development of radiation hard semiconductor sensors for charged particle tracking at very high luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt, Christopher; Fadeyev, Vitaliy; Sadrozinski, Hartmut F.; Wright, John

    2010-09-01

    The RD50 collaboration (sponsored by the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN) has been exploring the development of radiation hard semiconductor devices for very high-luminosity colliders since 2002. The target fluence to qualify detectors set by the anticipated dose for the innermost tracking layers of the future upgrade of the CERN large hadron collider (LHC) is 1016 1 MeV neutron equivalent (neq) cm-2. This is much larger than typical fluences in space, but is mainly limited to displacement and total dose damage, without the single-event effects typical for the space environment. RD50 investigates radiation hardening from many angles, including: Search for alternative semiconductor to replace silicon, improvement of the intrinsic tolerance of the substrate material (p- vs. n-type, initial doping concentration, oxygen concentration), optimization of the readout geometry (collection of holes or electrons, surface treatment), novel detector designs (3D, edge-less, interconnects).

  7. Very-High-Energy Gamma-Ray Observations of M 31 with VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, R.

    2014-07-01

    VERITAS, an array of 12 m imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes in southern Arizona, is one of the world's most sensitive detectors of astrophysical very-high-energy (VHE, > 100 GeV) gamma rays. We present the current status of the VERITAS observations of M 31 (Andromeda Galaxy) including an upper limit on the VHE flux and a comparison with theoretical predictions. The dominant mechanism for the formation of diffuse gamma rays is expected to be through the inelastic collision of high-energy cosmic rays with the interstellar medium (ISM). M 31 provides an opportunity to probe this mechanism due to its proximity and spatial extent, with the VERITAS point-spread function sufficient to resolve the ISM dense star-forming ring and the galaxy core with its multiple supernova remnants.

  8. Multiquasiparticle configuration effects deduced from the very high frequency discrete lines spectroscopy of /sup 165/Yb

    SciTech Connect

    Schuck, C.; Bendjallah, N.; Diamond, R.M.; Ellis-Akovali, Y.; Lindenberg, K.H.; Newton, J.O.; Shih, S.; Stephens, F.S.; Garret, J.D.; Herskind, B.

    1982-01-01

    New experimental data are presented for /sup 165/Yb in which three already known rotational bands are extended up to very high angular frequencies. We do not observe, below h-bar omega/sub c/ approx. 0.45 MeV in any of these three bands the second discontinuity occuring for h-bar omega/sub c/ approx. 0.42 MeV in N = 90 nuclei. Furthermore, we observe in these three sequences a dealignment of high enough amplitude that it cannot be explained in terms of a single quasi-neutron configuration, and must then be due to a collective effect. A gradual decrease of the neutron pairing with increasing angular frequencies is suggested.

  9. Locating very high energy gamma ray sources with arc minute accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akerlof, C. W.; Cawley, M. F.; Chantell, M.; Fegan, D. J.; Harris, K.; Hillas, A. M.; Jennings, D. G.; Lamb, R. C.; Lawrence, M. A.; Lang, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The angular accuracy of gamma-ray detectors is intrinsically limited by the physical processes involved in photon detection. Although a number of point-like sources were detected by the COS-B satellite, only two were unambiguously identified by time signature with counterparts at longer wavelengths. By taking advantage of the extended longitudinal structure of Very High Energy gamma-ray showers, measurements in the TeV energy range can pinpoint source coordinates to arc minute accuracy. This was demonstrated using Cerenkov air shower imaging techniques. With two telescopes in coincidence, the individual event circular probable error will be 0.13 deg. The half-cone angle of the field of view is effectively 1 deg.

  10. Very-High-Energy Gamma-Ray Observations of Active Galactic Nuclei with VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, John

    2016-08-01

    VERITAS is an array of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes for very-high-energy (VHE, E>100 GeV) gamma-ray astronomy that has been in full scientific operation since 2007. The VERITAS collaboration is conducting several key science projects, one of which is the study of active galactic nuclei (AGN). So far, VERITAS has invested more than 3000 hours in observations of AGN, with approximately 150 objects observed. The program has resulted in the successful detection of 34 AGN as VHE gamma-ray sources, with the majority belonging to the blazar AGN subclass. Significant effort is made to acquire multiwavelength data coincident with the VERITAS observations. An overview of the VERITAS AGN program and its key results will be presented.

  11. Tests of quantum electrodynamics in few-electron very high-Z ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, H.; Munger, C.T.

    1986-08-01

    This article discusses our measurement of the Lamb shift in heliumlike uranium and outlines future tests of QED using few- electron very high atomic number (Z) ions. Our recently reported Lamb shift value of 70.4 (8.1) eV for the one- electron Lamb shift in uranium is in agreement with the theoretical value of 75.3 (0.4) eV. The experimental value was extracted from a beam-foil time-of-flight measurement of the 54.4 (3.3) ps lifetime of the 1s2p/sub 1/2/ /sup 3/P/sub 0/ state of heliumlike uranium. 24 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Fabrication of Very-High-Aspect-Ratio Microstructures in Complex Patterns by Photoelectrochemical Etching

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, GY; Zhao, X; Kim, CJ

    2012-12-01

    We have fabricated very-high-aspect-ratio (VHAR) silicon and metal microstructures in complex geometric patterns. The recently developed surfactant-added tetramethylammonium hydroxide etching allows the formation of V-grooves in any pattern, i.e., not limited by the crystal direction, on a silicon surface. As the resulting sharp pits allow very deep photoelectrochemical etching, VHAR silicon microstructures (4-mu m-wide and over-300-mu m-deep trenches) are successfully fabricated in complex patterns (spiral and zigzag demonstrated), overcoming the prevailing limitations of simple pores and straight trenches. Furthermore, by filling the VHAR silicon mold with nickel and removing the silicon, high-aspect-ratio metal microstructures of complex patterns are also obtained. These VHAR microstructures in complex patterns, which are structurally much stronger than the simple posts and straight plates, overcome the stiction problem even when densely populated. [2012-0042

  13. VERITAS UPPER LIMIT ON THE VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM THE RADIO GALAXY NGC 1275

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Boltuch, D.; Arlen, T.; Celik, O.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Cogan, P.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Bradbury, S. M.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.

    2009-12-01

    The recent detection by the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope of high-energy gamma-rays from the radio galaxy NGC 1275 makes the observation of the very high energy (VHE: E>100 GeV) part of its broadband spectrum particularly interesting, especially for the understanding of active galactic nuclei with misaligned multi-structured jets. The radio galaxy NGC 1275 was recently observed by VERITAS at energies above 100 GeV for about 8 hr. No VHE gamma-ray emission was detected by VERITAS from NGC 1275. A 99% confidence level upper limit of 2.1% of the Crab Nebula flux level is obtained at the decorrelation energy of approximately 340 GeV, corresponding to 19% of the power-law extrapolation of the Fermi Large Area Telescope result.

  14. Very High Energy Observations of Gamma Ray Bursts with the Whipple/VERITAS Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, D.; Badran, H.M.; Blaylock, G.; Bond, I.H.; Boyle, P.J.; Bradbury, S.M.; Buckley, J.H.; Byrum, K.; Carter-Lewis, D.A.; Celik, O.; Cogan, P.; Cui, W.; Daniel, M.K.; Calle Perez, I. de la; Duke, C.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, D.J.; Fegan, S.J.; Finley, J.P.; Fortson, L.F.

    2005-02-21

    Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) observations at Very High Energies (VHE, E > 100 GeV) can impose tight constraints on some GRB emission models. Many GRB after-glow models predict a VHE component similar to that seen in blazars and supernova remnants, in which the GRB spectral energy distribution has a double-peaked shape extending into the VHE regime. Consistent with this afterglow scenario, EGRET detected delayed high energy emission from all five bright BATSE GRBs that occurred within its field of view. GRB observations have had high priority in the observing program at the Whipple 10m Telescope and will continue to be high priority targets when the next generation observatory VERITAS comes online. Upper limits on the VHE emission from ten GRBs observed with the Whipple Telescope are reported here.

  15. Very high energy gamma-ray emission of Perseus Cluster and NGC 1275

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyna, V. G.; Sinitsyna, V. Y.

    2016-07-01

    The Perseus cluster of galaxies with the central galaxy NGC 1275 is ideally suitable both for studying the physics of relativistic jets from Active Galactic Nuclei and for revealing the feedback role of the central galaxy. The data obtained at very high energies by SHALON, namely the images of the galaxy and its surroundings, and the flux variability indicate that the TeV γ-ray emission is produced by a number of processes: in partraular, part of this emission is generated by relativistic jets in the nucleus of NGC 1275 itself. Unique data on GK Per(Nova 1901) TeV γ-ray emission were obtained with SHALON experiment for the first time.

  16. Bioslurry treatment for soils contaminated with very high concentrations of 2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine (tetryl).

    PubMed

    Fuller, Mark E; Kruczek, Jessica; Schuster, Rachel L; Sheehan, Pamela L; Arienti, Per M

    2003-06-27

    Past and current DoD activities have resulted in the contamination of soil, sediment and groundwater with various explosive compounds. This research was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of a soil bioslurry process for remediation of soil with very high concentrations of 2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine (tetryl). A 99.9% reduction in tetryl concentrations (from 100,000 to below 100 mg/kg) was achieved in 180 to 200 days. A variety of process modifications (i.e. addition of fertilizer, microbial biomass, purging with nitrogen, etc.) that were performed during the course of the experiment did not increase the tetryl biodegradation rate beyond the rates of degradation without modifications. Subsequent batches of soil added as a 25% (v/v) replacement of the slurry were also degraded. These results indicate the potential for this process to remediate highly contaminated soils at many former and current ammunition manufacturing sites.

  17. Climatic consequences of very high carbon dioxide levels in the earth's early atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, James F.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    1986-01-01

    The possible consequences of very high carbon dioxide concentrations in the earth's early atmosphere have been investigated with a radiative-convective climate model. The early atmosphere would apparently have been stable against the onset of a runaway greenhouse (that is, the complete evaporation of the oceans) for carbon dioxide pressures up to at least 100 bars. A 10- to 20-bar carbon dioxide atmosphere, such as may have existed during the first several hundred million years of the earth's history, would have had a surface temperature of approximately 85 to 110 C. The early stratosphere should have been dry, thereby precluding the possibility of an oxygenic prebiotic atmosphere caused by photodissociation of water vapor followed by escape of hydrogen to space. Earth's present atmosphere also appears to be stable against a carbon dioxide-induced runaway greenhouse.

  18. Comprehensive Thermal Hydraulics Research of the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh; Eung Kim; Richard Schultz; Mike Patterson; David Petti; Hyung Kang

    2010-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is conducting research on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core will be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during reactor core-accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, perform research and development (R&D) that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: • High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior • High temperature materials qualification • Design methods development and validation • Hydrogen production technologies • Energy conversion. This paper presents current R&D work that addresses fundamental thermal hydraulics issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs.

  19. e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions at very high energy: searching beyond the standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfan, J.

    1983-04-01

    These lectures discuss e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions at very high energies with a particular emphasis on searching the standard model which we take to be SU(3)/sub color/..lambda.. SU(2) ..lambda.. U(1). The highest e/sup +/e/sup -/ collision energy exploited to date is at PETRA where data have been taken at 38 GeV. We will consider energies above this to be the very high energy frontier. The lectures will begin with a review of the collision energies which will be available in the upgraded machines of today and the machines planned for tomorrow. Without going into great detail, we will define the essential elements of the standard model. We will remind ourselves that some of these essential elements have not yet been verified and that part of the task of searching beyond the standard model will involve experiments aimed at this verification. For if we find the standard model lacking, then clearly we are forced to find an alternative. So we will investigate how the higher energy e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions can be used to search for the top quark, the neutral Higgs scalar, provide true verification of the non-Abelian nature of QCD, etc. Having done this we will look at tests of models involving simple extensions of the standard model. Models considered are those without a top quark, those with charged Higgs scalars, with multiple and/or composite vector bosons, with additional generations and possible alternative explanations for the PETRA three jet events which don't require gluon bremsstrahlung. From the simple extensions of the standard model we will move to more radical alternatives, alternatives which have arisen from the unhappiness with the gauge hierarchy problem of the standard model. Technicolor, Supersymmetry and composite models will be discussed. In the final section we will summarize what the future holds in terms of the search beyond the standard model.

  20. The Flux Variability of Markarian 501 in Very High Energy Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, J. Dept. of Experimental Physics, University College, Belfield, Dublin 4 ); Bond, I.H. ); Boyle, P.J. ); Bradbury, S.M. ); Breslin, A.C. ); Buckley, J.H. ); Burdett, A.M. Department of Physics, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, West Yorkshire, England ); Gordo, J.B. (Department of

    1999-06-01

    The BL Lacertae object Markarian 501 was identified as a source of [gamma]-ray emission at the Whipple Observatory in 1995 March. Here we present a flux variability analysis on several timescales of the 233 hr data set accumulated over 213 nights (from March 1995 to July 1998) with the Whipple Observatory 10 m atmospheric Cerenkov imaging telescope. In 1995, with the exception of a single night, the flux from Markarian 501 was constant on daily and monthly timescales and had an average flux of only 10[percent] that of the Crab Nebula, making it the weakest very high energy source detected to date. In 1996, the average flux was approximately twice the 1995 flux and showed significant month-to-month variability. No significant day-scale variations were detected. The average [gamma]-ray flux above [approximately]350 GeV in the 1997 observing season rose to 1.4 times that of the Crab Nebula[emdash]14 times the 1995 discovery level[emdash]allowing a search for variability on timescales shorter than 1 day. Significant hour-scale variability was present in the 1997 data, with the shortest, observed on MJD 50,607, having a doubling time of [approximately]2 hr. In 1998 the average emission level decreased considerably from that of 1997 (to [approximately]20[percent] of the Crab Nebula flux), but two significant flaring events were observed. Thus the emission from Markarian 501 shows large amplitude and rapid flux variability at very high energies, as does Markarian 421. It also shows large mean flux level variations on year-to-year timescales, behavior that has not been seen from Markarian 421 so far. [copyright] [ital [copyright] 1999.] [ital The American Astronomical Society

  1. Importance of axion-like particles for very-high-energy astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncadelli, Marco; De Angelis, Alessandro; Galanti, Giorgio

    2012-07-01

    Several extensions ol the Standard Model predict the existence ol Axion-Like Particles (ALPs), very light spin-zero bosons with a two-photon coupling. ALPs can give rise to observable effects in very-high-energy astrophysics. Above roughly 100 GeV the horizon of the observable Universe progressively shrinks as the energy increases, due to scattering of beam photons off background photons in the optical and infrared bands, which produces e+ e- pairs. In the presence of large-scale magnetic fields photons emitted by a blazar can oscillate into ALPs on the way to us and back into photons before reaching the Earth. Since ALPs do not interact with background photons, the effective mean free path of beam photons increases, enhancing the photon survival probability. While the absorption probability increases with energy, photon-ALP oscillations are energy-independent, and so the survival probability increases with energy compared to standard expectations. We have performed a systematic analysis of this effect, interpreting the present data on very-high-energy photons from blazars. Our predictions can be tested with presently operating Cherenkov Telescopes like H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS and CANGAROO III as well as with detectors like ARGO-YBJ and MILAGRO and with the planned Cherenkov Telescope Array and the HAWC γ-ray observatory. ALPs with the right properties to produce the above effects can possibly be discovered by the GammeV experiment at FERMILAB and surely by the planned photon regeneration experiment ALPS at DESY.

  2. Elucidation of Advanced Function by Combined High-Resolution Neutron and X-ray Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamada, Taro; Kuroki, Ryota; Kinoshita, Takayoshi; Tada, Toshiji

    To help resolve long-standing questions regarding the catalytic activity of the serine proteases the structure of porcine pancreatic elastase has been analyzed by high-resolution neutron (1.65 Å resolution) and X-ray (0.94 Å resolution) crystallography. In order to mimic the tetrahedral transition intermediate, a peptidic inhibitor was used. The neutron and X-ray data show that the hydrogen bond between His57 and Asp102 is not consistent with a low-barrier hydrogen which is predicted to have the hydrogen midway between the donor and acceptor atom. The neutron analysis also shows that the oxygen of the oxopropyl group of the inhibitor is present as an oxygen anion rather than a hydroxyl group, supporting the role of the “oxyanion hole” in stabilizing the tetrahedral intermediate in catalysis.

  3. MACHETE: A transit imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope to survey half of the very high energy γ-ray sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortina, J.; López-Coto, R.; Moralejo, A.

    2016-01-01

    Current imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes for very high energy γ-ray astrophysics are pointing instruments with a field of view up to a few tens of sq deg. We propose to build an array of two non-steerable (drift) telescopes. Each of the telescopes would have a camera with a FOV of 5 × 60 sq deg oriented along the meridian. About half of the sky drifts through this FOV in a year. We have performed a Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the performance of this instrument. We expect it to survey this half of the sky with an integral flux sensitivity of ˜0.77% of the steady flux of the Crab Nebula in 5 years, an analysis energy threshold of ˜150 GeV and an angular resolution of ˜0.1°. For astronomical objects that transit over the telescope for a specific night, we can achieve an integral sensitivity of 12% of the Crab Nebula flux in a night, making it a very powerful tool to trigger further observations of variable sources using steerable IACTs or instruments at other wavelengths.

  4. DISCOVERY OF VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SNR G54.1+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Boltuch, D.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Bradbury, S. M.; Butt, Y.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Finley, J. P.; Duke, C.; Finnegan, G. E-mail: wakely@uchicago.ed

    2010-08-10

    We report the discovery of very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission from the direction of the SNR G54.1+0.3 using the VERITAS ground-based gamma-ray observatory. The TeV signal has an overall significance of 6.8{sigma} and appears pointlike given the resolution of the instrument. The integral flux above 1 TeV is 2.5% of the Crab Nebula flux and significant emission is measured between 250 GeV and 4 TeV, well described by a power-law energy spectrum dN/dE {approx} E {sup -{Gamma}} with a photon index {Gamma} = 2.39 {+-} 0.23{sub stat} {+-} 0.30{sub sys}. We find no evidence of time variability among observations spanning almost two years. Based on the location, the morphology, the measured spectrum, the lack of variability, and a comparison with similar systems previously detected in the TeV band, the most likely counterpart of this new VHE gamma-ray source is the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the SNR G54.1+0.3. The measured X-ray to VHE gamma-ray luminosity ratio is the lowest among all the nebulae supposedly driven by young rotation-powered pulsars, which could indicate a particle-dominated PWN.

  5. Measurement of liquid film flow on nuclear rod bundle in micro-scale by using very high speed camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Son; Kawara, Zensaku; Yokomine, Takehiko; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2012-11-01

    Playing important roles in the mass and heat transfer as well as the safety of boiling water reactor, the liquid film flow on nuclear fuel rods has been studied by different measurement techniques such as ultrasonic transmission, conductivity probe, etc. Obtained experimental data of this annular two-phase flow, however, are still not enough to construct the physical model for critical heat flux analysis especially at the micro-scale. Remain problems are mainly caused by complicated geometry of fuel rod bundles, high velocity and very unstable interface behavior of liquid and gas flow. To get over these difficulties, a new approach using a very high speed digital camera system has been introduced in this work. The test section simulating a 3×3 rectangular rod bundle was made of acrylic to allow a full optical observation of the camera. Image data were taken through Cassegrain optical system to maintain the spatiotemporal resolution up to 7 μm and 20 μs. The results included not only the real-time visual information of flow patterns, but also the quantitative data such as liquid film thickness, the droplets' size and speed distributions, and the tilt angle of wavy surfaces. These databases could contribute to the development of a new model for the annular two-phase flow. Partly supported by the Global Center of Excellence (G-COE) program (J-051) of MEXT, Japan.

  6. New and unconventional approaches for advancing resolution in biological transmission electron microscopy by improving macromolecular specimen preparation and preservation.

    SciTech Connect

    Massover, W.; Materials Science Division

    2011-02-01

    Resolution in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) now is limited by the properties of specimens, rather than by those of instrumentation. The long-standing difficulties in obtaining truly high-resolution structure from biological macromolecules with TEM demand the development, testing, and application of new ideas and unconventional approaches. This review concisely describes some new concepts and innovative methodologies for TEM that deal with unsolved problems in the preparation and preservation of macromolecular specimens. The selected topics include use of better support films, a more protective multi-component matrix surrounding specimens for cryo-TEM and negative staining, and, several quite different changes in microscopy and micrography that should decrease the effects of electron radiation damage; all these practical approaches are non-traditional, but have promise to advance resolution for specimens of biological macromolecules beyond its present level of 3-10 {angstrom} (0.3-1.0 nm). The result of achieving truly high resolution will be a fulfillment of the still unrealized potential of transmission electron microscopy for directly revealing the structure of biological macromolecules down to the atomic level.

  7. Advanced Materials and Processes for High Energy Resolution Room Temperature Gamma Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas S. McGregor

    2007-12-12

    A significant amount of progress has been achieved in the development of the novel vacuum distillation method described in the proposal. The process for the purification of Te was fully developed and characterized in a series of trials. The purification effect was confirmed with GDMS sample analysis and indicates the process yields very high purity Te metal. Results of this initial process study have been submitted for publication in the Proceedings of the SPIE and will be presented on August 28, 2007 at the SPIE Optics and Photonics 2007 conference in San Diego, CA. Concurrent to the development of the Te process, processes for the purification of Cd, Zn, and Mn have also progressed. The development of the processes for Cd and Zn are nearly complete, while the development of the process for Mn is still in its infancy. It is expected that a full characterization of the Cd process will be completed within the next quarter, followed by Zn. Parallel to those characterization studies, efforts will be made to further develop the Mn purification process. Zone melting work for Te and Cd has also been efforted as per the project work schedule. Initial trials have been completed and the processes developed. Characterization of the results will be completed within the first fiscal year. Finally, an apparatus for the zone refinement of Cd, Zn, and Mn has been constructed and initial trials are set to begin shortly.

  8. Spatial resolution measurements of the advanced radiographic capability x-ray imaging system at energies relevant to Compton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, G. N.; Izumi, N.; Landen, O. L.; Tommasini, R.; Holder, J. P.; Hargrove, D.; Bradley, D. K.; Lumbard, A.; Cruz, J. G.; Piston, K.; Lee, J. J.; Romano, E.; Bell, P. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Palmer, N. E.; Felker, B.; Rekow, V.; Allen, F. V.

    2016-11-01

    Compton radiography provides a means to measure the integrity, ρR and symmetry of the DT fuel in an inertial confinement fusion implosion near peak compression. Upcoming experiments at the National Ignition Facility will use the ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) laser to drive backlighter sources for Compton radiography experiments and will use the newly commissioned AXIS (ARC X-ray Imaging System) instrument as the detector. AXIS uses a dual-MCP (micro-channel plate) to provide gating and high DQE at the 40-200 keV x-ray range required for Compton radiography, but introduces many effects that contribute to the spatial resolution. Experiments were performed at energies relevant to Compton radiography to begin characterization of the spatial resolution of the AXIS diagnostic.

  9. Recent advances in a linear micromirror array for high-resolution projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Francis; Doucet, Michel; Niall, Keith K.; Larouche, Carl; Savard, Maxime; Crisan, Silviu; Thibault, Simon; Jerominek, Hubert

    2004-05-01

    The visual displays of contemporary military flight simulators lack adequate definition to represent scenes in basic fast-jet fighter tasks. For example, air-to-air and air-to-ground targets are not projected with sufficient contrast and resolution for a pilot to perceive aspect, aspect rate and object detail at real world slant ranges. Simulator display geometries require the development of ultra-high resolution projectors with greater than 20 megapixel resolution at 60 Hz frame rate. A new micromirror device has been developed to address this requirement; it is able to modulate light intensity in an analog fashion with switching times shorter than 5 μs. When combined with a scanner, a laser and Schlieren optics, a linear array of these flexible micromirrors can display images composed of thousands of lines at a frame rate of 60 Hz. Recent results related to evaluation of this technology for high resolution projection are presented. Alternate operation modes for light modulation with flexible micromirrors are proposed. The related importance of controlling the residual micromirror curvature is discussed and results of experiments investigating the use of the deposition pressure to achieve such control are reported. Moreover, activities aiming at minimizing the micromirror response time and, so doing, maximizing the number of image columns per image frame are discussed. Finally, contrast measurement and estimate of the contrast limit achievable with the flexible micromirror technology are presented. All reported activities support the development of a fully addressable 2000-element micromirror array.

  10. Optimal welding parameters for very high power ultrasonic additive manufacturing of smart structures with aluminum 6061 matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolcott, Paul J.; Hehr, Adam; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a recent solid state manufacturing process that combines ad- ditive joining of thin metal tapes with subtractive milling operations to generate near net shape metallic parts. Due to the minimal heating during the process, UAM is a proven method of embedding Ni-Ti, Fe-Ga, and PVDF to create active metal matrix composites. Recently, advances in the UAM process utilizing 9 kW very high power (VHP) welding has improved bonding properties, enabling joining of high strength materials previously unweldable with 1 kW low power UAM. Consequently, a design of experiments study was conducted to optimize welding conditions for aluminum 6061 components. This understanding is critical in the design of UAM parts containing smart materials. Build parameters, including weld force, weld speed, amplitude, and temperature were varied based on a Taguchi experimental design matrix and tested for me- chanical strength. Optimal weld parameters were identi ed with statistical methods including a generalized linear model for analysis of variance (ANOVA), mean e ects plots, and interaction e ects plots.

  11. Disc-corona energetics in the very high state of Galactic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Done, Chris; Kubota, Aya

    2006-09-01

    The X-ray spectra of Galactic binary systems dominated by a quasi-thermal component (disc dominated or high/soft state) are well described by a standard Shakura-Sunyaev disc structure down to the last stable orbit around the black hole. This is not the case in the very high (or steep power-law) state, where the X-ray spectra show both a strong disc component and strong, steep tail to higher energies. We use two such spectra from the black hole transient XTE J1550-564 as specific examples of this state, where the power emitted in the tail is more than 50 per cent of the bolometric luminosity. The simultaneous ASCA and RXTE data show that these have disc spectra which are significantly lower in temperature than those seen from the same source at the same luminosity in the high/soft state. If these give a true picture of the disc, then either the disc emissivity has reduced, and/or the disc truncates above the last stable orbit. However, it is often assumed that the tail is produced by Compton scattering, in which case its shape in these spectra requires that the Comptonizing region is marginally optically thick (τ ~ 2-3), and covers a large fraction of the inner disc. This will distort our view of the disc, especially of the hottest-temperature material. We build a theoretical model of a Comptonizing corona over an inner disc, and fit this to the data, but find that it still requires a large increase in inner disc radius for a standard disc emissivity. Instead, it seems more probable that the disc emissivity changes in the presence of the corona. We implement the specific inner disc-corona coupling model of Svensson & Zdziarski, in which some fraction f of the accretion power is dissipated in the corona, leaving only a fraction 1 - f to be dissipated in the optically thick disc. We show that this can explain the low-temperature/high-luminosity disc emission seen in the very high state with only a small increase in radius of the disc. While this inferred disc

  12. Transport studies on very high purity gallium arsenide grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Cheung Fat

    1997-12-01

    Very high purity GaAs layers have been grown in a modified organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) system using trimethyl gallium (TMGa) and arsine including the purest layer ever reported from these chemical sources with purity approaching the very best reported by the chloride-VPE technique. Several of these high purity GaAs samples were chemically etched into Kelvin and Greek cross structures which were fabricated with PdGe ohmic contacts for the specific contact resistivity, Hall effect, and persistent photo-Hall measurements performed in the full temperature range (4.2 K to 305 K). Resonant excitation photoluminescence technique operated at zero magnetic field was used to discriminate the impurity species in the very high purity layer where Ge and C were detected as the principle impurities. The consistency of growing GaAs layers with very low donor impurity concentration was found to be limited by the variability of arsine quality from bottle to bottle. Peak mobilities of the high purity GaAs layers are shown to be linearly dependent on the donor concentration while the low temperature mobilities are limited by the acceptor impurity level and the degree of carrier compensation. The acoustic deformation potential is generally conceived as a material constant but is demonstrated in the analysis as a variable parameter that has a linear relationship with the total impurity concentration. As for the contact resistivity of PdGe contacts on high purity GaAs layers, a room temperature Nsb{D}sp{-1/2} dependence was confirmed. Inhomogeneities in several samples were detected by the persistent photo-Hall measurements and the impurity band formation-like characteristics were observed at the very low temperatures. This technique was also used to facilitate the measurement of a carrier-depleted, high purity GaAs layer that has a relatively high carrier compensation. Finally, chemical etching techniques for the fabrication of the measurement samples including the micro

  13. Atorvastatin treatment and LDL cholesterol target attainment in patients at very high cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Laufs, Ulrich; Karmann, Barbara; Pittrow, David

    2016-09-01

    The use of atorvastatin is rapidly increasing among statins since the introduction of generics. However, only limited data are available on its current use and the effectiveness outside of randomised trials. The aim of the study was to assess low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) levels in ambulatory patients at very high cardiovascular risk on atorvastatin therapy in physician's offices. A total of 2625 high-risk patients on atorvastatin were included into this cross-sectional study by 539 office-based physicians between June and December 2014. 47.0 % of the patients had documented coronary heart disease (CHD), 25.1 % type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), and 27.9 % CHD plus concomitant DM. The mean age was 66.1 ± 10.8 years, 62.1 % were male. Atorvastatin at the dose of 10, 20, 40 and 80 mg/day was administered in 15.6, 45.7, 33.9, and 4.8 % of the patients, respectively. The treatment duration was 92.6 ± 109.6 weeks. The mean atorvastatin dose at therapy start was 24.8 ± 15.2 mg/day and at time of documentation 27.9 ± 15.8 mg/day. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) <70 mg/dL was achieved by 10.5 % of the total cohort (7.5 % in DM, 9.3 % in CHD, and 15.2 % in CHD + DM). In contrast, according to physicians' subjective assessment, 62.7 % of patients (with small differences between groups) had reached their individual LDL-C target. In summary, higher doses of atorvastatin are not frequently used in clinical practice. The LDL-C target level <70 mg/dL as recommended by current guidelines is achieved only in a minority of atorvastatin treated patients at very high cardiovascular risk. PMID:27120330

  14. Advanced karst hydrological and contaminant monitoring techniques for real-time and high resolution applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In telogenetic and soil-mantled karst aquifers, the movement of autogenic recharge through the epikarstic zone and into the regional aquifer can be a complex process and have implications for flooding, groundwater contamination, and other difficult to capture processes. Recent advances in instrument...

  15. MODIS - Advanced facility instrument for studies of the earth as a system. [Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, V. V.; Barnes, W.; Montgomery, H.; Ostrow, H.

    1987-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS), a key part of the Earth Observing System planned for the 1990's, is described. The complementary MODIS-T (64 channels) and MODIS-N (40 channels) instruments provide a multispectral observing capability that has application to land, ocean, and atmospheric research. The modules have a 500-1000 meter spatial resolution to accompany a swath width sufficient to provide two-day repeat coverage from a polar-orbiting, sun-synchronous, space-station serviceable platform. High signal-to-noise capability (500/1 or better) and 10-12 bit quantization over the dynamic ranges of the various spectral bands will be provided by the two modules.

  16. Strain mapping at nanometer resolution using advanced nano-beam electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdol, V. B.; Gammer, C.; Jin, X. G.; Ercius, P.; Ophus, C.; Ciston, J.; Minor, A. M.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the development of a nanometer scale strain mapping technique by means of scanning nano-beam electron diffraction. Only recently possible due to fast acquisition with a direct electron detector, this technique allows for strain mapping with a high precision of 0.1% at a lateral resolution of 1 nm for a large field of view reaching up to 1 μm. We demonstrate its application to a technologically relevant strain-engineered GaAs/GaAsP hetero-structure and show that the method can even be applied to highly defected regions with substantial changes in local crystal orientation. Strain maps derived from atomically resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy images were used to validate the accuracy, precision and resolution of this versatile technique.

  17. Strain mapping at nanometer resolution using advanced nano-beam electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdol, V. B.; Ercius, P.; Ophus, C.; Ciston, J.; Gammer, C. E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov; Jin, X. G.; Minor, A. M. E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov

    2015-06-22

    We report on the development of a nanometer scale strain mapping technique by means of scanning nano-beam electron diffraction. Only recently possible due to fast acquisition with a direct electron detector, this technique allows for strain mapping with a high precision of 0.1% at a lateral resolution of 1 nm for a large field of view reaching up to 1 μm. We demonstrate its application to a technologically relevant strain-engineered GaAs/GaAsP hetero-structure and show that the method can even be applied to highly defected regions with substantial changes in local crystal orientation. Strain maps derived from atomically resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy images were used to validate the accuracy, precision and resolution of this versatile technique.

  18. In Situ Measurements of Spectral Emissivity of Materials for Very High Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    G. Cao; S. J. Weber; S. O. Martin; T. L. Malaney; S. R. Slattery; M. H. Anderson; K. Sridharan; T. R. Allen

    2011-08-01

    An experimental facility for in situ measurements of high-temperature spectral emissivity of materials in environments of interest to the gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR) has been developed. The facility is capable of measuring emissivities of seven materials in a single experiment, thereby enhancing the accuracy in measurements due to even minor systemic variations in temperatures and environments. The system consists of a cylindrical silicon carbide (SiC) block with seven sample cavities and a deep blackbody cavity, a detailed optical system, and a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The reliability of the facility has been confirmed by comparing measured spectral emissivities of SiC, boron nitride, and alumina (Al2O3) at 600 C against those reported in literature. The spectral emissivities of two candidate alloys for VHTR, INCONEL{reg_sign} alloy 617 (INCONEL is a registered trademark of the Special Metals Corporation group of companies) and SA508 steel, in air environment at 700 C were measured.

  19. Redox potential driven aeration during very-high-gravity ethanol fermentation by using flocculating yeast

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen-Guang; Hao, Xue-Mi; Lin, Yen-Han; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol fermentation requires oxygen to maintain high biomass and cell viability, especially under very-high-gravity (VHG) condition. In this work, fermentation redox potential (ORP) was applied to drive the aeration process at low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, which is infeasible to be regulated by a DO sensor. The performance and characteristics of flocculating yeast grown under 300 and 260 g glucose/L conditions were subjected to various aeration strategies including: no aeration; controlled aeration at −150, −100 and −50 mV levels; and constant aeration at 0.05 and 0.2 vvm. The results showed that anaerobic fermentation produced the least ethanol and had the highest residual glucose after 72 h of fermentation. Controlled aerations, depending on the real-time oxygen demand, led to higher cell viability than the no-aeration counterpart. Constant aeration triggered a quick biomass formation, and fast glucose utilization. However, over aeration at 0.2 vvm caused a reduction of final ethanol concentration. The controlled aeration driven by ORP under VHG conditions resulted in the best fermentation performance. Moreover, the controlled aeration could enhance yeast flocculating activity, promote an increase of flocs size, and accelerate yeast separation near the end of fermentation. PMID:27161047

  20. Very-high Energy Observations of the Galactic Center Region by VERITAS in 2010-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Biteau, J.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickinson, H. J.; Dumm, J.; Eisch, J. D.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Griffin, S.; Griffiths, S. T.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Håkansson, N.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hughes, G.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Kumar, S.; Lang, M. J.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Prokoph, H.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Rajotte, J.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zajczyk, A.; Zitzer, B.

    2014-08-01

    The Galactic center is an interesting region for high-energy (0.1-100 GeV) and very-high-energy (E > 100 GeV) γ-ray observations. Potential sources of GeV/TeV γ-ray emission have been suggested, e.g., the accretion of matter onto the supermassive black hole, cosmic rays from a nearby supernova remnant (e.g., Sgr A East), particle acceleration in a plerion, or the annihilation of dark matter particles. The Galactic center has been detected by EGRET and by Fermi/LAT in the MeV/GeV energy band. At TeV energies, the Galactic center was detected with moderate significance by the CANGAROO and Whipple 10 m telescopes and with high significance by H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS. We present the results from three years of VERITAS observations conducted at large zenith angles resulting in a detection of the Galactic center on the level of 18 standard deviations at energies above ~2.5 TeV. The energy spectrum is derived and is found to be compatible with hadronic, leptonic, and hybrid emission models discussed in the literature. Future, more detailed measurements of the high-energy cutoff and better constraints on the high-energy flux variability will help to refine and/or disentangle the individual models.

  1. Spatially Resolving the Very High Energy Emission from MGRO J2019+37 with VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliu, E.; Aune, T.; Behera, B.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dumm, J.; Dwarkadas, V. V.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gillanders, G. H.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Griffin, S.; Griffiths, S. T.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hughes, G.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kargaltsev, O.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Park, N.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Rajotte, J.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Roberts, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.

    2014-06-01

    We present very high energy (VHE) imaging of MGRO J2019+37 obtained with the VERITAS observatory. The bright extended (~2°) unidentified Milagro source is located toward the rich star formation region Cygnus-X. MGRO J2019+37 is resolved into two VERITAS sources. The faint, point-like source VER J2016+371 overlaps CTB 87, a filled-center remnant (SNR) with no evidence of a supernova remnant shell at the present time. Its spectrum is well fit in the 0.65-10 TeV energy range by a power-law model with photon index 2.3 ± 0.4. VER J2019+378 is a bright extended (~1°) source that likely accounts for the bulk of the Milagro emission and is notably coincident with PSR J2021+3651 and the star formation region Sh 2-104. Its spectrum in the range 1-30 TeV is well fit with a power-law model of photon index 1.75 ± 0.3, among the hardest values measured in the VHE band, comparable to that observed near Vela-X. We explore the unusual spectrum and morphology in the radio and X-ray bands to constrain possible emission mechanisms for this source.

  2. Global stratospheric change: Requirements for a Very-High-Altitude Aircraft for Atmospheric Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The workshop on Requirements for a Very-High-Altitude Aircraft for Atmospheric Research, sponsored by NASA Ames Research Center, was held July 15 to 16, 1989, at Truckee, CA. The workshop had two purposes: to assess the scientific justification for a new aircraft that will support stratospheric research beyond the altitudes accessible to the NASA ER-2; and to determine the aircraft characteristics (e.g., ceiling altitude, payload accommodations, range, flight duration, operational capabilities) required to perform the stratospheric research referred to in the justification. To accomplish these purposes, the workshop brought together a cross-section of stratospheric scientists with several aircraft design and operations experts. The stratospheric scientists included theoreticians as well as experimenters with experience in remote and in situ measurements from satellites, rockets, balloons, aircraft, and the ground. Discussions of required aircraft characteristics focused on the needs of stratospheric research. It was recognized that an aircraft optimal for stratospheric science would also be useful for other applications, including remote measurements of Earth's surface. A brief description of these other applications was given at the workshop.

  3. The proteomic response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in very high glucose conditions with amino acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Pham, Trong Khoa; Wright, Phillip C

    2008-11-01

    Ethanol yield by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in very high glucose (VHG) media with an amino acid supplement was investigated. Amino acid supplementation led to positive cell responses, including reduced lag time and increased cell viability in VHG media. A quantitative shotgun proteomic analysis was used to understand how amino acid supplemented S. cerevisiae responds to high osmotic conditions. iTRAQ data revealed that most proteins involved in glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways were up-regulated under high glucose shock. Reactivation of amino acid metabolism was also observed at the end of the lag phase. The relative abundance of most identified proteins, including aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis proteins, and heat-shock proteins, remained unchanged in the hours immediately following application of glucose shock. However, the expression of these proteins increased significantly at the end of the lag phase. Furthermore, the up-regulation of trehalose and glycogen biosynthesis proteins, first maintaining then latterly increasing glycolysis pathway activity was also observed. This was verified by enhanced ethanol yields at 10 and 12 h (0.43 and 0.45 g ethanol/g glucose) compared to 2 h (0.32 g ethanol/g glucose). These data combined with relevant metabolite measurements demonstrates that enhanced ethanol fermentation under VHG conditions can be achieved with the aid of amino acid supplementation.

  4. Lipid target achievement among patients with very high and high cardiovascular risk in a lipid clinic.

    PubMed

    Barkas, Fotios; Liberopoulos, Evangelos N; Kostapanos, Michael S; Liamis, George; Tziallas, Dimitrios; Elisaf, Moses

    2015-04-01

    This was a retrospective study that assessed achievement of lipid-lowering treatment targets in the setting of a University Hospital Lipid Clinic. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goal attainment according to National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) and European Society of Cardiology/European Atherosclerosis Society (ESC/EAS) guidelines was recorded in 1000 consecutive adult patients followed for ≥3 years (mean 8 years). The LDL-C targets according to the NCEP ATP III were attained by 66% and 86% of patients with "very high" (n = 477) and "high" (n = 408) cardiovascular risk, respectively. Fewer patients were within LDL-C goals according to the ESC/EAS guidelines: 25% and 42%. Overall, 92% of the patients were on statins: 67% were on statin monotherapy, while 33% were on combinations with ezetimibe (25%), ω-3 fatty acids (5%), fibrates (4%), or colesevelam (2%). Even in a specialist lipid clinic, a large proportion of patients are not at goal according to the recent ESC/EAS guidelines. PMID:24830420

  5. Prescription omega-3-acid ethyl esters for the treatment of very high triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Sadovsky, Richard; Kris-Etherton, Penny

    2009-07-01

    Triglyceride (TG) levels can increase for numerous reasons, including a sedentary lifestyle, an unhealthy diet, especially one rich in refined carbohydrates, and comorbidities. According to the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP), the normal TG level is < 150 mg/dL. Patients with very high TG (VHTG) levels (> or = 500 mg/dL) should be promptly managed and treated to reach lipid treatment goals, as determined by the NCEP. Lowering TG levels is the primary management goal in these patients, while lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels are secondary goals. Therapeutic lifestyle changes are often recommended initially for patients with elevated TGs; however, concomitant drug therapy is often required. Data show that intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can significantly decrease serum TGs, along with plasma concentrations of certain lipoproteins. Omega-3-acid ethyl esters are available by prescription or as dietary supplements. Clinical trials in adult patients with VHTGs show that four 1 g capsules of prescription omega-3 fatty acids, which contain 465 mg of EPA and 375 mg of DHA per capsule, can effectively decrease TG levels by up to 45%, and is generally well tolerated. PMID:19641280

  6. Near-Conjugate Characteristics of Long Period ULF waves at very high Latitudes (L≈14 RE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. K.; Sinha, A. K.; Saini, S.; Dhar, A.

    2015-12-01

    Indian Antarctic station Bharati (CGM location 74.8 deg S, 97.8 deg E; L=14.8 RE) and IMAGE chain observatory Hornsund (74.3 deg N, 108.5 deg E; L=14 RE) form a near-conjugate pair. Around the latitudes of stations under consideration, the geomagnetic field lines are typically connected to the outermost region of magnetosphere. Using magnetic field variations recorded at these stations, we examine characteristics of the Pc5 band (frequency ~2-10 mHz) ULF activity. We observe that Pc5 activity, in general, maximizes near magnetic noon in both the hemispheres. Its amplitude appears related with the speed of the solar wind. For the selected events when the footprints of CLUSTER satellites were close to the ground stations, strikingly similar waveforms were observed on the ground and in the magnetosphere. Possible cause for generation of Pc5 waves at very high latitudes and the ionospheric modulation have been discussed.

  7. Angular momentum conservation in heavy ion collisions at very high energy

    SciTech Connect

    Becattini, F.; Piccinini, F.; Rizzo, J.

    2008-02-15

    The effects of angular momentum conservation in peripheral heavy ion collisions at very high energy are investigated. It is shown that the initial angular momentum of the quark-gluon plasma should enhance the azimuthal anisotropy of particle spectra (elliptic flow) with respect to the usual picture where only the initial geometrical eccentricity of the nuclear overlap region is responsible for the anisotropy. In hydrodynamical terms, the initial angular momentum entails a nontrivial dependence of the initial longitudinal flow velocity on the transverse coordinates. This gives rise to a nonvanishing vorticity in the equations of motion, which enhances the expansion rate of the supposedly created fluid compensating for the possible quenching effect of viscosity. A distinctive signature of the vorticity in the plasma is the generation of an average polarization of the emitted hadrons, for which we provide analytical expressions. These phenomena might be better observed at LHC, where the initial angular momentum density will be larger and where we envisage an increase of the elliptic flow coefficient v{sub 2} with respect to RHIC energies.

  8. Very High Pressure Single Pulse Shock Tube Studies of Aromatic Species

    SciTech Connect

    Brezinsky, K.

    2006-11-28

    The principal focus of this research program is aimed at understanding the oxidation and pyrolysis chemistry of primary aromatic molecules and radicals with the goal of developing a comprehensive kinetic model at conditions that are relevant to practical combustion devices. A very high pressure single pulse shock tube is used to obtain experimental data over a wide pressure range in the high pressure regime, 5-1000 bars, at pre-flame temperatures for fuel pyrolysis and oxidation over a broad spectrum of equivalence ratios. Stable species sampled from the shock tube are analyzed using standard chromatographic techniques using GC/MS-PDD and GC/TCD-FID. Experimental data from the HPST (stable species profiles) and data from other laboratories (if available) are simulated using kinetic models (if available) to develop a comprehensive model that can describe aromatics oxidation and pyrolysis over a wide range of experimental conditions. The shock tube has been heated (1000C) recently to minimize effects due to condensation of aromatic, polycyclic and other heavy species. Work during this grant period has focused on 7 main areas summarized in the final technical report.

  9. Background Modelling in Very-High-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, David; Funk, S.; Hinton, J.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Heidelberg Observ. /Leeds U.

    2006-11-07

    Ground based Cherenkov telescope systems measure astrophysical {gamma}-ray emission against a background of cosmic-ray induced air showers. The subtraction of this background is a major challenge for the extraction of spectra and morphology of {gamma}-ray sources. The unprecedented sensitivity of the new generation of ground based very-high-energy {gamma}-ray experiments such as H.E.S.S. has lead to the discovery of many previously unknown extended sources. The analysis of such sources requires a range of different background modeling techniques. Here we describe some of the techniques that have been applied to data from the H.E.S.S. instrument and compare their performance. Each background model is introduced and discussed in terms of suitability for image generation or spectral analysis and possible caveats are mentioned. We show that there is not a single multi-purpose model, different models are appropriate for different tasks. To keep systematic uncertainties under control it is important to apply several models to the same data set and compare the results.

  10. Milagro Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Era

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.

    2006-05-19

    The recently launched Swift satellite is providing an unprecedented number of rapid and accurate Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) localizations, facilitating a flurry of follow-up observations by a large number of telescopes at many different wavelengths. The Very High Energy (VHE, >100 GeV) regime has so far been relatively unexplored. Milagro is a wide field of view (2 sr) and high duty cycle (> 90%) ground-based gamma-ray telescope which employs a water Cherenkov detector to monitor the northern sky almost continuously in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. We have searched the Milagro data for emission from the most recent GRBs identified within our field of view. These include three Swift bursts which also display late-time X-ray flares. We have searched for emission coincident with these flares. No significant detection was made. A 99% confidence upper limit is provided for each of the GRBs, as well as the flares.

  11. Novel Iron-based ternary amorphous oxide semiconductor with very high transparency, electronic conductivity, and mobility

    DOE PAGES

    Malasi, A.; Taz, H.; Farah, A.; Patel, M.; Lawrie, Benjamin; Pooser, R.; Baddorf, A.; Duscher, G.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2015-12-16

    We report that ternary metal oxides of type (Me)2O3 with the primary metal (Me) constituent being Fe (66 atomic (at.) %) along with the two Lanthanide elements Tb (10 at.%) and Dy (24 at.%) can show excellent semiconducting transport properties. Thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature followed by ambient oxidation showed very high electronic conductivity (>5 × 104 S/m) and Hall mobility (>30 cm2/V-s). These films had an amorphous microstructure which was stable to at least 500 °C and large optical transparency with a direct band gap of 2.85 ± 0.14 eV. This material shows emergentmore » semiconducting behavior with significantly higher conductivity and mobility than the constituent insulating oxides. In conclusion, since these results demonstrate a new way to modify the behaviors of transition metal oxides made from unfilled d- and/or f-subshells, a new class of functional transparent conducting oxide materials could be envisioned.« less

  12. Multistage estimation of received carrier signal parameters under very high dynamic conditions of the receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Rajendra (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A multistage estimator is provided for the parameters of a received carrier signal possibly phase-modulated by unknown data and experiencing very high Doppler, Doppler rate, etc., as may arise, for example, in the case of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) where the signal parameters are directly related to the position, velocity and jerk of the GPS ground-based receiver. In a two-stage embodiment of the more general multistage scheme, the first stage, selected to be a modified least squares algorithm referred to as differential least squares (DLS), operates as a coarse estimator resulting in higher rms estimation errors but with a relatively small probability of the frequency estimation error exceeding one-half of the sampling frequency, provides relatively coarse estimates of the frequency and its derivatives. The second stage of the estimator, an extended Kalman filter (EKF), operates on the error signal available from the first stage refining the overall estimates of the phase along with a more refined estimate of frequency as well and in the process also reduces the number of cycle slips.

  13. Novel Iron-based ternary amorphous oxide semiconductor with very high transparency, electronic conductivity, and mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malasi, A.; Taz, H.; Farah, A.; Patel, M.; Lawrie, B.; Pooser, R.; Baddorf, A.; Duscher, G.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2015-12-01

    Here we report that ternary metal oxides of type (Me)2O3 with the primary metal (Me) constituent being Fe (66 atomic (at.) %) along with the two Lanthanide elements Tb (10 at.%) and Dy (24 at.%) can show excellent semiconducting transport properties. Thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature followed by ambient oxidation showed very high electronic conductivity (>5 × 104 S/m) and Hall mobility (>30 cm2/V-s). These films had an amorphous microstructure which was stable to at least 500 °C and large optical transparency with a direct band gap of 2.85 ± 0.14 eV. This material shows emergent semiconducting behavior with significantly higher conductivity and mobility than the constituent insulating oxides. Since these results demonstrate a new way to modify the behaviors of transition metal oxides made from unfilled d- and/or f-subshells, a new class of functional transparent conducting oxide materials could be envisioned.

  14. Development of n-on-p Silicon Sensors for Very High Radiation Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Unno, Y.; Li, Z.; Affolder, A.A.; Allport, P.P. et al.

    2010-05-06

    We have developed a novel and highly radiation-tolerant n-in-p silicon microstrip sensor for very high radiation environments such as in the Super Large Hadron Collider. The sensors are designed for a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 15} neq/cm{sup 2} and are fabricated from p-type, FZ, 6 in. (150 mm) wafers onto which we lay out a single 9.75 cm x 9.75 cm large-area sensor and several 1 cm x 1 cm miniature sensors with various n-strip isolation structures. By evaluating the sensors both pre- and post-irradiation by protons and neutrons, we find that the full depletion voltage evolves to approximately 800 V and that the n-strip isolation depends on the p{sup +} concentration. In addition, we characterize the interstrip resistance, interstrip capacitance and the punch-through-protection (PTP) voltage. The first fabrication batch allowed us to identify the weak spots in the PTP and the stereo strip layouts. By understanding the source of the weakness, the mask was modified accordingly. After modification, the follow-up fabrication batches and the latest fabrication of about 30 main sensors and associated miniature sensors have shown good performance, with no sign of microdischarge up to 1000 V.

  15. Analysis of a water-coolant leak into a very high-temperature vitrification chamber.

    SciTech Connect

    Felicione, F. S.

    1998-06-11

    A coolant-leakage incident occurred during non-radioactive operation of the Plasma Hearth Process waste-vitrification development system at Argonne National Laboratory when a stray electric arc ruptured az water-cooling jacket. Rapid evaporation of the coolant that entered the very high-temperature chamber pressurized the normally sub-atmospheric system above ambient pressure for over 13 minutes. Any positive pressurization, and particularly a lengthy one, is a safety concern since this can cause leakage of contaminants from the system. A model of the thermal phenomena that describe coolant/hot-material interactions was developed to better understand the characteristics of this type of incident. The model is described and results for a variety of hypothetical coolant-leak incidents are presented. It is shown that coolant leak rates above a certain threshold will cause coolant to accumulate in the chamber, and evaporation from this pool can maintain positive pressure in the system long after the leak has been stopped. Application of the model resulted in reasonably good agreement with the duration of the pressure measured during the incident. A closed-form analytic solution is shown to be applicable to the initial leak period in which the peak pressures are generated, and is presented and discussed.

  16. Ground-based very high energy gamma ray astronomy: Observational highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turver, K. E.

    1986-01-01

    It is now more than 20 years since the first ground based gamma ray experiments involving atmospheric Cerenkov radiation were undertaken. The present highlights in observational ground-based very high energy (VHE) gamma ray astronomy and the optimism about an interesting future for the field follow progress in these areas: (1) the detection at increased levels of confidence of an enlarged number of sources so that at present claims were made for the detection, at the 4 to 5 sd level of significance, of 8 point sources; (2) the replication of the claimed detections with, for the first time, confirmation of the nature and detail of the emission; and (3) the extension of gamma ray astronomy to the ultra high energy (UHE) domain. The pattern, if any, to emerge from the list of sources claimed so far is that X-ray binary sources appear to be copious emitters of gamma rays over at least 4 decades of energy. These X-ray sources which behave as VHE and UHE gamma ray emitters are examined.

  17. Very high-energy gamma ray astronomy. [using the atmospheric cerenkov technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Recent results in ground-based very high-energy (less than 10 to the eleventh power eV) gamma-ray astronomy are reviewed. The various modes of the atmospheric Cerenkov technique are described, and the importance of cosmic ray rejection methods is stressed. The positive detections (at approximately less than 10 to the 12th power eV) of the Crab pulsar that suggest a very flat spectrum and time-variable pulse phase are discussed. Observations of other pulsars (particularly Vela) suggest that these features may be general. The steady flux upper limits for the Crab Nebula are thus reconsidered, and a new value of the implied (Compton-synchrotron) magnetic field in the Nebula is reported. Evidence that a 4.8-hour modulated effect was detected at E sub gamma is less than 10 to the 12th power eV from Cyg X-3 is strengthened in that the exact period originally proposed agrees well with a recent determination of the X-ray period. The southern sky observations are reviewed, and the significance of the detection of an active galaxy (NGC 5128) is considered for source models and future observations.

  18. Mechanisms for tolerance of very high tissue phosphorus concentrations in Ptilotus polystachyus.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Tariq; Lambers, Hans; Nicol, Dion; Ryan, Megan H

    2015-04-01

    Study of plants with unusual phosphorus (P) physiology may assist development of more P-efficient crops. Ptilotus polystachyus grows well at high P supply, when shoot P concentrations ([P]) may exceed 40 mg P g(-1) dry matter (DM). We explored the P physiology of P. polystachyus seedlings grown in nutrient solution with 0-5 mM P. In addition, young leaves and roots of soil-grown plants were used for cryo-scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis. No P-toxicity symptoms were observed, even at 5 mM P in solution. Shoot DM was similar at 0.1 and 1.0 mM P in solution, but was ∼14% lower at 2 and 5 mM P. At 1 mM P, [P] was 36, 18, 14 and 11 mg P g(-1) DM in mature leaves, young leaves, stems and roots, respectively. Leaf potassium, calcium and magnesium concentrations increased with increasing P supply. Leaf epidermal and palisade mesophyll cells had similar [P]. The root epidermis and most cortical cells had senesced, even in young roots. We conclude that preferential accumulation of P in mature leaves, accumulation of balancing cations and uniform distribution of P across leaf cell types allow P. polystachyus to tolerate very high leaf [P].

  19. VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY EMISSION FROM PASSIVE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES: CONSTRAINTS FOR NGC 1399

    SciTech Connect

    Pedaletti, G.; Wagner, S. J.; Rieger, F. M.

    2011-09-10

    Very high energy (VHE, >100 GeV) {gamma}-rays are expected to be emitted from the vicinity of supermassive black holes (SMBHs), irrespective of their activity state. In the magnetosphere of rotating SMBH, efficient acceleration of charged particles can take place through various processes. These particles could reach energies up to E {approx} 10{sup 19} eV. VHE {gamma}-ray emission from these particles is then feasible via leptonic or hadronic processes. Therefore, passive systems, where the lack of a strong photon field allows the VHE {gamma}-rays to escape, are expected to be detected by Cherenkov telescopes. We present results from recent VHE experiments on the passive SMBH in the nearby elliptical galaxy NGC 1399. No {gamma}-ray signal has been found, neither by the H.E.S.S. experiment nor in the Fermi data analyzed here. We discuss possible implications for the physical characteristics of the system. We conclude that in a scenario where particles are accelerated in vacuum gaps in the magnetosphere, only a fraction {approx}0.3 of the gap is available for particle acceleration, indicating that the system is unlikely to be able to accelerate protons up to E {approx} 10{sup 19} eV.

  20. Spatially resolving the very high energy emission from MGRO J2019+37 with VERITAS

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M.; Aune, T.; Behera, B.; Chen, X.; Federici, S.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dumm, J.; Dwarkadas, V. V.; Falcone, A. E-mail: nahee@uchicago.edu; and others

    2014-06-10

    We present very high energy (VHE) imaging of MGRO J2019+37 obtained with the VERITAS observatory. The bright extended (∼2°) unidentified Milagro source is located toward the rich star formation region Cygnus-X. MGRO J2019+37 is resolved into two VERITAS sources. The faint, point-like source VER J2016+371 overlaps CTB 87, a filled-center remnant (SNR) with no evidence of a supernova remnant shell at the present time. Its spectrum is well fit in the 0.65-10 TeV energy range by a power-law model with photon index 2.3 ± 0.4. VER J2019+378 is a bright extended (∼1°) source that likely accounts for the bulk of the Milagro emission and is notably coincident with PSR J2021+3651 and the star formation region Sh 2–104. Its spectrum in the range 1-30 TeV is well fit with a power-law model of photon index 1.75 ± 0.3, among the hardest values measured in the VHE band, comparable to that observed near Vela-X. We explore the unusual spectrum and morphology in the radio and X-ray bands to constrain possible emission mechanisms for this source.

  1. Recent Observations of Human-induced Asymmetric Effects on Climate in Very High-Altitude Area

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Heli; Liu, Guifang

    2014-01-01

    Like urban heat islands (UHI), human-induced land degradation (HLD) is a phenomenon attributed to human activities, but this phenomenon occurs in non-urban areas. Although a large body of work has demonstrated that land-cover change influences local climate systems, little work has been done on separating the impact of HLD from naturally-occurring fluctuations in very high-altitude areas. We developed an innovative NDVI-difference method in order to evaluate HLD effects upon the climate system in the central Tibet Plateau. The results show that the minimum temperature increased at a significantly faster pace than the maximum temperature in the growing season at HLD meteorological stations, but this was reversed at stations with natural forces only. Further analysis revealed that abrupt changes of minimum temperature occurred five years earlier and amplitudes of these changes were 1.4 times larger than at stations with natural forces only. Therefore, our results complement other evidence that points to the fact that local effects from UHI contribute to climatic asymmetry observed between minimum and maximum temperature trends. Accordingly, we stress the need for consideration of non-urban factors from anthropogenic activities, such as human-induced land degradation, in understanding these asymmetric diurnal changes. PMID:24489643

  2. Aspects of operation of the Fermilab Booster RF System at very high intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, J.E.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this note is to examine the likelihood and problems associated with operation of the Fermilab Booster rf systems as it presently exists, or with only minor modifications, at beam intensity approaching 5x10{sup 13} protons per pulse. Beam loading of the rf system at such an intensity will be one order of magnitude larger than at the present operation level. It is assumed that the injection energy will be raised to 1 GeV with no major increase in the injected energy spread (longitudinal emittance). The beam will be bunched by adiabatic capture as is presently done although it may be necessary to remove one or two bunches prior to acceleration to allow clean extraction at 8 GeV. At very high intensity the charge in each bunch will interact with the vacuum chamber impedance (and with itself) in such a way as to reduce in some cases the bucket area generated by the rf voltage. Because this decrement must be made up by changes in the rf ring voltage if the required bucket area is to be maintained, these effects must be taken into consideration in any analysis of the capability of the rf system to accelerate very large intensity.

  3. Redox potential driven aeration during very-high-gravity ethanol fermentation by using flocculating yeast.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Guang; Hao, Xue-Mi; Lin, Yen-Han; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2016-05-10

    Ethanol fermentation requires oxygen to maintain high biomass and cell viability, especially under very-high-gravity (VHG) condition. In this work, fermentation redox potential (ORP) was applied to drive the aeration process at low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, which is infeasible to be regulated by a DO sensor. The performance and characteristics of flocculating yeast grown under 300 and 260 g glucose/L conditions were subjected to various aeration strategies including: no aeration; controlled aeration at -150, -100 and -50 mV levels; and constant aeration at 0.05 and 0.2 vvm. The results showed that anaerobic fermentation produced the least ethanol and had the highest residual glucose after 72 h of fermentation. Controlled aerations, depending on the real-time oxygen demand, led to higher cell viability than the no-aeration counterpart. Constant aeration triggered a quick biomass formation, and fast glucose utilization. However, over aeration at 0.2 vvm caused a reduction of final ethanol concentration. The controlled aeration driven by ORP under VHG conditions resulted in the best fermentation performance. Moreover, the controlled aeration could enhance yeast flocculating activity, promote an increase of flocs size, and accelerate yeast separation near the end of fermentation.

  4. Absorption of very high energy gamma rays in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernetto, Silvia; Lipari, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Galactic gamma ray astronomy at very high energy (Eγ≳30 TeV ) is a vital tool in the study of the nonthermal universe. The interpretation of the observations in this energy region requires the precise modeling of the attenuation of photons due to pair production interactions (γ γ →e+e- ) where the targets are the radiation fields present in interstellar space. For gamma rays with energy Eγ≳300 TeV the attenuation is mostly due to the photons of the cosmic microwave background radiation. At lower energy the most important targets are infrared photons with wavelengths in the range λ ≃50 - 500 μ m emitted by dust. The evaluation of the attenuation requires a good knowledge of the density, and energy and angular distributions of the target photons for all positions in the Galaxy. In this work we discuss a simple model for the infrared radiation that depends on only few parameters associated to the space and temperature distributions of the emitting dust. The model allows to compute with good accuracy the effects of absorption for any space and energy distribution of the diffuse Galactic gamma ray emission. The absorption probability due to the Galactic infrared radiation is maximum for Eγ≃150 TeV , and can be as large as Pabs≃0.45 for distant sources on lines of sight that pass close to the Galactic center. The systematic uncertainties on the absorption probability are estimated as Δ Pabs≲0.08 .

  5. Efficacy and consequences of very-high-protein diets for athletes and exercisers.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Kevin D

    2011-05-01

    Athletes and exercisers have utilised high-protein diets for centuries. The objective of this review is to examine the evidence for the efficacy and potential dangers of high-protein diets. One important factor to consider is the definition of a 'high-protein diet'. There are several ways to consider protein content of a diet. The composition of the diet can be determined as the absolute amount of the protein (or other nutrient of interest), the % of total energy (calories) as protein and the amount of protein ingested per kg of body weight. Many athletes consume very high amounts of protein. High-protein diets most often are associated with muscle hypertrophy and strength, but now also are advocated for weight loss and recovery from intense exercise or injuries. Prolonged intake of a large amount of protein has been associated with potential dangers, such as bone mineral loss and kidney damage. In otherwise healthy individuals, there is little evidence that high protein intake is dangerous. However, kidney damage may be an issue for individuals with already existing kidney dysfunction. Increased protein intake necessarily means that overall energy intake must increase or consumption of either carbohydrate or fat must decrease. In conclusion, high protein intake may be appropriate for some athletes, but there are potential negative consequences that must be carefully considered before adopting such a diet. In particular, care must be taken to ensure that there is sufficient intake of other nutrients to support the training load.

  6. Novel Iron-based ternary amorphous oxide semiconductor with very high transparency, electronic conductivity, and mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Malasi, A.; Taz, H.; Farah, A.; Patel, M.; Lawrie, Benjamin; Pooser, R.; Baddorf, A.; Duscher, G.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2015-12-16

    We report that ternary metal oxides of type (Me)2O3 with the primary metal (Me) constituent being Fe (66 atomic (at.) %) along with the two Lanthanide elements Tb (10 at.%) and Dy (24 at.%) can show excellent semiconducting transport properties. Thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature followed by ambient oxidation showed very high electronic conductivity (>5 × 104 S/m) and Hall mobility (>30 cm2/V-s). These films had an amorphous microstructure which was stable to at least 500 °C and large optical transparency with a direct band gap of 2.85 ± 0.14 eV. This material shows emergent semiconducting behavior with significantly higher conductivity and mobility than the constituent insulating oxides. In conclusion, since these results demonstrate a new way to modify the behaviors of transition metal oxides made from unfilled d- and/or f-subshells, a new class of functional transparent conducting oxide materials could be envisioned.

  7. Diverse communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inhabit sites with very high altitude in Tibet Plateau.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongjun; He, Junxia; Shi, Guoxi; An, Lizhe; Öpik, Maarja; Feng, Huyuan

    2011-11-01

    Diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) is well studied in many ecosystems, but little is known about AMF in cold-dominated regions with very high altitude. Here, we examined AMF communities associated with two plant species in the Tibet Plateau. Roots and rhizosphere soils of Dracocephalum heterophyllum (pioneer species) and Astragalus polycladus (late-successional species) were sampled at five sites with altitude from 4500 to 4800 m a.s.l. A total of 21 AMF phylotypes were identified from roots and spores following cloning and sequencing of 18S rRNA gene, including eight new phylotypes and one new family-like clade. More AMF phylotypes colonized root samples of D. heterophyllum (5.4±0.49) than of A. polycladus (1.93±0.25). Vegetation coverage was the most important factor influencing AMF community composition in roots. Globally infrequent phylotype Glo-B2 in Glomus group B was the most dominant in roots, followed by globally frequent phylotype Glo-A2 related to Glomus fasciculatum/intraradices group. Our findings suggest that a diverse AMF flora is present in the Tibet Plateau, comprising both potentially habitat-selective and generalist fungi.

  8. Cosine-Modulated Multitone for Very-High-Speed Digital Subscriber Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lekun; Farhang-Boroujeny, Behrouz

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, the use of cosine-modulated filter banks (CMFBs) for multicarrier modulation in the application of very-high-speed digital subscriber lines (VDSLs) is studied. We refer to this modulation technique as cosine-modulated multitone (CMT). CMT has the same transmitter structure as discrete wavelet multitone (DWMT). However, the receiver structure in CMT is different from its DWMT counterpart. DWMT uses linear combiner equalizers, which typically have more than 20 taps per subcarrier. CMT, on the other hand, adopts a receiver structure that uses only two taps per subcarrier for equalization. This paper has the following contributions. (i) A modification that reduces the computational complexity of the receiver structure of CMT is proposed. (ii) Although traditionally CMFBs are designed to satisfy perfect-reconstruction (PR) property, in transmultiplexing applications, the presence of channel destroys the PR property of the filter bank, and thus other criteria of filter design should be adopted. We propose one such method. (iii) Through extensive computer simulations, we compare CMT with zipper discrete multitone (z-DMT) and filtered multitone (FMT), the two modulation techniques that have been included in the VDSL draft standard. Comparisons are made in terms of computational complexity, transmission latency, achievable bit rate, and resistance to radio ingress noise.

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analyses on Very High Temperature Reactor Air Ingress

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; David Petti; Hyung S. Kang

    2009-07-01

    A preliminary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to understand density-gradient-induced stratified flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) air-ingress accident. Various parameters were taken into consideration, including turbulence model, core temperature, initial air mole-fraction, and flow resistance in the core. The gas turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) 600 MWt was selected as the reference reactor and it was simplified to be 2-D geometry in modeling. The core and the lower plenum were assumed to be porous bodies. Following the preliminary CFD results, the analysis of the air-ingress accident has been performed by two different codes: GAMMA code (system analysis code, Oh et al. 2006) and FLUENT CFD code (Fluent 2007). Eventually, the analysis results showed that the actual onset time of natural convection (~160 sec) would be significantly earlier than the previous predictions (~150 hours) calculated based on the molecular diffusion air-ingress mechanism. This leads to the conclusion that the consequences of this accident will be much more serious than previously expected.

  10. Observation of binary systems at very-high energies with VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, G.; VERITAS Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    Non-thermal variable emission from radio to very-high energy gamma rays (VHE; >100 GeV) are the prime characteristics of gamma-ray binaries. The underlying physical processes leading to the observed VHE emission are not well understood, as even the most basic features of these systems are under dispute (microquasar model vs shocked pulsar wind model). VHE binaries can be difficult to observe, some have orbital periods of the order of years (e.g. HESS J0632+057 or PSR B1259-69) or show irregular emission patterns as observed in LS I +61 303. We present here new VERITAS observations of the binary systems LS I +61 303 and HESS J0632+057 carried out with higher sensitivity and more dense temporal coverage than previous observations. The gamma-ray results and their astrophysical implications are discussed in the context of contemporaneous observations with Swift XRT and Fermi LAT at X-ray and gamma-ray energies.

  11. DUST FORMATION, EVOLUTION, AND OBSCURATION EFFECTS IN THE VERY HIGH-REDSHIFT UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Dwek, Eli; Benford, Dominic J.; Staguhn, Johannes; Su, Ting; Arendt, Richard G.; Kovacks, Attila

    2014-06-20

    The evolution of dust at redshifts z ≳ 9, and consequently the dust properties, differs greatly from that in the local universe. In contrast to the local universe, core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the only source of thermally condensed dust. Because of the low initial dust-to-gas mass ratio, grain destruction rates are low, so that CCSNe are net producers of interstellar dust. Galaxies with large initial gas mass or high mass infall rate will therefore have a more rapid net rate of dust production compared to galaxies with lower gas mass, even at the same star formation rate. The dust composition is dominated by silicates, which exhibit a strong rise in the UV opacity near the Lyman break. This ''silicate-UV break'' may be confused with the Lyman break, resulting in a misidentification of a galaxy's photometric redshift. In this Letter we demonstrate these effects by analyzing the spectral energy distribution of MACS1149-JD, a lensed galaxy at z = 9.6. A potential 2 mm counterpart of MACS1149-JD has been identified with GISMO. While additional observations are required to corroborate this identification, we use this possible association to illustrate the physical processes and the observational effects of dust in the very high-redshift universe.

  12. Very high gravity ethanol and fatty acid production of Zymomonas mobilis without amino acid and vitamin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haoyong; Cao, Shangzhi; Wang, William Tianshuo; Wang, Kaven Tianyv; Jia, Xianhui

    2016-06-01

    Very high gravity (VHG) fermentation is the mainstream technology in ethanol industry, which requires the strains be resistant to multiple stresses such as high glucose concentration, high ethanol concentration, high temperature and harsh acidic conditions. To our knowledge, it was not reported previously that any ethanol-producing microbe showed a high performance in VHG fermentations without amino acid and vitamin. Here we demonstrate the engineering of a xylose utilizing recombinant Zymomonas mobilis for VHG ethanol fermentations. The recombinant strain can produce ethanol up to 136 g/L without amino acid and vitamin with a theoretical yield of 90 %, which is significantly superior to that produced by all the reported ethanol-producing strains. The intracellular fatty acids of the bacterial were about 16 % of the bacterial dry biomass, with the ratio of ethanol:fatty acids was about 273:1 (g/g). The recombinant strain was achieved by a multivariate-modular strategy tackles with the multiple stresses which are closely linked to the ethanol productivity of Z. mobilis. The over-expression of metB/yfdZ operon enabled the growth of the recombinant Z. mobilis in a chemically defined medium without amino acid and vitamin; and the fatty acids overproduction significantly increased ethanol tolerance and ethanol production. The coupled production of ethanol with fatty acids of the Z. mobilis without amino acid and vitamin under VHG fermentation conditions may permit a significant reduction of the production cost of ethanol and microbial fatty acids.

  13. Comparison of electrostatic and electromagnetic simulations for very high frequency plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yuru; Xu Xiang; Wang Younian; Zhao Shuxia; Bogaerts, A.

    2010-11-15

    A two-dimensional self-consistent fluid model combined with the full set of Maxwell equations is developed to investigate an argon capacitively coupled plasma, focusing on the electromagnetic effects on the discharge characteristics at various discharge conditions. The results indicate that there exist distinct differences in plasma characteristics calculated with the so-called electrostatic model (i.e., without taking into account the electromagnetic effects) and the electromagnetic model (which includes the electromagnetic effects), especially at very high frequencies. Indeed, when the excitation source is in the high frequency regime and the electromagnetic effects are taken into account, the plasma density increases significantly and meanwhile the ionization rate evolves to a very different distribution when the electromagnetic effects are dominant. Furthermore, the dependence of the plasma characteristics on the voltage and pressure is also investigated, at constant frequency. It is observed that when the voltage is low, the difference between these two models becomes more obvious than at higher voltages. As the pressure increases, the plasma density profiles obtained from the electromagnetic model smoothly shift from edge-peaked over uniform to a broad maximum in the center. In addition, the edge effect becomes less pronounced with increasing frequency and pressure, and the skin effect rather than the standing-wave effect becomes dominant when the voltage is high.

  14. Multistage estimation of received carrier signal parameters under very high dynamic conditions of the receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Rajendra (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A multistage estimator is provided for the parameters of a received carrier signal possibly phase-modulated by unknown data and experiencing very high Doppler, Doppler rate, etc., as may arise, for example, in the case of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) where the signal parameters are directly related to the position, velocity and jerk of the GPS ground-based receiver. In a two-stage embodiment of the more general multistage scheme, the first stage, selected to be a modified least squares algorithm referred to as differential least squares (DLS), operates as a coarse estimator resulting in higher rms estimation errors but with a relatively small probability of the frequency estimation error exceeding one-half of the sampling frequency, provides relatively coarse estimates of the frequency and its derivatives. The second stage of the estimator, an extended Kalman filter (EKF), operates on the error signal available from the first stage refining the overall estimates of the phase along with a more refined estimate of frequency as well and in the process also reduces the number of cycle slips.

  15. Effects of interelectrode gap on high frequency and very high frequency capacitively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bera, Kallol; Rauf, Shahid; Ramaswamy, Kartik; Collins, Ken

    2009-07-15

    Capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) discharges using high frequency (HF) and very high frequency (VHF) sources are widely used for dielectric etching in the semiconductor industry. A two-dimensional fluid plasma model is used to investigate the effects of interelectrode gap on plasma spatial characteristics of both HF and VHF CCPs. The plasma model includes the full set of Maxwell's equations in their potential formulation. The peak in plasma density is close to the electrode edge at 13.5 MHz for a small interelectrode gap. This is due to electric field enhancement at the electrode edge. As the gap is increased, the plasma produced at the electrode edge diffuses to the chamber center and the plasma becomes more uniform. At 180 MHz, where electromagnetic standing wave effects are strong, the plasma density peaks at the chamber center at large interelectrode gap. As the interelectrode gap is decreased, the electron density increases near the electrode edge due to inductive heating and electrostatic electron heating, which makes the plasma more uniform in the interelectrode region.

  16. Renewable Electricity Futures. Operational Analysis of the Western Interconnection at Very High Renewable Penetrations

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, Gregory

    2015-09-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures)--an analysis of the costs and grid impacts of integrating large amounts of renewable electricity generation into the U.S. power system--examined renewable energy resources, technical issues regarding the integration of these resources into the grid, and the costs associated with high renewable penetration scenarios. These scenarios included up to 90% of annual generation from renewable sources, although most of the analysis was focused on 80% penetration scenarios. Hourly production cost modeling was performed to understand the operational impacts of high penetrations. One of the conclusions of RE Futures was that further work was necessary to understand whether the operation of the system was possible at sub-hourly time scales and during transient events. This study aimed to address part of this by modeling the operation of the power system at sub-hourly time scales using newer methodologies and updated data sets for transmission and generation infrastructure. The goal of this work was to perform a detailed, sub-hourly analysis of very high penetration scenarios for a single interconnection (the Western Interconnection). It focused on operational impacts, and it helps verify that the operational results from the capacity expansion models are useful. The primary conclusion of this study is that sub-hourly operation of the grid is possible with renewable generation levels between 80% and 90%.

  17. Intelligent Local Avoided Collision (iLAC) MAC Protocol for Very High Speed Wireless Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieu, Dinh Chi; Masuda, Akeo; Rabarijaona, Verotiana Hanitriniala; Shimamoto, Shigeru

    Future wireless communication systems aim at very high data rates. As the medium access control (MAC) protocol plays the central role in determining the overall performance of the wireless system, designing a suitable MAC protocol is critical to fully exploit the benefit of high speed transmission that the physical layer (PHY) offers. In the latest 802.11n standard [2], the problem of long overhead has been addressed adequately but the issue of excessive colliding transmissions, especially in congested situation, remains untouched. The procedure of setting the backoff value is the heart of the 802.11 distributed coordination function (DCF) to avoid collision in which each station makes its own decision on how to avoid collision in the next transmission. However, collision avoidance is a problem that can not be solved by a single station. In this paper, we introduce a new MAC protocol called Intelligent Local Avoided Collision (iLAC) that redefines individual rationality in choosing the backoff counter value to avoid a colliding transmission. The distinguishing feature of iLAC is that it fundamentally changes this decision making process from collision avoidance to collaborative collision prevention. As a result, stations can avoid colliding transmissions with much greater precision. Analytical solution confirms the validity of this proposal and simulation results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the conventional algorithms by a large margin.

  18. Dust Formation, Evolution, and Obscuration Effects in the Very High-Redshift Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli; Staguhn, Johannes; Arendt, Richard G.; Kovacs, Attila; Su, Ting; Benford, Dominic J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of dust at redshifts z > or approx. 9, and consequently the dust properties, differs greatly from that in the local universe. In contrast to the local universe, core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the only source of thermally-condensed dust. Because of the low initial dust-to-gas mass ratio, grain destruction rates are low, so that CCSNe are net producers of interstellar dust. Galaxies with large initial gas mass or high mass infall rate will therefore have a more rapid net rate of dust production comported to galaxies with lower gas mass, even at the same star formation rate. The dust composition is dominated by silicates, which exhibit a strong rise in the UV opacity near the Lyman break. This "silicate-UV break" may be confused with the Lyman break, resulting in a misidentification of a galaxies' photometric redshift. In this paper we demonstrate these effects by analyzing the spectral energy distribution (SED) of MACS1149-JD, a lensed galaxy at z = 9.6. A potential 2mm counterpart of MACS1149-JD has been identified with GISMO. While additional observations are required to corroborate this identification, we use this possible association to illustrate the physical processes and the observational effects of dust in the very high redshift universe. Subject headings: galaxies: high-redshift - galaxies: evolution - galaxies: individual (MACS1149- JD) - Interstellar medium (ISM), nebulae: dust, extinction - physical data and processes: nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances.

  19. Dust Formation, Evolution, and Obscuration Effects in the Very High-Redshift Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli; Staguhn, Johannes; Arendt, Richard G.; Kovacks, Attila; Su, Ting; Benford, Dominic J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of dust at redshifts z > or approx. 9, and consequently the dust properties, differs greatly from that in the local universe. In contrast to the local universe, core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the only source of thermally-condensed dust. Because of the low initial dust-togas mass ratio, grain destruction rates are low, so that CCSNe are net producers of interstellar dust. Galaxies with large initial gas mass or high mass infall rate will therefore have a more rapid net rate of dust production comported to galaxies with lower gas mass, even at the same star formation rate. The dust composition is dominated by silicates, which exhibit a strong rise in the UV opacity near the Lyman break. This "silicate-UV break" may be confused with the Lyman break, resulting in a misidentification of a galaxies' photometric redshift. In this paper we demonstrate these effects by analyzing the spectral energy distribution (SED) of MACS1149-JD, a lensed galaxy at z = 9.6. A potential 2mm counterpart of MACS1149-JD has been identified with GISMO. While additional observations are required to corroborate this identification, we use this possible association to illustrate the physical processes and the observational effects of dust in the very high redshift universe.

  20. Very high-density planets: a possible remnant of gas giants.

    PubMed

    Mocquet, A; Grasset, O; Sotin, C

    2014-04-28

    Data extracted from the Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia (see http://exoplanet.eu) show the existence of planets that are more massive than iron cores that would have the same size. After meticulous verification of the data, we conclude that the mass of the smallest of these planets is actually not known. However, the three largest planets, Kepler-52b, Kepler-52c and Kepler-57b, which are between 30 and 100 times the mass of the Earth, have indeed density larger than an iron planet of the same size. This observation triggers this study that investigates under which conditions these planets could represent the naked cores of gas giants that would have lost their atmospheres during their migration towards the star. This study shows that for moderate viscosity values (10(25) Pa s or lower), large values of escape rate and associated unloading stress rate during the atmospheric loss process lead to the explosion of extremely massive planets. However, for moderate escape rate, the bulk viscosity and finite-strain incompressibility of the cores of giant planets can be large enough to retain a very high density during geological time scales. This would make those a new kind of planet, which would help in understanding the interior structure of the gas giants. However, this new family of exoplanets adds some degeneracy for characterizing terrestrial exoplanets. PMID:24664925

  1. Investigating strength of materials at very high strain rates using magnetically driven expanding cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovinger, Zev; Nemirovsky, Ron; Avriel, Eyal; Dorogoy, Avraham; Ashuach, Yehezkel; Rittel, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic characterization of strength properties is done, in common practice by the means of a Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (also named Kolsky-Bar) apparatus. In such systems, strain rates are limited up to ˜ 5 ṡ 103 sec-1. For higher strain rates, the strain rate hardening is assumed to be the same as that measured at lower rates, with no direct measurement to validate the assumptions used for this extrapolation. In this work we are using a pulsed current generator (PCG) to create electro-magnetic (EM) driving forces on expanding cylinders. Most standard techniques for creating EM driving forces on cylinders or rings, as reported in the literature, reach strain rates of 1e3-1e4. Using our PCG, characterized by a fast rise time, we reach strain rates of ˜1e5, thus paving the way to a standard technique to measure strength at very high strain rates. To establish the experimental technique, we conducted a numerical study of the expanding cylinder set up using 2D hydrodynamic simulations to reach the desired high strain rates.

  2. Connection of Very High Energy Gamma-ray Flares in Blazars to Activity at Lower Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.

    2016-04-01

    The author will briefly review the results of multi-wavelength observations of blazars that emit very high-energy (VHE) gamma rays. The VHE gamma-ray emission is generally episodic, including flares that are often very short-lived. While many of these flares have counterparts only at X-ray energies, or no counterparts at all, some events are seen also at optical wavelengths, and a number are associated with the passage of new superluminal knots passing through the core in mm-wave VLBA images. Two explanations for the short-term VHE flares in the relativistic jets are supersonic turbulence and ultra-fast plasma jets resulting from magnetic reconnections. Observations of frequency-dependent linear polarization during flares can potentially decide between these models. VLBA images can help to locate VHE events that are seen at millimeter wavelengths. In some cases, the flares take place near the parsec-scale core, while in others they occur closer to the black hole.This research is supported in part by NASA through Swift Guest Investigator grants NNX15AR45G and NNX15AR34G.

  3. TARGET: A multi-channel digitizer chip for very-high-energy gamma-ray telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtol, K.; Funk, S.; Okumura, A.; Ruckman, L.; Simons, A.; Tajima, H.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Varner, G.; /Hawaii U.

    2011-08-11

    The next-generation very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray observatory, the Cherenkov Telescope Array, will feature dozens of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs), each with thousands of pixels of photosensors. To be affordable and reliable, reading out such a mega-channel array requires event recording technology that is highly integrated and modular, with a low cost per channel. We present the design and performance of a chip targeted to this application: the TeV Array Readout with GSa/s sampling and Event Trigger (TARGET). This application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) has 16 parallel input channels, a 4096-sample buffer for each channel, adjustable input termination, self-trigger functionality, and tight window-selected readout. We report the performance of TARGET in terms of sampling frequency, power consumption, dynamic range, current-mode gain, analog bandwidth, and cross talk. The large number of channels per chip allows a low cost per channel ($10 to $20 including front-end and back-end electronics but not including photosensors) to be achieved with a TARGET-based IACT readout system. In addition to basic performance parameters of the TARGET chip itself, we present a camera module prototype as well as a second-generation chip (TARGET 2), both of which have been produced.

  4. The relation between high-density and very-high-density amorphous ice.

    PubMed

    Loerting, Thomas; Salzmann, Christoph G; Winkel, Katrin; Mayer, Erwin

    2006-06-28

    The exact nature of the relationship between high-density (HDA) and very-high-density (VHDA) amorphous ice is unknown at present. Here we review the relation between HDA and VHDA, concentrating on experimental aspects and discuss these with respect to the relation between low-density amorphous ice (LDA) and HDA. On compressing LDA at 125 K up to 1.5 GPa, two distinct density steps are observable in the pressure-density curves which correspond to the LDA --> HDA and HDA --> VHDA conversion. This stepwise formation process LDA --> HDA --> VHDA at 125 K is the first unambiguous observation of a stepwise amorphous-amorphous-amorphous transformation sequence. Density values of amorphous ice obtained in situ between 0.3 and 1.9 GPa on isobaric heating up to the temperatures of crystallization show a pronounced change of slope at ca. 0.8 GPa which could indicate formation of a distinct phase. We infer that the relation between HDA and VHDA is very similar to that between LDA and HDA except for a higher activation barrier between the former. We further discuss the two options of thermodynamic phase transition versus kinetic densification for the HDA --> VHDA conversion.

  5. Comparison of the very high cycle fatigue behaviors of INCONEL 718 with different loading frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, YangYang; Duan, Zheng; Shi, HuiJi

    2013-03-01

    In order to clarify the differences of very high cycle fatigue (VHCF) behavior of nickel based superalloy IN718 with different loading frequencies, stress-controlled fatigue tests were carried out by using ultrasonic testing method (20 KHz) and rotary bending testing method (52.5 Hz), both at room temperatures, to establish stress versus cycles to failure (S-N) relationships. Results disclosed that cycles to failure at a given stress level increased with an increase of the applied frequency, i.e., the higher frequency produced an upper shift of the S-N curves. Fractographic analysis suggested that crack initiation and propagation behaviors had large differences: cracks in low-frequency tests preferentially initiated from multiple sources on the specimen surface, while in high-frequency tests, cracks mostly originated from a unique source of subsurface inclusions. Subsequently, frequency-involved modeling was proposed, based on the damage accumulation theory, which could well illustrate qualitatively those comparisons due to different loading frequencies.

  6. Low-Enriched Fuel Design Concept for the Prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect

    Sterbentz, James W

    2007-05-01

    A new non-TRISO fuel and clad design concept is proposed for the prismatic, heliumcooled Very High Temperature Reactor core. The new concept could substantially reduce the current 10-20 wt% TRISO uranium enrichments down to 4-6 wt% for both initial and reload cores. The proposed fuel form would be a high-temperature, high-density uranium ceramic, for example UO2, configured into very small diameter cylindrical rods. The small diameter fuel rods significantly increase core reactivity through improved neutron moderation and fuel lumping. Although a high-temperature clad system for the concept remains to be developed, recent success in tube fabrication and preliminary irradiation testing of silicon carbide (SiC) cladding for light water reactor applications offers good potential for this application, and for future development of other carbide clad designs. A high-temperature ceramic fuel, together with a high-temperature clad material, could also lead to higher thermal safety margins during both normal and transient reactor conditions relative to TRISO fuel. The calculated neutronic results show that the lowenrichment, small diameter fuel rods and low thermal neutron absorbing clad retain the strong negative Doppler fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity that ensures inherent safe operation of the VHTR, and depletion studies demonstrate that an 18-month power cycle can be achieved with the lower enrichment fuel.

  7. Methodology for determining void swelling at very high damage under ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getto, E.; Sun, K.; Taller, S.; Monterrosa, A. M.; Jiao, Z.; Was, G. S.

    2016-08-01

    At very high damage levels in ion irradiated samples, the decrease in effective density of the irradiated material due to void swelling can lead to errors in quantifying swelling. HT9 was pre-implanted with 10 appm He and subjected to a raster-scanned beam with a damage rate of ∼1 × 10-3 dpa/s at 460oC. Voids were characterized from 0 to 1300 nm. Fixed damage rate and fixed depth methods were developed to account for damage-dependent porosity increase and resulting dependence on depth. The fixed depth method was more appropriate as it limits undue effects from the injected interstitial while maintaining a usable void distribution. By keeping the depth fixed and accounting for the change in damage rate due to reduced density, the steady state swelling rate was 10% higher than calculation of swelling from raw data. This method is easily translatable to other materials, ion types and energies and limits the impact of the injected interstitial.

  8. Observations of very-high-latitude ionospheric irregularities with the Goose Bay HF (high frequency) radar

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwald, R.A.; Baker, K.B.

    1985-06-07

    The Goose Bay HF radar is a sophisticated instrument capable of providing detailed information on very-high-latitude E- and F-region ionospheric electron-density irregularities which act as a source of clutter on OTH radar systems. Through the use of two parallel phased-array antennas, this instrument is able to image the location of these irregularities within a three-dimensional volume covering much of northeastern Canada and Greenland. It is also capable of following the temporal variability of these irregularities as well as determining unambiguously the Doppler shift and broadening of radar signals scattered by them. This paper presents initial results with a single phased-array antenna, which represent typical examples of the spatial intensity distribution of these irregularities at different local times. Examples are presented of Doppler spectra of the irregularities at different local times. Data of this type are of appreciable value in ascertaining the techniques that must be utilized to improve clutter mitigation on high-latitude radar systems.

  9. Very high-density planets: a possible remnant of gas giants.

    PubMed

    Mocquet, A; Grasset, O; Sotin, C

    2014-04-28

    Data extracted from the Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia (see http://exoplanet.eu) show the existence of planets that are more massive than iron cores that would have the same size. After meticulous verification of the data, we conclude that the mass of the smallest of these planets is actually not known. However, the three largest planets, Kepler-52b, Kepler-52c and Kepler-57b, which are between 30 and 100 times the mass of the Earth, have indeed density larger than an iron planet of the same size. This observation triggers this study that investigates under which conditions these planets could represent the naked cores of gas giants that would have lost their atmospheres during their migration towards the star. This study shows that for moderate viscosity values (10(25) Pa s or lower), large values of escape rate and associated unloading stress rate during the atmospheric loss process lead to the explosion of extremely massive planets. However, for moderate escape rate, the bulk viscosity and finite-strain incompressibility of the cores of giant planets can be large enough to retain a very high density during geological time scales. This would make those a new kind of planet, which would help in understanding the interior structure of the gas giants. However, this new family of exoplanets adds some degeneracy for characterizing terrestrial exoplanets.

  10. Novel Iron-based ternary amorphous oxide semiconductor with very high transparency, electronic conductivity, and mobility

    PubMed Central

    Malasi, A.; Taz, H.; Farah, A.; Patel, M.; Lawrie, B.; Pooser, R.; Baddorf, A.; Duscher, G.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we report that ternary metal oxides of type (Me)2O3 with the primary metal (Me) constituent being Fe (66 atomic (at.) %) along with the two Lanthanide elements Tb (10 at.%) and Dy (24 at.%) can show excellent semiconducting transport properties. Thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature followed by ambient oxidation showed very high electronic conductivity (>5 × 104 S/m) and Hall mobility (>30 cm2/V-s). These films had an amorphous microstructure which was stable to at least 500 °C and large optical transparency with a direct band gap of 2.85 ± 0.14 eV. This material shows emergent semiconducting behavior with significantly higher conductivity and mobility than the constituent insulating oxides. Since these results demonstrate a new way to modify the behaviors of transition metal oxides made from unfilled d- and/or f-subshells, a new class of functional transparent conducting oxide materials could be envisioned. PMID:26670421

  11. Ageing vessel configuration for continuous redox potential-controlled very-high-gravity fermentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Guang; Lin, Yen-Han; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2011-01-01

    The development of continuous very-high-gravity (VHG) fermentation is hindered by ineffective glucose uptake in order to result in zero discharge in the effluent stream. To overcome the problem, we proposed a continuous redox potential-controlled fermentation configuration, consisting of a Chemostat vessel connected with two ageing vessels installed in parallel, and the relevant design criteria are also specified. The Chemostat vessel is subjected to redox potential control to maintain yeast viability, and the ageing vessels are used to completely utilize glucose before discharging to next process unit. Two ageing vessels are scheduled alternatively, resulting in continuously-like operation. The size of ageing vessel is governed by the Chemostat size, dilution rate and filling time. The guideline to choose proper dilution rate is provided and the selection criterion of the proposed continuous configuration over batch fermentation is derived. The excess ethanol produced by the proposed continuous configuration over batch fermenter is quantified. As an illustration, a bio-ethanol plant is typically operated 8000 h per annum and the downtime between batches is 6h. Given that the fermenter size of 100 m(3) for both batch fermenter and Chemostat vessel, and glucose fed at 300 g/l, if the proposed continuous redox potential-controlled fermentation configuration (operated at 0.028 h(-1) and controlled at -50 mV) is selected, it will take 191 h for this configuration to outperform the batch counterpart, and the excess amount of ethanol being produced will be 1142 t. PMID:20875953

  12. Novel Iron-based ternary amorphous oxide semiconductor with very high transparency, electronic conductivity, and mobility.

    PubMed

    Malasi, A; Taz, H; Farah, A; Patel, M; Lawrie, B; Pooser, R; Baddorf, A; Duscher, G; Kalyanaraman, R

    2015-12-16

    Here we report that ternary metal oxides of type (Me)2O3 with the primary metal (Me) constituent being Fe (66 atomic (at.) %) along with the two Lanthanide elements Tb (10 at.%) and Dy (24 at.%) can show excellent semiconducting transport properties. Thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature followed by ambient oxidation showed very high electronic conductivity (>5 × 10(4) S/m) and Hall mobility (>30 cm(2)/V-s). These films had an amorphous microstructure which was stable to at least 500 °C and large optical transparency with a direct band gap of 2.85 ± 0.14 eV. This material shows emergent semiconducting behavior with significantly higher conductivity and mobility than the constituent insulating oxides. Since these results demonstrate a new way to modify the behaviors of transition metal oxides made from unfilled d- and/or f-subshells, a new class of functional transparent conducting oxide materials could be envisioned.

  13. Very-high energy observations of the galactic center region by VERITAS in 2010-2012

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Chen, W.; Barnacka, A.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Biteau, J.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V; Dickinson, H. J.; Eisch, J. D.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dumm, J.; and others

    2014-08-01

    The Galactic center is an interesting region for high-energy (0.1-100 GeV) and very-high-energy (E > 100 GeV) γ-ray observations. Potential sources of GeV/TeV γ-ray emission have been suggested, e.g., the accretion of matter onto the supermassive black hole, cosmic rays from a nearby supernova remnant (e.g., Sgr A East), particle acceleration in a plerion, or the annihilation of dark matter particles. The Galactic center has been detected by EGRET and by Fermi/LAT in the MeV/GeV energy band. At TeV energies, the Galactic center was detected with moderate significance by the CANGAROO and Whipple 10 m telescopes and with high significance by H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS. We present the results from three years of VERITAS observations conducted at large zenith angles resulting in a detection of the Galactic center on the level of 18 standard deviations at energies above ∼2.5 TeV. The energy spectrum is derived and is found to be compatible with hadronic, leptonic, and hybrid emission models discussed in the literature. Future, more detailed measurements of the high-energy cutoff and better constraints on the high-energy flux variability will help to refine and/or disentangle the individual models.

  14. Redox potential driven aeration during very-high-gravity ethanol fermentation by using flocculating yeast.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Guang; Hao, Xue-Mi; Lin, Yen-Han; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol fermentation requires oxygen to maintain high biomass and cell viability, especially under very-high-gravity (VHG) condition. In this work, fermentation redox potential (ORP) was applied to drive the aeration process at low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, which is infeasible to be regulated by a DO sensor. The performance and characteristics of flocculating yeast grown under 300 and 260 g glucose/L conditions were subjected to various aeration strategies including: no aeration; controlled aeration at -150, -100 and -50 mV levels; and constant aeration at 0.05 and 0.2 vvm. The results showed that anaerobic fermentation produced the least ethanol and had the highest residual glucose after 72 h of fermentation. Controlled aerations, depending on the real-time oxygen demand, led to higher cell viability than the no-aeration counterpart. Constant aeration triggered a quick biomass formation, and fast glucose utilization. However, over aeration at 0.2 vvm caused a reduction of final ethanol concentration. The controlled aeration driven by ORP under VHG conditions resulted in the best fermentation performance. Moreover, the controlled aeration could enhance yeast flocculating activity, promote an increase of flocs size, and accelerate yeast separation near the end of fermentation. PMID:27161047

  15. Advances in mapping malaria for elimination: fine resolution modelling of Plasmodium falciparum incidence

    PubMed Central

    Alegana, Victor A.; Atkinson, Peter M.; Lourenço, Christopher; Ruktanonchai, Nick W.; Bosco, Claudio; Erbach-Schoenberg, Elisabeth zu; Didier, Bradley; Pindolia, Deepa; Le Menach, Arnaud; Katokele, Stark; Uusiku, Petrina; Tatem, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The long-term goal of the global effort to tackle malaria is national and regional elimination and eventually eradication. Fine scale multi-temporal mapping in low malaria transmission settings remains a challenge and the World Health Organisation propose use of surveillance in elimination settings. Here, we show how malaria incidence can be modelled at a fine spatial and temporal resolution from health facility data to help focus surveillance and control to population not attending health facilities. Using Namibia as a case study, we predicted the incidence of malaria, via a Bayesian spatio-temporal model, at a fine spatial resolution from parasitologically confirmed malaria cases and incorporated metrics on healthcare use as well as measures of uncertainty associated with incidence predictions. We then combined the incidence estimates with population maps to estimate clinical burdens and show the benefits of such mapping to identifying areas and seasons that can be targeted for improved surveillance and interventions. Fine spatial resolution maps produced using this approach were then used to target resources to specific local populations, and to specific months of the season. This remote targeting can be especially effective where the population distribution is sparse and further surveillance can be limited to specific local areas. PMID:27405532

  16. Advances in mapping malaria for elimination: fine resolution modelling of Plasmodium falciparum incidence.

    PubMed

    Alegana, Victor A; Atkinson, Peter M; Lourenço, Christopher; Ruktanonchai, Nick W; Bosco, Claudio; Erbach-Schoenberg, Elisabeth Zu; Didier, Bradley; Pindolia, Deepa; Le Menach, Arnaud; Katokele, Stark; Uusiku, Petrina; Tatem, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    The long-term goal of the global effort to tackle malaria is national and regional elimination and eventually eradication. Fine scale multi-temporal mapping in low malaria transmission settings remains a challenge and the World Health Organisation propose use of surveillance in elimination settings. Here, we show how malaria incidence can be modelled at a fine spatial and temporal resolution from health facility data to help focus surveillance and control to population not attending health facilities. Using Namibia as a case study, we predicted the incidence of malaria, via a Bayesian spatio-temporal model, at a fine spatial resolution from parasitologically confirmed malaria cases and incorporated metrics on healthcare use as well as measures of uncertainty associated with incidence predictions. We then combined the incidence estimates with population maps to estimate clinical burdens and show the benefits of such mapping to identifying areas and seasons that can be targeted for improved surveillance and interventions. Fine spatial resolution maps produced using this approach were then used to target resources to specific local populations, and to specific months of the season. This remote targeting can be especially effective where the population distribution is sparse and further surveillance can be limited to specific local areas. PMID:27405532

  17. Altered Carbon Isotope Discrimination of C3 Plants Under Very High pCO2 Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, R. J.; Schubert, B.; Jahren, H.

    2009-12-01

    Various modeling and proxy-based reconstructions of atmospheric pCO2 levels for the last 120 Ma have estimated RCO2 as high as 12x for the Early Cretaceous, generally decreasing into the Cenozoic, and decreasing further into the Quaternary. Multiple ecological studies to assess the effect of elevated CO2 on plant biomass and δ13C value have been spurred on by recent increases in greenhouse gases, however these studies typically grow plants under only slightly elevated CO2 levels (i.e., the twenty foremost studies published since 1990 involved 550 to 750 ppm pCO2, which equals RCO2 = 1.4 to 1.9x). In order to recreate the highest pCO2 environments of the last 120 Ma, we grew radish (Raphanus sativus L.) in growth chambers that maintained controlled environmental conditions and pCO2 levels ranging from ~5 to 11x that of today’s atmosphere (1791 to 4200 ppm); upon harvest we measured total biomass and stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13Cplant) in both above and below ground plant tissue. Unlike the 1:1 relationship between stable isotopes of atmospheric CO2 (δ13Catm) and δ13Cplant observed at lower pCO2 levels (i.e., RCO2 = 1x to 3x; Jahren et al., 2008), the δ13Cplant of biomass grown at more elevated RCO2 was dependent upon δ13Catm according to the linear relationship: δ13Cplant = 1.9(δ13Cplant) - 12.2 ‰ (r2 = 0.71). Concomitantly, we see a highly significant (p < 0.001) positive correlation between net carbon isotope discrimination in plant tissue and pCO2 level, with a change in the average Δδ13Cplant-atm in R. sativus L. from -27.0 to -28.0 ‰ at RCO2 = 5x to 11x, respectively. We will discuss possible mechanisms for changing isotope discrimination at very high pCO2 levels that may not be operative at lower concentrations. For example, we noted a striking reduction in the variability of biomass between plants grown at the same (very high) level of pCO2. This variability (calculated as the standard deviation of the log-transformed biomass data after

  18. An advanced image processing method to improve the spatial resolution of ion radiographies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krah, N.; Testa, M.; Brons, S.; Jäkel, O.; Parodi, K.; Voss, B.; Rinaldi, I.

    2015-11-01

    We present an optimization method to improve the spatial resolution and the water equivalent thickness (WET) accuracy of ion radiographies. The method is designed for imaging systems measuring for each actively scanned beam spot the lateral position of the pencil beam and at the same time the Bragg curve (behind the target) in discrete steps without relying on tracker detectors to determine the ion trajectory before and after the irradiated volume. Specifically, the method was used for an imaging set-up consisting of a stack of 61 parallel-plate ionization chambers (PPIC) interleaved with absorber plates of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) working as a range telescope. The method uses not only the Bragg peak position, but approximates the entire measured Bragg curve as a superposition of differently shifted Bragg curves. Their relative weights allow to reconstruct the distribution of thickness around each scan spot of a heterogeneous phantom. The approach also allows merging the ion radiography with the geometric information of a co-registered x-ray radiography in order to increase its spatial resolution. The method was tested using Monte Carlo simulated and experimental proton radiographies of a PMMA step phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom. For the step phantom, the effective spatial resolution was found to be 6 and 4 times higher than the nominal resolution for the simulated and experimental radiographies, respectively. For the head phantom, a gamma index was calculated to quantify the conformity of the simulated proton radiographies with a digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) obtained from an x-ray CT and properly converted into WET. For a distance-to-agreement (DTA) of 2.5 mm and a relative WET difference (RWET) of 2.5%, the passing ratio was 100%/85% for the optimized/non-optimized case, respectively. When the optimized proton radiography was merged with the co-registered DRR, the passing ratio was 100% at DTA  =  1.3 mm and RWET

  19. PyMCT: A Very High Level Language Coupling Tool For Climate System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobis, M.; Pierrehumbert, R. T.; Steder, M.; Jacob, R. L.

    2006-12-01

    At the Climate Systems Center of the University of Chicago, we have been examining strategies for applying agile programming techniques to complex high-performance modeling experiments. While the "agile" development methodology differs from a conventional requirements process and its associated milestones, the process remain a formal one. It is distinguished by continuous improvement in functionality, large numbers of small releases, extensive and ongoing testing strategies, and a strong reliance on very high level languages (VHLL). Here we report on PyMCT, which we intend as a core element in a model ensemble control superstructure. PyMCT is a set of Python bindings for MCT, the Fortran-90 based Model Coupling Toolkit, which forms the infrastructure for the inter-component communication in the Community Climate System Model (CCSM). MCT provides a scalable model communication infrastructure. In order to take maximum advantage of agile software development methodologies, we exposed MCT functionality to Python, a prominent VHLL. We describe how the scalable architecture of MCT allows us to overcome the relatively weak runtime performance of Python, so that the performance of the combined system is not severely impacted. To demonstrate these advantages, we reimplemented the CCSM coupler in Python. While this alone offers no new functionality, it does provide a rigorous test of PyMCT functionality and performance. We reimplemented the CPL6 library, presenting an interesting case study of the comparison between conventional Fortran-90 programming and the higher abstraction level provided by a VHLL. The powerful abstractions provided by Python will allow much more complex experimental paradigms. In particular, we hope to build on the scriptability of our coupling strategy to enable systematic sensitivity tests. Our most ambitious objective is to combine our efforts with Bayesian inverse modeling techniques toward objective tuning at the highest level, across model

  20. Pulsar Astrophysics at Very High Energies in the Fermi-HAWC Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saz Parkinson, Pablo; Belfiore, A.; HAWC Collaboration; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2013-04-01

    Pulsar astrophysics has received a major boost in recent years with the tremendous progress achieved in the gamma-ray regime. In the 0.1-100 GeV energy range, where pulsars emit a large fraction of their energy, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) is providing an abundance of high-quality data, greatly improving our understanding of the pulsar mechanism. In addition to detecting over 120 pulsars, the improved statistics from the LAT have enabled studies of some of the brightest pulsars with exquisite detail, up to unprecedented energies (in some cases above 25 GeV), finally bridging the gap with ground-based instruments. At very high energies (VHE, > 100 GeV), recent detections by VERITAS and MAGIC of pulsations from the Crab pose a serious challenge to pulsar models. It is unclear whether the Crab is unique in this respect, or whether VHE emission is common in other pulsars. Some models predict that such emission should smoothly connect with the standard GeV emission seen by the LAT, while others point instead to a different spectral (e.g. inverse Compton) component altogether. If present in other pulsars, such a component might be found at higher energies (> 1 TeV), but its flux is highly uncertain. Further VHE observations of pulsars are crucial to distinguish between (and constrain) the competing scenarios. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC), currently under construction in Mexico, is well-suited to perform observations of pulsars above 100 GeV. The HAWC detector has a wide field of view, high duty cycle, and excellent sensitivity 15 times better than its predecessor Milagro), and its contemporaneous operation with Fermi should enable it to carry out the first comprehensive survey of northern-hemisphere gamma-ray pulsars above 100 GeV. I will discuss the motivations, goals, timeline, and sensitivity of HAWC searches for VHE emission from pulsars.

  1. Light enables a very high efficiency of carbon storage in developing embryos of rapeseed.

    PubMed

    Goffman, Fernando D; Alonso, Ana P; Schwender, Jörg; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Ohlrogge, John B

    2005-08-01

    The conversion of photosynthate to seed storage reserves is crucial to plant fitness and agricultural production, yet quantitative information about the efficiency of this process is lacking. To measure metabolic efficiency in developing seeds, rapeseed (Brassica napus) embryos were cultured in media in which all carbon sources were [U-14C]-labeled and their conversion into CO2, oil, protein, and other biomass was determined. The conversion efficiency of the supplied carbon into seed storage reserves was very high. When provided with 0, 50, or 150 micromol m(-2) s(-1) light, the proportion of carbon taken up by embryos that was recovered in biomass was 60% to 64%, 77% to 86%, and 85% to 95%, respectively. Light not only improved the efficiency of carbon storage, but also increased the growth rate, the proportion of 14C recovered in oil relative to protein, and the fixation of external 14CO2 into biomass. Embryos grown at 50 micromol m(-2) s(-1) in the presence of 5 microM 1,1-dimethyl-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl) urea (an inhibitor of photosystem II) were reduced in total biomass and oil synthesis by 3.2-fold and 2.8-fold, respectively, to the levels observed in the dark. To explore if the reduced growth and carbon conversion efficiency in dark were related to oxygen supplied by photosystem II, embryos and siliques were cultured with increased oxygen. The carbon conversion efficiency of embryos remained unchanged when oxygen levels were increased 3-fold. Increasing the O2 levels surrounding siliques from 21% to 60% did not increase oil synthesis rates either at 1,000 micromol m(-2) s(-1) or in the dark. We conclude that light increases the growth, efficiency of carbon storage, and oil synthesis in developing rapeseed embryos primarily by providing reductant and/or ATP.

  2. Crystal accumulation and very high short-circuit currents in rabbit urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Loo, D D; Diamond, J M

    1985-01-01

    We describe a condition in rabbits characterized by CaCO3 crystal accumulation and very high short-circuit current (Isc) in the urinary bladder. The incidence of the condition was high in rabbits kept for 2 mo or more in the vivarium. The crystal mass in the bladder increased with age or time until it occupied up to one-third of the bladder volume and occasionally aggregated as stones, and the urine attained a sludgy consistency. In animals with sludgy urine, the urine excreted had a crystal content 20 times lower than that of urine contained in the bladder at time of death, implying retention of crystals in the bladder. Kidney stones were not detected in rabbits with bladder crystals, and bladder crystals were absent in rabbits with kidney stones induced experimentally by uremia. In old rabbits with sludgy urine the Isc, a measure of Na+ transport, was up to 46 microA/cm2 and averaged 12 microA/cm2, seven times the Isc of rabbits with nonsludgy urine. The increased Isc was entirely amiloride sensitive. Noise analysis showed it to arise entirely from increased channel density, without change in single-channel current. With one possible exception, we could not find bacterial infection or abnormalities in plasma aldosterone, GFR, or urinary [Na+], [Ca2+], pH, or osmolality that could explain the condition. The exception is that some unidentified component accounting for half the osmolality of nonsludgy urine is absent or at low concentration in sludgy urine. It remains unknown why the condition develops and whether CaCO3 crystals cause high Isc or vice versa or whether both result from a third factor. PMID:3970165

  3. A novel strategy to construct yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for very high gravity fermentation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xianglin; Zheng, Daoqiong; Liu, Tianzhe; Wang, Pinmei; Zhao, Wenpeng; Zhu, Muyuan; Jiang, Xinhang; Zhao, Yuhua; Wu, Xuechang

    2012-01-01

    Very high gravity (VHG) fermentation is aimed to considerably increase both the fermentation rate and the ethanol concentration, thereby reducing capital costs and the risk of bacterial contamination. This process results in critical issues, such as adverse stress factors (ie., osmotic pressure and ethanol inhibition) and high concentrations of metabolic byproducts which are difficult to overcome by a single breeding method. In the present paper, a novel strategy that combines metabolic engineering and genome shuffling to circumvent these limitations and improve the bioethanol production performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains under VHG conditions was developed. First, in strain Z5, which performed better than other widely used industrial strains, the gene GPD2 encoding glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase was deleted, resulting in a mutant (Z5ΔGPD2) with a lower glycerol yield and poor ethanol productivity. Second, strain Z5ΔGPD2 was subjected to three rounds of genome shuffling to improve its VHG fermentation performance, and the best performing strain SZ3-1 was obtained. Results showed that strain SZ3-1 not only produced less glycerol, but also increased the ethanol yield by up to 8% compared with the parent strain Z5. Further analysis suggested that the improved ethanol yield in strain SZ3-1 was mainly contributed by the enhanced ethanol tolerance of the strain. The differences in ethanol tolerance between strains Z5 and SZ3-1 were closely associated with the cell membrane fatty acid compositions and intracellular trehalose concentrations. Finally, genome rearrangements in the optimized strain were confirmed by karyotype analysis. Hence, a combination of genome shuffling and metabolic engineering is an efficient approach for the rapid improvement of yeast strains for desirable industrial phenotypes.

  4. Experimental and Analytic Study on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Schultz

    2012-04-01

    Core bypass flow has been one of key issues in the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design for securing core thermal margins and achieving target temperatures at the core exit. The bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core occurs through the control element holes and the radial and axial gaps between the graphite blocks for manufacturing and refueling tolerances. These gaps vary with the core life cycles because of the irradiation swelling/shrinkage characteristic of the graphite blocks such as fuel and reflector blocks, which are main components of a core's structure. Thus, the core bypass flow occurs in a complicated multidimensional way. The accurate prediction of this bypass flow and counter-measures to minimize it are thus of major importance in assuring core thermal margins and securing higher core efficiency. Even with this importance, there has not been much effort in quantifying and accurately modeling the effect of the core bypass flow. The main objectives of this project were to generate experimental data for validating the software to be used to calculate the bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core, validate thermofluid analysis tools and their model improvements, and identify and assess measures for reducing the bypass flow. To achieve these objectives, tasks were defined to (1) design and construct experiments to generate validation data for software analysis tools, (2) determine the experimental conditions and define the measurement requirements and techniques, (3) generate and analyze the experimental data, (4) validate and improve the thermofluid analysis tools, and (5) identify measures to control the bypass flow and assess its performance in the experiment.

  5. Very High-Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP)

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, David Lewis

    2011-10-01

    This report documents the detailed background information that has been compiled to support the preparation of a much shorter white paper on the design features and fuel cycles of Very High-Temperature Reactors (VHTRs), including the proposed Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), to identify the important proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR&PP) aspects of the proposed concepts. The shorter white paper derived from the information in this report was prepared for the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Science and Technology for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) VHTR Systems Steering Committee (SSC) as input to the GIF Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Working Group (PR&PPWG) (http://www.gen-4.org/Technology/horizontal/proliferation.htm). The short white paper was edited by the GIF VHTR SCC to address their concerns and thus may differ from the information presented in this supporting report. The GIF PR&PPWG will use the derived white paper based on this report along with other white papers on the six alternative Generation IV design concepts (http://www.gen-4.org/Technology/systems/index.htm) to employ an evaluation methodology that can be applied and will evolve from the earliest stages of design. This methodology will guide system designers, program policy makers, and external stakeholders in evaluating the response of each system, to determine each system's resistance to proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and terrorism threats, and thereby guide future international cooperation on ensuring safeguards in the deployment of the Generation IV systems. The format and content of this report is that specified in a template prepared by the GIF PR&PPWG. Other than the level of detail, the key exception to the specified template format is the addition of Appendix C to document the history and status of coated-particle fuel reprocessing technologies, which fuel reprocessing technologies have yet to be deployed

  6. THE VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM PULSARS: A CASE FOR INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Otte, Nepomuk; McCann, Andrew

    2012-07-20

    The observations of gamma-ray emission from pulsars with the Fermi-LAT detector and the detection of the Crab pulsar with the VERITAS array of Cherenkov telescopes at energies above 100 GeV make it unlikely that curvature radiation is the main source of photons above GeV energies in the Crab and many other pulsars. We outline a model in which the broad UV-X-ray component and the very high energy {gamma}-ray emission of pulsars are explained within the synchrotron self-Compton framework. We argue that the bulk of the observed radiation is generated by the secondary plasma, which is produced in cascades in the outer gaps of the magnetosphere. We find that the inverse Compton (IC) scattering occurs in the Klein-Nishina regime, which favors synchrotron photons in the UV band as target field for the scattering process. The primary beam is accelerated in a modest electric field, with a field strength that is of the order of a few percent of the magnetic field near the light cylinder. Overall, for IC scattering occurring in the Klein-Nishina regime, the particle distribution in the gap does not evolve toward a stationary distribution and thus is intrinsically time-dependent. We point out that in a radiation reaction-limited regime of particle acceleration the gamma-ray luminosity L{sub {gamma}} scales linearly with the pulsar spin-down power E-dot , L{sub {gamma}}{proportional_to} E-dot , and not proportional to {radical}( E-dot ) as expected from potential-limited acceleration.

  7. Utility of a very high IRT/No mutation referral category in cystic fibrosis newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Kay, Denise M; Langfelder-Schwind, Elinor; DeCelie-Germana, Joan; Sharp, Jack K; Maloney, Breanne; Tavakoli, Norma P; Saavedra-Matiz, Carlos A; Krein, Lea M; Caggana, Michele; Kier, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    Newborn screening for Cystic Fibrosis (CF) began in New York in October, 2002 using immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT)/DNA methodology. Infants with at least one CFTR mutation or very high IRT and no mutations (VHIRT) are referred for sweat testing. In a preliminary analysis, we noted a very low positive predictive value (PPV) and preponderance of Hispanic infants in the group of infants with CF referred for VHIRT, which led to a decision to revise, but not eliminate, the VHIRT category. Automatic referral for specimens with VHIRT collected on the day of birth was eliminated, and the VHIRT threshold was raised from 0.2% to 0.1%. In this report, we describe outcomes from VHIRT referrals among 2.4 million infants screened between March 2003 and February 2013. Following the algorithm change, referrals decreased by 37.8% overall (annual mean 1,485 vs. 923), and the VHIRT PPV improved (0.6-1.0%). The number of infants diagnosed has remained consistent at 1 in 4,400 births. The proportion of Black/Hispanic/Asian/Other infants with confirmed CF, CFTR-related metabolic syndrome (CRMS), or possible CF/CRMS was 21.3% in infants with 1-2 mutations, but 75.8% in the VHIRT group. In conclusion, although the PPV among VHIRT referrals remains low, had this category never been implemented, 24 infants with confirmed CF, and 9 infants with CRMS or possible CF/CRMS, most of whom were Hispanic, would have been missed over the 10 years. Information from this study may be helpful in assessing the need for the VHIRT category and algorithm changes in other screening programs.

  8. Geochronology and petrogenesis of Apollo 14 very high potassium mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Bansal, B. M.; Wiesmann, H.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.

    1986-01-01

    Rb-Sr, K-Ar, and Sm-Nd isotopic studies were undertaken for two Apollo 14 very high potassium (VHK) highly radiogenic mare basaltic clasts from breccias 14305 and 14168. Rb-Sr data indicate ages of 3.83 + or - 0.08 b.y., and 3.82 + or - 0.12 b.y. for samples 14305 and 14168 respectively, for lambda(Rb-87) = 0.0 139/b.y. Their corresponding initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios are nearly identical, as well as their Ar-39 to Ar-40 age spectra, and it is proposed that they were derived from the same flow. The Sm-Nd isotopic data of whole rock and mineral separates for the two VHK basalts define an internal isochrone age of 3.94 + or - 0.16 b.y. for lambda (Sm-147) = 0.00654/b.y. and an initial Nd-143/Nd-144 of 0.50673 + or - 21. The similarity in isotopic ages suggests that VHK basalts crystallized from a melt about 3.85 b.y. ago. VHK basalts show very large Rb/Sr fractionation but no significant Sm/Nd fractionation at the time of crystallization. The source material had a Rb/Sr ratio similar to those of Apollo 14 high-Al mare basalts and a nearly chrondritic Sm/Nd ratio. Basalt/granite interaction was found to be responsible for the extreme enrichments of Rb/Sr and K/La during the formation of VHK basalts. It is concluded that K, Rb-rich components of granitic wall rocks in the highland crust were selectively introduced into ascending hot high-Al mare basaltic magma upon contact.

  9. Characterization of very high frequency transducers with wire target and hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bin; Kik Shung, K.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the wire-target technique will be shown to be a useful alternative for beam profile measurements in very high frequency range (30-60 MHz). A 9 cm long tungsten wire with a diameter of 8 µm was used as the pulse-echo target to measure the lateral beam profiles at the focal points of two transducers, a spherically focused 40 MHz Panametrics transducer with an aperture size of 6.35 mm and a geometrical focal length of 12.7 mm and a lense-focused in-house lithium niobate (LiNbO3) 60 MHz transducer with an aperture size of 2 mm and a geometrical focal length around 6.5 mm. For comparison, measurements on the same transducers were performed by three small-aperture hydrophones. The first one is a polyvinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene (PVDF-TrFE) membrane hydrophone developed by Hewlett-Packard, which has a geometric diameter of 37 µm, a measured effective diameter of less than 100 µm and a –3 dB bandwidth of more than 150 MHz. The second one is a needle-type PVDF hydrophone from Precision Acoustics, which has a 9 µm-thick PVDF element, a 40 µm geometrical aperture and a measured effective diameter of less than 100 µm. The third one is a needle-type PVDF hydrophone from Onda, which has a 150 µm geometrical aperture and an effective diameter of about 180 µm. Experimental results show that the –6 dB two-way beam widths measured by this 8 µm wire-target are in agreement with –3 dB transmitted beam widths measured by small-aperture hydrophones. Compared to small-aperture hydrophones, the wire-target technique is simpler and more cost-effective. Its major advantage however is in the frequency range above 100 MHz in which commercial hydrophones are not yet available.

  10. MAGIC DISCOVERY OF VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM THE FSRQ PKS 1222+21

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksic, J.; Blanch, O.; Antonelli, L. A.; Bonnoli, G.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Berger, K.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Boller, A.; Braun, I.; Bock, R. K.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bretz, T.; Canellas, A. E-mail: antonio.stamerra@pi.infn.it E-mail: ksaito@mpp.mpg.de

    2011-03-20

    Very high energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray emission from the flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) PKS 1222+21 (4C 21.35, z = 0.432) was detected with the MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes during a short observation ({approx}0.5 hr) performed on 2010 June 17. The MAGIC detection coincides with high-energy MeV/GeV {gamma}-ray activity measured by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi satellite. The VHE spectrum measured by MAGIC extends from about 70 GeV up to at least 400 GeV and can be well described by a power-law dN/dE {proportional_to} E {sup -}{Gamma} with a photon index {Gamma} = 3.75 {+-} 0.27{sub stat} {+-} 0.2{sub syst}. The averaged integral flux above 100 GeV is (4.6 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup -10} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} ({approx}1 Crab Nebula flux). The VHE flux measured by MAGIC varies significantly within the 30 minute exposure implying a flux doubling time of about 10 minutes. The VHE and MeV/GeV spectra, corrected for the absorption by the extragalactic background light (EBL), can be described by a single power law with photon index 2.72 {+-} 0.34 between 3 GeV and 400 GeV, and is consistent with emission belonging to a single component in the jet. The absence of a spectral cutoff constrains the {gamma}-ray emission region to lie outside the broad-line region, which would otherwise absorb the VHE {gamma}-rays. Together with the detected fast variability, this challenges present emission models from jets in FSRQs. Moreover, the combined Fermi/LAT and MAGIC spectral data yield constraints on the density of the EBL in the UV-optical to near-infrared range that are compatible with recent models.

  11. Induced Anisotropy in FeCo-Based Nanocrystalline Ferromagnetic Alloys (HITPERM) by Very High Field Annealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F.; Garmestani, H.; Chu, S.-Y.; McHenry, M. E.; Laughlin, D. E.

    2004-01-01

    Very high magnetic field annealing is shown to affect the magnetic anisotropy in FeCo-base nanocrystalline soft ferromagnetic alloys. Alloys of composition Fe(44.5)Co(44.5)Zr(7)B(4) were prepared by melt spinning into amorphous ribbons, then wound to form toroidal bobbin cores. One set of cores was crystallized in a zero field at 600 deg. C for 1 h, then, field annealed at 17 tesla (T) at 480 deg. C for 1 h. Another set was crystallized in a 17-T field at 480 deg. C for 1 h. Field orientation was transverse to the magnetic path of the toroidal cores. An induced anisotropy is indicated by a sheared hysteresis loop. Sensitive torque magnetometry measurements with a Si cantilever sensor indicated a strong, uniaxial, longitudinal easy axis in the zero-field-crystallized sample. The source is most likely magnetoelastic anisotropy, caused by the residual stress from nanocrystallization and the nonzero magnetostriction coefficient for this material. The magnetostrictive coefficient lambda(5) is measured to be 36 ppm by a strain gage technique. Field annealing reduces the magnitude of the induced anisotropy. Core loss measurements were made in the zero-field-crystallized, zero-field-crystallized- than-field-annealed, and field-crystallized states. Core loss is reduced 30%-50% (depending on frequency) by field annealing. X-ray diffraction reveals no evidence of crystalline texture or orientation that would cause the induced anisotropy. Diffusional pair ordering is thought to be the cause of the induced anisotropy. However, reannealing the samples in the absence of a magnetic field at 480 deg. C does not completely remove the induced anisotropy.

  12. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Survey of Materials Research and Development Needs to Support Early Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Shaber; G. Baccaglini; S. Ball; T. Burchell; B. Corwin; T. Fewell; M. Labar; P. MacDonald; P. Rittenhouse; Russ Vollam; F. Southworth

    2003-01-01

    The VHTR reference concept is a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. It is expected that the VHTR will be purchased in the future as either an electricity producing plant with a direct cycle gas turbine or a hydrogen producing (or other process heat application) plant. The process heat version of the VHTR will require that an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and primary gas circulator be located in an adjoining power conversion vessel. A third VHTR mission - actinide burning - can be accomplished with either the hydrogen-production or gas turbine designs. The first ''demonstration'' VHTR will produce both electricity and hydrogen using the IHX to transfer the heat to either a hydrogen production plant or the gas turbine. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. The purpose of this report is to identify the materials research and development needs for the VHTR. To do this, we focused on the plant design described in Section 2, which is similar to the GT-MHR plant design (850 C core outlet temperature). For system or component designs that present significant material challenges (or far greater expense) there may be some viable design alternatives or options that can reduce development needs or allow use of available (cheaper) materials. Nevertheless, we were not able to assess those alternatives in the time allotted for this report and, to move forward with this material research and development assessment, the authors of this report felt that it was necessary to use a GT-MHR type design as the baseline design.

  13. Neutronic analysis stochastic distribution of fuel particles in Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei

    The Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) is a promising candidate for Generation IV designs due to its inherent safety, efficiency, and its proliferation-resistant and waste minimizing fuel cycle. A number of these advantages stem from its unique fuel design, consisting of a stochastic mixture of tiny (0.78mm diameter) microspheres with multiple coatings. However, the microsphere fuel regions represent point absorbers for resonance energy neutrons, resulting in the "double heterogeneity" for particle fuel. Special care must be taken to analyze this fuel in order to predict the spatial and spectral dependence of the neutron population in a steady-state reactor configuration. The challenges are considerable and resist brute force computation: there are over 1010 microspheres in a typical reactor configuration, with no hope of identifying individual microspheres in this stochastic mixture. Moreover, when individual microspheres "deplete" (e.g., burn the fissile isotope U-235 or transmute the fertile isotope U-238 (eventually) to Pu-239), the stochastic time-dependent nature of the depletion compounds the difficulty posed by the stochastic spatial mixture of the fuel, resulting in a prohibitive computational challenge. The goal of this research is to develop a methodology to analyze particle fuel randomly distributed in the reactor, accounting for the kernel absorptions as well as the stochastic depletion of the fuel mixture. This Ph.D. dissertation will address these challenges by developing a methodology for analyzing particle fuel that will be accurate enough to properly model stochastic particle fuel in both static and time-dependent configurations and yet be efficient enough to be used for routine analyses. This effort includes creation of a new physical model, development of a simulation algorithm, and application to real reactor configurations.

  14. Thermoacoustic contrast of prostate cancer due to heating by very high frequency irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patch, S. K.; Hull, D.; Thomas, M.; Griep, SK; Jacobsohn, K.; See, WA

    2015-01-01

    Applying the thermoacoustic (TA) effect to diagnostic imaging was first proposed in the 1980s. The object under test is irradiated by high-power pulses of electromagnetic energy, which heat tissue and cause thermal expansion. Outgoing TA pressure pulses are detected by ultrasound transducers and reconstructed to provide images of the object. The TA contrast mechanism is strongly dependent upon the frequency of the irradiating electromagnetic pulse. When very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic irradiation is utilized, TA signal production is driven by ionic content. Prostatic fluids contain high levels of ionic metabolites, including citrate, zinc, calcium, and magnesium. Healthy prostate glands produce more ionic metabolites than diseased glands. VHF pulses are therefore expected to generate stronger TA signal in healthy prostate glands than in diseased glands. A benchtop system for performing ex vivo TA computed tomography with VHF energy is described and images are presented. The system utilizes irradiation pulses of 700 ns duration exceeding 20 kW power. Reconstructions frequently visualize anatomic landmarks such as the urethra and verumontanum. TA reconstructions from three freshly excised human prostate glands with little, moderate, and severe cancerous involvement are compared with histology. TA signal strength is negatively correlated with percent cancerous involvement in this small sample size. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity. This sample size is far too small to draw sweeping conclusions, but the results warrant a larger volume study including comparison of TA images to the gold standard, histology.

  15. Thermoacoustic contrast of prostate cancer due to heating by very high frequency irradiation.

    PubMed

    Patch, S K; Hull, D; Thomas, M; Griep, S K; Jacobsohn, K; See, W A

    2015-01-21

    Applying the thermoacoustic (TA) effect to diagnostic imaging was first proposed in the 1980s. The object under test is irradiated by high-power pulses of electromagnetic energy, which heat tissue and cause thermal expansion. Outgoing TA pressure pulses are detected by ultrasound transducers and reconstructed to provide images of the object. The TA contrast mechanism is strongly dependent upon the frequency of the irradiating electromagnetic pulse. When very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic irradiation is utilized, TA signal production is driven by ionic content. Prostatic fluids contain high levels of ionic metabolites, including citrate, zinc, calcium, and magnesium. Healthy prostate glands produce more ionic metabolites than diseased glands. VHF pulses are therefore expected to generate stronger TA signal in healthy prostate glands than in diseased glands. A benchtop system for performing ex vivo TA computed tomography with VHF energy is described and images are presented. The system utilizes irradiation pulses of 700 ns duration exceeding 20 kW power. Reconstructions frequently visualize anatomic landmarks such as the urethra and verumontanum. TA reconstructions from three freshly excised human prostate glands with little, moderate, and severe cancerous involvement are compared with histology. TA signal strength is negatively correlated with percent cancerous involvement in this small sample size. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity. This sample size is far too small to draw sweeping conclusions, but the results warrant a larger volume study including comparison of TA images to the gold standard, histology.

  16. Intrinsic advantages of packed capillaries over narrow-bore columns in very high-pressure gradient liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; McDonald, Thomas; Gilar, Martin

    2016-06-17

    250μm×100mm fused silica glass capillaries were packed with 1.8μm high-strength silica (HSS) fully porous particles. They were prepared without bulky stainless steel endfittings and metal frits, which both generate significant sample dispersion. The isocratic efficiencies and gradient peak capacities of these prototype capillary columns were measured for small molecules (n-alkanophenones) using a home-made ultra-low dispersive micro-HPLC instrument. Their resolution power was compared to that of standard 2.1mm×100mm very high-pressure liquid chromatography (vHPLC) narrow-bore columns packed with the same particles. The results show that, for the same column efficiency (25000 plates) and gradient steepness (0.04min(-1)), the peak capacity of the 250μm i.d. capillary columns is systematically 15-20% higher than that of the 2.1mm i.d. narrow-bore columns. A validated model of gradient chromatography enabled one to predict accurately the observed peak capacities of the capillary columns for non-linear solvation strength retention behavior and under isothermal conditions. Thermodynamics applied to the eluent quantified the temperature difference for the thermal gradients in both capillary and narrow-bore columns. Experimental data revealed that the gradient peak capacity is more affected by viscous heating than the column efficiency. Unlike across 2.1mm i.d. columns, the changes in eluent composition across the 250μm i.d. columns during the gradient is rapidly relaxed by transverse dispersion. The combination of (1) the absence of viscous heating and (2) the high uniformity of the eluent composition across the diameter of capillary columns explains the intrinsic advantage of capillary over narrow-bore columns in gradient vHPLC.

  17. Epithelial Thickness After Hyperopic LASIK: Three-dimensional Display With Artemis Very High-frequency Digital Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Reinstein, Dan Z.; Archer, Timothy J.; Gobbe, Marine; Silverman, Ronald H.; Coleman, D. Jackson

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To characterize the epithelial thickness profile in a population of eyes after LASIK for hyperopia or hyperopic astigmatism. METHODS The epithelial thickness profile was measured in vivo by Artemis very high-frequency (VHF) digital ultrasound scanning (ArcScan Inc) across the central 10-mm diameter of the cornea on 65 eyes at least 3 months after hyperopic LASIK using a 7-mm ablation zone with the MEL 80 excimer laser (Carl Zeiss Meditec). Maps of the average, standard deviation, minimum, maximum, and range of epithelial thickness were plotted. The cross-sectional hemi-meridional epithelial thickness profile was calculated using annular averaging. Linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate correlations between epithelial thickness, spherical equivalent refraction treated, and maximum simulated keratometry. RESULTS The mean thinnest epithelial thickness was 39.7±5.6 μm and the mean thickest epithelial thickness was 89.3±14.6 μm. The average epithelial thickness profile showed an epithelial doughnut pattern characterized by localized central thinning within the 4-mm diameter zone surrounded by an annulus of thick epithelium, with the thickest epithelium at the 3.4-mm radius. The epithelium was on average 10-μm thicker temporally than nasally at the 3.4-mm radius. Central epithelium was thinner and paracentral epithelium was thicker for higher hyperopic corrections and steeper maximum simulated keratometry. CONCLUSIONS Three-dimensional high-resolution ultrasound mapping of epithelial thickness profile after LASIK for hyperopia demonstrated thinner epithelium centrally and thicker epithelium paracentrally. Presumably, the paracentral epithelial thickening compensated in part for the stromal tissue removed by the hyperopic ablation, whereas the central epithelial thinning compensated for the localized increase in corneal curvature. PMID:19928697

  18. Intrinsic advantages of packed capillaries over narrow-bore columns in very high-pressure gradient liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; McDonald, Thomas; Gilar, Martin

    2016-06-17

    250μm×100mm fused silica glass capillaries were packed with 1.8μm high-strength silica (HSS) fully porous particles. They were prepared without bulky stainless steel endfittings and metal frits, which both generate significant sample dispersion. The isocratic efficiencies and gradient peak capacities of these prototype capillary columns were measured for small molecules (n-alkanophenones) using a home-made ultra-low dispersive micro-HPLC instrument. Their resolution power was compared to that of standard 2.1mm×100mm very high-pressure liquid chromatography (vHPLC) narrow-bore columns packed with the same particles. The results show that, for the same column efficiency (25000 plates) and gradient steepness (0.04min(-1)), the peak capacity of the 250μm i.d. capillary columns is systematically 15-20% higher than that of the 2.1mm i.d. narrow-bore columns. A validated model of gradient chromatography enabled one to predict accurately the observed peak capacities of the capillary columns for non-linear solvation strength retention behavior and under isothermal conditions. Thermodynamics applied to the eluent quantified the temperature difference for the thermal gradients in both capillary and narrow-bore columns. Experimental data revealed that the gradient peak capacity is more affected by viscous heating than the column efficiency. Unlike across 2.1mm i.d. columns, the changes in eluent composition across the 250μm i.d. columns during the gradient is rapidly relaxed by transverse dispersion. The combination of (1) the absence of viscous heating and (2) the high uniformity of the eluent composition across the diameter of capillary columns explains the intrinsic advantage of capillary over narrow-bore columns in gradient vHPLC. PMID:27185055

  19. USGS advances in integrated, high-resolution sea-floor mapping: inner continental shelf to estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denny, J.F.; Schwab, W.C.; Twichell, D.C.; O'Brien, T.F.; Danforth, W.W.; Foster, D.S.; Bergeron, E.; Worley, C.W.; Irwin, B.J.; Butman, B.; Valentine, P.C.; Baldwin, W.E.; Morton, R.A.; Thieler, E.R.; Nichols, D.R.; Andrews, B.D.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been involved in geological mapping of the sea floor for the past thirty years. Early geophysical and acoustic mapping efforts using GLORIA (Geologic LOng Range Inclined ASDIC) a long-range sidescan-sonar system, provided broad-scale imagery of deep waters within the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). In the early 1990's, research emphasis shifted from deep- to shallow-water environments to address pertinent coastal research and resource management issues. Use of shallow-water, high-resolution geophysical systems has enhanced our understanding of the processes shaping shallow marine environments. However, research within these shallow-water environments continues to present technological challenges.

  20. Advanced CLARITY for rapid and high-resolution imaging of intact tissues

    PubMed Central

    Tomer, Raju; Ye, Li; Hsueh, Brian; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    CLARITY is a method for chemical transformation of intact biological tissues into a hydrogel-tissue hybrid, which becomes amenable to interrogation with light and macromolecular labels while retaining fine structure and native biological molecules. This emerging accessibility of information from large intact samples has created both new opportunities and new challenges. Here we describe next-generation protocols spanning multiple dimensions of the CLARITY workflow, ranging from a novel approach to simple, reliable, and efficient lipid removal without electrophoretic instrumentation (passive CLARITY), to optimized objectives and integration with light-sheet optics (CLARITY-optimized light-sheet microscopy or COLM) for accelerating data collection from clarified samples by several orders of magnitude while maintaining or increasing quality and resolution. These methods may find application in the structural and molecular analysis of large assembled biological systems such as the intact mammalian brain. PMID:24945384

  1. Advancing Satellite-Based Flood Prediction in Complex Terrain Using High-Resolution Numerical Weather Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Nikolopoulos, E. I.; Bartsotas, N. S.

    2015-12-01

    Floods constitute one of the most significant and frequent natural hazard in mountainous regions. Satellite-based precipitation products offer in many cases the only available source of QPE. However, satellite-based QPE over complex terrain suffer from significant bias that limits their applicability for hydrologic modeling. In this work we investigate the potential of a new correction procedure, which involves the use of high-resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP) model simulations to adjust satellite QPE. Adjustment is based on the pdf matching of satellite and NWP (used as reference) precipitation distribution. The impact of correction procedure on simulating the hydrologic response is examined for 15 storm events that generated floods over the mountainous Upper Adige region of Northern Italy. Atmospheric simulations were performed at 1-km resolution from a state-of-the-art atmospheric model (RAMS/ICLAMS). The proposed error correction procedure was then applied on the widely used TRMM 3B42 satellite precipitation product and the evaluation of the correction was based on independent in situ precipitation measurements from a dense rain gauge network (1 gauge / 70 km2) available in the study area. Satellite QPE, before and after correction, are used to simulate flood response using ARFFS (Adige River Flood Forecasting System), a semi-distributed hydrologic model, which is used for operational flood forecasting in the region. Results showed that bias in satellite QPE before correction was significant and had a tremendous impact on the simulation of flood peak, however the correction procedure was able to reduce bias in QPE and therefore improve considerably the simulated flood hydrograph.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Frisani, Angelo; Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2010-11-02

    The design of passive heat removal systems is one of the main concerns for the modular very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR) vessel cavity. The reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) is a key heat removal system during normal and off-normal conditions. The design and validation of the RCCS is necessary to demonstrate that VHTRs can survive to the postulated accidents. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) STAR-CCM+/V3.06.006 code was used for three-dimensional system modeling and analysis of the RCCS. A CFD model was developed to analyze heat exchange in the RCCS. The model incorporates a 180-deg section resembling the VHTR RCCS experimentally reproduced in a laboratory-scale test facility at Texas A&M University. All the key features of the experimental facility were taken into account during the numerical simulations. The objective of the present work was to benchmark CFD tools against experimental data addressing the behavior of the RCCS following accident conditions. Two cooling fluids (i.e., water and air) were considered to test the capability of maintaining the RCCS concrete walls' temperature below design limits. Different temperature profiles at the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall obtained from the experimental facility were used as boundary conditions in the numerical analyses to simulate VHTR transient evolution during accident scenarios. Mesh convergence was achieved with an intensive parametric study of the two different cooling configurations and selected boundary conditions. To test the effect of turbulence modeling on the RCCS heat exchange, predictions using several different turbulence models and near-wall treatments were evaluated and compared. The comparison among the different turbulence models analyzed showed satisfactory agreement for the temperature distribution inside the RCCS cavity medium and at the standpipes walls. For such a complicated geometry and flow conditions, the tested turbulence models demonstrated that the

  3. Multiwavelength Observations of the Very High Energy Blazar 1ES 2344+514

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acciari, V. A.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Boltuch, D.; Bugaev, V.; Cannon, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cogan, P.; Colin, P.; Dickherber, R.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S. J.; Finley, J. P.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L. F.; Furniss, A.; Gall, D.; Gillanders, G. H.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Horan, D.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Kildea, J.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; LeBohec, S.; Maier, G.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Rose, H. J.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Smith, A. W.; Steele, D.; Swordy, S. P.; Theiling, M.; Toner, J. A.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wagner, R.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wissel, S.; Wood, M.; Zitzer, B.

    2011-09-01

    Multiwavelength observations of the high-frequency-peaked blazar 1ES 2344+514 were performed from 2007 October to 2008 January. The campaign represents the first contemporaneous data on the object at very high energy (VHE, E >100 GeV) γ-ray, X-ray, and UV energies. Observations with VERITAS in VHE γ-rays yield a strong detection of 20σ with 633 excess events in a total exposure of 18.1 hr live time. A strong VHE γ-ray flare on 2007 December 7 is measured at F(>300 GeV) = (6.76 ± 0.62) × 10-11 photons cm-2 s-1, corresponding to 48% of the Crab Nebula flux. Excluding this flaring episode, nightly variability at lower fluxes is observed with a time-averaged mean of F(>300 GeV) = (1.06 ± 0.09) × 10-11 photons cm-2 s-1 (7.6% of the Crab Nebula flux). The differential photon spectrum between 390 GeV and 8.3 TeV for the time-averaged observations excluding 2007 December 7 is well described by a power law with a photon index of Γ = 2.78 ± 0.09stat ± 0.15syst. On the flaring night of 2007 December 7 the measured VHE γ-ray photon index was Γ = 2.43 ± 0.22stat ± 0.15syst. Over the full period of VERITAS observations contemporaneous X-ray and UV data were taken with Swift and RXTE. The measured 2-10 keV flux ranged by a factor of ~7 during the campaign. On 2007 December 8 the highest ever observed X-ray flux from 1ES 2344+514 was measured by Swift X-ray Telescope at a flux of F(2-10 keV) = (6.28 ± 0.31) × 10-11 erg cm-2 s-1. Evidence for a correlation between the X-ray flux and VHE γ-ray flux on nightly timescales is indicated with a Pearson correlation coefficient of r = 0.60 ± 0.11. Contemporaneous spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 1ES 2344+514 are presented for two distinct flux states. A one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model describes both SEDs using parameters consistent with previous SSC modeling of 1ES 2344+514 from non-contemporaneous observations.

  4. Effect of column dimension on observed column efficiency in very high pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Naijun; Bradley, Ashley C

    2012-10-26

    The effect of extra-column volume on observed linear velocity was investigated for columns of various internal diameters in very high pressure liquid chromatography. The results showed that the observed linear velocities were approximately 4.5, 9.5, 16.8, and 39.5% lower than the linear velocities corrected for the extra-column volume contribution for 4.6, 3.0, 2.1, and 1.0mm internal diameter columns, respectively. An empirical relationship between extra-column band broadening and extra-column volume was obtained using 50 cm long tubings of various internal diameters. The peak variance from the extra-column volume is near linearly proportional to the square of the extra-column volume for tubings with 0.0635-0.178 mm (0.025-0.07 in.) i.d. using a 50/50 acetonitrile/water mobile phase at flow rates greater than 0.3 mL/min. The effect of column internal diameter and column length on observed efficiency was studied using 50mm columns with four different column internal diameters and 2.1mm i.d columns with three different lengths. The results showed that the observed column efficiencies for 3.0, 2.1, and 1.0mm internal diameter columns were 18, 33, and 73% lower than that for a 4.6mm internal diameter column for benzophenone (k=5.5), respectively. An approximate 20% decrease in theoretical plate number was observed for propiophenone (k=3.3) using a 50 mm × 2.1 mm column packed with 1.7 μm particles compared to a 150 mm × 2.1 mm column packed with 5.0 μm particles, while the former column provided 9 fold faster separation. It is the column to extra column volume ratio instead of absolute extra-column volume that determines the degree of extra-column band-broadening in VHPLC.

  5. Investigation on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Yassin

    2013-10-22

    Uncertainties associated with the core bypass flow are some of the key issues that directly influence the coolant mass flow distribution and magnitude, and thus the operational core temperature profiles, in the very high-temperature reactor (VHTR). Designers will attempt to configure the core geometry so the core cooling flow rate magnitude and distribution conform to the design values. The objective of this project is to study the bypass flow both experimentally and computationally. Researchers will develop experimental data using state-of-the-art particle image velocimetry in a small test facility. The team will attempt to obtain full field temperature distribution using racks of thermocouples. The experimental data are intended to benchmark computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes by providing detailed information. These experimental data are urgently needed for validation of the CFD codes. The following are the project tasks: • Construct a small-scale bench-top experiment to resemble the bypass flow between the graphite blocks, varying parameters to address their impact on bypass flow. Wall roughness of the graphite block walls, spacing between the blocks, and temperature of the blocks are some of the parameters to be tested. • Perform CFD to evaluate pre- and post-test calculations and turbulence models, including sensitivity studies to achieve high accuracy. • Develop the state-of-the art large eddy simulation (LES) using appropriate subgrid modeling. • Develop models to be used in systems thermal hydraulics codes to account and estimate the bypass flows. These computer programs include, among others, RELAP3D, MELCOR, GAMMA, and GAS-NET. Actual core bypass flow rate may vary considerably from the design value. Although the uncertainty of the bypass flow rate is not known, some sources have stated that the bypass flow rates in the Fort St. Vrain reactor were between 8 and 25 percent of the total reactor mass flow rate. If bypass flow rates are on the

  6. Very high CO2 reduces photosynthesis, dark respiration and yield in wheat.

    PubMed

    Reuveni, J; Bugbee, B

    1997-10-01

    Although terrestrial CO2 concentrations, [CO2] are not expected to reach 1000 micromoles mol-1 for many decades, CO2 levels in closed systems such as growth chambers and glasshouses, can easily exceed this concentration. CO2 levels in life support systems in space can exceed 10000 micromoles mol-1 (1%). Here we studied the effect of six CO2 concentrations, from ambient up to 10000 micromoles mol-1, on seed yield, growth and gas exchange of two wheat cultivars (USU-Apogee and Veery-l0). Elevating [CO2] from 350 to 1000 micromoles mol-1 increased seed yield (by 33%), vegetative biomass (by 25%) and number of heads m-2 (by 34%) of wheat plants. Elevation of [CO2] from 1000 to 10000 micromoles mol-1 decreased seed yield (by 37%), harvest index (by 14%), mass per seed (by 9%) and number of seeds per head (by 29%). This very high [CO2] had a negligible, non-significant effect on vegetative biomass, number of heads m-2 and seed mass per head. A sharp decrease in seed yield, harvest index and seeds per head occurred by elevating [CO2] from 1000 to 2600 micromoles mol-1. Further elevation of [CO2] from 2600 to 10000 micromoles mol-1 caused a further but smaller decrease. The effect of CO2 on both wheat cultivars was similar for all growth parameters. Similarly there were no differences in the response to high [CO2] between wheat grown hydroponically in growth chambers under fluorescent lights and those grown in soilless media in a glasshouse under sunlight and high pressure sodium lamps. There was no correlation between high [CO2] and ethylene production by flag leaves or by wheat heads. Therefore, the reduction in seed set in wheat plants is not mediated by ethylene. The photosynthetic rate of whole wheat plants was 8% lower and dark respiration of the wheat heads 25% lower when exposed to 2600 micromoles mol-1 CO2 compared to ambient [CO2]. It is concluded that the reduction in the seed set can be mainly explained by the reduction in the dark respiration in wheat heads

  7. Very high CO2 reduces photosynthesis, dark respiration and yield in wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuveni, J.; Bugbee, B.

    1997-01-01

    Although terrestrial CO2 concentrations, [CO2] are not expected to reach 1000 micromoles mol-1 for many decades, CO2 levels in closed systems such as growth chambers and glasshouses, can easily exceed this concentration. CO2 levels in life support systems in space can exceed 10000 micromoles mol-1 (1%). Here we studied the effect of six CO2 concentrations, from ambient up to 10000 micromoles mol-1, on seed yield, growth and gas exchange of two wheat cultivars (USU-Apogee and Veery-l0). Elevating [CO2] from 350 to 1000 micromoles mol-1 increased seed yield (by 33%), vegetative biomass (by 25%) and number of heads m-2 (by 34%) of wheat plants. Elevation of [CO2] from 1000 to 10000 micromoles mol-1 decreased seed yield (by 37%), harvest index (by 14%), mass per seed (by 9%) and number of seeds per head (by 29%). This very high [CO2] had a negligible, non-significant effect on vegetative biomass, number of heads m-2 and seed mass per head. A sharp decrease in seed yield, harvest index and seeds per head occurred by elevating [CO2] from 1000 to 2600 micromoles mol-1. Further elevation of [CO2] from 2600 to 10000 micromoles mol-1 caused a further but smaller decrease. The effect of CO2 on both wheat cultivars was similar for all growth parameters. Similarly there were no differences in the response to high [CO2] between wheat grown hydroponically in growth chambers under fluorescent lights and those grown in soilless media in a glasshouse under sunlight and high pressure sodium lamps. There was no correlation between high [CO2] and ethylene production by flag leaves or by wheat heads. Therefore, the reduction in seed set in wheat plants is not mediated by ethylene. The photosynthetic rate of whole wheat plants was 8% lower and dark respiration of the wheat heads 25% lower when exposed to 2600 micromoles mol-1 CO2 compared to ambient [CO2]. It is concluded that the reduction in the seed set can be mainly explained by the reduction in the dark respiration in wheat heads

  8. Development and Verification of Tritium Analyses Code for a Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

    2009-09-01

    A tritium permeation analyses code (TPAC) has been developed by Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of analyzing tritium distributions in the VHTR systems including integrated hydrogen production systems. A MATLAB SIMULINK software package was used for development of the code. The TPAC is based on the mass balance equations of tritium-containing species and a various form of hydrogen (i.e., HT, H2, HTO, HTSO4, and TI) coupled with a variety of tritium source, sink, and permeation models. In the TPAC, ternary fission and neutron reactions with 6Li, 7Li 10B, 3He were taken into considerations as tritium sources. Purification and leakage models were implemented as main tritium sinks. Permeation of HT and H2 through pipes, vessels, and heat exchangers were importantly considered as main tritium transport paths. In addition, electroyzer and isotope exchange models were developed for analyzing hydrogen production systems including both high-temperature electrolysis and sulfur-iodine process. The TPAC has unlimited flexibility for the system configurations, and provides easy drag-and-drops for making models by adopting a graphical user interface. Verification of the code has been performed by comparisons with the analytical solutions and the experimental data based on the Peach Bottom reactor design. The preliminary results calculated with a former tritium analyses code, THYTAN which was developed in Japan and adopted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency were also compared with the TPAC solutions. This report contains descriptions of the basic tritium pathways, theory, simple user guide, verifications, sensitivity studies, sample cases, and code tutorials. Tritium behaviors in a very high temperature reactor/high temperature steam electrolysis system have been analyzed by the TPAC based on the reference indirect parallel configuration proposed by Oh et al. (2007). This analysis showed that only 0.4% of tritium released from the core is transferred to the product hydrogen

  9. Development of Safety Analysis Codes and Experimental Validation for a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, H. Oh, PhD; Cliff Davis; Richard Moore

    2004-11-01

    The very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTGRs) are those concepts that have average coolant temperatures above 900 degrees C or operational fuel temperatures above 1250 degrees C. These concepts provide the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation and nuclear hydrogen generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperatures to support process heat applications, such as desalination and cogeneration, the VHTGR's higher temperatures are suitable for particular applications such as thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the high temperature operation can be detrimental to safety following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) initiated by pipe breaks caused by seismic or other events. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air from the containment will enter the core by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structures and fuel. The oxidation will release heat and accelerate the heatup of the reactor core. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has investigated this event for the past three years for the HTGR. However, the computer codes used, and in fact none of the world's computer codes, have been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably predict this event. New code development, improvement of the existing codes, and experimental validation are imperative to narrow the uncertaninty in the predictions of this type of accident. The objectives of this Korean/United States collaboration are to develop advanced computational methods for VHTGR safety analysis codes and to validate these computer codes.

  10. Final report: VHE [very high energy] gamma-ray astronomy at Iowa State University, 1991-2000

    SciTech Connect

    Carter-Lewis, D.

    2001-01-30

    A brief summary of the important results and a listing of publications which have resulted from the Iowa State University Very High Energy Gamma-ray Astrophysics Program for the decade 1991-2000 are given.

  11. Advanced Characterization of Soil Organic Matter Using Ultra High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tfaily, M. M.; Chu, R.; Tolic, N.; Roscioli, K.; Robinson, E. R.; Paša-Tolić, L.; Hess, N. J.

    2014-12-01

    The focus on ecosystem stress and climate change is currently relevant as researchers and policymakers strive to understand the feedbacks between soil C dynamics and climate change. Successful development of molecular profiles that link soil microbiology with soil carbon (C) to ascertain soil vulnerability and resilience to climate change would have great impact on assessments of soil ecosystems in response to climate change. Additionally, better understanding of the dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM) plays a central role to climate modeling, and fate and transport of carbon. The use of ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry (UHR MS) has enabled the examination of molecules, directly from mixtures, with ultrahigh mass resolution and sub-ppm mass accuracy. In this study, EMSL's extensive expertise and capabilities in UHR MS proteomics were leveraged to develop extraction protocols for the characterization of carbon compounds in SOM, thereby providing the chemical and structural detail needed to develop mechanistic descriptions of soil carbon flow processes. Our experiments have allowed us to identify thousands of individual compounds in complex soil mixtures with a wide range of C content representing diverse ecosystems within the USA. The yield of the chemical extraction was dependent on (1) the type of solvent used and its polarity, (2) sample-to-solvent ratios and (3) the chemical and physical nature of the samples including their origins. Hexane, a non-polar organic solvent, was efficient in extracting lipid-like compounds regardless of soil origin or organic carbon %. For samples with high organic carbon %, acetonitrile extracted a wide range of compounds characterized with high O/C ratios, identified as polyphenolic compounds that were not observed with methanol extraction. Soils extracted with pyridine showed a similar molecular distribution to those extracted by methanol. Solvent extraction followed by UHR MS is a promising tool to understand the

  12. Fast neural network surrogates for very high dimensional physics-based models in computational oceanography.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Rudolph; Leen, Todd K; Lu, Zhengdong; Frolov, Sergey; Baptista, Antonio M

    2007-05-01

    We present neural network surrogates that provide extremely fast and accurate emulation of a large-scale circulation model for the coupled Columbia River, its estuary and near ocean regions. The circulation model has O(10(7)) degrees of freedom, is highly nonlinear and is driven by ocean, atmospheric and river influences at its boundaries. The surrogates provide accurate emulation of the full circulation code and run over 1000 times faster. Such fast dynamic surrogates will enable significant advances in ensemble forecasts in oceanography and weather.

  13. Fast neural network surrogates for very high dimensional physics-based models in computational oceanography.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Rudolph; Leen, Todd K; Lu, Zhengdong; Frolov, Sergey; Baptista, Antonio M

    2007-05-01

    We present neural network surrogates that provide extremely fast and accurate emulation of a large-scale circulation model for the coupled Columbia River, its estuary and near ocean regions. The circulation model has O(10(7)) degrees of freedom, is highly nonlinear and is driven by ocean, atmospheric and river influences at its boundaries. The surrogates provide accurate emulation of the full circulation code and run over 1000 times faster. Such fast dynamic surrogates will enable significant advances in ensemble forecasts in oceanography and weather. PMID:17517493

  14. MODIS - Advanced facility instrument for studies of the earth as a system. [Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, Vincent V.; Barnes, W. L.; Maymon, Peter W.; Montgomery, Harry E.; Ostrow, Harvey

    1989-01-01

    The moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS) is discussed as an earth-viewing sensor that is planned as a facility instrument for the Earth Observing System (EOS) scheduled to begin functioning in the mid-1990s. The MODIS is composed of two mutually supporting sensors that cover a swath width sufficient to provide nearly complete two-day global coverage from a polar-orbiting, sun-synchronous, serviceable platform. High signal-to-noise ratios are to be provided, e.g., 500 to 1 or greater with 10-12-bit quantization over the dynamic ranges of the spectral bands. MODIS' lifetime is expected to be about ten years. One of the MODIS sensors is termed MODIS-N, where N signifies nadir-viewing. The companion to MODIS-N is MODIS-T, where T signifies a tiltable field-of-view. The development of the MODIS facility from conceptual design studies (Phase-A) into detailed design studies (Phase-B) is discussed.

  15. Large-Vortex Capture by a Wing at Very High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. M.; Wu, J. Z.; Denny, G. A.; Lu, X. Y.

    1996-01-01

    In generating the lift on a wing, the static stall is a severe barrier. As the angle of attack, alpha, increases to the stall angle, alpha(sub stall) the flow separation point on the upper surface of the wing moves to the leading edge, so that on a two-dimensional airfoil or a large-aspect-ratio wing, the lift abruptly drops to a very low level. Therefore, the first generation of aeronautical flow type, i.e., the attached steady flow, has been limited to alpha less than alpha(sub stall). Owing to the obvious importance in applications, therefore, a great effort has been made in the past two decades to enlarge the range of usable angles of attack by various flow controls for a large-aspect-ratio wing. Basically, relevant works fall into two categories. The first category is usually refereed to as separation control, which concentrates on partially separated flow at alpha less than alpha(sub stall). Since the first experimental study of Collins and Zelenevitz, there has been ample literature showing that a partially separated flow can be turned to almost fully attached by flow controls, so that the lift is recovered and the stall is delayed (for a recent work see Seifert et al.). It has been well established that, in this category, unsteady controls are much more effective than steady ones and can be realized at a very low power-input level (Wu et al.; Seifert et al.). The second and more ambitious category of relevant efforts is the post-stall lift enhancement. Its possibility roots at the existence of a second lift peak at a very high angle of attack. In fact, As alpha further increases from alpha(sub stall), the completely separated flow develops and gradually becomes a bluff-body flow. This flow gives a normal force to the airfoil with a lift component, which reaches a peak at a maximum utilizable angle of attack, alpha(sub m) approx.= 40 deg. This second peak is of the same level as the first lift peak at alpha(sub stall). Meanwhile, the drag is also quickly

  16. Behavior of femtosecond laser-induced eccentric fiber Bragg gratings at very high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chikh-Bled, Hicham; Chah, Karima; González-Vila, Álvaro; Lasri, Boumediène; Caucheteur, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    In this work, eccentric Bragg gratings are photoinscribed in telecommunication-grade optical fibers. They are localized close to the core-cladding interface, yielding strong cladding mode resonance couplings and high photoinduced birefringence. Their transmitted amplitude spectrum is measured with polarized light while they are exposed to temperature changes up to 900°C. Despite the gratings' overall good thermal stability that confirms their robustness for high-temperature refractometry, we report an interesting polarization effect depending on both the cladding mode resonance family and mode order. While the core mode birefringence decreases with growing temperatures, certain cladding mode resonances show an increase in wavelength splitting between their orthogonally polarized components. This differential behavior is of high interest in developing high-resolution, multiparametric sensing platforms. PMID:27607969

  17. A New Advanced Backcross Tomato Population Enables High Resolution Leaf QTL Mapping and Gene Identification

    PubMed Central

    Fulop, Daniel; Ranjan, Aashish; Ofner, Itai; Covington, Michael F.; Chitwood, Daniel H.; West, Donelly; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Headland, Lauren; Zamir, Daniel; Maloof, Julin N.; Sinha, Neelima R.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) mapping is a powerful technique for dissecting the genetic basis of traits and species differences. Established tomato mapping populations between domesticated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and its more distant interfertile relatives typically follow a near isogenic line (NIL) design, such as the S. pennellii Introgression Line (IL) population, with a single wild introgression per line in an otherwise domesticated genetic background. Here, we report on a new advanced backcross QTL mapping resource for tomato, derived from a cross between the M82 tomato cultivar and S. pennellii. This so-called Backcrossed Inbred Line (BIL) population is comprised of a mix of BC2 and BC3 lines, with domesticated tomato as the recurrent parent. The BIL population is complementary to the existing S. pennellii IL population, with which it shares parents. Using the BILs, we mapped traits for leaf complexity, leaflet shape, and flowering time. We demonstrate the utility of the BILs for fine-mapping QTL, particularly QTL initially mapped in the ILs, by fine-mapping several QTL to single or few candidate genes. Moreover, we confirm the value of a backcrossed population with multiple introgressions per line, such as the BILs, for epistatic QTL mapping. Our work was further enabled by the development of our own statistical inference and visualization tools, namely a heterogeneous hidden Markov model for genotyping the lines, and by using state-of-the-art sparse regression techniques for QTL mapping. PMID:27510891

  18. Performance of a high-resolution x-ray microprobe at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Lai, B.; Yun, W.; McNulty, I.; Khounsary, A.; Maser, J.; Ilinski, P.; Legnini, D.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Xu, S.; Tieman, B.; Wiemerslage, G.; Gluskin, E.

    1999-12-20

    The authors have developed a x-ray microprobe in the energy region from 6 to 20 keV using undulator radiation and zone-plate optics for microfocusing-based techniques and applications at a beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The performance of the beamline was shown to meet the design objectives, including preservation of the source brilliance and coherence, selectable transverse coherence length and energy bandwidth, high angular stability, and harmonic suppression of the beam. These objectives were achieved by careful thermal management and use of a novel mirror and crystal monochromator cooling geometry. All beamline optical components are water cooled, and the x-ray beam in the experiment station is stable in beam intensity, energy, and position over many days with no active feedback. Using a double-crystal Si(111) monochromator, they have obtained a focal spot size (FWHM) of 0.15 {micro}m (v) x 1.0 {micro}m (h), and a photon flux of 4 x 10{sup 9} photons/sec at the focal spot, and thus a photon flux density gain of 15,000. A circular beam spot of 0.15 {micro}m in diameter can be achieved by reducing the horizontal source size using a white beam slit located 43.5 meters upstream of the zone plate, with an order of magnitude less flux in the focal spot.

  19. High-resolution imaging of hypervelocity metal jets using advanced high-speed photographic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, L.L.; Muelder, S.A.

    1995-08-29

    It is now possible to obtain high resolution sequential photographs of the initial formation and evolution of hypervelocity metal jets formed by shaped charge devices fired in air. Researchers have been frustrated by the high velocity of the jet material and the luminous sheath of hot gases cloaking the jet that made detailed observation of the jet body extremely difficult. The camera system that provides the photographs is a large format multi-frame electro-optic camera, referred to as an IC camera (IC stands for image converter), that utilizes electro-optic shuttering, monochromatic pulsed laser illumination and bandpass filtering to provide sequential pictures (in 3D if desired) with minimal degradation due to luminous air shocks or motion blur. The large format (75mm image plane), short exposure (15 ns minimum), ruby laser illumination and bandpass filtering (monochromatic illumination while excluding extraneous light) produces clear, sharp, images of the detailed surface structure of a metal shaped charge jet during early jet formation, elongation of the jet body, jet tip evolution and subsequent particulation (breakup) of the jet body. By utilizing the new camera system in conjunction with the more traditional rotating mirror high speed cameras, pulsed radiography, and electrical sensors, a maximum amount of, often unique, data can be extracted from a single experiment. This paper was intended primarily as an oral presentation. For purposes of continuity and simplicity in these proceedings, the authors have chosen to concentrate on the development of the IC camera system and its impact on the photography of high speed shaped chargejets.

  20. Interference effects of very high bypass ratio nacelle installations on a low-wing transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingraldi, Anthony M.; Re, Richard J.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.; Kariya, Timmy T.

    1991-01-01

    A twin-engine, low-wing transport model, with a supercritical wing designed for a cruise Mach number of 0.77 and a lift coefficient of 0.55 was tested in the 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of this test was to compare the wing/nacelle interference effects of superfans (BPR 18) with the interference effects of advanced turbofans (BPR 6). Flow-through nacelles were used. Forces and moments on the complete model were measured using a strain gage balance, and extensive surface static pressure measurements were made on the model's wing, nacelles, and pylons. Results of the investigation indicate that superfan nacelles can be installed with approximately the same drag penalty as conventional turbofan nacelles.