Science.gov

Sample records for advanced visualization tools

  1. STRING 3: An Advanced Groundwater Flow Visualization Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Simon; Michel, Isabel; Biedert, Tim; Gräfe, Marius; Seidel, Torsten; König, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The visualization of 3D groundwater flow is a challenging task. Previous versions of our software STRING [1] solely focused on intuitive visualization of complex flow scenarios for non-professional audiences. STRING, developed by Fraunhofer ITWM (Kaiserslautern, Germany) and delta h Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH (Witten, Germany), provides the necessary means for visualization of both 2D and 3D data on planar and curved surfaces. In this contribution we discuss how to extend this approach to a full 3D tool and its challenges in continuation of Michel et al. [2]. This elevates STRING from a post-production to an exploration tool for experts. In STRING moving pathlets provide an intuition of velocity and direction of both steady-state and transient flows. The visualization concept is based on the Lagrangian view of the flow. To capture every detail of the flow an advanced method for intelligent, time-dependent seeding is used building on the Finite Pointset Method (FPM) developed by Fraunhofer ITWM. Lifting our visualization approach from 2D into 3D provides many new challenges. With the implementation of a seeding strategy for 3D one of the major problems has already been solved (see Schröder et al. [3]). As pathlets only provide an overview of the velocity field other means are required for the visualization of additional flow properties. We suggest the use of Direct Volume Rendering and isosurfaces for scalar features. In this regard we were able to develop an efficient approach for combining the rendering through raytracing of the volume and regular OpenGL geometries. This is achieved through the use of Depth Peeling or A-Buffers for the rendering of transparent geometries. Animation of pathlets requires a strict boundary of the simulation domain. Hence, STRING needs to extract the boundary, even from unstructured data, if it is not provided. In 3D we additionally need a good visualization of the boundary itself. For this the silhouette based on the angle of

  2. Human Factors Evaluation of Advanced Electric Power Grid Visualization Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Dauenhauer, Peter M.; Wierks, Tamara G.; Podmore, Robin

    2009-04-01

    This report describes initial human factors evaluation of four visualization tools (Graphical Contingency Analysis, Force Directed Graphs, Phasor State Estimator and Mode Meter/ Mode Shapes) developed by PNNL, and proposed test plans that may be implemented to evaluate their utility in scenario-based experiments.

  3. Recovery Act: Advanced Interaction, Computation, and Visualization Tools for Sustainable Building Design

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Donald P.; Hencey, Brandon M.

    2013-08-20

    Current building energy simulation technology requires excessive labor, time and expertise to create building energy models, excessive computational time for accurate simulations and difficulties with the interpretation of the results. These deficiencies can be ameliorated using modern graphical user interfaces and algorithms which take advantage of modern computer architectures and display capabilities. To prove this hypothesis, we developed an experimental test bed for building energy simulation. This novel test bed environment offers an easy-to-use interactive graphical interface, provides access to innovative simulation modules that run at accelerated computational speeds, and presents new graphics visualization methods to interpret simulation results. Our system offers the promise of dramatic ease of use in comparison with currently available building energy simulation tools. Its modular structure makes it suitable for early stage building design, as a research platform for the investigation of new simulation methods, and as a tool for teaching concepts of sustainable design. Improvements in the accuracy and execution speed of many of the simulation modules are based on the modification of advanced computer graphics rendering algorithms. Significant performance improvements are demonstrated in several computationally expensive energy simulation modules. The incorporation of these modern graphical techniques should advance the state of the art in the domain of whole building energy analysis and building performance simulation, particularly at the conceptual design stage when decisions have the greatest impact. More importantly, these better simulation tools will enable the transition from prescriptive to performative energy codes, resulting in better, more efficient designs for our future built environment.

  4. Continuous Symmetry and Chemistry Teachers: Learning Advanced Chemistry Content through Novel Visualization Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuvi-Arad, Inbal; Blonder, Ron

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe the learning process of a group of experienced chemistry teachers in a specially designed workshop on molecular symmetry and continuous symmetry. The workshop was based on interactive visualization tools that allow molecules and their symmetry elements to be rotated in three dimensions. The topic of continuous symmetry is…

  5. Performance analysis and optimization of an advanced pharmaceutical wastewater treatment plant through a visual basic software tool (PWWT.VB).

    PubMed

    Pal, Parimal; Thakura, Ritwik; Chakrabortty, Sankha

    2016-05-01

    A user-friendly, menu-driven simulation software tool has been developed for the first time to optimize and analyze the system performance of an advanced continuous membrane-integrated pharmaceutical wastewater treatment plant. The software allows pre-analysis and manipulation of input data which helps in optimization and shows the software performance visually on a graphical platform. Moreover, the software helps the user to "visualize" the effects of the operating parameters through its model-predicted output profiles. The software is based on a dynamic mathematical model, developed for a systematically integrated forward osmosis-nanofiltration process for removal of toxic organic compounds from pharmaceutical wastewater. The model-predicted values have been observed to corroborate well with the extensive experimental investigations which were found to be consistent under varying operating conditions like operating pressure, operating flow rate, and draw solute concentration. Low values of the relative error (RE = 0.09) and high values of Willmott-d-index (d will = 0.981) reflected a high degree of accuracy and reliability of the software. This software is likely to be a very efficient tool for system design or simulation of an advanced membrane-integrated treatment plant for hazardous wastewater.

  6. CMS tracker visualization tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennea, M. S.; Osborne, I.; Regano, A.; Zito, G.

    2005-08-01

    This document will review the design considerations, implementations and performance of the CMS Tracker Visualization tools. In view of the great complexity of this sub-detector (more than 50 millions channels organized in 16540 modules each one of these being a complete detector), the standard CMS visualization tools (IGUANA and IGUANACMS) that provide basic 3D capabilities and integration within CMS framework, respectively, have been complemented with additional 2D graphics objects. Based on the experience acquired using this software to debug and understand both hardware and software during the construction phase, we propose possible future improvements to cope with online monitoring and event analysis during data taking.

  7. Visual Tools for Constructing Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyerle, David

    The brain works by making patterns, and this process can be visualized through a medium called visual tools. The book discusses three types of visual tools: brainstorming webs, task-specific organizers, and thinking-process maps. Sample lessons, assessments, and descriptions of visual tools in action are included. Emphasis is placed on the…

  8. Grid Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chouinard, Caroline; Fisher, Forest; Estlin, Tara; Gaines, Daniel; Schaffer, Steven

    2005-01-01

    The Grid Visualization Tool (GVT) is a computer program for displaying the path of a mobile robotic explorer (rover) on a terrain map. The GVT reads a map-data file in either portable graymap (PGM) or portable pixmap (PPM) format, representing a gray-scale or color map image, respectively. The GVT also accepts input from path-planning and activity-planning software. From these inputs, the GVT generates a map overlaid with one or more rover path(s), waypoints, locations of targets to be explored, and/or target-status information (indicating success or failure in exploring each target). The display can also indicate different types of paths or path segments, such as the path actually traveled versus a planned path or the path traveled to the present position versus planned future movement along a path. The program provides for updating of the display in real time to facilitate visualization of progress. The size of the display and the map scale can be changed as desired by the user. The GVT was written in the C++ language using the Open Graphics Library (OpenGL) software. It has been compiled for both Sun Solaris and Linux operating systems.

  9. A Visual Basic simulation software tool for performance analysis of a membrane-based advanced water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Pal, P; Kumar, R; Srivastava, N; Chowdhury, J

    2014-02-01

    A Visual Basic simulation software (WATTPPA) has been developed to analyse the performance of an advanced wastewater treatment plant. This user-friendly and menu-driven software is based on the dynamic mathematical model for an industrial wastewater treatment scheme that integrates chemical, biological and membrane-based unit operations. The software-predicted results corroborate very well with the experimental findings as indicated in the overall correlation coefficient of the order of 0.99. The software permits pre-analysis and manipulation of input data, helps in optimization and exhibits performance of an integrated plant visually on a graphical platform. It allows quick performance analysis of the whole system as well as the individual units. The software first of its kind in its domain and in the well-known Microsoft Excel environment is likely to be very useful in successful design, optimization and operation of an advanced hybrid treatment plant for hazardous wastewater.

  10. MO-E-18C-04: Advanced Computer Simulation and Visualization Tools for Enhanced Understanding of Core Medical Physics Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Most medical physics programs emphasize proficiency in routine clinical calculations and QA. The formulaic aspect of these calculations and prescriptive nature of measurement protocols obviate the need to frequently apply basic physical principles, which, therefore, gradually decay away from memory. E.g. few students appreciate the role of electron transport in photon dose, making it difficult to understand key concepts such as dose buildup, electronic disequilibrium effects and Bragg-Gray theory. These conceptual deficiencies manifest when the physicist encounters a new system, requiring knowledge beyond routine activities. Methods: Two interactive computer simulation tools are developed to facilitate deeper learning of physical principles. One is a Monte Carlo code written with a strong educational aspect. The code can “label” regions and interactions to highlight specific aspects of the physics, e.g., certain regions can be designated as “starters” or “crossers,” and any interaction type can be turned on and off. Full 3D tracks with specific portions highlighted further enhance the visualization of radiation transport problems. The second code calculates and displays trajectories of a collection electrons under arbitrary space/time dependent Lorentz force using relativistic kinematics. Results: Using the Monte Carlo code, the student can interactively study photon and electron transport through visualization of dose components, particle tracks, and interaction types. The code can, for instance, be used to study kerma-dose relationship, explore electronic disequilibrium near interfaces, or visualize kernels by using interaction forcing. The electromagnetic simulator enables the student to explore accelerating mechanisms and particle optics in devices such as cyclotrons and linacs. Conclusion: The proposed tools are designed to enhance understanding of abstract concepts by highlighting various aspects of the physics. The simulations serve as

  11. NASA Planetary Visualization Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, P.; Kim, R.

    2004-12-01

    NASA World Wind allows one to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth, leveraging the combination of high resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM elevation data to experience Earth in visually rich 3D, just as if they were really there. NASA World Wind combines LandSat 7 imagery with Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) elevation data, for a dramatic view of the Earth at eye level. Users can literally fly across the world's terrain from any location in any direction. Particular focus was put into the ease of usability so people of all ages can enjoy World Wind. All one needs to control World Wind is a two button mouse. Additional guides and features can be accessed though a simplified menu. Navigation is automated with single clicks of a mouse as well as the ability to type in any location and automatically zoom to it. NASA World Wind was designed to run on recent PC hardware with the same technology used by today's 3D video games. NASA World Wind delivers the NASA Blue Marble, spectacular true-color imagery of the entire Earth at 1-kilometer-per-pixel. Using NASA World Wind, you can continue to zoom past Blue Marble resolution to seamlessly experience the extremely detailed mosaic of LandSat 7 data at an impressive 15-meters-per-pixel resolution. NASA World Wind also delivers other color bands such as the infrared spectrum. The NASA Scientific Visualization Studio at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has produced a set of visually intense animations that demonstrate a variety of subjects such as hurricane dynamics and seasonal changes across the globe. NASA World Wind takes these animations and plays them directly on the world. The NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) produces a set of time relevant planetary imagery that's updated every day. MODIS catalogs fires, floods, dust, smoke, storms and volcanic activity. NASA World Wind produces an easily customized view of this information and marks them directly on the globe. When one

  12. VCAT: Visual Crosswalk Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, Timothy J.; Forslund, David W.; Cleland, Catherine A.

    2012-08-31

    VCAT is a knowledge modeling and analysis tool. It was synthesized from ideas in functional analysis, business process modeling, and complex network science. VCAT discovers synergies by analyzing natural language descriptions. Specifically, it creates visual analytic perspectives that capture intended organization structures, then overlays the serendipitous relationships that point to potential synergies within an organization or across multiple organizations.

  13. Visualization tool for the scientist/engineer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appino, Perry A.; Farrell, Edward J.; Mandelman, Jack A.; Linton, Thomas D., Jr.

    1990-08-01

    Continuing advances in supercomputer technology give the scientist/engineer the ability to run increasingly complex computational experiments and simulations. Gaining insight from the flood of simulation resuits is a difficult task for the scientist. This paper presents the Visual interpretation System (VIS), an easy to use, interactive, discipline-independent tool for understanding multidimensional data sets. Components of the VIS are a database manager, a user interface, and a visualization manager. The database manager facilitates discipline-independent visualization and lets the scientist manipulate data with familiar names and attributes. The visualization manager uses an optical model to generate 3D images with a variety of options including opaque and transparent structures, cutouts, and region highlighting. The effectiveness ofthe VIS is demonstrated using data from a 3D simulation of a transistor device.

  14. Global Precipitation Mission Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwaller, Mathew

    2011-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) software provides graphic visualization tools that enable easy comparison of ground- and space-based radar observations. It was initially designed to compare ground radar reflectivity from operational, ground-based, S- and C-band meteorological radars with comparable measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite's precipitation radar instrument. This design is also applicable to other groundbased and space-based radars, and allows both ground- and space-based radar data to be compared for validation purposes. The tool creates an operational system that routinely performs several steps. It ingests satellite radar data (precipitation radar data from TRMM) and groundbased meteorological radar data from a number of sources. Principally, the ground radar data comes from national networks of weather radars (see figure). The data ingested by the visualization tool must conform to the data formats used in GPM Validation Network Geometry-matched data product generation. The software also performs match-ups of the radar volume data for the ground- and space-based data, as well as statistical and graphical analysis (including two-dimensional graphical displays) on the match-up data. The visualization tool software is written in IDL, and can be operated either in the IDL development environment or as a stand-alone executable function.

  15. Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0870 TITLE: Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool...Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0870 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Rajankumar...produce a computer-based Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool to aid in the training of clinicians at military treatment facilities providing care for

  16. Advancement on Visualization Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Aeroa and As ronautics Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139 USA I !ii 1 I This AGARDograph was prepared at the request of the...the fields of science § and technology relating to aerospace for the following purposes: - Exchanging of scientific and technical information...Techniques for providing the pilot visualization have grown rapidly. Technology has developed fron mechanical gauges through electro-mechanical

  17. Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    study is to produce a computer-based Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool to aid in the training of clinicians at military treatment facilities...providing care for wounded service members. In Phase I of the effort, significant work was completed at the University of Iowa Center for Computer- Aided ...Gait Training Tool Introduction The objective of our study is to produce a computer-based Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool (APGTT) to aid in

  18. Survey of Network Visualization Tools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Discovery • Boost Graph Library • CCVisu • cheops-ng • ConceptDraw NetDiagrammer • Coplink • Corgent Diagram for .NET • Daisy • DyNet • Eye of the...Cost $101 - $1000 Comments: Images Last Modified 2006-12-10 16:39:16 Name DyNet URL http://www.atalab.com/software/ dynet /index.php...Description Brief description: DyNet is a knowledge visualization tool which enables rapid domain analysis Detailed description: Data are mined

  19. Engineering visualization utilizing advanced animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabionski, Gunter R.; Robinson, Thomas L., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Engineering visualization is the use of computer graphics to depict engineering analysis and simulation in visual form from project planning through documentation. Graphics displays let engineers see data represented dynamically which permits the quick evaluation of results. The current state of graphics hardware and software generally allows the creation of two types of 3D graphics. The use of animated video as an engineering visualization tool is presented. The engineering, animation, and videography aspects of animated video production are each discussed. Specific issues include the integration of staffing expertise, hardware, software, and the various production processes. A detailed explanation of the animation process reveals the capabilities of this unique engineering visualization method. Automation of animation and video production processes are covered and future directions are proposed.

  20. Advanced Welding Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Accutron Tool & Instrument Co.'s welder was originally developed as a tool specifically for joining parts made of plastic or composite materials in any atmosphere to include the airless environment of space. Developers decided on induction or magnetic heating to avoid causing deformation and it also can be used with almost any type of thermoplastic material. Induction coil transfers magnetic flux through the plastic to a metal screen that is sandwiched between the sheets of plastic to be joined. When welder is energized, alternating current produces inductive heating on the screen causing the adjacent plastic surfaces to melt and flow into the mesh, creating a bond on the total surface area. Dave Brown, owner of Great Falls Canoe and Kayak Repair, Vienna, VA, uses a special repair technique based on operation of the Induction Toroid Welder to fix canoes. Whitewater canoeing poses the problem of frequent gashes that are difficult to repair. The main reason is that many canoes are made of plastics. The commercial Induction model is a self-contained, portable welding gun with a switch on the handle to regulate the temperature of the plastic melting screen. Welder has a broad range of applications in the automobile, appliance, aerospace and construction industries.

  1. From models to advanced 4D visualization tools: Developing a comprehensive framework for collaborative research in physical modelling and hazard assessment of volcanic phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposti Ongaro, T.; Barsotti, S.; de Michieli Vitturi, M.; Favalli, M.; Longo, A.; Nannipieri, L.; Neri, A.; Papale, P.; Saccorotti, G.; Tarquini, S.

    2009-04-01

    The use of numerical models in volcanological research and volcanic hazard assessment is indispensable to cope with the variety of processes and interactions characterizing magma evolution and eruption dynamics, which are dominated by non-linear phenomena and cannot be modelled at full scale in the laboratory. However, new multidisciplinary problems arise when dealing with complex mathematical formulations, numerical algorithms and their implementations on modern computer architectures, so that new tools are needed for sharing knowledge, software and datasets among scientists. Additionally, the need of communicating the results from complex, physical-based models to the public and authorities requires a further effort to present them in an effective and easy way, while highlighting the strengths and limitations of the approach. Finally, availability of Geographic Information System (GIS) data represents an issue when numerical models have to be applied to real volcanoes for impact studies. We are carrying on several initiatives, started during former and ongoing national and European projects, to develop an electronic infrastructure for promoting information transfer in this field of research. In particular, a web portal, based on a dynamic Content Manager System (CMS), is under construction to host and present physical models and their applications in an extensive way (what is usually not possible in research papers), share numerical codes and simulation datasets and discuss model validation and calibration tests. Moreover, advanced 4D visualization tools have been developed to present model results in a synthetic and effective form. Finally, a web interface to GIS databases has been implemented to share and navigate geographic data. Within this framework, it will be possible to integrate physical model outcomes into a geographic context and access them via an interactive web engine such as Google-Earth.

  2. Visualization Tools for Teaching Computer Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Xiaohong; Vega, Percy; Qadah, Yaseen; Archer, Ricky; Yu, Huiming; Xu, Jinsheng

    2010-01-01

    Using animated visualization tools has been an important teaching approach in computer science education. We have developed three visualization and animation tools that demonstrate various information security concepts and actively engage learners. The information security concepts illustrated include: packet sniffer and related computer network…

  3. Fostering Collaborative Knowledge Construction with Visualization Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, F.; Bruhn, J.; Grasel, C.; Mandl, H.

    2002-01-01

    Studied the extent to which collaborative knowledge construction can be fostered by providing students with visualization tools as structural support. Results for 32 college students working in dyads show that providing a content-specific visualization tool improves both the process and the outcome of the cooperative effort. (SLD)

  4. Integrated Data Visualization and Virtual Reality Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, David A.

    1998-01-01

    The Integrated Data Visualization and Virtual Reality Tool (IDVVRT) Phase II effort was for the design and development of an innovative Data Visualization Environment Tool (DVET) for NASA engineers and scientists, enabling them to visualize complex multidimensional and multivariate data in a virtual environment. The objectives of the project were to: (1) demonstrate the transfer and manipulation of standard engineering data in a virtual world; (2) demonstrate the effects of design and changes using finite element analysis tools; and (3) determine the training and engineering design and analysis effectiveness of the visualization system.

  5. Next Generation of Visualization Tools for Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheller, C.; Becciani, U.; Teuben, P. J.

    2007-10-01

    Visualization exists in many niche packages, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. In this BoF a series of presentations was meant to stimulate a discussion between developers and users about the future of visualization tools. A wiki {http://wiki.eurovotech.org/twiki/bin/view/VOTech/BoFADASSTucson2006} page has been set up to log and continue this discussion. One recent technique, dubbed ``plastifying,'' has enabled different tools to inter-operate data between them and result in a very flexible environment. Also deemed important are the ability to write plug-ins for analysis in visualization tools. Publication quality graphs are sometimes missing from the tools we use.

  6. An interactive visualization tool for mobile objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    Recent advancements in mobile devices---such as Global Positioning System (GPS), cellular phones, car navigation system, and radio-frequency identification (RFID)---have greatly influenced the nature and volume of data about individual-based movement in space and time. Due to the prevalence of mobile devices, vast amounts of mobile objects data are being produced and stored in databases, overwhelming the capacity of traditional spatial analytical methods. There is a growing need for discovering unexpected patterns, trends, and relationships that are hidden in the massive mobile objects data. Geographic visualization (GVis) and knowledge discovery in databases (KDD) are two major research fields that are associated with knowledge discovery and construction. Their major research challenges are the integration of GVis and KDD, enhancing the ability to handle large volume mobile objects data, and high interactivity between the computer and users of GVis and KDD tools. This dissertation proposes a visualization toolkit to enable highly interactive visual data exploration for mobile objects datasets. Vector algebraic representation and online analytical processing (OLAP) are utilized for managing and querying the mobile object data to accomplish high interactivity of the visualization tool. In addition, reconstructing trajectories at user-defined levels of temporal granularity with time aggregation methods allows exploration of the individual objects at different levels of movement generality. At a given level of generality, individual paths can be combined into synthetic summary paths based on three similarity measures, namely, locational similarity, directional similarity, and geometric similarity functions. A visualization toolkit based on the space-time cube concept exploits these functionalities to create a user-interactive environment for exploring mobile objects data. Furthermore, the characteristics of visualized trajectories are exported to be utilized for data

  7. Production-quality Tools for Adaptive Mesh RefinementVisualization

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Gunther H.; Childs, Hank; Bonnell, Kathleen; Meredith,Jeremy; Miller, Mark; Whitlock, Brad; Bethel, E. Wes

    2007-10-25

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a highly effectivesimulation method for spanning a large range of spatiotemporal scales,such as astrophysical simulations that must accommodate ranges frominterstellar to sub-planetary. Most mainstream visualization tools stilllack support for AMR as a first class data type and AMR code teams usecustom built applications for AMR visualization. The Department ofEnergy's (DOE's) Science Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC)Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) isextending and deploying VisIt, an open source visualization tool thataccommodates AMR as a first-class data type, for use asproduction-quality, parallel-capable AMR visual data analysisinfrastructure. This effort will help science teams that use AMR-basedsimulations and who develop their own AMR visual data analysis softwareto realize cost and labor savings.

  8. SAMPLES Visualization Tools V1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Yarberry, Victor R.; Jorgensen, Craig

    2000-01-17

    The SAMPLE Visualization Tools CD consists of a 2D Process Visualizer, 3D Visualizer, and integration code for use with AutoCAD uner Windows NT. The tools are intended to be an add-on package to the SAMPLES (Sandia Agile MEMS Prototyping, Layout Tools, Education and Services). Program CD, a previously published Sandia software package. The 2D Process Visualizer creates 2D cross-section slice views of a MEMS (micro-electromechanical)design. Views are created for each step in the MEMS fabrication process. The 2D viewer has capabilities to pan, zoom, step forward and backward to allow the user to inspect the design. The 3D Visualizer creates an extruded-model view of a MEMS design. The 3D viewer has capabilities to pan, zoom, and fly around the model to allow the user to inspect the design.

  9. A Visual Information Retrieval Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jin

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of visualization for information retrieval, that transforms unseen internal semantic representation of a document collection into visible geometric displays, focuses on DARE (Distance Angle Retrieval Environment). Highlights include expression of information need; interpretation and manipulation of information retrieval models; ranking…

  10. Interactive Tools for Measuring Visual Scanning Performance and Reaction Time

    PubMed Central

    Seeanner, Julia; Hennessy, Sarah; Manganelli, Joseph; Crisler, Matthew; Rosopa, Patrick; Jenkins, Casey; Anderson, Michael; Drouin, Nathalie; Belle, Leah; Truesdail, Constance; Tanner, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Occupational therapists are constantly searching for engaging, high-technology interactive tasks that provide immediate feedback to evaluate and train clients with visual scanning deficits. This study examined the relationship between two tools: the VISION COACH™ interactive light board and the Functional Object Detection© (FOD) Advanced driving simulator scenario. Fifty-four healthy drivers, ages 21–66 yr, were divided into three age groups. Participants performed braking response and visual target (E) detection tasks of the FOD Advanced driving scenario, followed by two sets of three trials using the VISION COACH Full Field 60 task. Results showed no significant effect of age on FOD Advanced performance but a significant effect of age on VISION COACH performance. Correlations showed that participants’ performance on both braking and E detection tasks were significantly positively correlated with performance on the VISION COACH (.37 < r < .40, p < .01). These tools provide new options for therapists. PMID:28218598

  11. Visualization tools: Models, representations and knowledge integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Brian John

    cue the energy-density model during problem solving. On the posttest, some students drew images with dots in them, but they lacked the model that underlies the representation. Students who avoided these problems and integrated the visualizations into their thinking were highly successful on the posttest. These results suggest that for visualizations to be effective learning tools, students need to understand the visualizations and also explore underlying scientific model. Students in this study who connected the visualizations to other ideas about thermodynamics developed a robust understanding of the science. These findings inform our understanding of the science learning process. Students appear to draw from a repertoire of models in their reasoning. Visualizations are a powerful way to introduce models to students, but work best with opportunities for students to integrate the models into their thinking.

  12. Spacecraft Guidance, Navigation, and Control Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandic, Milan; Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, Lars

    2011-01-01

    G-View is a 3D visualization tool for supporting spacecraft guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) simulations relevant to small-body exploration and sampling (see figure). The tool is developed in MATLAB using Virtual Reality Toolbox and provides users with the ability to visualize the behavior of their simulations, regardless of which programming language (or machine) is used to generate simulation results. The only requirement is that multi-body simulation data is generated and placed in the proper format before applying G-View.

  13. Development of a Geometric Spatial Visualization Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganesh, Bibi; Wilhelm, Jennifer; Sherrod, Sonya

    2009-01-01

    This paper documents the development of the Geometric Spatial Assessment. We detail the development of this instrument which was designed to identify middle school students' strategies and advancement in understanding of four geometric concept domains (geometric spatial visualization, spatial projection, cardinal directions, and periodic patterns)…

  14. Automatic Generation of Remote Visualization Tools with WATT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, P. A.; Bollig, E. F.; Yuen, D. A.; Erlebacher, G.; Momsen, A. R.

    2006-12-01

    The ever increasing size and complexity of geophysical and other scientific datasets has forced developers to turn to more powerful alternatives for visualizing results of computations and experiments. These alternative need to be faster, scalable, more efficient, and able to be run on large machines. At the same time, advances in scripting languages and visualization libraries have significantly decreased the development time of smaller, desktop visualization tools. Ideally, programmers would be able to develop visualization tools in a high-level, local, scripted environment and then automatically convert their programs into compiled, remote visualization tools for integration into larger computation environments. The Web Automation and Translation Toolkit (WATT) [1] converts a Tcl script for the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) [2] into a standards-compliant web service. We will demonstrate the used of WATT for the automated conversion of a desktop visualization application (written in Tcl for VTK) into a remote visualization service of interest to geoscientists. The resulting service will allow real-time access to a large dataset through the Internet, and will be easily integrated into the existing architecture of the Virtual Laboratory for Earth and Planetary Materials (VLab) [3]. [1] Jensen, P.A., Yuen, D.A., Erlebacher, G., Bollig, E.F., Kigelman, D.G., Shukh, E.A., Automated Generation of Web Services for Visualization Toolkits, Eos Trans. AGU, 86(52), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract IN42A-06, 2005. [2] The Visualization Toolkit, http://www.vtk.org [3] The Virtual Laboratory for Earth and Planetary Materials, http://vlab.msi.umn.edu

  15. The LandCarbon Web Application: Advanced Geospatial Data Delivery and Visualization Tools for Communication about Ecosystem Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Gas Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, N.; Galey, B.; Zhu, Z.; Sleeter, B. M.; Lehmer, E.

    2015-12-01

    The LandCarbon web application (http://landcarbon.org) is a collaboration between the U.S. Geological Survey and U.C. Berkeley's Geospatial Innovation Facility (GIF). The LandCarbon project is a national assessment focused on improved understanding of carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas fluxes in and out of ecosystems related to land use, using scientific capabilities from USGS and other organizations. The national assessment is conducted at a regional scale, covers all 50 states, and incorporates data from remote sensing, land change studies, aquatic and wetland data, hydrological and biogeochemical modeling, and wildfire mapping to estimate baseline and future potential carbon storage and greenhouse gas fluxes. The LandCarbon web application is a geospatial portal that allows for a sophisticated data delivery system as well as a suite of engaging tools that showcase the LandCarbon data using interactive web based maps and charts. The web application was designed to be flexible and accessible to meet the needs of a variety of users. Casual users can explore the input data and results of the assessment for a particular area of interest in an intuitive and interactive map, without the need for specialized software. Users can view and interact with maps, charts, and statistics that summarize the baseline and future potential carbon storage and fluxes for U.S. Level 2 Ecoregions for 3 IPCC emissions scenarios. The application allows users to access the primary data sources and assessment results for viewing and download, and also to learn more about the assessment's objectives, methods, and uncertainties through published reports and documentation. The LandCarbon web application is built on free and open source libraries including Django and D3. The GIF has developed the Django-Spillway package, which facilitates interactive visualization and serialization of complex geospatial raster data. The underlying LandCarbon data is available through an open application

  16. Modeling Tool Advances Rotorcraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Continuum Dynamics Inc. (CDI), founded in 1979, specializes in advanced engineering services, including fluid dynamic modeling and analysis for aeronautics research. The company has completed a number of SBIR research projects with NASA, including early rotorcraft work done through Langley Research Center, but more recently, out of Ames Research Center. NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants on helicopter wake modeling resulted in the Comprehensive Hierarchical Aeromechanics Rotorcraft Model (CHARM), a tool for studying helicopter and tiltrotor unsteady free wake modeling, including distributed and integrated loads, and performance prediction. Application of the software code in a blade redesign program for Carson Helicopters, of Perkasie, Pennsylvania, increased the payload and cruise speeds of its S-61 helicopter. Follow-on development resulted in a $24 million revenue increase for Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation, of Stratford, Connecticut, as part of the company's rotor design efforts. Now under continuous development for more than 25 years, CHARM models the complete aerodynamics and dynamics of rotorcraft in general flight conditions. CHARM has been used to model a broad spectrum of rotorcraft attributes, including performance, blade loading, blade-vortex interaction noise, air flow fields, and hub loads. The highly accurate software is currently in use by all major rotorcraft manufacturers, NASA, the U.S. Army, and the U.S. Navy.

  17. Advanced Human Factors Engineering Tool Technologies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-20

    identified the types of tools they would like to see V developed to fill the existing technology gaps. The advanced tools were catego- rized using an...the prototype phase of development were considered candidates for inclusion. The advanced tools were next categorized using an eight point...role, application, status and cost. Decision criteria were then developed as the basis for the tradeoff process to aid in tool selection. To

  18. ADVANCED POWER SYSTEMS ANALYSIS TOOLS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert R. Jensen; Steven A. Benson; Jason D. Laumb

    2001-08-31

    The use of Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) modeling tools and improved analytical methods has provided key information in optimizing advanced power system design and operating conditions for efficiency, producing minimal air pollutant emissions and utilizing a wide range of fossil fuel properties. This project was divided into four tasks: the demonstration of the ash transformation model, upgrading spreadsheet tools, enhancements to analytical capabilities using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and improvements to the slag viscosity model. The ash transformation model, Atran, was used to predict the size and composition of ash particles, which has a major impact on the fate of the combustion system. To optimize Atran key factors such as mineral fragmentation and coalescence, the heterogeneous and homogeneous interaction of the organically associated elements must be considered as they are applied to the operating conditions. The resulting model's ash composition compares favorably to measured results. Enhancements to existing EERC spreadsheet application included upgrading interactive spreadsheets to calculate the thermodynamic properties for fuels, reactants, products, and steam with Newton Raphson algorithms to perform calculations on mass, energy, and elemental balances, isentropic expansion of steam, and gasifier equilibrium conditions. Derivative calculations can be performed to estimate fuel heating values, adiabatic flame temperatures, emission factors, comparative fuel costs, and per-unit carbon taxes from fuel analyses. Using state-of-the-art computer-controlled scanning electron microscopes and associated microanalysis systems, a method to determine viscosity using the incorporation of grey-scale binning acquired by the SEM image was developed. The image analysis capabilities of a backscattered electron image can be subdivided into various grey-scale ranges that can be analyzed separately. Since the grey scale's intensity is

  19. Advances in reactor physics education: Visualization of reactor parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Snoj, L.; Kromar, M.; Zerovnik, G.

    2012-07-01

    Modern computer codes allow detailed neutron transport calculations. In combination with advanced 3D visualization software capable of treating large amounts of data in real time they form a powerful tool that can be used as a convenient modern educational tool for reactor operators, nuclear engineers, students and specialists involved in reactor operation and design. Visualization is applicable not only in education and training, but also as a tool for fuel management, core analysis and irradiation planning. The paper treats the visualization of neutron transport in different moderators, neutron flux and power distributions in two nuclear reactors (TRIGA type research reactor and a typical PWR). The distributions are calculated with MCNP and CORD-2 computer codes and presented using Amira software. (authors)

  20. Visualization Tools for Lattice QCD - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Massimo Di Pierro

    2012-03-15

    Our research project is about the development of visualization tools for Lattice QCD. We developed various tools by extending existing libraries, adding new algorithms, exposing new APIs, and creating web interfaces (including the new NERSC gauge connection web site). Our tools cover the full stack of operations from automating download of data, to generating VTK files (topological charge, plaquette, Polyakov lines, quark and meson propagators, currents), to turning the VTK files into images, movies, and web pages. Some of the tools have their own web interfaces. Some Lattice QCD visualization have been created in the past but, to our knowledge, our tools are the only ones of their kind since they are general purpose, customizable, and relatively easy to use. We believe they will be valuable to physicists working in the field. They can be used to better teach Lattice QCD concepts to new graduate students; they can be used to observe the changes in topological charge density and detect possible sources of bias in computations; they can be used to observe the convergence of the algorithms at a local level and determine possible problems; they can be used to probe heavy-light mesons with currents and determine their spatial distribution; they can be used to detect corrupted gauge configurations. There are some indirect results of this grant that will benefit a broader audience than Lattice QCD physicists.

  1. Data Visualization Using Immersive Virtual Reality Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioc, Alexandru; Djorgovski, S. G.; Donalek, C.; Lawler, E.; Sauer, F.; Longo, G.

    2013-01-01

    The growing complexity of scientific data poses serious challenges for an effective visualization. Data sets, e.g., catalogs of objects detected in sky surveys, can have a very high dimensionality, ~ 100 - 1000. Visualizing such hyper-dimensional data parameter spaces is essentially impossible, but there are ways of visualizing up to ~ 10 dimensions in a pseudo-3D display. We have been experimenting with the emerging technologies of immersive virtual reality (VR) as a platform for a scientific, interactive, collaborative data visualization. Our initial experiments used the virtual world of Second Life, and more recently VR worlds based on its open source code, OpenSimulator. There we can visualize up to ~ 100,000 data points in ~ 7 - 8 dimensions (3 spatial and others encoded as shapes, colors, sizes, etc.), in an immersive virtual space where scientists can interact with their data and with each other. We are now developing a more scalable visualization environment using the popular (practically an emerging standard) Unity 3D Game Engine, coded using C#, JavaScript, and the Unity Scripting Language. This visualization tool can be used through a standard web browser, or a standalone browser of its own. Rather than merely plotting data points, the application creates interactive three-dimensional objects of various shapes, colors, and sizes, and of course the XYZ positions, encoding various dimensions of the parameter space, that can be associated interactively. Multiple users can navigate through this data space simultaneously, either with their own, independent vantage points, or with a shared view. At this stage ~ 100,000 data points can be easily visualized within seconds on a simple laptop. The displayed data points can contain linked information; e.g., upon a clicking on a data point, a webpage with additional information can be rendered within the 3D world. A range of functionalities has been already deployed, and more are being added. We expect to make this

  2. Advancing Water Science through Data Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Troy, T.

    2014-12-01

    As water scientists, we are increasingly handling larger and larger datasets with many variables, making it easy to lose ourselves in the details. Advanced data visualization will play an increasingly significant role in propelling the development of water science in research, economy, policy and education. It can enable analysis within research and further data scientists' understanding of behavior and processes and can potentially affect how the public, whom we often want to inform, understands our work. Unfortunately for water scientists, data visualization is approached in an ad hoc manner when a more formal methodology or understanding could potentially significantly improve both research within the academy and outreach to the public. Firstly to broaden and deepen scientific understanding, data visualization can allow for more analyzed targets to be processed simultaneously and can represent the variables effectively, finding patterns, trends and relationships; thus it can even explores the new research direction or branch of water science. Depending on visualization, we can detect and separate the pivotal and trivial influential factors more clearly to assume and abstract the original complex target system. Providing direct visual perception of the differences between observation data and prediction results of models, data visualization allows researchers to quickly examine the quality of models in water science. Secondly data visualization can also improve public awareness and perhaps influence behavior. Offering decision makers clearer perspectives of potential profits of water, data visualization can amplify the economic value of water science and also increase relevant employment rates. Providing policymakers compelling visuals of the role of water for social and natural systems, data visualization can advance the water management and legislation of water conservation. By building the publics' own data visualization through apps and games about water

  3. Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT): Semi-Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D N

    2012-02-29

    This report summarizes work carried out by the Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) Team for the period of July 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011. It discusses highlights, overall progress, period goals, and collaborations and lists papers and presentations. The UV-CDAT team is positioned to address the following high-level visualization requirements: (1) Alternative parallel streaming statistics and analysis pipelines - Data parallelism, Task parallelism, Visualization parallelism; (2) Optimized parallel input/output (I/O); (3) Remote interactive execution; (4) Advanced intercomparison visualization; (5) Data provenance processing and capture; and (6) Interfaces for scientists - Workflow data analysis and visualization construction tools, Visualization interfaces.

  4. Evaluation of filesystem provenance visualization tools.

    PubMed

    Borkin, Michelle A; Yeh, Chelsea S; Boyd, Madelaine; Macko, Peter; Gajos, Krzysztof Z; Seltzer, Margo; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2013-12-01

    Having effective visualizations of filesystem provenance data is valuable for understanding its complex hierarchical structure. The most common visual representation of provenance data is the node-link diagram. While effective for understanding local activity, the node-link diagram fails to offer a high-level summary of activity and inter-relationships within the data. We present a new tool, InProv, which displays filesystem provenance with an interactive radial-based tree layout. The tool also utilizes a new time-based hierarchical node grouping method for filesystem provenance data we developed to match the user's mental model and make data exploration more intuitive. We compared InProv to a conventional node-link based tool, Orbiter, in a quantitative evaluation with real users of filesystem provenance data including provenance data experts, IT professionals, and computational scientists. We also compared in the evaluation our new node grouping method to a conventional method. The results demonstrate that InProv results in higher accuracy in identifying system activity than Orbiter with large complex data sets. The results also show that our new time-based hierarchical node grouping method improves performance in both tools, and participants found both tools significantly easier to use with the new time-based node grouping method. Subjective measures show that participants found InProv to require less mental activity, less physical activity, less work, and is less stressful to use. Our study also reveals one of the first cases of gender differences in visualization; both genders had comparable performance with InProv, but women had a significantly lower average accuracy (56%) compared to men (70%) with Orbiter.

  5. Igloo-Plot: a tool for visualization of multidimensional datasets.

    PubMed

    Kuntal, Bhusan K; Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Mande, Sharmila S

    2014-01-01

    Advances in science and technology have resulted in an exponential growth of multivariate (or multi-dimensional) datasets which are being generated from various research areas especially in the domain of biological sciences. Visualization and analysis of such data (with the objective of uncovering the hidden patterns therein) is an important and challenging task. We present a tool, called Igloo-Plot, for efficient visualization of multidimensional datasets. The tool addresses some of the key limitations of contemporary multivariate visualization and analysis tools. The visualization layout, not only facilitates an easy identification of clusters of data-points having similar feature compositions, but also the 'marker features' specific to each of these clusters. The applicability of the various functionalities implemented herein is demonstrated using several well studied multi-dimensional datasets. Igloo-Plot is expected to be a valuable resource for researchers working in multivariate data mining studies. Igloo-Plot is available for download from: http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/IglooPlot/.

  6. A Flexible Visualization Tool for Rapid Access to EFIT Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruirui; Xiao, Bingjia; Luo, Zhengping

    2014-04-01

    This paper introduces the design and implementation of an interactive tool, the EASTViewer, for the visualization of plasma equilibrium reconstruction results for EAST (the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak). Aimed at the operating system independently, Python, when combined with the PyGTK toolkit, is used as the programming language. Using modular design, the EASTViewer provides a unified interface with great flexibility. It is easy to access numerous data sources either from local data files or an MDSplus tree, and with the pre-defined configuration files, it can be extended to other tokamaks. The EASTViewer has been used as the major tool to visualize equilibrium data since the second EAST campaign in 2008, and it has been verified that the EASTViewer features a user-friendly interface, and has easy access to numerous data sources and cross-platforms.

  7. Integration of Advanced Simulation and Visualization for Manufacturing Process Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chenn; Wang, Jichao; Tang, Guangwu; Moreland, John; Fu, Dong; Wu, Bin

    2016-05-01

    The integration of simulation and visualization can provide a cost-effective tool for process optimization, design, scale-up and troubleshooting. The Center for Innovation through Visualization and Simulation (CIVS) at Purdue University Northwest has developed methodologies for such integration with applications in various manufacturing processes. The methodologies have proven to be useful for virtual design and virtual training to provide solutions addressing issues on energy, environment, productivity, safety, and quality in steel and other industries. In collaboration with its industrial partnerships, CIVS has provided solutions to companies, saving over US38 million. CIVS is currently working with the steel industry to establish an industry-led Steel Manufacturing Simulation and Visualization Consortium through the support of National Institute of Standards and Technology AMTech Planning Grant. The consortium focuses on supporting development and implementation of simulation and visualization technologies to advance steel manufacturing across the value chain.

  8. Recent Advances in Algal Genetic Tool Development

    SciTech Connect

    R. Dahlin, Lukas; T. Guarnieri, Michael

    2016-06-24

    The goal of achieving cost-effective biofuels and bioproducts derived from algal biomass will require improvements along the entire value chain, including identification of robust, high-productivity strains and development of advanced genetic tools. Though there have been modest advances in development of genetic systems for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, progress in development of algal genetic tools, especially as applied to non-model algae, has generally lagged behind that of more commonly utilized laboratory and industrial microbes. This is in part due to the complex organellar structure of algae, including robust cell walls and intricate compartmentalization of target loci, as well as prevalent gene silencing mechanisms, which hinder facile utilization of conventional genetic engineering tools and methodologies. However, recent progress in global tool development has opened the door for implementation of strain-engineering strategies in industrially-relevant algal strains. Here, we review recent advances in algal genetic tool development and applications in eukaryotic microalgae.

  9. Web tools for rapid experimental visualization prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Jonathan W.; Livingstion, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Quite often a researcher finds themselves looking at spreadsheets of high-dimensional data generated by experimental models and user studies. We can use analysis to challenge or confirm hypothesis, but unexpected results can easily be lost in the shuffle. For this reason, it would be useful to visualize the results so we can explore our data and make new discoveries. Web browsers have become increasingly capable for creating complex, multi-view applications. Javascript is quickly becoming a de facto standard for scripting, online and offline. This work demonstrates the use of web technologies as a powerful tool for rapid visualization prototyping. We have developed two prototypes: One for high-dimensional results of the abELICIT - multi-agent version of the ELICIT platform tasked with collaborating to identify the parameters of a pending attack. Another prototype displays responses to a user study on the effectiveness of multi-layer visualization techniques. We created coordinated multiple views prototypes in the Google Chrome web browser written in Javascript, CSS and HTML. We will discuss the benefits and shortcomings of this approach.

  10. Rapid medical advances challenge the tooling industry.

    PubMed

    Conley, B

    2008-01-01

    The requirement for greater performance in smaller spaces has increased demands for product and process innovation in tubing and other medical products. In turn, these developments have placed greater demands on the producers of the advanced tooling for these products. Tooling manufacturers must now continuously design equipment with much tighter tolerances for more sophisticated coextrusions and for newer generations of multilumen and multilayer tubing.

  11. A pandemic influenza modeling and visualization tool

    SciTech Connect

    Maciejewski, Ross; Livengood, Philip; Rudolph, Stephen; Collins, Timothy F.; Ebert, David S.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Corley, Courtney D.; Muller, George A.; Sanders, Stephen W.

    2011-08-01

    The National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza outlines a plan for community response to a potential pandemic. In this outline, state and local communities are charged with enhancing their preparedness. In order to help public health officials better understand these charges, we have developed a modeling and visualization toolkit (PanViz) for analyzing the effect of decision measures implemented during a simulated pandemic influenza scenario. Spread vectors based on the point of origin and distance traveled over time are calculated and the factors of age distribution and population density are taken into effect. Healthcare officials are able to explore the effects of the pandemic on the population through a spatiotemporal view, moving forward and backward through time and inserting decision points at various days to determine the impact. Linked statistical displays are also shown, providing county level summaries of data in terms of the number of sick, hospitalized and dead as a result of the outbreak. Currently, this tool has been deployed in Indiana State Department of Health planning and preparedness exercises, and as an educational tool for demonstrating the impact of social distancing strategies during the recent H1N1 (swine flu) outbreak.

  12. Interactive visualization to advance earthquake simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, L.H.; Bawden, G.W.; Bernardin, T.; Billen, M.; Cowgill, E.; Hamann, B.; Jadamec, M.; Kreylos, O.; Staadt, O.; Sumner, D.

    2008-01-01

    The geological sciences are challenged to manage and interpret increasing volumes of data as observations and simulations increase in size and complexity. For example, simulations of earthquake-related processes typically generate complex, time-varying data sets in two or more dimensions. To facilitate interpretation and analysis of these data sets, evaluate the underlying models, and to drive future calculations, we have developed methods of interactive visualization with a special focus on using immersive virtual reality (VR) environments to interact with models of Earth's surface and interior. Virtual mapping tools allow virtual "field studies" in inaccessible regions. Interactive tools allow us to manipulate shapes in order to construct models of geological features for geodynamic models, while feature extraction tools support quantitative measurement of structures that emerge from numerical simulation or field observations, thereby enabling us to improve our interpretation of the dynamical processes that drive earthquakes. VR has traditionally been used primarily as a presentation tool, albeit with active navigation through data. Reaping the full intellectual benefits of immersive VR as a tool for scientific analysis requires building on the method's strengths, that is, using both 3D perception and interaction with observed or simulated data. This approach also takes advantage of the specialized skills of geological scientists who are trained to interpret, the often limited, geological and geophysical data available from field observations. ?? Birkhaueser 2008.

  13. Recent Advances in Algal Genetic Tool Development

    DOE PAGES

    R. Dahlin, Lukas; T. Guarnieri, Michael

    2016-06-24

    The goal of achieving cost-effective biofuels and bioproducts derived from algal biomass will require improvements along the entire value chain, including identification of robust, high-productivity strains and development of advanced genetic tools. Though there have been modest advances in development of genetic systems for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, progress in development of algal genetic tools, especially as applied to non-model algae, has generally lagged behind that of more commonly utilized laboratory and industrial microbes. This is in part due to the complex organellar structure of algae, including robust cell walls and intricate compartmentalization of target loci, as well asmore » prevalent gene silencing mechanisms, which hinder facile utilization of conventional genetic engineering tools and methodologies. However, recent progress in global tool development has opened the door for implementation of strain-engineering strategies in industrially-relevant algal strains. Here, we review recent advances in algal genetic tool development and applications in eukaryotic microalgae.« less

  14. Using Visual Analytics Tool for Improving Data Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Géryk, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of animated data visualizations in comparison with static data visualizations is still inconclusive. Some researches resulted that the failure to find out the benefits of animations may relate to the way how they are constructed and perceived. In this paper, we present visual analytics (VA) tool which makes use of enhanced animated…

  15. Learn to Teach Chemistry Using Visual Media Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkoguz, Suat

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate undergraduate students' attitudes to using visual media tools in the chemistry laboratory. One hundred and fifteen undergraduates studying science education at Dokuz Eylul University, Turkey participated in the study. They video-recorded chemistry experiments with visual media tools and assessed them on a…

  16. Advanced genetic tools for plant biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wusheng; Yuan, Joshua S; Stewart, C Neal

    2013-11-01

    Basic research has provided a much better understanding of the genetic networks and regulatory hierarchies in plants. To meet the challenges of agriculture, we must be able to rapidly translate this knowledge into generating improved plants. Therefore, in this Review, we discuss advanced tools that are currently available for use in plant biotechnology to produce new products in plants and to generate plants with new functions. These tools include synthetic promoters, 'tunable' transcription factors, genome-editing tools and site-specific recombinases. We also review some tools with the potential to enable crop improvement, such as methods for the assembly and synthesis of large DNA molecules, plant transformation with linked multigenes and plant artificial chromosomes. These genetic technologies should be integrated to realize their potential for applications to pressing agricultural and environmental problems.

  17. Advanced genetic tools for plant biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, WS; Yuan, JS; Stewart, CN

    2013-10-09

    Basic research has provided a much better understanding of the genetic networks and regulatory hierarchies in plants. To meet the challenges of agriculture, we must be able to rapidly translate this knowledge into generating improved plants. Therefore, in this Review, we discuss advanced tools that are currently available for use in plant biotechnology to produce new products in plants and to generate plants with new functions. These tools include synthetic promoters, 'tunable' transcription factors, genome-editing tools and site-specific recombinases. We also review some tools with the potential to enable crop improvement, such as methods for the assembly and synthesis of large DNA molecules, plant transformation with linked multigenes and plant artificial chromosomes. These genetic technologies should be integrated to realize their potential for applications to pressing agricultural and environmental problems.

  18. Visual illusion of tool use recalibrates tactile perception.

    PubMed

    Miller, Luke E; Longo, Matthew R; Saygin, Ayse P

    2017-02-11

    Brief use of a tool recalibrates multisensory representations of the user's body, a phenomenon called tool embodiment. Despite two decades of research, little is known about its boundary conditions. It has been widely argued that embodiment requires active tool use, suggesting a critical role for somatosensory and motor feedback. The present study used a visual illusion to cast doubt on this view. We used a mirror-based setup to induce a visual experience of tool use with an arm that was in fact stationary. Following illusory tool use, tactile perception was recalibrated on this stationary arm, and with equal magnitude as physical use. Recalibration was not found following illusory passive tool holding, and could not be accounted for by sensory conflict or general interhemispheric plasticity. These results suggest visual tool-use signals play a critical role in driving tool embodiment.

  19. National Laboratory for Advanced Scientific Visualization at UNAM - Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Marina; Constantin Manea, Vlad; Varela, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    In 2015, the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) joined the family of Universities and Research Centers where advanced visualization and computing plays a key role to promote and advance missions in research, education, community outreach, as well as business-oriented consulting. This initiative provides access to a great variety of advanced hardware and software resources and offers a range of consulting services that spans a variety of areas related to scientific visualization, among which are: neuroanatomy, embryonic development, genome related studies, geosciences, geography, physics and mathematics related disciplines. The National Laboratory for Advanced Scientific Visualization delivers services through three main infrastructure environments: the 3D fully immersive display system Cave, the high resolution parallel visualization system Powerwall, the high resolution spherical displays Earth Simulator. The entire visualization infrastructure is interconnected to a high-performance-computing-cluster (HPCC) called ADA in honor to Ada Lovelace, considered to be the first computer programmer. The Cave is an extra large 3.6m wide room with projected images on the front, left and right, as well as floor walls. Specialized crystal eyes LCD-shutter glasses provide a strong stereo depth perception, and a variety of tracking devices allow software to track the position of a user's hand, head and wand. The Powerwall is designed to bring large amounts of complex data together through parallel computing for team interaction and collaboration. This system is composed by 24 (6x4) high-resolution ultra-thin (2 mm) bezel monitors connected to a high-performance GPU cluster. The Earth Simulator is a large (60") high-resolution spherical display used for global-scale data visualization like geophysical, meteorological, climate and ecology data. The HPCC-ADA, is a 1000+ computing core system, which offers parallel computing resources to applications that requires

  20. Evaluation of current visualization tools for cyber security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langton, John T.; Newey, Brent

    2010-04-01

    Visualization tools for cyber security often overlook related research from the information visualization domain. Cyber security data sets are notoriously large, yet many of the popular analysis tools use 3D techniques and parallel coordinates which have been shown to suffer issues of occlusion when applied to large data sets1,2. While techniques exist to ameliorate these issues they are typically not used. In this paper we evaluate several cyber security visualization tools based on established design principles and human-computer interaction research. We conclude by enumerating challenges, requirements, and recommendations for future work.

  1. Self-advancing step-tap tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Donald R. (Inventor); Penner, Ronald K. (Inventor); Franklin, Larry D. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Methods and tool for simultaneously forming a bore in a work piece and forming a series of threads in said bore. In an embodiment, the tool has a predetermined axial length, a proximal end, and a distal end, said tool comprising: a shank located at said proximal end; a pilot drill portion located at said distal end; and a mill portion intermediately disposed between said shank and said pilot drill portion. The mill portion is comprised of at least two drill-tap sections of predetermined axial lengths and at least one transition section of predetermined axial length, wherein each of said at least one transition section is sandwiched between a distinct set of two of said at least two drill-tap sections. The at least two drill-tap sections are formed of one or more drill-tap cutting teeth spirally increasing along said at least two drill-tap sections, wherein said tool is self-advanced in said work piece along said formed threads, and wherein said tool simultaneously forms said bore and said series of threads along a substantially similar longitudinal axis.

  2. A survey of visualization tools for biological network analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Wegener, Anna-Lynn; Schneider, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    The analysis and interpretation of relationships between biological molecules, networks and concepts is becoming a major bottleneck in systems biology. Very often the pure amount of data and their heterogeneity provides a challenge for the visualization of the data. There are a wide variety of graph representations available, which most often map the data on 2D graphs to visualize biological interactions. These methods are applicable to a wide range of problems, nevertheless many of them reach a limit in terms of user friendliness when thousands of nodes and connections have to be analyzed and visualized. In this study we are reviewing visualization tools that are currently available for visualization of biological networks mainly invented in the latest past years. We comment on the functionality, the limitations and the specific strengths of these tools, and how these tools could be further developed in the direction of data integration and information sharing. PMID:19040716

  3. The Mission Planning Lab: A Visualization and Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Sarah C.; Cervantes, Benjamin W.

    2009-01-01

    Simulation and visualization are powerful decision making tools that are time-saving and cost-effective. Space missions pose testing and e valuation challenges that can be overcome through modeling, simulatio n, and visualization of mission parameters. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration?s (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) capi talizes on the benefits of modeling, simulation, and visualization to ols through a project initiative called The Mission Planning Lab (MPL ).

  4. Compositing Visualization Tools for Improving Design Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Wayne C.

    2005-01-01

    Today's designers deal with a range of communication modes. These modes vary from hand gestures to sketches, physical models, and computer-generated images. It has been the norm to use these mediums throughout the process to visualize the intended design so that the potential users, designers, team members, and clients can understand the end…

  5. Sinking Maps: A Conceptual Tool for Visual Metaphor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giampa, Joan Marie

    2012-01-01

    Sinking maps, created by Northern Virginia Community College professor Joan Marie Giampa, are tools that teach fine art students how to construct visual metaphor by conceptually mapping sensory perceptions. Her dissertation answers the question, "Can visual metaphor be conceptually mapped in the art classroom?" In the Prologue, Giampa…

  6. VCMM: a visual tool for continuum molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shiyang; Lu, Benzhuo

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes the design and function of a visualization tool, VCMM, for visualizing and analyzing data, and interfacing solvers for generic continuum molecular modeling. In particular, an emphasis of the program is to treat the data set based on unstructured mesh as used in finite/boundary element simulations, which largely enhances the capabilities of current visualization tools in this area that only support structured mesh. VCMM is segmented into molecular, meshing and numerical modules. The capabilities of molecular module include molecular visualization and force field assignment. Meshing module contains mesh generation, analysis and visualization tools. Numerical module currently provides a few finite/boundary element solvers of continuum molecular modeling, and contains several common visualization tools for the numerical result such as line and plane interpolations, surface probing, volume rendering and stream rendering. Three modules can exchange data with each other and carry out a complete process of modeling. Interfaces are also designed in order to facilitate usage of other mesh generation tools and numerical solvers. We develop a technique to accelerate data retrieval and have combined many graphical techniques in visualization. VCMM is highly extensible, and users can obtain more powerful functions by introducing relevant plug-ins. VCMM can also be useful in other fields such as computational quantum chemistry, image processing, and material science.

  7. Visualization Skills: A Prerequisite to Advanced Solid Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gow, George

    2007-01-01

    Many educators believe that solid modeling software has made teaching two- and three-dimensional visualization skills obsolete. They claim that the visual tools built into the solid modeling software serve as a replacement for the CAD operator's personal visualization skills. They also claim that because solid modeling software can produce…

  8. Interactive visualization tools for the structural biologist.

    PubMed

    Porebski, Benjamin T; Ho, Bosco K; Buckle, Ashley M

    2013-10-01

    In structural biology, management of a large number of Protein Data Bank (PDB) files and raw X-ray diffraction images often presents a major organizational problem. Existing software packages that manipulate these file types were not designed for these kinds of file-management tasks. This is typically encountered when browsing through a folder of hundreds of X-ray images, with the aim of rapidly inspecting the diffraction quality of a data set. To solve this problem, a useful functionality of the Macintosh operating system (OSX) has been exploited that allows custom visualization plugins to be attached to certain file types. Software plugins have been developed for diffraction images and PDB files, which in many scenarios can save considerable time and effort. The direct visualization of diffraction images and PDB structures in the file browser can be used to identify key files of interest simply by scrolling through a list of files.

  9. Interactive visualization tools for the structural biologist

    PubMed Central

    Porebski, Benjamin T.; Ho, Bosco K.; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2013-01-01

    In structural biology, management of a large number of Protein Data Bank (PDB) files and raw X-ray diffraction images often presents a major organizational problem. Existing software packages that manipulate these file types were not designed for these kinds of file-management tasks. This is typically encountered when browsing through a folder of hundreds of X-ray images, with the aim of rapidly inspecting the diffraction quality of a data set. To solve this problem, a useful functionality of the Macintosh operating system (OSX) has been exploited that allows custom visualization plugins to be attached to certain file types. Software plugins have been developed for diffraction images and PDB files, which in many scenarios can save considerable time and effort. The direct visualization of diffraction images and PDB structures in the file browser can be used to identify key files of interest simply by scrolling through a list of files. PMID:24068844

  10. Data Analysis Tools for Visualization Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    represented true threats. The correct answers and the selections by each subject were recorded as fixed-format text files. My tools parse this text ...1 2.3 Three Display Types 2 2.4 Inputs from Test Subjects 3 3. Subject Trial Results 4 3.1 Selection Text Files 4 3.2 Creation of Table...the selections by each subject were recorded as fixed-format text files. My tools parse the text files and insert the data into tables in a

  11. Our Experiences with Using Visualization Tools in Teaching Calculus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalczyk, Robert E.; Hausknecht, Adam O.

    This paper describes two uses of the software package TEMATH (Tools for Exploring Mathematics) with calculus students: (1) as a demonstration tool in the classroom to visually explore with students the many mathematical models introduced in a first year calculus course; and (2) as a part of a lab where students use a set of laboratory explorations…

  12. DspaceOgre 3D Graphics Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan; Myin, Steven; Pomerantz, Marc I.

    2011-01-01

    This general-purpose 3D graphics visualization C++ tool is designed for visualization of simulation and analysis data for articulated mechanisms. Examples of such systems are vehicles, robotic arms, biomechanics models, and biomolecular structures. DspaceOgre builds upon the open-source Ogre3D graphics visualization library. It provides additional classes to support the management of complex scenes involving multiple viewpoints and different scene groups, and can be used as a remote graphics server. This software provides improved support for adding programs at the graphics processing unit (GPU) level for improved performance. It also improves upon the messaging interface it exposes for use as a visualization server.

  13. IView: Introgression library visualization and query tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near-isogenic lines (NIL) are powerful genetic resources to analyze phenotypic variation and are important to map-base clone genes underlying mutations and traits. With many thousands of distinct genotypes, querying introgression libraries for lines of interest is an issue. We have created a tool ...

  14. Visual Images as Tools of Teacher Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Nancy M.; Van Harken, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    As aspiring professionals, pre-service teachers must become good consumers of educational research as well as competent researchers who can use tools of inquiry to improve their practice and conduct their own educational research. Many, however, resist learning research skills or find difficulties in doing so. This article presents ways in which…

  15. Software tools for visualizing Hi-C data.

    PubMed

    Yardımcı, Galip Gürkan; Noble, William Stafford

    2017-02-03

    High-throughput assays for measuring the three-dimensional (3D) configuration of DNA have provided unprecedented insights into the relationship between DNA 3D configuration and function. Data interpretation from assays such as ChIA-PET and Hi-C is challenging because the data is large and cannot be easily rendered using standard genome browsers. An effective Hi-C visualization tool must provide several visualization modes and be capable of viewing the data in conjunction with existing, complementary data. We review five software tools that do not require programming expertise. We summarize their complementary functionalities, and highlight which tool is best equipped for specific tasks.

  16. Visualization tools for comprehensive test ban treaty research

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.L.; Harris, J.M.; Simons, R.W.

    1997-08-01

    This paper focuses on tools used in Data Visualization efforts at Sandia National Laboratories under the Department of Energy CTBT R&D program. These tools provide interactive techniques for the examination and interpretation of scientific data, and can be used for many types of CTBT research and development projects. We will discuss the benefits and drawbacks of using the tools to display and analyze CTBT scientific data. While the tools may be used for everyday applications, our discussion will focus on the use of these tools for visualization of data used in research and verification of new theories. Our examples focus on uses with seismic data, but the tools may also be used for other types of data sets. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Got Graphs? An Assessment of Data Visualization Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, C. M.; Foy, M.

    2015-01-01

    Graphs are powerful tools for simplifying complex data. They are useful for quickly assessing patterns and relationships among one or more variables from a dataset. As the amount of data increases, it becomes more difficult to visualize potential associations. Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) was charged with assessing its current visualization tools along with others on the market to determine whether new tools would be useful for supporting NASA's occupational surveillance effort. It was concluded by members of LSAH that the current tools hindered their ability to provide quick results to researchers working with the department. Due to the high volume of data requests and the many iterations of visualizations requested by researchers, software with a better ability to replicate graphs and edit quickly could improve LSAH's efficiency and lead to faster research results.

  18. A Software-System Visualization Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    databases. servers) and the dependencies established between these modules (e.g., procedure calls, message passing channels). \\ Ve use the tool to write...A MINION user can view these implicitly constructed connections and notice incorrect links to library modules and "regions" of a graph. We can scale ...configuration programming systems. MINION handles this problem by hiding unimportant details or scaling them graphically. We can graphically select

  19. A Visualization-Based Tutoring Tool for Engineering Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tang-Hung; Khoo, I.-Hung

    2010-06-01

    In engineering disciplines, students usually have hard time to visualize different aspects of engineering analysis and design, which inherently are too complex or abstract to fully understand without the aid of visual explanations or visualizations. As examples, when learning materials and sequences of construction process, students need to visualize how all components of a constructed facility are assembled? Such visualization can not be achieved in a textbook and a traditional lecturing environment. In this paper, the authors present the development of a computer tutoring software, in which different visualization tools including video clips, 3 dimensional models, drawings, pictures/photos together with complementary texts are used to assist students in deeply understanding and effectively mastering materials. The paper will also discuss the implementation and the effectiveness evaluation of the proposed tutoring software, which was used to teach a construction engineering management course offered at California State University, Long Beach.

  20. Visual Object Recognition and Tracking of Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, James; Chang, Chu-Yin; Tardella, Neil

    2011-01-01

    A method has been created to automatically build an algorithm off-line, using computer-aided design (CAD) models, and to apply this at runtime. The object type is discriminated, and the position and orientation are identified. This system can work with a single image and can provide improved performance using multiple images provided from videos. The spatial processing unit uses three stages: (1) segmentation; (2) initial type, pose, and geometry (ITPG) estimation; and (3) refined type, pose, and geometry (RTPG) calculation. The image segmentation module files all the tools in an image and isolates them from the background. For this, the system uses edge-detection and thresholding to find the pixels that are part of a tool. After the pixels are identified, nearby pixels are grouped into blobs. These blobs represent the potential tools in the image and are the product of the segmentation algorithm. The second module uses matched filtering (or template matching). This approach is used for condensing synthetic images using an image subspace that captures key information. Three degrees of orientation, three degrees of position, and any number of degrees of freedom in geometry change are included. To do this, a template-matching framework is applied. This framework uses an off-line system for calculating template images, measurement images, and the measurements of the template images. These results are used online to match segmented tools against the templates. The final module is the RTPG processor. Its role is to find the exact states of the tools given initial conditions provided by the ITPG module. The requirement that the initial conditions exist allows this module to make use of a local search (whereas the ITPG module had global scope). To perform the local search, 3D model matching is used, where a synthetic image of the object is created and compared to the sensed data. The availability of low-cost PC graphics hardware allows rapid creation of synthetic images

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF SOLUBILITY PRODUCT VISUALIZATION TOOLS

    SciTech Connect

    T.F. Turner; A.T. Pauli; J.F. Schabron

    2004-05-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed software for the visualization of data acquired from solubility tests. The work was performed in conjunction with AB Nynas Petroleum, Nynashamn, Sweden who participated as the corporate cosponsor for this Jointly Sponsored Research (JSR) task. Efforts in this project were split between software development and solubility test development. The Microsoft Windows-compatible software developed inputs up to three solubility data sets, calculates the parameters for six solid body types to fit the data, and interactively displays the results in three dimensions. Several infrared spectroscopy techniques have been examined for potential use in determining bitumen solubility in various solvents. Reflectance, time-averaged absorbance, and transmittance techniques were applied to bitumen samples in single and binary solvent systems. None of the techniques were found to have wide applicability.

  2. Visualizing data mining results with the brede tools.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Finn Arup

    2009-01-01

    A few neuroinformatics databases now exist that record results from neuroimaging studies in the form of brain coordinates in stereotaxic space. The Brede Toolbox was originally developed to extract, analyze and visualize data from one of them - the BrainMap database. Since then the Brede Toolbox has expanded and now includes its own database with coordinates along with ontologies for brain regions and functions: The Brede Database. With Brede Toolbox and Database combined, we setup automated workflows for extraction of data, mass meta-analytic data mining and visualizations. Most of the Web presence of the Brede Database is established by a single script executing a workflow involving these steps together with a final generation of Web pages with embedded visualizations and links to interactive three-dimensional models in the Virtual Reality Modeling Language. Apart from the Brede tools I briefly review alternate visualization tools and methods for Internet-based visualization and information visualization as well as portals for visualization tools.

  3. Visualizing Data Mining Results with the Brede Tools

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Finn Årup

    2009-01-01

    A few neuroinformatics databases now exist that record results from neuroimaging studies in the form of brain coordinates in stereotaxic space. The Brede Toolbox was originally developed to extract, analyze and visualize data from one of them – the BrainMap database. Since then the Brede Toolbox has expanded and now includes its own database with coordinates along with ontologies for brain regions and functions: The Brede Database. With Brede Toolbox and Database combined, we setup automated workflows for extraction of data, mass meta-analytic data mining and visualizations. Most of the Web presence of the Brede Database is established by a single script executing a workflow involving these steps together with a final generation of Web pages with embedded visualizations and links to interactive three-dimensional models in the Virtual Reality Modeling Language. Apart from the Brede tools I briefly review alternate visualization tools and methods for Internet-based visualization and information visualization as well as portals for visualization tools. PMID:19668704

  4. Optogenetics Advances in Primate Visual Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Mehrdad; Remington, Evan

    2016-04-06

    In this issue of Neuron, Klein et al. (2016) used cell-type-specific optogenetics and electrical microstimulation to characterize the koniocellular geniculocortical projections in nonhuman primates. Their work offers a powerful platform for refining our understanding of the mechanisms of visual information processing in the lateral geniculate nucleus and primary visual cortex.

  5. Cytoscape: the network visualization tool for GenomeSpace workflows

    PubMed Central

    Demchak, Barry; Hull, Tim; Reich, Michael; Liefeld, Ted; Smoot, Michael; Ideker, Trey; Mesirov, Jill P.

    2014-01-01

    Modern genomic analysis often requires workflows incorporating multiple best-of-breed tools. GenomeSpace is a web-based visual workbench that combines a selection of these tools with mechanisms that create data flows between them. One such tool is Cytoscape 3, a popular application that enables analysis and visualization of graph-oriented genomic networks. As Cytoscape runs on the desktop, and not in a web browser, integrating it into GenomeSpace required special care in creating a seamless user experience and enabling appropriate data flows. In this paper, we present the design and operation of the Cytoscape GenomeSpace app, which accomplishes this integration, thereby providing critical analysis and visualization functionality for GenomeSpace users. It has been downloaded over 850 times since the release of its first version in September, 2013. PMID:25165537

  6. Large Terrain Continuous Level of Detail 3D Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myint, Steven; Jain, Abhinandan

    2012-01-01

    This software solved the problem of displaying terrains that are usually too large to be displayed on standard workstations in real time. The software can visualize terrain data sets composed of billions of vertices, and can display these data sets at greater than 30 frames per second. The Large Terrain Continuous Level of Detail 3D Visualization Tool allows large terrains, which can be composed of billions of vertices, to be visualized in real time. It utilizes a continuous level of detail technique called clipmapping to support this. It offloads much of the work involved in breaking up the terrain into levels of details onto the GPU (graphics processing unit) for faster processing.

  7. Visual Decision Support Tool for Supporting Asset ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Abstract:Managing urban water infrastructures faces the challenge of jointly dealing with assets of diverse types, useful life, cost, ages and condition. Service quality and sustainability require sound long-term planning, well aligned with tactical and operational planning and management. In summary, the objective of an integrated approach to infrastructure asset management is to assist utilities answer the following questions:•Who are we at present?•What service do we deliver?•What do we own?•Where do we want to be in the long-term?•How do we get there?The AWARE-P approach (www.aware-p.org) offers a coherent methodological framework and a valuable portfolio of software tools. It is designed to assist water supply and wastewater utility decision-makers in their analyses and planning processes. It is based on a Plan-Do-Check-Act process and is in accordance with the key principles of the International Standards Organization (ISO) 55000 standards on asset management. It is compatible with, and complementary to WERF’s SIMPLE framework. The software assists in strategic, tactical, and operational planning, through a non-intrusive, web-based, collaborative environment where objectives and metrics drive IAM planning. It is aimed at industry professionals and managers, as well as at the consultants and technical experts that support them. It is easy to use and maximizes the value of information from multiple existing data sources, both in da

  8. CTViz: A tool for the visualization of transport in nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Beach, Benjamin; Brown, Joshua; Tarlton, Taylor; Derosa, Pedro A

    2016-05-01

    A visualization tool (CTViz) for charge transport processes in 3-D hybrid materials (nanocomposites) was developed, inspired by the need for a graphical application to assist in code debugging and data presentation of an existing in-house code. As the simulation code grew, troubleshooting problems grew increasingly difficult without an effective way to visualize 3-D samples and charge transport in those samples. CTViz is able to produce publication and presentation quality visuals of the simulation box, as well as static and animated visuals of the paths of individual carriers through the sample. CTViz was designed to provide a high degree of flexibility in the visualization of the data. A feature that characterizes this tool is the use of shade and transparency levels to highlight important details in the morphology or in the transport paths by hiding or dimming elements of little relevance to the current view. This is fundamental for the visualization of 3-D systems with complex structures. The code presented here provides these required capabilities, but has gone beyond the original design and could be used as is or easily adapted for the visualization of other particulate transport where transport occurs on discrete paths.

  9. Visualization techniques and tools for large geo-physical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocke, Thomas; Buschmann, Stefan; Donges, Jonathan F.; Marwan, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    Network analysis is an important approach in studying complex phenomena within geophysical observation and simulation data. This field produces increasing numbers of large geo-referenced networks to be analyzed. Particular focus lies on the network analysis of the complex statistical interrelationship structure within climatological fields. The typical procedure for such network analyzes is the extraction of network measures in combination with static standard visualization methods. To analyze the visualization challenges within this field, we performed a questionnaire with climate and complex system scientists, and identified a strong requirement for solutions visualizing large and very large geo-referenced networks by providing alternative mappings for static plots and allowing for interactive visualization for networks with 100.000 or even millions of edges. In addition, the questionnaire revealed, that existing interactive visualization methods and tools for geo-referenced network exploration are often either not known to the analyst or their potential is not fully exploited. Within this presentation, we illustrate how interactive visual analytics methods in combination with geo-visualisation can be tailored for visual large climate network investigation (see as well Nocke et al. 2015). Therefore, we present a survey of requirements of network analysts and the related challenges and, as an overview for the interested practitioner, we review the state-of-the-art in climate network visualization techniques and tools, underpinned with concrete examples from climate network research and innovative solutions (e.g. alternative projections, 3D layered networks) implemented within the network visualization system GTX. References: Nocke, T., S. Buschmann, J. F. Donges, N. Marwan, H.-J. Schulz, and C. Tominski: Review: Visual analytics of climate networks, Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics, 22, 545-570, doi:10.5194/npg-22-545-2015, 2015

  10. SERVIR Viz: A 3D Visualization Tool for Mesoamerica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercurio, M.; Coughlin, J.; Deneau, D.

    2007-05-01

    SERVIR Viz is a customized version of NASA's WorldWind, which is a freely distributed, open-source, web- enabled, 3D earth exploration tool. IAGT developed SERVIR Viz in a joint effort with SERVIR research partners to create a visualization framework for geospatial data resources available to the SERVIR project. SERVIR Viz is customized by providing users with newly developed custom tools, enhancements to existing open source tools and a specialized toolbar that allows shortcut access to existing tools. Another key feature is the ability to visualize remotely-hosted framework GIS data layers, maps, real-time satellite images, and other SERVIR products relevant to the Mesoamerica region using the NASA WorldWind visualization engine and base mapping layers. The main users of SERVIR Viz are the seven countries of Mesoamerica, SERVIR participants, educators, scientists, decision-makers, and the general public. SERVIR Viz enhances the SERVIR project infrastructure by providing access to NASA GEOSS data products and internet served Mesoamerica centric GIS data products within a tool developed specifically to promote use of GIS and visualization technologies in the decision support goals of the SERVIR project. In addition, SERVIZ Viz can be toggled between English and Spanish to support a wide cross section of users and development still continues to support new data and user requirements. This presentation will include a live demonstration of SERVIR Viz.

  11. Visualization for learners: a framework for adapting scientists' tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelson, Daniel C.; Gordin, Douglas

    1998-08-01

    The use of scientific investigation tools for education is receiving considerable attention as a result of an increased emphasis in the educational community on open-ended inquiry. The scientific community possesses a treasure trove of tools that could be adapted for use by learners. Scientific visualization technologies, in particular, offer great promise for education because of the way they use visual representations to facilitate exploration of complex data. However, the tools that are used by scientists are inappropriate for learners because of their reliance on the tacit knowledge of expert users. Through a careful consideration of the differences between scientists and science students and the design of a series of scientific visualization environments for learners in grades 8-16, we have developed a design framework for the creation of scientific investigation tools based on those of scientists. The framework highlights five critical issues for the construction of tools to support inquiry-based learning: motivating context, learner-appropriate activities, data selection, scaffolding interfaces and support for learning. We have applied this framework to the design of ClimateWatcher, a scientific visualization environment for the investigation of issues related to global climate and climate change that is now in use in middle school, high school and university settings.

  12. Optimal visual-haptic integration with articulated tools.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Chie; Watt, Simon J

    2017-02-18

    When we feel and see an object, the nervous system integrates visual and haptic information optimally, exploiting the redundancy in multiple signals to estimate properties more precisely than is possible from either signal alone. We examined whether optimal integration is similarly achieved when using articulated tools. Such tools (tongs, pliers, etc) are a defining characteristic of human hand function, but complicate the classical sensory 'correspondence problem' underlying multisensory integration. Optimal integration requires establishing the relationship between signals acquired by different sensors (hand and eye) and, therefore, in fundamentally unrelated units. The system must also determine when signals refer to the same property of the world-seeing and feeling the same thing-and only integrate those that do. This could be achieved by comparing the pattern of current visual and haptic input to known statistics of their normal relationship. Articulated tools disrupt this relationship, however, by altering the geometrical relationship between object properties and hand posture (the haptic signal). We examined whether different tool configurations are taken into account in visual-haptic integration. We indexed integration by measuring the precision of size estimates, and compared our results to optimal predictions from a maximum-likelihood integrator. Integration was near optimal, independent of tool configuration/hand posture, provided that visual and haptic signals referred to the same object in the world. Thus, sensory correspondence was determined correctly (trial-by-trial), taking tool configuration into account. This reveals highly flexible multisensory integration underlying tool use, consistent with the brain constructing internal models of tools' properties.

  13. Computers as Research Tools 2.Data Processing and Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Namio

    This article introduces how to process and visualize scientific data with using ”Gnuplot” which is freely available plotting utility from the Internet. Not only a simple example of drawing a single plot on a page but also advanced feature of handling data stream and communication to the external application is explained.

  14. Lighting Studies for Fuelling Machine Deployed Visual Inspection Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Stoots, Carl; Griffith, George

    2015-04-01

    Under subcontract to James Fisher Nuclear, Ltd., INL has been reviewing advanced vision systems for inspection of graphite in high radiation, high temperature, and high pressure environments. INL has performed calculations and proof-of-principle measurements of optics and lighting techniques to be considered for visual inspection of graphite fuel channels in AGR reactors in UK.

  15. ASCI visualization tool evaluation, Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Kegelmeyer, P.

    1997-04-01

    The charter of the ASCI Visualization Common Tools subgroup was to investigate and evaluate 3D scientific visualization tools. As part of that effort, a Tri-Lab evaluation effort was launched in February of 1996. The first step was to agree on a thoroughly documented list of 32 features against which all tool candidates would be evaluated. These evaluation criteria were both gleaned from a user survey and determined from informed extrapolation into the future, particularly as concerns the 3D nature and extremely large size of ASCI data sets. The second step was to winnow a field of 41 candidate tools down to 11. The selection principle was to be as inclusive as practical, retaining every tool that seemed to hold any promise of fulfilling all of ASCI`s visualization needs. These 11 tools were then closely investigated by volunteer evaluators distributed across LANL, LLNL, and SNL. This report contains the results of those evaluations, as well as a discussion of the evaluation philosophy and criteria.

  16. BMDExpress Data Viewer - a visualization tool to analyze BMDExpress datasets.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Byron; Francina Webster, A; Thomas, Russell S; Yauk, Carole L

    2016-08-01

    Regulatory agencies increasingly apply benchmark dose (BMD) modeling to determine points of departure for risk assessment. BMDExpress applies BMD modeling to transcriptomic datasets to identify transcriptional BMDs. However, graphing and analytical capabilities within BMDExpress are limited, and the analysis of output files is challenging. We developed a web-based application, BMDExpress Data Viewer (http://apps.sciome.com:8082/BMDX_Viewer/), for visualizing and graphing BMDExpress output files. The application consists of "Summary Visualization" and "Dataset Exploratory" tools. Through analysis of transcriptomic datasets of the toxicants furan and 4,4'-methylenebis(N,N-dimethyl)benzenamine, we demonstrate that the "Summary Visualization Tools" can be used to examine distributions of gene and pathway BMD values, and to derive a potential point of departure value based on summary statistics. By applying filters on enrichment P-values and minimum number of significant genes, the "Functional Enrichment Analysis" tool enables the user to select biological processes or pathways that are selectively perturbed by chemical exposure and identify the related BMD. The "Multiple Dataset Comparison" tool enables comparison of gene and pathway BMD values across multiple experiments (e.g., across timepoints or tissues). The "BMDL-BMD Range Plotter" tool facilitates the observation of BMD trends across biological processes or pathways. Through our case studies, we demonstrate that BMDExpress Data Viewer is a useful tool to visualize, explore and analyze BMDExpress output files. Visualizing the data in this manner enables rapid assessment of data quality, model fit, doses of peak activity, most sensitive pathway perturbations and other metrics that will be useful in applying toxicogenomics in risk assessment. © 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Journal of Applied Toxicology published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Photoelectron Imaging as a Quantum Chemistry Visualization Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grumbling, Emily R.; Pichugin, Kostyantyn; Mabbs, Richard; Sanov, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    An overview and simple example of photoelectron imaging is presented, highlighting its efficacy as a pedagogical tool for visualizing quantum phenomena. Specifically, photoelectron imaging of H[superscript -] (the simplest negative ion) is used to demonstrate several quantum mechanical principles. This example could be incorporated into an…

  18. A Multidimensional Analysis Tool for Visualizing Online Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Minjeong; Lee, Eunchul

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes and verifies the performance of an analysis tool for visualizing online interactions. A review of the most widely used methods for analyzing online interactions, including quantitative analysis, content analysis, and social network analysis methods, indicates these analysis methods have some limitations resulting from their…

  19. Advanced cryogenics for cutting tools. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to determine if cryogenic treatment improved the life and cost effectiveness of perishable cutting tools over other treatments or coatings. Test results showed that in five of seven of the perishable cutting tools tested there was no improvement in tool life. The other two tools showed a small gain in tool life, but not as much as when switching manufacturers of the cutting tool. The following conclusions were drawn from this study: (1) titanium nitride coatings are more effective than cryogenic treatment in increasing the life of perishable cutting tools made from all cutting tool materials, (2) cryogenic treatment may increase tool life if the cutting tool is improperly heat treated during its origination, and (3) cryogenic treatment was only effective on those tools made from less sophisticated high speed tool steels. As a part of a recent detailed investigation, four cutting tool manufacturers and two cutting tool laboratories were queried and none could supply any data to substantiate cryogenic treatment of perishable cutting tools.

  20. MATLAB tools for lidar data conversion, visualization, and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Zhou, Kaijing; Yang, Jie; Lu, Yilong

    2011-10-01

    LIDAR (LIght Detection and Ranging) [1] is an optical remote sensing technology that has gained increasing acceptance for topographic mapping. LIDAR technology has higher accuracy than RADAR and has wide applications. The relevant commercial market for LIDAR has developed greatly in the last few years. LAS format is approved to be the standard data format for interchanging LIDAR data among different software developers, manufacturers and end users. LAS data format reduces the data size compared to ASCII data format. However, LAS data file can only be visualized by some expensive commercial software. There are some free tools available, but they are not user-friendly and have less or poor visualization functionality. This makes it difficult for researchers to investigate and use LIDAR data. Therefore, there is a need to develop an efficient and low cost LIDAR data toolbox. For this purpose we have developed a free and efficient Matlab tool for LIDAR data conversion, visualization and processing.

  1. CEOS Visualization Environment (COVE) Tool for Intercalibration of Satellite Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Paul D.; Killough, Brian D.; Gowda, Sanjay; Williams, Brian R.; Chander, Gyanesh; Qu, Min

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, data from multiple instruments are used to gain a more complete understanding of land surface processes at a variety of scales. Intercalibration, comparison, and coordination of satellite instrument coverage areas is a critical effort of space agencies and of international and domestic organizations. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites Visualization Environment (COVE) is a suite of browser-based applications that leverage Google Earth to display past, present, and future satellite instrument coverage areas and coincident calibration opportunities. This forecasting and ground coverage analysis and visualization capability greatly benefits the remote sensing calibration community in preparation for multisatellite ground calibration campaigns or individual satellite calibration studies. COVE has been developed for use by a broad international community to improve the efficiency and efficacy of such calibration efforts. This paper provides a brief overview of the COVE tool, its validation, accuracies and limitations with emphasis on the applicability of this visualization tool for supporting ground field campaigns and intercalibration of satellite instruments.

  2. Visualization as a Tool for Validation and Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, S.; Huesca, M.; Roth, K. L.; Ustin, S.; Amenta, N.

    2015-12-01

    NEON's Airborne Observation Platform will provide LiDAR and hyperspectral imaging data that can be used to characterize environmental change over large study areas. While the quality of the instruments continues to increase, software tools for exploring, analyzing and visualizing LiDAR data are one area that lags behind. I will present a real time visualization technique that creates an easy-to-interpret non-photrealistic visualization of discrete NEON LiDAR data. This technique can be used to virtually explore the dataset at varying levels of detail and also for validating results of analyses such as tree segmentation, species identification, biomass estimation and unsupervised clustering, which could be used to guide fieldwork. The integration of visualization and analysis helps evaluate the performance of analysis software and leads an overall better understanding of the dataset.

  3. Haptic over visual information in the distribution of visual attention after tool-use in near and far space.

    PubMed

    Park, George D; Reed, Catherine L

    2015-10-01

    Despite attentional prioritization for grasping space near the hands, tool-use appears to transfer attentional bias to the tool's end/functional part. The contributions of haptic and visual inputs to attentional distribution along a tool were investigated as a function of tool-use in near (Experiment 1) and far (Experiment 2) space. Visual attention was assessed with a 50/50, go/no-go, target discrimination task, while a tool was held next to targets appearing near the tool-occupied hand or tool-end. Target response times (RTs) and sensitivity (d-prime) were measured at target locations, before and after functional tool practice for three conditions: (1) open-tool: tool-end visible (visual + haptic inputs), (2) hidden-tool: tool-end visually obscured (haptic input only), and (3) short-tool: stick missing tool's length/end (control condition: hand occupied but no visual/haptic input). In near space, both open- and hidden-tool groups showed a tool-end, attentional bias (faster RTs toward tool-end) before practice; after practice, RTs near the hand improved. In far space, the open-tool group showed no bias before practice; after practice, target RTs near the tool-end improved. However, the hidden-tool group showed a consistent tool-end bias despite practice. Lack of short-tool group results suggested that hidden-tool group results were specific to haptic inputs. In conclusion, (1) allocation of visual attention along a tool due to tool practice differs in near and far space, and (2) visual attention is drawn toward the tool's end even when visually obscured, suggesting haptic input provides sufficient information for directing attention along the tool.

  4. Advanced Human Factors Engineering Tool Technologies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    representing the government, the military, academe, and private industry were surveyed to identify those tools that are most frequently used or viewed...tools by HFE researchers and practitioners within the academic, industrial , and military settings. % .. J. &@ossion For XTIS GR&&I DTIC TAS 0...267 E. Human Factors Engineering Tools Questionnaire .. ......... . 279 F. Listing of Industry , Government, and Academe

  5. Visualize: a free and open source multifunction tool for proteomics data analysis.

    PubMed

    Halligan, Brian D; Greene, Andrew S

    2011-03-01

    A major challenge in the field of high-throughput proteomics is the conversion of the large volume of experimental data that is generated into biological knowledge. Typically, proteomics experiments involve the combination and comparison of multiple data sets and the analysis and annotation of these combined results. Although there are some commercial applications that provide some of these functions, there is a need for a free, open source, multifunction tool for advanced proteomics data analysis. We have developed the Visualize program that provides users with the abilities to visualize, analyze, and annotate proteomics data; combine data from multiple runs, and quantitate differences between individual runs and combined data sets. Visualize is licensed under GNU GPL and can be downloaded from http://proteomics.mcw.edu/visualize. It is available as compiled client-based executable files for both Windows and Mac OS X platforms as well as PERL source code.

  6. Tool for Sizing Analysis of the Advanced Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Hue-Hsie Jannivine; Brown, Cheryl B.; Jeng, Frank J.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced Life Support Sizing Analysis Tool (ALSSAT) is a computer model for sizing and analyzing designs of environmental-control and life support systems (ECLSS) for spacecraft and surface habitats involved in the exploration of Mars and Moon. It performs conceptual designs of advanced life support (ALS) subsystems that utilize physicochemical and biological processes to recycle air and water, and process wastes in order to reduce the need of resource resupply. By assuming steady-state operations, ALSSAT is a means of investigating combinations of such subsystems technologies and thereby assisting in determining the most cost-effective technology combination available. In fact, ALSSAT can perform sizing analysis of the ALS subsystems that are operated dynamically or steady in nature. Using the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet software with Visual Basic programming language, ALSSAT has been developed to perform multiple-case trade studies based on the calculated ECLSS mass, volume, power, and Equivalent System Mass, as well as parametric studies by varying the input parameters. ALSSAT s modular format is specifically designed for the ease of future maintenance and upgrades.

  7. Advanced Technology for Portable Personal Visualization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Chen (Ultrasomund), Jim Chung (HMD-Radianon Tresmarent Planning), Dmw Davidson (HMD-Sound, 3D Modeler), Erik Erikson (HMD-Foot Tracking, Virtual Tool...Ubiquitous Computing. Taylor, Russell M., Warren Robinett, Vernon L. Chi, Frederick P. Brooks, Jr., William V. Wright, R. Stanley Williams, Erik J. Snyder

  8. Engaging Patients with Advance Directives using an Information Visualization Approach

    PubMed Central

    Woollen, Janet; Bakken, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Despite the benefits of advance directives (AD) to both patients and care providers, they are often not completed due to lack of patient awareness. The purpose of this paper is to advocate for creation and use of an innovative information visualization (infovisual) as a health communication tool aimed at improving AD dissemination and engagement. The infovisual would promote AD awareness by engaging patients to learn about their options and inspire contemplation and conversation regarding patients’ end-of-life (EOL) journey. An infovisual may be able to communicate insights that are often communicated in words, but are much more powerfully communicated by example. Furthermore, an infovisual could facilitate vivid understanding of options and inspire the beginning of often-difficult conversations between care providers, patients and loved ones. It may also save clinicians’ time, as care providers may be able to spend less time explaining details of EOL care options. Use of an infovisual could assist in ensuring a well-planned EOL. PMID:26273950

  9. Sandia MEMS Visualization Tools v. 3.0

    SciTech Connect

    Yarberry, Victor; Jorgensen, Craig R.; Young, Andrew I.

    2016-06-23

    This is a revision to the Sandia MEMS Visualization Tools. It replaces all previous versions. New features in this version: Support for AutoCAD 2014 and 2015 . This CD contains an integrated set of electronic files that: a) Provides a 2D Process Visualizer that generates cross-section images of devices constructed using the SUMMiT V fabrication process. b) Provides a 3D Visualizer that generates 3D images of devices constructed using the SUMMiT V fabrication process. c) Provides a MEMS 3D Model generator that creates 3D solid models of devices constructed using the SUMMiT V fabrication process. While there exists some files on the CD that are used in conjunction with software package AutoCAD , these files are not intended for use independent of the CD. Note that the customer must purchase his/her own copy of AutoCAD to use with these files.

  10. DspaceOgreTerrain 3D Terrain Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myint, Steven; Jain, Abhinandan; Pomerantz, Marc I.

    2012-01-01

    DspaceOgreTerrain is an extension to the DspaceOgre 3D visualization tool that supports real-time visualization of various terrain types, including digital elevation maps, planets, and meshes. DspaceOgreTerrain supports creating 3D representations of terrains and placing them in a scene graph. The 3D representations allow for a continuous level of detail, GPU-based rendering, and overlaying graphics like wheel tracks and shadows. It supports reading data from the SimScape terrain- modeling library. DspaceOgreTerrain solves the problem of displaying the results of simulations that involve very large terrains. In the past, it has been used to visualize simulations of vehicle traverses on Lunar and Martian terrains. These terrains were made up of billions of vertices and would not have been renderable in real-time without using a continuous level of detail rendering technique.

  11. A New Collaborative Tool for Visually Understanding National Health Indicators

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Songhua; Jewell, Brian C; Steed, Chad A; Schryver, Jack C

    2012-01-01

    The authors propose a new online collaborative tool for visually understanding national health indicators, which facilitates the full spectrum of investigation of indicators, from an overview of all the correlation coefficients between variables, to investigation of subsets of selected variables, and to individual data element analysis. this tool is publicly accessible at http://cda.ornl.gov/heat/heatmap.html. In this paper, they discuss the key issues regarding the interface design and implementation. They also illustrate how to use their interface for analyzing the health indicator dataset by showing some key system views. In the end, they introduce and discuss some ongoing research efforts extending this work.

  12. MATISSE a web-based tool to access, visualize and analyze high resolution minor bodies observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinzi, Angelo; Capria, Maria Teresa; Palomba, Ernesto; Antonelli, Lucio Angelo; Giommi, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    In the recent years planetary exploration missions acquired data from minor bodies (i.e., dwarf planets, asteroid and comets) at a detail level never reached before. Since these objects often present very irregular shapes (as in the case of the comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko target of the ESA Rosetta mission) "classical" bidimensional projections of observations are difficult to understand. With the aim of providing the scientific community a tool to access, visualize and analyze data in a new way, ASI Science Data Center started to develop MATISSE (Multi-purposed Advanced Tool for the Instruments for the Solar System Exploration - http://tools.asdc.asi.it/matisse.jsp) in late 2012. This tool allows 3D web-based visualization of data acquired by planetary exploration missions: the output could either be the straightforward projection of the selected observation over the shape model of the target body or the visualization of a high-order product (average/mosaic, difference, ratio, RGB) computed directly online with MATISSE. Standard outputs of the tool also comprise downloadable files to be used with GIS software (GeoTIFF and ENVI format) and 3D very high-resolution files to be viewed by means of the free software Paraview. During this period the first and most frequent exploitation of the tool has been related to visualization of data acquired by VIRTIS-M instruments onboard Rosetta observing the comet 67P. The success of this task, well represented by the good number of published works that used images made with MATISSE confirmed the need of a different approach to correctly visualize data coming from irregular shaped bodies. In the next future the datasets available to MATISSE are planned to be extended, starting from the addition of VIR-Dawn observations of both Vesta and Ceres and also using standard protocols to access data stored in external repositories, such as NASA ODE and Planetary VO.

  13. Living Color Frame System: PC graphics tool for data visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Long V.

    1993-01-01

    Living Color Frame System (LCFS) is a personal computer software tool for generating real-time graphics applications. It is highly applicable for a wide range of data visualization in virtual environment applications. Engineers often use computer graphics to enhance the interpretation of data under observation. These graphics become more complicated when 'run time' animations are required, such as found in many typical modern artificial intelligence and expert systems. Living Color Frame System solves many of these real-time graphics problems.

  14. McIDAS-V: A powerful visualization and data analysis tool for geostationary environmental satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtor, T. H.; Rink, T.; Straka, W.; Feltz, J.

    2012-12-01

    The University of Wisconsin's Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC) has been at the forefront in developing data analysis and visualization tools for environmental satellite and other geophysical data. The fifth generation of the Man-computer Interactive Data Access System (McIDAS-V) is a java-based, open-source, freely available system for researchers and algorithm developers that is being adapted and expanded for use with advanced geostationary environmental satellite observations. A key attribute of analysis and visualization systems is access to and display of a large variety of geophysical data. Providing these capabilities for numerous data types provides users with powerful tools for merging information, comparison of products and evaluation. McIDAS-V provides unique capabilities that support creative techniques for developing and evaluating algorithms, visualizing data and products in 4 dimensions, and validating results. For geostationary applications, McIDAS-V provides visualization and analysis support for GOES, MSG, MTSAT and FY2 data. NOAA is supporting the McIDAS-V development program for ABI imagery and products for the GOES-R/S series, which will bring an advanced multi-spectral imager into geostationary orbit. Used together, the geostationary environmental satellites provide the user community with detailed global coverage with rapid update cycles. This poster and demonstration will provide an overview of McIDAS-V with demonstrations of the data acquisition, visualization and analysis tools to support the international geostationary environmental satellite programs. It will also present results from several research projects involving current and future environmental satellites, demonstrating how the McIDAS-V software can be used to acquire satellite and ancillary data, create multi--spectral products using both scripting and interactive data manipulation tools, and evaluate output through on-board validation techniques.;

  15. Tools and procedures for visualization of proteins and other biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lurong; Aller, Stephen G

    2015-04-01

    Protein, peptides, and nucleic acids are biomolecules that drive biological processes in living organisms. An enormous amount of structural data for a large number of these biomolecules has been described with atomic precision in the form of structural "snapshots" that are freely available in public repositories. These snapshots can help explain how the biomolecules function, the nature of interactions between multi-molecular complexes, and even how small-molecule drugs can modulate the biomolecules for clinical benefits. Furthermore, these structural snapshots serve as inputs for sophisticated computer simulations to turn the biomolecules into moving, "breathing" molecular machines for understanding their dynamic properties in real-time computer simulations. In order for the researcher to take advantage of such a wealth of structural data, it is necessary to gain competency in the use of computer molecular visualization tools for exploring the structures and visualizing three-dimensional spatial representations. Here, we present protocols for using two common visualization tools--the Web-based Jmol and the stand-alone PyMOL package--as well as a few examples of other popular tools.

  16. Sandia Advanced MEMS Design Tools, Version 2.2.5

    SciTech Connect

    Yarberry, Victor; Allen, James; Lantz, Jeffery; Priddy, Brian; & Westling, Belinda

    2010-01-19

    The Sandia National Laboratories Advanced MEMS Design Tools, Version 2.2.5, is a collection of menus, prototype drawings, and executables that provide significant productivity enhancements when using AutoCAD to design MEMS components. This release is designed for AutoCAD 2000i, 2002, or 2004 and is supported under Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000, or XP. SUMMiT V (Sandia Ultra planar Multi level MEMS Technology) is a 5 level surface micromachine fabrication technology, which customers internal and external to Sandia can access to fabricate prototype MEMS devices. This CD contains an integrated set of electronic files that: a) Describe the SUMMiT V fabrication process b) Facilitate the process of designing MEMS with the SUMMiT process (prototype file, Design Rule Checker, Standard Parts Library) New features in this version: AutoCAD 2004 support has been added. SafeExplode ? a new feature that explodes blocks without affecting polylines (avoids exploding polylines into objects that are ignored by the DRC and Visualization tools). Layer control menu ? a pull-down menu for selecting layers to isolate, freeze, or thaw. Updated tools: A check has been added to catch invalid block names. DRC features: Added username/password validation, added a method to update the user?s password. SNL_DRC_WIDTH ? a value to control the width of the DRC error lines. SNL_BIAS_VALUE ? a value use to offset selected geometry SNL_PROCESS_NAME ? a value to specify the process name Documentation changes: The documentation has been updated to include the new features. While there exist some files on the CD that are used in conjunction with software package AutoCAD, these files are not intended for use independent of the CD. Note that the customer must purchase his/her own copy of AutoCAD to use with these files.

  17. Visualization tools facilitate geological investigations of Mars Exploration Rover landing sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwehr, Kurt D.; Nishimura, Carrie; Johnson, Catherine L.; Kilb, Debi L.; Nayak, Atul

    2005-03-01

    The current rate of Mars exploration data acquisition demands that geoscientists and computer scientists coordinate central storage, processing and visualization strategies to anticipate future technological advancements. We investigate how existing 3-D visualization tools can be used to study a part of the Mars orbiter and lander data (about 4 terabytes of data). Our tools assist in juxtaposition of different datum and in viewing data that spans multiple orders of magnitude, specifically for current scientific research pertaining to Mars" geophysics and geology. These tools also permit effective data fidelity and resolution assessment, allowing quick identification of problems related to the use of differing spatial coordinate systems, a continued problem. Knowledge gained from the small dataset we test, helps us identify key tools needed to accommodate the technology required to process and analyze approximately 64 terabytes of Mars data expected by 2008. We use the current planetary data archives, and identify key visualization techniques and tools that distill multiple data types into manageable end products. Our goal is to broaden the user base, using readily available platform-independent freeware packages, while simultaneously including sufficient modularity to be compatible with future technologies.

  18. Advanced Visualization and Analysis of Climate Data using DV3D and UV-CDAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, T. P.

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes DV3D, a Vistrails package of high-level modules for the Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) interactive visual exploration system that enables exploratory analysis of diverse and rich data sets stored in the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF). DV3D provides user-friendly workflow interfaces for advanced visualization and analysis of climate data at a level appropriate for scientists. The application builds on VTK, an open-source, object-oriented library, for visualization and analysis. DV3D provides the high-level interfaces, tools, and application integrations required to make the analysis and visualization power of VTK readily accessible to users without exposing burdensome details such as actors, cameras, renderers, and transfer functions. It can run as a desktop application or distributed over a set of nodes for hyperwall or distributed visualization applications. DV3D is structured as a set of modules which can be linked to create workflows in Vistrails. Figure 1 displays a typical DV3D workflow as it would appear in the Vistrails workflow builder interface of UV-CDAT and, on the right, the visualization spreadsheet output of the workflow. Each DV3D module encapsulates a complex VTK pipeline with numerous supporting objects. Each visualization module implements a unique interactive 3D display. The integrated Vistrails visualization spreadsheet offers multiple synchronized visualization displays for desktop or hyperwall. The currently available displays include volume renderers, volume slicers, 3D isosurfaces, 3D hovmoller, and various vector plots. The DV3D GUI offers a rich selection of interactive query, browse, navigate, and configure options for all displays. All configuration operations are saved as Vistrails provenance. DV3D's seamless integration with UV-CDAT's climate data management system (CDMS) and other climate data analysis tools provides a wide range of climate data analysis operations, e

  19. The visual encoding of tool-object affordances.

    PubMed

    Natraj, N; Pella, Y M; Borghi, A M; Wheaton, L A

    2015-12-03

    The perception of tool-object pairs involves understanding their action-relationships (affordances). Here, we sought to evaluate how an observer visually encodes tool-object affordances. Eye-movements were recorded as right-handed participants freely viewed static, right-handed, egocentric tool-object images across three contexts: correct (e.g. hammer-nail), incorrect (e.g. hammer-paper), spatial/ambiguous (e.g. hammer-wood), and three grasp-types: no hand, functional grasp-posture (grasp hammer-handle), non-functional/manipulative grasp-posture (grasp hammer-head). There were three areas of interests (AOI): the object (nail), the operant tool-end (hammer-head), the graspable tool-end (hammer-handle). Participants passively evaluated whether tool-object pairs were functionally correct/incorrect. Clustering of gaze scanpaths and AOI weightings grouped conditions into three distinct grasp-specific clusters, especially across correct and spatial tool-object contexts and to a lesser extent within the incorrect tool-object context. The grasp-specific gaze scanpath clusters were reasonably robust to the temporal order of gaze scanpaths. Gaze was therefore automatically primed to grasp-affordances though the task required evaluating tool-object context. Participants also primarily focused on the object and the operant tool-end and sparsely attended to the graspable tool-end, even in images with functional grasp-postures. In fact, in the absence of a grasp, the object was foveally weighted the most, indicative of a possible object-oriented action priming effect wherein the observer may be evaluating how the tool engages on the object. Unlike the functional grasp-posture, the manipulative grasp-posture caused the greatest disruption in the object-oriented priming effect, ostensibly as it does not afford tool-object action due to its non-functional interaction with the operant tool-end that actually engages with the object (e.g., hammer-head to nail). The enhanced attention

  20. 3D Immersive Visualization: An Educational Tool in Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Campos, N.; Cárdenas-Soto, M.; Juárez-Casas, M.; Castrejón-Pineda, R.

    2007-05-01

    3D immersive visualization is an innovative tool currently used in various disciplines, such as medicine, architecture, engineering, video games, etc. Recently, the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) mounted a visualization theater (Ixtli) with leading edge technology, for academic and research purposes that require immersive 3D tools for a better understanding of the concepts involved. The Division of Engineering in Earth Sciences of the School of Engineering, UNAM, is running a project focused on visualization of geoscience data. Its objective is to incoporate educational material in geoscience courses in order to support and to improve the teaching-learning process, especially in well-known difficult topics for students. As part of the project, proffessors and students are trained in visualization techniques, then their data are adapted and visualized in Ixtli as part of a class or a seminar, where all the attendants can interact, not only among each other but also with the object under study. As part of our results, we present specific examples used in basic geophysics courses, such as interpreted seismic cubes, seismic-wave propagation models, and structural models from bathymetric, gravimetric and seismological data; as well as examples from ongoing applied projects, such as a modeled SH upward wave, the occurrence of an earthquake cluster in 1999 in the Popocatepetl volcano, and a risk atlas from Delegación Alvaro Obregón in Mexico City. All these examples, plus those to come, constitute a library for students and professors willing to explore another dimension of the teaching-learning process. Furthermore, this experience can be enhaced by rich discussions and interactions by videoconferences with other universities and researchers.

  1. Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Tools (AFAVT), AFDC (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-01-01

    The Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Web site offers a collection of calculators, interactive maps, and informational tools to assist fleets, fuel providers, and others looking to reduce petroleum consumption in the transportation sector.

  2. Parallel analysis tools and new visualization techniques for ultra-large climate data set

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, Don; Haley, Mary

    2014-12-10

    ParVis was a project funded under LAB 10-05: “Earth System Modeling: Advanced Scientific Visualization of Ultra-Large Climate Data Sets”. Argonne was the lead lab with partners at PNNL, SNL, NCAR and UC-Davis. This report covers progress from January 1st, 2013 through Dec 1st, 2014. Two previous reports covered the period from Summer, 2010, through September 2011 and October 2011 through December 2012, respectively. While the project was originally planned to end on April 30, 2013, personnel and priority changes allowed many of the institutions to continue work through FY14 using existing funds. A primary focus of ParVis was introducing parallelism to climate model analysis to greatly reduce the time-to-visualization for ultra-large climate data sets. Work in the first two years was conducted on two tracks with different time horizons: one track to provide immediate help to climate scientists already struggling to apply their analysis to existing large data sets and another focused on building a new data-parallel library and tool for climate analysis and visualization that will give the field a platform for performing analysis and visualization on ultra-large datasets for the foreseeable future. In the final 2 years of the project, we focused mostly on the new data-parallel library and associated tools for climate analysis and visualization.

  3. CEOS visualization environment (COVE) tool for intercalibration of satellite instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kessler, P.D.; Killough, B.D.; Gowda, S.; Williams, B.R.; Chander, G.; Qu, Min

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, data from multiple instruments are used to gain a more complete understanding of land surface processes at a variety of scales. Intercalibration, comparison, and coordination of satellite instrument coverage areas is a critical effort of international and domestic space agencies and organizations. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites Visualization Environment (COVE) is a suite of browser-based applications that leverage Google Earth to display past, present, and future satellite instrument coverage areas and coincident calibration opportunities. This forecasting and ground coverage analysis and visualization capability greatly benefits the remote sensing calibration community in preparation for multisatellite ground calibration campaigns or individual satellite calibration studies. COVE has been developed for use by a broad international community to improve the efficiency and efficacy of such calibration planning efforts, whether those efforts require past, present, or future predictions. This paper provides a brief overview of the COVE tool, its validation, accuracies, and limitations with emphasis on the applicability of this visualization tool for supporting ground field campaigns and intercalibration of satellite instruments.

  4. Visual Data Comm: A Tool for Visualizing Data Communication in the Multi Sector Planner Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hwasoo Eric

    2010-01-01

    Data comm is a new technology proposed in future air transport system as a potential tool to provide comprehensive data connectivity. It is a key enabler to manage 4D trajectory digitally, potentially resulting in improved flight times and increased throughput. Future concepts with data comm integration have been tested in a number of human-in-the-loop studies but analyzing the results has proven to be particularly challenging because future traffic environment in which data comm is fully enabled has assumed high traffic density, resulting in data set with large amount of information. This paper describes the motivation, design, current and potential future application of Visual Data Comm (VDC), a tool for visualizing data developed in Java using Processing library which is a tool package designed for interactive visualization programming. This paper includes an example of an application of VDC on data pertaining to the most recent Multi Sector Planner study, conducted at NASA s Airspace Operations Laboratory in 2009, in which VDC was used to visualize and interpret data comm activities

  5. Vizic: Jupyter-based interactive visualization tool for astronomical catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Weixiang; Carrasco-Kind, Matias; Brunner, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Vizic is a Python visualization library that builds the connection between images and catalogs through an interactive map of the sky region. The software visualizes catalog data over a custom background canvas using the shape, size and orientation of each object in the catalog and displays interactive and customizable objects in the map. Property values such as redshift and magnitude can be used to filter or apply colormaps, and objects can be selected for further analysis through standard Python functions from inside a Jupyter notebook. Vizic allows custom overlays to be appended dynamically on top of the sky map; included are Voronoi, Delaunay, Minimum Spanning Tree and HEALPix layers, which are helpful for visualizing large-scale structure. Overlays can be generated, added or removed dynamically with one line of code. Catalog data is kept in a non-relational database. The Jupyter Notebook allows the user to create scripts to analyze and plot the data selected/displayed in the interactive map, making Vizic a powerful and flexible interactive analysis tool. Vizic be used for data inspection, clustering analysis, galaxy alignment studies, outlier identification or simply large-scale visualizations.

  6. Tools for 3D scientific visualization in computational aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gordon; Plessel, Todd; Merritt, Fergus; Watson, Val

    1989-01-01

    The purpose is to describe the tools and techniques in use at the NASA Ames Research Center for performing visualization of computational aerodynamics, for example visualization of flow fields from computer simulations of fluid dynamics about vehicles such as the Space Shuttle. The hardware used for visualization is a high-performance graphics workstation connected to a super computer with a high speed channel. At present, the workstation is a Silicon Graphics IRIS 3130, the supercomputer is a CRAY2, and the high speed channel is a hyperchannel. The three techniques used for visualization are post-processing, tracking, and steering. Post-processing analysis is done after the simulation. Tracking analysis is done during a simulation but is not interactive, whereas steering analysis involves modifying the simulation interactively during the simulation. Using post-processing methods, a flow simulation is executed on a supercomputer and, after the simulation is complete, the results of the simulation are processed for viewing. The software in use and under development at NASA Ames Research Center for performing these types of tasks in computational aerodynamics is described. Workstation performance issues, benchmarking, and high-performance networks for this purpose are also discussed as well as descriptions of other hardware for digital video and film recording.

  7. Innovative Tools Advance Revolutionary Weld Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The iconic, orange external tank of the space shuttle launch system not only contains the fuel used by the shuttle s main engines during liftoff but also comprises the shuttle s backbone, supporting the space shuttle orbiter and solid rocket boosters. Given the tank s structural importance and the extreme forces (7.8 million pounds of thrust load) and temperatures it encounters during launch, the welds used to construct the tank must be highly reliable. Variable polarity plasma arc welding, developed for manufacturing the external tank and later employed for building the International Space Station, was until 1994 the best process for joining the aluminum alloys used during construction. That year, Marshall Space Flight Center engineers began experimenting with a relatively new welding technique called friction stir welding (FSW), developed in 1991 by The Welding Institute, of Cambridge, England. FSW differs from traditional fusion welding in that it is a solid-state welding technique, using frictional heat and motion to join structural components without actually melting any of the material. The weld is created by a shouldered pin tool that is plunged into the seam of the materials to be joined. The tool traverses the line while rotating at high speeds, generating friction that heats and softens but does not melt the metal. (The heat produced approaches about 80 percent of the metal s melting temperature.) The pin tool s rotation crushes and stirs the plasticized metal, extruding it along the seam as the tool moves forward. The material cools and consolidates, resulting in a weld with superior mechanical properties as compared to those weld properties of fusion welds. The innovative FSW technology promises a number of attractive benefits. Because the welded materials are not melted, many of the undesirables associated with fusion welding porosity, cracking, shrinkage, and distortion of the weld are minimized or avoided. The process is more energy efficient, safe

  8. Intelligent Software Tools for Advanced Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart, C.W.

    2001-04-03

    Feature extraction and evaluation are two procedures common to the development of any pattern recognition application. These features are the primary pieces of information which are used to train the pattern recognition tool, whether that tool is a neural network, a fuzzy logic rulebase, or a genetic algorithm. Careful selection of the features to be used by the pattern recognition tool can significantly streamline the overall development and training of the solution for the pattern recognition application. This report summarizes the development of an integrated, computer-based software package called the Feature Extraction Toolbox (FET), which can be used for the development and deployment of solutions to generic pattern recognition problems. This toolbox integrates a number of software techniques for signal processing, feature extraction and evaluation, and pattern recognition, all under a single, user-friendly development environment. The toolbox has been developed to run on a laptop computer, so that it may be taken to a site and used to develop pattern recognition applications in the field. A prototype version of this toolbox has been completed and is currently being used for applications development on several projects in support of the Department of Energy.

  9. A Jupyter-based Interactive Visualization Tool for Astronomical Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Weixiang; Carrasco Kind, Matias; Brunner, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The ever-growing datasets in observational astronomy have challenged scientists in many aspects, including an efficient and interactive data exploration and visualization. Many tools have been developed to confront this challenge. However, they usually focus on displaying the actual images or focus on visualizing patterns within catalogs. Here we present Vizic, a Python visualization library that builds the connection between images and catalogs through an interactive map of the sky region. Vizic visualizes catalog data over a custom background canvas using the shape, size and orientation of each object in the catalog. The displayed objects in the map are highly interactive and customizable comparing to those in the observation images. These objects can be filtered by or colored by their property values, such as redshift and/or magnitude or can be sub-selected using a lasso-like tool. In addition, Vizic also allows custom overlays to be appended dynamically on top of the image. We have implemented a minimum spanning tree overlay and a Voronoi diagram overlay. Both overlays can be generated, added or removed with just a click of a button. All the data is kept in a non relational database, and the interfaces were developed in JavaScript and Python to work on Jupyter notebooks which allows to create custom widgets, user generated scripts to analyze and plot the data selected/displayed in the interactive map.Vizic can be adopted in variety of exercises, for example, data inspection, clustering analysis, galaxy alignment studies or public data release for large surveys.

  10. Visualizing genome and systems biology: technologies, tools, implementation techniques and trends, past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Malliarakis, Dimitris; Papanikolaou, Nikolas; Theodosiou, Theodosis; Enright, Anton J; Iliopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    "Α picture is worth a thousand words." This widely used adage sums up in a few words the notion that a successful visual representation of a concept should enable easy and rapid absorption of large amounts of information. Although, in general, the notion of capturing complex ideas using images is very appealing, would 1000 words be enough to describe the unknown in a research field such as the life sciences? Life sciences is one of the biggest generators of enormous datasets, mainly as a result of recent and rapid technological advances; their complexity can make these datasets incomprehensible without effective visualization methods. Here we discuss the past, present and future of genomic and systems biology visualization. We briefly comment on many visualization and analysis tools and the purposes that they serve. We focus on the latest libraries and programming languages that enable more effective, efficient and faster approaches for visualizing biological concepts, and also comment on the future human-computer interaction trends that would enable for enhancing visualization further.

  11. Terahertz Tools Advance Imaging for Security, Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Picometrix, a wholly owned subsidiary of Advanced Photonix Inc. (API), of Ann Arbor, Michigan, invented the world s first commercial terahertz system. The company improved the portability and capabilities of their systems through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) agreements with Langley Research Center to provide terahertz imaging capabilities for inspecting the space shuttle external tanks and orbiters. Now API s systems make use of the unique imaging capacity of terahertz radiation on manufacturing floors, for thickness measurements of coatings, pharmaceutical tablet production, and even art conservation.

  12. GLIDER: Free tool imagery data visualization, analysis and mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, R.; Graves, S. J.; Berendes, T.; Maskey, M.; Chidambaram, C.; Hogan, P.; Gaskin, T.

    2009-12-01

    Satellite imagery can be analyzed to extract thematic information, which has increasingly been used as a source of information for making policy decisions. The uses of such thematic information can vary from military applications such as detecting assets of interest to science applications such as characterizing land-use/land cover change at local, regional and global scales. However, extracting thematic information using satellite imagery is a non-trivial task. It requires a user to preprocess the data by applying operations for radiometric and geometric corrections. The user also needs to be able to visualize the data and apply different image enhancement operations to digitally improve the images to identify subtle information that might be otherwise missed. Finally, the user needs to apply different information extraction algorithms to the imagery to obtain the thematic information. At present, there are limited tools that provide users with the capability to easily extract and exploit the information contained within the satellite imagery. This presentation will present GLIDER, a free software tool addressing this void. GLIDER provides users with a easy to use tool to visualize, analyze and mine satellite imagery. GLIDER allows users to visualize and analyze satellite in its native sensor view, an important capability because any transformation to either a geographic coordinate system or any projected coordinate system entails spatial and intensity interpolation; and hence, loss of information. GLIDER allows users to perform their analysis in the native sensor view without any loss of information. GLIDER provides users with a full suite of image processing algorithms that can be used to enhance the satellite imagery. It also provides pattern recognition and data mining algorithms for information extraction. GLIDER allows its users to project satellite data and the analysis/mining results onto to a globe and overlay additional data layers. Traditional analysis

  13. Visual feedback mounted on surgical tool: proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, K.; Vaughan, T.; Holden, M.; Gauvin, G.; Pezeshki, P.; Lasso, A.; Ungi, T.; Morin, E.; Rudan, J.; Engel, C. J.; Fichtinger, G.

    2016-03-01

    PURPOSE: When using surgical navigation systems in the operating room, feedback is typically displayed on a computer monitor. The surgeon's attention is usually focused on the tool and the surgical site, so the display is typically out of the direct line of sight. The purpose is to develop a visual feedback device mounted on an electromagnetically tracked electrosurgical cauterizer which will provide navigation information for the surgeon in their field of view. METHODS: A study was conducted to determine the usefulness of the visual feedback in adjunct to the navigation system currently in use. Subjects were asked to follow tumor contours with the tracked cauterizer using 3D screen navigation with the mounted visual feedback and the 3D navigation screen alone. The movements of the cauterizer were recorded. RESULTS: The study showed a significant decrease in the subjects' distance from the tumor margin, a significant increase in the subjects' confidence to avoid cutting the tumor and a statistically significant reduction in the subjects' perception of the need to look at the screen when using the visual feedback device compared to without. DISCUSSION: The LED feedback device helped the subjects feel confident in their ability to identify safe margins and minimize the amount of healthy tissue removed in the tumor resection. CONCLUSION: Good potential for the visual LED feedback has been shown. With additional training, this approach promises to lead to improved resection technique, with fewer cuts into the tumor and less healthy tissue removed.

  14. Optopharmacological tools for restoring visual function in degenerative retinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tochitsky, Ivan; Kramer, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are progressive retinal diseases that result from the death of rod and cone photoreceptors, ultimately leading to blindness. The only currently approved vision restoration treatment employs an implanted retinal ‘chip’ as a prosthetic device to electrically stimulate retinal neurons that survive after the photoreceptors are gone, thereby restoring light-driven neural signaling to the brain. An alternative strategy has been proposed, which would utilize optogenetic or opto-pharmacological tools to enable direct optical stimulation of surviving retinal neurons. Here, we review the latest studies evaluating the feasibility of these molecular tools as potential therapeutics for restoring visual function in human blinding disease. PMID:25706312

  15. Allen Brain Atlas-Driven Visualizations: a web-based gene expression energy visualization tool.

    PubMed

    Zaldivar, Andrew; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    The Allen Brain Atlas-Driven Visualizations (ABADV) is a publicly accessible web-based tool created to retrieve and visualize expression energy data from the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) across multiple genes and brain structures. Though the ABA offers their own search engine and software for researchers to view their growing collection of online public data sets, including extensive gene expression and neuroanatomical data from human and mouse brain, many of their tools limit the amount of genes and brain structures researchers can view at once. To complement their work, ABADV generates multiple pie charts, bar charts and heat maps of expression energy values for any given set of genes and brain structures. Such a suite of free and easy-to-understand visualizations allows for easy comparison of gene expression across multiple brain areas. In addition, each visualization links back to the ABA so researchers may view a summary of the experimental detail. ABADV is currently supported on modern web browsers and is compatible with expression energy data from the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas in situ hybridization data. By creating this web application, researchers can immediately obtain and survey numerous amounts of expression energy data from the ABA, which they can then use to supplement their work or perform meta-analysis. In the future, we hope to enable ABADV across multiple data resources.

  16. The development of a visualization tool for displaying analysis and test results

    SciTech Connect

    Uncapher, W.L.; Ammerman, D.J.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Knight, R.D.; Wix, S.D.

    1995-12-31

    The evaluation and certification of packages for transportation of radioactive materials is performed by analysis, testing, or a combination of both. Within the last few years, many transport packages that were certified have used a combination of analysis and testing. The ability to combine and display both kinds of data with interactive graphical tools allows a faster and more complete understanding of the response of the package to these environments. Sandia National Laboratories has developed an initial version of a visualization tool that allows the comparison and display of test and of analytical data as part of a Department of Energy-sponsored program to support advanced analytical techniques and test methodologies. The capability of the tool extends to both mechanical (structural) and thermal data.

  17. FilooT: a visualization tool for exploring genomic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeinaly, Mahshid; Soltangheis, Mina; Shaw, Chris D.

    2013-12-01

    In order to enhance analysis of synthetic health data of the IEEE VAST Challenge 2010, we introduce an interactive Visual Analytics tool called FilooT designed as a part of the Interactive Multi-genomic Analysis System (IMAS) project. In this paper, we describe different interactive views of FilooT: the Tabular View for exploring and comparing genetic sequences, the Matrix View for sorting sequences according to the values of different characteristics, the P-value View for finding the most important mutations across a family of sequences, the Graph View for finding related sequences and the Group View to group them for further investigation. We followed the Nested Process Model framework throughout the design process and the evaluation. To understand the tool's design capabilities for target domain analysts, we conducted a User Experience scenario-based study followed by an informal interview. The findings indicated how analysts employ each of the visualization and interaction designs in their Bioinformatics task-analysis process. The critical analysis of the results inspired design informing suggestions.

  18. An Integrated Multivariable Visualization Tool for Marine Sanctuary Climate Assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shein, K. A.; Johnston, S.; Stachniewicz, J.; Duncan, B.; Cecil, D.; Ansari, S.; Urzen, M.

    2012-12-01

    The comprehensive development and use of ecological climate impact assessments by ecosystem managers can be limited by data access and visualization methods that require a priori knowledge about the various large and complex climate data products necessary to those impact assessments. In addition, it can be difficult to geographically and temporally integrate climate and ecological data to fully characterize climate-driven ecological impacts. To address these considerations, we have enhanced and extended the functionality of the NOAA National Climatic Data Center's Weather and Climate Toolkit (WCT). The WCT is a freely available Java-based tool designed to access and display NCDC's georeferenced climate data products (e.g., satellite, radar, and reanalysis gridded data). However, the WCT requires users already know how to obtain the data products, which products are preferred for a given variable, and which products are most relevant to their needs. Developed in cooperation with research and management customers at the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary, the Integrated Marine Protected Area Climate Tools (IMPACT) modification to the WCT simplifies or eliminates these requirements, while simultaneously adding core analytical functionality to the tool. Designed for use by marine ecosystem managers, WCT-IMPACT accesses a suite of data products that have been identified as relevant to marine ecosystem climate impact assessments, such as NOAA's Climate Data Records. WCT-IMPACT regularly crops these products to the geographic boundaries of each included marine protected area (MPA), and those clipped regions are processed to produce MPA-specific analytics. The tool retrieves the most appropriate data files based on the user selection of MPA, environmental variable(s), and time frame. Once the data are loaded, they may be visualized, explored, analyzed, and exported to other formats (e.g., Google KML). Multiple variables may be simultaneously visualized using

  19. Instrumentation, performance visualization, and debugging tools for multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Jerry C.; Fineman, Charles E.; Hontalas, Philip J.

    1991-01-01

    The need for computing power has forced a migration from serial computation on a single processor to parallel processing on multiprocessor architectures. However, without effective means to monitor (and visualize) program execution, debugging, and tuning parallel programs becomes intractably difficult as program complexity increases with the number of processors. Research on performance evaluation tools for multiprocessors is being carried out at ARC. Besides investigating new techniques for instrumenting, monitoring, and presenting the state of parallel program execution in a coherent and user-friendly manner, prototypes of software tools are being incorporated into the run-time environments of various hardware testbeds to evaluate their impact on user productivity. Our current tool set, the Ames Instrumentation Systems (AIMS), incorporates features from various software systems developed in academia and industry. The execution of FORTRAN programs on the Intel iPSC/860 can be automatically instrumented and monitored. Performance data collected in this manner can be displayed graphically on workstations supporting X-Windows. We have successfully compared various parallel algorithms for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications in collaboration with scientists from the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Systems Division. By performing these comparisons, we show that performance monitors and debuggers such as AIMS are practical and can illuminate the complex dynamics that occur within parallel programs.

  20. Tools for visualization of phosphoinositides in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kalasova, Ilona; Fáberová, Veronika; Kalendová, Alžběta; Yildirim, Sukriye; Uličná, Lívia; Venit, Tomáš; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) are glycerol-based phospholipids containing hydrophilic inositol ring. The inositol ring is mono-, bis-, or tris-phosphorylated yielding seven PIs members. Ample evidence shows that PIs localize both to the cytoplasm and to the nucleus. However, tools for direct visualization of nuclear PIs are limited and many studies thus employ indirect approaches, such as staining of their metabolic enzymes. Since localization and mobility of PIs differ from their metabolic enzymes, these approaches may result in incomplete data. In this paper, we tested commercially available PIs antibodies by light microscopy on fixed cells, tested their specificity using protein-lipid overlay assay and blocking assay, and compared their staining patterns. Additionally, we prepared recombinant PIs-binding domains and tested them on both fixed and live cells by light microscopy. The results provide a useful overview of usability of the tools tested and stress that the selection of adequate tools is critical. Knowing the localization of individual PIs in various functional compartments should enable us to better understand the roles of PIs in the cell nucleus.

  1. TOFIR: A Tool of Facilitating Information Retrieval - Introduce a Visual Retrieval Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jin

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a new method for the visualization of information retrieval called TOFIR (Tool of Facilitating Information Retrieval). Discusses the use of angle attributes of a document to construct the angle-based visual space; two-dimensional and three-dimensional visual tools; ambiguity; and future research directions. (Author/LRW)

  2. The Development of a Visual-Perceptual Chemistry Specific (VPCS) Assessment Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver-Hoyo, Maria; Sloan, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    The development of the Visual-Perceptual Chemistry Specific (VPCS) assessment tool is based on items that align to eight visual-perceptual skills considered as needed by chemistry students. This tool includes a comprehensive range of visual operations and presents items within a chemistry context without requiring content knowledge to solve…

  3. New abstraction networks and a new visualization tool in support of auditing the SNOMED CT content.

    PubMed

    Geller, James; Ochs, Christopher; Perl, Yehoshua; Xu, Junchuan

    2012-01-01

    Medical terminologies are large and complex. Frequently, errors are hidden in this complexity. Our objective is to find such errors, which can be aided by deriving abstraction networks from a large terminology. Abstraction networks preserve important features but eliminate many minor details, which are often not useful for identifying errors. Providing visualizations for such abstraction networks aids auditors by allowing them to quickly focus on elements of interest within a terminology. Previously we introduced area taxonomies and partial area taxonomies for SNOMED CT. In this paper, two advanced, novel kinds of abstraction networks, the relationship-constrained partial area subtaxonomy and the root-constrained partial area subtaxonomy are defined and their benefits are demonstrated. We also describe BLUSNO, an innovative software tool for quickly generating and visualizing these SNOMED CT abstraction networks. BLUSNO is a dynamic, interactive system that provides quick access to well organized information about SNOMED CT.

  4. How Formal Dynamic Verification Tools Facilitate Novel Concurrency Visualizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aananthakrishnan, Sriram; Delisi, Michael; Vakkalanka, Sarvani; Vo, Anh; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Kirby, Robert M.; Thakur, Rajeev

    With the exploding scale of concurrency, presenting valuable pieces of information collected by formal verification tools intuitively and graphically can greatly enhance concurrent system debugging. Traditional MPI program debuggers present trace views of MPI program executions. Such views are redundant, often containing equivalent traces that permute independent MPI calls. In our ISP formal dynamic verifier for MPI programs, we present a collection of alternate views made possible by the use of formal dynamic verification. Some of ISP’s views help pinpoint errors, some facilitate discerning errors by eliminating redundancy, while others help understand the program better by displaying concurrent even orderings that must be respected by all MPI implementations, in the form of completes-before graphs. In this paper, we describe ISP’s graphical user interface (GUI) capabilities in all these areas which are currently supported by a portable Java based GUI, a Microsoft Visual Studio GUI, and an Eclipse based GUI whose development is in progress.

  5. Dynamic Visual Acuity: a Functionally Relevant Research Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Brian T.; Brady, Rachel A.; Miller, Chris A.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Wood, Scott J.; Cohen, Helen S.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2010-01-01

    Coordinated movements between the eyes and head are required to maintain a stable retinal image during head and body motion. The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) plays a significant role in this gaze control system that functions well for most daily activities. However, certain environmental conditions or interruptions in normal VOR function can lead to inadequate ocular compensation, resulting in oscillopsia, or blurred vision. It is therefore possible to use acuity to determine when the environmental conditions, VOR function, or the combination of the two is not conductive for maintaining clear vision. Over several years we have designed and tested several tests of dynamic visual acuity (DVA). Early tests used the difference between standing and walking acuity to assess decrements in the gaze stabilization system after spaceflight. Supporting ground-based studies measured the responses from patients with bilateral vestibular dysfunction and explored the effects of visual target viewing distance and gait cycle events on walking acuity. Results from these studies show that DVA is affected by spaceflight, is degraded in patients with vestibular dysfunction, changes with target distance, and is not consistent across the gait cycle. We have recently expanded our research to include studies in which seated subjects are translated or rotated passively. Preliminary results from this work indicate that gaze stabilization ability may differ between similar active and passive conditions, may change with age, and can be affected by the location of the visual target with respect to the axis of motion. Use of DVA as a diagnostic tool is becoming more popular but the functional nature of the acuity outcome measure also makes it ideal for identifying conditions that could lead to degraded vision. By doing so, steps can be taken to alter the problematic environments to improve the man-machine interface and optimize performance.

  6. Food Web Designer: a flexible tool to visualize interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Sint, Daniela; Traugott, Michael

    Species are embedded in complex networks of ecological interactions and assessing these networks provides a powerful approach to understand what the consequences of these interactions are for ecosystem functioning and services. This is mandatory to develop and evaluate strategies for the management and control of pests. Graphical representations of networks can help recognize patterns that might be overlooked otherwise. However, there is a lack of software which allows visualizing these complex interaction networks. Food Web Designer is a stand-alone, highly flexible and user friendly software tool to quantitatively visualize trophic and other types of bipartite and tripartite interaction networks. It is offered free of charge for use on Microsoft Windows platforms. Food Web Designer is easy to use without the need to learn a specific syntax due to its graphical user interface. Up to three (trophic) levels can be connected using links cascading from or pointing towards the taxa within each level to illustrate top-down and bottom-up connections. Link width/strength and abundance of taxa can be quantified, allowing generating fully quantitative networks. Network datasets can be imported, saved for later adjustment and the interaction webs can be exported as pictures for graphical display in different file formats. We show how Food Web Designer can be used to draw predator-prey and host-parasitoid food webs, demonstrating that this software is a simple and straightforward tool to graphically display interaction networks for assessing pest control or any other type of interaction in both managed and natural ecosystems from an ecological network perspective.

  7. VECT: an automatic visual Perl programming tool for nonprogrammers.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hui-Hsien

    2005-04-01

    Modern high-throughput biological research produces enormous amount of data that must be processed by computers, but many biologists dealing with these data are not professional programmers. Despite increased awareness of interdisciplinary training in bioinformatics, many biologists still find it difficult to create their own computational solutions. VECT, the Visual Extraction and Conversion Tool, has been developed to assist nonprogrammers to create simple bioinformatics without having to master a programming language. VECT provides a unified graphical user interface for data extraction, data conversion, output composition, and Perl code generation. Programming using VECT is achieved by visually performing the desired data extraction, conversion, and output composition tasks using some sample user data. These tasks are then compiled by VECT into an executable Perl program, which can be saved for later use and can carry out the same computation independently of VECT. VECT is released under the GNU General Public License and is freely available for all major computing platforms including Macintosh OS X, Linux, and Microsoft Windows at www.complex.iastate.edu.

  8. Intuitive Visualization of Transient Flow: Towards a Full 3D Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Isabel; Schröder, Simon; Seidel, Torsten; König, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Visualization of geoscientific data is a challenging task especially when targeting a non-professional audience. In particular, the graphical presentation of transient vector data can be a significant problem. With STRING Fraunhofer ITWM (Kaiserslautern, Germany) in collaboration with delta h Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH (Witten, Germany) developed a commercial software for intuitive 2D visualization of 3D flow problems. Through the intuitive character of the visualization experts can more easily transport their findings to non-professional audiences. In STRING pathlets moving with the flow provide an intuition of velocity and direction of both steady-state and transient flow fields. The visualization concept is based on the Lagrangian view of the flow which means that the pathlets' movement is along the direction given by pathlines. In order to capture every detail of the flow an advanced method for intelligent, time-dependent seeding of the pathlets is implemented based on ideas of the Finite Pointset Method (FPM) originally conceived at and continuously developed by Fraunhofer ITWM. Furthermore, by the same method pathlets are removed during the visualization to avoid visual cluttering. Additional scalar flow attributes, for example concentration or potential, can either be mapped directly to the pathlets or displayed in the background of the pathlets on the 2D visualization plane. The extensive capabilities of STRING are demonstrated with the help of different applications in groundwater modeling. We will discuss the strengths and current restrictions of STRING which have surfaced during daily use of the software, for example by delta h. Although the software focusses on the graphical presentation of flow data for non-professional audiences its intuitive visualization has also proven useful to experts when investigating details of flow fields. Due to the popular reception of STRING and its limitation to 2D, the need arises for the extension to a full 3D tool

  9. SnopViz, an interactive snow profile visualization tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierz, Charles; Egger, Thomas; gerber, Matthias; Bavay, Mathias; Techel, Frank

    2016-04-01

    SnopViz is a visualization tool for both simulation outputs of the snow-cover model SNOWPACK and observed snow profiles. It has been designed to fulfil the needs of operational services (Swiss Avalanche Warning Service, Avalanche Canada) as well as offer the flexibility required to satisfy the specific needs of researchers. This JavaScript application runs on any modern browser and does not require an active Internet connection. The open source code is available for download from models.slf.ch where examples can also be run. Both the SnopViz library and the SnopViz User Interface will become a full replacement of the current research visualization tool SN_GUI for SNOWPACK. The SnopViz library is a stand-alone application that parses the provided input files, for example, a single snow profile (CAAML file format) or multiple snow profiles as output by SNOWPACK (PRO file format). A plugin architecture allows for handling JSON objects (JavaScript Object Notation) as well and plugins for other file formats may be added easily. The outputs are provided either as vector graphics (SVG) or JSON objects. The SnopViz User Interface (UI) is a browser based stand-alone interface. It runs in every modern browser, including IE, and allows user interaction with the graphs. SVG, the XML based standard for vector graphics, was chosen because of its easy interaction with JS and a good software support (Adobe Illustrator, Inkscape) to manipulate graphs outside SnopViz for publication purposes. SnopViz provides new visualization for SNOWPACK timeline output as well as time series input and output. The actual output format for SNOWPACK timelines was retained while time series are read from SMET files, a file format used in conjunction with the open source data handling code MeteoIO. Finally, SnopViz is able to render single snow profiles, either observed or modelled, that are provided as CAAML-file. This file format (caaml.org/Schemas/V5.0/Profiles/SnowProfileIACS) is an international

  10. Mapping as a visual health communication tool: promises and dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Roxanne; Hopfer, Suellen; Ghetian, Christie; Lengerich, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    In the era of evidence-based public health promotion and planning, the use of maps as a form of evidence to communicate about the multiple determinants of cancer is on the rise. Geographic information systems and mapping technologies make future proliferation of this strategy likely. Yet disease maps as a communication form remain largely unexamined. This content analysis considers the presence of multivariate information, credibility cues, and the communication function of publicly accessible maps for cancer control activities. Thirty-six state comprehensive cancer control plans were publicly available in July 2005 and were reviewed for the presence of maps. Fourteen of the 36 state cancer plans (39%) contained map images (N = 59 static maps). A continuum of map inter activity was observed, with 10 states having interactive mapping tools available to query and map cancer information. Four states had both cancer plans with map images and interactive mapping tools available to the public on their Web sites. Of the 14 state cancer plans that depicted map images, two displayed multivariate data in a single map. Nine of the 10 states with interactive mapping capability offered the option to display multivariate health risk messages. The most frequent content category mapped was cancer incidence and mortality, with stage at diagnosis infrequently available. The most frequent communication function served by the maps reviewed was redundancy, as maps repeated information contained in textual forms. The social and ethical implications for communicating about cancer through the use of visual geographic representations are discussed.

  11. Advanced Computing Tools and Models for Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, Robert; Ryne, Robert D.

    2008-06-11

    This paper is based on a transcript of my EPAC'08 presentation on advanced computing tools for accelerator physics. Following an introduction I present several examples, provide a history of the development of beam dynamics capabilities, and conclude with thoughts on the future of large scale computing in accelerator physics.

  12. Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology Program (MAST). Overview and Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Technical Coll., Waco.

    The Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology Program (MAST) is a geographical partnership of six of the nation's best two-year colleges located in the six states that have about one-third of the density of metals-related industries in the United States. The purpose of the MAST grant is to develop and implement a national training model to overcome…

  13. [Advanced data analysis and visualization for clinical laboratory].

    PubMed

    Inada, Masanori; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes visualization techniques that help identify hidden structures in clinical laboratory data. The visualization of data is helpful for a rapid and better understanding of the characteristics of data sets. Various charts help the user identify trends in data. Scatter plots help prevent misinterpretations due to invalid data by identifying outliers. The representation of experimental data in figures is always useful for communicating results to others. Currently, flexible methods such as smoothing methods and latent structure analysis are available owing to the presence of advanced hardware and software. Principle component analysis, which is a well-known technique used to reduce multidimensional data sets, can be carried out on a personal computer. These methods could lead to advanced visualization with regard to exploratory data analysis. In this paper, we present 3 examples in order to introduce advanced data analysis. In the first example, a smoothing spline was fitted to a time-series from the control chart which is not in a state of statistical control. The trend line was clearly extracted from the daily measurements of the control samples. In the second example, principal component analysis was used to identify a new diagnostic indicator for Graves' disease. The multi-dimensional data obtained from patients were reduced to lower dimensions, and the principle components thus obtained summarized the variation in the data set. In the final example, a latent structure analysis for a Gaussian mixture model was used to draw complex density functions suitable for actual laboratory data. As a result, 5 clusters were extracted. The mixed density function of these clusters represented the data distribution graphically. The methods used in the above examples make the creation of complicated models for clinical laboratories more simple and flexible.

  14. Advances in the treatment of visual hallucinations in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Collerton, Daniel; Taylor, John-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of visual hallucinations in neurodegenerative disorders is not well advanced. The complexity of underlying mechanisms presents a number of potential avenues for developing treatments, but also suggests that any single one may be of limited efficacy. Reducing medication, with the careful introduction of antidementia medication if needed, is the mainstay of current management. Antipsychotic medication leads to excessive morbidity and mortality and should only be used in cases of high distress that do not otherwise respond. Education, reduction of risk factors and psychological treatments have limited evidence of efficacy, but are unlikely to cause harm. PMID:23882162

  15. Deploying web-based visual exploration tools on the grid

    SciTech Connect

    Jankun-Kelly, T.J.; Kreylos, Oliver; Shalf, John; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Hamann, Bernd; Joy, Kenneth; Bethel, E. Wes

    2002-02-01

    We discuss a web-based portal for the exploration, encapsulation, and dissemination of visualization results over the Grid. This portal integrates three components: an interface client for structured visualization exploration, a visualization web application to manage the generation and capture of the visualization results, and a centralized portal application server to access and manage grid resources. We demonstrate the usefulness of the developed system using an example for Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) data visualization.

  16. Automation of Coordinated Planning Between Observatories: The Visual Observation Layout Tool (VOLT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maks, Lori; Koratkar, Anuradha; Kerbel, Uri; Pell, Vince

    2002-01-01

    Fulfilling the promise of the era of great observatories, NASA now has more than three space-based astronomical telescopes operating in different wavebands. This situation provides astronomers with the unique opportunity of simultaneously observing a target in multiple wavebands with these observatories. Currently scheduling multiple observatories simultaneously, for coordinated observations, is highly inefficient. Coordinated observations require painstaking manual collaboration among the observatory staff at each observatory. Because they are time-consuming and expensive to schedule, observatories often limit the number of coordinated observations that can be conducted. In order to exploit new paradigms for observatory operation, the Advanced Architectures and Automation Branch of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a tool called the Visual Observation Layout Tool (VOLT). The main objective of VOLT is to provide a visual tool to automate the planning of coordinated observations by multiple astronomical observatories. Four of NASA's space-based astronomical observatories - the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and Chandra - are enthusiastically pursuing the use of VOLT. This paper will focus on the purpose for developing VOLT, as well as the lessons learned during the infusion of VOLT into the planning and scheduling operations of these observatories.

  17. Visual Illusions: An Interesting Tool to Investigate Developmental Dyslexia and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Simone; Molteni, Massimo; Facoetti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A visual illusion refers to a percept that is different in some aspect from the physical stimulus. Illusions are a powerful non-invasive tool for understanding the neurobiology of vision, telling us, indirectly, how the brain processes visual stimuli. There are some neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by visual deficits. Surprisingly, just a few studies investigated illusory perception in clinical populations. Our aim is to review the literature supporting a possible role for visual illusions in helping us understand the visual deficits in developmental dyslexia and autism spectrum disorder. Future studies could develop new tools – based on visual illusions – to identify an early risk for neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:27199702

  18. Recent Advancements in the Infrared Flow Visualization System for the NASA Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbeff, Theodore J., II; Baerny, Jennifer K.

    2017-01-01

    The following details recent efforts undertaken at the NASA Ames Unitary Plan wind tunnels to design and deploy an advanced, production-level infrared (IR) flow visualization data system. Highly sensitive IR cameras, coupled with in-line image processing, have enabled the visualization of wind tunnel model surface flow features as they develop in real-time. Boundary layer transition, shock impingement, junction flow, vortex dynamics, and buffet are routinely observed in both transonic and supersonic flow regimes all without the need of dedicated ramps in test section total temperature. Successful measurements have been performed on wing-body sting mounted test articles, semi-span floor mounted aircraft models, and sting mounted launch vehicle configurations. The unique requirements of imaging in production wind tunnel testing has led to advancements in the deployment of advanced IR cameras in a harsh test environment, robust data acquisition storage and workflow, real-time image processing algorithms, and evaluation of optimal surface treatments. The addition of a multi-camera IR flow visualization data system to the Ames UPWT has demonstrated itself to be a valuable analyses tool in the study of new and old aircraft/launch vehicle aerodynamics and has provided new insight for the evaluation of computational techniques.

  19. Visualization and Quality Control Web Tools for CERES Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrescu, C.; Doelling, D.; Chu, C.; Mlynczak, P.

    2014-12-01

    The CERES project continues to provide the scientific community a wide variety of satellite-derived data products. The flagship products TOA broadband shortwave and longwave observed fluxes, computed TOA and Surface fluxes, as well as cloud, aerosol, and other atmospheric parameters. These datasets encompass a wide range of temporal and spatial resolutions, suited to specific applications. We thus offer time resolutions that range from instantaneous to monthly means, with spatial resolutions that range from 20-km footprint to global scales. The 14-year record is mostly used by climate modeling communities that focus on global mean energetics, meridianal heat transport, and climate trend studies. CERES products are also used by the remote sensing community for their climatological studies. In the last years however, our CERES products had been used by an even broader audience, like the green energy, health and environmental research communities, and others. Because of that, the CERES project has implemented a now well-established web-oriented Ordering and Visualization Tool (OVT), which is well into its fifth year of development. In order to help facilitate a comprehensive quality control of CERES products, the OVT Team began introducing a series of specialized functions. These include the 1- and 2-D histogram, anomaly, deseasonalization, temporal and spatial averaging, side-by-side parameter comparison, and other specialized scientific application capabilities. Over time increasingly higher order temporal and spatial resolution products are being made available to the public through the CERES OVT. These high-resolution products require accessing the existing long-term archive - thus the reading of many very large netCDF or HDF files that pose a real challenge to the task of near instantaneous visualization. An overview of the CERES OVT basic functions and QC capabilities as well as future steps in expanding its capabilities will be presented at the meeting.

  20. Advances in directional borehole radar data analysis and visualization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.V.G.; Brown, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is developing a directional borehole radar (DBOR) tool for mapping fractures, lithologic changes, and underground utility and void detection. An important part of the development of the DBOR tool is data analysis and visualization, with the aim of making the software graphical user interface (GUI) intuitive and easy to use. The DBOR software system consists of a suite of signal and image processing routines written in Research Systems' Interactive Data Language (IDL). The software also serves as a front-end to many widely accepted Colorado School of Mines Center for Wave Phenomena (CWP) Seismic UNIX (SU) algorithms (Cohen and Stockwell, 2001). Although the SU collection runs natively in a UNIX environment, our system seamlessly emulates a UNIX session within a widely used PC operating system (MicroSoft Windows) using GNU tools (Noer, 1998). Examples are presented of laboratory data acquired with the prototype tool from two different experimental settings. The first experiment imaged plastic pipes in a macro-scale sand tank. The second experiment monitored the progress of an invasion front resulting from oil injection. Finally, challenges to further development and planned future work are discussed.

  1. CoreWall: A Scalable Interactive Tool for Visual Core Description, Data Visualization, and Stratigraphic Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. G.; Rack, F.; Kamp, B.; Fils, D.; Ito, E.; Morin, P.; Higgins, S.; Leigh, J.; Johnson, A.; Renambot, L.

    2005-12-01

    A primary need for studies of sediment, ice and rock cores is an integrated environment for visual core description. CoreWall is a tool that uses digital line-scan images of split-core surfaces as the fundamental template for all sediment descriptive work. Textual and image annotations support description about structures, lithologic variation, macroscopic grain size variation, bioturbation intensity, chemical composition, and micropaleontology at points of interest registered within the core image itself. The integration of core-section images with discrete data streams and nested annotations provide a robust approach to the description of sediment and rock cores. This project provides for the real-time and/or simultaneous display of multiple integrated databases, with all the data rectified (co-registered) to the fundamental template of the core image. This visualization tool enables rapid multidisciplinary interpretation during the Initial Core Description process. A prototype computer environment for working with the high-resolution data is the Personal GeoWall-2, a single computer used to drive six tiled LCD screens. As a wideband display, the Personal GeoWall-2 can show more content then a single display system. This new visualization tool is both scaleable and portable from the Personal GeoWall-2 environment down to a single screen driven by a laptop computer. Using the screen resolution, core sections are drawn at a life size scale with both core and downhole wireline logging data drawn alongside. Using standard computer interfaces, individuals can pan through meters of core imagery and data, annotating along the length of the core itself. They can zoom in on a high-resolution core image to see details that appear under the proper lighting in which the images were taken. Using the Internet, CoreWall can retrieve images and data files from remote databases or web portals/services, such as CHRONOS, allowing individuals from ship to shore to look at data and

  2. Advances in 3D visualization of air quality data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San José, R.; Pérez, J. L.; González, R. M.

    2012-10-01

    The air quality models produce a considerable amount of data, raw data can be hard to conceptualize, particularly when the size of the data sets can be terabytes, so to understand the atmospheric processes and consequences of air pollution it is necessary to analyse the results of the air pollution simulations. The basis of the development of the visualization is shaped by the requirements of the different group of users. We show different possibilities to represent 3D atmospheric data and geographic data. We present several examples developed with IDV software, which is a generic tool that can be used directly with the simulation results. The rest of solutions are specific applications developed by the authors which are the integration of different tools and technologies. In the case of the buildings has been necessary to make a 3D model from the buildings data using COLLADA standard format. In case of the Google Earth approach, for the atmospheric part we use Ferret software. In the case of gvSIG.-3D for the atmospheric visualization we have used different geometric figures available: "QuadPoints", "Polylines", "Spheres" and isosurfaces. The last one is also displayed following the VRML standard.

  3. Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dean N.

    2011-07-20

    parallelism, Task parallelism, Visualization parallelism; (2) Optimized parallel input/output (I/O); (3) Remote interactive execution; (4) Advanced intercomparison visualization; (5) Data provenance processing and capture; and (6) Interfaces for scientists - Workflow data analysis and visualization construction tools, and Visualization interfaces.

  4. Visual Programming: A Programming Tool for Increasing Mathematics Achivement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanier, Cheryl A.; Seals, Cheryl D.; Billionniere, Elodie V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to address the need of increasing student achievement in mathematics using a visual programming language such as Scratch. This visual programming language facilitates creating an environment where students in K-12 education can develop mathematical simulations while learning a visual programming language at the same time.…

  5. A Sensemaking Visualization Tool with Military Doctrinal Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    design is to enable information sharing in a community of battle staffs. As noted by Eppler and Burkhard (2004), knowledge visualization allows visual...Introduction to Generalized Linear Models, end Edition. Eppler, M., and Burkhard , R. (2004). Knowledge visualization: Towards a new discipline and its

  6. Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box (TTB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Monica; ONeil, Daniel A.; Christensen, Carissa B.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) is a decision support tool designed to aid program managers and strategic planners in determining how to invest technology research and development dollars. It is an Excel-based modeling package that allows a user to build complex space architectures and evaluate the impact of various technology choices. ATLAS contains system models, cost and operations models, a campaign timeline and a centralized technology database. Technology data for all system models is drawn from a common database, the ATLAS Technology Tool Box (TTB). The TTB provides a comprehensive, architecture-independent technology database that is keyed to current and future timeframes.

  7. Visualizing epigenetics: current advances and advantages in HDAC PET imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Schroeder, F A; Hooker, J M

    2014-04-04

    Abnormal gene regulation as a consequence of flawed epigenetic mechanisms may be central to the initiation and persistence of many human diseases. However, the association of epigenetic dysfunction with disease and the development of therapeutic agents for treatment are slow. Developing new methodologies used to visualize chromatin-modifying enzymes and their function in the human brain would be valuable for the diagnosis of brain disorders and drug discovery. We provide an overview of current invasive and noninvasive techniques for measuring expression and functions of chromatin-modifying enzymes in the brain, emphasizing tools applicable to histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes as a leading example. The majority of current techniques are invasive and difficult to translate to what is happening within a human brain in vivo. However, recent progress in molecular imaging provides new, noninvasive ways to visualize epigenetics in the human brain. Neuroimaging tool development presents a unique set of challenges in order to identify and validate CNS radiotracers for HDACs and other histone-modifying enzymes. We summarize advances in the effort to image HDACs and HDAC inhibitory effects in the brain using positron emission tomography (PET) and highlight generalizable techniques that can be adapted to investigate other specific components of epigenetic machinery. Translational tools like neuroimaging by PET and magnetic resonance imaging provide the best way to link our current understanding of epigenetic changes with in vivo function in normal and diseased brains. These tools will be a critical addition to ex vivo methods to evaluate - and intervene - in CNS dysfunction.

  8. Visualizing epigenetics: current advances and advantages in HDAC PET imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changning; Schroeder, Frederick A.; Hooker, Jacob M.

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal gene regulation as a consequence of flawed epigenetic mechanisms may be central to the initiation and persistence of many human diseases. However, the association of epigenetic dysfunction with disease and the development of therapeutic agents for treatment are slow. Developing new methodologies used to visualize chromatin modifying enzymes and their function in the human brain would be valuable for diagnosis of brain disorders and drug discovery. We provide an overview of current invasive and noninvasive techniques for measuring expression and functions of chromatin modifying enzymes in the brain, emphasizing tools applicable to histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes as a leading example. The majority of current techniques are invasive and difficult to translate to what is happening within a human brain in vivo. However, recent progress in molecular imaging provides new, noninvasive ways to visualize epigenetics in human brain. Neuroimaging tool development presents a unique set of challenges in order to identify and validate CNS radiotracers for HDACs and other histone modifying enzymes. We summarize advances in the effort to image HDACs and HDAC inhibitory effects in the brain using PET and highlight generalizable techniques that can be adapted to investigate other specific components of epigenetic machinery. Translational tools like neuroimaging by PET and MRI provide the best way to link our current understanding of epigenetic changes with in vivo function in normal and diseased brain. These tools will be a critical addition to ex vivo methods to evaluate - and intervene - in CNS dysfunction. PMID:24051365

  9. Knowledge, Models and Tools in Support of Advanced Distance Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    authoring iRides simulations and training, Rivets , is a fast C++ program that has been compiled for three Unix-type operating systems: Linux, Silicon...School instructors to introduce core concepts of the tool in advance of teaching about expected value theory. 4.0 Rivets -Linux-based Authoring of...Simulations and Instruction Functioning versions of Rivets , a descendent of the classic RIDES program have been developed for Linux and for the Macintosh

  10. Bacteriophage-based tools: recent advances and novel applications

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Lisa; Buttimer, Colin; McAuliffe, Olivia; Bolton, Declan; Coffey, Aidan

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses that infect bacterial hosts, and since their discovery over a century ago they have been primarily exploited to control bacterial populations and to serve as tools in molecular biology. In this commentary, we highlight recent diverse advances in the field of phage research, going beyond bacterial control using whole phage, to areas including biocontrol using phage-derived enzybiotics, diagnostics, drug discovery, novel drug delivery systems and bionanotechnology. PMID:27990274

  11. Anvil Tool in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe, III; Bauman, William, III; Keen, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Meteorologists from the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) and Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have identified anvil forecasting as one of their most challenging tasks when predicting the probability of violations of the lightning Launch Commit Criteria and Space Shuttle Flight Rules. As a result, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) created a graphical overlay tool for the Meteorological Interactive Data Display Systems (MIDDS) to indicate the threat of thunderstorm anvil clouds, using either observed or model forecast winds as input. In order for the Anvil Tool to remain available to the meteorologists, the AMU was tasked to transition the tool to the Advanced Weather interactive Processing System (AWIPS). This report describes the work done by the AMU to develop the Anvil Tool for AWIPS to create a graphical overlay depicting the threat from thunderstorm anvil clouds. The AWIPS Anvil Tool is based on the previously deployed AMU MIDDS Anvil Tool. SMG and 45 WS forecasters have used the MIDDS Anvil Tool during launch and landing operations. SMG's primary weather analysis and display system is now AWIPS and the 45 WS has plans to replace MIDDS with AWIPS. The Anvil Tool creates a graphic that users can overlay on satellite or radar imagery to depict the potential location of thunderstorm anvils one, two, and three hours into the future. The locations are based on an average of the upper-level observed or forecasted winds. The graphic includes 10 and 20 nm standoff circles centered at the location of interest, in addition to one-, two-, and three-hour arcs in the upwind direction. The arcs extend outward across a 30 degree sector width based on a previous AMU study which determined thunderstorm anvils move in a direction plus or minus 15 degrees of the upper-level (300- to 150-mb) wind direction. This report briefly describes the history of the MIDDS Anvil Tool and then explains how the initial development of the AWIPS Anvil Tool was carried out. After testing was

  12. A Visual Training Tool for Teaching Kanji to Children with Developmental Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikeshita-Yamazoe, Hanae; Miyao, Masutomo

    2016-01-01

    We developed a visual training tool to assist children with developmental dyslexia in learning to recognize and understand Chinese characters (kanji). The visual training tool presents the strokes of a kanji character as separate shapes and requires students to use these fragments to construct the character. Two types of experiments were conducted…

  13. Model-Based Reasoning: Using Visual Tools to Reveal Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckie, Douglas; Harrison, Scott H.; Ebert-May, Diane

    2011-01-01

    Using visual models is common in science and should become more common in classrooms. Our research group has developed and completed studies on the use of a visual modeling tool, the Concept Connector. This modeling tool consists of an online concept mapping Java applet that has automatic scoring functions we refer to as Robograder. The Concept…

  14. Advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Glover, C.W.; Protopopescu, V.A.

    1996-06-01

    The global objective of this effort is to develop advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis, and test the products using a model dataset developed under the joint aegis of the United States` Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and the European Association of Exploration Geophysicists (EAEG). The goal is to enhance the value to the oil industry of the SEG/EAEG modeling project, carried out with US Department of Energy (DOE) funding in FY` 93-95. The primary objective of the ORNL Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) is to spearhead the computational innovations techniques that would enable a revolutionary advance in 3-D seismic analysis. The CESAR effort is carried out in collaboration with world-class domain experts from leading universities, and in close coordination with other national laboratories and oil industry partners.

  15. MaterialVis: material visualization tool using direct volume and surface rendering techniques.

    PubMed

    Okuyan, Erhan; Güdükbay, Uğur; Bulutay, Ceyhun; Heinig, Karl-Heinz

    2014-05-01

    Visualization of the materials is an indispensable part of their structural analysis. We developed a visualization tool for amorphous as well as crystalline structures, called MaterialVis. Unlike the existing tools, MaterialVis represents material structures as a volume and a surface manifold, in addition to plain atomic coordinates. Both amorphous and crystalline structures exhibit topological features as well as various defects. MaterialVis provides a wide range of functionality to visualize such topological structures and crystal defects interactively. Direct volume rendering techniques are used to visualize the volumetric features of materials, such as crystal defects, which are responsible for the distinct fingerprints of a specific sample. In addition, the tool provides surface visualization to extract hidden topological features within the material. Together with the rich set of parameters and options to control the visualization, MaterialVis allows users to visualize various aspects of materials very efficiently as generated by modern analytical techniques such as the Atom Probe Tomography.

  16. Evaluation of reliability modeling tools for advanced fault tolerant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Robert; Scheper, Charlotte

    1986-01-01

    The Computer Aided Reliability Estimation (CARE III) and Automated Reliability Interactice Estimation System (ARIES 82) reliability tools for application to advanced fault tolerance aerospace systems were evaluated. To determine reliability modeling requirements, the evaluation focused on the Draper Laboratories' Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) architecture as an example architecture for fault tolerance aerospace systems. Advantages and limitations were identified for each reliability evaluation tool. The CARE III program was designed primarily for analyzing ultrareliable flight control systems. The ARIES 82 program's primary use was to support university research and teaching. Both CARE III and ARIES 82 were not suited for determining the reliability of complex nodal networks of the type used to interconnect processing sites in the AIPS architecture. It was concluded that ARIES was not suitable for modeling advanced fault tolerant systems. It was further concluded that subject to some limitations (the difficulty in modeling systems with unpowered spare modules, systems where equipment maintenance must be considered, systems where failure depends on the sequence in which faults occurred, and systems where multiple faults greater than a double near coincident faults must be considered), CARE III is best suited for evaluating the reliability of advanced tolerant systems for air transport.

  17. Web tools for effective retrieval, visualization, and evaluation of cardiology medical images and records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masseroli, Marco; Pinciroli, Francesco

    2000-12-01

    To provide easy retrieval, integration and evaluation of multimodal cardiology images and data in a web browser environment, distributed application technologies and java programming were used to implement a client-server architecture based on software agents. The server side manages secure connections and queries to heterogeneous remote databases and file systems containing patient personal and clinical data. The client side is a Java applet running in a web browser and providing a friendly medical user interface to perform queries on patient and medical test dat and integrate and visualize properly the various query results. A set of tools based on Java Advanced Imaging API enables to process and analyze the retrieved cardiology images, and quantify their features in different regions of interest. The platform-independence Java technology makes the developed prototype easy to be managed in a centralized form and provided in each site where an intranet or internet connection can be located. Giving the healthcare providers effective tools for querying, visualizing and evaluating comprehensively cardiology medical images and records in all locations where they can need them- i.e. emergency, operating theaters, ward, or even outpatient clinics- the developed prototype represents an important aid in providing more efficient diagnoses and medical treatments.

  18. Anvil Forecast Tool in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Hood, Doris

    2009-01-01

    Meteorologists from the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) and National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have identified anvil forecasting as one of their most challenging tasks when predicting the probability of violations of the Lightning Launch Commit Criteria and Space Shuttle Flight Rules. As a result, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) was tasked to create a graphical overlay tool for the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS) that indicates the threat of thunderstorm anvil clouds, using either observed or model forecast winds as input. The tool creates a graphic depicting the potential location of thunderstorm anvils one, two, and three hours into the future. The locations are based on the average of the upper level observed or forecasted winds. The graphic includes 10 and 20 n mi standoff circles centered at the location of interest, as well as one-, two-, and three-hour arcs in the upwind direction. The arcs extend outward across a 30 sector width based on a previous AMU study that determined thunderstorm anvils move in a direction plus or minus 15 of the upper-level wind direction. The AMU was then tasked to transition the tool to the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). SMG later requested the tool be updated to provide more flexibility and quicker access to model data. This presentation describes the work performed by the AMU to transition the tool into AWIPS, as well as the subsequent improvements made to the tool.

  19. GAViT: Genome Assembly Visualization Tool for Short Read Data

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Aijazuddin; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Trong, Stephan

    2008-03-14

    It is a challenging job for genome analysts to accurately debug, troubleshoot, and validate genome assembly results. Genome analysts rely on visualization tools to help validate and troubleshoot assembly results, including such problems as mis-assemblies, low-quality regions, and repeats. Short read data adds further complexity and makes it extremely challenging for the visualization tools to scale and to view all needed assembly information. As a result, there is a need for a visualization tool that can scale to display assembly data from the new sequencing technologies. We present Genome Assembly Visualization Tool (GAViT), a highly scalable and interactive assembly visualization tool developed at the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  20. KENO3D Visualization Tool for KENO V.a and KENO-VI Geometry Models

    SciTech Connect

    Horwedel, J.E.; Bowman, S.M.

    2000-06-01

    Criticality safety analyses often require detailed modeling of complex geometries. Effective visualization tools can enhance checking the accuracy of these models. This report describes the KENO3D visualization tool developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide visualization of KENO V.a and KENO-VI criticality safety models. The development of KENO3D is part of the current efforts to enhance the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluations) computer software system.

  1. Visualization and Quality Control Web Tools for CERES Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrescu, C.; Doelling, D.; Chu, C.; Rutan, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The CERES project continues to provide the scientific community a wide variety of satellite-derived data products such as observed TOA broadband shortwave and longwave observed fluxes, computed TOA and Surface fluxes, as well as cloud, aerosol, and other atmospheric parameters. These datasets encompass a wide range of temporal and spatial resolutions, suited to specific applications. Now in its 15-year, CERES products are mostly used by climate modeling communities that focus on global mean energetics, meridianal heat transport, and climate trend studies. However, CERES products are now beginning to be used by an even broader audience, like the green energy, health and environmental agencies. With its well-established web-oriented Ordering and Visualization Tool (OVT), CERES products are now much more assessable to users of all communities. The OVT Team introduced a series of specialized functions such as 1- and 2-D histogram, anomaly, deseasonalization, temporal and spatial averaging, side-by-side parameter comparison, and others that made the process of Quality Control far easier and faster. Over time increasingly higher order temporal and spatial resolution products are being made available to the public through the CERES OVT's web-pages. Moreover, ground site observed surface fluxes are being integrated into the OVT to facilitate the CERES project to QC the CERES computed surface fluxes. These features will give users the opportunity to perform their own comparisons of the CERES computed surface fluxes and observed ground site fluxes. An overview of the CERES OVT basic functions and its QC capabilities, new developments, as well as future steps in expanding its capabilities will be presented at the meeting.

  2. Graphical arterial blood gas visualization tool supports rapid and accurate data interpretation.

    PubMed

    Doig, Alexa K; Albert, Robert W; Syroid, Noah D; Moon, Shaun; Agutter, Jim A

    2011-04-01

    A visualization tool that integrates numeric information from an arterial blood gas report with novel graphics was designed for the purpose of promoting rapid and accurate interpretation of acid-base data. A study compared data interpretation performance when arterial blood gas results were presented in a traditional numerical list versus the graphical visualization tool. Critical-care nurses (n = 15) and nursing students (n = 15) were significantly more accurate identifying acid-base states and assessing trends in acid-base data when using the graphical visualization tool. Critical-care nurses and nursing students using traditional numerical data had an average accuracy of 69% and 74%, respectively. Using the visualization tool, average accuracy improved to 83% for critical-care nurses and 93% for nursing students. Analysis of response times demonstrated that the visualization tool might help nurses overcome the "speed/accuracy trade-off" during high-stress situations when rapid decisions must be rendered. Perceived mental workload was significantly reduced for nursing students when they used the graphical visualization tool. In this study, the effects of implementing the graphical visualization were greater for nursing students than for critical-care nurses, which may indicate that the experienced nurses needed more training and use of the new technology prior to testing to show similar gains. Results of the objective and subjective evaluations support the integration of this graphical visualization tool into clinical environments that require accurate and timely interpretation of arterial blood gas data.

  3. A Visual Search Tool for Early Elementary Science Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revelle, Glenda; Druin, Allison; Platner, Michele; Bederson, Ben; Hourcade, Juan Pablo; Sherman, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Reports on the development of a visual search interface called "SearchKids" to support children ages 5-10 years in their efforts to find animals in a hierarchical information structure. Investigates whether children can construct search queries to conduct complex searches if sufficiently supported both visually and conceptually. (Contains 27…

  4. VAPOR: A desktop tool for visualization aided analysis of earth sciences CFD data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clyne, J.; Norton, A.

    2009-12-01

    Continual advancements in microprocessor technology are permitting numerical modelers in the earth sciences to run simulations at unprecedented scale. For many computational scientists their most daunting challenge has become analyzing the ever-growing data outputs resulting from these simulations. Computing resources suitable for interactive analysis are rarely available at a scale comparable with the batch computing systems employed to run a model. Moreover, computing technologies essential to supporting interactive analysis work, such as storage, are advancing at more modest rates than the microprocessor. The result is often a deluge of data and a poor return on our scientific investments. We will present a visual data analysis tool that recognizes the current HPC environment and computing technology landscape by taking an intelligent approach to large data handling unlike those tools solely relying on the existence of large scale, highly-parallel interactive computing platforms. VAPOR employs of form of progressive data refinement akin to the techniques used by GoogleEarthTM to display 2D image data at progressively finer resolutions. A VAPOR user is able to make speed/quality trade offs when navigating through data sets that may be Terabytes in size. VAPOR has been used in practice on simulation outputs computed on grids up to 2048^3 using only a commodity Linux PC. Though VAPOR’s roots are in numerical turbulence, recent developments have focused on scientific groups with geo-referenced data sets such as the weather research community. Flapping magnetic field lines visualized with VAPOR by Aake Nordlund, Niels Bohr Institute

  5. Avogadro: an advanced semantic chemical editor, visualization, and analysis platform

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Avogadro project has developed an advanced molecule editor and visualizer designed for cross-platform use in computational chemistry, molecular modeling, bioinformatics, materials science, and related areas. It offers flexible, high quality rendering, and a powerful plugin architecture. Typical uses include building molecular structures, formatting input files, and analyzing output of a wide variety of computational chemistry packages. By using the CML file format as its native document type, Avogadro seeks to enhance the semantic accessibility of chemical data types. Results The work presented here details the Avogadro library, which is a framework providing a code library and application programming interface (API) with three-dimensional visualization capabilities; and has direct applications to research and education in the fields of chemistry, physics, materials science, and biology. The Avogadro application provides a rich graphical interface using dynamically loaded plugins through the library itself. The application and library can each be extended by implementing a plugin module in C++ or Python to explore different visualization techniques, build/manipulate molecular structures, and interact with other programs. We describe some example extensions, one which uses a genetic algorithm to find stable crystal structures, and one which interfaces with the PackMol program to create packed, solvated structures for molecular dynamics simulations. The 1.0 release series of Avogadro is the main focus of the results discussed here. Conclusions Avogadro offers a semantic chemical builder and platform for visualization and analysis. For users, it offers an easy-to-use builder, integrated support for downloading from common databases such as PubChem and the Protein Data Bank, extracting chemical data from a wide variety of formats, including computational chemistry output, and native, semantic support for the CML file format. For developers, it can be

  6. Interactive Visualization Tools to Improve Learning and Teaching in Online Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuosa, Kirsi; Distante, Damiano; Tervakari, Anne; Cerulo, Luigi; Fernández, Alejandro; Koro, Juho; Kailanto, Meri

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents two interactive visualization tools for learning management systems (LMS) in order to improve learning and teaching in online courses. The first tool was developed at the Intelligent Information Systems Laboratory (IISLab) at the Tampere University of Technology (TUT). The tool is used to analyse students' activity from…

  7. Application of Multimedia Design Principles to Visuals Used in Course-Books: An Evaluation Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuzu, Abdullah; Akbulut, Yavuz; Sahin, Mehmet Can

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces an evaluation tool prepared to examine the quality of visuals in course-books. The tool is based on Mayer's Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (i.e. Generative Theory) and its principles regarding the correct use of illustrations within text. The reason to generate the tool, the development process along with the…

  8. Advances in Mass Spectrometric Tools for Probing Neuropeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchberger, Amanda; Yu, Qing; Li, Lingjun

    2015-07-01

    Neuropeptides are important mediators in the functionality of the brain and other neurological organs. Because neuropeptides exist in a wide range of concentrations, appropriate characterization methods are needed to provide dynamic, chemical, and spatial information. Mass spectrometry and compatible tools have been a popular choice in analyzing neuropeptides. There have been several advances and challenges, both of which are the focus of this review. Discussions range from sample collection to bioinformatic tools, although avenues such as quantitation and imaging are included. Further development of the presented methods for neuropeptidomic mass spectrometric analysis is inevitable, which will lead to a further understanding of the complex interplay of neuropeptides and other signaling molecules in the nervous system.

  9. Advanced Electric Submersible Pump Design Tool for Geothermal Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Xuele Qi; Norman Turnquist; Farshad Ghasripoor

    2012-05-31

    Electrical Submersible Pumps (ESPs) present higher efficiency, larger production rate, and can be operated in deeper wells than the other geothermal artificial lifting systems. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) applications recommend lifting 300 C geothermal water at 80kg/s flow rate in a maximum 10-5/8-inch diameter wellbore to improve the cost-effectiveness. In this paper, an advanced ESP design tool comprising a 1D theoretical model and a 3D CFD analysis has been developed to design ESPs for geothermal applications. Design of Experiments was also performed to optimize the geometry and performance. The designed mixed-flow type centrifugal impeller and diffuser exhibit high efficiency and head rise under simulated EGS conditions. The design tool has been validated by comparing the prediction to experimental data of an existing ESP product.

  10. Constructing an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Sims, Michael; Podolak, Ester; Mckay, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Scientific model building can be an intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large and complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot be easily distributed and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complex, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientist/programmer to understand. We believe that advanced software techniques can facilitate both the model building and model sharing process. In this paper, we describe a prototype for a scientific modeling software tool that serves as an aid to the scientist in developing and using models. This tool includes an interactive intelligent graphical interface, a high level domain specific modeling language, a library of physics equations and experimental datasets, and a suite of data display facilities. Our prototype has been developed in the domain of planetary atmospheric modeling, and is being used to construct models of Titan's atmosphere.

  11. Leveraging Interaction History for Intelligent Configuration of Multiple Coordinated Views in Visualization Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Pachuilo, Andrew R; Ragan, Eric; Goodall, John R

    2016-01-01

    Visualization tools can take advantage of multiple coordinated views to support analysis of large, multidimensional data sets. Effective design of such views and layouts can be challenging, but understanding users analysis strategies can inform design improvements. We outline an approach for intelligent design configuration of visualization tools with multiple coordinated views, and we discuss a proposed software framework to support the approach. The proposed software framework could capture and learn from user interaction data to automate new compositions of views and widgets. Such a framework could reduce the time needed for meta analysis of the visualization use and lead to more effective visualization design.

  12. Dynamic visualizations as tools for supporting cosmological literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Zoe Elizabeth

    My dissertation research is designed to improve access to STEM content through the development of cosmology visualizations that support all learners as they engage in cosmological sense-making. To better understand how to design visualizations that work toward breaking cycles of power and access in the sciences, I orient my work to following "meta-question": How might educators use visualizations to support diverse ways of knowing and learning in order to expand access to cosmology, and to science? In this dissertation, I address this meta-question from a pragmatic epistemological perspective, through a sociocultural lens, following three lines of inquiry: experimental methods (Creswell, 2003) with a focus on basic visualization design, activity analysis (Wells, 1996; Ash, 2001; Rahm, 2012) with a focus on culturally and linguistically diverse learners, and case study (Creswell, 2000) with a focus on expansive learning at a planetarium (Engestrom, 2001; Ash, 2014). My research questions are as follows, each of which corresponds to a self contained course of inquiry with its own design, data, analysis and results: 1) Can mediational cues like color affect the way learners interpret the content in a cosmology visualization? 2) How do cosmology visualizations support cosmological sense-making for diverse students? 3) What are the shared objects of dynamic networks of activity around visualization production and use in a large, urban planetarium and how do they affect learning? The result is a mixed-methods design (Sweetman, Badiee & Creswell, 2010) where both qualitative and quantitative data are used when appropriate to address my research goals. In the introduction I begin by establishing a theoretical framework for understanding visualizations within cultural historical activity theory (CHAT) and situating the chapters that follow within that framework. I also introduce the concept of cosmological literacy, which I define as the set of conceptual, semiotic and

  13. Review on advanced composite materials boring mechanism and tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Runping; Wang, Chengyong

    2011-05-01

    With the rapid development of aviation and aerospace manufacturing technology, advanced composite materials represented by carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) and super hybrid composites (fibre/metal plates) are more and more widely applied. The fibres are mainly carbon fibre, boron fibre, Aramid fiber and Sic fibre. The matrixes are resin matrix, metal matrix and ceramic matrix. Advanced composite materials have higher specific strength and higher specific modulus than glass fibre reinforced resin composites of the 1st generation. They are widely used in aviation and aerospace industry due to their high specific strength, high specific modulus, excellent ductility, anticorrosion, heat-insulation, sound-insulation, shock absorption and high&low temperature resistance. They are used for radomes, inlets, airfoils(fuel tank included), flap, aileron, vertical tail, horizontal tail, air brake, skin, baseboards and tails, etc. Its hardness is up to 62~65HRC. The holes are greatly affected by the fibre laminates direction of carbon fibre reinforced composite material due to its anisotropy when drilling in unidirectional laminates. There are burrs, splits at the exit because of stress concentration. Besides there is delamination and the hole is prone to be smaller. Burrs are caused by poor sharpness of cutting edge, delamination, tearing, splitting are caused by the great stress caused by high thrust force. Poorer sharpness of cutting edge leads to lower cutting performance and higher drilling force at the same time. The present research focuses on the interrelation between rotation speed, feed, drill's geometry, drill life, cutting mode, tools material etc. and thrust force. At the same time, holes quantity and holes making difficulty of composites have also increased. It requires high performance drills which won't bring out defects and have long tool life. It has become a trend to develop super hard material tools and tools with special geometry for drilling

  14. Review on advanced composite materials boring mechanism and tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Runping; Wang, Chengyong

    2010-12-01

    With the rapid development of aviation and aerospace manufacturing technology, advanced composite materials represented by carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) and super hybrid composites (fibre/metal plates) are more and more widely applied. The fibres are mainly carbon fibre, boron fibre, Aramid fiber and Sic fibre. The matrixes are resin matrix, metal matrix and ceramic matrix. Advanced composite materials have higher specific strength and higher specific modulus than glass fibre reinforced resin composites of the 1st generation. They are widely used in aviation and aerospace industry due to their high specific strength, high specific modulus, excellent ductility, anticorrosion, heat-insulation, sound-insulation, shock absorption and high&low temperature resistance. They are used for radomes, inlets, airfoils(fuel tank included), flap, aileron, vertical tail, horizontal tail, air brake, skin, baseboards and tails, etc. Its hardness is up to 62~65HRC. The holes are greatly affected by the fibre laminates direction of carbon fibre reinforced composite material due to its anisotropy when drilling in unidirectional laminates. There are burrs, splits at the exit because of stress concentration. Besides there is delamination and the hole is prone to be smaller. Burrs are caused by poor sharpness of cutting edge, delamination, tearing, splitting are caused by the great stress caused by high thrust force. Poorer sharpness of cutting edge leads to lower cutting performance and higher drilling force at the same time. The present research focuses on the interrelation between rotation speed, feed, drill's geometry, drill life, cutting mode, tools material etc. and thrust force. At the same time, holes quantity and holes making difficulty of composites have also increased. It requires high performance drills which won't bring out defects and have long tool life. It has become a trend to develop super hard material tools and tools with special geometry for drilling

  15. Conceptual design study for an advanced cab and visual system, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rue, R. J.; Cyrus, M. L.; Garnett, T. A.; Nachbor, J. W.; Seery, J. A.; Starr, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The performance, design, construction and testing requirements are defined for developing an advanced cab and visual system. The rotorcraft system integration simulator is composed of the advanced cab and visual system and the rotorcraft system motion generator, and is part of an existing simulation facility. User's applications for the simulator include rotorcraft design development, product improvement, threat assessment, and accident investigation.

  16. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science.

    PubMed

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-09-15

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields.

  17. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science

    PubMed Central

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M.; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields. PMID:26370627

  18. HYPATIA--An Online Tool for ATLAS Event Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kourkoumelis, C.; Vourakis, S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an interactive tool for analysis of data from the ATLAS experiment taking place at the world's highest energy particle collider at CERN. The tool, called HYPATIA/applet, enables students of various levels to become acquainted with particle physics and look for discoveries in a similar way to that of real research.

  19. ADVISOR: a systems analysis tool for advanced vehicle modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markel, T.; Brooker, A.; Hendricks, T.; Johnson, V.; Kelly, K.; Kramer, B.; O'Keefe, M.; Sprik, S.; Wipke, K.

    This paper provides an overview of Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR)—the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) ADVISOR written in the MATLAB/Simulink environment and developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. ADVISOR provides the vehicle engineering community with an easy-to-use, flexible, yet robust and supported analysis package for advanced vehicle modeling. It is primarily used to quantify the fuel economy, the performance, and the emissions of vehicles that use alternative technologies including fuel cells, batteries, electric motors, and internal combustion engines in hybrid (i.e. multiple power sources) configurations. It excels at quantifying the relative change that can be expected due to the implementation of technology compared to a baseline scenario. ADVISOR's capabilities and limitations are presented and the power source models that are included in ADVISOR are discussed. Finally, several applications of the tool are presented to highlight ADVISOR's functionality. The content of this paper is based on a presentation made at the 'Development of Advanced Battery Engineering Models' workshop held in Crystal City, Virginia in August 2001.

  20. Immunohistochemical tools and techniques to visualize Notch in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Tognon, Emiliana; Vaccari, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The ability to accurately visualize proteins in Drosophila tissues is critical for studying their abundance and localization relative to the morphology of cells during tissue development and homeostasis. Here we describe the procedure to visualize Notch localization in whole-mount preparations of several Drosophila organs using confocal microscopy. The use of monoclonal antibodies directed to distinct portions of Notch allows one to follow the fate of the receptor during constitutive and inductive processes. The protocol described here can be used to co-label with antibodies recognizing markers of subcellular compartments in wild-type as well as mutant tissues.

  1. iVCJ: A tool for Interactive Visualization of high explosives CJ states

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, Hasani Omar; Aslam, Tariq Dennis; Whitley, Von Howard

    2016-12-12

    A graphical user interface (GUI) tool has been developed that facilitates the visualization and analysis of the Chapman-Jouguet state for high explosives gaseous products using the Jones- Wilkins-Lee equation of state.

  2. A system for advanced real-time visualization and monitoring of MR-guided thermal ablations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothgang, Eva; Gilson, Wesley D.; Hornegger, Joachim; Lorenz, Christine H.

    2010-02-01

    In modern oncology, thermal ablations are increasingly used as a regional treatment option to supplement systemic treatment strategies such as chemotherapy and immunotherapy. The goal of all thermal ablation procedures is to cause cell death of disease tissue while sparing adjacent healthy tissue. Real-time assessment of thermal damage is the key to therapeutic efficiency and safety of such procedures. Magnetic resonance thermometry is capable of monitoring the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of temperature changes during thermal ablations. In this work, we present an advanced monitoring system for MR-guided thermal ablations that includes multiplanar visualization, specialized overlay visualization methods, and additional methods for correcting errors resulting from magnetic field shifts and motion. To ensure the reliability of the displayed thermal data, systematic quality control of thermal maps is carried out on-line. The primary purpose of this work is to provide clinicians with an intuitive tool for accurately visualizing the progress of thermal treatment at the time of the procedure. Importantly, the system is designed to be independent of the heating source. The presented system is expected to be of great value not only to guide thermal procedures but also to further explore the relationship between temperature-time exposure and tissue damage. The software application was implemented within the eXtensible Imaging Platform (XIP) and has been validated with clinical data.

  3. GWVis: A tool for comparative ground-water data visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Daniel M.; Lewis, Robert R.

    2010-11-01

    The Ground-Water Visualization application ( GWVis) presents ground-water data visually in order to educate the public on ground-water issues. It is also intended for presentations to government and other funding agencies. GWVis works with ground-water level elevation data collected or modeled over a given time span, together with a matching fixed underlying terrain. GWVis was developed using the Python programming language in conjunction with associated extension packages and application program interfaces such as OpenGLTM to improve performance and allow us fine control of attributes of the model such as lighting, material properties, transformations, and interpolation. There are currently several systems available for visualizing ground-water data. We classify these into two categories: research-oriented models and static presentation-based models. While both of them have their strengths, we find the former overly complex and non-intuitive and the latter not engaging and presenting problems showing multiple data dimensions. GWVis bridges the gap between static and research based visualizations by providing an intuitive, interactive design that allows participants to view the model from different perspectives, infer information about simulations, and view a comparison of two datasets. By incorporating scientific data in an environment that can be easily understood, GWVis allows that information to be presented to a large audience base.

  4. Conceptual Organizers: Tools for Visualizing Complex Ideas, Interactions, and Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begler, Elsie

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the development of the "World Culture Model," a visual aid illustrating the interconnection and universality of various components of civilization (political, social, economic, historical). Includes a lesson plan using the World Culture Model to identify various aspects of culture found in different interactions and to…

  5. Discovering unexpected information using a building energy visualization tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, B.; Rodriguez, N.; Puech, W.; Vasques, X.

    2013-03-01

    Building energy consumption is an important problem in construction field, old buildings are gap of energy and they need to be refactored. Energy footprint of buildings needs to be reduced. New buildings are designed to be suitable with energy efficiency paradigm. To improve energy efficiency, Building Management Systems (BMS) are used: BMS are IT (Information Technology) systems composed by a rules engine and a database connected to sensors. Unfortunately, BMS are only monitoring systems: they cannot predict and mine efficiently building information. RIDER project has emerged from this observation. This project is conducted by several French companies and universities, IBM at Montpellier, France, leads the project. The main goal of this project is to create a smart and scalable BMS. This new kind of BMS will be able to dig into data and predict events. This IT system is based on component paradigm and the core can be extended with external components. Some of them are developed during the project: data mining, building generation model and visualization. All of these components will provide new features to improve rules used by the core. In this paper, we will focus on the visualization component. This visualization use a volume rendering method based on sensors data interpolation and a correlation method to create new views. We will present the visualization method used and which rules can be provided by this component.

  6. Line Spread as a Visual Clinical Tool for Thickened Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Annelise Masters; Mertz Garcia, Jane; Chambers, Edgar, IV.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Preparing modified liquids to a target level of consistency is critical to patients' nutritional care. This study examined the relationship of line spread (i.e., the distance a liquid flows) to viscometer measurements for a variety of product/liquid combinations and determined if flow distance visually differentiated nectar-thick…

  7. Visualizing simulated learning experiences through the use of informatics tools.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Teri L; Warren, Judith J

    2009-01-01

    High-fidelity simulation technology is a growing educational technology. Designing effective simulations requires the use of informatics tools such as UML modeling. This poster demonstrates the steps in modeling a simulation exercise.

  8. The Tools, Approaches and Applications of Visual Literacy in the Visual Arts Department of Cross River University of Technology, Calabar, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ecoma, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The paper reflects upon the tools, approaches and applications of visual literacy in the Visual Arts Department of Cross River University of Technology, Calabar, Nigeria. The objective of the discourse is to examine how the visual arts training and practice equip students with skills in visual literacy through methods of production, materials and…

  9. Bioinformatics Methods and Tools to Advance Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Lecroq, T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives To summarize excellent current research in the field of Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics with application in the health domain and clinical care. Method We provide a synopsis of the articles selected for the IMIA Yearbook 2015, from which we attempt to derive a synthetic overview of current and future activities in the field. As last year, a first step of selection was performed by querying MEDLINE with a list of MeSH descriptors completed by a list of terms adapted to the section. Each section editor has evaluated separately the set of 1,594 articles and the evaluation results were merged for retaining 15 articles for peer-review. Results The selection and evaluation process of this Yearbook’s section on Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics yielded four excellent articles regarding data management and genome medicine that are mainly tool-based papers. In the first article, the authors present PPISURV a tool for uncovering the role of specific genes in cancer survival outcome. The second article describes the classifier PredictSNP which combines six performing tools for predicting disease-related mutations. In the third article, by presenting a high-coverage map of the human proteome using high resolution mass spectrometry, the authors highlight the need for using mass spectrometry to complement genome annotation. The fourth article is also related to patient survival and decision support. The authors present datamining methods of large-scale datasets of past transplants. The objective is to identify chances of survival. Conclusions The current research activities still attest the continuous convergence of Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics, with a focus this year on dedicated tools and methods to advance clinical care. Indeed, there is a need for powerful tools for managing and interpreting complex, large-scale genomic and biological datasets, but also a need for user-friendly tools developed for the clinicians in their

  10. Clinical holistic health: advanced tools for holistic medicine.

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Clausen, Birgitte; Nielsen, May Lyck; Merrick, Joav

    2006-02-24

    According to holistic medical theory, the patient will heal when old painful moments, the traumatic events of life that are often called "gestalts", are integrated in the present "now". The advanced holistic physician's expanded toolbox has many different tools to induce this healing, some that are more dangerous and potentially traumatic than others. The more intense the therapeutic technique, the more emotional energy will be released and contained in the session, but the higher also is the risk for the therapist to lose control of the session and lose the patient to his or her own dark side. To avoid harming the patient must be the highest priority in holistic existential therapy, making sufficient education and training an issue of highest importance. The concept of "stepping up" the therapy by using more and more "dramatic" methods to get access to repressed emotions and events has led us to a "therapeutic staircase" with ten steps: (1) establishing the relationship; (2) establishing intimacy, trust, and confidentiality; (3) giving support and holding; (4) taking the patient into the process of physical, emotional, and mental healing; (5) social healing of being in the family; (6) spiritual healing--returning to the abstract wholeness of the soul; (7) healing the informational layer of the body; (8) healing the three fundamental dimensions of existence: love, power, and sexuality in a direct way using, among other techniques, "controlled violence" and "acupressure through the vagina"; (9) mind-expanding and consciousness-transformative techniques like psychotropic drugs; and (10) techniques transgressing the patient's borders and, therefore, often traumatizing (for instance, the use of force against the will of the patient). We believe that the systematic use of the staircase will greatly improve the power and efficiency of holistic medicine for the patient and we invite a broad cooperation in scientifically testing the efficiency of the advanced holistic

  11. Advanced data visualization and sensor fusion: Conversion of techniques from medical imaging to Earth science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Richard C.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Pelizzari, Charles; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran

    1993-01-01

    Hughes Aircraft Company and the University of Chicago propose to transfer existing medical imaging registration algorithms to the area of multi-sensor data fusion. The University of Chicago's algorithms have been successfully demonstrated to provide pixel by pixel comparison capability for medical sensors with different characteristics. The research will attempt to fuse GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite), AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer), and SSM/I (Special Sensor Microwave Imager) sensor data which will benefit a wide range of researchers. The algorithms will utilize data visualization and algorithm development tools created by Hughes in its EOSDIS (Earth Observation SystemData/Information System) prototyping. This will maximize the work on the fusion algorithms since support software (e.g. input/output routines) will already exist. The research will produce a portable software library with documentation for use by other researchers.

  12. Visual tools and languages: Directions for the '90s

    SciTech Connect

    Glinert, E.P. . Dept. of Computer Science); Blattner, M.M. ); Frerking, C.J. )

    1991-01-01

    We identify and discuss three domains where we believe that innovative application of visual programming languages is likely to make a significant impact in the near term: concurrent computing, computer-based assistance for people with disabilities, and the multimedia/multimodal environments of tomorrow in which it will be possible to hear and physically interact with information as well as see it. 33 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Advanced Tools and Techniques for Formal Techniques in Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, John C.

    2005-01-01

    This is the final technical report for grant number NAG-1-02101. The title of this grant was "Advanced Tools and Techniques for Formal Techniques In Aerospace Systems". The principal investigator on this grant was Dr. John C. Knight of the Computer Science Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904-4740. This report summarizes activities under the grant during the period 7/01/2002 to 9/30/2004. This report is organized as follows. In section 2, the technical background of the grant is summarized. Section 3 lists accomplishments and section 4 lists students funded under the grant. In section 5, we present a list of presentations given at various academic and research institutions about the research conducted. Finally, a list of publications generated under this grant is included in section 6.

  14. Sandia Advanced MEMS Design Tools, Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Jim; McBrayer, John; Miller, Sam; Rodgers, Steve; montague, Steve; Sniegowski, Jeff; Jakubczak, Jay; Yarberry, Vic; Barnes, Steve; Priddy, Brian; Reyes, David; Westling, Belinda

    2002-06-13

    Sandia Advanced MEMS Design Tools is a 5-level surface micromachine fabrication technology, which customers internal and external to Sandia can access to fabricate prototype MEMS devices. This CD contains an integrated set of electronic files that: a) Describe the SUMMiT V fabrication process b) Provide enabling educational information (including pictures, videos, technical information) c)Facilitate the process of designing MEMS with the SUMMiT process (prototype file, Design Rule Checker, Standard Parts Library) d) Facilitate the process of having MEMS fabricated at SNL e) Facilitate the process of having post-fabrication services performed While there exist some files on the CD that are used in conjunction with the software AutoCAD, these files are not intended for use independent of the CD. NOTE: THE CUSTOMER MUST PURCHASE HIS/HER OWN COPY OF AutoCAD TO USE WITH THESE FILES.

  15. Sandia Advanced MEMS Design Tools v. 3.0

    SciTech Connect

    Yarberry, Victor R.; Allen, James J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.; Priddy, Brian; Westlin, Belinda; Young, Andrew

    2016-08-25

    This is a major revision to the Sandia Advanced MEMS Design Tools. It replaces all previous versions. New features in this version: Revised to support AutoCAD 2014 and 2015 This CD contains an integrated set of electronic files that: a) Describe the SUMMiT V fabrication process b) Provide enabling educational information (including pictures, videos, technical information) c) Facilitate the process of designing MEMS with the SUMMiT process (prototype file, Design Rule Checker, Standard Parts Library) d) Facilitate the process of having MEMS fabricated at Sandia National Laboratories e) Facilitate the process of having post-fabrication services performed. While there exists some files on the CD that are used in conjunction with software package AutoCAD, these files are not intended for use independent of the CD. Note that the customer must purchase his/her own copy of AutoCAD to use with these files.

  16. Advances and limitations of visual conditioning protocols in harnessed bees.

    PubMed

    Avarguès-Weber, Aurore; Mota, Theo

    2016-12-18

    Bees are excellent invertebrate models for studying visual learning and memory mechanisms, because of their sophisticated visual system and impressive cognitive capacities associated with a relatively simple brain. Visual learning in free-flying bees has been traditionally studied using an operant conditioning paradigm. This well-established protocol, however, can hardly be combined with invasive procedures for studying the neurobiological basis of visual learning. Different efforts have been made to develop protocols in which harnessed honey bees could associate visual cues with reinforcement, though learning performances remain poorer than those obtained with free-flying animals. Especially in the last decade, the intention of improving visual learning performances of harnessed bees led many authors to adopt distinct visual conditioning protocols, altering parameters like harnessing method, nature and duration of visual stimulation, number of trials, inter-trial intervals, among others. As a result, the literature provides data hardly comparable and sometimes contradictory. In the present review, we provide an extensive analysis of the literature available on visual conditioning of harnessed bees, with special emphasis on the comparison of diverse conditioning parameters adopted by different authors. Together with this comparative overview, we discuss how these diverse conditioning parameters could modulate visual learning performances of harnessed bees.

  17. A component based astronomical visualization tool for instrument control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briegel, Florian; Berwein, Jürgen; Kittmann, Frank; Pavlov, Alexey

    2008-07-01

    For various astronomical instruments developed at the Max-Planck-Institute-Heidelberg there was a need for a highly flexible display and control tool. Many display tools (ximtool, DS9, skycat,...) are available for astronomy, but all this applications are monolitic and can't be easily enriched by plugins for interaction with the graphical display, and other functionalities for remote access and control of the instrument and data pipepline. It was developed on top of Trolltechs Cross-Platform Rich Client Development Framework Qt,1 the modern middleware Internet Communications Engine 2 from ZeroC and the template based SOA developer framework for astronomical instrumentation - NICE.3 The display tool is used on the Calar Alto Observatory, Spain) as a guider, for a wide field imager and guider at the Wise Observatory (Israel; for the LBT interferometer Linc-Nirvana, USA).

  18. Experimental Evaluation of Electric Power Grid Visualization Tools in the EIOC

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Dauenhauer, Peter M.; Wierks, Tamara G.; Podmore, Robin; Dalton, Angela C.

    2009-12-01

    The present study follows an initial human factors evaluation of four electric power grid visualization tools and reports on an empirical evaluation of two of the four tools: Graphical Contingency Analysis, and Phasor State Estimator. The evaluation was conducted within specific experimental studies designed to measure the impact on decision making performance.

  19. Data Visualization: An Exploratory Study into the Software Tools Used by Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Michael; Mattia, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Data visualization is a key component to business and data analytics, allowing analysts in businesses to create tools such as dashboards for business executives. Various software packages allow businesses to create these tools in order to manipulate data for making informed business decisions. The focus is to examine what skills employers are…

  20. The DiaCog: A Prototype Tool for Visualizing Online Dialog Games' Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yengin, Ilker; Lazarevic, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes and explains the design of a prototype learning tool named the DiaCog. The DiaCog visualizes dialog interactions within an online dialog game by using dynamically created cognitive maps. As a purposefully designed tool for enhancing learning effectiveness the DiaCog might be applicable to dialogs at discussion boards within a…

  1. Advanced REACH Tool: A Bayesian Model for Occupational Exposure Assessment

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Kevin; Warren, Nicholas; Fransman, Wouter; Entink, Rinke Klein; Schinkel, Jody; van Tongeren, Martie; Cherrie, John W.; Kromhout, Hans; Schneider, Thomas; Tielemans, Erik

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a Bayesian model for the assessment of inhalation exposures in an occupational setting; the methodology underpins a freely available web-based application for exposure assessment, the Advanced REACH Tool (ART). The ART is a higher tier exposure tool that combines disparate sources of information within a Bayesian statistical framework. The information is obtained from expert knowledge expressed in a calibrated mechanistic model of exposure assessment, data on inter- and intra-individual variability in exposures from the literature, and context-specific exposure measurements. The ART provides central estimates and credible intervals for different percentiles of the exposure distribution, for full-shift and long-term average exposures. The ART can produce exposure estimates in the absence of measurements, but the precision of the estimates improves as more data become available. The methodology presented in this paper is able to utilize partially analogous data, a novel approach designed to make efficient use of a sparsely populated measurement database although some additional research is still required before practical implementation. The methodology is demonstrated using two worked examples: an exposure to copper pyrithione in the spraying of antifouling paints and an exposure to ethyl acetate in shoe repair. PMID:24665110

  2. EPIPOI: A user-friendly analytical tool for the extraction and visualization of temporal parameters from epidemiological time series

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is an increasing need for processing and understanding relevant information generated by the systematic collection of public health data over time. However, the analysis of those time series usually requires advanced modeling techniques, which are not necessarily mastered by staff, technicians and researchers working on public health and epidemiology. Here a user-friendly tool, EPIPOI, is presented that facilitates the exploration and extraction of parameters describing trends, seasonality and anomalies that characterize epidemiological processes. It also enables the inspection of those parameters across geographic regions. Although the visual exploration and extraction of relevant parameters from time series data is crucial in epidemiological research, until now it had been largely restricted to specialists. Methods EPIPOI is freely available software developed in Matlab (The Mathworks Inc) that runs both on PC and Mac computers. Its friendly interface guides users intuitively through useful comparative analyses including the comparison of spatial patterns in temporal parameters. Results EPIPOI is able to handle complex analyses in an accessible way. A prototype has already been used to assist researchers in a variety of contexts from didactic use in public health workshops to the main analytical tool in published research. Conclusions EPIPOI can assist public health officials and students to explore time series data using a broad range of sophisticated analytical and visualization tools. It also provides an analytical environment where even advanced users can benefit by enabling a higher degree of control over model assumptions, such as those associated with detecting disease outbreaks and pandemics. PMID:23153033

  3. Visualization tools for vorticity transport analysis in incompressible flow.

    PubMed

    Sadlo, Filip; Peikert, Ronald; Sick, Mirjam

    2006-01-01

    Vortices are undesirable in many applications while indispensable in others. It is therefore of common interest to understand their mechanisms of creation. This paper aims at analyzing the transport of vorticity inside incompressible flow. The analysis is based on the vorticity equation and is performed along pathlines which are typically started in upstream direction from vortex regions. Different methods for the quantitative and explorative analysis of vorticity transport are presented and applied to CFD simulations of water turbines. Simulation quality is accounted for by including the errors of meshing and convergence into analysis and visualization. The obtained results are discussed and interpretations with respect to engineering questions are given.

  4. Mathematical Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogness, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Advances in computer graphics have provided mathematicians with the ability to create stunning visualizations, both to gain insight and to help demonstrate the beauty of mathematics to others. As educators these tools can be particularly important as we search for ways to work with students raised with constant visual stimulation, from video games…

  5. VisAdapt: A Visualization Tool to Support Climate Change Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jimmy; Opach, Tomasz; Glaas, Erik; Neset, Tina-Simone; Navarra, Carlo; Linner, Bjorn-Ola; Rod, Jan Ketil

    2017-01-01

    The web-based visualization VisAdapt tool was developed to help laypeople in the Nordic countries assess how anticipated climate change will impact their homes. The tool guides users through a three-step visual process that helps them explore risks and identify adaptive actions specifically modified to their location and house type. This article walks through the tool's multistep, user-centered design process. Although VisAdapt's target end users are Nordic homeowners, the insights gained from the development process and the lessons learned from the project are applicable to a wide range of domains.

  6. X3DBio1: a visual analysis tool for biomolecular structure exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hong; Singh, Abhishek; Yingling, Yaroslava G.

    2012-01-01

    Protein tertiary structure analysis provides valuable information on their biochemical functions. The structure-to-function relationship can be directly addressed through three dimensional (3D) biomolecular structure exploration and comparison. We present X3DBio1, a visual analysis tool for 3D biomolecular structure exploration, which allows for easy visual analysis of 2D intra-molecular contact map and 3D density exploration for protein, DNA, and RNA structures. A case study is also presented in this paper to illustrate the utility of the tool. X3DBio1 is open source and freely downloadable. We expect this tool can be applied to solve a variety of biological problems.

  7. Exploration of Metagenome Assemblies with an Interactive Visualization Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Cantor, Michael; Nordberg, Henrik; Smirnova, Tatyana; Andersen, Evan; Tringe, Susannah; Hess, Matthias; Dubchak, Inna

    2014-07-09

    Metagenomics, one of the fastest growing areas of modern genomic science, is the genetic profiling of the entire community of microbial organisms present in an environmental sample. Elviz is a web-based tool for the interactive exploration of metagenome assemblies. Elviz can be used with publicly available data sets from the Joint Genome Institute or with custom user-loaded assemblies. Elviz is available at genome.jgi.doe.gov/viz

  8. An interactive tool for visualization of spike train synchronization.

    PubMed

    Terry, Kevin

    2010-08-15

    A number of studies have examined the synchronization of central and peripheral spike trains by applying signal analysis techniques in the time and frequency domains. These analyses can reveal the presence of one or more common neural inputs that produce synchronization. However, synchronization measurements can fluctuate significantly due to the inherent variability of neural discharges and a finite data record length. Moreover, the effect of these natural variations is further compounded by the number of parameters available for calculating coherence in the frequency domain and the number of indices used to quantify short-term synchronization (STS) in the time domain. The computational tool presented here provides the user with an interactive environment that dynamically calculates and displays spike train properties along with STS and coherence indices to show how these factors interact. It is intended for a broad range of users, from those who are new to synchronization to experienced researchers who want to develop more meaningful and effective computational and experimental studies. To ensure this freely available tool meets the needs of all users, there are two versions. The first is a stand-alone version for educational use that can run on any computer. The second version can be modified and expanded by researchers who want to explore more in-depth questions about synchronization. Therefore, the distribution and use of this tool should both improve the understanding of fundamental spike train synchronization dynamics and produce more efficient and meaningful synchronization studies.

  9. Interactive Data Visualization for HIV Cohorts: Leveraging Data Exchange Standards to Share and Reuse Research Tools

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, Meridith; Wehbe, Firas H.; Rebeiro, Peter F.; Caro-Vega, Yanink; McGowan, Catherine C.; Shepherd, Bryan E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop and disseminate tools for interactive visualization of HIV cohort data. Design and Methods If a picture is worth a thousand words, then an interactive video, composed of a long string of pictures, can produce an even richer presentation of HIV population dynamics. We developed an HIV cohort data visualization tool using open-source software (R statistical language). The tool requires that the data structure conform to the HIV Cohort Data Exchange Protocol (HICDEP), and our implementation utilized Caribbean, Central and South America network (CCASAnet) data. Results This tool currently presents patient-level data in three classes of plots: (1) Longitudinal plots showing changes in measurements viewed alongside event probability curves allowing for simultaneous inspection of outcomes by relevant patient classes. (2) Bubble plots showing changes in indicators over time allowing for observation of group level dynamics. (3) Heat maps of levels of indicators changing over time allowing for observation of spatial-temporal dynamics. Examples of each class of plot are given using CCASAnet data investigating trends in CD4 count and AIDS at antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, CD4 trajectories after ART initiation, and mortality. Conclusions We invite researchers interested in this data visualization effort to use these tools and to suggest new classes of data visualization. We aim to contribute additional shareable tools in the spirit of open scientific collaboration and hope that these tools further the participation in open data standards like HICDEP by the HIV research community. PMID:26963255

  10. Advanced Infusion Techniques with 3-D Printed Tooling

    SciTech Connect

    Nuttall, David; Elliott, Amy; Post, Brian K.; Love, Lonnie J.

    2016-05-10

    The manufacturing of tooling for large, contoured surfaces for fiber-layup applications requires significant effort to understand the geometry and then to subtractively manufacture the tool. Traditional methods for the auto industry use clay that is hand sculpted. In the marine pleasure craft industry, the exterior of the model is formed from a foam lay-up that is either hand cut or machined to create smooth lines. Engineers and researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (ORNL MDF) collaborated with Magnum Venus Products (MVP) in the development of a process for reproducing legacy whitewater adventure craft via digital scanning and large scale 3-D printed layup molds. The process entailed 3D scanning a legacy canoe form, converting that form to a CAD model, additively manufacturing (3-D Print) the mold tool, and subtractively finishing the mold s transfer surfaces. Future work will include applying a gelcoat to the mold transfer surface and infusing using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding, or VARTM principles, to create a watertight vessel. The outlined steps were performed on a specific canoe geometry found by MVP s principal participant. The intent of utilizing this geometry is to develop an energy efficient and marketable process for replicating complex shapes, specifically focusing on this particular watercraft, and provide a finished product for demonstration to the composites industry. The culminating part produced through this agreement has been slated for public presentation and potential demonstration at the 2016 CAMX (Composites and Advanced Materials eXpo) exposition in Anaheim, CA. Phase I of this collaborative research and development agreement (MDF-15-68) was conducted under CRADA NFE-15-05575 and was initiated on May 7, 2015, with an introduction to the MVP product line, and concluded in March of 2016 with the printing of and processing of a canoe mold. The project partner Magnum Venous Products (MVP) is

  11. Visualization of Near-Infrared Spectral Data of Eros Using the Small Body Mapping Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klima, Rachel L.; Ernst, Carolyn

    2016-10-01

    One of the primary drivers for many missions visiting asteroids is to advance our understanding of their composition beyond what can be (and is) already measured by telescopes. Without sample return or lander missions, this task relies primarily on resolved near-infrared spectroscopic measurements. Scientific analysis using spectral data collected by point spectrometers is not as straightforward as for imaging spectrometers, where the local spatial context is immediately available. In the case of Eros and other highly non-spherical bodies, this problem becomes even more severe when trying to locate spectra that cross a mapped feature that bends over an irregularly shaped surface. Thus, it is often the case that outside of the mission teams, few from the community at large delve into these data sets, as they lack the tools necessary to incorporate the spectral information into geological analyses of the asteroids. Ultimately, we seek to make such spectral datasets, which NASA has invested significant amounts of money to obtain, more widely accessible and user-friendly. The Small Bodies Mapping Tool (SBMT) is a Java-based, interactive, three-dimensional visualization tool written and developed at APL to map and analyze features on irregularly shaped solar system bodies. The SBMT can be used to locate and then "drape" spacecraft images, spectra, and laser altimetry around the shape model of such bodies. It provides a means for rapid identification of available data in a region of interest and allows features to be mapped directly onto the shape model. The program allows the free rotation of a shape model (including any overlain data) in all directions, so that the correlation and distribution of mapped features can be easily and globally observed.We will present the results of our work on the NEAR/Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIS) data, including improvements to the calibration made by using the geometric information provided by the SBMT and improvements to the SMBT

  12. GlastCam: A Telemetry-Driven Spacecraft Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoneking, Eric T.; Tsai, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Developed for the GLAST project, which is now the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, GlastCam software ingests telemetry from the Integrated Test and Operations System (ITOS) and generates four graphical displays of geometric properties in real time, allowing visual assessment of the attitude, configuration, position, and various cross-checks. Four windows are displayed: a "cam" window shows a 3D view of the satellite; a second window shows the standard position plot of the satellite on a Mercator map of the Earth; a third window displays star tracker fields of view, showing which stars are visible from the spacecraft in order to verify star tracking; and the fourth window depicts

  13. Living Liquid: Design and Evaluation of an Exploratory Visualization Tool for Museum Visitors.

    PubMed

    Ma, J; Liao, I; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Frazier, J

    2012-12-01

    Interactive visualizations can allow science museum visitors to explore new worlds by seeing and interacting with scientific data. However, designing interactive visualizations for informal learning environments, such as museums, presents several challenges. First, visualizations must engage visitors on a personal level. Second, visitors often lack the background to interpret visualizations of scientific data. Third, visitors have very limited time at individual exhibits in museums. This paper examines these design considerations through the iterative development and evaluation of an interactive exhibit as a visualization tool that gives museumgoers access to scientific data generated and used by researchers. The exhibit prototype, Living Liquid, encourages visitors to ask and answer their own questions while exploring the time-varying global distribution of simulated marine microbes using a touchscreen interface. Iterative development proceeded through three rounds of formative evaluations using think-aloud protocols and interviews, each round informing a key visualization design decision: (1) what to visualize to initiate inquiry, (2) how to link data at the microscopic scale to global patterns, and (3) how to include additional data that allows visitors to pursue their own questions. Data from visitor evaluations suggests that, when designing visualizations for public audiences, one should (1) avoid distracting visitors from data that they should explore, (2) incorporate background information into the visualization, (3) favor understandability over scientific accuracy, and (4) layer data accessibility to structure inquiry. Lessons learned from this case study add to our growing understanding of how to use visualizations to actively engage learners with scientific data.

  14. Three Dimensional Lightning Launch Commit Criteria Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2014-01-01

    Lightning occurrence too close to a NASA LSP or future SLS program launch vehicle in flight would have disastrous results. The sensitive electronics on the vehicle could be damaged to the point of causing an anomalous flight path and ultimate destruction of the vehicle and payload.According to 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LLCC), a vehicle cannot launch if lightning is within 10 NM of its pre-determined flight path. The 45 WS Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) evaluate this LLCC for their launch customers to ensure the safety of the vehicle in flight. Currently, the LWOs conduct a subjective analysis of the distance between lightning and the flight path using data from different display systems. A 3-D display in which the lightning data and flight path are together would greatly reduce the ambiguity in evaluating this LLCC. It would give the LWOs and launch directors more confidence in whether a GO or NO GO for launch should be issued. When lightning appears close to the path, the LWOs likely err on the side of conservatism and deem the lightning to be within 10 NM. This would cause a costly delay or scrub. If the LWOs can determine with a strong level of certainty that the lightning is beyond 10 NM, launch availability would increase without compromising safety of the vehicle, payload or, in the future, astronauts.The AMU was tasked to conduct a market research of commercial, government, and open source software that might be able to ingest and display the 3-D lightning data from the KSC Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), the 45th Space Wing Weather Surveillance Radar (WSR), the National Weather Service in Melbourne Weather Surveillance Radar 1988 Doppler (WSR-88D), and the vehicle flight path data so that all can be visualized together. To accomplish this, the AMU conducted Internet searches for potential software candidates and interviewed software developers.None of the available off-the-shelf software had a 3-D capability that could

  15. Head mounted DLP for visual stimulation in freely moving rats: a novel tool for visual neuroscience research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Yossi; Arens-Arad, Tamar; Farah, Nairouz; Zlotnik, Alex; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-03-01

    Novel technologies are constantly under development for vision restoration in blind patients. In some of these techniques, such as photodiode implants or optogenetics based treatment, a glasses mounted optical projection system projects the visual scene onto the retina. The desired projection system is characterized by a relatively high power density, a localized retinal stimulation area and compatibility for wavelengths that are specific for the technology at hand. The challenges of obtaining such a projection system are not only limited by developing the tools and the apparatus for testing the visual performance of artificial retina, but also devising the technique and the methodology for training and testing the behaving animals using this tool. Current research techniques used for evaluation of visual function in behaving animals utilize computer screens for retinal stimulation, and therefore do not fulfill the requirements of the evaluation of retinal implant performance or optogenetics based treatment (inefficient power and no wavelength flexibility). In the following work we will present and evaluate a novel projection system that is suited for behavioral animal studies and meet the requirements for artificial retinal stimulation. The proposed system is based on a miniature Digital Mirror Device (DMD) for pattern projection and a telescope for relaying the pattern directly onto the animal eye. This system facilitates the projection of patterns with high spatial resolution at high light intensities with the desired wavelength and may prove to be a vital tool in natural and artificial vision performance research in behaving animals.

  16. Alphavirus transducing system: tools for visualizing infection in mosquito vectors.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Aaron; Mossel, Eric; Sanchez-Vargas, Irma; Foy, Brian; Olson, Ken

    2010-11-24

    Alphavirus transducing systems (ATSs) are important tools for expressing genes of interest (GOI) during infection. ATSs are derived from cDNA clones of mosquito-borne RNA viruses (genus Alphavirus; family Togaviridae). The Alphavirus genus contains about 30 different mosquito-borne virus species. Alphaviruses are enveloped viruses and contain single-stranded RNA genomes (~11.7 Kb). Alphaviruses transcribe a subgenomic mRNA that encodes the structural proteins of the virus required for encapsidation of the genome and maturation of the virus. Alphaviruses are usually highly lytic in vertebrate cells, but persistently infect susceptible mosquito cells with minimal cytopathology. These attributes make them excellent tools for gene expression in mosquito vectors. The most common ATSs in use are derived from Sindbis virus (SINV). The broad species tropism of SINV allows for infection of insect, avian, and mammalian cells8. However, ATSs have been derived from other alphaviruses as well. Foreign gene expression is made possible by the insertion of an additional viral subgenomic RNA initiation site or promoter. ATSs in which an exogenous gene sequence is positioned 5' to the viral structural genes is used for stable protein expression in insects. ATSs, in which a gene sequence is positioned 3' to the structural genes, is used to trigger RNAi and silence expression of that gene in the insect. ATSs have proven to be valuable tools for understanding vector-pathogen interactions, molecular details of viral replication and maintenance infectious cycles. In particular, the expression of fluorescent and bioluminescent reporters has been instrumental tracking the viral infection in the vector and virus transmission. Additionally, the vector immune response has been described using two strains of SINV engineered to express GFP(2,9). Here, we present a method for the production of SINV containing a fluorescent reporter (GFP) from the cDNA infectious clone. Infectious, full

  17. VU-flow: a visualization tool for analyzing navigation in virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Chittaro, Luca; Ranon, Roberto; Ieronutti, Lucio

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a tool for the visual analysis of navigation patterns of moving entities, such as users, virtual characters, or vehicles in 3D Virtual Environments (VEs). The tool, called VU-Flow, provides a set of interactive visualizations that highlight interesting navigation behaviors of single or groups of moving entities that were the VE together or separately. The visualizations help to improve the design of VEs and to study the navigation behavior of users, e.g., during controlled experiments. Besides VEs, the proposed techniques could also be applied to visualize real-world data recorded by positioning systems, allowing one to employ VU-Flow in domains such as urban planning, transportation, and emergency response.

  18. The scientific modeling assistant: An advanced software tool for scientific model building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Sims, Michael H.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the scientific modeling assistant: an advanced software tool for scientific model building are presented. The objective is to build a specialized software tool to assist in scientific model-building.

  19. Visual Impairment/lntracranial Pressure Risk Clinical Care Data Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Baalen, Mary; Mason, Sara S.; Taiym, Wafa; Wear, Mary L.; Moynihan, Shannan; Alexander, David; Hart, Steve; Tarver, William

    2014-01-01

    Prior to 2010, several ISS crewmembers returned from spaceflight with changes to their vision, ranging from a mild hyperopic shift to frank disc edema. As a result, NASA expanded clinical vision testing to include more comprehensive medical imaging, including Optical Coherence Tomography and 3 Tesla Brain and Orbit MRIs. The Space and Clinical Operations (SCO) Division developed a clinical practice guideline that classified individuals based on their symptoms and diagnoses to facilitate clinical care. For the purposes of clinical surveillance, this classification was applied retrospectively to all crewmembers who had sufficient testing for classification. This classification is also a tool that has been leveraged for researchers to identify potential risk factors. In March 2014, driven in part by a more comprehensive understanding of the imaging data and increased imaging capability on orbit, the SCO Division revised their clinical care guidance to outline in-flight care and increase post-flight follow up. The new clinical guidance does not include a classification scheme

  20. Functional toxicology: tools to advance the future of toxicity testing

    PubMed Central

    Gaytán, Brandon D.; Vulpe, Chris D.

    2014-01-01

    The increased presence of chemical contaminants in the environment is an undeniable concern to human health and ecosystems. Historically, by relying heavily upon costly and laborious animal-based toxicity assays, the field of toxicology has often neglected examinations of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of toxicity for the majority of compounds—information that, if available, would strengthen risk assessment analyses. Functional toxicology, where cells or organisms with gene deletions or depleted proteins are used to assess genetic requirements for chemical tolerance, can advance the field of toxicity testing by contributing data regarding chemical mechanisms of toxicity. Functional toxicology can be accomplished using available genetic tools in yeasts, other fungi and bacteria, and eukaryotes of increased complexity, including zebrafish, fruit flies, rodents, and human cell lines. Underscored is the value of using less complex systems such as yeasts to direct further studies in more complex systems such as human cell lines. Functional techniques can yield (1) novel insights into chemical toxicity; (2) pathways and mechanisms deserving of further study; and (3) candidate human toxicant susceptibility or resistance genes. PMID:24847352

  1. VisPortal: Deploying grid-enabled visualization tools through a web-portal interface

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, Wes; Siegerist, Cristina; Shalf, John; Shetty, Praveenkumar; Jankun-Kelly, T.J.; Kreylos, Oliver; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2003-06-09

    The LBNL/NERSC Visportal effort explores ways to deliver advanced Remote/Distributed Visualization (RDV) capabilities through a Grid-enabled web-portal interface. The effort focuses on latency tolerant distributed visualization algorithms, GUI designs that are more appropriate for the capabilities of web interfaces, and refactoring parallel-distributed applications to work in a N-tiered component deployment strategy. Most importantly, our aim is to leverage commercially-supported technology as much as possible in order to create a deployable, supportable, and hence viable platform for delivering grid-based visualization services to collaboratory users.

  2. Applying Dataflow Architecture and Visualization Tools to In Vitro Pharmacology Data Automation.

    PubMed

    Pechter, David; Xu, Serena; Kurtz, Marc; Williams, Steven; Sonatore, Lisa; Villafania, Artjohn; Agrawal, Sony

    2016-12-01

    The pace and complexity of modern drug discovery places ever-increasing demands on scientists for data analysis and interpretation. Data flow programming and modern visualization tools address these demands directly. Three different requirements-one for allosteric modulator analysis, one for a specialized clotting analysis, and one for enzyme global progress curve analysis-are reviewed, and their execution in a combined data flow/visualization environment is outlined.

  3. GIS as an Integration Tool for Hydrologic Modeling: Spatial Data Management, Analysis and Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setegn, S. G.; Lawrence, A.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Applied Research Center at Florida International University (ARC-FIU) is supporting the soil and groundwater remediation efforts of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) by developing a surface water model to simulate the hydrology and the fate and transport of contaminants and sediment in the Tims Branch watershed. The first phase of model development was initiated in 2014 using the MIKE SHE/MIKE 11 hydrological modeling package which has a geographic information systems (GIS) user interface built into its system that can directly use spatial GIS databases (geodatabases) for model inputs. This study developed an ArcGIS geodatabase to support the hydrological modeling work for SRS. The coupling of a geodatabase with MIKE SHE/MIKE 11 numerical models can serve as an efficient tool that significantly reduces the time needed for data preparation. The geodatabase provides an advanced spatial data structure needed to address the management, processing, and analysis of large GIS and timeseries datasets derived from multiple sources that are used for numerical model calibration, uncertainty analysis, and simulation of flow and contaminant fate and transport during extreme climatic events. The geodatabase developed is based on the ArcHydro and ArcGIS Base Map data models with modifications made for project specific input parameters. The significance of this approach was to ensure its replicability for potential application in other watersheds. This paper describes the process of development of the SRS geodatabase and the application of GIS tools to pre-process and analyze hydrological model data; automate repetitive geoprocessing tasks; and produce maps for visualization of the surface water hydrology of the Tims Branch watershed. Key Words: GIS, hydrological modeling, geodatabase, hydrology, MIKE SHE/MIKE 11

  4. An open source GIS tool to quantify the visual impact of wind turbines and photovoltaic panels

    SciTech Connect

    Minelli, Annalisa; Marchesini, Ivan; Taylor, Faith E.; De Rosa, Pierluigi; Casagrande, Luca; Cenci, Michele

    2014-11-15

    Although there are clear economic and environmental incentives for producing energy from solar and wind power, there can be local opposition to their installation due to their impact upon the landscape. To date, no international guidelines exist to guide quantitative visual impact assessment of these facilities, making the planning process somewhat subjective. In this paper we demonstrate the development of a method and an Open Source GIS tool to quantitatively assess the visual impact of these facilities using line-of-site techniques. The methods here build upon previous studies by (i) more accurately representing the shape of energy producing facilities, (ii) taking into account the distortion of the perceived shape and size of facilities caused by the location of the observer, (iii) calculating the possible obscuring of facilities caused by terrain morphology and (iv) allowing the combination of various facilities to more accurately represent the landscape. The tool has been applied to real and synthetic case studies and compared to recently published results from other models, and demonstrates an improvement in accuracy of the calculated visual impact of facilities. The tool is named r.wind.sun and is freely available from GRASS GIS AddOns. - Highlights: • We develop a tool to quantify wind turbine and photovoltaic panel visual impact. • The tool is freely available to download and edit as a module of GRASS GIS. • The tool takes into account visual distortion of the shape and size of objects. • The accuracy of calculation of visual impact is improved over previous methods.

  5. Development of a visualization tool for integrated surface water-groundwater modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yong; Zheng, Yi; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-01-01

    Physically-based, fully integrated surface water (SW)-groundwater (GW) models have been increasingly used in water resources research and management. The integrated modeling involves a large amount of scientific data. The use of three-dimensional (3D) visualization software to integrate all the scientific data into a comprehensive system can facilitate the interpretation and validation of modeling results. Nevertheless, at present few software tools can efficiently perform data visualization for integrated SW-GW modeling. In this study, a visualization tool named IHM3D was designed and developed specifically for integrated SW-GW modeling. In IHM3D, spatially distributed model inputs/outputs and geo-referenced data sets are visualized in a virtual globe-based 3D environment. End users can conveniently explore and validate modeling results within the 3D environment. A GSLFOW (an integrated SW-GW model developed by USGS) modeling case in the Heihe River Basin (Northwest China) was used to demonstrate the applicability of IHM3D at a large basin scale. The visualization of the modeling results significantly improved the understanding of the complex hydrologic cycle in this water-limited area, and provided insights into the regional water resources management. This study shows that visualization tools like IHM3D can promote data and model sharing in the water resources research community, and make it more practical to perform complex hydrological modeling in real-world water resources management.

  6. Measurement Tools for the Immersive Visualization Environment: Steps Toward the Virtual Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, John G.; Dunkers, Joy P.; Satterfield, Steven G.; Peskin, Adele P.; Kelso, John T.; Terrill, Judith E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a set of tools for performing measurements of objects in a virtual reality based immersive visualization environment. These tools enable the use of the immersive environment as an instrument for extracting quantitative information from data representations that hitherto had be used solely for qualitative examination. We provide, within the virtual environment, ways for the user to analyze and interact with the quantitative data generated. We describe results generated by these methods to obtain dimensional descriptors of tissue engineered medical products. We regard this toolbox as our first step in the implementation of a virtual measurement laboratory within an immersive visualization environment. PMID:27110469

  7. Visualizing vowel-production mechanism using simple educational tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Takayuki

    2005-09-01

    To develop intuitive and effective methods for educating Acoustics to students of different ages and from varied backgrounds, Arai [J. Phonetic Soc. Jpn. 5, 31-38, (2001)] replicated Chiba and Kajiyama's physical models of the human vocal tract as educational tools and verified that the physical models and sound sources, such as an artificial larynx, yield a simple but powerful demonstration of vowel production in the classroom. We have also started exhibiting our models at the Science Museum ``Ru-Ku-Ru'' in Shizuoka City, Japan. We further extended our model to a lung model as well as several head-shaped models with visible vocal tract to demonstrate the total vowel-production mechanism from phonation to articulation. The lung model imitates the human respiratory system with a diaphragm. In the head-shaped model, the midsaggital cross section is visible from the outside. To adjust the degree of nasopharyngeal coupling, the velum may be rotated. Another head-shaped model with the manipulable tongue position was also developed. Two test results were compared before and after using these physical models, and the educational effectiveness of the models was confirmed. The homepage of the vocal-tract models is available at http://www.splab.ee.sophia.ac.jp/Vocal-Tract-Model/index-e.htm. [Work supported by KAKENHI (17500603).

  8. PhyloToAST: Bioinformatics tools for species-level analysis and visualization of complex microbial datasets

    PubMed Central

    Dabdoub, Shareef M.; Fellows, Megan L.; Paropkari, Akshay D.; Mason, Matthew R.; Huja, Sarandeep S.; Tsigarida, Alexandra A.; Kumar, Purnima S.

    2016-01-01

    The 16S rRNA gene is widely used for taxonomic profiling of microbial ecosystems; and recent advances in sequencing chemistry have allowed extremely large numbers of sequences to be generated from minimal amounts of biological samples. Analysis speed and resolution of data to species-level taxa are two important factors in large-scale explorations of complex microbiomes using 16S sequencing. We present here new software, Phylogenetic Tools for Analysis of Species-level Taxa (PhyloToAST), that completely integrates with the QIIME pipeline to improve analysis speed, reduce primer bias (requiring two sequencing primers), enhance species-level analysis, and add new visualization tools. The code is free and open source, and can be accessed at http://phylotoast.org. PMID:27357721

  9. The Use of Visual Advance Organizers for Learning Earth Science Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisberg, Joseph S.

    This study was designed to determine whether advance organizers in the form of visual aids might serve the same function as Ausubel's verbal advance organizers. The basic design of the study consisted of a 4 X 3 X 2 ANOVA factorial design. Ninety-six eighth-grade students were involved in the study. One group was exposed to a physiographic diagram…

  10. Advances in flow visualization using liquid-crystal coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Obara, Clifford J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses a new four-part mixing method for visualizing boundary layer flows, including transitions, separation, and shock locations, by the use of liquid-crystal coatings. The method controls the event temperature and color-play bandwidth best suited to specific experimental conditions, and is easily learned. The method is applicable almost throughout the altitude and speed ranges for subsonic aircraft flight envelopes, and is also applicable to supersonic flow visualization and for general use in high- and low-speed wind tunnel and water tunnel testing.

  11. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Tools, Algorithms, and Methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    David E. Shropshire

    2009-05-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Systems Analysis supports engineering economic analyses and trade-studies, and requires a requisite reference cost basis to support adequate analysis rigor. In this regard, the AFCI program has created a reference set of economic documentation. The documentation consists of the “Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC) Cost Basis” report (Shropshire, et al. 2007), “AFCI Economic Analysis” report, and the “AFCI Economic Tools, Algorithms, and Methodologies Report.” Together, these documents provide the reference cost basis, cost modeling basis, and methodologies needed to support AFCI economic analysis. The application of the reference cost data in the cost and econometric systems analysis models will be supported by this report. These methodologies include: the energy/environment/economic evaluation of nuclear technology penetration in the energy market—domestic and internationally—and impacts on AFCI facility deployment, uranium resource modeling to inform the front-end fuel cycle costs, facility first-of-a-kind to nth-of-a-kind learning with application to deployment of AFCI facilities, cost tradeoffs to meet nuclear non-proliferation requirements, and international nuclear facility supply/demand analysis. The economic analysis will be performed using two cost models. VISION.ECON will be used to evaluate and compare costs under dynamic conditions, consistent with the cases and analysis performed by the AFCI Systems Analysis team. Generation IV Excel Calculations of Nuclear Systems (G4-ECONS) will provide static (snapshot-in-time) cost analysis and will provide a check on the dynamic results. In future analysis, additional AFCI measures may be developed to show the value of AFCI in closing the fuel cycle. Comparisons can show AFCI in terms of reduced global proliferation (e.g., reduction in enrichment), greater sustainability through preservation of a natural resource (e.g., reduction in uranium ore depletion), value from

  12. ForestPMPlot: A Flexible Tool for Visualizing Heterogeneity Between Studies in Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eun Yong; Park, Yurang; Li, Xiao; Segrè, Ayellet V; Han, Buhm; Eskin, Eleazar

    2016-07-07

    Meta-analysis has become a popular tool for genetic association studies to combine different genetic studies. A key challenge in meta-analysis is heterogeneity, or the differences in effect sizes between studies. Heterogeneity complicates the interpretation of meta-analyses. In this paper, we describe ForestPMPlot, a flexible visualization tool for analyzing studies included in a meta-analysis. The main feature of the tool is visualizing the differences in the effect sizes of the studies to understand why the studies exhibit heterogeneity for a particular phenotype and locus pair under different conditions. We show the application of this tool to interpret a meta-analysis of 17 mouse studies, and to interpret a multi-tissue eQTL study.

  13. A WebGL Tool for Visualizing the Topology of the Sun's Coronal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, A.; Cheung, C.; DeRosa, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    We present a web-based, topology-viewing tool that allows users to visualize the geometry and topology of the Sun's 3D coronal magnetic field in an interactive manner. The tool is implemented using, open-source, mature, modern web technologies including WebGL, jQuery, HTML 5, and CSS 3, which are compatible with nearly all modern web browsers. As opposed to the traditional method of visualization, which involves the downloading and setup of various software packages-proprietary and otherwise-the tool presents a clean interface that allows the user to easily load and manipulate the model, while also offering great power to choose which topological features are displayed. The tool accepts data encoded in the JSON open format that has libraries available for nearly every major programming language, making it simple to generate the data.

  14. Advancing Creative Visual Thinking with Constructive Function-Based Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasko, Alexander; Adzhiev, Valery; Malikova, Evgeniya; Pilyugin, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Modern education technologies are destined to reflect the realities of a modern digital age. The juxtaposition of real and synthetic (computer-generated) worlds as well as a greater emphasis on visual dimension are especially important characteristics that have to be taken into account in learning and teaching. We describe the ways in which an…

  15. Knowledge Visualizations: A Tool to Achieve Optimized Operational Decision Making and Data Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    and pedigree possess additive implications toward the quality of the data utilized within the DSS. F. SUMMARY Decision - making theories such as...VISUALIZATIONS: A TOOL TO ACHIEVE OPTIMIZED OPERATIONAL DECISION MAKING AND DATA INTEGRATION by Paul C. Hudson Jeffrey A. Rzasa June 2015 Thesis...TOOL TO ACHIEVE OPTIMIZED OPERATIONAL DECISION MAKING AND DATA INTEGRATION 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Paul C. Hudson, and Jeffrey A. Rzasa

  16. Photovoice as a Teaching Tool: Learning by Doing with Visual Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schell, Kara; Ferguson, Alana; Hamoline, Rita; Shea, Jennifer; Thomas-MacLean, Roanne

    2009-01-01

    There has been a lack of research done on in-class teaching and learning using visual methods. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate an enriched teaching and learning experience, facilitated by a Photovoice project, in an Advanced Methodology class where sociology graduate students were exposed to various social research methods and…

  17. Comparing Simple and Advanced Video Tools as Supports for Complex Collaborative Design Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahn, Carmen; Pea, Roy; Hesse, Friedrich W.; Rosen, Joe

    2010-01-01

    Working with digital video technologies, particularly advanced video tools with editing capabilities, offers new prospects for meaningful learning through design. However, it is also possible that the additional complexity of such tools does "not" advance learning. We compared in an experiment the design processes and learning outcomes…

  18. Advanced Image Processing for Defect Visualization in Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotnikov, Yuri A.; Winfree, William P.

    1997-01-01

    Results of a defect visualization process based on pulse infrared thermography are presented. Algorithms have been developed to reduce the amount of operator participation required in the process of interpreting thermographic images. The algorithms determine the defect's depth and size from the temporal and spatial thermal distributions that exist on the surface of the investigated object following thermal excitation. A comparison of the results from thermal contrast, time derivative, and phase analysis methods for defect visualization are presented. These comparisons are based on three dimensional simulations of a test case representing a plate with multiple delaminations. Comparisons are also based on experimental data obtained from a specimen with flat bottom holes and a composite panel with delaminations.

  19. Simplifying touch data from tri-axial sensors using a new data visualization tool.

    PubMed

    Salud, Lawrence H; Kwan, Calvin; Pugh, Carla M

    2013-01-01

    Quantification and evaluation of palpation is a growing field of research in medicine and engineering. A newly developed tri-axial touch sensor has been designed to capture a multi-dimensional profile of touch-loaded forces. We have developed a data visualization tool as a first step in simplifying interpretation of touch for assessing hands-on clinical performance.

  20. Development and methods for an open-sourced data visualization tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents an open source on-demand web tool, which is specifically addressed to scientists and researchers that are non-expert in converting time series data into a time surface visualization. Similar to a GIS environment the time surface shows time on two axes; time of day vs. day of year...

  1. The Life Story Board: A Feasibility Study of a Visual Interview Tool for School Counsellors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Robert M.; Medina, Maria Fernanda; Mignone, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The article describes the findings of a pilot study of the Life Story Board (LSB), a novel visual information system with a play board and sets of magnetic cards designed to be a practical clinical tool for counsellors, therapists, and researchers. The LSB is similar to a multidimensional genogram, and serves as a platform to depict personal…

  2. Web-Based Interactive 3D Visualization as a Tool for Improved Anatomy Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersson, Helge; Sinkvist, David; Wang, Chunliang; Smedby, Orjan

    2009-01-01

    Despite a long tradition, conventional anatomy education based on dissection is declining. This study tested a new virtual reality (VR) technique for anatomy learning based on virtual contrast injection. The aim was to assess whether students value this new three-dimensional (3D) visualization method as a learning tool and what value they gain…

  3. Using a Self-Administered Visual Basic Software Tool To Teach Psychological Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strang, Harold R.; Sullivan, Amie K.; Schoeny, Zahrl G.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces LearningLinks, a Visual Basic software tool that allows teachers to create individualized learning modules that use constructivist and behavioral learning principles. Describes field testing of undergraduates at the University of Virginia that tested a module designed to improve understanding of the psychological concepts of…

  4. GreedEx: A Visualization Tool for Experimentation and Discovery Learning of Greedy Algorithms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velazquez-Iturbide, J. A.; Debdi, O.; Esteban-Sanchez, N.; Pizarro, C.

    2013-01-01

    Several years ago we presented an experimental, discovery-learning approach to the active learning of greedy algorithms. This paper presents GreedEx, a visualization tool developed to support this didactic method. The paper states the design goals of GreedEx, makes explicit the major design decisions adopted, and describes its main characteristics…

  5. Exploring NASA and ESA Atmospheric Data Using GIOVANNI, the Online Visualization and Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptoukh, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Giovanni, the NASA Goddard online visualization and analysis tool (http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov) allows users explore various atmospheric phenomena without learning remote sensing data formats and downloading voluminous data. Using NASA MODIS (Terra and Aqua) and ESA MERIS (ENVISAT) aerosol data as an example, we demonstrate Giovanni usage for online multi-sensor remote sensing data comparison and analysis.

  6. Generating and Analyzing Visual Representations of Conic Sections with the Use of Technological Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos-Trigo, Manuel; Espinosa-Perez, Hugo; Reyes-Rodriguez, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Technological tools have the potential to offer students the possibility to represent information and relationships embedded in problems and concepts in ways that involve numerical, algebraic, geometric, and visual approaches. In this paper, the authors present and discuss an example in which an initial representation of a mathematical object…

  7. Visualization: A Tool for Enhancing Students' Concept Images of Basic Object-Oriented Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: to investigate students' concept images about class, object, and their relationship and to help them enhance their learning of these notions with a visualization tool. Fifty-six second-year university students participated in the study. To investigate his/her concept images, the researcher developed a survey…

  8. Understanding the operational environment: implications for advanced visualizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleva, Denise; Fitzhugh, Elisabeth; Dixon, Sharon

    2009-05-01

    With the changing character of warfare, information superiority is a high priority. Given the complexity of current and future operating environments, analysts, strategists and planners need a multidimensional understanding of the battlespace. Asymmetric warfare necessitates that our strategists look beyond targets-based operations, where we simply identify and destroy enemy entities. Effects-based operations models the enemy as a system which reacts to our actions. This requires the capability to predict the adversary response to a selected action. Actions may be diplomatic, information, military or economic (DIME). Effects may be political, military, economic, social, information or infrastructure (PMESII). Timing must be explicitly considered and effects dynamically assessed. Visualizations of intelligence information are needed which will promote full understanding of all aspects of adversary strengths and weaknesses by providing the extensive data about adversary forces, organic essentials, infrastructure, leadership, population, and science and technology in an easily accessible and understandable format. This will enhance Effectsbased operations, and therefore, the capability to predict and counter adversary courses of action. This paper outlines a systems engineering approach to designing visualizations which convey the multidimensional information to decision makers. Visualization issues inherent in understanding the multidimensional operational environment will be discussed.

  9. Recent advances in microscopic techniques for visualizing leukocytes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rohit; Tikoo, Shweta; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Leukocytes are inherently motile and interactive cells. Recent advances in intravital microscopy approaches have enabled a new vista of their behavior within intact tissues in real time. This brief review summarizes the developments enabling the tracking of immune responses in vivo. PMID:27239292

  10. New advanced radio diagnostics tools for Space Weather Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krankowski, A.; Rothkaehl, H.; Atamaniuk, B.; Morawski, M.; Zakharenkova, I.; Cherniak, I.; Otmianowska-Mazur, K.

    2013-12-01

    To give a more detailed and complete understanding of physical plasma processes that govern the solar-terrestrial space, and to develop qualitative and quantitative models of the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupling, it is necessary to design and build the next generation of instruments for space diagnostics and monitoring. Novel ground- based wide-area sensor networks, such as the LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) radar facility, comprising wide band, and vector-sensing radio receivers and multi-spacecraft plasma diagnostics should help solve outstanding problems of space physics and describe long-term environmental changes. The LOw Frequency ARray - LOFAR - is a new fully digital radio telescope designed for frequencies between 30 MHz and 240 MHz located in Europe. The three new LOFAR stations will be installed until summer 2015 in Poland. The LOFAR facilities in Poland will be distributed among three sites: Lazy (East of Krakow), Borowiec near Poznan and Baldy near Olsztyn. All they will be connected via PIONIER dedicated links to Poznan. Each site will host one LOFAR station (96 high-band+96 low-band antennas). They will most time work as a part of European network, however, when less charged, they can operate as a national network The new digital radio frequency analyzer (RFA) on board the low-orbiting RELEC satellite was designed to monitor and investigate the ionospheric plasma properties. This two-point ground-based and topside ionosphere-located space plasma diagnostic can be a useful new tool for monitoring and diagnosing turbulent plasma properties. The RFA on board the RELEC satellite is the first in a series of experiments which is planned to be launched into the near-Earth environment. In order to improve and validate the large scales and small scales ionospheric structures we will used the GPS observations collected at IGS/EPN network employed to reconstruct diurnal variations of TEC using all satellite passes over individual GPS stations and the

  11. A visualization tool for parallel and distributed computing using the Lilith framework

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, A.C.; Evensky, D.A.; Wyckoff, P.

    1998-05-01

    The authors present a visualization tool for the monitoring and debugging of codes run in a parallel and distributed computing environment, called Lilith Lights. This tool can be used both for debugging parallel codes as well as for resource management of clusters. It was developed under Lilith, a framework for creating scalable software tools for distributed computing. The use of Lilith provides scalable, non-invasive debugging, as opposed to other commonly used software debugging and visualization tools. Furthermore, by implementing the visualization tool in software rather than in hardware (as available on some MPPs), Lilith Lights is easily transferable to other machines, and well adapted for use on distributed clusters of machines. The information provided in a clustered environment can further be used for resource management of the cluster. In this paper, they introduce Lilith Lights, discussing its use on the Computational Plant cluster at Sandia National Laboratories, show its design and development under the Lilith framework, and present metrics for resource use and performance.

  12. Making sense of competitive intelligence with TIGER: an information visualization tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Barbara E.; Flast, Robert; Gershman, Anatole; Gottsman, Edward J.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes a joint research project in data visualization between MetLife and the CSTAR group at Andersen Consulting. The goal of the project was to produce a tool for retrieval, display, and analyzing competitive information that would run on conventional PC platforms. As part of the visualization scheme, icon clusters provide a graphical representation of each case's salient features, while 1, 2, or 3 dimensional maps of clusters reveal relationships among the cases. A graphical query facility allows users to specify cluster maps dynamically. In addition, the tool supports an ever-present 'bird's-eye-view' of the information space being analyzed. The tool is particularly valuable for exploring patterns among stories grouped and viewed in the 2 and 3 dimensional views which would be difficult to discern from a hardcopy version.

  13. Sinistrals are rarely "right": evidence from tool-affordance processing in visual half-field paradigms.

    PubMed

    Michałowski, Bartosz; Króliczak, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Although current neuroscience and behavioral studies provide substantial understanding of tool representations (e.g., the processing of tool-related affordances) in the human brain, most of this knowledge is limited to right-handed individuals with typical organization of cognitive and manual skills. Therefore, any insights from these lines of research may be of little value in rehabilitation of patients with atypical laterality of praxis and/or hand dominance. To fill this gap, we tested perceptual processing of man-made objects in 18 healthy left-handers who were likely to show greater incidence of right-sided or bilateral (atypical) lateralization of functions. In the two experiments reported here, participants performed a tool vs. non-tool categorization task. In Experiment 1, target and distracter objects were presented for 200 ms in the left (LVF) or right (RVF) visual field, followed by 200 ms masks. In Experiment 2, the centrally presented targets were preceded by masked primes of 35 ms duration, again presented in the LVF or RVF. Based on results from both studies, i.e., response times (RTs) to correctly discriminated stimuli irrespective of their category, participants were divided into two groups showing privileged processing in either left (N = 9) or right (N = 9) visual field. In Experiment 1, only individuals with RVF advantage showed significantly faster categorization of tools in their dominant visual field, whereas those with LVF advantage revealed merely a trend toward such an effect. In Experiment 2, when targets were preceded by identical primes, the "atypical" group showed significantly facilitated categorization of non-tools, whereas the "typical" group demonstrated a trend toward faster categorization of tools. These results indicate that in subjects with atypically organized cognitive skills, tool-related processes are not just mirror reversed. Thus, our outcomes call for particular caution in neurorehabilitation directed at left

  14. Development of a Visual Inspection Data Collection Tool for Evaluation of Fielded PV Module Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Packard, C. E.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-08-01

    A visual inspection data collection tool for the evaluation of fielded photovoltaic (PV) modules has been developed to facilitate describing the condition of PV modules with regard to field performance. The proposed data collection tool consists of 14 sections, each documenting the appearance or properties of a part of the module. This report instructs on how to use the collection tool and defines each attribute to ensure reliable and valid data collection. This tool has been evaluated through the inspection of over 60 PV modules produced by more than 20 manufacturers and fielded at two different sites for varying periods of time. Aggregated data from such a single data collection tool has the potential to enable longitudinal studies of module condition over time, technology evolution, and field location for the enhancement of module reliability models.

  15. Advanced 3D Sensing and Visualization System for Unattended Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.J.; Little, C.Q.; Nelson, C.L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to create a reliable, 3D sensing and visualization system for unattended monitoring. The system provides benefits for several of Sandia's initiatives including nonproliferation, treaty verification, national security and critical infrastructure surety. The robust qualities of the system make it suitable for both interior and exterior monitoring applications. The 3D sensing system combines two existing sensor technologies in a new way to continuously maintain accurate 3D models of both static and dynamic components of monitored areas (e.g., portions of buildings, roads, and secured perimeters in addition to real-time estimates of the shape, location, and motion of humans and moving objects). A key strength of this system is the ability to monitor simultaneous activities on a continuous basis, such as several humans working independently within a controlled workspace, while also detecting unauthorized entry into the workspace. Data from the sensing system is used to identi~ activities or conditions that can signi~ potential surety (safety, security, and reliability) threats. The system could alert a security operator of potential threats or could be used to cue other detection, inspection or warning systems. An interactive, Web-based, 3D visualization capability was also developed using the Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML). The intex%ace allows remote, interactive inspection of a monitored area (via the Internet or Satellite Links) using a 3D computer model of the area that is rendered from actual sensor data.

  16. MAPT and PAICE: Tools for time series and single time point transcriptionist visualization and knowledge discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Parsa; Tremblay, Arianne; Matthews, Benjamin F; Alkharouf, Nadim W

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of next-generation sequencing, -omics fields such as transcriptomics have experienced increases in data throughput on the order of magnitudes. In terms of analyzing and visually representing these huge datasets, an intuitive and computationally tractable approach is to map quantified transcript expression onto biochemical pathways while employing datamining and visualization principles to accelerate knowledge discovery. We present two cross-platform tools: MAPT (Mapping and Analysis of Pathways through Time) and PAICE (Pathway Analysis and Integrated Coloring of Experiments), an easy to use analysis suite to facilitate time series and single time point transcriptomics analysis. In unison, MAPT and PAICE serve as a visual workbench for transcriptomics knowledge discovery, data-mining and functional annotation. Both PAICE and MAPT are two distinct but yet inextricably linked tools. The former is specifically designed to map EC accessions onto KEGG pathways while handling multiple gene copies, detection-call analysis, as well as UN/annotated EC accessions lacking quantifiable expression. The latter tool integrates PAICE datasets to drive visualization, annotation, and data-mining. Availability The database is available for free at http://sourceforge.net/projects/paice/http://sourceforge.net/projects/mapt/ PMID:22493539

  17. Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dean N.

    2014-05-19

    A partnership across government, academic, and private sectors has created a novel system that enables climate researchers to solve current and emerging data analysis and visualization challenges. The Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) software project utilizes the Python application programming interface (API) combined with C/C++/Fortran implementations for performance-critical software that offers the best compromise between "scalability" and “ease-of-use.” The UV-CDAT system is highly extensible and customizable for high-performance interactive and batch visualization and analysis for climate science and other disciplines of geosciences. For complex, climate data-intensive computing, UV-CDAT’s inclusive framework supports Message Passing Interface (MPI) parallelism as well as taskfarming and other forms of parallelism. More specifically, the UV-CDAT framework supports the execution of Python scripts running in parallel using the MPI executable commands and leverages Department of Energy (DOE)-funded general-purpose, scalable parallel visualization tools such as ParaView and VisIt. This is the first system to be successfully designed in this way and with these features. The climate community leverages these tools and others, in support of a parallel client-server paradigm, allowing extreme-scale, server-side computing for maximum possible speed-up.

  18. Examining Chemistry Students Visual-Perceptual Skills Using the VSCS tool and Interview Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Caroline

    The Visual-Spatial Chemistry Specific (VSCS) assessment tool was developed to test students' visual-perceptual skills, which are required to form a mental image of an object. The VSCS was designed around the theoretical framework of Rochford and Archer that provides eight distinct and well-defined visual-perceptual skills with identified problems students might have with each skill set. Factor analysis was used to analyze the results during the validation process of the VSCS. Results showed that the eight factors could not be separated from each other, but instead two factors emerged as significant to the data. These two factors have been defined and described as a general visual-perceptual skill (factor 1) and a skill that adds on a second level of complexity by involving multiple viewpoints such as changing frames of reference. The questions included in the factor analysis were bolstered by the addition of an item response theory (IRT) analysis. Interviews were also conducted with twenty novice students to test face validity of the tool, and to document student approaches at solving visualization problems of this type. Students used five main physical resources or processes to solve the questions, but the resource that was the most successful was handling or building a physical representation of an object.

  19. iRaster: a novel information visualization tool to explore spatiotemporal patterns in multiple spike trains.

    PubMed

    Somerville, J; Stuart, L; Sernagor, E; Borisyuk, R

    2010-12-15

    Over the last few years, simultaneous recordings of multiple spike trains have become widely used by neuroscientists. Therefore, it is important to develop new tools for analysing multiple spike trains in order to gain new insight into the function of neural systems. This paper describes how techniques from the field of visual analytics can be used to reveal specific patterns of neural activity. An interactive raster plot called iRaster has been developed. This software incorporates a selection of statistical procedures for visualization and flexible manipulations with multiple spike trains. For example, there are several procedures for the re-ordering of spike trains which can be used to unmask activity propagation, spiking synchronization, and many other important features of multiple spike train activity. Additionally, iRaster includes a rate representation of neural activity, a combined representation of rate and spikes, spike train removal and time interval removal. Furthermore, it provides multiple coordinated views, time and spike train zooming windows, a fisheye lens distortion, and dissemination facilities. iRaster is a user friendly, interactive, flexible tool which supports a broad range of visual representations. This tool has been successfully used to analyse both synthetic and experimentally recorded datasets. In this paper, the main features of iRaster are described and its performance and effectiveness are demonstrated using various types of data including experimental multi-electrode array recordings from the ganglion cell layer in mouse retina. iRaster is part of an ongoing research project called VISA (Visualization of Inter-Spike Associations) at the Visualization Lab in the University of Plymouth. The overall aim of the VISA project is to provide neuroscientists with the ability to freely explore and analyse their data. The software is freely available from the Visualization Lab website (see www.plymouth.ac.uk/infovis).

  20. Identifying contamination with advanced visualization and analysis practices: metagenomic approaches for eukaryotic genome assemblies.

    PubMed

    Delmont, Tom O; Eren, A Murat

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing provides a fast and cost-effective mean to recover genomes of organisms from all domains of life. However, adequate curation of the assembly results against potential contamination of non-target organisms requires advanced bioinformatics approaches and practices. Here, we re-analyzed the sequencing data generated for the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini, and created a holistic display of the eukaryotic genome assembly using DNA data originating from two groups and eleven sequencing libraries. By using bacterial single-copy genes, k-mer frequencies, and coverage values of scaffolds we could identify and characterize multiple near-complete bacterial genomes from the raw assembly, and curate a 182 Mbp draft genome for H. dujardini supported by RNA-Seq data. Our results indicate that most contaminant scaffolds were assembled from Moleculo long-read libraries, and most of these contaminants have differed between library preparations. Our re-analysis shows that visualization and curation of eukaryotic genome assemblies can benefit from tools designed to address the needs of today's microbiologists, who are constantly challenged by the difficulties associated with the identification of distinct microbial genomes in complex environmental metagenomes.

  1. Identifying contamination with advanced visualization and analysis practices: metagenomic approaches for eukaryotic genome assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Delmont, Tom O.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing provides a fast and cost-effective mean to recover genomes of organisms from all domains of life. However, adequate curation of the assembly results against potential contamination of non-target organisms requires advanced bioinformatics approaches and practices. Here, we re-analyzed the sequencing data generated for the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini, and created a holistic display of the eukaryotic genome assembly using DNA data originating from two groups and eleven sequencing libraries. By using bacterial single-copy genes, k-mer frequencies, and coverage values of scaffolds we could identify and characterize multiple near-complete bacterial genomes from the raw assembly, and curate a 182 Mbp draft genome for H. dujardini supported by RNA-Seq data. Our results indicate that most contaminant scaffolds were assembled from Moleculo long-read libraries, and most of these contaminants have differed between library preparations. Our re-analysis shows that visualization and curation of eukaryotic genome assemblies can benefit from tools designed to address the needs of today’s microbiologists, who are constantly challenged by the difficulties associated with the identification of distinct microbial genomes in complex environmental metagenomes. PMID:27069789

  2. MAVEN: a tool for visualization and functional analysis of genome-wide association results

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Kanchana; Li, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Summary: We describe the features and implementation of a web application tool named MAVEN—for Management, Analysis, Visualization and rEsults shariNg of genome-wide association data using cutting edge technologies. Main capabilities include user data uploading and management, queries using a variety of criteria, visualization of results, interactive selections and seamless integration of users' data with databases at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) for functional annotations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genes. Availability: http://cbc.case.edu/maven Contact: jingli@case.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19933166

  3. Collaboratively Conceived, Designed and Implemented: Matching Visualization Tools with Geoscience Data Collections and Geoscience Data Collections with Visualization Tools via the ToolMatch Service.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoebelheinrich, N. J.; Lynnes, C.; West, P.; Ferritto, M.

    2014-12-01

    Two problems common to many geoscience domains are the difficulties in finding tools to work with a given dataset collection, and conversely, the difficulties in finding data for a known tool. A collaborative team from the Earth Science Information Partnership (ESIP) has gotten together to design and create a web service, called ToolMatch, to address these problems. The team began their efforts by defining an initial, relatively simple conceptual model that addressed the two uses cases briefly described above. The conceptual model is expressed as an ontology using OWL (Web Ontology Language) and DCterms (Dublin Core Terms), and utilizing standard ontologies such as DOAP (Description of a Project), FOAF (Friend of a Friend), SKOS (Simple Knowledge Organization System) and DCAT (Data Catalog Vocabulary). The ToolMatch service will be taking advantage of various Semantic Web and Web standards, such as OpenSearch, RESTful web services, SWRL (Semantic Web Rule Language) and SPARQL (Simple Protocol and RDF Query Language). The first version of the ToolMatch service was deployed in early fall 2014. While more complete testing is required, a number of communities besides ESIP member organizations have expressed interest in collaborating to create, test and use the service and incorporate it into their own web pages, tools and / or services including the USGS Data Catalog service, DataONE, the Deep Carbon Observatory, Virtual Solar Terrestrial Observatory (VSTO), and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. In this session, presenters will discuss the inception and development of the ToolMatch service, the collaborative process used to design, refine, and test the service, and future plans for the service.

  4. Advanced Data Visualization in Astrophysics: The X3D Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Owen, Chris I.; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta

    2016-02-01

    Most modern astrophysical data sets are multi-dimensional; a characteristic that can nowadays generally be conserved and exploited scientifically during the data reduction/simulation and analysis cascades. However, the same multi-dimensional data sets are systematically cropped, sliced, and/or projected to printable two-dimensional diagrams at the publication stage. In this article, we introduce the concept of the “X3D pathway” as a mean of simplifying and easing the access to data visualization and publication via three-dimensional (3D) diagrams. The X3D pathway exploits the facts that (1) the X3D 3D file format lies at the center of a product tree that includes interactive HTML documents, 3D printing, and high-end animations, and (2) all high-impact-factor and peer-reviewed journals in astrophysics are now published (some exclusively) online. We argue that the X3D standard is an ideal vector for sharing multi-dimensional data sets because it provides direct access to a range of different data visualization techniques, is fully open source, and is a well-defined standard from the International Organization for Standardization. Unlike other earlier propositions to publish multi-dimensional data sets via 3D diagrams, the X3D pathway is not tied to specific software (prone to rapid and unexpected evolution), but instead is compatible with a range of open-source software already in use by our community. The interactive HTML branch of the X3D pathway is also actively supported by leading peer-reviewed journals in the field of astrophysics. Finally, this article provides interested readers with a detailed set of practical astrophysical examples designed to act as a stepping stone toward the implementation of the X3D pathway for any other data set.

  5. Applying a visual language for image processing as a graphical teaching tool in medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birchman, James J.; Tanimoto, Steven L.; Rowberg, Alan H.; Choi, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Yongmin

    1992-05-01

    Typical user interaction in image processing is with command line entries, pull-down menus, or text menu selections from a list, and as such is not generally graphical in nature. Although applying these interactive methods to construct more sophisticated algorithms from a series of simple image processing steps may be clear to engineers and programmers, it may not be clear to clinicians. A solution to this problem is to implement a visual programming language using visual representations to express image processing algorithms. Visual representations promote a more natural and rapid understanding of image processing algorithms by providing more visual insight into what the algorithms do than the interactive methods mentioned above can provide. Individuals accustomed to dealing with images will be more likely to understand an algorithm that is represented visually. This is especially true of referring physicians, such as surgeons in an intensive care unit. With the increasing acceptance of picture archiving and communications system (PACS) workstations and the trend toward increasing clinical use of image processing, referring physicians will need to learn more sophisticated concepts than simply image access and display. If the procedures that they perform commonly, such as window width and window level adjustment and image enhancement using unsharp masking, are depicted visually in an interactive environment, it will be easier for them to learn and apply these concepts. The software described in this paper is a visual programming language for imaging processing which has been implemented on the NeXT computer using NeXTstep user interface development tools and other tools in an object-oriented environment. The concept is based upon the description of a visual language titled `Visualization of Vision Algorithms' (VIVA). Iconic representations of simple image processing steps are placed into a workbench screen and connected together into a dataflow path by the user. As

  6. Constructing an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Sims, Michael H.; Podolak, Esther; Mckay, Christopher P.

    1990-01-01

    A prototype is described that can serve as a scientific-modeling software tool to facilitate the development of useful scientific models. The prototype is developed for applications to planetary modeling, and specific examples are given that relate to the atmosphere of Titan. The scientific modeling tool employs a high-level domain-specific modeling language, several data-display facilities, and a library of experimental datasets and scientific equations. The planetary modeling prototype links uncomputed physical variables to computed variables with computational transformations based on a backchaining procedure. The system - implemented in LISP with an object-oriented knowledge-representation tool - is run on a workstation that provides interface with several models. The prototype is expected to form the basis for a sophisticated modeling tool that can permit active experimentation.

  7. Tools and Methods for Visualizing and Representing Seismic Waves in College Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysession, M. E.; McDaris, J. R.; Mogk, D. W.

    2011-12-01

    Remarkable new advances in visualizing seismic waves now provide exciting opportunities for teaching and learning in the areas of geophysics dealing with earthquakes, earth structure, and seismic wave propagation. An online workshop entitled "Visualizing Seismic Waves for Teaching and Research" was held in the spring of 2011, sponsored by On the Cutting Edge (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/geophysics/seismic11/index.html). This workshop developed a comprehensive collection of visualizations, animations, sound records, and teaching lessons involving seismic waves that can be used throughout the geoscience curriculum, from introductory courses through upper division courses for undergraduate and graduate students. The results of the workshop are archived and publicly available through the One The Cutting Edge website at http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/geophysics/visualizations.html. The goal of providing these visualizations is to help students (and colleagues in related geoscience disciplines) to understand the underlying principles of seismology, to visualize what earthquake waves look like as they propagate through Earth, and to be able to work with seismograms and the large volumes of seismological data that are now available. The visualizations (and auditizations) take many different forms. Some are synthetic records that can demonstrate both the physics of wave propagation and the structure of the earth (both global and regional). In some cases these are part of databases that generated representations for large earthquakes (e.g., tsunami or surface wave propagation). Others are ways of visualizing actual data, such as from the EarthScope Transportable Array, in ways that are engaging and intuitively understandable. These online web resources are available to the entire community, and everyone is encouraged to contribute and upload activities and demonstrations of their own so that others can benefit from them as well.

  8. Benchmarking a Visual-Basic based multi-component one-dimensional reactive transport modeling tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torlapati, Jagadish; Prabhakar Clement, T.

    2013-01-01

    We present the details of a comprehensive numerical modeling tool, RT1D, which can be used for simulating biochemical and geochemical reactive transport problems. The code can be run within the standard Microsoft EXCEL Visual Basic platform, and it does not require any additional software tools. The code can be easily adapted by others for simulating different types of laboratory-scale reactive transport experiments. We illustrate the capabilities of the tool by solving five benchmark problems with varying levels of reaction complexity. These literature-derived benchmarks are used to highlight the versatility of the code for solving a variety of practical reactive transport problems. The benchmarks are described in detail to provide a comprehensive database, which can be used by model developers to test other numerical codes. The VBA code presented in the study is a practical tool that can be used by laboratory researchers for analyzing both batch and column datasets within an EXCEL platform.

  9. Recent Advances in Visualizing 3D Flow with LIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria; Grosch, Chester

    1998-01-01

    Line Integral Convolution (LIC), introduced by Cabral and Leedom in 1993, is an elegant and versatile technique for representing directional information via patterns of correlation in a texture. Although most commonly used to depict 2D flow, or flow over a surface in 3D, LIC methods can equivalently be used to portray 3D flow through a volume. However, the popularity of LIC as a device for illustrating 3D flow has historically been limited both by the computational expense of generating and rendering such a 3D texture and by the difficulties inherent in clearly and effectively conveying the directional information embodied in the volumetric output textures that are produced. In an earlier paper, we briefly discussed some of the factors that may underlie the perceptual difficulties that we can encounter with dense 3D displays and outlined several strategies for more effectively visualizing 3D flow with volume LIC. In this article, we review in more detail techniques for selectively emphasizing critical regions of interest in a flow and for facilitating the accurate perception of the 3D depth and orientation of overlapping streamlines, and we demonstrate new methods for efficiently incorporating an indication of orientation into a flow representation and for conveying additional information about related scalar quantities such as temperature or vorticity over a flow via subtle, continuous line width and color variations.

  10. Non-invasive visual tools for diagnosis of oral cancer and dysplasia: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Giovannacci, Ilaria; Vescovi, Paolo; Manfredi, Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    Background Gold standard for the diagnosis of oral dysplasia (OD) oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and malignant lesions is the histological examination. Several adjunctive diagnostic techniques have been proposed in order to increase the sensitivity (SE) and specificity (SP) of conventional oral examination and to improve the diagnostic first level accuracy. The aim of this study is to perform a systematic review on non-invasive tools for diagnosis of OD and early OSCC. Material and Methods Medline, Scopus, Web of Knowledge databases were searched, using as entry terms “oral dysplasia AND diagnosis” / ”oral cancer AND diagnosis”. Data extracted from each study included number of lesions evaluated, histopathological diagnosis, SE, SP, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV), diagnostic accuracy (DA) and the main conclusions. Results After title and abstract scanning of 11.080 records, we selected 35 articles for full text evaluation. Most evaluated tools were autofluorescence (AF), chemiluminescence (CL), toluidine blu (TL) and chemiluminescence associated with toluidine blue (CLTB). Conclusions There is a great inhomogeneity of the reported values and there is no significant evidence of superiority of one tool over the other. Further clinical trials with a higher level of evidence are necessary in order to assess the real usefulness visual diagnostic tools. Key words:Oral dysplasia, oral cancer, diagnosis, visual diagnostic tool, systematic review. PMID:26946204

  11. VisBOL: Web-Based Tools for Synthetic Biology Design Visualization.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, James Alastair; Pocock, Matthew; Mısırlı, Göksel; Madsen, Curtis; Wipat, Anil

    2016-08-19

    VisBOL is a Web-based application that allows the rendering of genetic circuit designs, enabling synthetic biologists to visually convey designs in SBOL visual format. VisBOL designs can be exported to formats including PNG and SVG images to be embedded in Web pages, presentations and publications. The VisBOL tool enables the automated generation of visualizations from designs specified using the Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL) version 2.0, as well as a range of well-known bioinformatics formats including GenBank and Pigeoncad notation. VisBOL is provided both as a user accessible Web site and as an open-source (BSD) JavaScript library that can be used to embed diagrams within other content and software.

  12. Visual Tools for Crowdsourcing Data Validation Within the GLOBELAND30 Geoportal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuprikova, E.; Wu, H.; Murphy, C. E.; Meng, L.

    2016-06-01

    This research aims to investigate the role of visualization of the user generated data that can empower the geoportal of GlobeLand30 produced by NGCC (National Geomatics Center of China). The focus is set on the development of a concept of tools that can extend the Geo-tagging functionality and make use of it for different target groups. The anticipated tools should improve the continuous data validation, updating and efficient use of the remotely-sensed data distributed within GlobeLand30.

  13. A Survey of Visualization Tools Assessed for Anomaly-Based Intrusion Detection Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    network security analysts’ tasks. They are AutoFocus, Beluga, Cichild, Cuttlefish, FlowScan, GeoPlot, GTrace, MapNet, Otter , Plankton, PlotPaths, Real...animation. One monitoring and one analysis capability; no response capabilities. Otter http://www.caida.org/tools/visualization/ otter ...AVS Express, Otter , and Tableau Desktop. AVS Express manages memory better and provides faster graphics. Otter has high memory usage for large data

  14. VisIt: An End-User Tool for Visualizing and Analyzing Very Large Data

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Hank; Brugger, Eric; Whitlock, Brad; Meredith, Jeremy; Ahern, Sean; Pugmire, David; Biagas, Kathleen; Miller, Mark; Weber, Gunther H.; Krishnan, Hari; Fogal, Thomas; Sanderson, Allen; Garth, Christoph; Bethel, E. Wes; Camp, David; Ruebel, Oliver; Durant, Marc; Favre, Jean; Navratil, Paul

    2012-11-01

    VisIt is a popular open source tool for visualizing and analyzing big data. It owes its success to its foci of increasing data understanding, large data support, and providing a robust and usable product, as well as its underlying design that fits today's supercomputing landscape. This report, which draws heavily from an earlier publication at the SciDAC Conference in 2011 describes the VisIt project and its accomplishments.

  15. Visualization tools for extremely high resolution DEM from the LRO and other orbiter satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, J.; McDonald, John

    2012-10-01

    Recent space missions have included laser altimetry instrumentation that provides precise high-resolution global topographic data products. These products are critical in analyzing geomorphological surface processes of planets and moons. Although highly valued, the high-resolution data is often overlooked by researchers due to the high level of IT sophistication necessary to use the high-resolution data products, which can be as large as several hundred gigabytes. Researchers have developed software tools to assist in viewing and manipulating data products derived from altimetry data, however current software tools require substantial off-line processing, provide rudimentary visualization or are not suited for viewing the new high-resolution data. We have adapted mVTK, a novel software visualization tool, to work with NASA's recently acquired Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter data. mVTK is a software visualization package that dynamically creates cylindrical cartographic map projections from gridded high-resolution altimetry data in real-time. The projections are interactive 2D shade relief, false color maps that allow the user to make simple slope and distance measurements on the actual underlying high-resolution data. We have tested mVTK on several laser altimetry data sets including binned gridded record data from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter space missions.

  16. LASAGNA-Search: an integrated web tool for transcription factor binding site search and visualization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chic; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2013-03-01

    The release of ChIP-seq data from the ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and Model Organism ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (modENCODE) projects has significantly increased the amount of transcription factor (TF) binding affinity information available to researchers. However, scientists still routinely use TF binding site (TFBS) search tools to scan unannotated sequences for TFBSs, particularly when searching for lesser-known TFs or TFs in organisms for which ChIP-seq data are unavailable. The sequence analysis often involves multiple steps such as TF model collection, promoter sequence retrieval, and visualization; thus, several different tools are required. We have developed a novel integrated web tool named LASAGNA-Search that allows users to perform TFBS searches without leaving the web site. LASAGNA-Search uses the LASAGNA (Length-Aware Site Alignment Guided by Nucleotide Association) algorithm for TFBS alignment. Important features of LASAGNA-Search include (i) acceptance of unaligned variable-length TFBSs, (ii) a collection of 1726 TF models, (iii) automatic promoter sequence retrieval, (iv) visualization in the UCSC Genome Browser, and (v) gene regulatory network inference and visualization based on binding specificities. LASAGNA-Search is freely available at http://biogrid.engr.uconn.edu/lasagna_search/.

  17. XML based tools for assessing potential impact of advanced technology space validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Some, Raphael R.; Weisbin, Charles

    2004-01-01

    A hierarchical XML database and related analysis tools are being developed by the New Millennium Program to provide guidance on the relative impact, to future NASA missions, of advanced technologies under consideration for developmental funding.

  18. Advanced Vibration Analysis Tool Developed for Robust Engine Rotor Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this research program is to develop vibration analysis tools, design tools, and design strategies to significantly improve the safety and robustness of turbine engine rotors. Bladed disks in turbine engines always feature small, random blade-to-blade differences, or mistuning. Mistuning can lead to a dramatic increase in blade forced-response amplitudes and stresses. Ultimately, this results in high-cycle fatigue, which is a major safety and cost concern. In this research program, the necessary steps will be taken to transform a state-of-the-art vibration analysis tool, the Turbo- Reduce forced-response prediction code, into an effective design tool by enhancing and extending the underlying modeling and analysis methods. Furthermore, novel techniques will be developed to assess the safety of a given design. In particular, a procedure will be established for using natural-frequency curve veerings to identify ranges of operating conditions (rotational speeds and engine orders) in which there is a great risk that the rotor blades will suffer high stresses. This work also will aid statistical studies of the forced response by reducing the necessary number of simulations. Finally, new strategies for improving the design of rotors will be pursued.

  19. Uncovering the Visual “Alphabet”: Advances in our understanding of object perception

    PubMed Central

    Ungerleider, Leslie G.; Bell, Andrew H.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to rapidly and accurately recognize visual stimuli represents a significant computational challenge. Yet, despite such complexity, the primate brain manages this task effortlessly. How it does so remains largely a mystery. The study of visual perception and object recognition was once limited to investigations of brain-damaged individuals or lesion experiments in animals. However, in the last 25 years, new methodologies, such as functional neuroimaging and advances in electrophysiological approaches, have provided scientists with the opportunity to examine this problem from new perspectives. This review highlights how some of these recent technological advances have contributed to the study of visual processing and where we now stand with respect to our understanding of neural mechanisms underlying object recognition. PMID:20971130

  20. Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dean N.; Silva, Claudio

    2013-09-30

    For the past three years, a large analysis and visualization effort—funded by the Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)—has brought together a wide variety of industry-standard scientific computing libraries and applications to create Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) to serve the global climate simulation and observational research communities. To support interactive analysis and visualization, all components connect through a provenance application–programming interface to capture meaningful history and workflow. Components can be loosely coupled into the framework for fast integration or tightly coupled for greater system functionality and communication with other components. The overarching goal of UV-CDAT is to provide a new paradigm for access to and analysis of massive, distributed scientific data collections by leveraging distributed data architectures located throughout the world. The UV-CDAT framework addresses challenges in analysis and visualization and incorporates new opportunities, including parallelism for better efficiency, higher speed, and more accurate scientific inferences. Today, it provides more than 600 users access to more analysis and visualization products than any other single source.

  1. Interactive 3D Visualization of the Great Lakes of the World (GLOW) as a Tool to Facilitate Informal Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yikilmaz, M.; Harwood, C. L.; Hsi, S.; Kellogg, L. H.; Kreylos, O.; McDermott, J.; Pellett, B.; Schladow, G.; Segale, H. M.; Yalowitz, S.

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) visualization is a powerful research tool that has been used to investigate complex scientific problems in various fields. It allows researchers to explore and understand processes and features that are not directly observable and help with building of new models. It has been shown that 3D visualization creates a more engaging environment for public audiences. Interactive 3D visualization can allow individuals to explore scientific concepts on their own. We present an NSF funded project developed in collaboration with UC Davis KeckCAVES, UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center, ECHO Lake Aquarium & Science Center, and Lawrence Hall of Science. The Great Lakes of the World (GLOW) project aims to build interactive 3D visualization of some of the major lakes and reservoirs of the world to enhance public awareness and increase understanding and stewardship of freshwater lake ecosystems, habitats, and earth science processes. The project includes a collection of publicly available satellite imagery and digital elevation models at various resolutions for the 20 major lakes of the world as well as the bathymetry data for the 12 lakes. It also includes the vector based 'Global Lakes and Wetlands Database (GLWD)' by the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF) and the Center for Environmental System Research University of Kassel, Germany and the CIA World DataBank II data sets to show wetlands and water reservoirs at global scale. We use a custom virtual globe (Crusta) developed at the UC Davis KeckCAVES. Crusta is designed to specifically allow for visualization and mapping of features in very high spatial resolution (< 1m) and large extent (1000's of km2) raster imagery and topographic data. In addition to imagery, a set of pins, labels and billboards are used to provide textual information about these lakes. Users can interactively learn about the lake and watershed processes as well as geologic processes (e.g. faulting, landslide, glacial, volcanic

  2. Improving exposure assessment in environmental epidemiology: Application of spatio-temporal visualization tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliker, Jaymie R.; Slotnick, Melissa J.; Avruskin, Gillian A.; Kaufmann, Andrew; Jacquez, Geoffrey M.; Nriagu, Jerome O.

    2005-05-01

    A thorough assessment of human exposure to environmental agents should incorporate mobility patterns and temporal changes in human behaviors and concentrations of contaminants; yet the temporal dimension is often under-emphasized in exposure assessment endeavors, due in part to insufficient tools for visualizing and examining temporal datasets. Spatio-temporal visualization tools are valuable for integrating a temporal component, thus allowing for examination of continuous exposure histories in environmental epidemiologic investigations. An application of these tools to a bladder cancer case-control study in Michigan illustrates continuous exposure life-lines and maps that display smooth, continuous changes over time. Preliminary results suggest increased risk of bladder cancer from combined exposure to arsenic in drinking water (>25 μg/day) and heavy smoking (>30 cigarettes/day) in the 1970s and 1980s, and a possible cancer cluster around automotive, paint, and organic chemical industries in the early 1970s. These tools have broad application for examining spatially- and temporally-specific relationships between exposures to environmental risk factors and disease.

  3. X3DBio2: A visual analysis tool for biomolecular structure comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hong; Thakur, Sidharth; Sethaphong, Latsavongsakda; Yingling, Yaroslava G.

    2013-01-01

    A major problem in structural biology is the recognition of differences and similarities between related three dimensional (3D) biomolecular structures. Investigating these structure relationships is important not only for understanding of functional properties of biologically significant molecules, but also for development of new and improved materials based on naturally-occurring molecules. We developed a new visual analysis tool, X3DBio2, for 3D biomolecular structure comparison and analysis. The tool is designed for elucidation of structural effects of mutations in proteins and nucleic acids and for assessment of time dependent trajectories from molecular dynamics simulations. X3DBio2 is a freely downloadable open source software and provides tightly integrated features to perform many standard analysis and visual exploration tasks. We expect this tool can be applied to solve a variety of biological problems and illustrate the use of the tool on the example study of the differences and similarities between two proteins of the glycosyltransferase family 2 that synthesize polysaccharides oligomers. The size and conformational distances and retained core structural similarity of proteins SpsA to K4CP represent significant epochs in the evolution of inverting glycosyltransferases.

  4. On the road to a stronger public health workforce: visual tools to address complex challenges.

    PubMed

    Drehobl, Patricia; Stover, Beth H; Koo, Denise

    2014-11-01

    The public health workforce is vital to protecting the health and safety of the public, yet for years, state and local governmental public health agencies have reported substantial workforce losses and other challenges to the workforce that threaten the public's health. These challenges are complex, often involve multiple influencing or related causal factors, and demand comprehensive solutions. However, proposed solutions often focus on selected factors and might be fragmented rather than comprehensive. This paper describes approaches to characterizing the situation more comprehensively and includes two visual tools: (1) a fishbone, or Ishikawa, diagram that depicts multiple factors affecting the public health workforce; and (2) a roadmap that displays key elements-goals and strategies-to strengthen the public health workforce, thus moving from the problems depicted in the fishbone toward solutions. The visual tools aid thinking about ways to strengthen the public health workforce through collective solutions and to help leverage resources and build on each other's work. The strategic roadmap is intended to serve as a dynamic tool for partnership, prioritization, and gap assessment. These tools reflect and support CDC's commitment to working with partners on the highest priorities for strengthening the workforce to improve the public's health.

  5. Construction of an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, Peter; Keller, Richard M.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Sims, Michael H.; Thompson, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Scientific model-building can be a time intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot be distributed easily and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complicated, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientist/programmer to understand. We propose to construct a scientific modeling software tool that serves as an aid to the scientist in developing, using and sharing models. The proposed tool will include an interactive intelligent graphical interface and a high-level domain-specific modeling language. As a test bed for this research, we propose to develop a software prototype in the domain of planetary atmospheric modeling.

  6. Construction of an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, Peter; Keller, Richard M.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Sims, Michael H.; Thompson, David E.

    1993-01-01

    Scientific model-building can be a time intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot be distributed easily and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complicated, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientist/programmer to understand. We propose to construct a scientific modeling software tool that serves as an aid to the scientist in developing, using and sharing models. The proposed tool will include an interactive intelligent graphical interface and a high-level domain-specific modeling language. As a testbed for this research, we propose to develop a software prototype in the domain of planetary atmospheric modeling.

  7. MARs Tools for Interactive ANalysis (MARTIAN): Google Maps Tools for Visual Exploration of Geophysical Modeling on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, L. L.; Haines, M.; Holt, W. E.; Schultz, R. A.; Richard, G.; Haines, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Interactive maps of surface-breaking faults and stress models on Mars provide important tools to engage undergraduate students, educators, and scientists with current geological and geophysical research. We have developed a map based on the Google Maps API -- an Internet based tool combining DHTML and AJAX, -- which allows very large maps to be viewed over the World Wide Web. Typically, small portions of the maps are downloaded as needed, rather than the entire image at once. This set-up enables relatively fast access for users with low bandwidth. Furthermore, Google Maps provides an extensible interactive interface making it ideal for visualizing multiple data sets at the user's choice. The Google Maps API works primarily with data referenced to latitudes and longitudes, which is then mapped in Mercator projection only. We have developed utilities for general cylindrical coordinate systems by converting these coordinates into equivalent Mercator projection before including them on the map. The MARTIAN project is available at http://rock.geo.sunysb.edu/~holt/Mars/MARTIAN/. We begin with an introduction to the Martian surface using a topography model. Faults from several datasets are classified by type (extension vs. compression) and by time epoch. Deviatoric stresses due to gravitational potential energy differences, calculated from the topography and crustal thickness, can be overlain. Several quantitative measures for the fit of the stress field to the faults are also included. We provide introductory text and exercises spanning a range of topics: how are faults identified, what stress is and how it relates to faults, what gravitational potential energy is and how variations in it produce stress, how the models are created, and how these models can be evaluated and interpreted. The MARTIAN tool is used at Stony Brook University in GEO 310: Introduction to Geophysics, a class geared towards junior and senior geosciences majors. Although this project is in its

  8. Trajectory Browser: An Online Tool for Interplanetary Trajectory Analysis and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Cyrus James

    2013-01-01

    The trajectory browser is a web-based tool developed at the NASA Ames Research Center for finding preliminary trajectories to planetary bodies and for providing relevant launch date, time-of-flight and (Delta)V requirements. The site hosts a database of transfer trajectories from Earth to planets and small-bodies for various types of missions such as rendezvous, sample return or flybys. A search engine allows the user to find trajectories meeting desired constraints on the launch window, mission duration and (Delta)V capability, while a trajectory viewer tool allows the visualization of the heliocentric trajectory and the detailed mission itinerary. The anticipated user base of this tool consists primarily of scientists and engineers designing interplanetary missions in the context of pre-phase A studies, particularly for performing accessibility surveys to large populations of small-bodies.

  9. Full 3D visualization tool-kit for Monte Carlo and deterministic transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Frambati, S.; Frignani, M.

    2012-07-01

    We propose a package of tools capable of translating the geometric inputs and outputs of many Monte Carlo and deterministic radiation transport codes into open source file formats. These tools are aimed at bridging the gap between trusted, widely-used radiation analysis codes and very powerful, more recent and commonly used visualization software, thus supporting the design process and helping with shielding optimization. Three main lines of development were followed: mesh-based analysis of Monte Carlo codes, mesh-based analysis of deterministic codes and Monte Carlo surface meshing. The developed kit is considered a powerful and cost-effective tool in the computer-aided design for radiation transport code users of the nuclear world, and in particular in the fields of core design and radiation analysis. (authors)

  10. IPAT: a freely accessible software tool for analyzing multiple patent documents with inbuilt landscape visualizer.

    PubMed

    Ajay, Dara; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2015-01-01

    Intelligent Patent Analysis Tool (IPAT) is an online data retrieval tool, operated based on text mining algorithm to extract specific patent information in a predetermined pattern into an Excel sheet. The software is designed and developed to retrieve and analyze technology information from multiple patent documents and generate various patent landscape graphs and charts. The software is C# coded in visual studio 2010, which extracts the publicly available patent information from the web pages like Google Patent and simultaneously study the various technology trends based on user-defined parameters. In other words, IPAT combined with the manual categorization will act as an excellent technology assessment tool in competitive intelligence and due diligence for predicting the future R&D forecast.

  11. The value of clinical electrophysiology in the assessment of the eye and visual system in the era of advanced imaging.

    PubMed

    Whatham, Andrew R; Nguyen, Vincent; Zhu, Yuan; Hennessy, Michael; Kalloniatis, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Electrophysiological techniques allow clinical investigations to include a 'dissection' of the visual system. Using suitable electrophysiological techniques, the 'dissection' allows function to be ascribed to the different photoreceptors (rod and cone photoreceptors), retinal layers, retinal location or the visual pathway up to the visual cortex. Combined with advances in genetics, retinal biochemistry, visual fields and ocular imaging, it is now possible to obtain a better understanding of diseases affecting the retina and visual pathways. This paper reviews core electrophysiological principles that can complement other examination techniques, including advanced ocular imaging, and help the interpretation of other clinical data and thus, refine and guide clinical diagnosis.

  12. User Directed Tools for Exploiting Expert Knowledge in an Immersive Segmentation and Visualization Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senger, Steven O.

    1998-01-01

    Volumetric data sets have become common in medicine and many sciences through technologies such as computed x-ray tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR), positron emission tomography (PET), confocal microscopy and 3D ultrasound. When presented with 2D images humans immediately and unconsciously begin a visual analysis of the scene. The viewer surveys the scene identifying significant landmarks and building an internal mental model of presented information. The identification of features is strongly influenced by the viewers expectations based upon their expert knowledge of what the image should contain. While not a conscious activity, the viewer makes a series of choices about how to interpret the scene. These choices occur in parallel with viewing the scene and effectively change the way the viewer sees the image. It is this interaction of viewing and choice which is the basis of many familiar visual illusions. This is especially important in the interpretation of medical images where it is the expert knowledge of the radiologist which interprets the image. For 3D data sets this interaction of view and choice is frustrated because choices must precede the visualization of the data set. It is not possible to visualize the data set with out making some initial choices which determine how the volume of data is presented to the eye. These choices include, view point orientation, region identification, color and opacity assignments. Further compounding the problem is the fact that these visualization choices are defined in terms of computer graphics as opposed to language of the experts knowledge. The long term goal of this project is to develop an environment where the user can interact with volumetric data sets using tools which promote the utilization of expert knowledge by incorporating visualization and choice into a tight computational loop. The tools will support activities involving the segmentation of structures, construction of surface meshes and local

  13. Increasing access to terrestrial ecology and remote sensing (MODIS) data through Web services and visualization tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhana Vannan, S.; Cook, R. B.; Wei, Y.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years user access to data and information is increasingly handled through tools, services, and applications. Standards-based services have facilitated this development. These service-based methods to access data has boosted the use of data and in increasingly complex ways. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC) has taken the approach of service-based access to data and visualization for distribution and visualization of its terrestrial ecology data, including MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) remote sensing data products. The MODIS data products are highly useful for field research. The spectral, spatial and temporal characteristics of MODIS products have made them an important data source for analyzing key science questions relating to Earth system processes at multiple spatial and temporal scales. However, MODIS data volume and the complexity in data format make it less usable in some cases. To solve this usability issue, the ORNL DAAC has developed a system that prepares and distributes subsets of selected MODIS land products in a scale and format useful for field researchers. Web and Web service tools provide MODIS subsets in comma-delimited text format and in GIS compatible GeoTIFF format. Users can download and visualize MODIS subsets for a set of pre-defined locations, order MODIS subsets for any land location or automate the process of subset extraction using a SOAP-based Web service. The MODIS tools and services can be extended to support the large volume of data that would be produced by the various decadal survey missions. http://daac.ornl.gov/MODIS . The ORNL DAAC has also created a Web-based Spatial Data Access Tool (SDAT) that enables users to browse, visualize, and download a wide variety of geospatial data in various user-selected spatial/temporal extents, formats, and projections. SDAT is based on Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web service standards that allows users to

  14. Visual aid tool to improve decision making in acute stroke care.

    PubMed

    Saposnik, Gustavo; Goyal, Mayank; Majoie, Charles; Dippel, Diederik; Roos, Yvo; Demchuk, Andrew; Menon, Bijoy; Mitchell, Peter; Campbell, Bruce; Dávalos, Antoni; Jovin, Tudor; Hill, Michael D

    2016-10-01

    Background Acute stroke care represents a challenge for decision makers. Recent randomized trials showed the benefits of endovascular therapy. Our goal was to provide a visual aid tool to guide clinicians in the decision process of endovascular intervention in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods We created visual plots (Cates' plots; www.nntonline.net ) representing benefits of standard of care vs. endovascular thrombectomy from the pooled analysis of five RCTs using stent retrievers. These plots represent the following clinically relevant outcomes (1) functionally independent state (modified Rankin scale (mRS) 0 to 2 at 90 days) (2) excellent recovery (mRS 0-1) at 90 days, (3) NIHSS 0-2 (4) early neurological recovery, and (5) revascularization at 24 h. Subgroups visually represented include time to treatment and baseline stroke severity strata. Results Overall, 1287 patients (634 assigned to endovascular thrombectomy, 653 assigned to control were included to create the visual plots. Cates' visual plots revealed that for every 100 patients with acute ischemic stroke and large vessel occlusion, 27 would achieve independence at 90 days (mRS 0-2) in the control group compared to 49 (95% CI 43-56) in the intervention group. Similarly, 21 patients would achieve early neurological recovery at 24 h compared to 54 (95% CI 45-63) out of 100 for the intervention group. Conclusion Cates' plots may assist clinicians and patients to visualize and compare potential outcomes after an acute ischemic stroke. Our results suggest that for every 100 treated individuals with an acute ischemic stroke and a large vessel occlusion, endovascular thrombectomy would provide 22 additional patients reaching independency at three months and 33 more patients achieving ENR compared to controls.

  15. Development of a Quick Look Pandemic Influenza Modeling and Visualization Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Brigantic, Robert T.; Ebert, David S.; Corley, Courtney D.; Maciejewski, Ross; Muller, George; Taylor, Aimee E.

    2010-05-30

    Federal, State, and local decision makers and public health officials must prepare and exercise complex plans to contend with a variety of possible mass casualty events, such as pandemic influenza. Through the provision of quick look tools (QLTs) focused on mass casualty events, such planning can be done with higher accuracy and more realism through the combination of interactive simulation and visualization in these tools. If an event happens, the QLTs can then be employed to rapidly assess and execute alternative mitigation strategies, and thereby minimize casualties. This can be achieved by conducting numerous 'what-if' assessments prior to any event in order to assess potential health impacts (e.g., number of sick individuals), required community resources (e.g., vaccinations and hospital beds), and optimal mitigative decision strategies (e.g., school closures) during the course of a pandemic. In this presentation, we overview and demonstrate a pandemic influenza QLT, discuss some of the modeling methods and construct and visual analytic components and interface, and outline additional development concepts. These include the incorporation of a user selectable infectious disease palette, simultaneous visualization of decision alternatives, additional resource elements associated with emergency response (e.g., first responders and medical professionals), and provisions for other potential disaster events.

  16. BioViews: Java-Based Tools for Genomic Data Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Helt, Gregg A.; Lewis, Suzanna; Loraine, Ann E.; Rubin, Gerald M.

    1998-01-01

    Visualization tools for bioinformatics ideally should provide universal access to the most current data in an interactive and intuitive graphical user interface. Since the introduction of Java, a language designed for distributed programming over the Web, the technology now exists to build a genomic data visualization tool that meets these requirements. Using Java we have developed a prototype genome browser applet (BioViews) that incorporates a three-level graphical view of genomic data: a physical map, an annotated sequence map, and a DNA sequence display. Annotated biological features are displayed on the physical and sequence-based maps, and the different views are interconnected. The applet is linked to several databases and can retrieve features and display hyperlinked textual data on selected features. In addition to browsing genomic data, different types of analyses can be performed interactively and the results of these analyses visualized alongside prior annotations. Our genome browser is built on top of extensible, reusable graphic components specifically designed for bioinformatics. Other groups can (and do) reuse this work in various ways. Genome centers can reuse large parts of the genome browser with minor modifications, bioinformatics groups working on sequence analysis can reuse components to build front ends for analysis programs, and biology laboratories can reuse components to publish results as dynamic Web documents. PMID:9521932

  17. A Hyperbolic Ontology Visualization Tool for Model Application Programming Interface Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, Cody

    2011-01-01

    Spacecraft modeling, a critically important portion in validating planned spacecraft activities, is currently carried out using a time consuming method of mission to mission model implementations and integration. A current project in early development, Integrated Spacecraft Analysis (ISCA), aims to remedy this hindrance by providing reusable architectures and reducing time spent integrating models with planning and sequencing tools. The principle objective of this internship was to develop a user interface for an experimental ontology-based structure visualization of navigation and attitude control system modeling software. To satisfy this, a number of tree and graph visualization tools were researched and a Java based hyperbolic graph viewer was selected for experimental adaptation. Early results show promise in the ability to organize and display large amounts of spacecraft model documentation efficiently and effectively through a web browser. This viewer serves as a conceptual implementation for future development but trials with both ISCA developers and end users should be performed to truly evaluate the effectiveness of continued development of such visualizations.

  18. Advanced tools and framework for historical film restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croci, Simone; Aydın, Tunç Ozan; Stefanoski, Nikolce; Gross, Markus; Smolic, Aljosa

    2017-01-01

    Digital restoration of film content that has historical value is crucial for the preservation of cultural heritage. Also, digital restoration is not only a relevant application area of various video processing technologies that have been developed in computer graphics literature but also involves a multitude of unresolved research challenges. Currently, the digital restoration workflow is highly labor intensive and often heavily relies on expert knowledge. We revisit some key steps of this workflow and propose semiautomatic methods for performing them. To do that we build upon state-of-the-art video processing techniques by adding the components necessary for enabling (i) restoration of chemically degraded colors of the film stock, (ii) removal of excessive film grain through spatiotemporal filtering, and (iii) contrast recovery by transferring contrast from the negative film stock to the positive. We show that when applied individually our tools produce compelling results and when applied in concert significantly improve the degraded input content. Building on a conceptual framework of film restoration ensures the best possible combination of tools and use of available materials.

  19. Web based tools for visualizing imaging data and development of XNATView, a zero footprint image viewer

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, David A.; Dunn, William D.; Cobb, Jake; Stoner, Richard M.; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Erickson, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Advances in web technologies now allow direct visualization of imaging data sets without necessitating the download of large file sets or the installation of software. This allows centralization of file storage and facilitates image review and analysis. XNATView is a light framework recently developed in our lab to visualize DICOM images stored in The Extensible Neuroimaging Archive Toolkit (XNAT). It consists of a PyXNAT-based framework to wrap around the REST application programming interface (API) and query the data in XNAT. XNATView was developed to simplify quality assurance, help organize imaging data, and facilitate data sharing for intra- and inter-laboratory collaborations. Its zero-footprint design allows the user to connect to XNAT from a web browser, navigate through projects, experiments, and subjects, and view DICOM images with accompanying metadata all within a single viewing instance. PMID:24904399

  20. Retinal topography maps in R: New tools for the analysis and visualization of spatial retinal data

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Brian A.; Collin, Shaun P.; Wainwright, Peter C.; Schmitz, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Retinal topography maps are a widely used tool in vision science, neuroscience, and visual ecology, providing an informative visualization of the spatial distribution of cell densities across the retinal hemisphere. Here, we introduce Retina, an R package for computational mapping, inspection of topographic model fits, and generation of average maps. Functions in Retina take cell count data obtained from retinal wholemounts using stereology software. Accurate visualizations and comparisons between different eyes have been difficult in the past, because of deformation and incisions of retinal wholemounts. We account for these issues by incorporation of the R package Retistruct, which results in a retrodeformation of the wholemount into a hemispherical shape, similar to the original eyecup. The maps are generated by thin plate splines, after the data were transformed into a two-dimensional space with an azimuthal equidistant plot projection. Retina users can compute retinal topography maps independent of stereology software choice and assess model fits with a variety of diagnostic plots. Functionality of Retina also includes species average maps, an essential feature for interspecific analyses. The Retina package will facilitate rigorous comparative studies in visual ecology by providing a robust quantitative approach to generate retinal topography maps. PMID:26230981

  1. Evolview v2: an online visualization and management tool for customized and annotated phylogenetic trees.

    PubMed

    He, Zilong; Zhang, Huangkai; Gao, Shenghan; Lercher, Martin J; Chen, Wei-Hua; Hu, Songnian

    2016-07-08

    Evolview is an online visualization and management tool for customized and annotated phylogenetic trees. It allows users to visualize phylogenetic trees in various formats, customize the trees through built-in functions and user-supplied datasets and export the customization results to publication-ready figures. Its 'dataset system' contains not only the data to be visualized on the tree, but also 'modifiers' that control various aspects of the graphical annotation. Evolview is a single-page application (like Gmail); its carefully designed interface allows users to upload, visualize, manipulate and manage trees and datasets all in a single webpage. Developments since the last public release include a modern dataset editor with keyword highlighting functionality, seven newly added types of annotation datasets, collaboration support that allows users to share their trees and datasets and various improvements of the web interface and performance. In addition, we included eleven new 'Demo' trees to demonstrate the basic functionalities of Evolview, and five new 'Showcase' trees inspired by publications to showcase the power of Evolview in producing publication-ready figures. Evolview is freely available at: http://www.evolgenius.info/evolview/.

  2. Evolview v2: an online visualization and management tool for customized and annotated phylogenetic trees

    PubMed Central

    He, Zilong; Zhang, Huangkai; Gao, Shenghan; Lercher, Martin J.; Chen, Wei-Hua; Hu, Songnian

    2016-01-01

    Evolview is an online visualization and management tool for customized and annotated phylogenetic trees. It allows users to visualize phylogenetic trees in various formats, customize the trees through built-in functions and user-supplied datasets and export the customization results to publication-ready figures. Its ‘dataset system’ contains not only the data to be visualized on the tree, but also ‘modifiers’ that control various aspects of the graphical annotation. Evolview is a single-page application (like Gmail); its carefully designed interface allows users to upload, visualize, manipulate and manage trees and datasets all in a single webpage. Developments since the last public release include a modern dataset editor with keyword highlighting functionality, seven newly added types of annotation datasets, collaboration support that allows users to share their trees and datasets and various improvements of the web interface and performance. In addition, we included eleven new ‘Demo’ trees to demonstrate the basic functionalities of Evolview, and five new ‘Showcase’ trees inspired by publications to showcase the power of Evolview in producing publication-ready figures. Evolview is freely available at: http://www.evolgenius.info/evolview/. PMID:27131786

  3. Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Patibandla, Nag; Agrawal, Vivek

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of this program, Applied Materials, Inc., with generous support from the United States Department of Energy, developed a world-class three chamber III-Nitride epi cluster tool for low-cost, high volume GaN growth for the solid state lighting industry. One of the major achievements of the program was to design, build, and demonstrate the world’s largest wafer capacity HVPE chamber suitable for repeatable high volume III-Nitride template and device manufacturing. Applied Materials’ experience in developing deposition chambers for the silicon chip industry over many decades resulted in many orders of magnitude reductions in the price of transistors. That experience and understanding was used in developing this GaN epi deposition tool. The multi-chamber approach, which continues to be unique in the ability of the each chamber to deposit a section of the full device structure, unlike other cluster tools, allows for extreme flexibility in the manufacturing process. This robust architecture is suitable for not just the LED industry, but GaN power devices as well, both horizontal and vertical designs. The new HVPE technology developed allows GaN to be grown at a rate unheard of with MOCVD, up to 20x the typical MOCVD rates of 3{micro}m per hour, with bulk crystal quality better than the highest-quality commercial GaN films grown by MOCVD at a much cheaper overall cost. This is a unique development as the HVPE process has been known for decades, but never successfully commercially developed for high volume manufacturing. This research shows the potential of the first commercial-grade HVPE chamber, an elusive goal for III-V researchers and those wanting to capitalize on the promise of HVPE. Additionally, in the course of this program, Applied Materials built two MOCVD chambers, in addition to the HVPE chamber, and a robot that moves wafers between them. The MOCVD chambers demonstrated industry-leading wavelength yield for GaN based LED wafers and industry

  4. Trans3D: a free tool for dynamical visualization of EEG activity transmission in the brain.

    PubMed

    Blinowski, Grzegorz; Kamiński, Maciej; Wawer, Dariusz

    2014-08-01

    The problem of functional connectivity in the brain is in the focus of attention nowadays, since it is crucial for understanding information processing in the brain. A large repertoire of measures of connectivity have been devised, some of them being capable of estimating time-varying directed connectivity. Hence, there is a need for a dedicated software tool for visualizing the propagation of electrical activity in the brain. To this aim, the Trans3D application was developed. It is an open access tool based on widely available libraries and supporting both Windows XP/Vista/7(™), Linux and Mac environments. Trans3D can create animations of activity propagation between electrodes/sensors, which can be placed by the user on the scalp/cortex of a 3D model of the head. Various interactive graphic functions for manipulating and visualizing components of the 3D model and input data are available. An application of the Trans3D tool has helped to elucidate the dynamics of the phenomena of information processing in motor and cognitive tasks, which otherwise would have been very difficult to observe. Trans3D is available at: http://www.eeg.pl/.

  5. A Model-Driven Visualization Tool for Use with Model-Based Systems Engineering Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trase, Kathryn; Fink, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) promotes increased consistency between a system's design and its design documentation through the use of an object-oriented system model. The creation of this system model facilitates data presentation by providing a mechanism from which information can be extracted by automated manipulation of model content. Existing MBSE tools enable model creation, but are often too complex for the unfamiliar model viewer to easily use. These tools do not yet provide many opportunities for easing into the development and use of a system model when system design documentation already exists. This study creates a Systems Modeling Language (SysML) Document Traceability Framework (SDTF) for integrating design documentation with a system model, and develops an Interactive Visualization Engine for SysML Tools (InVEST), that exports consistent, clear, and concise views of SysML model data. These exported views are each meaningful to a variety of project stakeholders with differing subjects of concern and depth of technical involvement. InVEST allows a model user to generate multiple views and reports from a MBSE model, including wiki pages and interactive visualizations of data. System data can also be filtered to present only the information relevant to the particular stakeholder, resulting in a view that is both consistent with the larger system model and other model views. Viewing the relationships between system artifacts and documentation, and filtering through data to see specialized views improves the value of the system as a whole, as data becomes information

  6. AN ADVANCED TOOL FOR APPLIED INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Potts, T. Todd; Hylko, James M.; Douglas, Terence A.

    2003-02-27

    WESKEM, LLC's Environmental, Safety and Health (ES&H) Department had previously assessed that a lack of consistency, poor communication and using antiquated communication tools could result in varying operating practices, as well as a failure to capture and disseminate appropriate Integrated Safety Management (ISM) information. To address these issues, the ES&H Department established an Activity Hazard Review (AHR)/Activity Hazard Analysis (AHA) process for systematically identifying, assessing, and controlling hazards associated with project work activities during work planning and execution. Depending on the scope of a project, information from field walkdowns and table-top meetings are collected on an AHR form. The AHA then documents the potential failure and consequence scenarios for a particular hazard. Also, the AHA recommends whether the type of mitigation appears appropriate or whether additional controls should be implemented. Since the application is web based, the information is captured into a single system and organized according to the >200 work activities already recorded in the database. Using the streamlined AHA method improved cycle time from over four hours to an average of one hour, allowing more time to analyze unique hazards and develop appropriate controls. Also, the enhanced configuration control created a readily available AHA library to research and utilize along with standardizing hazard analysis and control selection across four separate work sites located in Kentucky and Tennessee. The AHR/AHA system provides an applied example of how the ISM concept evolved into a standardized field-deployed tool yielding considerable efficiency gains in project planning and resource utilization. Employee safety is preserved through detailed planning that now requires only a portion of the time previously necessary. The available resources can then be applied to implementing appropriate engineering, administrative and personal protective equipment

  7. A tool for improving the Web accessibility of visually handicapped persons.

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Tadayoshi; Hanada, Eisuke; Yamada, Tomomi; Noda, Yoshihiro; Antoku, Yasuaki; Nakashima, Naoki; Nose, Yoshiaki

    2006-04-01

    Abstract Much has been written concerning the difficulties faced by visually handicapped persons when they access the internet. To solve some of the problems and to make web pages more accessible, we developed a tool we call the "Easy Bar," which works as a toolbar on the web browser. The functions of the Easy Bar are to change the size of web texts and images, to adjust the color, and to clear cached data that is automatically saved by the web browser. These functions are executed with ease by clicking buttons and operating a pull-down list. Since the icons built into Easy Bar are quite large, it is not necessary for the user to deal with delicate operations. The functions of Easy Bar run on any web page without increasing the processing time. For the visually handicapped, Easy Bar would contribute greatly to improved web accessibility to medical information.

  8. A Web-based visualization tool for very large 2D geophysical datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, M. L.; Yuen, D. A.; Gerya, T. V.

    2005-12-01

    The intraoceanic subduction simulation developed by Taras Gerya has been run using as many as 40 billion tracers. The incredible spatial resolution afforded by these computationally expensive simulations has expanded our understanding of multiscale phenomena in subduction zones. However, the interactive visualization of these high resolution runs has mandated new software, especially new software suited for collaboration over the internet. We present a new version of our tool, WEB-IS4, which allows rapid, sub-second, visualization of datasets on the order of 10-100GB. WEB-IS4 performs dynamic region-of-interest retrieval, colormap application, and can produce composite displays of multiple fields - for example chemical composition and temperature.

  9. Advanced Flow Control as a Management Tool in the National Airspace System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wugalter, S.

    1974-01-01

    Advanced Flow Control is closely related to Air Traffic Control. Air Traffic Control is the business of the Federal Aviation Administration. To formulate an understanding of advanced flow control and its use as a management tool in the National Airspace System, it becomes necessary to speak somewhat of air traffic control, the role of FAA, and their relationship to advanced flow control. Also, this should dispell forever, any notion that advanced flow control is the inspirational master valve scheme to be used on the Alaskan Oil Pipeline.

  10. Structural and functional brain changes beyond visual system in patients with advanced glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Frezzotti, Paolo; Giorgio, Antonio; Motolese, Ilaria; De Leucio, Alessandro; Iester, Michele; Motolese, Eduardo; Federico, Antonio; De Stefano, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), an important cause of irreversible blindness, a spreading of neurodegeneration occurs through the brain, we performed multimodal MRI and subsequent whole-brain explorative voxelwise analyses in 13 advanced POAG patients and 12 age-matched normal controls (NC). Altered integrity (decreased fractional anisotropy or increased diffusivities) of white matter (WM) tracts was found not only along the visual pathway of POAG but also in nonvisual WM tracts (superior longitudinal fascicle, anterior thalamic radiation, corticospinal tract, middle cerebellar peduncle). POAG patients also showed brain atrophy in both visual cortex and other distant grey matter (GM) regions (frontoparietal cortex, hippocampi and cerebellar cortex), decreased functional connectivity (FC) in visual, working memory and dorsal attention networks and increased FC in visual and executive networks. In POAG, abnormalities in structure and FC within and outside visual system correlated with visual field parameters in the poorer performing eyes, thus emphasizing their clinical relevance. Altogether, this represents evidence that a vision disorder such as POAG can be considered a widespread neurodegenerative condition.

  11. VisANT: an online visualization and analysis tool for biological interaction data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhenjun; Mellor, Joseph; Wu, Jie; DeLisi, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Background New techniques for determining relationships between biomolecules of all types – genes, proteins, noncoding DNA, metabolites and small molecules – are now making a substantial contribution to the widely discussed explosion of facts about the cell. The data generated by these techniques promote a picture of the cell as an interconnected information network, with molecular components linked with one another in topologies that can encode and represent many features of cellular function. This networked view of biology brings the potential for systematic understanding of living molecular systems. Results We present VisANT, an application for integrating biomolecular interaction data into a cohesive, graphical interface. This software features a multi-tiered architecture for data flexibility, separating back-end modules for data retrieval from a front-end visualization and analysis package. VisANT is a freely available, open-source tool for researchers, and offers an online interface for a large range of published data sets on biomolecular interactions, including those entered by users. This system is integrated with standard databases for organized annotation, including GenBank, KEGG and SwissProt. VisANT is a Java-based, platform-independent tool suitable for a wide range of biological applications, including studies of pathways, gene regulation and systems biology. Conclusion VisANT has been developed to provide interactive visual mining of biological interaction data sets. The new software provides a general tool for mining and visualizing such data in the context of sequence, pathway, structure, and associated annotations. Interaction and predicted association data can be combined, overlaid, manipulated and analyzed using a variety of built-in functions. VisANT is available at . PMID:15028117

  12. ClustVis: a web tool for visualizing clustering of multivariate data using Principal Component Analysis and heatmap

    PubMed Central

    Metsalu, Tauno; Vilo, Jaak

    2015-01-01

    The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is a widely used method of reducing the dimensionality of high-dimensional data, often followed by visualizing two of the components on the scatterplot. Although widely used, the method is lacking an easy-to-use web interface that scientists with little programming skills could use to make plots of their own data. The same applies to creating heatmaps: it is possible to add conditional formatting for Excel cells to show colored heatmaps, but for more advanced features such as clustering and experimental annotations, more sophisticated analysis tools have to be used. We present a web tool called ClustVis that aims to have an intuitive user interface. Users can upload data from a simple delimited text file that can be created in a spreadsheet program. It is possible to modify data processing methods and the final appearance of the PCA and heatmap plots by using drop-down menus, text boxes, sliders etc. Appropriate defaults are given to reduce the time needed by the user to specify input parameters. As an output, users can download PCA plot and heatmap in one of the preferred file formats. This web server is freely available at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/clustvis/. PMID:25969447

  13. Advanced tools for astronomical time series and image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    The algorithms described here, which I have developed for applications in X-ray and γ-ray astronomy, will hopefully be of use in other ways, perhaps aiding in the exploration of modern astronomy's data cornucopia. The goal is to describe principled approaches to some ubiquitous problems, such as detection and characterization of periodic and aperiodic signals, estimation of time delays between multiple time series, and source detection in noisy images with noisy backgrounds. The latter problem is related to detection of clusters in data spaces of various dimensions. A goal of this work is to achieve a unifying view of several related topics: signal detection and characterization, cluster identification, classification, density estimation, and multivariate regression. In addition to being useful for analysis of data from space-based and ground-based missions, these algorithms may be a basis for a future automatic science discovery facility, and in turn provide analysis tools for the Virtual Observatory. This chapter has ties to those by Larry Bretthorst, Tom Loredo, Alanna Connors, Fionn Murtagh, Jim Berger, David van Dyk, Vicent Martinez & Enn Saar.

  14. Atomic force microscopy as an advanced tool in neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Jembrek, Maja Jazvinšćak; Šimić, Goran; Hof, Patrick R.; Šegota, Suzana

    2015-01-01

    This review highlights relevant issues about applications and improvements of atomic force microscopy (AFM) toward a better understanding of neurodegenerative changes at the molecular level with the hope of contributing to the development of effective therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative illnesses. The basic principles of AFM are briefly discussed in terms of evaluation of experimental data, including the newest PeakForce Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (QNM) and the evaluation of Young’s modulus as the crucial elasticity parameter. AFM topography, revealed in imaging mode, can be used to monitor changes in live neurons over time, representing a valuable tool for high-resolution detection and monitoring of neuronal morphology. The mechanical properties of living cells can be quantified by force spectroscopy as well as by new AFM. A variety of applications are described, and their relevance for specific research areas discussed. In addition, imaging as well as non-imaging modes can provide specific information, not only about the structural and mechanical properties of neuronal membranes, but also on the cytoplasm, cell nucleus, and particularly cytoskeletal components. Moreover, new AFM is able to provide detailed insight into physical structure and biochemical interactions in both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:28123795

  15. Visual Sensor Technology for Advanced Surveillance Systems: Historical View, Technological Aspects and Research Activities in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Foresti, Gian Luca; Micheloni, Christian; Piciarelli, Claudio; Snidaro, Lauro

    2009-01-01

    The paper is a survey of the main technological aspects of advanced visual-based surveillance systems. A brief historical view of such systems from the origins to nowadays is given together with a short description of the main research projects in Italy on surveillance applications in the last twenty years. The paper then describes the main characteristics of an advanced visual sensor network that (a) directly processes locally acquired digital data, (b) automatically modifies intrinsic (focus, iris) and extrinsic (pan, tilt, zoom) parameters to increase the quality of acquired data and (c) automatically selects the best subset of sensors in order to monitor a given moving object in the observed environment. PMID:22574011

  16. Verification of visual odometry algorithms with an OpenGL-based software tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skulimowski, Piotr; Strumillo, Pawel

    2015-05-01

    We present a software tool called a stereovision egomotion sequence generator that was developed for testing visual odometry (VO) algorithms. Various approaches to single and multicamera VO algorithms are reviewed first, and then a reference VO algorithm that has served to demonstrate the program's features is described. The program offers simple tools for defining virtual static three-dimensional scenes and arbitrary six degrees of freedom motion paths within such scenes and output sequences of stereovision images, disparity ground-truth maps, and segmented scene images. A simple script language is proposed that simplifies tests of VO algorithms for user-defined scenarios. The program's capabilities are demonstrated by testing a reference VO technique that employs stereoscopy and feature tracking.

  17. A Multi-facetted Visual Analytics Tool for Exploratory Analysis of Human Brain and Function Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Diego A.; Schneider, Cyril; Oliver, James H.; Charpak, Nathalie; Hernandez, Jose T.

    2016-01-01

    Brain research typically requires large amounts of data from different sources, and often of different nature. The use of different software tools adapted to the nature of each data source can make research work cumbersome and time consuming. It follows that data is not often used to its fullest potential thus limiting exploratory analysis. This paper presents an ancillary software tool called BRAVIZ that integrates interactive visualization with real-time statistical analyses, facilitating access to multi-facetted neuroscience data and automating many cumbersome and error-prone tasks required to explore such data. Rather than relying on abstract numerical indicators, BRAVIZ emphasizes brain images as the main object of the analysis process of individuals or groups. BRAVIZ facilitates exploration of trends or relationships to gain an integrated view of the phenomena studied, thus motivating discovery of new hypotheses. A case study is presented that incorporates brain structure and function outcomes together with different types of clinical data. PMID:27601990

  18. Electrochemical Processing Tools for Advanced Copper Interconnects: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Madhav

    The change from vacuum-deposited aluminum to electroplated copper in 1997 brought about a paradigm shift in interconnect technology and in chip making [1]. Since then, most of the leading chip manufacturers have converted to electroplated Cu technology for chip interconnects. Cu interconnects are fabricated by dual Damascene process which is referred to a metallization patterning process by which two insulator (dielectric) levels are patterned, filled with copper, and planarized to create a metal layer consisting of vias and lines. The process steps consist of laying a sandwich of two levels of insulator and etch stop layers that are patterned as holes for vias and troughs for lines. They are then filled with a single metallization step. Finally, the excess material is removed, and the wafer is planarized by chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). While finer details of exact sequence of fabrication steps vary, the end result of forming a metal layer remains the same in which vias are formed in the lower layer, and trenches are formed in the upper layer. Electroplating enables deposition of Cu in via holes and overlying trenches in a single step thus eliminating a via/line interface and significantly reducing the cycle time. Due to these reasons and due to relatively less expensive tooling, electroplating is a cost-effective and efficient process for Cu interconnects [2, 3]. Compared with vacuum deposition processes, electroplated Cu provides improved super filling capabilities and abnormal grain growth phenomena. These properties contribute significantly to improved reliability of Cu interconnects. With the proper choice of additives and plating conditions, void-free, seam-free Damascene deposits are obtained which eliminates surface-like fast diffusion paths for Cu electromigration.

  19. Advancing alternate tools: why science education needs CRP and CRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodo Seriki, Vanessa

    2016-09-01

    Ridgeway and Yerrick's paper, Whose banner are we waving?: exploring STEM partnerships for marginalized urban youth, unearthed the tensions that existed between a local community "expert" and a group of students and their facilitator in an afterschool program. Those of us who work with youth who are traditionally marginalized, understand the importance of teaching in culturally relevant ways, but far too often—as Ridgeway and Yerrick shared—community partners have beliefs, motives, and ideologies that are incompatible to the program's mission and goals. Nevertheless, we often enter partnerships assuming that the other party understands the needs of the students or community; understands how in U.S. society White is normative while all others are deficient; and understands how to engage with students in culturally relevant ways. This forum addresses the underlying assumption, described in the Ridgeway and Yerrick article, that educators—despite their background and experiences—are able to teach in culturally relevant ways. Additionally, I assert based on the finding in the article that just as Ladson-Billings and Tate (Teach Coll Rec 97(1):47-68, 1995) asserted, race in the U.S. society, as a scholarly pursuit, was under theorized. The same is true of science education; race in science education is under theorized and the use of culturally relevant pedagogy and critical race theory as a pedagogical model and analytical tool, respectively, in science education is minimal. The increased use of both would impact our understanding of who does science, and how to broaden participation among people of color.

  20. Teaching Advanced Data Analysis Tools to High School Astronomy Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, David V.; Herring, Julie; Hintz, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    A major barrier to becoming an astronomer is learning how to analyze astronomical data, such as using photometry to compare the brightness of stars. Most fledgling astronomers learn observation, data reduction, and analysis skills through an upper division college class. If the same skills could be taught in an introductory high school astronomy class, then more students would have an opportunity to do authentic science earlier, with implications for how many choose to become astronomers. Several software tools have been developed that can analyze astronomical data ranging from fairly straightforward (AstroImageJ and DS9) to very complex (IRAF and DAOphot). During the summer of 2014, a study was undertaken at Brigham Young University through a Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program to evaluate the effectiveness and ease-of-use of these four software packages. Standard tasks tested included creating a false-color IR image using WISE data in DS9, Adobe Photoshop, and The Gimp; a multi-aperture analyses of variable stars over time using AstroImageJ; creating Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of stars using photometry at multiple wavelengths in AstroImageJ and DS9; and color-magnitude and hydrogen alpha index diagrams for open star clusters using IRAF and DAOphot. Tutorials were then written and combined with screen captures to teach high school astronomy students at Walden School of Liberal Arts in Provo, UT how to perform these same tasks. They analyzed image data using the four software packages, imported it into Microsoft Excel, and created charts using images from BYU's 36-inch telescope at their West Mountain Observatory. The students' attempts to complete these tasks were observed, mentoring was provided, and the students then reported on their experience through a self-reflection essay and concept test. Results indicate that high school astronomy students can successfully complete professional-level astronomy data analyses when given detailed

  1. [Visual cues as a therapeutic tool in Parkinson's disease. A systematic review].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Hellín, Elena; Cano-de-la-Cuerda, Roberto; Miangolarra-Page, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Sensory stimuli or sensory cues are being used as a therapeutic tool for improving gait disorders in Parkinson's disease patients, but most studies seem to focus on auditory stimuli. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review regarding the use of visual cues over gait disorders, dual tasks during gait, freezing and the incidence of falls in patients with Parkinson to obtain therapeutic implications. We conducted a systematic review in main databases such as Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, TripDataBase, PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE and Physiotherapy Evidence Database, during 2005 to 2012, according to the recommendations of the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials, evaluating the quality of the papers included with the Downs & Black Quality Index. 21 articles were finally included in this systematic review (with a total of 892 participants) with variable methodological quality, achieving an average of 17.27 points in the Downs and Black Quality Index (range: 11-21). Visual cues produce improvements over temporal-spatial parameters in gait, turning execution, reducing the appearance of freezing and falls in Parkinson's disease patients. Visual cues appear to benefit dual tasks during gait, reducing the interference of the second task. Further studies are needed to determine the preferred type of stimuli for each stage of the disease.

  2. Phylo-VISTA: An interactive visualization tool for multiple DNAsequence alignments

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Nameeta; Couronne, Olivier; Pennacchio, Len A.; Brudno,Michael; Batzoglou, Serafim; Bethel, E. Wes; Rubin, Edward M.; Hamann,Bernd; Dubchak, Inna

    2003-04-25

    Motivation. The power of multi-sequence comparison forbiological discovery is well established and sequence data from a growinglist of organisms is becoming available. Thus, a need exists forcomputational strategies to visually compare multiple aligned sequencesto support conservation analysis across various species. To be efficientthese visualization algorithms require the ability to universally handlea wide range of evolutionary distances while taking into accountphylogeny Results. We have developed Phylo-VISTA, an interactive tool foranalyzing multiple alignments by visualizing the similarity of DNAsequences among multiple species while considering their phylogenicrelationships. Features include a broad spectrum of resolution parametersfor examining the alignment and the ability to easily compare any subtreeof sequences within a complete alignment dataset. Phylo-VISTA uses VISTAconcepts that have been successfully applied previously to a wide rangeof comparative genomics data analysis problems. Availability Phylo-VISTAis an interactive java applet available for downloading athttp://graphics.cs.ucdavis.edu/~;nyshah/Phylo-VISTA. It is also availableon-line at http://www-gsd.lbl.gov/phylovista and is integrated with theglobal alignment program LAGAN athttp://lagan.stanford.edu.Contactphylovista@lbl.gov

  3. NOAA View: A Visualization Tool for Archived and Real-Time Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisut, D.; Powell, A. M.; Loomis, T.; Goel, V.; Cowan, D.; Mills, B.

    2013-12-01

    Wouldn't data discovery be easier if you could see the output before actually downloading it? Although data visualization provides an invaluable ability to better understand the complex processes associated with studying atmospheric and oceanic data, an enormous amount of time may be spent in the initial research phases of downloading and developing preliminary data plots. The NOAA Visualization Lab has recently released a new data portal that may help expedite the process of seeing visualizing data and comparing variables. The NOAA View portal is not a typical data portal - it is a data imagery portal. Using pre-rendered imagery of NOAA's vast data archives, the WMS-enabled website interface allows the user to easily browse historical and real-time data for over 75 variables. Though initially intended as an outreach tool, the site has proven useful to researchers, and also acts as a portal to official data distribution points in NOAA. In this presentation we will discuss the architecture and browsing capabilities of NOAA View related to its application in data discovery and exploration.

  4. Visualization: a tool for enhancing students' concept images of basic object-oriented concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, Ibrahim

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: to investigate students' concept images about class, object, and their relationship and to help them enhance their learning of these notions with a visualization tool. Fifty-six second-year university students participated in the study. To investigate his/her concept images, the researcher developed a survey including open-ended questions, which was administered to the participants. Follow-up interviews with 12 randomly selected students were conducted to explore their answers to the survey in depth. The results of the first part of the research were utilized to construct visualization scenarios. The students used these scenarios to develop animations using Flash software. The study found that most of the students experienced difficulties in learning object-oriented notions. Overdependence on code-writing practice and examples and incorrectly learned analogies were determined to be the sources of their difficulties. Moreover, visualization was found to be a promising approach in facilitating students' concept images of basic object-oriented notions. The results of this study have implications for researchers and practitioners when designing programming instruction.

  5. McIDAS-V: A powerful visualization and data analysis tool for GOES-R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtor, T. H.; Rink, T. D.

    2011-12-01

    The University of Wisconsin's Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC) has been at the forefront in developing data analysis and visualization tools for environmental satellite and other geophysical data. The fifth generation of the Man-computer Interactive Data Access System (McIDAS-V) is a java-based, open-source, freely available system for researchers and algorithm developers that is being adapted and expanded for use with GOES-R observations. The McIDAS-V software tools provide powerful new data manipulation and visualization capabilities, including 4-dimensional displays, an abstract data model with integrated metadata, user defined computation, and a powerful scripting capability. McIDAS-V provides the GOES-R user community with a variety of powerful capabilities to analyze and display the high spatial, temporal and spectral resolution data. This poster and accompanying computer demonstration will display GOES-R proxy data and products as well as applications of McIDAS-V for validation and scientific analysis.

  6. Development of visualization tools and data processing for the PRISM earth system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Martino, G.; Prism Work Package 4a Visualization Group

    2003-04-01

    The PRISM project includes development of a set of visualization and processing tools for use by earth system scientists. A list of requirements has been formulated, based upon information provided by the PRISM community. After having conducted a review of the requirements and of the software packages available, the team is ready to begin development of two visualization systems: a web-enabled system designed for monitoring and quality controlling model runs as they are running (Low-End graphics), and another system for high quality analysis of data which includes the ability to do 3-D plots, animations etc. with the option of controlling plot generation through scripts or using graphical interfaces (High-End graphics). Both Low-End and High-End graphics tools will use netCDF-CF metadata, the chosen PRISM System standard type of data. This poster is intended to be a showcase for our current ideas and early plans. We wish to invite comments from the wide community of earth system modellers about what functionalities would be most useful.

  7. Visualizing Anomalies in Electronic Health Record Data: The Variability Explorer Tool

    PubMed Central

    Estiri, Hossein; Chan, Ya-Fen; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Jung, Hyunggu; Cole, Allison; Stephens, Kari A.

    2015-01-01

    As Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems are becoming more prevalent in the U.S. health care domain, the utility of EHR data in translational research and clinical decision-making gains prominence. Leveraging primay· care-based. multi-clinic EHR data, this paper introduces a web-based visualization tool, the Variability Explorer Tool (VET), to assist researchers with profiling variability among diagnosis codes. VET applies a simple statistical method to approximate probability distribution functions for the prevalence of any given diagnosis codes to visualize between-clinic and across-year variability. In a depression diagnoses use case, VET outputs demonstrated substantial variability in code use. Even though data quality research often characterizes variability as an indicator for data quality, variability can also reflect real characteristics of data, such as practice-level, and patient-level issues. Researchers benefit from recognizing variability in early stages of research to improve their research design and ensure validity and generalizability of research findings. PMID:26306237

  8. Using molecular visualization to explore protein structure and function and enhance student facility with computational tools.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Cassidy R; Listenberger, Laura L

    2017-02-01

    Recognizing that undergraduate students can benefit from analysis of 3D protein structure and function, we have developed a multiweek, inquiry-based molecular visualization project for Biochemistry I students. This project uses a virtual model of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) to guide students through multiple levels of protein structure analysis. The first assignment explores primary structure by generating and examining a protein sequence alignment. Subsequent assignments introduce 3D visualization software to explore secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure. Students design an inhibitor, based on scrutiny of the enzyme active site, and evaluate the fit of the molecule using computed binding energies. In the last assignment, students introduce a point mutation to model the active site of the related COX-2 enzyme and analyze the impact of the mutation on inhibitor binding. With this project we aim to increase knowledge about, and confidence in using, online databases and computational tools. Here, we share results of our mixed methods pre- and postsurvey demonstrating student gains in knowledge about, and confidence using, online databases and computational tools. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2017.

  9. 2014 Earth System Grid Federation and Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools Conference Report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dean N.

    2015-01-27

    The climate and weather data science community met December 9–11, 2014, in Livermore, California, for the fourth annual Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) Face-to-Face (F2F) Conference, hosted by the Department of Energy, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the European Infrastructure for the European Network of Earth System Modelling, and the Australian Department of Education. Both ESGF and UVCDATremain global collaborations committed to developing a new generation of open-source software infrastructure that provides distributed access and analysis to simulated and observed data from the climate and weather communities. The tools and infrastructure created under these international multi-agency collaborations are critical to understanding extreme weather conditions and long-term climate change. In addition, the F2F conference fosters a stronger climate and weather data science community and facilitates a stronger federated software infrastructure. The 2014 F2F conference detailed the progress of ESGF, UV-CDAT, and other community efforts over the year and sets new priorities and requirements for existing and impending national and international community projects, such as the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase Six. Specifically discussed at the conference were project capabilities and enhancements needs for data distribution, analysis, visualization, hardware and network infrastructure, standards, and resources.

  10. Advances in Coupling of Kinetics and Molecular Scale Tools to Shed Light on Soil Biogeochemical Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, Donald

    2014-09-02

    Biogeochemical processes in soils such as sorption, precipitation, and redox play critical roles in the cycling and fate of nutrients, metal(loid)s and organic chemicals in soil and water environments. Advanced analytical tools enable soil scientists to track these processes in real-time and at the molecular scale. Our review focuses on recent research that has employed state-of-the-art molecular scale spectroscopy, coupled with kinetics, to elucidate the mechanisms of nutrient and metal(loid) reactivity and speciation in soils. We found that by coupling kinetics with advanced molecular and nano-scale tools major advances have been made in elucidating important soil chemical processes including sorption, precipitation, dissolution, and redox of metal(loids) and nutrients. Such advances will aid in better predicting the fate and mobility of nutrients and contaminants in soils and water and enhance environmental and agricultural sustainability.

  11. An interactive mapping tool for visualizing lacunarity of laser scanned point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kania, Adam; Székely, Balázs

    2016-04-01

    Lacunarity, a measure of the spatial distribution of the empty space in a certain model or real space over large spatial scales, is found to be a useful descriptive quantity in many fields using imagery, including, among others, geology, dentistry, neurology. Its application in ecology was suggested more than 20 years ago. The main problem of its application was the lack of appropriate high resolution data. Nowadays, full-waveform laser scanning, also known as FWF LiDAR, provides the tool for mapping the vegetation in unprecedented details and accuracy. Consequently, the lacunarity concept can be revitalized, in order to study the structure of the vegetation in this sense as well. Calculation of lacunarity, even if it is done in two dimensions (2D), is still has its problems: on one hand it is a number-crunching procedure, on the other hand, it produces 4D results: at each 3D point it returns a set of data that are function of scale. These data sets are difficult to visualize, to evaluate, and to compare. In order to solve this problem, an interactive mapping tool has been conceptualized that is designed to manipulate and visualize the data, lets the user set parameters for best visualization or comparison results. The system is able to load large amounts of data, visualize them as lacunarity curves, or map view as horizontal slices or in 3D point clouds coloured according to the user's choice. Lacunarity maps are presented as a series of (usually) horizontal profiles, e.g. rasters, which cells contain color-mapped values of selected lacunarity of the point cloud. As lacunarity is usually analysed in a series of successive windows sizes, the tool can show a series of rasters with sequentially animated lacunarity maps calculated for various window sizes. A very fast switching of colour schemes is possible to facilitate rapid visual feedback to better understand underlying data patterns exposed by lacunarity functions. In the comparison mode, two sites (or two areas

  12. PointCloudXplore: a visualization tool for 3D gene expressiondata

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, Oliver; Weber, Gunther H.; Keranen, Soile V.E.; Fowlkes,Charles C.; Luengo Hendriks, Cristian L.; Simirenko, Lisa; Shah, NameetaY.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggn, Mark D.; Hagen, Hans; Sudar, Damir J.; Malik, Jitendra; Knowles, David W.; Hamann, Bernd

    2006-10-01

    The Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project (BDTNP) has developed a suite of methods that support quantitative, computational analysis of three-dimensional (3D) gene expression patterns with cellular resolution in early Drosophila embryos, aiming at a more in-depth understanding of gene regulatory networks. We describe a new tool, called PointCloudXplore (PCX), that supports effective 3D gene expression data exploration. PCX is a visualization tool that uses the established visualization techniques of multiple views, brushing, and linking to support the analysis of high-dimensional datasets that describe many genes' expression. Each of the views in PointCloudXplore shows a different gene expression data property. Brushing is used to select and emphasize data associated with defined subsets of embryo cells within a view. Linking is used to show in additional views the expression data for a group of cells that have first been highlighted as a brush in a single view, allowing further data subset properties to be determined. In PCX, physical views of the data are linked to abstract data displays such as parallel coordinates. Physical views show the spatial relationships between different genes' expression patterns within an embryo. Abstract gene expression data displays on the other hand allow for an analysis of relationships between different genes directly in the gene expression space. We discuss on parallel coordinates as one example abstract data view currently available in PCX. We have developed several extensions to standard parallel coordinates to facilitate brushing and the visualization of 3D gene expression data.

  13. A results-based process for evaluation of diverse visual analytics tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Gary; Berger, David H.

    2013-05-01

    With the pervasiveness of still and full-motion imagery in commercial and military applications, the need to ingest and analyze these media has grown rapidly in recent years. Additionally, video hosting and live camera websites provide a near real-time view of our changing world with unprecedented spatial coverage. To take advantage of these controlled and crowd-sourced opportunities, sophisticated visual analytics (VA) tools are required to accurately and efficiently convert raw imagery into usable information. Whether investing in VA products or evaluating algorithms for potential development, it is important for stakeholders to understand the capabilities and limitations of visual analytics tools. Visual analytics algorithms are being applied to problems related to Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR), facility security, and public safety monitoring, to name a few. The diversity of requirements means that a onesize- fits-all approach to performance assessment will not work. We present a process for evaluating the efficacy of algorithms in real-world conditions, thereby allowing users and developers of video analytics software to understand software capabilities and identify potential shortcomings. The results-based approach described in this paper uses an analysis of end-user requirements and Concept of Operations (CONOPS) to define Measures of Effectiveness (MOEs), test data requirements, and evaluation strategies. We define metrics that individually do not fully characterize a system, but when used together, are a powerful way to reveal both strengths and weaknesses. We provide examples of data products, such as heatmaps, performance maps, detection timelines, and rank-based probability-of-detection curves.

  14. Web-Based Model Visualization Tools to Aid in Model Optimization and Uncertainty Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alder, J.; van Griensven, A.; Meixner, T.

    2003-12-01

    Individuals applying hydrologic models have a need for a quick easy to use visualization tools to permit them to assess and understand model performance. We present here the Interactive Hydrologic Modeling (IHM) visualization toolbox. The IHM utilizes high-speed Internet access, the portability of the web and the increasing power of modern computers to provide an online toolbox for quick and easy model result visualization. This visualization interface allows for the interpretation and analysis of Monte-Carlo and batch model simulation results. Often times a given project will generate several thousands or even hundreds of thousands simulations. This large number of simulations creates a challenge for post-simulation analysis. IHM's goal is to try to solve this problem by loading all of the data into a database with a web interface that can dynamically generate graphs for the user according to their needs. IHM currently supports: a global samples statistics table (e.g. sum of squares error, sum of absolute differences etc.), top ten simulations table and graphs, graphs of an individual simulation using time step data, objective based dotty plots, threshold based parameter cumulative density function graphs (as used in the regional sensitivity analysis of Spear and Hornberger) and 2D error surface graphs of the parameter space. IHM is ideal for the simplest bucket model to the largest set of Monte-Carlo model simulations with a multi-dimensional parameter and model output space. By using a web interface, IHM offers the user complete flexibility in the sense that they can be anywhere in the world using any operating system. IHM can be a time saving and money saving alternative to spending time producing graphs or conducting analysis that may not be informative or being forced to purchase or use expensive and proprietary software. IHM is a simple, free, method of interpreting and analyzing batch model results, and is suitable for novice to expert hydrologic modelers.

  15. A patient-specific visualization tool for comprehensive analysis of coronary CTA and perfusion MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirisli, H. A.; Gupta, V.; Kirschbaum, S.; Neefjes, L.; van Geuns, R. J.; Mollet, N.; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; Reiber, J. H. C.; van Walsum, T.; Niessen, W. J.

    2011-03-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion imaging (CMR) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) are widely used to assess heart disease. CMR is used to measure the global and regional myocardial function and to evaluate the presence of ischemia; CTA is used for diagnosing coronary artery disease, such as coronary stenoses. Nowadays, the hemodynamic significance of coronary artery stenoses is determined subjectively by combining information on myocardial function with assumptions on coronary artery territories. As the anatomy of coronary arteries varies greatly between individuals, we developed a patient-specific tool for relating CTA and perfusion CMR data. The anatomical and functional information extracted from CTA and CMR data are combined into a single frame of reference. Our graphical user interface provides various options for visualization. In addition to the standard perfusion Bull's Eye Plot (BEP), it is possible to overlay a 2D projection of the coronary tree on the BEP, to add a 3D coronary tree model and to add a 3D heart model. The perfusion BEP, the 3D-models and the CTA data are also interactively linked. Using the CMR and CTA data of 14 patients, our tool directly established a spatial correspondence between diseased coronary artery segments and myocardial regions with abnormal perfusion. The location of coronary stenoses and perfusion abnormalities were visualized jointly in 3D, thereby facilitating the study of the relationship between the anatomic causes of a blocked artery and the physiological effects on the myocardial perfusion. This tool is expected to improve diagnosis and therapy planning of early-stage coronary artery disease.

  16. Utility of the advanced chronic kidney disease patient management tools: case studies.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Meenal B; Matchar, David B; Samsa, Gregory P; Haley, William E

    2008-01-01

    Appropriate management of advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) delays or limits its progression. The Advanced CKD Patient Management Toolkit was developed using a process-improvement technique to assist patient management and address CKD-specific management issues. We pilot tested the toolkit in 2 community nephrology practices, assessed the utility of individual tools, and evaluated the impact on conformance to an advanced CKD guideline through patient chart abstraction. Tool use was distinct in the 2 sites and depended on the site champion's involvement, the extent of process reconfiguration demanded by a tool, and its perceived value. Baseline conformance varied across guideline recommendations (averaged 54%). Posttrial conformance increased in all clinical areas (averaged 59%). Valuable features of the toolkit in real-world settings were its ability to: facilitate tool selection, direct implementation efforts in response to a baseline performance audit, and allow selection of tool versions and customizing them. Our results suggest that systematically created, multifaceted, and customizable tools can promote guideline conformance.

  17. Design strategies and functionality of the Visual Interface for Virtual Interaction Development (VIVID) tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Lac; Kenney, Patrick J.

    1993-01-01

    Development of interactive virtual environments (VE) has typically consisted of three primary activities: model (object) development, model relationship tree development, and environment behavior definition and coding. The model and relationship tree development activities are accomplished with a variety of well-established graphic library (GL) based programs - most utilizing graphical user interfaces (GUI) with point-and-click interactions. Because of this GUI format, little programming expertise on the part of the developer is necessary to create the 3D graphical models or to establish interrelationships between the models. However, the third VE development activity, environment behavior definition and coding, has generally required the greatest amount of time and programmer expertise. Behaviors, characteristics, and interactions between objects and the user within a VE must be defined via command line C coding prior to rendering the environment scenes. In an effort to simplify this environment behavior definition phase for non-programmers, and to provide easy access to model and tree tools, a graphical interface and development tool has been created. The principal thrust of this research is to effect rapid development and prototyping of virtual environments. This presentation will discuss the 'Visual Interface for Virtual Interaction Development' (VIVID) tool; an X-Windows based system employing drop-down menus for user selection of program access, models, and trees, behavior editing, and code generation. Examples of these selection will be highlighted in this presentation, as will the currently available program interfaces. The functionality of this tool allows non-programming users access to all facets of VE development while providing experienced programmers with a collection of pre-coded behaviors. In conjunction with its existing, interfaces and predefined suite of behaviors, future development plans for VIVID will be described. These include incorporation

  18. Three-Dimensional Online Visualization and Engagement Tools for the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockett, R.; Moran, T.; Pidlisecky, A.

    2013-12-01

    Educational tools often sacrifice interactivity in favour of scalability so they can reach more users. This compromise leads to tools that may be viewed as second tier when compared to more engaging activities performed in a laboratory; however, the resources required to deliver laboratory exercises that are scalable is often impractical. Geoscience education is well situated to benefit from interactive online learning tools that allow users to work in a 3D environment. Visible Geology (http://3ptscience.com/visiblegeology) is an innovative web-based application designed to enable visualization of geologic structures and processes through the use of interactive 3D models. The platform allows users to conceptualize difficult, yet important geologic principles in a scientifically accurate manner by developing unique geologic models. The environment allows students to interactively practice their visualization and interpretation skills by creating and interacting with their own models and terrains. Visible Geology has been designed from a user centric perspective resulting in a simple and intuitive interface. The platform directs students to build there own geologic models by adding beds and creating geologic events such as tilting, folding, or faulting. The level of ownership and interactivity encourages engagement, leading learners to discover geologic relationships on their own, in the context of guided assignments. In January 2013, an interactive geologic history assignment was developed for a 700-student introductory geology class at The University of British Columbia. The assignment required students to distinguish the relative age of geologic events to construct a geologic history. Traditionally this type of exercise has been taught through the use of simple geologic cross-sections showing crosscutting relationships; from these cross-sections students infer the relative age of geologic events. In contrast, the Visible Geology assignment offers students a unique

  19. Trajectory Browser: An online tool for interplanetary trajectory analysis and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, C.

    The Trajectory Browser is a web-based tool developed at the NASA Ames Research Center for finding preliminary trajectories to planetary bodies and for providing relevant launch date, time-of-flight and Δ V requirements. The site hosts a database of transfer trajectories from Earth to planets and small-bodies for various types of missions such as rendezvous, sample return or flybys. A search engine allows the user to find trajectories meeting desired constraints on the launch window, mission duration and Δ V capability, while a trajectory viewer tool allows the visualization of the heliocentric trajectory and the detailed mission itinerary. The anticipated user base of this tool consists primarily of scientists and engineers designing interplanetary missions in the context of pre-phase A studies, particularly for performing accessibility surveys to large populations of small-bodies. The educational potential of the website is also recognized for academia and the public with regards to trajectory design, a field that has generally been poorly understood by the public. The website is currently hosted on NASA-internal URL http://trajbrowser.arc.nasa.gov/ with plans for a public release in early 2013.

  20. zPicture: Dynamic Alignment and Visualization Tool for Analyzing Conservation Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Ovcharenko, I.; Loots, G. G.; Hardison, R. C.; Miller., W.; Stubbs, L.

    2004-03-01

    Comparative sequence analysis has evolved as an essential technique for identifying functional coding and noncoding elements conserved throughout evolution. Here we introduce zPicture (http://zpicture.dcode.org), an interactive web-based sequence alignment and visualization tool for dynamically generating conservation profiles and identifying evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs). zPicture is highly flexible because critical parameters can be modified interactively, allowing users to differentially predict ECRs in comparisons of sequences of different phylogenetic distances and evolutionary rates. We demonstrate the application of this module to identify a known regulatory element in the HOXD locus, where functional ECRs are difficult to discern against the highly conserved genomic background. zPicture also facilitates transcription factor binding site analysis via the rVISTA tool portal. We present an example of the HBB complex when zPicture/rVista combination specifically pinpoints to two ECRs containing GATA- 1, NF-E2 and TAL1/E47 binding sites that were previously identified as transcriptional enhancers. In addition, zPicture is linked to the UCSC Genome Browser allowing users to automatically extract sequences and gene annotations for any recorded locus. Finally, we describe how this tool can be efficiently applied to the analysis of nonvertebrate genomes including those of microbial organisms.

  1. Second NASA Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM): Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box (TTB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeil, D. A.; Mankins, J. C.; Christensen, C. B.; Gresham, E. C.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS), a spreadsheet analysis tool suite, applies parametric equations for sizing and lifecycle cost estimation. Performance, operation, and programmatic data used by the equations come from a Technology Tool Box (TTB) database. In this second TTB Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM), technologists, system model developers, and architecture analysts discussed methods for modeling technology decisions in spreadsheet models, identified specific technology parameters, and defined detailed development requirements. This Conference Publication captures the consensus of the discussions and provides narrative explanations of the tool suite, the database, and applications of ATLAS within NASA s changing environment.

  2. Anvi’o: an advanced analysis and visualization platform for ‘omics data

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Özcan C.; Quince, Christopher; Vineis, Joseph H.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; Delmont, Tom O.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in high-throughput sequencing and ‘omics technologies are revolutionizing studies of naturally occurring microbial communities. Comprehensive investigations of microbial lifestyles require the ability to interactively organize and visualize genetic information and to incorporate subtle differences that enable greater resolution of complex data. Here we introduce anvi’o, an advanced analysis and visualization platform that offers automated and human-guided characterization of microbial genomes in metagenomic assemblies, with interactive interfaces that can link ‘omics data from multiple sources into a single, intuitive display. Its extensible visualization approach distills multiple dimensions of information about each contig, offering a dynamic and unified work environment for data exploration, manipulation, and reporting. Using anvi’o, we re-analyzed publicly available datasets and explored temporal genomic changes within naturally occurring microbial populations through de novo characterization of single nucleotide variations, and linked cultivar and single-cell genomes with metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data. Anvi’o is an open-source platform that empowers researchers without extensive bioinformatics skills to perform and communicate in-depth analyses on large ‘omics datasets. PMID:26500826

  3. Met.3D - a new open-source tool for interactive 3D visualization of ensemble weather forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, Marc; Kern, Michael; Schäfler, Andreas; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2015-04-01

    We introduce Met.3D, a new open-source tool for the interactive 3D visualization of numerical ensemble weather predictions. The tool has been developed to support weather forecasting during aircraft-based atmospheric field campaigns, however, is applicable to further forecasting, research and teaching activities. Our work approaches challenging topics related to the visual analysis of numerical atmospheric model output -- 3D visualisation, ensemble visualization, and how both can be used in a meaningful way suited to weather forecasting. Met.3D builds a bridge from proven 2D visualization methods commonly used in meteorology to 3D visualization by combining both visualization types in a 3D context. It implements methods that address the issue of spatial perception in the 3D view as well as approaches to using the ensemble in order to assess forecast uncertainty. Interactivity is key to the Met.3D approach. The tool uses modern graphics hardware technology to achieve interactive visualization of present-day numerical weather prediction datasets on standard consumer hardware. Met.3D supports forecast data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts and operates directly on ECMWF hybrid sigma-pressure level grids. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the software --illustrated with short video examples--, and give information on its availability.

  4. Technologies Used in the Study of Advanced Mathematics by Students Who Are Visually Impaired in Classrooms: Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePountis, Vicki M.; Pogrund, Rona L.; Griffin-Shirley, Nora; Lan, William Y.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This research examined the perspectives of teachers of students who are visually impaired regarding the use and effectiveness of high-tech assistive technology purported to assist visually impaired students in advanced mathematics. Methods: The data for this study were collected via a mixed-methods online survey distributed through…

  5. Earthquake information products and tools from the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    This Fact Sheet provides a brief description of postearthquake tools and products provided by the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) through the U.S. Geological Survey Earthquake Hazards Program. The focus is on products specifically aimed at providing situational awareness in the period immediately following significant earthquake events.

  6. Conceptual design study for an advanced cab and visual system, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rue, R. J.; Cyrus, M. L.; Garnett, T. A.; Nachbor, J. W.; Seery, J. A.; Starr, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to define requirements for an advanced cab and visual system. The rotorcraft system integration simulator is for engineering studies in the area of mission associated vehicle handling qualities. Principally a technology survey and assessment of existing and proposed simulator visual display systems, image generation systems, modular cab designs, and simulator control station designs were performed and are discussed. State of the art survey data were used to synthesize a set of preliminary visual display system concepts of which five candidate display configurations were selected for further evaluation. Basic display concepts incorporated in these configurations included: real image projection, using either periscopes, fiber optic bundles, or scanned laser optics; and virtual imaging with helmet mounted displays. These display concepts were integrated in the study with a simulator cab concept employing a modular base for aircraft controls, crew seating, and instrumentation (or other) displays. A simple concept to induce vibration in the various modules was developed and is described. Results of evaluations and trade offs related to the candidate system concepts are given, along with a suggested weighting scheme for numerically comparing visual system performance characteristics.

  7. BLASTGrabber: a bioinformatic tool for visualization, analysis and sequence selection of massive BLAST data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Advances in sequencing efficiency have vastly increased the sizes of biological sequence databases, including many thousands of genome-sequenced species. The BLAST algorithm remains the main search engine for retrieving sequence information, and must consequently handle data on an unprecedented scale. This has been possible due to high-performance computers and parallel processing. However, the raw BLAST output from contemporary searches involving thousands of queries becomes ill-suited for direct human processing. Few programs attempt to directly visualize and interpret BLAST output; those that do often provide a mere basic structuring of BLAST data. Results Here we present a bioinformatics application named BLASTGrabber suitable for high-throughput sequencing analysis. BLASTGrabber, being implemented as a Java application, is OS-independent and includes a user friendly graphical user interface. Text or XML-formatted BLAST output files can be directly imported, displayed and categorized based on BLAST statistics. Query names and FASTA headers can be analysed by text-mining. In addition to visualizing sequence alignments, BLAST data can be ordered as an interactive taxonomy tree. All modes of analysis support selection, export and storage of data. A Java interface-based plugin structure facilitates the addition of customized third party functionality. Conclusion The BLASTGrabber application introduces new ways of visualizing and analysing massive BLAST output data by integrating taxonomy identification, text mining capabilities and generic multi-dimensional rendering of BLAST hits. The program aims at a non-expert audience in terms of computer skills; the combination of new functionalities makes the program flexible and useful for a broad range of operations. PMID:24885091

  8. aCGHViewer: A Generic Visualization Tool For aCGH data

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Ganesh; Rossi, Michael R.; McQuaid, Devin E.; Conroy, Jeffrey M.; Gaile, Daniel G.; Cowell, John K.; Nowak, Norma J.; Liang, Ping

    2006-01-01

    Array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) is a powerful high throughput technology for detecting chromosomal copy number aberrations (CNAs) in cancer, aiming at identifying related critical genes from the affected genomic regions. However, advancing from a dataset with thousands of tabular lines to a few candidate genes can be an onerous and time-consuming process. To expedite the aCGH data analysis process, we have developed a user-friendly aCGH data viewer (aCGHViewer) as a conduit between the aCGH data tables and a genome browser. The data from a given aCGH analysis are displayed in a genomic view comprised of individual chromosome panels which can be rapidly scanned for interesting features. A chromosome panel containing a feature of interest can be selected to launch a detail window for that single chromosome. Selecting a data point of interest in the detail window launches a query to the UCSC or NCBI genome browser to allow the user to explore the gene content in the chromosomal region. Additionally, aCGHViewer can display aCGH and expression array data concurrently to visually correlate the two. aCGHViewer is a stand alone Java visualization application that should be used in conjunction with separate statistical programs. It operates on all major computer platforms and is freely available at http://falcon.roswellpark.org/aCGHview/. PMID:17404607

  9. Linking Advanced Visualization and MATLAB for the Analysis of 3D Gene Expression Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebel, Oliver; Keranen, Soile V.E.; Biggin, Mark; Knowles, David W.; Weber, Gunther H.; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2011-03-30

    Three-dimensional gene expression PointCloud data generated by the Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project (BDTNP) provides quantitative information about the spatial and temporal expression of genes in early Drosophila embryos at cellular resolution. The BDTNP team visualizes and analyzes Point-Cloud data using the software application PointCloudXplore (PCX). To maximize the impact of novel, complex data sets, such as PointClouds, the data needs to be accessible to biologists and comprehensible to developers of analysis functions. We address this challenge by linking PCX and Matlab via a dedicated interface, thereby providing biologists seamless access to advanced data analysis functions and giving bioinformatics researchers the opportunity to integrate their analysis directly into the visualization application. To demonstrate the usefulness of this approach, we computationally model parts of the expression pattern of the gene even skipped using a genetic algorithm implemented in Matlab and integrated into PCX via our Matlab interface.

  10. Data Visualization and Analysis Tools for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Validation Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Kenneth R.; Schwaller, Mathew

    2010-01-01

    The Validation Network (VN) prototype for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission compares data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite Precipitation Radar (PR) to similar measurements from U.S. and international operational weather radars. This prototype is a major component of the GPM Ground Validation System (GVS). The VN provides a means for the precipitation measurement community to identify and resolve significant discrepancies between the ground radar (GR) observations and similar satellite observations. The VN prototype is based on research results and computer code described by Anagnostou et al. (2001), Bolen and Chandrasekar (2000), and Liao et al. (2001), and has previously been described by Morris, et al. (2007). Morris and Schwaller (2009) describe the PR-GR volume-matching algorithm used to create the VN match-up data set used for the comparisons. This paper describes software tools that have been developed for visualization and statistical analysis of the original and volume matched PR and GR data.

  11. Vortex filament method as a tool for computational visualization of quantum turbulence.

    PubMed

    Hänninen, Risto; Baggaley, Andrew W

    2014-03-25

    The vortex filament model has become a standard and powerful tool to visualize the motion of quantized vortices in helium superfluids. In this article, we present an overview of the method and highlight its impact in aiding our understanding of quantum turbulence, particularly superfluid helium. We present an analysis of the structure and arrangement of quantized vortices. Our results are in agreement with previous studies showing that under certain conditions, vortices form coherent bundles, which allows for classical vortex stretching, giving quantum turbulence a classical nature. We also offer an explanation for the differences between the observed properties of counterflow and pure superflow turbulence in a pipe. Finally, we suggest a mechanism for the generation of coherent structures in the presence of normal fluid shear.

  12. Ultrasound: An Unexplored Tool for Blood Flow Visualization and Hemodynamic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shung, K. Kirk; Paeng, Dong-Guk

    2003-05-01

    Ultrasonic scattering by blood has been studied both theoretically and experimentally for a better characterization of the performance of ultrasonic devices. In the course of these investigations it became clear that ultrasonic scattering from blood is critically related to the hematological and hemodynamic properties of blood, including hematocrit, plasma protein concentration, flow rate, and flow cycle duration, to name a few parameters. An unexpected conclusion from this work is that ultrasound appears to be a totally unexplored and ignored tool for blood flow visualization and hemodynamic measurements. Two unique hemodynamic phenomena have been observed: the black hole, a low echogenic zone in the center stream of a blood vessel, and the collapsing ring, an hyperechogenic ring converging from the vessel periphery toward the center, and eventually collapsing during pulsatile flow. They seemed to be resulted from the spatial and temporal variations of the shear rate and acceleration in the vessel.

  13. Vortex filament method as a tool for computational visualization of quantum turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Hänninen, Risto; Baggaley, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    The vortex filament model has become a standard and powerful tool to visualize the motion of quantized vortices in helium superfluids. In this article, we present an overview of the method and highlight its impact in aiding our understanding of quantum turbulence, particularly superfluid helium. We present an analysis of the structure and arrangement of quantized vortices. Our results are in agreement with previous studies showing that under certain conditions, vortices form coherent bundles, which allows for classical vortex stretching, giving quantum turbulence a classical nature. We also offer an explanation for the differences between the observed properties of counterflow and pure superflow turbulence in a pipe. Finally, we suggest a mechanism for the generation of coherent structures in the presence of normal fluid shear. PMID:24704873

  14. Exploring Variability of Gaseous Composition of the Troposphere Using Giovanni Online Visualization and Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leptoukh, G.

    2006-05-01

    We present remote sensing observations of various gases in the atmospheric measured by several instruments aboard EOS NASA satellites. The emphasis is on providing options for quick exploration of these data using Giovanni, the NASA GES DISC developed online visualization and analysis tool. We describe the Atmospheric Composition Data and Information Services Center (http://acdisc.gsfc.nasa.gov), a one-stop shopping center for atmospheric composition. We provide a comprehensive list of geophysical parameters measured by TOMS, OMI, AIRS, MODIS, MLS, and other instruments, including description of data preparation for utilization in Giovanni. We describe various Giovanni functionalities, including time-series, area maps, vertical profiles, vertical cross- sections, zonal averages, etc., that allow Atmospheric Composition researches quickly and conveniently assess variability and intercompare behavior of various gases without even downloading data - everything is done online. We also discuss potential inclusion of ground station measurements of pollution into Giovanni, and utilization of this system in air-quality studies.

  15. WEBSAGE: a web tool for visual analysis of differentially expressed human SAGE tags.

    PubMed

    Pylouster, Jean; Sénamaud-Beaufort, Catherine; Saison-Behmoaras, Tula Ester

    2005-07-01

    The serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is a powerful method to compare gene expression of mRNA populations. To provide quantitative expression levels on a genome-wide scale, the Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) uses SAGE. Over 7 million SAGE tags, from 171 human cell types have been assembled. The growing number of laboratories involved in SAGE research necessitates the use of software that provides statistical analysis of raw data, allowing the rapid visualization and interpretation of results. We have created the first simple tool that performs statistical analysis on SAGE data, identifies the tags differentially expressed and shows the results in a scatter plot. It is freely available and accessible at http://bioserv.rpbs.jussieu.fr/websage/index.php.

  16. A capstone teaching project for undergraduate nursing students: development of a visual teaching-learning tool.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Carol D

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an original teaching-learning capstone project designed to promote active learning by senior nursing students as they transition to professional practice. The centerpiece of the capstone experience is the creation of a three-dimensional educational tool called a Visual Project, which addresses the learning needs of patients, their families, or the nursing staff. Students create their project during the spring semester of their senior year, when they are paired with an experienced, baccalaureate-prepared nurse preceptor. Students present their projects to both the nursing unit in which they worked and the faculty and students of the nursing school. Students consistently express a sense of accomplishment when they present their projects and recognize that they themselves have undergone the same teaching-learning process that was the focus of their project.

  17. Noodles: a tool for visualization of numerical weather model ensemble uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Jibonananda; Zhang, Song; Dyer, Jamie; Mercer, Andrew; Amburn, Philip; Moorhead, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Numerical weather prediction ensembles are routinely used for operational weather forecasting. The members of these ensembles are individual simulations with either slightly perturbed initial conditions or different model parameterizations, or occasionally both. Multi-member ensemble output is usually large, multivariate, and challenging to interpret interactively. Forecast meteorologists are interested in understanding the uncertainties associated with numerical weather prediction; specifically variability between the ensemble members. Currently, visualization of ensemble members is mostly accomplished through spaghetti plots of a single mid-troposphere pressure surface height contour. In order to explore new uncertainty visualization methods, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used to create a 48-hour, 18 member parameterization ensemble of the 13 March 1993 "Superstorm". A tool was designed to interactively explore the ensemble uncertainty of three important weather variables: water-vapor mixing ratio, perturbation potential temperature, and perturbation pressure. Uncertainty was quantified using individual ensemble member standard deviation, inter-quartile range, and the width of the 95% confidence interval. Bootstrapping was employed to overcome the dependence on normality in the uncertainty metrics. A coordinated view of ribbon and glyph-based uncertainty visualization, spaghetti plots, iso-pressure colormaps, and data transect plots was provided to two meteorologists for expert evaluation. They found it useful in assessing uncertainty in the data, especially in finding outliers in the ensemble run and therefore avoiding the WRF parameterizations that lead to these outliers. Additionally, the meteorologists could identify spatial regions where the uncertainty was significantly high, allowing for identification of poorly simulated storm environments and physical interpretation of these model issues.

  18. New Tools for Visual Analysis of Multivariate Data from Large Scale Climate Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelitz, R.

    2002-12-01

    The POP ocean model is used to compute global velocity, temperature, salinity, and surface conditions at .1o resolution and 40 irregularly spaced depths, resulting in data sets 80 Gb in size for 200 time steps. This is too large for most screens and most programs; POPTEX, a visualization application developed at LANL uses low level graphics primitives to accelerate animation to a sufficiently high frame rate. Today's graphics cards employ increasingly powerful processors that rival if not exceed the capabilities of the CPU, although the instruction sets and data paths are highly optimized for graphics processors. However, there is now enough power and flexibility to migrate many algorithms to the card level, increasing the speed sufficiently to reach interactive levels even for the larger data sets. The data from the simulations are markedly different from those from observations; they are an attempt to model the processes that control the evolution of a dynamic system. We discuss a framework that we are developing that provides effective analysis and visualization tools to the user that has the ability to evaluate development and processes over a wide range of time scales and distances. First, the data is transformed from a Cartesian grid to a (streamline, streamfront, vorticity) framework. This generalization of particles and tracers allows the user to distinguish between transport and transformation processes. Multiple variables can be viewed concurrently by brushing or selecting regions in the joint probability distribution windows. The path of a packet or particle set in space and time can also be displayed as a trajectory in the distribution space. Finally, and most specific to the essential difference between simulation data and observed data, the trajectories can be linked back to the governing equations. Nonlinearities are detectable in the visualization by relating them to innovations, instances that cannot adequately be predicted from linear

  19. Planetary SUrface Portal (PSUP): a tool for easy visualization and analysis of Martian surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, Francois; Quantin-Nataf, Cathy; Ballans, Hervé; Lozac'h, Loic; Audouard, Joachim; Carter, John; Dassas, karin; Malapert, Jean-Christophe; Marmo, Chiara; Poulleau, Gilles; Riu, Lucie; Séjourné, antoine

    2016-10-01

    PSUP is two software application platforms for working with raster, vector, DTM, and hyper-spectral data acquired by various space instruments analyzing the surface of Mars from orbit. The first platform of PSUP is MarsSI (Martian surface data processing Information System, http://emars.univ-lyon1.fr). It provides data analysis functionalities to select and download ready-to-use products or to process data though specific and validated pipelines. To date, MarsSI handles CTX, HiRISE and CRISM data of NASA/MRO mission, HRSC and OMEGA data of ESA/MEx mission and THEMIS data of NASA/ODY mission (Lozac'h et al., EPSC 2015). The second part of PSUP is also open to the scientific community and can be visited at http://psup.ias.u-psud.fr/. This web-based user interface provides access to many data products for Mars: image footprints and rasters from the MarsSI tool; compositional maps from OMEGA and TES; albedo and thermal inertia from OMEGA and TES; mosaics from THEMIS, Viking, and CTX; high level specific products (defined as catalogues) such as hydrated mineral sites derived from CRISM and OMEGA data, central peaks mineralogy,… In addition, OMEGA C channel data cubes corrected for atmospheric and aerosol contributions can be downloaded. The architecture of PSUP data management and visualization is based on SITools2 and MIZAR, two CNES generic tools developed by a joint effort between CNES and scientific laboratories. SITools2 provides a self-manageable data access layer deployed on the PSUP data, while MIZAR is 3D application in a browser for discovering and visualizing geospatial data. Further developments including the addition of high level products of Mars (regional geological maps, new global compositional maps,…) are foreseen. Ultimately, PSUP will be adapted to other planetary surfaces and space missions in which the French research institutes are involved.

  20. The Particle-Hole Map: A Computational Tool To Visualize Electronic Excitations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghui; Ullrich, Carsten A

    2015-12-08

    We introduce the particle-hole map (PHM), which is a visualization tool to analyze electronic excitations in molecules in the time or frequency domain, to be used in conjunction with time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) or other ab initio methods. The purpose of the PHM is to give detailed insight into electronic excitation processes that is not obtainable from local visualization methods, such as transition densities, density differences, or natural transition orbitals. The PHM is defined as a nonlocal function of two spatial variables and provides information about the origins, destinations, and connections of charge fluctuations during an excitation process; it is particularly valuable to analyze charge-transfer excitonic processes. In contrast with the transition density matrix, the PHM has a statistical interpretation involving joint probabilities of individual states and their transitions; it satisfies several sum rules and exact conditions, and it is easier to read and interpret. We discuss and illustrate the properties of the PHM and give several examples and applications to excitations in one-dimensional model systems, in a hydrogen chain, and in a benzothiadiazole (BT)-based molecule.

  1. VisIt: An End-User Tool for Visualizing and Analyzing Very Large Data

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Hank; Brugger, Eric; Whitlock, B.; Meredith, Jeremy S; Ahern, Sean; Bonnell, Kathleen; Miller, Mark; Weber, G.; Harrison, Cyrus; Pugmire, Dave; Fogal, T.; Garth, Christoph; Sanderson, Allen; Bethel, E Wes; Durant, Marc; Camp, David; Favre, Jean M.; Ruebel, O; Navratil, Paul; Wheeler, Matthew; Selby, Paul; Vivodtzev, Fabien

    2011-01-01

    VisIt is a popular open source tool for visualizing and analyzing data. It owes its success to its foci of increasing data understanding, large data support, and providing a robust and usable product, as well as its underlying design that fits today's supercomputing landscape. In this short paper, we describe the VisIt project and its accomplishments. The VisIt project's three focal points - understanding data, large data, and delivering a product - together form a powerful environment for analyzing data from HPC simulations. It is used in varied ways: it enables visualization scientists, computational code developers, and the physicists that run these codes to perform a broad range of data understanding activities, including debugging, making movies, and exploring data. The user interface portion of its design provides a powerful paradigm for analyzing data while the data processing portion of its design is well suited for big data. This in turn has led to many successes: in scaling up to high levels of concurrency and large data sizes, in providing a 'home' for large data algorithms, in understanding how to best use supercomputers, and, most importantly, in helping users understand their data. Further, despite significant upcoming changes in supercomputing architecture, VisIt's future appears bright, as it enjoys vibrant user and developer communities.

  2. Time Scale Creator - A Visualization and Database Tool for Earth History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, A.; Ogg, J.

    2008-12-01

    Unravelling Earth's history requires the ability to compare biologic, lithologic, chemical, magnetic and other records from different regions. Published correlation charts provide some details, but tend to be unwieldy, difficult to update, and awkward to merge with other records. The Time Scale Creator program of the International Commission on Stratigraphy provides a suite of global and regional reference datasets (approximately 20,000 Phanerozoic datums, plus geochemical and other trends) within a visualization package. Users can append additional regional lithostratigraphic or other datasets, then create on-screen charts for any portion of the geologic time scale with any subsets of the extensive stratigraphic data. In addition to scalable-vector graphics (SVG) or PDF file output, the on-screen display contains "hot-cursor- points" which open up windows with additional information on events, zones, and URL links to external documentation. For example, a user can select from within a datapack with 50 representative stratigraphic columns spanning the British Isles, then display lithologic sections against models of global sea-level trends or adjacent to Sub-boreal ammonite zones, and the pop-up window for each formation is linked directly to the British Geologic Survey lexicon entry. Much in the way that GIS greatly enhances accessibility to spatial data, the Time Scale Creator and its temporal data are completely digital, allowing quick and easy distribution and updating. The database and visualization package are a convenient reference tool, chart-production device, and educational program.

  3. Visinets: a web-based pathway modeling and dynamic visualization tool.

    PubMed

    Spychala, Jozef; Spychala, Pawel; Gomez, Shawn; Weinreb, Gabriel E

    2015-01-01

    In this report we describe a novel graphically oriented method for pathway modeling and a software package that allows for both modeling and visualization of biological networks in a user-friendly format. The Visinets mathematical approach is based on causal mapping (CMAP) that has been fully integrated with graphical interface. Such integration allows for fully graphical and interactive process of modeling, from building the network to simulation of the finished model. To test the performance of Visinets software we have applied it to: a) create executable EGFR-MAPK pathway model using an intuitive graphical way of modeling based on biological data, and b) translate existing ordinary differential equation (ODE) based insulin signaling model into CMAP formalism and compare the results. Our testing fully confirmed the potential of the CMAP method for broad application for pathway modeling and visualization and, additionally, showed significant advantage in computational efficiency. Furthermore, we showed that Visinets web-based graphical platform, along with standardized method of pathway analysis, may offer a novel and attractive alternative for dynamic simulation in real time for broader use in biomedical research. Since Visinets uses graphical elements with mathematical formulas hidden from the users, we believe that this tool may be particularly suited for those who are new to pathway modeling and without the in-depth modeling skills often required when using other software packages.

  4. Visinets: A Web-Based Pathway Modeling and Dynamic Visualization Tool

    PubMed Central

    Spychala, Pawel; Gomez, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    In this report we describe a novel graphically oriented method for pathway modeling and a software package that allows for both modeling and visualization of biological networks in a user-friendly format. The Visinets mathematical approach is based on causal mapping (CMAP) that has been fully integrated with graphical interface. Such integration allows for fully graphical and interactive process of modeling, from building the network to simulation of the finished model. To test the performance of Visinets software we have applied it to: a) create executable EGFR-MAPK pathway model using an intuitive graphical way of modeling based on biological data, and b) translate existing ordinary differential equation (ODE) based insulin signaling model into CMAP formalism and compare the results. Our testing fully confirmed the potential of the CMAP method for broad application for pathway modeling and visualization and, additionally, showed significant advantage in computational efficiency. Furthermore, we showed that Visinets web-based graphical platform, along with standardized method of pathway analysis, may offer a novel and attractive alternative for dynamic simulation in real time for broader use in biomedical research. Since Visinets uses graphical elements with mathematical formulas hidden from the users, we believe that this tool may be particularly suited for those who are new to pathway modeling and without the in-depth modeling skills often required when using other software packages. PMID:26020230

  5. Visual Basic, Excel-based fish population modeling tool - The pallid sturgeon example

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, Edward H.; Wildhaber, Mark L.; Green, Nicholas S.; Albers, Janice L.

    2016-02-10

    The model presented in this report is a spreadsheet-based model using Visual Basic for Applications within Microsoft Excel (http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7057D0Z) prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It uses the same model structure and, initially, parameters as used by Wildhaber and others (2015) for pallid sturgeon. The difference between the model structure used for this report and that used by Wildhaber and others (2015) is that variance is not partitioned. For the model of this report, all variance is applied at the iteration and time-step levels of the model. Wildhaber and others (2015) partition variance into parameter variance (uncertainty about the value of a parameter itself) applied at the iteration level and temporal variance (uncertainty caused by random environmental fluctuations with time) applied at the time-step level. They included implicit individual variance (uncertainty caused by differences between individuals) within the time-step level.The interface developed for the model of this report is designed to allow the user the flexibility to change population model structure and parameter values and uncertainty separately for every component of the model. This flexibility makes the modeling tool potentially applicable to any fish species; however, the flexibility inherent in this modeling tool makes it possible for the user to obtain spurious outputs. The value and reliability of the model outputs are only as good as the model inputs. Using this modeling tool with improper or inaccurate parameter values, or for species for which the structure of the model is inappropriate, could lead to untenable management decisions. By facilitating fish population modeling, this modeling tool allows the user to evaluate a range of management options and implications. The goal of this modeling tool is to be a user-friendly modeling tool for developing fish population models useful to natural resource

  6. BYMUR software: a free and open source tool for quantifying and visualizing multi-risk analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonini, Roberto; Selva, Jacopo

    2013-04-01

    The BYMUR software aims to provide an easy-to-use open source tool for both computing multi-risk and managing/visualizing/comparing all the inputs (e.g. hazard, fragilities and exposure) as well as the corresponding results (e.g. risk curves, risk indexes). For all inputs, a complete management of inter-model epistemic uncertainty is considered. The BYMUR software will be one of the final products provided by the homonymous ByMuR project (http://bymur.bo.ingv.it/) funded by Italian Ministry of Education, Universities and Research (MIUR), focused to (i) provide a quantitative and objective general method for a comprehensive long-term multi-risk analysis in a given area, accounting for inter-model epistemic uncertainty through Bayesian methodologies, and (ii) apply the methodology to seismic, volcanic and tsunami risks in Naples (Italy). More specifically, the BYMUR software will be able to separately account for the probabilistic hazard assessment of different kind of hazardous phenomena, the relative (time-dependent/independent) vulnerabilities and exposure data, and their possible (predefined) interactions: the software will analyze these inputs and will use them to estimate both single- and multi- risk associated to a specific target area. In addition, it will be possible to connect the software to further tools (e.g., a full hazard analysis), allowing a dynamic I/O of results. The use of Python programming language guarantees that the final software will be open source and platform independent. Moreover, thanks to the integration of some most popular and rich-featured Python scientific modules (Numpy, Matplotlib, Scipy) with the wxPython graphical user toolkit, the final tool will be equipped with a comprehensive Graphical User Interface (GUI) able to control and visualize (in the form of tables, maps and/or plots) any stage of the multi-risk analysis. The additional features of importing/exporting data in MySQL databases and/or standard XML formats (for

  7. Visible Earthquakes: a web-based tool for visualizing and modeling InSAR earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funning, G. J.; Cockett, R.

    2012-12-01

    InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a technique for measuring the deformation of the ground using satellite radar data. One of the principal applications of this method is in the study of earthquakes; in the past 20 years over 70 earthquakes have been studied in this way, and forthcoming satellite missions promise to enable the routine and timely study of events in the future. Despite the utility of the technique and its widespread adoption by the research community, InSAR does not feature in the teaching curricula of most university geoscience departments. This is, we believe, due to a lack of accessibility to software and data. Existing tools for the visualization and modeling of interferograms are often research-oriented, command line-based and/or prohibitively expensive. Here we present a new web-based interactive tool for comparing real InSAR data with simple elastic models. The overall design of this tool was focused on ease of access and use. This tool should allow interested nonspecialists to gain a feel for the use of such data and greatly facilitate integration of InSAR into upper division geoscience courses, giving students practice in comparing actual data to modeled results. The tool, provisionally named 'Visible Earthquakes', uses web-based technologies to instantly render the displacement field that would be observable using InSAR for a given fault location, geometry, orientation, and slip. The user can adjust these 'source parameters' using a simple, clickable interface, and see how these affect the resulting model interferogram. By visually matching the model interferogram to a real earthquake interferogram (processed separately and included in the web tool) a user can produce their own estimates of the earthquake's source parameters. Once satisfied with the fit of their models, users can submit their results and see how they compare with the distribution of all other contributed earthquake models, as well as the mean and median

  8. A visualization tool for the kernel-driven model with improved ability in data analysis and kernel assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yadong; Jiao, Ziti; Zhang, Hu; Bai, Dongni; Zhang, Xiaoning; Li, Yang; He, Dandan

    2016-10-01

    The semi-empirical, kernel-driven Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) model has been widely used for many aspects of remote sensing. With the development of the kernel-driven model, there is a need to further assess the performance of newly developed kernels. The use of visualization tools can facilitate the analysis of model results and the assessment of newly developed kernels. However, the current version of the kernel-driven model does not contain a visualization function. In this study, a user-friendly visualization tool, named MaKeMAT, was developed specifically for the kernel-driven model. The POLDER-3 and CAR BRDF datasets were used to demonstrate the applicability of MaKeMAT. The visualization of inputted multi-angle measurements enhances understanding of multi-angle measurements and allows the choice of measurements with good representativeness. The visualization of modeling results facilitates the assessment of newly developed kernels. The study shows that the visualization tool MaKeMAT can promote the widespread application of the kernel-driven model.

  9. Gas discharge visualization: an imaging and modeling tool for medical biometrics.

    PubMed

    Kostyuk, Nataliya; Cole, Phyadragren; Meghanathan, Natarajan; Isokpehi, Raphael D; Cohly, Hari H P

    2011-01-01

    The need for automated identification of a disease makes the issue of medical biometrics very current in our society. Not all biometric tools available provide real-time feedback. We introduce gas discharge visualization (GDV) technique as one of the biometric tools that have the potential to identify deviations from the normal functional state at early stages and in real time. GDV is a nonintrusive technique to capture the physiological and psychoemotional status of a person and the functional status of different organs and organ systems through the electrophotonic emissions of fingertips placed on the surface of an impulse analyzer. This paper first introduces biometrics and its different types and then specifically focuses on medical biometrics and the potential applications of GDV in medical biometrics. We also present our previous experience with GDV in the research regarding autism and the potential use of GDV in combination with computer science for the potential development of biological pattern/biomarker for different kinds of health abnormalities including cancer and mental diseases.

  10. Gas Discharge Visualization: An Imaging and Modeling Tool for Medical Biometrics

    PubMed Central

    Kostyuk, Nataliya; Cole, Phyadragren; Meghanathan, Natarajan; Isokpehi, Raphael D.; Cohly, Hari H. P.

    2011-01-01

    The need for automated identification of a disease makes the issue of medical biometrics very current in our society. Not all biometric tools available provide real-time feedback. We introduce gas discharge visualization (GDV) technique as one of the biometric tools that have the potential to identify deviations from the normal functional state at early stages and in real time. GDV is a nonintrusive technique to capture the physiological and psychoemotional status of a person and the functional status of different organs and organ systems through the electrophotonic emissions of fingertips placed on the surface of an impulse analyzer. This paper first introduces biometrics and its different types and then specifically focuses on medical biometrics and the potential applications of GDV in medical biometrics. We also present our previous experience with GDV in the research regarding autism and the potential use of GDV in combination with computer science for the potential development of biological pattern/biomarker for different kinds of health abnormalities including cancer and mental diseases. PMID:21747817

  11. NOAA View: An Exploration Tool to Simplify Data Access and Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisut, D.; Loomis, T.; Goel, V.; Carroll, J.

    2014-12-01

    A normal search for data would, ideally, start with the defining a variable of interest and eventually moving down to the acquisition method or analysis type. Too often, data archives assume the users understand the complex terminology of sensors and model names, or even worse - their acronyms. Imagine a non-subject matter expert, especially an educator or hobbyist, trying to navigate this sea of data and seemingly nonsense strings of letters like AVHRR, ESM2M, CFSR, or MLOST. At the NOAA VIsualization Lab, we deal with these issues on a routine basis, and are trying to make data discovery for formal and informal educational use much easier. In this talk, we'll describe the efforts to build the NOAA View data exploration tool, which provides access to over 100 variables from a myriad of satellite, in situ, model, and analysis sources across the agency. NOAA View, a WMS and OpenLayers based web tool and data portal, not only serves data imagery, but also links back to original sources in the data archives. The current architecture as well as plans for future versions will be detailed, along with examples of uses across the geophysical sciences. In addition to the talk, please visit NOAA View at the NOAA exhibit. www.nnvl.noaa.gov/view

  12. AView: An Image-based Clinical Computational Tool for Intracranial Aneurysm Flow Visualization and Clinical Management.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jianping; Antiga, Luca; Varble, Nicole; Snyder, Kenneth V; Levy, Elad I; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Meng, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) occur in around 3% of the entire population. IA rupture is responsible for the most devastating type of hemorrhagic strokes, with high fatality and disability rates as well as healthcare costs. With increasing detection of unruptured aneurysms, clinicians are routinely faced with the dilemma whether to treat IA patients and how to best treat them. Hemodynamic and morphological characteristics are increasingly considered in aneurysm rupture risk assessment and treatment planning, but currently no computational tools allow routine integration of flow visualization and quantitation of these parameters in clinical workflow. In this paper, we introduce AView, a prototype of a clinician-oriented, integrated computation tool for aneurysm hemodynamics, morphology, and risk and data management to aid in treatment decisions and treatment planning in or near the procedure room. Specifically, we describe how we have designed the AView structure from the end-user's point of view, performed a pilot study and gathered clinical feedback. The positive results demonstrate AView's potential clinical value on enhancing aneurysm treatment decision and treatment planning.

  13. netview p: a network visualization tool to unravel complex population structure using genome-wide SNPs.

    PubMed

    Steinig, Eike J; Neuditschko, Markus; Khatkar, Mehar S; Raadsma, Herman W; Zenger, Kyall R

    2016-01-01

    Network-based approaches are emerging as valuable tools for the analysis of complex genetic structure in wild and captive populations. netview p combines data quality control with the construction of population networks through mutual k-nearest neighbours thresholds applied to genome-wide SNPs. The program is cross-platform compatible, open-source and efficiently operates on data ranging from hundreds to hundreds of thousands of SNPs. The pipeline was used for the analysis of pedigree data from simulated (n = 750, SNPs = 1279) and captive silver-lipped pearl oysters (n = 415, SNPs = 1107), wild populations of the European hake from the Atlantic and Mediterranean (n = 834, SNPs = 380) and grey wolves from North America (n = 239, SNPs = 78 255). The population networks effectively visualize large- and fine-scale genetic structure within and between populations, including family-level structure and relationships. netview p comprises a network-based addition to other population analysis tools and provides user-friendly access to a complex network analysis pipeline through implementation in python.

  14. Recent advances in visualizing vulnerable plaque: focus on noninvasive molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Bala, Gezim; Cosyns, Bernard

    2014-09-01

    Traditional imaging methods in atherosclerosis have focused primarily on anatomic information. Imaging approaches that visualize molecular targets rather than anatomic structures may emphasize biologic aspects of atherosclerosis. Molecular imaging of atherosclerotic lesions has become a crucial experimental tool and is now emerging in the clinical arena. In this review, we briefly highlight the rationale and fundamental principles of molecular imaging. We then discuss the promising imaging modalities, along with their potential limitations, and the molecular targets being investigated in experimental research. Finally, we summarize the most important clinical studies recently performed in humans.

  15. SocialMood: an information visualization tool to measure the mood of the people in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, Guilherme; Franco, Roberto; Moraes, Rodolfo; Figueiredo, Bruno; Miranda, João.; Dobrões, José; Afonso, Ricardo; Meiguins, Bianchi

    2013-12-01

    Based on the arena of social networks, the tool developed in this study aims to identify trends mood among undergraduate students. Combining the methodology Self-Assessment Manikin (SAM), which originated in the field of Psychology, the system filters the content provided on the Web and isolates certain words, establishing a range of values as perceived positive, negative or neutral. A Big Data summarizing the results, assisting in the construction and visualization of behavioral profiles generic, so we have a guideline for the development of information visualization tools for social networks.

  16. The effectiveness of dental health education tools for visually impaired students in Bukit Mertajam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabudin, Saadiah; Hashim, Hasnah; Omar, Maizurah

    2016-12-01

    Oral health is a vital component of overall health. It is important in adults and children alike, however, it is even more crucial for children with special needs as they have limited ability to perform oral health practices. Disabled children deserve the same opportunity for oral health as normal children. Unfortunately, oral health care is the most unattended health needs of the disabled children. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of dental health education tools for visually impaired students in two schools in Bukit Mertajam, Penang. The project utilized dental health education tools consisting of an oral health module (printed in braille for the blind and in font 18px for the partially blind), an audio narration of the module were prepared and content-validated by an expert panel. Baseline plaque scores of 38 subjects aged 6-17 years were determined by a trained dental staff nurse. The module was then administered to the subjects facilitated by the teachers. Post intervention plaque scores were recorded again after one month. The pre and post intervention data were analyzed using Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test with a significant p value set at < 0.05. The results showed that there was a reduction in the overall median plaque score in both partially blind (n = 22) and totally blind (n = 16) subjects (2.2 (IQR 0.7) to 1.8 (IQR 0.5) and 2.1 (IQR 0.4) to 2.0 0 (IQR 0.7) respectively). The score difference in the totally blind group was significant (p=0.025). Reductions in plaque scores were also observed in stratified data (based on age); with the partially blind aged 12-17 years showing the greatest reduction. However, the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.067). At younger age, tooth brushing should be supervised by parents as their manual dexterity and cognitive ability is still low. In addition, the younger subjects are less motivated if compared to the older ones. These factors could affect the result of the overall mean OHI-score in this

  17. The Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT): Data Analysis and Visualization for Geoscience Data

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dean; Doutriaux, Charles; Patchett, John; Williams, Sean; Shipman, Galen; Miller, Ross; Steed, Chad; Krishnan, Harinarayan; Silva, Claudio; Chaudhary, Aashish; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Pugmire, David; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank; Prabhat, Mr.; Geveci, Berk; Bauer, Andrew; Pletzer, Alexander; Poco, Jorge; Ellqvist, Tommy; Santos, Emanuele; Potter, Gerald; Smith, Brian; Maxwell, Thomas; Kindig, David; Koop, David

    2013-05-01

    To support interactive visualization and analysis of complex, large-scale climate data sets, UV-CDAT integrates a powerful set of scientific computing libraries and applications to foster more efficient knowledge discovery. Connected through a provenance framework, the UV-CDAT components can be loosely coupled for fast integration or tightly coupled for greater functionality and communication with other components. This framework addresses many challenges in the interactive visual analysis of distributed large-scale data for the climate community.

  18. Synthetic biology and molecular genetics in non-conventional yeasts: Current tools and future advances.

    PubMed

    Wagner, James M; Alper, Hal S

    2016-04-01

    Coupling the tools of synthetic biology with traditional molecular genetic techniques can enable the rapid prototyping and optimization of yeast strains. While the era of yeast synthetic biology began in the well-characterized model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it is swiftly expanding to include non-conventional yeast production systems such as Hansenula polymorpha, Kluyveromyces lactis, Pichia pastoris, and Yarrowia lipolytica. These yeasts already have roles in the manufacture of vaccines, therapeutic proteins, food additives, and biorenewable chemicals, but recent synthetic biology advances have the potential to greatly expand and diversify their impact on biotechnology. In this review, we summarize the development of synthetic biological tools (including promoters and terminators) and enabling molecular genetics approaches that have been applied in these four promising alternative biomanufacturing platforms. An emphasis is placed on synthetic parts and genome editing tools. Finally, we discuss examples of synthetic tools developed in other organisms that can be adapted or optimized for these hosts in the near future.

  19. Measuring political commitment and opportunities to advance food and nutrition security: piloting a rapid assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Fox, Ashley M; Balarajan, Yarlini; Cheng, Chloe; Reich, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    Lack of political commitment has been identified as a primary reason for the low priority that food and nutrition interventions receive from national governments relative to the high disease burden caused by malnutrition. Researchers have identified a number of factors that contribute to food and nutrition's 'low-priority cycle' on national policy agendas, but few tools exist to rapidly measure political commitment and identify opportunities to advance food and nutrition on the policy agenda. This article presents a theory-based rapid assessment approach to gauging countries' level of political commitment to food and nutrition security and identifying opportunities to advance food and nutrition on the policy agenda. The rapid assessment tool was piloted among food and nutrition policymakers and planners in 10 low- and middle-income countries in April to June 2013. Food and nutrition commitment and policy opportunity scores were calculated for each country and strategies to advance food and nutrition on policy agendas were designed for each country. The article finds that, in a majority of countries, political leaders had verbally and symbolically committed to addressing food and nutrition, but adequate financial resources were not allocated to implement specific programmes. In addition, whereas the low cohesion of the policy community has been viewed a major underlying cause of the low-priority status of food and nutrition, the analysis finds that policy community cohesion and having a well thought-out policy alternative were present in most countries. This tool may be useful to policymakers and planners providing information that can be used to benchmark and/or evaluate advocacy efforts to advance reforms in the food and nutrition sector; furthermore, the results can help identify specific strategies that can be employed to move the food and nutrition agenda forward. This tool complements others that have been recently developed to measure national commitment to

  20. EEGNET: An Open Source Tool for Analyzing and Visualizing M/EEG Connectome.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mahmoud; Shamas, Mohamad; Khalil, Mohamad; El Falou, Wassim; Wendling, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    The brain is a large-scale complex network often referred to as the "connectome". Exploring the dynamic behavior of the connectome is a challenging issue as both excellent time and space resolution is required. In this context Magneto/Electroencephalography (M/EEG) are effective neuroimaging techniques allowing for analysis of the dynamics of functional brain networks at scalp level and/or at reconstructed sources. However, a tool that can cover all the processing steps of identifying brain networks from M/EEG data is still missing. In this paper, we report a novel software package, called EEGNET, running under MATLAB (Math works, inc), and allowing for analysis and visualization of functional brain networks from M/EEG recordings. EEGNET is developed to analyze networks either at the level of scalp electrodes or at the level of reconstructed cortical sources. It includes i) Basic steps in preprocessing M/EEG signals, ii) the solution of the inverse problem to localize / reconstruct the cortical sources, iii) the computation of functional connectivity among signals collected at surface electrodes or/and time courses of reconstructed sources and iv) the computation of the network measures based on graph theory analysis. EEGNET is the unique tool that combines the M/EEG functional connectivity analysis and the computation of network measures derived from the graph theory. The first version of EEGNET is easy to use, flexible and user friendly. EEGNET is an open source tool and can be freely downloaded from this webpage: https://sites.google.com/site/eegnetworks/.

  1. Methylation plotter: a web tool for dynamic visualization of DNA methylation data.

    PubMed

    Mallona, Izaskun; Díez-Villanueva, Anna; Peinado, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    Methylation plotter is a Web tool that allows the visualization of methylation data in a user-friendly manner and with publication-ready quality. The user is asked to introduce a file containing the methylation status of a genomic region. This file can contain up to 100 samples and 100 CpGs. Optionally, the user can assign a group for each sample (i.e. whether a sample is a tumoral or normal tissue). After the data upload, the tool produces different graphical representations of the results following the most commonly used styles to display this type of data. They include an interactive plot that summarizes the status of every CpG site and for every sample in lollipop or grid styles. Methylation values ranging from 0 (unmethylated) to 1 (fully methylated) are represented using a gray color gradient. A practical feature of the tool allows the user to choose from different types of arrangement of the samples in the display: for instance, sorting by overall methylation level, by group, by unsupervised clustering or just following the order in which data were entered. In addition to the detailed plot, Methylation plotter produces a methylation profile plot that summarizes the status of the scrutinized region, a boxplot that sums up the differences between groups (if any) and a dendrogram that classifies the data by unsupervised clustering. Coupled with this analysis, descriptive statistics and testing for differences at both CpG and group levels are provided. The implementation is based in R/shiny, providing a highly dynamic user interface that generates quality graphics without the need of writing R code. Methylation plotter is freely available at http://gattaca.imppc.org:3838/methylation_plotter/.

  2. EEGNET: An Open Source Tool for Analyzing and Visualizing M/EEG Connectome

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mahmoud; Shamas, Mohamad; Khalil, Mohamad; El Falou, Wassim; Wendling, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    The brain is a large-scale complex network often referred to as the “connectome”. Exploring the dynamic behavior of the connectome is a challenging issue as both excellent time and space resolution is required. In this context Magneto/Electroencephalography (M/EEG) are effective neuroimaging techniques allowing for analysis of the dynamics of functional brain networks at scalp level and/or at reconstructed sources. However, a tool that can cover all the processing steps of identifying brain networks from M/EEG data is still missing. In this paper, we report a novel software package, called EEGNET, running under MATLAB (Math works, inc), and allowing for analysis and visualization of functional brain networks from M/EEG recordings. EEGNET is developed to analyze networks either at the level of scalp electrodes or at the level of reconstructed cortical sources. It includes i) Basic steps in preprocessing M/EEG signals, ii) the solution of the inverse problem to localize / reconstruct the cortical sources, iii) the computation of functional connectivity among signals collected at surface electrodes or/and time courses of reconstructed sources and iv) the computation of the network measures based on graph theory analysis. EEGNET is the unique tool that combines the M/EEG functional connectivity analysis and the computation of network measures derived from the graph theory. The first version of EEGNET is easy to use, flexible and user friendly. EEGNET is an open source tool and can be freely downloaded from this webpage: https://sites.google.com/site/eegnetworks/. PMID:26379232

  3. The effects of visual magnification and physical movement scale on the manipulation of a tool with indirect vision.

    PubMed

    Bohan, Michael; McConnell, Daniel S; Chaparro, Alex; Thompson, Shelby G

    2010-03-01

    Modern tools often separate the visual and physical aspects of operation, requiring users to manipulate an instrument while viewing the results indirectly on a display. This can pose usability challenges particularly in applications, such as laparoscopic surgery, that require a high degree of movement precision. Magnification used to augment the view and, theoretically, enable finer movements, may introduce other visual-motor disruptions due to the apparent speed of the visual motion on screen (i.e., motion scaling). In this research, we sought to better understand the effects of visual magnification on human movement performance and control in operating a tool via indirect vision. Ten adult participants manipulated a computer mouse to direct a pointer to targets on a display. Results (Experiment 1) showed that, despite increased motion scaling, magnification of the view on screen enabled higher precision control of the mouse pointer. However, the relative effectiveness of visual magnification ultimately depended on the scale of the physical movement, and more specifically the precision limits of the whole-hand grip afforded by the mouse. When the physical scale of the hand/mouse movement was reduced (Experiment 2), fine-precision control began to reach its limits, even at full magnification. The role of magnification can thus be understood as "amplifying" the particular skill level afforded by the effecting limb. These findings suggest a fruitful area for future research is the optimization of hand-control interfaces of tools to maximize movement precision.

  4. Advanced Risk Reduction Tool (ARRT) Special Case Study Report: Science and Engineering Technical Assessments (SETA) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, Paul J.; Hayes, Jane; Zelinski, Lillian

    2000-01-01

    This special case study report presents the Science and Engineering Technical Assessments (SETA) team's findings for exploring the correlation between the underlying models of Advanced Risk Reduction Tool (ARRT) relative to how it identifies, estimates, and integrates Independent Verification & Validation (IV&V) activities. The special case study was conducted under the provisions of SETA Contract Task Order (CTO) 15 and the approved technical approach documented in the CTO-15 Modification #1 Task Project Plan.

  5. Visual DMDX: A web-based authoring tool for DMDX, a Windows display program with millisecond accuracy.

    PubMed

    Garaizar, Pablo; Reips, Ulf-Dietrich

    2015-09-01

    DMDX is a software package for the experimental control and timing of stimulus display for Microsoft Windows systems. DMDX is reliable, flexible, millisecond accurate, and can be downloaded free of charge; therefore it has become very popular among experimental researchers. However, setting up a DMDX-based experiment is burdensome because of its command-based interface. Further, DMDX relies on RTF files in which parts of the stimuli, design, and procedure of an experiment are defined in a complicated (DMASTR-compatible) syntax. Other experiment software, such as E-Prime, Psychopy, and WEXTOR, became successful as a result of integrated visual authoring tools. Such an intuitive interface was lacking for DMDX. We therefore created and present here Visual DMDX (http://visualdmdx.com/), a HTML5-based web interface to set up experiments and export them to DMDX item files format in RTF. Visual DMDX offers most of the features available from the rich DMDX/DMASTR syntax, and it is a useful tool to support researchers who are new to DMDX. Both old and modern versions of DMDX syntax are supported. Further, with Visual DMDX, we go beyond DMDX by having added export to JSON (a versatile web format), easy backup, and a preview option for experiments. In two examples, one experiment each on lexical decision making and affective priming, we explain in a step-by-step fashion how to create experiments using Visual DMDX. We release Visual DMDX under an open-source license to foster collaboration in its continuous improvement.

  6. The Effects of Visual Magnification and Physical Movement Scale on the Manipulation of a Tool with Indirect Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohan, Michael; McConnell, Daniel S.; Chaparro, Alex; Thompson, Shelby G.

    2010-01-01

    Modern tools often separate the visual and physical aspects of operation, requiring users to manipulate an instrument while viewing the results indirectly on a display. This can pose usability challenges particularly in applications, such as laparoscopic surgery, that require a high degree of movement precision. Magnification used to augment the…

  7. Surveying the maize community for their diversity and pedigree visualization needs to prioritize tool development and curation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Maize Genetics and Genomics Database (MaizeGDB) team prepared a survey to identify breeders’ needs for visualizing pedigrees, diversity data, and haplotypes in order to prioritize tool development and curation efforts at MaizeGDB. The survey was distributed to the maize research community on beh...

  8. The Effect of Using a Visual Representation Tool in a Teaching-Learning Sequence for Teaching Newton's Third Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savinainen, Antti; Mäkynen, Asko; Nieminen, Pasi; Viiri, Jouni

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a research-based teaching-learning sequence (TLS) that focuses on the notion of interaction in teaching Newton's third law (N3 law) which is, as earlier studies have shown, a challenging topic for students to learn. The TLS made systematic use of a visual representation tool--an interaction diagram (ID)--highlighting…

  9. Tool kit development to refine and visualize essential climate data and information for marine protected areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, L.; Stachniewicz, J.; Shein, K. A.; Ansari, S.; Jarvis, C.

    2013-05-01

    Marine ecosystem responses to climate variability and change such as changing water temperature, water chemistry (e.g., pH, salinity), water level, or storminess may result in adverse impacts including mass mortality, loss of habitat, increased disease susceptibility, and trophic cascade feedbacks. Unfortunately, while marine ecosystem resource managers are aware of these threats, they often lack sufficient expertise with identifying, accessing and using the many large and complex climate data products that would inform ecosystem-scale climate impact assessments. NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) has been working with the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary Ocean Climate Center to enhance and expand the functionality of NCDC's Weather and Climate Toolkit (WCT) to begin to address this limitation. The WCT is a freely available, Java-based user interface (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/wct/) designed to access, analyze, and display a variety of NCDC's georeferenced climate data products (e.g., satellite data, radar, reanalysis datasets, in-situ observations). However, the WCT requires the user to have already identified a data set of interest and gained access to it. This can limit its utility by users who are not knowledgeable about which data sets are relevant to their needs and where those data sets can be found. The Integrated Marine Protected Area Climate Tools (IMPACT) prototype modification to the WCT addresses those requirements through an iterative process between climate scientists and resource managers. The WCT-IMPACT prototype couples a user query approach with a quasi-expert system that determines, retrieves, and loads the appropriate data products for visualization and analysis by the user. Relevant data products are identified based on the environmental variables in which ecosystem managers have indicated an importance to their ecosystems. To improve response time, the user, through the WCT-IMPACT interface, crops (or subsets) the

  10. Play dough as an educational tool for visualization of complicated cerebral aneurysm anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Behzad; Ghodsi, Mohammad; Ketabchi, Ebrahim; Ghazvini, Arman Rakan

    2005-01-01

    Background Imagination of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of cerebral vascular lesions using two-dimensional (2D) angiograms is one of the skills that neurosurgical residents should achieve during their training. Although ongoing progress in computer software and digital imaging systems has facilitated viewing and interpretation of cerebral angiograms enormously, these facilities are not always available. Methods We have presented the use of play dough as an adjunct to the teaching armamentarium for training in visualization of cerebral aneurysms in some cases. Results The advantages of play dough are low cost, availability and simplicity of use, being more efficient and realistic in training the less experienced resident in comparison with the simple drawings and even angiographic views from different angles without the need for computers and similar equipment. The disadvantages include the psychological resistance of residents to the use of something in surgical training that usually is considered to be a toy, and not being as clean as drawings or computerized images. Conclusion Although technology and computerized software using the patients' own imaging data seems likely to become more advanced in the future, use of play dough in some complicated cerebral aneurysm cases may be helpful in 3D reconstruction of the real situation. PMID:15885141

  11. MY NASA DATA: An Earth Science Data Visualization Tool for the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, P.; Oostra, D.; Crecelius, S.; Chambers, L. H.

    2012-08-01

    Have you needed a source of up-to-date authentic data to use in the classroom? Do your students wonder why they need to know how to use data? This workshop shows how to engage your science students using authentic NASA satellite data! Explore the MY NASA DATA Live Access Server along with classroom-ready lessons using real satellite data. These data can be visualized in a number of ways to suit your established curriculum while grabbing the attention of your students. A focus on the implementation and use of Earth Systems data sets, developed for student researchers in grades K-12, will allow you to better make use of this wonderful tool. All of the data sets are derived from an archive of remotely sensed data retrieved from the myriad of NASA's Earth Observing System Satellites. The data that you and your students will be using and manipulating is the same data, formatted for educational use, that NASA scientists rely on every day to better understand our Earth. Regardless of what subject you teach, you will find multiple lesson plans that will fit right into your class. For more information on the project, go to the MY NASA DATA webpage at http://mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov/.

  12. Domain view: a web tool for protein domain visualization and analysis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaokang; Bingman, Craig A; Wesenberg, Gary E; Sun, Zhaohui; Phillips, George N

    2010-12-01

    The identification of sequence-based protein domains and their boundaries is often a prelude to structure determination. An accurate prediction of disordered regions, secondary structures and low complexity segments of target protein sequences can improve the efficiency of selection in structural genomics and also aid in design of constructs for directed structural biology studies. At the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG) we have developed DomainView, a web tool to visualize and analyze predicted protein domains, disordered regions, secondary structures and low complexity segments of target protein sequences for selection of experimental protein structure attempts. DomainView consists of a relational database and a web graphical-user interface. The database was developed based on MySQL, which stores data from target protein sequences and their domains, disordered regions, secondary structures and low complexity segments. The program of the web user interface is a Perl CGI script. When a user searches for a target protein sequence, the script displays the combinational information about the domains and other features of that target sequence graphically on a web page by querying the database. The graphical representation for each feature is linked to a web page showing more detailed annotation information or to a new window directly running the corresponding prediction program to show further information about that feature.

  13. The "phosphorus pyramid": a visual tool for dietary phosphate management in dialysis and CKD patients.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Claudia; Piccoli, Giorgina B; Cupisti, Adamasco

    2015-01-20

    Phosphorus retention plays a pivotal role in the onset of mineral and bone disorders (MBD) in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Phosphorus retention commonly occurs as a result of net intestinal absorption exceeding renal excretion or dialysis removal. The dietary phosphorus load is crucial since the early stages of CKD, throughout the whole course of the disease, up to dialysis-dependent end-stage renal disease.Agreement exits regarding the need for dietary phosphate control, but it is quite challenging in the real-life setting. Effective strategies to control dietary phosphorus intake include restricting phosphorus-rich foods, preferring phosphorus sourced from plant origin, boiling as the preferred cooking procedure and avoiding foods with phosphorus-containing additives. Nutritional education is crucial in this regard.Based on the existing literature, we developed the "phosphorus pyramid", namely a novel, visual, user-friendly tool for the nutritional education of patients and health-care professionals. The pyramid consists of six levels in which foods are arranged on the basis of their phosphorus content, phosphorus to protein ratio and phosphorus bioavailability. Each has a colored edge (from green to red) that corresponds to recommended intake frequency, ranging from "unrestricted" to "avoid as much as possible".The aim of the phosphorus pyramid is to support dietary counseling in order to reduce the phosphorus load, a crucial aspect of integrated CKD-MBD management.

  14. Hamilton's turns as a visual tool kit for designing single-qubit unitary gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, B. Neethi; Chandrashekar, C. M.; Simon, Sudhavathani

    2012-02-01

    Unitary evolutions of a qubit are traditionally represented geometrically as rotations of the Bloch sphere, but the composition of such evolutions is handled algebraically through matrix multiplication [of SU(2) or SO(3) matrices]. Hamilton's construct, called turns, provides for handling the latter pictorially through the addition of directed great circle arcs on the unit sphere S2⊂R3, resulting in a non-Abelian version of the parallelogram law of vector addition of the Euclidean translation group. This construct is developed into a visual tool kit for handling the design of single-qubit unitary gates. As an application, it is shown, in the concrete case wherein the qubit is realized as polarization states of light, that all unitary gates can be realized conveniently through a universal gadget consisting of just two quarter-wave plates (QWP) and one half-wave plate (HWP). The analysis and results easily transcribe to other realizations of the qubit: The case of NMR is obtained by simply substituting π/2 and π pulses respectively for QWPs and HWPs, the phases of the pulses playing the role of the orientation of fast axes of these plates.

  15. SOURCE EXPLORER: Towards Web Browser Based Tools for Astronomical Source Visualization and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. D.; Hayashi, S.; Gopu, A.

    2014-05-01

    As a new generation of large format, high-resolution imagers come online (ODI, DECAM, LSST, etc.) we are faced with the daunting prospect of astronomical images containing upwards of hundreds of thousands of identifiable sources. Visualizing and interacting with such large datasets using traditional astronomical tools appears to be unfeasible, and a new approach is required. We present here a method for the display and analysis of arbitrarily large source datasets using dynamically scaling levels of detail, enabling scientists to rapidly move from large-scale spatial overviews down to the level of individual sources and everything in-between. Based on the recognized standards of HTML5+JavaScript, we enable observers and archival users to interact with their images and sources from any modern computer without having to install specialized software. We demonstrate the ability to produce large-scale source lists from the images themselves, as well as overlaying data from publicly available source ( 2MASS, GALEX, SDSS, etc.) or user provided source lists. A high-availability cluster of computational nodes allows us to produce these source maps on demand and customized based on user input. User-generated source lists and maps are persistent across sessions and are available for further plotting, analysis, refinement, and culling.

  16. Web-based decision support and visualization tools for water quality management in the Chesapeake Bay watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullinix, C.; Hearn, P.; Zhang, H.; Aguinaldo, J.

    2009-01-01

    Federal, State, and local water quality managers charged with restoring the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem require tools to maximize the impact of their limited resources. To address this need, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Environmental Protection Agency's Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP) are developing a suite of Web-based tools called the Chesapeake Online Assessment Support Toolkit (COAST). The goal of COAST is to help CBP partners identify geographic areas where restoration activities would have the greatest effect, select the appropriate management strategies, and improve coordination and prioritization among partners. As part of the COAST suite of tools focused on environmental restoration, a water quality management visualization component called the Nutrient Yields Mapper (NYM) tool is being developed by USGS. The NYM tool is a web application that uses watershed yield estimates from USGS SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed (SPARROW) attributes model (Schwarz et al., 2006) [6] to allow water quality managers to identify important sources of nitrogen and phosphorous within the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The NYM tool utilizes new open source technologies that have become popular in geospatial web development, including components such as OpenLayers and GeoServer. This paper presents examples of water quality data analysis based on nutrient type, source, yield, and area of interest using the NYM tool for the Chesapeake Bay watershed. In addition, we describe examples of map-based techniques for identifying high and low nutrient yield areas; web map engines; and data visualization and data management techniques.

  17. Imaging mass spectrometry of the visual system: Advancing the molecular understanding of retina degenerations.

    PubMed

    Bowrey, Hannah E; Anderson, David M; Pallitto, Patrick; Gutierrez, Danielle B; Fan, Jie; Crouch, Rosalie K; Schey, Kevin L; Ablonczy, Zsolt

    2016-04-01

    Visual sensation is fundamental for quality of life, and loss of vision to retinal degeneration is a debilitating condition. The eye is the only part of the central nervous system that can be noninvasively observed with optical imaging. In the clinics, various spectroscopic methods provide high spatial resolution images of the fundus and the developing degenerative lesions. However, the currently utilized tools are not specific enough to establish the molecular underpinnings of retinal diseases. In contrast, mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool to identify molecularly specific disease indicators and classification markers. This technique is particularly well suited to the eye, where molecular information can be correlated with clinical data collected via noninvasive diagnostic imaging modalities. Recent studies during the last few recent years have uncovered a plethora of new spatially defined molecular information on several vision-threatening diseases, including age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt disease, glaucoma, cataract, as well as lipid disorders. Even though MS inside the eye cannot be performed noninvasively, by linking diagnostic and molecular information, these studies are the first step toward the development of smart ophthalmic diagnostic and surgical tools. Here, we provide an overview of current approaches applying MSI technology to ocular pathology.

  18. New Visualization and Analysis Tools for Magnetospheric, Heliospheric, and Solar Models from the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrios, D.; LaSota, J.; Donti, N.; Boblitt, J.; Mullinix, R.; Maddox, M. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed new analysis tools to help scientists analyze space weather simulation data executed at the CCMC. Space Weather Explorer 2 is a Java-based application that can visualize, in 2D and 3D, large data files on common hardware. A new WebGL and HTML5-based version of Space Weather Explorer, along with a data streaming server, allows even more users to access larger datasets than normally possible. The tool allows users to remotely and easily share visualization data with others, bringing collaborative research to a new level. We will demonstrate how these tools enable new insights into the structures and dynamics of complex heliophysics phenomena such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flux transfer events (FTEs), and Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices.

  19. Effectiveness of Program Visualization: A Case Study with the ViLLE Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajala, Teemu; Laakso, Mikko-Jussi; Kaila, Erkki; Salakoski, Tapio

    2008-01-01

    Program visualization is one of the various methods developed over the years to aid novices with their difficulties in learning to program. It consists of different graphical--often animated--and textual objects, visualizing the execution of programs. The aim of program visualization is to enhance students' understanding of different areas of…

  20. Sinistrals are rarely “right”: evidence from tool-affordance processing in visual half-field paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Michałowski, Bartosz; Króliczak, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Although current neuroscience and behavioral studies provide substantial understanding of tool representations (e.g., the processing of tool-related affordances) in the human brain, most of this knowledge is limited to right-handed individuals with typical organization of cognitive and manual skills. Therefore, any insights from these lines of research may be of little value in rehabilitation of patients with atypical laterality of praxis and/or hand dominance. To fill this gap, we tested perceptual processing of man-made objects in 18 healthy left-handers who were likely to show greater incidence of right-sided or bilateral (atypical) lateralization of functions. In the two experiments reported here, participants performed a tool vs. non-tool categorization task. In Experiment 1, target and distracter objects were presented for 200 ms in the left (LVF) or right (RVF) visual field, followed by 200 ms masks. In Experiment 2, the centrally presented targets were preceded by masked primes of 35 ms duration, again presented in the LVF or RVF. Based on results from both studies, i.e., response times (RTs) to correctly discriminated stimuli irrespective of their category, participants were divided into two groups showing privileged processing in either left (N = 9) or right (N = 9) visual field. In Experiment 1, only individuals with RVF advantage showed significantly faster categorization of tools in their dominant visual field, whereas those with LVF advantage revealed merely a trend toward such an effect. In Experiment 2, when targets were preceded by identical primes, the “atypical” group showed significantly facilitated categorization of non-tools, whereas the “typical” group demonstrated a trend toward faster categorization of tools. These results indicate that in subjects with atypically organized cognitive skills, tool-related processes are not just mirror reversed. Thus, our outcomes call for particular caution in neurorehabilitation directed at left

  1. Advanced gradient-index lens design tools to maximize system performance and reduce SWaP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Sawyer D.; Nagar, Jogender; Brocker, Donovan E.; Easum, John A.; Turpin, Jeremiah P.; Werner, Douglas H.

    2016-05-01

    GRadient-INdex (GRIN) lenses have long been of interest due to their potential for providing levels of performance unachievable with traditional homogeneous lenses. While historically limited by a lack of suitable materials, rapid advancements in manufacturing techniques, including 3D printing, have recently kindled a renewed interest in GRIN optics. Further increasing the desire for GRIN devices has been the advent of Transformation Optics (TO), which provides the mathematical framework for representing the behavior of electromagnetic radiation in a given geometry by "transforming" it to an alternative, usually more desirable, geometry through an appropriate mapping of the constituent material parameters. Using TO, aspherical lenses can be transformed to simpler spherical and flat geometries or even rotationally-asymmetric shapes which result in true 3D GRIN profiles. Meanwhile, there is a critical lack of suitable design tools which can effectively evaluate the optical wave propagation through 3D GRIN profiles produced by TO. Current modeling software packages for optical lens systems also lack advanced multi-objective global optimization capability which allows the user to explicitly view the trade-offs between all design objectives such as focus quality, FOV, ▵nand focal drift due to chromatic aberrations. When coupled with advanced design methodologies such as TO, wavefront matching (WFM), and analytical achromatic GRIN theory, these tools provide a powerful framework for maximizing SWaP (Size, Weight and Power) reduction in GRIN-enabled optical systems. We provide an overview of our advanced GRIN design tools and examples which minimize the presence of mono- and polychromatic aberrations in the context of reducing SWaP.

  2. Development of a Phasor Diagram Creator to Visualize the Piston and Displacer Forces in an Advanced Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Dipanjan; Lewandowski, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    The steady state, nearly sinusoidal behavior of the components in a Free Piston Stirling Engine allows for visualization of the forces in the system using phasor diagrams. Based on Newton's second law, F=ma, any phasor diagrams modeling a given component in a system should close if all of the acting forces have been considered. Since the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), currently being developed for future NASA deep space missions, is made up of such nearly sinusoidally oscillating components, its phasor diagrams would also be expected to close. A graphical user interface (GUI) has been written in MATLAB by taking user input data, passing it to Sage, a 1-D thermodynamic modeling program used to model the Stirling convertor, running Sage and then automatically plotting the phasor diagrams. Using this software tool, the effect of varying different Sage inputs on the phasor diagrams was determined. The parameters varied were piston amplitude, hot end temperature, cold end temperature, operating frequency, and displacer spring constant. By using these phasor diagrams, better insight can be gained as to why the convertor operates the way that it does.

  3. Development of a Phasor Diagram Creator to Visualize the Piston and Displacer Forces in an Advanced Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Dipanjan; Lewandowski, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    The steady-state, nearly sinusoidal behavior of the components in a free-piston Stirling engine allows for visualization of the forces in the system using phasor diagrams. Based on Newton's second law, F = ma, any phasor diagrams modeling a given component in a system should close if all of the acting forces have been considered. Since the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), currently being developed for future NASA deep space missions, is made up of such nearly sinusoidally oscillating components, its phasor diagrams would also be expected to close. A graphical user interface (GUI) has been written in MATLAB (MathWorks), which takes user input data, passes it to Sage (Gedeon Associates), a one-dimensional thermodynamic modeling program used to model the Stirling convertor, runs Sage, and then automatically plots the phasor diagrams. Using this software tool, the effect of varying different Sage inputs on the phasor diagrams was determined. The parameters varied were piston amplitude, hot-end temperature, cold-end temperature, operating frequency, and displacer spring constant. These phasor diagrams offer useful insight into convertor operation and performance.

  4. ADF/ADC Web Tools for Browsing and Visualizing Astronomical Catalogs and NASA Astrophysics Mission Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaya, E.; Kargatis, V.; Blackwell, J.; Borne, K.; White, R. A.; Cheung, C.

    1998-05-01

    Several new web based services have been introduced this year by the Astrophysics Data Facility (ADF) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. IMPReSS is a graphical interface to astrophysics databases that presents the user with the footprints of observations of space-based missions. It also aids astronomers in retrieving these data by sending requests to distributed data archives. The VIEWER is a reader of ADC astronomical catalogs and journal tables that allows subsetting of catalogs by column choices and range selection and provides database-like search capability within each table. With it, the user can easily find the table data most appropriate for their purposes and then download either the subset table or the original table. CATSEYE is a tool that plots output tables from the VIEWER (and soon AMASE), making exploring the datasets fast and easy. Having completed the basic functionality of these systems, we are enhancing the site to provide advanced functionality. These will include: market basket storage of tables and records of VIEWER output for IMPReSS and AstroBrowse queries, non-HTML table responses to AstroBrowse type queries, general column arithmetic, modularity to allow entrance into the sequence of web pages at any point, histogram plots, navigable maps, and overplotting of catalog objects on mission footprint maps. When completed, the ADF/ADC web facilities will provide astronomical tabled data and mission retrieval information in several hyperlinked environments geared for users at any level, from the school student to the typical astronomer to the expert datamining tools at state-of-the-art data centers.

  5. Environmental use of a Laser Range Finder and the Advanced Visualization System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, E. N.; Bohn, S.; Baker, C. P.; Jones, D. R.; Strope, L. A.

    1993-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is facing a large task in characterizing and remediating the contents of hazardous waste inside storage tanks. The characterization process of these tanks is a key step to the remediation process. Due to the hazardous materials inside the waste tanks, all of the work must be done remotely utilizing robotic systems. The Laser Range Finder (LRF) is a single point sensor used to remotely collect range and intensity data. The LRF sensor data is used to reconstruct the tank surface environment based on multiple LRF scans. This reconstructed surface definition can be used by a robotic controller to perform obstacle avoidance with items in the tank. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has used Advanced Visualization System (AVS) to prototype the filtering, transformation, and reconstructing process. AVS software modules have been written to address LRF filtering on both the range and intensity images. A coordinate transformation module was constructed to convert the raw LRF data into a Cartesian coordinate reference frame. The results of filtering and transforms are integrated into a master map of the tank using an octree database. Master octrees are traversed and made into AVS geometry to visualize the tank interior. The graphical display of the tank interior can be used for robotic path planning and monitoring waste removal progress.

  6. Environmental use of a Laser Range Finder and the Advanced Visualization System

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, E.N.; Bohn, S.; Baker, C.P.; Jones, D.R.; Strope, L.A.

    1993-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is facing a large task in characterizing and remediating the contents of hazardous waste inside storage tanks. The characterization process of these tanks is a key step to the remediation process. Due to the hazardous materials inside the waste tanks, all of the work must be done remotely utilizing robotic systems. The Laser Range Finder (LRF) is a single point sensor used to remotely collect range and intensity data. The LRF sensor data is used to reconstruct the tank surface environment based on multiple LRF scans. This reconstructed surface definition can be used by a robotic controller to perform obstacle avoidance with items in the tank. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has used Advanced Visualization System (AVS) to prototype the filtering, transformation and reconstructing process. AVS software modules have been written to address LRF filtering on both the range and intensity images. A coordinate transformation module was constructed to convert the raw LRF data into a Cartesian coordinate reference frame. The results of filtering and transforms are integrated into a master map of the tank using an octree database. Master octrees are traversed and made into AVS geometry to visualize the tank interior. The graphical display of the tank interior can be used for robotic path planning and monitoring waste removal progress.

  7. Advanced data visualization and sensor fusion: Conversion of techniques from medical imaging to Earth science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Richard C.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Pelizzari, Charles; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran

    1992-01-01

    Hughes Aircraft Company and the University of Chicago propose to transfer existing medical imaging registration algorithms to the area of multi-sensor data fusion. The University of Chicago's algorithms have been successfully demonstrated to provide pixel by pixel comparison capability for medical sensors with different characteristics. The research will attempt to fuse GOES, AVHRR, and SSM/I sensor data which will benefit a wide range of researchers. The algorithms will utilize data visualization and algorithm development tools created by Hughes in its EOSDIS prototyping. This will maximize the work on the fusion algorithms since support software (e.g. input/output routines) will already exist. The research will produce a portable software library with documentation for use by other researchers.

  8. Cellulosome-based, Clostridium-derived multi-functional enzyme complexes for advanced biotechnology tool development: advances and applications.

    PubMed

    Hyeon, Jeong Eun; Jeon, Sang Duck; Han, Sung Ok

    2013-11-01

    The cellulosome is one of nature's most elegant and elaborate nanomachines and a key biological and biotechnological macromolecule that can be used as a multi-functional protein complex tool. Each protein module in the cellulosome system is potentially useful in an advanced biotechnology application. The high-affinity interactions between the cohesin and dockerin domains can be used in protein-based biosensors to improve both sensitivity and selectivity. The scaffolding protein includes a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) that attaches strongly to cellulose substrates and facilitates the purification of proteins fused with the dockerin module through a one-step CBM purification method. Although the surface layer homology (SLH) domain of CbpA is not present in other strains, replacement of the cell surface anchoring domain allows a foreign protein to be displayed on the surface of other strains. The development of a hydrolysis enzyme complex is a useful strategy for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), enabling microorganisms with biomass hydrolysis activity. Thus, the development of various configurations of multi-functional protein complexes for use as tools in whole-cell biocatalyst systems has drawn considerable attention as an attractive strategy for bioprocess applications. This review provides a detailed summary of the current achievements in Clostridium-derived multi-functional complex development and the impact of these complexes in various areas of biotechnology.

  9. Anvil Forecast Tool in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Hood, Doris

    2009-01-01

    Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) from the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) and forecasters from the National Weather Service (NWS) Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have identified anvil forecasting as one of their most challenging tasks when predicting the probability of violating the Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LLCC) (Krider et al. 2006; Space Shuttle Flight Rules (FR), NASA/JSC 2004)). As a result, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a tool that creates an anvil threat corridor graphic that can be overlaid on satellite imagery using the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS, Short and Wheeler, 2002). The tool helps forecasters estimate the locations of thunderstorm anvils at one, two, and three hours into the future. It has been used extensively in launch and landing operations by both the 45 WS and SMG. The Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) is now used along with MIDDS for weather analysis and display at SMG. In Phase I of this task, SMG tasked the AMU to transition the tool from MIDDS to AWIPS (Barrett et aI., 2007). For Phase II, SMG requested the AMU make the Anvil Forecast Tool in AWIPS more configurable by creating the capability to read model gridded data from user-defined model files instead of hard-coded files. An NWS local AWIPS application called AGRID was used to accomplish this. In addition, SMG needed to be able to define the pressure levels for the model data, instead of hard-coding the bottom level as 300 mb and the top level as 150 mb. This paper describes the initial development of the Anvil Forecast Tool for MIDDS, followed by the migration of the tool to AWIPS in Phase I. It then gives a detailed presentation of the Phase II improvements to the AWIPS tool.

  10. Using Enabling Technologies to Advance Data Intensive Analysis Tools in the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knosp, B.; Gangl, M. E.; Hristova-Veleva, S. M.; Kim, R. M.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Li, P.; Niamsuwan, N.; Shen, T. P. J.; Turk, F. J.; Vu, Q. A.

    2014-12-01

    The JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) brings together satellite, aircraft, and model forecast data from several NASA, NOAA, and other data centers to assist researchers in comparing and analyzing data related to tropical cyclones. The TCIS has been supporting specific science field campaigns, such as the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign and the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) campaign, by creating near real-time (NRT) data visualization portals. These portals are intended to assist in mission planning, enhance the understanding of current physical processes, and improve model data by comparing it to satellite and aircraft observations. The TCIS NRT portals allow the user to view plots on a Google Earth interface. To compliment these visualizations, the team has been working on developing data analysis tools to let the user actively interrogate areas of Level 2 swath and two-dimensional plots they see on their screen. As expected, these observation and model data are quite voluminous and bottlenecks in the system architecture can occur when the databases try to run geospatial searches for data files that need to be read by the tools. To improve the responsiveness of the data analysis tools, the TCIS team has been conducting studies on how to best store Level 2 swath footprints and run sub-second geospatial searches to discover data. The first objective was to improve the sampling accuracy of the footprints being stored in the TCIS database by comparing the Java-based NASA PO.DAAC Level 2 Swath Generator with a TCIS Python swath generator. The second objective was to compare the performance of four database implementations - MySQL, MySQL+Solr, MongoDB, and PostgreSQL - to see which database management system would yield the best geospatial query and storage performance. The final objective was to integrate our chosen technologies with our Joint Probability Density Function (Joint PDF), Wave Number Analysis, and

  11. Big Data Geo-Analytical Tool Development for Spatial Analysis Uncertainty Visualization and Quantification Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, K.; Bauer, J. R.; Baker, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    As big data computing capabilities are increasingly paired with spatial analytical tools and approaches, there is a need to ensure uncertainty associated with the datasets used in these analyses is adequately incorporated and portrayed in results. Often the products of spatial analyses, big data and otherwise, are developed using discontinuous, sparse, and often point-driven data to represent continuous phenomena. Results from these analyses are generally presented without clear explanations of the uncertainty associated with the interpolated values. The Variable Grid Method (VGM) offers users with a flexible approach designed for application to a variety of analyses where users there is a need to study, evaluate, and analyze spatial trends and patterns while maintaining connection to and communicating the uncertainty in the underlying spatial datasets. The VGM outputs a simultaneous visualization representative of the spatial data analyses and quantification of underlying uncertainties, which can be calculated using data related to sample density, sample variance, interpolation error, uncertainty calculated from multiple simulations. In this presentation we will show how we are utilizing Hadoop to store and perform spatial analysis through the development of custom Spark and MapReduce applications that incorporate ESRI Hadoop libraries. The team will present custom 'Big Data' geospatial applications that run on the Hadoop cluster and integrate with ESRI ArcMap with the team's probabilistic VGM approach. The VGM-Hadoop tool has been specially built as a multi-step MapReduce application running on the Hadoop cluster for the purpose of data reduction. This reduction is accomplished by generating multi-resolution, non-overlapping, attributed topology that is then further processed using ESRI's geostatistical analyst to convey a probabilistic model of a chosen study region. Finally, we will share our approach for implementation of data reduction and topology generation

  12. Interactive tool for visualization and segmentation of permanent radioactive seeds in postoperative prostate brachytherapy CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Sayan D.; Stoknes, Kevin; Grimm, Peter D.; Estlund, Jacque; Chalana, Vikram; Kim, Yongmin

    1999-05-01

    Implantation of radioactive isotopes within the prostate for the treatment of early stage localized prostate cancer is becoming a popular treatment option. Postoperative calculation of the dose delivered to the prostate requires accurate verification of the number and location of seeds within the prostate. Current post operative dosimetry technique requires the dosimetrist to manually count and record the position of each seed from x-ray computed tomography (CT) images. This procedure is operator-dependent and time-consuming, thus limiting the ability of different brachytherapy centers to compare results and create a standard methodology. Seed identification is performed by thresholding the CT images interactively, using a graphical user interface, followed by mathematical morphology to remove noise. Segmented seeds are grouped into regions via connected-component analysis. Regions are then classified into seeds using a prior knowledge of the seed dimensions and their relative positions in the consecutive CT images. Unresolved regions, which can indicate the presence of more than one seed, are corrected manually. The efficiency of this tool was evaluated by comparing the time to manually count the seeds to the time required to do the same task using the automated program. For 15 sets of images from 15 patients, the average time for manually counting the seeds was 45 minutes per patient versus 6.4 minutes on average per patients, the average time for manually counting the seeds was 45 minutes per patient versus 6.4 minutes on average per patient when the software was used to perform the same task. Using the interactive visualization and segmentation algorithm, the time required to count the seeds during post- implant dosimetry has been reduced by a factor of 7 compared to the existing manual technique.

  13. Advanced computational tools for optimization and uncertainty quantification of carbon capture processes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C.; Ng, Brenda; Eslick, John

    2014-01-01

    Advanced multi-scale modeling and simulation has the potential to dramatically reduce development time, resulting in considerable cost savings. The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and universities that is developing, demonstrating, and deploying a suite of multi-scale modeling and simulation tools. One significant computational tool is FOQUS, a Framework for Optimization and Quantification of Uncertainty and Sensitivity, which enables basic data submodels, including thermodynamics and kinetics, to be used within detailed process models to rapidly synthesize and optimize a process and determine the level of uncertainty associated with the resulting process. The overall approach of CCSI is described with a more detailed discussion of FOQUS and its application to carbon capture systems.

  14. Proposal for constructing an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Sims, Michael H.; Podolak, Esther; Mckay, Christopher P.; Thompson, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Scientific model building can be a time intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large and complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot easily be distributed and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complex, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientist/programmer to understand. We believe that advanced software techniques can facilitate both the model building and model sharing process. We propose to construct a scientific modeling software tool that serves as an aid to the scientist in developing and using models. The proposed tool will include an interactive intelligent graphical interface and a high level, domain specific, modeling language. As a testbed for this research, we propose development of a software prototype in the domain of planetary atmospheric modeling.

  15. NASA Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM): Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeil, D. A.; Craig, D. A.; Christensen, C. B.; Gresham, E. C.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this Technical Interchange Meeting was to increase the quantity and quality of technical, cost, and programmatic data used to model the impact of investing in different technologies. The focus of this meeting was the Technology Tool Box (TTB), a database of performance, operations, and programmatic parameters provided by technologists and used by systems engineers. The TTB is the data repository used by a system of models known as the Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS). This report describes the result of the November meeting, and also provides background information on ATLAS and the TTB.

  16. A Collaborative Education Network for Advancing Climate Literacy using Data Visualization Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDougall, C.; Russell, E. L.; Murray, M.; Bendel, W. B.

    2013-12-01

    One of the more difficult issues in engaging broad audiences with scientific research is to present it in a way that is intuitive, captivating and up-to-date. Over the past ten years, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has made significant progress in this area through Science On a Sphere(R) (SOS). SOS is a room-sized, global display system that uses computers and video projectors to display Earth systems data onto a six-foot diameter sphere, analogous to a giant animated globe. This well-crafted data visualization system serves as a way to integrate and display global change phenomena; including polar ice melt, projected sea level rise, ocean acidification and global climate models. Beyond a display for individual data sets, SOS provides a holistic global perspective that highlights the interconnectedness of Earth systems, nations and communities. SOS is now a featured exhibit at more than 100 science centers, museums, universities, aquariums and other institutions around the world reaching more than 33 million visitors every year. To facilitate the development of how this data visualization technology and these visualizations could be used with public audiences, we recognized the need for the exchange of information among the users. To accomplish this, we established the SOS Users Collaborative Network. This network consists of the institutions that have an SOS system or partners who are creating content and educational programming for SOS. When we began the Network in 2005, many museums had limited capacity to both incorporate real-time, authentic scientific data about the Earth system and interpret global change visualizations. They needed not only the visualization platform and the scientific content, but also assistance with methods of approach. We needed feedback from these users on how to craft understandable visualizations and how to further develop the SOS platform to support learning. Through this Network and the collaboration

  17. Plant Aquaporins: Genome-Wide Identification, Transcriptomics, Proteomics, and Advanced Analytical Tools

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Rupesh K.; Sonah, Humira; Bélanger, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are channel-forming integral membrane proteins that facilitate the movement of water and many other small molecules. Compared to animals, plants contain a much higher number of AQPs in their genome. Homology-based identification of AQPs in sequenced species is feasible because of the high level of conservation of protein sequences across plant species. Genome-wide characterization of AQPs has highlighted several important aspects such as distribution, genetic organization, evolution and conserved features governing solute specificity. From a functional point of view, the understanding of AQP transport system has expanded rapidly with the help of transcriptomics and proteomics data. The efficient analysis of enormous amounts of data generated through omic scale studies has been facilitated through computational advancements. Prediction of protein tertiary structures, pore architecture, cavities, phosphorylation sites, heterodimerization, and co-expression networks has become more sophisticated and accurate with increasing computational tools and pipelines. However, the effectiveness of computational approaches is based on the understanding of physiological and biochemical properties, transport kinetics, solute specificity, molecular interactions, sequence variations, phylogeny and evolution of aquaporins. For this purpose, tools like Xenopus oocyte assays, yeast expression systems, artificial proteoliposomes, and lipid membranes have been efficiently exploited to study the many facets that influence solute transport by AQPs. In the present review, we discuss genome-wide identification of AQPs in plants in relation with recent advancements in analytical tools, and their availability and technological challenges as they apply to AQPs. An exhaustive review of omics resources available for AQP research is also provided in order to optimize their efficient utilization. Finally, a detailed catalog of computational tools and analytical pipelines is

  18. Global search tool for the Advanced Photon Source Integrated Relational Model of Installed Systems (IRMIS) database.

    SciTech Connect

    Quock, D. E. R.; Cianciarulo, M. B.; APS Engineering Support Division; Purdue Univ.

    2007-01-01

    The Integrated Relational Model of Installed Systems (IRMIS) is a relational database tool that has been implemented at the Advanced Photon Source to maintain an updated account of approximately 600 control system software applications, 400,000 process variables, and 30,000 control system hardware components. To effectively display this large amount of control system information to operators and engineers, IRMIS was initially built with nine Web-based viewers: Applications Organizing Index, IOC, PLC, Component Type, Installed Components, Network, Controls Spares, Process Variables, and Cables. However, since each viewer is designed to provide details from only one major category of the control system, the necessity for a one-stop global search tool for the entire database became apparent. The user requirements for extremely fast database search time and ease of navigation through search results led to the choice of Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX) technology in the implementation of the IRMIS global search tool. Unique features of the global search tool include a two-tier level of displayed search results, and a database data integrity validation and reporting mechanism.

  19. Book4All: A Tool to Make an e-Book More Accessible to Students with Vision/Visual-Impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrò, Antonello; Contini, Elia; Leporini, Barbara

    Empowering people who are blind or otherwise visually impaired includes ensuring that products and electronic materials incorporate a broad range of accessibility features and work well with screen readers and other assistive technology devices. This is particularly important for students with vision impairments. Unfortunately, authors and publishers often do not include specific criteria when preparing the contents. Consequently, e-books can be inadequate for blind and low vision users, especially for students. In this paper we describe a semi-automatic tool developed to support operators who adapt e-documents for visually impaired students. The proposed tool can be used to convert a PDF e-book into a more suitable accessible and usable format readable on desktop computer or on mobile devices.

  20. An Excel(®)-based visualization tool of 2-D soil gas concentration profiles in petroleum vapor intrusion.

    PubMed

    Verginelli, Iason; Yao, Yijun; Suuberg, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    In this study we present a petroleum vapor intrusion tool implemented in Microsoft(®) Excel(®) using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) and integrated within a graphical interface. The latter helps users easily visualize two-dimensional soil gas concentration profiles and indoor concentrations as a function of site-specific conditions such as source strength and depth, biodegradation reaction rate constant, soil characteristics and building features. This tool is based on a two-dimensional explicit analytical model that combines steady-state diffusion-dominated vapor transport in a homogeneous soil with a piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation model, in which rate is limited by oxygen availability. As recommended in the recently released United States Environmental Protection Agency's final Petroleum Vapor Intrusion guidance, a sensitivity analysis and a simplified Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis are also included in the spreadsheet.

  1. An Analysis of Energy Savings Possible Through Advances in Automotive Tooling Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Schmoyer, RLS

    2004-12-03

    The use of lightweight and highly formable advanced materials in automobile and truck manufacturing has the potential to save fuel. Advances in tooling technology would promote the use of these materials. This report describes an energy savings analysis performed to approximate the potential fuel savings and consequential carbon-emission reductions that would be possible because of advances in tooling in the manufacturing of, in particular, non-powertrain components of passenger cars and heavy trucks. Separate energy analyses are performed for cars and heavy trucks. Heavy trucks are considered to be Class 7 and 8 trucks (trucks rated over 26,000 lbs gross vehicle weight). A critical input to the analysis is a set of estimates of the percentage reductions in weight and drag that could be achieved by the implementation of advanced materials, as a consequence of improved tooling technology, which were obtained by surveying tooling industry experts who attended a DOE Workshop, Tooling Technology for Low-Volume Vehicle Production, held in Seattle and Detroit in October and November 2003. The analysis is also based on 2001 fuel consumption totals and on energy-audit component proportions of fuel use due to drag, rolling resistance, and braking. The consumption proportions are assumed constant over time, but an allowance is made for fleet growth. The savings for a particular component is then the product of total fuel consumption, the percentage reduction of the component, and the energy audit component proportion. Fuel savings estimates for trucks also account for weight-limited versus volume-limited operations. Energy savings are assumed to be of two types: (1) direct energy savings incurred through reduced forces that must be overcome to move the vehicle or to slow it down in braking. and (2) indirect energy savings through reductions in the required engine power, the production and transmission of which incur thermodynamic losses, internal friction, and other

  2. Improving Readability of an Evaluation Tool for Low-Income Clients Using Visual Information Processing Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Marilyn S.; Sylva, Kathryn; Martin, Anna; Metz, Diane; Wooten-Swanson, Patti

    2008-01-01

    Literacy is an issue for many low-income audiences. Using visual information processing theories, the goal was improving readability of a food behavior checklist and ultimately improving its ability to accurately capture existing changes in dietary behaviors. Using group interviews, low-income clients (n = 18) evaluated 4 visual styles. The text…

  3. Deaf Readers and Phrasal Verbs: Instructional Efficacy of Chunking as a Visual Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwell, William R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a visual strategy that of chunking or visually bracketing phrasal verbs in sentences in short stories. A descriptive case study design was used for this study to compare the two instructional strategies. In this study, stories were presented to 14 severely and profound deaf students…

  4. VID-R and SCAN: Tools and Methods for the Automated Analysis of Visual Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekman, Paul; And Others

    The VID-R (Visual Information Display and Retrieval) system that enables computer-aided analysis of visual records is composed of a film-to-television chain, two videotape recorders with complete remote control of functions, a video-disc recorder, three high-resolution television monitors, a teletype, a PDP-8, a video and audio interface, three…

  5. An Excel-based tool for evaluating and visualizing geothermometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, J. M.; Wörner, G.; Kronz, A.

    2012-12-01

    Most geothermometers are based on exchange of chemical components between two phases that are in equilibrium with one another. In cases where (a) pairs of minerals in mutual grain contact are difficult to find, (b) the sample has experienced multiple generations of crystal growth resulting in zoning along mutual grain contact, (c) has multiple populations of crystals that each preserve a point along a P-T-t path, or (d) exsolution is present, identification of equilibrium pairs of analyses is challenging. All of these problems are exacerbated where the element(s) of interest diffuse slowly, yet these systems are among the most useful because they have the advantage of being resistant to resetting by later thermal events. By relaxing the requirement that thermometry be done only on analyses across a mutual grain boundary, the problem changes from that of having a dearth of data to that of having large data sets that possibly include a significant proportion of meaningless pairs of analyses that need to be filtered out. We present a method using Microsoft Excel that allows large amounts of data to be handled in a compact form-factor, and provides a calculation and visualization tool that: (1) can be adapted for use with any thermometer involving two phases, (2) facilitates quick comparison of equilibrium and apparent temperature results from all possible equilibrium pairs in a sample, (3) identifies populations of mineral pairs that may have experienced similar P-T conditions in the case of an open system, and (4) shows whether resulting temperature estimations predominantly depend on observed compositional variability in one of the two phases. In contrast to a traditional data table where all samples and associated calculations are presented either in columns or rows, our approach is to array our calculations in a grid. Model inputs relating to one phase are arrayed vertically, and inputs related to the other phase are arrayed horizontally along the left and top

  6. A New Multifunctional GES DAAC Data Processing and Visualization Tool for Land, Ocean and Atmosphere MODIS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, L.; Deroo, C.; Ouzounov, D.; Ahmad, S.; Koziana, J.; Leptoukh, G.; Savtchenko, A.; Serafino, G.; Sharma, A.; Qu, J.

    2001-12-01

    The unique position of the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Center (GES DAAC) as an intermediary between users and MODIS data led us to explore and develop tools that could help users access and manipulate data. Currently all available tools are not able to meet the MODIS data processing requirements, which are critical at the GES DAAC. Our goal was to unify the strengths of the current tools and add new features in a new tool intended to visualize, validate, and analyze MODIS data. HDFLook-MODIS is a result of joint collaboration between LOA USTL, France, and GES DAAC and is based on the very popular MSPHINX (http://www-loa.univ-lille1.fr/informatique/anim.html) tool philosophy. Created as a flexible modular tool, is it easy to update, add new features, and is free to users obtaining it from the GES DAAC. HDFLook-MODIS helps MODIS Data Support Team significantly to visualize, validate and analyze MODIS data, and also is to be used for batch-mode local processing. Main features of HDFLook-MODIS are: 1) Accessing and visualization of all swath (level-1, and 2) and gridded (level-3 and 4) MODIS radiometric and geolocation, atmosphere, land, and ocean products; 2) Re-mapping of swath data to world map. Geo-projection conversion. Reprojection the initial projection into several pre defined selection; 3) Interactive and batch mode capabilities; 4) Subsetting features - availability of parameter, band, and spatial subsetting; 5) Multi-granule processing - Mosaic and stitch capabilities; 6) Displays ancillary/data attributes; 7) Data conversion- from scaled quantities to physical units. Format conversion- HDF-EOS to ASCII, Binary, JPEG, GIS (Geo Tiff shape files); 8) Aerosol and other ancillary data available from the ground based sun photometer measurements (AERONET data bank) for the atmospheric correction and validation of some atmospheric products. HDFLook-MODIS is developed for XWindows computer envorment and has been tested on SGI and Linux

  7. Analysis and Visualization Tool for Targeted Amplicon Bisulfite Sequencing on Ion Torrent Sequencers

    PubMed Central

    Pabinger, Stephan; Ernst, Karina; Pulverer, Walter; Kallmeyer, Rainer; Valdes, Ana M.; Metrustry, Sarah; Katic, Denis; Nuzzo, Angelo; Kriegner, Albert; Vierlinger, Klemens; Weinhaeusel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Targeted sequencing of PCR amplicons generated from bisulfite deaminated DNA is a flexible, cost-effective way to study methylation of a sample at single CpG resolution and perform subsequent multi-target, multi-sample comparisons. Currently, no platform specific protocol, support, or analysis solution is provided to perform targeted bisulfite sequencing on a Personal Genome Machine (PGM). Here, we present a novel tool, called TABSAT, for analyzing targeted bisulfite sequencing data generated on Ion Torrent sequencers. The workflow starts with raw sequencing data, performs quality assessment, and uses a tailored version of Bismark to map the reads to a reference genome. The pipeline visualizes results as lollipop plots and is able to deduce specific methylation-patterns present in a sample. The obtained profiles are then summarized and compared between samples. In order to assess the performance of the targeted bisulfite sequencing workflow, 48 samples were used to generate 53 different Bisulfite-Sequencing PCR amplicons from each sample, resulting in 2,544 amplicon targets. We obtained a mean coverage of 282X using 1,196,822 aligned reads. Next, we compared the sequencing results of these targets to the methylation level of the corresponding sites on an Illumina 450k methylation chip. The calculated average Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.91 confirms the sequencing results with one of the industry-leading CpG methylation platforms and shows that targeted amplicon bisulfite sequencing provides an accurate and cost-efficient method for DNA methylation studies, e.g., to provide platform-independent confirmation of Illumina Infinium 450k methylation data. TABSAT offers a novel way to analyze data generated by Ion Torrent instruments and can also be used with data from the Illumina MiSeq platform. It can be easily accessed via the Platomics platform, which offers a web-based graphical user interface along with sample and parameter storage. TABSAT is freely

  8. Tools for Analysis and Visualization of Large Time-Varying CFD Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelms, Jane; VanGelder, Allen

    1997-01-01

    In the second year, we continued to built upon and improve our scanline-based direct volume renderer that we developed in the first year of this grant. This extremely general rendering approach can handle regular or irregular grids, including overlapping multiple grids, and polygon mesh surfaces. It runs in parallel on multi-processors. It can also be used in conjunction with a k-d tree hierarchy, where approximate models and error terms are stored in the nodes of the tree, and approximate fast renderings can be created. We have extended our software to handle time-varying data where the data changes but the grid does not. We are now working on extending it to handle more general time-varying data. We have also developed a new extension of our direct volume renderer that uses automatic decimation of the 3D grid, as opposed to an explicit hierarchy. We explored this alternative approach as being more appropriate for very large data sets, where the extra expense of a tree may be unacceptable. We also describe a new approach to direct volume rendering using hardware 3D textures and incorporates lighting effects. Volume rendering using hardware 3D textures is extremely fast, and machines capable of using this technique are becoming more moderately priced. While this technique, at present, is limited to use with regular grids, we are pursuing possible algorithms extending the approach to more general grid types. We have also begun to explore a new method for determining the accuracy of approximate models based on the light field method described at ACM SIGGRAPH '96. In our initial implementation, we automatically image the volume from 32 equi-distant positions on the surface of an enclosing tessellated sphere. We then calculate differences between these images under different conditions of volume approximation or decimation. We are studying whether this will give a quantitative measure of the effects of approximation. We have created new tools for exploring the

  9. Laser vision: lidar as a transformative tool to advance critical zone science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpold, A. A.; Marshall, J. A.; Lyon, S. W.; Barnhart, T. B.; Fisher, B.; Donovan, M.; Brubaker, K. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Glenn, N. F.; Glennie, C. L.; Kirchner, P. B.; Lam, N.; Mankoff, K. D.; McCreight, J. L.; Molotch, N. P.; Musselman, K. N.; Pelletier, J.; Russo, T.; Sangireddy, H.; Sjöberg, Y.; Swetnam, T.; West, N.

    2015-01-01

    Laser vision: lidar as a transformative tool to advance critical zone science. Observation and quantification of the Earth surface is undergoing a revolutionary change due to the increased spatial resolution and extent afforded by light detection and ranging (lidar) technology. As a consequence, lidar-derived information has led to fundamental discoveries within the individual disciplines of geomorphology, hydrology, and ecology. These disciplines form the cornerstones of Critical Zone (CZ) science, where researchers study how interactions among the geosphere, hydrosphere, and ecosphere shape and maintain the "zone of life", extending from the groundwater to the vegetation canopy. Lidar holds promise as a transdisciplinary CZ research tool by simultaneously allowing for quantification of topographic, vegetative, and hydrological data. Researchers are just beginning to utilize lidar datasets to answer synergistic questions in CZ science, such as how landforms and soils develop in space and time as a function of the local climate, biota, hydrologic properties, and lithology. This review's objective is to demonstrate the transformative potential of lidar by critically assessing both challenges and opportunities for transdisciplinary lidar applications. A review of 147 peer-reviewed studies utilizing lidar showed that 38 % of the studies were focused in geomorphology, 18 % in hydrology, 32 % in ecology, and the remaining 12 % have an interdisciplinary focus. We find that using lidar to its full potential will require numerous advances across CZ applications, including new and more powerful open-source processing tools, exploiting new lidar acquisition technologies, and improved integration with physically-based models and complementary in situ and remote-sensing observations. We provide a five-year vision to utilize and advocate for the expanded use of lidar datasets to benefit CZ science applications.

  10. Contemporary molecular tools in microbial ecology and their application to advancing biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mamoon; Stingl, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    Novel methods in microbial ecology are revolutionizing our understanding of the structure and function of microbes in the environment, but concomitant advances in applications of these tools to biotechnology are mostly lagging behind. After more than a century of efforts to improve microbial culturing techniques, about 70-80% of microbial diversity - recently called the "microbial dark matter" - remains uncultured. In early attempts to identify and sample these so far uncultured taxonomic lineages, methods that amplify and sequence ribosomal RNA genes were extensively used. Recent developments in cell separation techniques, DNA amplification, and high-throughput DNA sequencing platforms have now made the discovery of genes/genomes of uncultured microorganisms from different environments possible through the use of metagenomic techniques and single-cell genomics. When used synergistically, these metagenomic and single-cell techniques create a powerful tool to study microbial diversity. These genomics techniques have already been successfully exploited to identify sources for i) novel enzymes or natural products for biotechnology applications, ii) novel genes from extremophiles, and iii) whole genomes or operons from uncultured microbes. More can be done to utilize these tools more efficiently in biotechnology.

  11. Development of Experimental and Computational Aeroacoustic Tools for Advanced Liner Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.; Nark, Douglas N.; Parrott, Tony L.; Gerhold, Carl H.; Brown, Martha C.

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic liners in aircraft engine nacelles suppress radiated noise. Therefore, as air travel increases, increasingly sophisticated tools are needed to maximize noise suppression. During the last 30 years, NASA has invested significant effort in development of experimental and computational acoustic liner evaluation tools. The Curved Duct Test Rig is a 152-mm by 381- mm curved duct that supports liner evaluation at Mach numbers up to 0.3 and source SPLs up to 140 dB, in the presence of user-selected modes. The Grazing Flow Impedance Tube is a 51- mm by 63-mm duct currently being fabricated to operate at Mach numbers up to 0.6 with source SPLs up to at least 140 dB, and will replace the existing 51-mm by 51-mm duct. Together, these test rigs allow evaluation of advanced acoustic liners over a range of conditions representative of those observed in aircraft engine nacelles. Data acquired with these test ducts are processed using three aeroacoustic propagation codes. Two are based on finite element solutions to convected Helmholtz and linearized Euler equations. The third is based on a parabolic approximation to the convected Helmholtz equation. The current status of these computational tools and their associated usage with the Langley test rigs is provided.

  12. Molecular tools for functional genomics in filamentous fungi: recent advances and new strategies.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dewei; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Yunchuan; Sun, Chang; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Yang, Jinkui

    2013-12-01

    Advances in genetic transformation techniques have made important contributions to molecular genetics. Various molecular tools and strategies have been developed for functional genomic analysis of filamentous fungi since the first DNA transformation was successfully achieved in Neurospora crassa in 1973. Increasing amounts of genomic data regarding filamentous fungi are continuously reported and large-scale functional studies have become common in a wide range of fungal species. In this review, various molecular tools used in filamentous fungi are compared and discussed, including methods for genetic transformation (e.g., protoplast transformation, electroporation, and microinjection), the construction of random mutant libraries (e.g., restriction enzyme mediated integration, transposon arrayed gene knockout, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation), and the analysis of gene function (e.g., RNA interference and transcription activator-like effector nucleases). We also focused on practical strategies that could enhance the efficiency of genetic manipulation in filamentous fungi, such as choosing a proper screening system and marker genes, assembling target-cassettes or vectors effectively, and transforming into strains that are deficient in the nonhomologous end joining pathway. In summary, we present an up-to-date review on the different molecular tools and latest strategies that have been successfully used in functional genomics in filamentous fungi.

  13. Interactive web visualization tools to the results interpretation of a seismic risk study aimed at the emergency levels definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas-Medina, A.; Gutierrez, V.; Gaspar-Escribano, J. M.; Benito, B.

    2009-04-01

    Results of a seismic risk assessment study are often applied and interpreted by users unspecialised on the topic or lacking a scientific background. In this context, the availability of tools that help translating essentially scientific contents to broader audiences (such as decision makers or civil defence officials) as well as representing and managing results in a user-friendly fashion, are on indubitable value. On of such tools is the visualization tool VISOR-RISNA, a web tool developed within the RISNA project (financed by the Emergency Agency of Navarre, Spain) for regional seismic risk assessment of Navarre and the subsequent development of emergency plans. The RISNA study included seismic hazard evaluation, geotechnical characterization of soils, incorporation of site effects to expected ground motions, vulnerability distribution assessment and estimation of expected damage distributions for a 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years. The main goal of RISNA was the identification of higher risk area where focusing detailed, local-scale risk studies in the future and the corresponding urban emergency plans. A geographic information system was used to combine different information layers, generate tables of results and represent maps with partial and final results. The visualization tool VISOR-RISNA is intended to facilitate the interpretation and representation of the collection of results, with the ultimate purpose of defining actuation plans. A number of criteria for defining actuation priorities are proposed in this work. They are based on combinations of risk parameters resulting from the risk study (such as expected ground motion and damage and exposed population), as determined by risk assessment specialists. Although the values that these parameters take are a result of the risk study, their distribution in several classes depends on the intervals defined by decision takers or civil defense officials. These criteria provide a ranking of

  14. DataViewer3D: An Open-Source, Cross-Platform Multi-Modal Neuroimaging Data Visualization Tool

    PubMed Central

    Gouws, André; Woods, Will; Millman, Rebecca; Morland, Antony; Green, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Integration and display of results from multiple neuroimaging modalities [e.g. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetoencephalography, EEG] relies on display of a diverse range of data within a common, defined coordinate frame. DataViewer3D (DV3D) is a multi-modal imaging data visualization tool offering a cross-platform, open-source solution to simultaneous data overlay visualization requirements of imaging studies. While DV3D is primarily a visualization tool, the package allows an analysis approach where results from one imaging modality can guide comparative analysis of another modality in a single coordinate space. DV3D is built on Python, a dynamic object-oriented programming language with support for integration of modular toolkits, and development of cross-platform software for neuroimaging. DV3D harnesses the power of the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) for two-dimensional (2D) and 3D rendering, calling VTK's low level C++ functions from Python. Users interact with data via an intuitive interface that uses Python to bind wxWidgets, which in turn calls the user's operating system dialogs and graphical user interface tools. DV3D currently supports NIfTI-1, ANALYZE™ and DICOM formats for MRI data display (including statistical data overlay). Formats for other data types are supported. The modularity of DV3D and ease of use of Python allows rapid integration of additional format support and user development. DV3D has been tested on Mac OSX, RedHat Linux and Microsoft Windows XP. DV3D is offered for free download with an extensive set of tutorial resources and example data. PMID:19352444

  15. DataViewer3D: An Open-Source, Cross-Platform Multi-Modal Neuroimaging Data Visualization Tool.

    PubMed

    Gouws, André; Woods, Will; Millman, Rebecca; Morland, Antony; Green, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Integration and display of results from multiple neuroimaging modalities [e.g. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetoencephalography, EEG] relies on display of a diverse range of data within a common, defined coordinate frame. DataViewer3D (DV3D) is a multi-modal imaging data visualization tool offering a cross-platform, open-source solution to simultaneous data overlay visualization requirements of imaging studies. While DV3D is primarily a visualization tool, the package allows an analysis approach where results from one imaging modality can guide comparative analysis of another modality in a single coordinate space. DV3D is built on Python, a dynamic object-oriented programming language with support for integration of modular toolkits, and development of cross-platform software for neuroimaging. DV3D harnesses the power of the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) for two-dimensional (2D) and 3D rendering, calling VTK's low level C++ functions from Python. Users interact with data via an intuitive interface that uses Python to bind wxWidgets, which in turn calls the user's operating system dialogs and graphical user interface tools. DV3D currently supports NIfTI-1, ANALYZE and DICOM formats for MRI data display (including statistical data overlay). Formats for other data types are supported. The modularity of DV3D and ease of use of Python allows rapid integration of additional format support and user development. DV3D has been tested on Mac OSX, RedHat Linux and Microsoft Windows XP. DV3D is offered for free download with an extensive set of tutorial resources and example data.

  16. 'tomo_display' and 'vol_tools': IDL VM Packages for Tomography Data Reconstruction, Processing, and Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, M. L.; Gualda, G. A.

    2009-05-01

    One of the challenges in tomography is the availability of suitable software for image processing and analysis in 3D. We present here 'tomo_display' and 'vol_tools', two packages created in IDL that enable reconstruction, processing, and visualization of tomographic data. They complement in many ways the capabilities offered by Blob3D (Ketcham 2005 - Geosphere, 1: 32-41, DOI: 10.1130/GES00001.1) and, in combination, allow users without programming knowledge to perform all steps necessary to obtain qualitative and quantitative information using tomographic data. The package 'tomo_display' was created and is maintained by Mark Rivers. It allows the user to: (1) preprocess and reconstruct parallel beam tomographic data, including removal of anomalous pixels, ring artifact reduction, and automated determination of the rotation center, (2) visualization of both raw and reconstructed data, either as individual frames, or as a series of sequential frames. The package 'vol_tools' consists of a series of small programs created and maintained by Guilherme Gualda to perform specific tasks not included in other packages. Existing modules include simple tools for cropping volumes, generating histograms of intensity, sample volume measurement (useful for porous samples like pumice), and computation of volume differences (for differential absorption tomography). The module 'vol_animate' can be used to generate 3D animations using rendered isosurfaces around objects. Both packages use the same NetCDF format '.volume' files created using code written by Mark Rivers. Currently, only 16-bit integer volumes are created and read by the packages, but floating point and 8-bit data can easily be stored in the NetCDF format as well. A simple GUI to convert sequences of tiffs into '.volume' files is available within 'vol_tools'. Both 'tomo_display' and 'vol_tools' include options to (1) generate onscreen output that allows for dynamic visualization in 3D, (2) save sequences of tiffs to disk

  17. Tools and strategies for visualization of large image data sets in high-resolution imaging mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkert, Ivo; McDonnell, Liam A.; Luxembourg, Stefan L.; Maarten Altelaar, A. F.; Amstalden, Erika R.; Piersma, Sander R.; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2007-05-01

    Mass spectrometry based proteomics is one of the scientific domains in which experiments produce a large amount of data that need special environments to interpret the results. Without the use of suitable tools and strategies, the transformation of the large data sets into information is not easily achievable. Therefore, in the context of the virtual laboratory of enhanced science, software tools are developed to handle mass spectrometry data sets. Using different data processing strategies for visualization, it enables fast mass spectrometric imaging of large surfaces at high-spatial resolution and thus aids in the understanding of various diseases and disorders. This article describes how to optimize the handling and processing of the data sets, including the selection of the most optimal data formats and the use of parallel processing. It also describes the tools and solutions and their application in mass spectrometric imaging strategies, including new measurement principles, image enhancement, and image artifact suppression.

  18. Coupling Advanced Modeling and Visualization to Improve High-Impact Tropical Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Bo-Wen; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Green, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    To meet the goals of extreme weather event warning, this approach couples a modeling and visualization system that integrates existing NASA technologies and improves the modeling system's parallel scalability to take advantage of petascale supercomputers. It also streamlines the data flow for fast processing and 3D visualizations, and develops visualization modules to fuse NASA satellite data.

  19. GEO Label - Quality Information Interrogation Tool for Geospatial Datasets: Towards Effective Visualization of Quality Metadata.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lush, Victoria; Lumsden, Jo; Bastin, Lucy

    2013-04-01

    Although the importance of dataset fitness-for-use evaluation and intercomparison is widely recognised within the GIS community, no practical tools have yet been developed to support such interrogation. GeoViQua aims to develop a GEO label which will visually summarise and allow interrogation of key informational aspects of geospatial datasets upon which users rely when selecting datasets for use. The proposed GEO label will be integrated in the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) and will be used as a value and trust indicator for datasets accessible through the GEO Portal. As envisioned, the GEO label will act as a decision support mechanism for dataset selection and thereby hopefully improve user recognition of the quality of datasets. To date we have conducted 3 user studies to (1) identify the informational aspects of geospatial datasets upon which users rely when assessing dataset quality and trustworthiness, (2) elicit initial user views on a GEO label and its potential role and (3), evaluate prototype label visualisations. Our first study revealed that, when evaluating quality of data, users consider 8 facets: dataset producer information; producer comments on dataset quality; dataset compliance with international standards; community advice; dataset ratings; links to dataset citations; expert value judgements; and quantitative quality information. Our second study confirmed the relevance of these facets in terms of the community-perceived function that a GEO label should fulfil: users and producers of geospatial data supported the concept of a GEO label that provides a drill-down interrogation facility covering all 8 informational aspects. Consequently, we developed three prototype label visualisations and evaluated their comparative effectiveness and user preference via a third user study to arrive at a final graphical GEO label representation. When integrated in the GEOSS, an individual GEO label will be provided for each dataset in the

  20. A decision support tool for synchronizing technology advances with strategic mission objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornstein, Rhoda S.; Willoughby, John K.

    1992-01-01

    Successful accomplishment of the objectives of many long-range future missions in areas such as space systems, land-use planning, and natural resource management requires significant technology developments. This paper describes the development of a decision-support data-derived tool called MisTec for helping strategic planners to determine technology development alternatives and to synchronize the technology development schedules with the performance schedules of future long-term missions. Special attention is given to the operations, concept, design, and functional capabilities of the MisTec. The MisTec was initially designed for manned Mars mission, but can be adapted to support other high-technology long-range strategic planning situations, making it possible for a mission analyst, planner, or manager to describe a mission scenario, determine the technology alternatives for making the mission achievable, and to plan the R&D activity necessary to achieve the required technology advances.

  1. Advanced Launch Technology Life Cycle Analysis Using the Architectural Comparison Tool (ACT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCleskey, Carey M.

    2015-01-01

    Life cycle technology impact comparisons for nanolauncher technology concepts were performed using an Affordability Comparison Tool (ACT) prototype. Examined are cost drivers and whether technology investments can dramatically affect the life cycle characteristics. Primary among the selected applications was the prospect of improving nanolauncher systems. As a result, findings and conclusions are documented for ways of creating more productive and affordable nanolauncher systems; e.g., an Express Lane-Flex Lane concept is forwarded, and the beneficial effect of incorporating advanced integrated avionics is explored. Also, a Functional Systems Breakdown Structure (F-SBS) was developed to derive consistent definitions of the flight and ground systems for both system performance and life cycle analysis. Further, a comprehensive catalog of ground segment functions was created.

  2. Analysis of visual quality improvements provided by known tools for HDR content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Alshina, Elena; Lee, JongSeok; Park, Youngo; Choi, Kwang Pyo

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the visual quality of different solutions for high dynamic range (HDR) compression using MPEG test contents is analyzed. We also simulate the method for an efficient HDR compression which is based on statistical property of the signal. The method is compliant with HEVC specification and also easily compatible with other alternative methods which might require HEVC specification changes. It was subjectively tested on commercial TVs and compared with alternative solutions for HDR coding. Subjective visual quality tests were performed using SUHD TVs model which is SAMSUNG JS9500 with maximum luminance up to 1000nit in test. The solution that is based on statistical property shows not only improvement of objective performance but improvement of visual quality compared to other HDR solutions, while it is compatible with HEVC specification.

  3. Visual Design for Interactive Learning Tools: Representation of Time-Based Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boling, Elizabeth; Brown, J. P.; Ray, Sumitra Das; Erwin, Anthony; Kirkley, Sonny

    The development of potentially powerful computer-based tools within rich learning environments is hampered by the constraints of delivery systems (specifically low-resolution, low-real estate displays). In designing a World Wide Web-based tool for manipulating time-based information, the authors have encountered a lack of guidelines or empirical…

  4. Visual Indicators on Vaccine Boxes as Early Warning Tools to Identify Potential Freeze Damage

    PubMed Central

    Angoff, Ronald; Wood, Jillian; Chernock, Maria C.; Tipping, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine whether the use of visual freeze indicators on vaccines would assist health care providers in identifying vaccines that may have been exposed to potentially damaging temperatures. Methods Twenty-seven sites in Connecticut involved in the Vaccine for Children Program participated. In addition to standard procedures, visual freeze indicators (FREEZEmarker® L; Temptime Corporation, Morris Plains, NJ) were affixed to each box of vaccine that required refrigeration but must not be frozen. Temperatures were monitored twice daily. Results During the 24 weeks, all 27 sites experienced triggered visual freeze indicator events in 40 of the 45 refrigerators. A total of 66 triggered freeze indicator events occurred in all 4 types of refrigerators used. Only 1 of the freeze events was identified by a temperature-monitoring device. Temperatures recorded on vaccine data logs before freeze indicator events were within the 35°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C) range in all but 1 instance. A total of 46,954 doses of freeze-sensitive vaccine were stored at the time of a visual freeze indicator event. Triggered visual freeze indicators were found on boxes containing 6566 doses (14.0% of total doses). Of all doses stored, 14,323 doses (30.5%) were of highly freeze-sensitive vaccine; 1789 of these doses (12.5%) had triggered indicators on the boxes. Conclusions Visual freeze indicators are useful in the early identification of freeze events involving vaccines. Consideration should be given to including these devices as a component of the temperature-monitoring system for vaccines. PMID:27330265

  5. CodaChrome: a tool for the visualization of proteome conservation across all fully sequenced bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationships between bacterial genomes are complicated by rampant horizontal gene transfer, varied selection pressures, acquisition of new genes, loss of genes, and divergence of genes, even in closely related lineages. As more and more bacterial genomes are sequenced, organizing and interpreting the incredible amount of relational information that connects them becomes increasingly difficult. Results We have developed CodaChrome (http://www.sourceforge.com/p/codachrome), a one-versus-all proteome comparison tool that allows the user to visually investigate the relationship between a bacterial proteome of interest and the proteomes encoded by every other bacterial genome recorded in GenBank in a massive interactive heat map. This tool has allowed us to rapidly identify the most highly conserved proteins encoded in the bacterial pan-genome, fast-clock genes useful for subtyping of bacterial species, the evolutionary history of an indel in the Sphingobium lineage, and an example of horizontal gene transfer from a member of the genus Enterococcus to a recent ancestor of Helicobacter pylori. Conclusion CodaChrome is a user-friendly and powerful tool for simultaneously visualizing relationships between thousands of proteomes. PMID:24460813

  6. Complex Spine Pathology Simulator: An Innovative Tool for Advanced Spine Surgery Training.

    PubMed

    Gragnaniello, Cristian; Abou-Hamden, Amal; Mortini, Pietro; Colombo, Elena V; Bailo, Michele; Seex, Kevin A; Litvack, Zachary; Caputy, Anthony J; Gagliardi, Filippo

    2016-11-01

    Background Technical advancements in spine surgery have made possible the treatment of increasingly complex pathologies with less morbidity. Time constraints in surgeons' training have made it necessary to develop new training models for spine pathology. Objective To describe the application of a novel compound, Stratathane resin ST-504 derived polymer (SRSDP), that can be injected at different spinal target locations to mimic spinal epidural, subdural extra-axial, and intra-axial pathologies for the use in advanced surgical training. Material and Methods Fresh-frozen thoracolumbar and cervical spine segments of human and sheep cadavers were used to study the model. SRSDP is initially liquid after mixing, allowing it to be injected into target areas where it expands and solidifies, mimicking the entire spectrum of spinal pathologies. Results Different polymer concentrations have been codified to vary adhesiveness, texture, spread capability, deformability, and radiologic visibility. Polymer injection was performed under fluoroscopic guidance through pathology-specific injection sites that avoided compromising the surgical approach for subsequent excision of the artificial lesion. Inflation of a balloon catheter of the desired size was used to displace stiff cadaveric neurovascular structures to mimic pathology-related mass effect. Conclusion The traditional cadaveric training models principally only allow surgeons to practice the surgical approach. The complex spine pathology simulator is a novel educational tool that in a user-friendly, low-cost fashion allows trainees to practice advanced technical skills in the removal of complex spine pathology, potentially shortening some of the aspects of the learning curve of operative skills that may otherwise take many years to acquire.

  7. DNA technological progress toward advanced diagnostic tools to support human hookworm control.

    PubMed

    Gasser, R B; Cantacessi, C; Loukas, A

    2008-01-01

    Blood-feeding hookworms are parasitic nematodes of major human health importance. Currently, it is estimated that 740 million people are infected worldwide, and more than 80 million of them are severely affected clinically by hookworm disease. In spite of the health problems caused and the advances toward the development of vaccines against some hookworms, limited attention has been paid to the need for improved, practical methods of diagnosis. Accurate diagnosis and genetic characterization of hookworms is central to their effective control. While traditional diagnostic methods have considerable limitations, there has been some progress toward the development of molecular-diagnostic tools. The present article provides a brief background on hookworm disease of humans, reviews the main methods that have been used for diagnosis and describes progress in establishing polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for the specific diagnosis of hookworm infection and the genetic characterisation of the causative agents. This progress provides a foundation for the rapid development of practical, highly sensitive and specific diagnostic and analytical tools to be used in improved hookworm prevention and control programmes.

  8. MATISSE: Multi-purpose Advanced Tool for Instruments for the Solar System Exploration .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinzi, A.; Capria, M. T.; Antonelli, L. A.

    In planetary sciences, design, assemble and launch onboard instruments are only preliminary steps toward the final aim of converting data into scientific knowledge, as the real challenge is the data analysis and interpretation. Up to now data have been generally stored in "old style" archives, i.e. common ftp servers where the user can manually search for data browsing directories organized in a time order manner. However, as datasets to be stored and searched become particularly large, this latter task absorbs a great part of the time, subtracting time to the real scientific work. In order to reduce the time spent to search and analyze data MATISSE (Multi-purpose Advanced Tool for Instruments for the Solar System Exploration), a new set of software tools developed together with the scientific teams of the instruments involved, is under development at ASDC (ASI Science Data Center), whose experience in space missions data management is well known (e.g., \\citealt{verrecchia07,pittori09,giommi09,massaro11}) and its features and aims will be presented here.

  9. Breeder survey, tools, and resources to visualize diversity and pedigree relationships at MaizeGDB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In collaboration with maize researchers, the MaizeGDB Team prepared a survey to identify breeder needs for visualizing pedigrees, diversity data, and haplotypes, and distributed it to the maize community on behalf of the Maize Genetics Executive Committee (Summer 2015). We received 48 responses from...

  10. Overview: The Design, Adoption, and Analysis of a Visual Document Mining Tool for Investigative Journalists.

    PubMed

    Brehmer, Matthew; Ingram, Stephen; Stray, Jonathan; Munzner, Tamara

    2014-12-01

    For an investigative journalist, a large collection of documents obtained from a Freedom of Information Act request or a leak is both a blessing and a curse: such material may contain multiple newsworthy stories, but it can be difficult and time consuming to find relevant documents. Standard text search is useful, but even if the search target is known it may not be possible to formulate an effective query. In addition, summarization is an important non-search task. We present Overview, an application for the systematic analysis of large document collections based on document clustering, visualization, and tagging. This work contributes to the small set of design studies which evaluate a visualization system "in the wild", and we report on six case studies where Overview was voluntarily used by self-initiated journalists to produce published stories. We find that the frequently-used language of "exploring" a document collection is both too vague and too narrow to capture how journalists actually used our application. Our iterative process, including multiple rounds of deployment and observations of real world usage, led to a much more specific characterization of tasks. We analyze and justify the visual encoding and interaction techniques used in Overview's design with respect to our final task abstractions, and propose generalizable lessons for visualization design methodology.

  11. Efficient analysis using custom interactive visualization tools at a Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G. ); Durham, L. )

    1992-01-01

    Custom visualization analysis programs were developed and used to analyze contaminant transport calculations from a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model developed for a Department of Energy Superfund site. The site hydrogeology, which is highly heterogenous, includes both fractured limestone and dolomite and alluvium deposits. Three-dimensional interactive visualization techniques were used to understand and analyze the three-dimensional, double-porosity modeling results. A graphical object oriented programming environment was applied to efficiently develop custom visualization programs in a coarse-grained data structure language. Comparisons were made, using the results from the three-dimensional, finite-difference model, between traditional two-dimensional analyses (contour and vector plots) and interactive three-dimensional techniques. Subjective comparison areas include the accuracy of analysis, the ability to understand the results of three-dimensional contaminant transport simulation, and the capability to transmit the results of the analysis to the project management. In addition, a quantitative comparison was made on the time required to develop a thorough analysis of the modeling results. The conclusions from the comparative study showed that the visualization analysis provided an increased awareness of the contaminant transport mechanisms, provided new insights into contaminant migration, and resulted in a significant time savings.

  12. Efficient analysis using custom interactive visualization tools at a Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.; Durham, L.

    1992-12-01

    Custom visualization analysis programs were developed and used to analyze contaminant transport calculations from a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model developed for a Department of Energy Superfund site. The site hydrogeology, which is highly heterogenous, includes both fractured limestone and dolomite and alluvium deposits. Three-dimensional interactive visualization techniques were used to understand and analyze the three-dimensional, double-porosity modeling results. A graphical object oriented programming environment was applied to efficiently develop custom visualization programs in a coarse-grained data structure language. Comparisons were made, using the results from the three-dimensional, finite-difference model, between traditional two-dimensional analyses (contour and vector plots) and interactive three-dimensional techniques. Subjective comparison areas include the accuracy of analysis, the ability to understand the results of three-dimensional contaminant transport simulation, and the capability to transmit the results of the analysis to the project management. In addition, a quantitative comparison was made on the time required to develop a thorough analysis of the modeling results. The conclusions from the comparative study showed that the visualization analysis provided an increased awareness of the contaminant transport mechanisms, provided new insights into contaminant migration, and resulted in a significant time savings.

  13. Evaluating the Interactive Learning Tool Simreal+ for Visualizing and Simulating Mathematical Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadjerrouit, Said

    2015-01-01

    This research study aims at evaluating the suitability of SimReal+ for effective use in teacher education. SimReal+ was originally developed to teach mathematics in universities, but it is has been recently improved to include school mathematics. The basic idea of SimReal+ is that the visualization of mathematical concepts is a powerful technique…

  14. Tonal Interface to MacroMolecules (TIMMol): A Textual and Tonal Tool for Molecular Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordes, Timothy J.; Carlson, C. Britt; Forest, Katrina T.

    2008-01-01

    We developed the three-dimensional visualization software, Tonal Interface to MacroMolecules or TIMMol, for studying atomic coordinates of protein structures. Key features include audio tones indicating x, y, z location, identification of the cursor location in one-dimensional and three-dimensional space, textual output that can be easily linked…

  15. Communicating Navigation Data Inside the Cassini-Huygens Project: Visualizations and Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Sean V.; Gist, Emily M.; Goodson, Troy D.; Hahn, Yungsun; Stumpf, Paul W.; Williams, Powtawche N.

    2008-01-01

    The Cassini-Huygens Saturn tour poses an interesting navigation challenge. From July 2004 through June 2008, the Cassini orbiter performed 112 of 161 planned maneuvers. This demanding schedule, where maneuvers are often separated by just a few days, motivated the development of maneuver design/analysis automation software tools. Besides generating maneuver designs and presentations, these tools are the mechanism to producing other types of navigation information; information used to facilitate operational decisions on such issues as maneuver cancellation and alternate maneuver strategies. This paper will discuss the navigation data that are communicated inside the Cassini-Huygens Project, as well as the maneuver software tools behind the processing of the data.

  16. A tool for home-based rehabilitation allowing for clinical evaluation in a visual markerless scenario.

    PubMed

    Capecci, M; Ceravolo, M G; D'Orazio, F; Ferracuti, F; Iarlori, S; Lazzaro, G; Longhi, S; Romeo, L; Verdini, F

    2015-08-01

    This work deals with the design of an interactive monitoring tool for home-based physical rehabilitation. The software platform includes a video processing stage and the exercise performance evaluation. Image features are extracted by a Kinect v2 sensor and elaborated to return the exercises score. Furthermore the tool provides to physiotherapists a quantitative exercise evaluation of subject's performances. The proposed tool for home rehabilitation has been tested on 5 subjects and 5 different exercises and results are presented. In particular both exercises and relative evaluation indexes were selected by specialists in neurorehabilitation.

  17. Laser vision: lidar as a transformative tool to advance critical zone science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpold, A. A.; Marshall, J. A.; Lyon, S. W.; Barnhart, T. B.; Fisher, B. A.; Donovan, M.; Brubaker, K. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Glenn, N. F.; Glennie, C. L.; Kirchner, P. B.; Lam, N.; Mankoff, K. D.; McCreight, J. L.; Molotch, N. P.; Musselman, K. N.; Pelletier, J.; Russo, T.; Sangireddy, H.; Sjöberg, Y.; Swetnam, T.; West, N.

    2015-06-01

    Observation and quantification of the Earth's surface is undergoing a revolutionary change due to the increased spatial resolution and extent afforded by light detection and ranging (lidar) technology. As a consequence, lidar-derived information has led to fundamental discoveries within the individual disciplines of geomorphology, hydrology, and ecology. These disciplines form the cornerstones of critical zone (CZ) science, where researchers study how interactions among the geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere shape and maintain the "zone of life", which extends from the top of unweathered bedrock to the top of the vegetation canopy. Fundamental to CZ science is the development of transdisciplinary theories and tools that transcend disciplines and inform other's work, capture new levels of complexity, and create new intellectual outcomes and spaces. Researchers are just beginning to use lidar data sets to answer synergistic, transdisciplinary questions in CZ science, such as how CZ processes co-evolve over long timescales and interact over shorter timescales to create thresholds, shifts in states and fluxes of water, energy, and carbon. The objective of this review is to elucidate the transformative potential of lidar for CZ science to simultaneously allow for quantification of topographic, vegetative, and hydrological processes. A review of 147 peer-reviewed lidar studies highlights a lack of lidar applications for CZ studies as 38 % of the studies were focused in geomorphology, 18 % in hydrology, 32 % in ecology, and the remaining 12 % had an interdisciplinary focus. A handful of exemplar transdisciplinary studies demonstrate lidar data sets that are well-integrated with other observations can lead to fundamental advances in CZ science, such as identification of feedbacks between hydrological and ecological processes over hillslope scales and the synergistic co-evolution of landscape-scale CZ structure due to interactions amongst carbon, energy, and water cycles

  18. Interactive tool for visualization of adiabatic adjustment in APH coordinates for computational studies of vibrational motion and chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplukhin, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2014-10-01

    The adiabatically-adjusting principal-axes hyperspherical (APH) coordinates reviewed in this letter are one of the best coordinate sets developed for computational treatment of spectroscopy and dynamics of triatomic molecules. Unfortunately, it is not so easy to understand and interpret them, compared to other simpler coordinates, like valence coordinates or Jacobi coordinates. To address this issue, we developed a desktop application called APHDemo. This tool visualizes the process of adjustment of the APH coordinates to the shape of a triatomic molecule during molecular vibrations or chemical reaction, and helps to understand their physical meaning without going into complicated math.

  19. ECR Browser: A Tool For Visualizing And Accessing Data From Comparisons Of Multiple Vertebrate Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, G G; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Nobrega, M A

    2004-01-06

    The increasing number of vertebrate genomes being sequenced in draft or finished form provide a unique opportunity to study and decode the language of DNA sequence through comparative genome alignments. However, novel tools and strategies are required to accommodate this increasing volume of genomic information and to facilitate experimental annotation of genome function. Here we present the ECR Browser, a tool that provides an easy and dynamic access to whole genome alignments of human, mouse, rat and fish sequences. This web-based tool (http://ecrbrowser.dcode.org) provides the starting point for discovery of novel genes, identification of distant gene regulatory elements and prediction of transcription factor binding sites. The genome alignment portal of the ECR Browser also permits fast and automated alignment of any user-submitted sequence to the genome of choice. The interconnection of the ECR browser with other DNA sequence analysis tools creates a unique portal for studying and exploring vertebrate genomes.

  20. A software tool for advanced MRgFUS prostate therapy planning and follow up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Straaten, Dörte; Hoogenboom, Martijn; van Amerongen, Martinus J.; Weiler, Florian; Issawi, Jumana Al; Günther, Matthias; Fütterer, Jurgen; Jenne, Jürgen W.

    2017-03-01

    US guided HIFU/FUS ablation for the therapy of prostate cancer is a clinical established method, while MR guided HIFU/FUS applications for prostate recently started clinical evaluation. Even if MRI examination is an excellent diagnostic tool for prostate cancer, it is a time consuming procedure and not practicable within an MRgFUS therapy session. The aim of our ongoing work is to develop software to support therapy planning and post-therapy follow-up for MRgFUS on localized prostate cancer, based on multi-parametric MR protocols. The clinical workflow of diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of MR guided FUS on prostate cancer was deeply analyzed. Based on this, the image processing workflow was designed and all necessary components, e.g. GUI, viewer, registration tools etc. were defined and implemented. The software bases on MeVisLab with several implemented C++ modules for the image processing tasks. The developed software, called LTC (Local Therapy Control) will register and visualize automatically all images (T1w, T2w, DWI etc.) and ADC or perfusion maps gained from the diagnostic MRI session. This maximum of diagnostic information helps to segment all necessary ROIs, e.g. the tumor, for therapy planning. Final therapy planning will be performed based on these segmentation data in the following MRgFUS therapy session. In addition, the developed software should help to evaluate the therapy success, by synchronization and display of pre-therapeutic, therapy and follow-up image data including the therapy plan and thermal dose information. In this ongoing project, the first stand-alone prototype was completed and will be clinically evaluated.

  1. PopulationProfiler: A Tool for Population Analysis and Visualization of Image-Based Cell Screening Data.

    PubMed

    Matuszewski, Damian J; Wählby, Carolina; Puigvert, Jordi Carreras; Sintorn, Ida-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Image-based screening typically produces quantitative measurements of cell appearance. Large-scale screens involving tens of thousands of images, each containing hundreds of cells described by hundreds of measurements, result in overwhelming amounts of data. Reducing per-cell measurements to the averages across the image(s) for each treatment leads to loss of potentially valuable information on population variability. We present PopulationProfiler-a new software tool that reduces per-cell measurements to population statistics. The software imports measurements from a simple text file, visualizes population distributions in a compact and comprehensive way, and can create gates for subpopulation classes based on control samples. We validate the tool by showing how PopulationProfiler can be used to analyze the effect of drugs that disturb the cell cycle, and compare the results to those obtained with flow cytometry.

  2. Using GIS tools to visually represent complex volcanic issues. Poas volcano, Costa Rica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haraldson, J.; Duarte, E.; Fernandez, E.

    2007-05-01

    GIS software was used to visualize a series of extraordinary events that have occurred recently at Poas Volcano, Costa Rica. Maps, images, graphics and other visual instruments were produced during the course of an academic internship at OVSICORI-UNA. Spatial and temporal concepts related to volcano monitoring conventional observations are introduced. Poas (10 11 15 N, 84 13 48 W, and 2708 m.a.s.l) is one of the main massifs on the Central Volcanic range, Costa Rica. It is located NW of the Central Valley, where the most developed and populated cities are located. The volcanogenic pollution and its impact on the environment, as well as the implications over socio-economic activities developed at the surroundings of the volcano, are more severe during increases in subaerial fumarolic outgassing and these points to the important role played by the presence of the crater lake as a buffering system. This is an important aspect to consider due to the frequency of the events and to the prolonged periods of impact over the same areas. The work consisted in putting together a large amount of data varying from notebooks, maps, documents, conventional, multispectral and aerial photographs, in a format readable by the GIS interface, in this case ArcGIS 9.1. As most data refers to geographic locations, a great deal of the data could easily be represented in a GIS. Using the built-in analysis functionalities in ArcGIS, complex issues, concerning volcanogenic pollution and its impact on the surrounding environment, were allowed to be visually represented, using both two and three dimensions. Being able to visualize these issues, do not only help volcanologists to understand the processes involved, but also aids in the communication of these issues to concerned actors in the society. This is of importance due to the fact that volcanogenic pollution does address several areas handled by various authorities. GIS offers a platform for analysis and visualization that could aid in

  3. Creating User-Friendly Tools for Data Analysis and Visualization in K-12 Classrooms: A Fortran Dinosaur Meets Generation Y

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, L. H.; Chaudhury, S.; Page, M. T.; Lankey, A. J.; Doughty, J.; Kern, Steven; Rogerson, Tina M.

    2008-01-01

    During the summer of 2007, as part of the second year of a NASA-funded project in partnership with Christopher Newport University called SPHERE (Students as Professionals Helping Educators Research the Earth), a group of undergraduate students spent 8 weeks in a research internship at or near NASA Langley Research Center. Three students from this group formed the Clouds group along with a NASA mentor (Chambers), and the brief addition of a local high school student fulfilling a mentorship requirement. The Clouds group was given the task of exploring and analyzing ground-based cloud observations obtained by K-12 students as part of the Students' Cloud Observations On-Line (S'COOL) Project, and the corresponding satellite data. This project began in 1997. The primary analysis tools developed for it were in FORTRAN, a computer language none of the students were familiar with. While they persevered through computer challenges and picky syntax, it eventually became obvious that this was not the most fruitful approach for a project aimed at motivating K-12 students to do their own data analysis. Thus, about halfway through the summer the group shifted its focus to more modern data analysis and visualization tools, namely spreadsheets and Google(tm) Earth. The result of their efforts, so far, is two different Excel spreadsheets and a Google(tm) Earth file. The spreadsheets are set up to allow participating classrooms to paste in a particular dataset of interest, using the standard S'COOL format, and easily perform a variety of analyses and comparisons of the ground cloud observation reports and their correspondence with the satellite data. This includes summarizing cloud occurrence and cloud cover statistics, and comparing cloud cover measurements from the two points of view. A visual classification tool is also provided to compare the cloud levels reported from the two viewpoints. This provides a statistical counterpart to the existing S'COOL data visualization tool

  4. Using McIDAS-V data analysis and visualization software as an educational tool for understanding the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtor, T. H.; Rink, T.

    2010-12-01

    The University of Wisconsin’s Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC) has been at the forefront in developing data analysis and visualization tools for environmental satellites and other geophysical data. The fifth generation of the Man-computer Interactive Data Access System (McIDAS-V) is Java-based, open-source, freely available software that operates on Linux, Macintosh and Windows systems. The software tools provide powerful new data manipulation and visualization capabilities that work with geophysical data in research, operational and educational environments. McIDAS-V provides unique capabilities to support innovative techniques for evaluating research results, teaching and training. McIDAS-V is based on three powerful software elements. VisAD is a Java library for building interactive, collaborative, 4 dimensional visualization and analysis tools. The Integrated Data Viewer (IDV) is a reference application based on the VisAD system and developed by the Unidata program that demonstrates the flexibility that is needed in this evolving environment, using a modern, object-oriented software design approach. The third tool, HYDRA, allows users to build, display and interrogate multi and hyperspectral environmental satellite data in powerful ways. The McIDAS-V software is being used for training and education in several settings. The McIDAS User Group provides training workshops at its annual meeting. Numerous online tutorials with training data sets have been developed to aid users in learning simple and more complex operations in McIDAS-V, all are available online. In a University of Wisconsin-Madison undergraduate course in Radar and Satellite Meteorology, McIDAS-V is used to create and deliver laboratory exercises using case study and real time data. At the high school level, McIDAS-V is used in several exercises in our annual Summer Workshop in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences to provide young scientists the opportunity to examine data with friendly and

  5. Interactive Poster: A Proposal for Sharing User Requirements for Visual Analytic Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Scholtz, Jean

    2009-10-11

    Although many in the community have advocated user-centered evaluations for visual analytic environments, a significant barrier exists. The users targeted by the visual analytics community (law enforcement personnel, professional information analysts, financial analysts, health care analysts, etc.) are often inaccessible to researchers. These analysts are extremely busy and their work environments and data are often classified or at least confidential. Furthermore, their tasks often last weeks or even months. It is simply not feasible to do such long-term observations to understand their jobs. How then can we hope to gather enough information about the diverse user populations to understand their needs? Some researchers have been successful in working with different end-users, including the author. A reasonable approach, therefore, would be to find a way to share user information. This paper outlines a proposal for developing a handbook of user profiles for use by researchers, developers, and evaluators.

  6. Visual symbolization as a learning tool: teaching pharmacology to international audiences.

    PubMed

    Giannini, A J; Giannini, J N; Melemis, S M

    1997-07-01

    Medieval and Renaissance teaching techniques used linkage between course content and tangentially related visual symbols to reinforce lectures. This technique was adopted in teaching pharmacologic principles of addiction to international audiences. It produced significant results with non-English-speaking audiences using concurrent or consecutive translation. This technique may be useful for non-English-speaking audiences because of enhancement of all three areas of memory: attention, storage, and retrieval.

  7. A Component Based Astronomical Visualization Tool for Instrument Control and Data Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briegel, F.; Berwein, J.; Kittmann, F.

    2008-08-01

    For various instruments developed at the Max-Planck-Institute-Heidelberg there was a need for a highly flexible display and control tool. Many display tools (ximtool, DS9, skycat,..) are available for astronomy, but all this applications are monolitic and can't be easily enriched by plugins for interaction with the graphical display, and other functionality for remote access and control of the instrument and data pipepline. It was developed on top of Trolltechs Cross-Platform Rich Client Development Framework Qt, the modern middleware Internet Communications Engine (ICE) from ZeroC and the template based SOA developer framework for astronomical instrumentation (NICE - see Abstract Juergen Berwein). The display tool is used on the Calar Alto Observatory (Spain) as a guider, for an wide field imager and guider at the Wise Observatory (Israel) and for LBTs interferometer Linc-Nirvana (USA).

  8. Ramping and Uncertainty Prediction Tool - Analysis and Visualization of Wind Generation Impact on Electrical Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Etingov, Pavel; Makarov, PNNL Yuri; Subbarao, PNNL Kris; PNNL,

    2014-03-03

    RUT software is designed for use by the Balancing Authorities to predict and display additional requirements caused by the variability and uncertainty in load and generation. The prediction is made for the next operating hours as well as for the next day. The tool predicts possible deficiencies in generation capability and ramping capability. This deficiency of balancing resources can cause serious risks to power system stability and also impact real-time market energy prices. The tool dynamically and adaptively correlates changing system conditions with the additional balancing needs triggered by the interplay between forecasted and actual load and output of variable resources. The assessment is performed using a specially developed probabilistic algorithm incorporating multiple sources of uncertainty including wind, solar and load forecast errors. The tool evaluates required generation for a worst case scenario, with a user-specified confidence level.

  9. Simulating Visual Attention Allocation of Pilots in an Advanced Cockpit Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frische, F.; Osterloh, J.-P.; Luedtke, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the results of experiments conducted with human line pilots and a cognitive pilot model during interaction with a new 40 Flight Management System (FMS). The aim of these experiments was to gather human pilot behavior data in order to calibrate the behavior of the model. Human behavior is mainly triggered by visual perception. Thus, the main aspect was to setup a profile of human pilots' visual attention allocation in a cockpit environment containing the new FMS. We first performed statistical analyses of eye tracker data and then compared our results to common results of familiar analyses in standard cockpit environments. The comparison has shown a significant influence of the new system on the visual performance of human pilots. Further on, analyses of the pilot models' visual performance have been performed. A comparison to human pilots' visual performance revealed important improvement potentials.

  10. A medical application integrating remote 3D visualization tools to access picture archiving and communication system on mobile devices.

    PubMed

    He, Longjun; Ming, Xing; Liu, Qian

    2014-04-01

    With computing capability and display size growing, the mobile device has been used as a tool to help clinicians view patient information and medical images anywhere and anytime. However, for direct interactive 3D visualization, which plays an important role in radiological diagnosis, the mobile device cannot provide a satisfactory quality of experience for radiologists. This paper developed a medical system that can get medical images from the picture archiving and communication system on the mobile device over the wireless network. In the proposed application, the mobile device got patient information and medical images through a proxy server connecting to the PACS server. Meanwhile, the proxy server integrated a range of 3D visualization techniques, including maximum intensity projection, multi-planar reconstruction and direct volume rendering, to providing shape, brightness, depth and location information generated from the original sectional images for radiologists. Furthermore, an algorithm that changes remote render parameters automatically to adapt to the network status was employed to improve the quality of experience. Finally, performance issues regarding the remote 3D visualization of the medical images over the wireless network of the proposed application were also discussed. The results demonstrated that this proposed medical application could provide a smooth interactive experience in the WLAN and 3G networks.

  11. COV2HTML: A Visualization and Analysis Tool of Bacterial Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) Data for Postgenomics Life Scientists

    PubMed Central

    Orgeur, Mickael; Camiade, Emilie; Brehier, Clément; Dupuy, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Abstract COV2HTML is an interactive web interface, which is addressed to biologists, and allows performing both coverage visualization and analysis of NGS alignments performed on prokaryotic organisms (bacteria and phages). It combines two processes: a tool that converts the huge NGS mapping or coverage files into light specific coverage files containing information on genetic elements; and a visualization interface allowing a real-time analysis of data with optional integration of statistical results. To demonstrate the scope of COV2HTML, the program was tested with data from two published studies. The first data were from RNA-seq analysis of Campylobacter jejuni, based on comparison of two conditions with two replicates. We were able to recover 26 out of 27 genes highlighted in the publication using COV2HTML. The second data comprised of stranded TSS and RNA-seq data sets on the Archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus. COV2HTML was able to highlight most of the TSSs from the article and allows biologists to visualize both TSS and RNA-seq on the same screen. The strength of the COV2HTML interface is making possible NGS data analysis without software installation, login, or a long training period. A web version is accessible at https://mmonot.eu/COV2HTML/. This website is free and open to users without any login requirement. PMID:24512253

  12. VISAD: an interactive and visual analytical tool for the detection of behavioral anomalies in maritime traffic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, Maria; Falkman, Göran; Ziemke, Tom; Warston, Håkan

    2009-05-01

    Monitoring the surveillance of large sea areas normally involves the analysis of huge quantities of heterogeneous data from multiple sources (radars, cameras, automatic identification systems, reports, etc.). The rapid identification of anomalous behavior or any threat activity in the data is an important objective for enabling homeland security. While it is worth acknowledging that many existing mining applications support identification of anomalous behavior, autonomous anomaly detection systems are rarely used in the real world. There are two main reasons: (1) the detection of anomalous behavior is normally not a well-defined and structured problem and therefore, automatic data mining approaches do not work well and (2) the difficulties that these systems have regarding the representation and employment of the prior knowledge that the users bring to their tasks. In order to overcome these limitations, we believe that human involvement in the entire discovery process is crucial. Using a visual analytics process model as a framework, we present VISAD: an interactive, visual knowledge discovery tool for supporting the detection and identification of anomalous behavior in maritime traffic data. VISAD supports the insertion of human expert knowledge in (1) the preparation of the system, (2) the establishment of the normal picture and (3) in the actual detection of rare events. For each of these three modules, VISAD implements different layers of data mining, visualization and interaction techniques. Thus, the detection procedure becomes transparent to the user, which increases his/her confidence and trust in the system and overall, in the whole discovery process.

  13. JavaProtein Dossier: a novel web-based data visualization tool for comprehensive analysis of protein structure

    PubMed Central

    Neshich, Goran; Rocchia, Walter; Mancini, Adauto L.; Yamagishi, Michel E. B.; Kuser, Paula R.; Fileto, Renato; Baudet, Christian; Pinto, Ivan P.; Montagner, Arnaldo J.; Palandrani, Juliana F.; Krauchenco, Joao N.; Torres, Renato C.; Souza, Savio; Togawa, Roberto C.; Higa, Roberto H.

    2004-01-01

    JavaProtein Dossier (JPD) is a new concept, database and visualization tool providing one of the largest collections of the physicochemical parameters describing proteins' structure, stability, function and interaction with other macromolecules. By collecting as many descriptors/parameters as possible within a single database, we can achieve a better use of the available data and information. Furthermore, data grouping allows us to generate different parameters with the potential to provide new insights into the sequence–structure–function relationship. In JPD, residue selection can be performed according to multiple criteria. JPD can simultaneously display and analyze all the physicochemical parameters of any pair of structures, using precalculated structural alignments, allowing direct parameter comparison at corresponding amino acid positions among homologous structures. In order to focus on the physicochemical (and consequently pharmacological) profile of proteins, visualization tools (showing the structure and structural parameters) also had to be optimized. Our response to this challenge was the use of Java technology with its exceptional level of interactivity. JPD is freely accessible (within the Gold Sting Suite) at http://sms.cbi.cnptia.embrapa.br, http://mirrors.rcsb.org/SMS, http://trantor.bioc.columbia.edu/SMS and http://www.es.embnet.org/SMS/ (Option: JavaProtein Dossier). PMID:15215458

  14. Visualization Tools and Techniques for Search and Validation of Large Earth Science Spatial-Temporal Metadata Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, W. E.; Herbert, A.; Kusterer, J.

    2014-12-01

    Spatial-temporal metadata databases are critical components of interactive data discovery services for ordering Earth Science datasets. The development staff at the Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) works closely with satellite Earth Science mission teams such as CERES, CALIPSO, TES, MOPITT, and CATS to create and maintain metadata databases that are tailored to the data discovery needs of the Earth Science community. This presentation focuses on the visualization tools and techniques used by the ASDC software development team for data discovery and validation/optimization of spatial-temporal objects in large multi-mission spatial-temporal metadata databases. The following topics will be addressed: Optimizing the level of detail of spatial temporal metadata to provide interactive spatial query performance over a multi-year Earth Science mission Generating appropriately scaled sensor footprint gridded (raster) metadata from Level1 and Level2 Satellite and Aircraft time-series data granules Performance comparison of raster vs vector spatial granule footprint mask queries in large metadata database and a description of the visualization tools used to assist with this analysis

  15. Visualization tool for improved accuracy in needle placement during percutaneous radio-frequency ablation of liver tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüdeli, Thomas; Kalkofen, Denis; Risholm, Petter; Ali, Wajid; Freudenthal, Adinda; Samset, Eigil

    2008-03-01

    The European research network "Augmented reality in Surgery" (ARIS*ER) developed a system that supports percutaneous radio frequency ablation of liver tumors. The system provides interventionists, during placement and insertion of the RFA needle, with information from pre-operative CT images and real-time tracking data. A visualization tool has been designed that aims to support (1) exploration of the abdomen, (2) planning of needle trajectory and (3) insertion of the needle in the most efficient way. This work describes a first evaluation of the system, where user performances and feedback of two visualization concepts of the tool - needle view and user view - are compared. After being introduced to the system, ten subjects performed three needle placements with both concepts. Task fulfillment rate, time for completion of task, special incidences, accuracy of needle placement recorded and analyzed. The results show ambiguous results with beneficial and less favorable effects on user performance and workload of both concepts. Effects depend on characteristics of intra-operative tasks as well as on task complexities depending on tumor location. The results give valuable input for the next design steps.

  16. BioSigPlot: an opensource tool for the visualization of multi-channel biomedical signals with Matlab.

    PubMed

    Boudet, Samuel; Peyrodie, Laurent; Gallois, Philippe; de l'Aulnoit, Denis Houzé; Cao, Hua; Forzy, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a Matlab-based software (MathWorks inc.) called BioSigPlot for the visualization of multi-channel biomedical signals, particularly for the EEG. This tool is designed for researchers on both engineering and medicine who have to collaborate to visualize and analyze signals. It aims to provide a highly customizable interface for signal processing experimentation in order to plot several kinds of signals while integrating the common tools for physician. The main advantages compared to other existing programs are the multi-dataset displaying, the synchronization with video and the online processing. On top of that, this program uses object oriented programming, so that the interface can be controlled by both graphic controls and command lines. It can be used as EEGlab plug-in but, since it is not limited to EEG, it would be distributed separately. BioSigPlot is distributed free of charge (http://biosigplot.sourceforge.net), under the terms of GNU Public License for non-commercial use and open source development.

  17. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0221

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  18. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0218

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  19. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_IM_KP_0214

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.

  20. International Solar-Terrestrial Program Key Parameter Visualization Tool Data: USA_NASA_DDF_ISTP_KP_0216

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocuna, M. H.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Baker, D. N.; Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Mish, W. H.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Geospace Science Program (GGS) is designed to improve greatly the understanding of the flow of energy, mass and momentum in the solar-terrestrial environment with particular emphasis on "Geospace". The Global Geospace Science Program is the US contribution to the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Science Initiative. This CD-ROM issue describes the WIND and POLAR spacecraft, the scientific experiments carried onboard, the Theoretical and Ground Based investigations which constitute the US Global Geospace Science Program and the ISTP Data Systems which support the data acquisition and analysis effort. The International Solar-Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP) Key Parameter Visualization Tool (KPVT), provided on the CD-ROM, was developed at the ISTP Science Planning and Operations Facility (SPOF). The KPVT is a generic software package for visualizing the key parameter data produced from all ISTP missions, interactively and simultaneously. The tool is designed to facilitate correlative displays of ISTP data from multiple spacecraft and instruments, and thus the selection of candidate events and data quality control. The software, written in IDL, includes a graphical/widget user interface, and runs on many platforms, including various UNIX workstations, Alpha/Open VMS, Macintosh (680x0 and PowerPC), and PC/Windows NT, Windows 3.1, and Windows 95.