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Sample records for advanced wavefront sensing

  1. Advanced Wavefront Sensing and Control Testbed (AWCT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Fang; Basinger, Scott A.; Diaz, Rosemary T.; Gappinger, Robert O.; Tang, Hong; Lam, Raymond K.; Sidick, Erkin; Hein, Randall C.; Rud, Mayer; Troy, Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Wavefront Sensing and Control Testbed (AWCT) is built as a versatile facility for developing and demonstrating, in hardware, the future technologies of wave front sensing and control algorithms for active optical systems. The testbed includes a source projector for a broadband point-source and a suite of extended scene targets, a dispersed fringe sensor, a Shack-Hartmann camera, and an imaging camera capable of phase retrieval wavefront sensing. The testbed also provides two easily accessible conjugated pupil planes which can accommodate the active optical devices such as fast steering mirror, deformable mirror, and segmented mirrors. In this paper, we describe the testbed optical design, testbed configurations and capabilities, as well as the initial results from the testbed hardware integrations and tests.

  2. Common-Path Wavefront Sensing for Advanced Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Serabyn, Eugene; Mawet, Dimitri

    2012-01-01

    Imaging of faint companions around nearby stars is not limited by either intrinsic resolution of a coronagraph/telescope system, nor is it strictly photon limited. Typically, it is both the magnitude and temporal variation of small phase and amplitude errors imparted to the electric field by elements in the optical system which will limit ultimate performance. Adaptive optics systems, particularly those with multiple deformable mirrors, can remove these errors, but they need to be sensed in the final image plane. If the sensing system is before the final image plane, which is typical for most systems, then the non-common path optics between the wavefront sensor and science image plane will lead to un-sensed errors. However, a new generation of high-performance coronagraphs naturally lend themselves to wavefront sensing in the final image plane. These coronagraphs and the wavefront sensing will be discussed, as well as plans for demonstrating this with a high-contrast system on the ground. Such a system will be a key system-level proof for a future space-based coronagraph mission, which will also be discussed.

  3. Compressed Wavefront Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Polans, James; McNabb, Ryan P.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Farsiu, Sina

    2014-01-01

    We report on an algorithm for fast wavefront sensing that incorporates sparse representation for the first time in practice. The partial derivatives of optical wavefronts were sampled sparsely with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) by randomly subsampling the original SHWFS data to as little as 5%. Reconstruction was performed by a sparse representation algorithm that utilized the Zernike basis. We name this method SPARZER. Experiments on real and simulated data attest to the accuracy of the proposed techniques as compared to traditional sampling and reconstruction methods. We have made the corresponding data set and software freely available online. Compressed wavefront sensing offers the potential to increase the speed of wavefront acquisition and to defray the cost of SHWFS devices. PMID:24690703

  4. Advanced Wavefront Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Brase, J M; Avicola, K; Thompson, C A; Kartz, M W; Winters, S; Hartley, R; Wihelmsen, J; Dowla, F V; Carrano, C J; Bauman, B J; Pennington, D M; Lande, D; Sawvel, R M; Silva, D A; Cooke, J B; Brown, C G

    2001-02-21

    this project, work was performed in four areas (1) advanced modeling tools for deformable mirrors (2) low-order wavefront correctors with Alvarez lenses, (3) a direct phase measuring heterdyne wavefront sensor, and (4) high-spatial-frequency wavefront control using spatial light modulators.

  5. Wavefront sensing, control, and pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Thomas; Sevaston, George; Agronin, Michael; Bely, Pierre; Colavita, Mark; Clampin, Mark; Harvey, James; Idell, Paul; Sandler, Dave; Ulmer, Melville

    1992-01-01

    A majority of future NASA astrophysics missions from orbiting interferometers to 16-m telescopes on the Moon have, as a common requirement, the need to bring light from a large entrance aperture to the focal plane in a way that preserves the spatial coherence properties of the starlight. Only by preserving the phase of the incoming wavefront, can many scientific observations be made, observations that range from measuring the red shift of quasi-stellar objects (QSO's) to detecting the IR emission of a planet in orbit around another star. New technologies for wavefront sensing, control, and pointing hold the key to advancing our observatories of the future from those already launched or currently under development. As the size of the optical system increases, either to increase the sensitivity or angular resolution of the instrument, traditional technologies for maintaining optical wavefront accuracy become prohibitively expensive or completely impractical. For space-based instruments, the low mass requirement and the large temperature excursions further challenge existing technologies. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is probably the last large space telescope to rely on passive means to keep its primary optics stable and the optical system aligned. One needs only look to the significant developments in wavefront sensing, control, and pointing that have occurred over the past several years to appreciate the potential of this technology for transforming the capability of future space observatories. Future developments in space-borne telescopes will be based in part on developments in ground-based systems. Telescopes with rigid primary mirrors much larger than 5 m in diameter are impractical because of gravity loading. New technologies are now being introduced, such as active optics, that address the scale problem and that allow very large telescopes to be built. One approach is a segmented design such as that being pioneered by the W.M. Keck telescope now under

  6. Compressive wavefront sensing with weak values.

    PubMed

    Howland, Gregory A; Lum, Daniel J; Howell, John C

    2014-08-11

    We demonstrate a wavefront sensor that unites weak measurement and the compressive-sensing, single-pixel camera. Using a high-resolution spatial light modulator (SLM) as a variable waveplate, we weakly couple an optical field's transverse-position and polarization degrees of freedom. By placing random, binary patterns on the SLM, polarization serves as a meter for directly measuring random projections of the wavefront's real and imaginary components. Compressive-sensing optimization techniques can then recover the wavefront. We acquire high quality, 256 × 256 pixel images of the wavefront from only 10,000 projections. Photon-counting detectors give sub-picowatt sensitivity.

  7. ARGOS wavefront sensing: from detection to correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orban de Xivry, Gilles; Bonaglia, M.; Borelli, J.; Busoni, L.; Connot, C.; Esposito, S.; Gaessler, W.; Kulas, M.; Mazzoni, T.; Puglisi, A.; Rabien, S.; Storm, J.; Ziegleder, J.

    2014-08-01

    Argos is the ground-layer adaptive optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope. In order to perform its wide-field correction, Argos uses three laser guide stars which sample the atmospheric turbulence. To perform the correction, Argos has at disposal three different wavefront sensing measurements : its three laser guide stars, a NGS tip-tilt, and a third wavefront sensor. We present the wavefront sensing architecture and its individual components, in particular: the finalized Argos pnCCD camera detecting the 3 laser guide stars at 1kHz, high quantum efficiency and 4e- noise; the Argos tip-tilt sensor based on a quad-cell avalanche photo-diodes; and the Argos wavefront computer. Being in the middle of the commissioning, we present the first wavefront sensing configurations and operations performed at LBT, and discuss further improvements in the measurements of the 3 laser guide star slopes as detected by the pnCCD.

  8. Properties of coherence-gated wavefront sensing.

    PubMed

    Rueckel, Markus; Denk, Winfried

    2007-11-01

    Coherence-gated wavefront sensing (CGWS) allows the determination of wavefront aberrations in strongly scattering tissue and their correction by adaptive optics. This allows, e.g., the restoration of the diffraction limit in light microscopy. Here, we develop a model, based on ray tracing of ballistic light scattered from a set of discrete scatterers, to characterize CGWS performance as it depends on coherence length, scatterer density, coherence-gate position, and polarization. The model is evaluated by using Monte Carlo simulation and verified against experimental measurements. We show, in particular, that all aberrations needed for adaptive wavefront restoration are correctly sensed if circularly polarized light is used. PMID:17975579

  9. Asymmetric cryptography based on wavefront sensing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiang; Wei, Hengzheng; Zhang, Peng

    2006-12-15

    A system of asymmetric cryptography based on wavefront sensing (ACWS) is proposed for the first time to our knowledge. One of the most significant features of the asymmetric cryptography is that a trapdoor one-way function is required and constructed by analogy to wavefront sensing, in which the public key may be derived from optical parameters, such as the wavelength or the focal length, while the private key may be obtained from a kind of regular point array. The ciphertext is generated by the encoded wavefront and represented with an irregular array. In such an ACWS system, the encryption key is not identical to the decryption key, which is another important feature of an asymmetric cryptographic system. The processes of asymmetric encryption and decryption are formulized mathematically and demonstrated with a set of numerical experiments.

  10. Recent developments of interferometric wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Yang, Yongying; Chen, Xiaoyu; Ling, Tong; Zhang, Lei; Bai, Jian; Shen, Yibing

    2015-08-01

    Recent trends of interferometric wavefront sensing tend to focus on high precision, anti-vibration, compact, along with much more involved of electric and computer technology. And the optical principles employed not only limit to interference but also include diffraction, scattering, polarization, etc. In this paper, some selected examples basing on the research works in our group will be given to illustrate the trends mentioned above. To achieve extra high accuracy, phase-shifting point diffraction interferometry (PS-PDI) is believed to be a good candidate as it employs a nearly perfect point diffraction spherical wavefront as the reference and also takes advantage of the high precision of phase-shifting algorithms. Cyclic radial shearing interferometry (C-RSI) successively demonstrate the anti-vibration characteristic and can diagnose transient wavefront with only one single shot by employing a three-mirror common-path configuration and a synchronizing system. In contrast sharply with those early interferometers, interferometers with very compact configuration are more suitable to develop portable wavefront sensing instruments. Cross-grating lateral shearing interferometer (CG-LSI) is a very compact interferometer that adopts a cross-grating of millimeters to produce lateral shearing of the diffraction wave of the test wavefront. Be aware that, computer technique has been used a lot in all of the above interferometers but the non-null annual sub-aperture stitching interferometer (NASSI) for general aspheric surface testing mostly relies on the computer model of the physical interferometer setup and iterative ray-tracing optimization. The principles of the above mentioned interferometric wavefront sensing methods would be given in detail.

  11. Implementation of a Wavefront-Sensing Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Dean, Bruce; Aronstein, David

    2013-01-01

    A computer program has been written as a unique implementation of an image-based wavefront-sensing algorithm reported in "Iterative-Transform Phase Retrieval Using Adaptive Diversity" (GSC-14879-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 4 (April 2007), page 32. This software was originally intended for application to the James Webb Space Telescope, but is also applicable to other segmented-mirror telescopes. The software is capable of determining optical-wavefront information using, as input, a variable number of irradiance measurements collected in defocus planes about the best focal position. The software also uses input of the geometrical definition of the telescope exit pupil (otherwise denoted the pupil mask) to identify the locations of the segments of the primary telescope mirror. From the irradiance data and mask information, the software calculates an estimate of the optical wavefront (a measure of performance) of the telescope generally and across each primary mirror segment specifically. The software is capable of generating irradiance data, wavefront estimates, and basis functions for the full telescope and for each primary-mirror segment. Optionally, each of these pieces of information can be measured or computed outside of the software and incorporated during execution of the software.

  12. Refractive error sensing from wavefront slopes.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    The problem of measuring the objective refractive error with an aberrometer has shown to be more elusive than expected. Here, the formalism of differential geometry is applied to develop a theoretical framework of refractive error sensing. At each point of the pupil, the local refractive error is given by the wavefront curvature, which is a 2 × 2 symmetric matrix, whose elements are directly related to sphere, cylinder, and axis. Aberrometers usually measure the local gradient of the wavefront. Then refractive error sensing consists of differentiating the gradient, instead of integrating as in wavefront sensing. A statistical approach is proposed to pass from the local to the global (clinically meaningful) refractive error, in which the best correction is assumed to be the maximum likelihood estimation. In the practical implementation, this corresponds to the mode of the joint histogram of the 3 different elements of the curvature matrix. Results obtained both in computer simulations and with real data provide a close agreement and consistency with the main optical image quality metrics such as the Strehl ratio.

  13. Refractive error sensing from wavefront slopes.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    The problem of measuring the objective refractive error with an aberrometer has shown to be more elusive than expected. Here, the formalism of differential geometry is applied to develop a theoretical framework of refractive error sensing. At each point of the pupil, the local refractive error is given by the wavefront curvature, which is a 2 × 2 symmetric matrix, whose elements are directly related to sphere, cylinder, and axis. Aberrometers usually measure the local gradient of the wavefront. Then refractive error sensing consists of differentiating the gradient, instead of integrating as in wavefront sensing. A statistical approach is proposed to pass from the local to the global (clinically meaningful) refractive error, in which the best correction is assumed to be the maximum likelihood estimation. In the practical implementation, this corresponds to the mode of the joint histogram of the 3 different elements of the curvature matrix. Results obtained both in computer simulations and with real data provide a close agreement and consistency with the main optical image quality metrics such as the Strehl ratio. PMID:21149305

  14. Robust Image-Based Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Thomas P.

    2011-12-01

    Several planned future optical systems, such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), rely on image-based wavefront sensing for alignment, testing, and control of optical surfaces during operation. The focus of this work is on characterizing the effects of various non-idealities on the performance of image-based wavefront sensing algorithms, developing techniques to mitigate those effects, and demonstrating these techniques in computer simulations and in the lab. Two new techniques for algorithmically determining the proper sampling factor for optical propagation are presented and tested against experimental data collected in the lab and during JWST ground-based testing. A new method for mitigating against the effects of vibration on phase retrieval is discussed, implemented, and tested in simulation. The use of an alternative type of diversity, called transverse translation, is explored for use in the JWST and shown to be a promising technique through simulation. A method for extending the capture range of phase retrieval algorithms is presented and tested both in simulation and with experimental data collected in the lab. A benchmark of a phase retrieval algorithm running on a graphics card is presented and the practical implications for JWST testing are discussed. Finally, phase retrieval results from a MEMS deformable mirror testbed are presented and compared against interferometry. The improved robustness resulting from this research will not only help to mitigate the risks associated with wavefront sensing for the JWST, but also serve as an enabling technology for future NASA missions.

  15. SAPHIRA detector for infrared wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, Gert; Baker, Ian; Alvarez, Domingo; Ives, Derek; Mehrgan, Leander; Meyer, Manfred; Stegmeier, Jörg; Weller, Harald J.

    2014-08-01

    The only way to overcome the CMOS noise barrier of near infrared sensors used for wavefront sensing and fringe tracking is the amplification of the photoelectron signal inside the infrared pixel by means of the avalanche gain. In 2007 ESO started a program at Selex to develop near infrared electron avalanche photodiode arrays (eAPD) for wavefront sensing and fringe tracking. In a first step the cutoff wavelength was reduced from 4.5 micron to 2.5 micron in order to verify that the dark current scales with the bandgap and can be reduced to less than one electron/ms, the value required for wavefront sensing. The growth technology was liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) with annular diodes based on the loophole interconnect technology. The arrays required deep cooling to 40K to achieve acceptable cosmetic performance at high APD gain. The second step was to develop a multiplexer tailored to the specific application of the GRAVITY instrument wavefront sensors and the fringe tracker. The pixel format is 320x256 pixels. The array has 32 parallel video outputs which are arranged in such a way that the full multiplex advantage is available also for small subwindows. Nondestructive readout schemes with subpixel sampling are possible. This reduces the readout noise at high APD gain well below the subelectron level at frame rates of 1 KHz. The third step was the change of the growth technology from liquid phase epitaxy to metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). This growth technology allows the band structure and doping to be controlled on a 0.1μm scale and provides more flexibility for the design of diode structures. The bandgap can be varied for different layers of Hg(1-x)CdxTe. It is possible to make heterojunctions and apply solid state engineering techniques. The change to MOVPE resulted in a dramatic improvement in the cosmetic quality with 99.97 % operable pixels at an operating temperature of 85K. Currently this sensor is deployed in the 4 wavefront sensors and in the

  16. Adaptive wavefront correction in two-photon microscopy using coherence-gated wavefront sensing

    PubMed Central

    Rueckel, Markus; Mack-Bucher, Julia A.; Denk, Winfried

    2006-01-01

    The image quality of a two-photon microscope is often degraded by wavefront aberrations induced by the specimen. We demonstrate here that resolution and signal size in two-photon microcopy can be substantially improved, even in living biological specimens, by adaptive wavefront correction based on sensing the wavefront of coherence-gated backscattered light (coherence-gated wavefront sensing, CGWS) and wavefront control by a deformable mirror. A nearly diffraction-limited focus can be restored even for strong aberrations. CGWS-based wavefront correction should be applicable to samples with a wide range of scattering properties and it should be possible to perform real-time pixel-by-pixel correction even at fast scan speeds. PMID:17088565

  17. Hybrid Architecture Active Wavefront Sensing and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Dean, Bruce; Hyde, Tupper

    2010-01-01

    A method was developed for performing relatively high-speed wavefront sensing and control to overcome thermal instabilities in a segmented primary mirror telescope [e.g., James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at L2], by using the onboard fine guidance sensor (FGS) to minimize expense and complexity. This FGS performs centroiding on a bright star to feed the information to the pointing and control system. The proposed concept is to beam split the image of the guide star (or use a single defocused guide star image) to perform wavefront sensing using phase retrieval techniques. Using the fine guidance sensor star image for guiding and fine phasing eliminates the need for other, more complex ways of achieving very accurate sensing and control that is needed for UV-optical applications. The phase retrieval occurs nearly constantly, so passive thermal stability over fourteen days is not required. Using the FGS as the sensor, one can feed segment update information to actuators on the primary mirror that can update the primary mirror segment fine phasing with this frequency. Because the thermal time constants of the primary mirror are very slow compared to this duration, the mirror will appear extremely stable during observations (to the level of accuracy of the sensing and control). The sensing can use the same phase retrieval techniques as the JWST by employing an additional beam splitter, and having each channel go through a weak lens (one positive and one negative). The channels can use common or separate detectors. Phase retrieval can be performed onboard. The actuation scheme would include a coarse stage able to achieve initial alignment of several millimeters of range (similar to JWST and can use a JWST heritage sensing approach in the science camera) and a fine stage capable of continual updates.

  18. Wavefront Compensation Segmented Mirror Sensing and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, David C.; Lou, John Z.; Kissil, Andrew; Bradford, Charles M.; Woody, David; Padin, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The primary mirror of very large submillimeter-wave telescopes will necessarily be segmented into many separate mirror panels. These panels must be continuously co-phased to keep the telescope wavefront error less than a small fraction of a wavelength, to ten microns RMS (root mean square) or less. This performance must be maintained continuously across the full aperture of the telescope, in all pointing conditions, and in a variable thermal environment. A wavefront compensation segmented mirror sensing and control system, consisting of optical edge sensors, Wavefront Compensation Estimator/Controller Soft ware, and segment position actuators is proposed. Optical edge sensors are placed two per each segment-to-segment edge to continuously measure changes in segment state. Segment position actuators (three per segment) are used to move the panels. A computer control system uses the edge sensor measurements to estimate the state of all of the segments and to predict the wavefront error; segment actuator commands are computed that minimize the wavefront error. Translational or rotational motions of one segment relative to the other cause lateral displacement of the light beam, which is measured by the imaging sensor. For high accuracy, the collimator uses a shaped mask, such as one or more slits, so that the light beam forms a pattern on the sensor that permits sensing accuracy of better than 0.1 micron in two axes: in the z or local surface normal direction, and in the y direction parallel to the mirror surface and perpendicular to the beam direction. Using a co-aligned pair of sensors, with the location of the detector and collimated light source interchanged, four degrees of freedom can be sensed: transverse x and y displacements, as well as two bending angles (pitch and yaw). In this approach, each optical edge sensor head has a collimator and an imager, placing one sensor head on each side of a segment gap, with two parallel light beams crossing the gap. Two sets

  19. Laser beacon wave-front sensing without focal anisoplanatism.

    PubMed

    Buscher, D F; Love, G D; Myers, R M

    2002-02-01

    Wave-front sensing from artificial beacons is normally performed by formation of a focused spot in the atmosphere and sensing of the wave-front distortions produced during the beam's return passage. We propose an alternative method that senses the distortions produced during the outgoing path by forming an intensity pattern in the atmosphere that is then viewed from the ground. A key advantage of this method is that a parallel beam is used, and therefore the wave-front measurements will not suffer from the effects of focal anisoplanatism. We also envisage other geometries, all based on the concept of projecting a pupil pattern onto the atmosphere.

  20. Experimental results for correlation-based wavefront sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Palmer, D W; LaFortune, K N; Bauman, B

    2005-07-01

    Correlation wave-front sensing can improve Adaptive Optics (AO) system performance in two keys areas. For point-source-based AO systems, Correlation is more accurate, more robust to changing conditions and provides lower noise than a centroiding algorithm. Experimental results from the Lick AO system and the SSHCL laser AO system confirm this. For remote imaging, Correlation enables the use of extended objects for wave-front sensing. Results from short horizontal-path experiments will show algorithm properties and requirements.

  1. Application of L3 technology to wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulloch, Simon M.

    2004-10-01

    The new L3 Technology CCDs from E2V combine sub-electron read noise with high pixel rates. This makes them ideal candidates for wavefront sensing. ING's NAOMI adaptive optics instrument is currently limited by the readout noise of its wavefront sensor CCDs. Upgrading to L3 detectors has the potential to give a large increase in performance; simulations suggest a 2 magnitude improvement to the guide star limit. At ING we have explored the behaviour of various L3 devices in applications ranging from fast photometry, fast spectroscopy through to wavefront sensing. The investigations have been done using our own cryogenic cameras containing L3 devices coupled to an SDSU controller. An integral Peltier packaged CCD60 has also been purchased specifically for the WFS upgrade. This paper describes the progress we have made to date on the L3 wavefront sensor upgrade and our future plans for its use with a Rayleigh laser beacon.

  2. Method and apparatus for wavefront sensing

    DOEpatents

    Bahk, Seung-Whan

    2016-08-23

    A method of measuring characteristics of a wavefront of an incident beam includes obtaining an interferogram associated with the incident beam passing through a transmission mask and Fourier transforming the interferogram to provide a frequency domain interferogram. The method also includes selecting a subset of harmonics from the frequency domain interferogram, individually inverse Fourier transforming each of the subset of harmonics to provide a set of spatial domain harmonics, and extracting a phase profile from each of the set of spatial domain harmonics. The method further includes removing phase discontinuities in the phase profile, rotating the phase profile, and reconstructing a phase front of the wavefront of the incident beam.

  3. Direct wavefront sensing in adaptive optical microscopy using backscattered light.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Saad A; Booth, Martin J

    2013-08-01

    Adaptive optics has been used to compensate the detrimental effects of aberrations in a range of high-resolution microscopes. We investigate how backscattered laser illumination can be used as the source for direct wavefront sensing using a pinhole-filtered Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. It is found that the sensor produces linear response to input aberrations for a given specimen. The gradient of this response is dependent upon experimental configuration and specimen structure. Cross sensitivity between modes is also observed. The double pass nature of the microscope system leads in general to lower sensitivity to odd-symmetry aberration modes. The results show that there is potential for use of this type of wavefront sensing in microscopes.

  4. UA wavefront control lab: design overview and implementation of new wavefront sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kelsey; Guyon, Olivier; Codona, Johanan; Knight, Justin; Rodack, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    We present an overview of the design of a new testbed for studying coronagraphic imaging and wavefront control using a variety of pupil and coronagraph architectures. The testbed is designed to explore optimal use of starlight (including starlight rejected by the coronagraph) for wavefront control, system self-calibration, and point spread function (PSF) calibration. It is also compatible with coronagraph designs for centrally obscured and segmented apertures, and includes shaped or apodized pupils, a range of focal plane masks and Lyot stops of multiple sizes, and an optional PIAA apodizing stage. Starlight is reflected and imaged from the focal plane mask and Lyot stop for low-order wavefront sensing. Both a segmented and a continuous sheet MEMS DM are included to simulate segmented telescope pupils, apply known test phase patterns, and implement a controllable phase apodization coronagraph. The testbed is adaptable and is currently being used to investigate three different techniques: (1) the differential optical transfer function (dOTF), (2) low-order wavefront sensing (LOWFS) with a hybrid-Lyot coronagraph, and (3) linear dark field control (LDFC).

  5. Wavefront Sensing for WFIRST with a Linear Optical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurling, Alden S.; Content, David A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop methods to use a linear optical model to capture the field dependence of wavefront aberrations in a nonlinear optimization-based phase retrieval algorithm for image-based wavefront sensing. The linear optical model is generated from a ray trace model of the system and allows the system state to be described in terms of mechanical alignment parameters rather than wavefront coefficients. This approach allows joint optimization over images taken at different field points and does not require separate convergence of phase retrieval at individual field points. Because the algorithm exploits field diversity, multiple defocused images per field point are not required for robustness. Furthermore, because it is possible to simultaneously fit images of many stars over the field, it is not necessary to use a fixed defocus to achieve adequate signal-to-noise ratio despite having images with high dynamic range. This allows high performance wavefront sensing using in-focus science data. We applied this technique in a simulation model based on the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Intermediate Design Reference Mission (IDRM) imager using a linear optical model with 25 field points. We demonstrate sub-thousandth-wave wavefront sensing accuracy in the presence of noise and moderate undersampling for both monochromatic and polychromatic images using 25 high-SNR target stars. Using these high-quality wavefront sensing results, we are able to generate upsampled point-spread functions (PSFs) and use them to determine PSF ellipticity to high accuracy in order to reduce the systematic impact of aberrations on the accuracy of galactic ellipticity determination for weak-lensing science.

  6. Non-iterative adaptive optical microscopy using wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, X.; Azucena, O.; Kubby, J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper will review the development of wide-field and confocal microscopes with wavefront sensing and adaptive optics for correcting refractive aberrations and compensating scattering when imaging through thick tissues (Drosophila embryos and mouse brain tissue). To make wavefront measurements in biological specimens we have modified the laser guide-star techniques used in astronomy for measuring wavefront aberrations that occur as star light passes through Earth's turbulent atmosphere. Here sodium atoms in Earth's mesosphere, at an altitude of 95 km, are excited to fluoresce at resonance by a high-power sodium laser. The fluorescent light creates a guide-star reference beacon at the top of the atmosphere that can be used for measuring wavefront aberrations that occur as the light passes through the atmosphere. We have developed a related approach for making wavefront measurements in biological specimens using cellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins as laser guide-stars. An example is a fluorescently labeled centrosome in a fruit fly embryo or neurons and dendrites in mouse brains. Using adaptive optical microscopy we show that the Strehl ratio, the ratio of the peak intensity of an aberrated point source relative to the diffraction limited image, can be improved by an order of magnitude when imaging deeply into live dynamic specimens, enabling near diffraction limited deep tissue imaging.

  7. Direct-Solve Image-Based Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    A method of wavefront sensing (more precisely characterized as a method of determining the deviation of a wavefront from a nominal figure) has been invented as an improved means of assessing the performance of an optical system as affected by such imperfections as misalignments, design errors, and fabrication errors. The method is implemented by software running on a single-processor computer that is connected, via a suitable interface, to the image sensor (typically, a charge-coupled device) in the system under test. The software collects a digitized single image from the image sensor. The image is displayed on a computer monitor. The software directly solves for the wavefront in a time interval of a fraction of a second. A picture of the wavefront is displayed. The solution process involves, among other things, fast Fourier transforms. It has been reported to the effect that some measure of the wavefront is decomposed into modes of the optical system under test, but it has not been reported whether this decomposition is postprocessing of the solution or part of the solution process.

  8. Advanced Imaging Optics Utilizing Wavefront Coding.

    SciTech Connect

    Scrymgeour, David; Boye, Robert; Adelsberger, Kathleen

    2015-06-01

    Image processing offers a potential to simplify an optical system by shifting some of the imaging burden from lenses to the more cost effective electronics. Wavefront coding using a cubic phase plate combined with image processing can extend the system's depth of focus, reducing many of the focus-related aberrations as well as material related chromatic aberrations. However, the optimal design process and physical limitations of wavefront coding systems with respect to first-order optical parameters and noise are not well documented. We examined image quality of simulated and experimental wavefront coded images before and after reconstruction in the presence of noise. Challenges in the implementation of cubic phase in an optical system are discussed. In particular, we found that limitations must be placed on system noise, aperture, field of view and bandwidth to develop a robust wavefront coded system.

  9. Broadband Phase Retrieval for Image-Based Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H.

    2007-01-01

    A focus-diverse phase-retrieval algorithm has been shown to perform adequately for the purpose of image-based wavefront sensing when (1) broadband light (typically spanning the visible spectrum) is used in forming the images by use of an optical system under test and (2) the assumption of monochromaticity is applied to the broadband image data. Heretofore, it had been assumed that in order to obtain adequate performance, it is necessary to use narrowband or monochromatic light. Some background information, including definitions of terms and a brief description of pertinent aspects of image-based phase retrieval, is prerequisite to a meaningful summary of the present development. Phase retrieval is a general term used in optics to denote estimation of optical imperfections or aberrations of an optical system under test. The term image-based wavefront sensing refers to a general class of algorithms that recover optical phase information, and phase-retrieval algorithms constitute a subset of this class. In phase retrieval, one utilizes the measured response of the optical system under test to produce a phase estimate. The optical response of the system is defined as the image of a point-source object, which could be a star or a laboratory point source. The phase-retrieval problem is characterized as image-based in the sense that a charge-coupled-device camera, preferably of scientific imaging quality, is used to collect image data where the optical system would normally form an image. In a variant of phase retrieval, denoted phase-diverse phase retrieval [which can include focus-diverse phase retrieval (in which various defocus planes are used)], an additional known aberration (or an equivalent diversity function) is superimposed as an aid in estimating unknown aberrations by use of an image-based wavefront-sensing algorithm. Image-based phase-retrieval differs from such other wavefront-sensing methods, such as interferometry, shearing interferometry, curvature

  10. Low order wavefront sensing and control for WFIRST coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fang; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Bartos, Randall; Hein, Randall; Lam, Raymond; Mandic, Milan; Moore, Douglas; Moore, James; Patterson, Keith; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Shields, Joel; Sidick, Erkin; Tang, Hong; Truong, Tuan; Wallace, James K.; Wang, Xu; Wilson, Daniel W.

    2016-07-01

    To maintain the required WFIRST Coronagraph starlight suppression performance in a realistic space environment, a low order wavefront sensing and control (LOWFS/C) subsystem is necessary. The LOWFS/C uses the rejected stellar light from coronagraph to sense and suppress the telescope pointing drift and jitter as well as the low order wavefront errors due to changes in thermal loading on the telescope and the rest of the observatory. In this paper we will present an overview of the low order wavefront sensing and control subsystem for the WFIRST Coronagraph and describe the WFIRST Coronagraph LOWFS function, its design, and modeled performance. We will present experimental results on a dedicated LOWFS/C testbed that show that the LOWFS/C subsystem not only can sense pointing errors better than 0.2 mas but has also experimentally demonstrated closed loop pointing error suppression with residuals better than 0.4 mas rms per axis for the vast majority of observatory reaction wheel speeds.

  11. Scene-based Wave-front Sensing for Remote Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; LaFortune, K; Chan, C

    2003-07-30

    Scene-based wave-front sensing (SBWFS) is a technique that allows an arbitrary scene to be used for wave-front sensing with adaptive optics (AO) instead of the normal point source. This makes AO feasible in a wide range of interesting scenarios. This paper first presents the basic concepts and properties of SBWFS. Then it discusses that application of this technique with AO to remote imaging. For the specific case of correction of a lightweight optic. End-to-end simulation results establish that in this case, SBWFS can perform as well as point-source AO. Design considerations such as noise propagation, number of subapertures and tracking changing image content are analyzed.

  12. Wavefront Sensing Using a Multi-Object Spectrograph (NIRSpec)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H.; Boucarut, Rene; Hadjimichael, Theo; Smith, Scott

    2004-01-01

    An analysis is presented that illustrates how the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) fine-phasing process can be carried out using the Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) data collected at the science focal plane. The analysis considers a multi-plane diffraction model which properly accounts for the microshutter diffractive element placed at the first relay position of the spectrograph. Wavefront sensing results are presented based on data collected from the NASA Goddard Microshutter Testbed.

  13. Hybrid architecture active wavefront sensing and control system, and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D. (Inventor); Dean, Bruce H. (Inventor); Hyde, Tristram T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    According to various embodiments, provided herein is an optical system and method that can be configured to perform image analysis. The optical system can comprise a telescope assembly and one or more hybrid instruments. The one or more hybrid instruments can be configured to receive image data from the telescope assembly and perform a fine guidance operation and a wavefront sensing operation, simultaneously, on the image data received from the telescope assembly.

  14. Sparse aperture mask for low order wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, Hari; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Cavanagh, Kathleen; Riggs, A. J. E.

    2015-09-01

    A high contrast is required for direct imaging of exoplanets. Ideally, the level of contrast required for direct imaging of exoplanets can be achieved by coronagraphic imaging, but in practice, the contrast is degraded by wavefront aberrations. To achieve the required contrast, low-order wavefront aberrations such as tip-tilt, defocus and coma must be determined and corrected. In this paper, we present a technique that integrates a sparse- aperture mask (SAM) with a shaped pupil coronagraph (SPC) to make precise estimates of these low-order aberrations. Starlight rejected by the coronagraph's focal plane stop is collimated to a relay pupil, where the mask forms an interference fringe pattern on a detector. Using numerical simulations, we show that the SAM can estimate rapidly varying tip-tilt errors in space telescopes arising from line-of-sight pointing oscillations as well as other higher-order modes. We also show that a Kalman filter can be used with the SAM to improve the estimation. At Princetons High Contrast Imaging Laboratory, we have recently created a testbed devoted to low-order wavefront sensing experiments. The testbed incorporates custom-fabricated masks (shaped pupil, focal plane, and sparse aperture) with a deformable mirror and a CCD camera to demonstrate the estimation and correction of low-order aberrations. Our first experiments aim to replicate the results of the SAM wavefront sensor (SAM WFS) Fourier propagation models.

  15. Preparing for JWST wavefront sensing and control operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Marshall D.; Acton, D. Scott; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Knight, J. Scott; Lallo, Matthew D.; Allen, Marsha; Baggett, Wayne; Barker, Elizabeth; Comeau, Thomas; Coppock, Eric; Dean, Bruce H.; Hartig, George; Hayden, William L.; Jordan, Margaret; Jurling, Alden; Kulp, Trey; Long, Joseph; McElwain, Michael W.; Meza, Luis; Nelan, Edmund P.; Soummer, Remi; Stansberry, John; Stark, Christopher; Telfer, Randal; Welsh, Andria L.; Zielinski, Thomas P.; Zimmerman, Neil T.

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescopes segmented primary and deployable secondary mirrors will be actively con- trolled to achieve optical alignment through a complex series of steps that will extend across several months during the observatory's commissioning. This process will require an intricate interplay between individual wavefront sensing and control tasks, instrument-level checkout and commissioning, and observatory-level calibrations, which involves many subsystems across both the observatory and the ground system. Furthermore, commissioning will often exercise observatory capabilities under atypical circumstances, such as fine guiding with unstacked or defocused images, or planning targeted observations in the presence of substantial time-variable offsets to the telescope line of sight. Coordination for this process across the JWST partnership has been conducted through the Wavefront Sensing and Control Operations Working Group. We describe at a high level the activities of this group and the resulting detailed commissioning operations plans, supporting software tools development, and ongoing preparations activities at the Science and Operations Center. For each major step in JWST's wavefront sensing and control, we also explain the changes and additions that were needed to turn an initial operations concept into a flight-ready plan with proven tools. These efforts are leading to a robust and well-tested process and preparing the team for an efficient and successful commissioning of JWSTs active telescope.

  16. Curvature wavefront sensing for the large synoptic survey telescope.

    PubMed

    Xin, Bo; Claver, Chuck; Liang, Ming; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Angeli, George; Shipsey, Ian

    2015-10-20

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will use an active optics system (AOS) to maintain alignment and surface figure on its three large mirrors. Corrective actions fed to the LSST AOS are determined from information derived from four curvature wavefront sensors located at the corners of the focal plane. Each wavefront sensor is a split detector such that the halves are 1 mm on either side of focus. In this paper, we describe the extensions to published curvature wavefront sensing algorithms needed to address challenges presented by the LSST, namely the large central obscuration, the fast f/1.23 beam, off-axis pupil distortions, and vignetting at the sensor locations. We also describe corrections needed for the split sensors and the effects from the angular separation of different stars providing the intrafocal and extrafocal images. Lastly, we present simulations that demonstrate convergence, linearity, and negligible noise when compared to atmospheric effects when the algorithm extensions are applied to the LSST optical system. The algorithm extensions reported here are generic and can easily be adapted to other wide-field optical systems including similar telescopes with large central obscuration and off-axis curvature sensing. PMID:26560396

  17. Curvature wavefront sensing for the large synoptic survey telescope.

    PubMed

    Xin, Bo; Claver, Chuck; Liang, Ming; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Angeli, George; Shipsey, Ian

    2015-10-20

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will use an active optics system (AOS) to maintain alignment and surface figure on its three large mirrors. Corrective actions fed to the LSST AOS are determined from information derived from four curvature wavefront sensors located at the corners of the focal plane. Each wavefront sensor is a split detector such that the halves are 1 mm on either side of focus. In this paper, we describe the extensions to published curvature wavefront sensing algorithms needed to address challenges presented by the LSST, namely the large central obscuration, the fast f/1.23 beam, off-axis pupil distortions, and vignetting at the sensor locations. We also describe corrections needed for the split sensors and the effects from the angular separation of different stars providing the intrafocal and extrafocal images. Lastly, we present simulations that demonstrate convergence, linearity, and negligible noise when compared to atmospheric effects when the algorithm extensions are applied to the LSST optical system. The algorithm extensions reported here are generic and can easily be adapted to other wide-field optical systems including similar telescopes with large central obscuration and off-axis curvature sensing.

  18. Advanced Techniques for Fourier Transform Wavefront Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A

    2002-08-05

    The performance of Fourier transform (FT) reconstructors in large adaptive optics systems with Shack-Hartmann sensors and a deformable mirror is analyzed. FT methods, which are derived for point-based geometries, are adapted for use on the continuous systems. Analysis and simulation show how to compensate for effects such as misalignment of the deformable mirror and wavefront sensor gain. Further filtering methods to reduce noise and improve performance are presented. All these modifications can be implemented at the filtering stage, preserving the speed of FT reconstruction. Simulation of a large system shows how compensated FT methods can have equivalent or better performance to slower vector-matrix-multiply reconstructions.

  19. Beam geometry, alignment, and wavefront aberration effects on interferometric differential wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiangzhi; Gillmer, S. R.; Ellis, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Heterodyne interferometry is a widely accepted methodology with high resolution in many metrology applications. As a functionality enhancement, differential wavefront sensing (DWS) enables simultaneous measurement of displacement, pitch, and yaw using a displacement interferometry system and a single beam incident on a plane mirror target. The angular change is measured using a weighted phase average between symmetrically adjacent quadrant photodiode pairs. In this paper, we present an analytical model to predict the scaling of differential phase signals based on fundamental Gaussian beams. Several numerical models are presented to discuss the effects of physical beam parameters, detector size, system alignment errors, and beam wavefront aberrations on the DWS technique. The results of our modeling predict rotational scaling factors and a usable linear range. Furthermore, experimental results show the analytically predicted scaling factor is in good agreement with empirical calibration. Our three degree-of-freedom interferometer can achieve a resolution of 0.4 nm in displacement and 0.2 μrad in pitch and yaw simultaneously.

  20. Analysis of non-linearity in differential wavefront sensing technique.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hui-Zong; Liang, Yu-Rong; Yeh, Hsien-Chi

    2016-03-01

    An analytical model of a differential wavefront sensing (DWS) technique based on Gaussian Beam propagation has been derived. Compared with the result of the interference signals detected by quadrant photodiode, which is calculated by using the numerical method, the analytical model has been verified. Both the analytical model and numerical simulation show milli-radians level non-linearity effect of DWS detection. In addition, the beam clipping has strong influence on the non-linearity of DWS. The larger the beam clipping is, the smaller the non-linearity is. However, the beam walking effect hardly has influence on DWS. Thus, it can be ignored in laser interferometer. PMID:26974079

  1. Visible and Infrared Wavefront Sensing detectors review in Europe - part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Gach, Jean-luc

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the state of the art wavefront sensor detectors developments held in Europe for the last decade. A major breakthrough has been achieved with the development by e2v technologies of the CCD220 between 2004 and 2012. Another major breakthrough is currently achieved with the very successful development of fast low noise infrared arrays called RAPID. The astonishing results of this device will be showed for the first time in an international conference at AO4ELT3.The CCD220, a 240x240 pixels 8 outputs EMCCD (CCD with internal multiplication), offers less than 0.2 e readout noise at a frame rate of 1500 Hz with negligible dark current. The OCAM2 camera is the commercial product that drives this advanced device. This system, commercialized by First Light Imaging, is quickly described in this paper. An upgrade of OCAM2 is currently developed to boost its frame rate to 2 kHz, opening the window of XAO wavefront sensing for the ELT using 4 synchronized cameras and pyramid wavefront sensing. This upgrade and the results obtained are described extensively elsewhere in this conference (Gach et al).Since this major success, new detector developments started in Europe. The NGSD CMOS device is fully dedicated to Natural and Laser Guide Star AO for the E-ELT with ESO involvement. The spot elongation from a LGS Shack Hartman wavefront sensor necessitates an increase of the pixel format. The NGSD will be a 880x840 pixels CMOS detector with a readout noise of 3 e (goal 1e) at 700 Hz frame rate. New technologies will be developed for that purpose: advanced CMOS pixel architecture, CMOS back thinned and back illuminated device for very high QE, full digital outputs with signal digital conversion on chip. This innovative device will be used on the European ELT but also interests potentially all giant telescopes.Additional developments also started in 2009 for wavefront sensing in the infrared based on a new technological breakthrough

  2. Large viewing field wavefront sensing by using a lightfield system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yang; Zhang, Xuanzhe; Ma, Haotong; Ning, Yu; Wang, Rui; Xu, Xiaojun

    2013-09-01

    To overcome the shortcomings of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, we developed a lightfield wavefront detection system, which is able to complete the large field of view, multi-perspective wavefront detection in a single photographic exposure. The lightfield wavefront detection system includes an imaging primary mirror, a lenslet array and a photosensitive device. The lenslet array is located on the imaging plane of the imaging primary mirror and the photosensitive device is located on the focal plane of the lenslet array. In this system, each lenslet reimages the aperture and forms a low-resolution image of the aperture. Compared with the Shack-Hartmann sensor, this lightfield measuring method can obtain imaging arrays in different perspectives. By comparing the array information with the standard information, we can obtain the slope matrix of the wavefront in different perspectives and restore the wavefront in a large field of view. Based on Fourier optics, we built the corresponding theoretical model and simulation system. By busing Meade telescope, turbulent phase screen, lenslet array and CCD camera, we founded the experimental lightfield wavefront measuring system. Numerical simulation results and experimental results show that this wavefront measuring method can effectively achieve the wavefront aberration information. This wavefront measurement method can realize the multi-perspective wavefront measurement, which is expected to solve the problem of large viewing field wavefront detection, and can be used for adaptive optics in giant telescopes.

  3. TRL-6 for JWST Wavefront Sensing and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Dean, Bruce; Smith, Scott; Aronstein, David; Shiri, Ron; Lyon, Rick; Hayden, Bill; Bowers, Chuck; Acton, D. Scott; Shields, Duncan; Sabatke, Erin; Schwenker, John; Towell, Tim; Carey, Larkin; Contos, Adam; Shi, Fang; Mesa, Luis

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Technology Readiness Level (TRL)-6 is documented for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Wavefront Sensing and Control (WFSC) subsystem. The WFSC subsystem is needed to align the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) after all deployments have occurred, and achieves that requirement through a robust commissioning sequence consisting of unique commissioning algorithms, all of which are part of the WFSC algorithm suite. This paper identifies the technology need, algorithm heritage, describes the finished TRL-6 design platform, and summarizes the TRL-6 test results and compliance. Additionally, the performance requirements needed to satisfy JWST science goals as well as the criterion that relate to the TRL-6 Testbed Telescope (TBT) performance requirements are discussed

  4. System and Method for Null-Lens Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Peter C. (Inventor); Thompson, Patrick L. (Inventor); Aronstein, David L. (Inventor); Bolcar, Matthew R. (Inventor); Smith, Jeffrey S. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method of measuring aberrations in a null-lens including assembly and alignment aberrations. The null-lens may be used for measuring aberrations in an aspheric optic with the null-lens. Light propagates from the aspheric optic location through the null-lens, while sweeping a detector through the null-lens focal plane. Image data being is collected at locations about said focal plane. Light is simulated propagating to the collection locations for each collected image. Null-lens aberrations may extracted, e.g., applying image-based wavefront-sensing to collected images and simulation results. The null-lens aberrations improve accuracy in measuring aspheric optic aberrations.

  5. Wavefront sensing based on phase contrast theory and coherent optical processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huang; Qi, Bian; Chenlu, Zhou; Tenghao, Li; Mali, Gong

    2016-07-01

    A novel wavefront sensing method based on phase contrast theory and coherent optical processing is proposed. The wavefront gradient field in the object plane is modulated into intensity distribution in a gang of patterns, making high-density detection available. By applying the method, we have also designed a wavefront sensor. It consists of a classical coherent optical processing system, a CCD detector array, two pieces of orthogonal composite sinusoidal gratings, and a mechanical structure that can perform real-time linear positioning. The simulation results prove and demonstrate the validity of the method and the sensor in high-precision measurement of the wavefront gradient field.

  6. Wavefront sensing using a liquid-filled photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Valente, Denise; Rativa, Diego; Vohnsen, Brian

    2015-05-18

    A novel wavefront sensor based on a microstructural array of waveguides is proposed. The method is based on the sensitivity in light-coupling efficiency to the wavefront gradient present at the entrance aperture of each waveguide in an array, and hence the amount of incident light that couples is influenced by wavefront aberrations. The concept is illustrated with wavefront measurements that have been performed using a liquid-filled photonic crystal fiber (LF-PCF) working as a coherent fiber bundle. The pros and cons of the LF-PCF based sensor are discussed. PMID:26074553

  7. Wavefront Sensing Analysis of Grazing Incidence Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrbach, Scott; Saha, Timo

    2012-01-01

    Wavefront sensing is a process by which optical system errors are deduced from the aberrations in the image of an ideal source. The method has been used successfully in near-normal incidence, but not for grazing incidence systems. This innovation highlights the ability to examine out-of-focus images from grazing incidence telescopes (typically operating in the x-ray wavelengths, but integrated using optical wavelengths) and determine the lower-order deformations. This is important because as a metrology tool, this method would allow the integration of high angular resolution optics without the use of normal incidence interferometry, which requires direct access to the front surface of each mirror. Measuring the surface figure of mirror segments in a highly nested x-ray telescope mirror assembly is difficult due to the tight packing of elements and blockage of all but the innermost elements to normal incidence light. While this can be done on an individual basis in a metrology mount, once the element is installed and permanently bonded into the assembly, it is impossible to verify the figure of each element and ensure that the necessary imaging quality will be maintained. By examining on-axis images of an ideal point source, one can gauge the low-order figure errors of individual elements, even when integrated into an assembly. This technique is known as wavefront sensing (WFS). By shining collimated light down the optical axis of the telescope and looking at out-of-focus images, the blur due to low-order figure errors of individual elements can be seen, and the figure error necessary to produce that blur can be calculated. The method avoids the problem of requiring normal incidence access to the surface of each mirror segment. Mirror figure errors span a wide range of spatial frequencies, from the lowest-order bending to the highest order micro-roughness. While all of these can be measured in normal incidence, only the lowest-order contributors can be determined

  8. Wavefront Sensing with the Fine Guidance Sensor for James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. Scott; Aronstein, David; Dean, Bruce H.; Howard,Joe; Shiri, Ron

    2008-01-01

    An analysis is presented that utilizes the Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) for focal-plane wavefront sensing (WFS) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). WFS with FGS increases the number of wavefront measurements taken in field of the telescope, but has many challenges over the other JWST instruments that make it unique, such as; less sampling of the Point Spread Function (PSF), a smaller diversity-defocus range, a smaller image detector size, and a polychromatic object or source. Additionally, presented is an analysis of sampling for wavefront sensing. Results are shown based on simulations of flight and the cryogenic optical testing at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  9. Tomographic wavefront error using multi-LGS constellation sensed with Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors.

    PubMed

    Robert, Clélia; Conan, Jean-Marc; Gratadour, Damien; Schreiber, Laura; Fusco, Thierry

    2010-11-01

    Noise effects induced by laser guide star (LGS) elongation have to be considered globally in a multi-LGS tomographic reconstruction analysis. This allows a fine estimation of performance and the comparison of different launching options. We present a modal analysis of the wavefront error with Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors based on quasi-analytical matrix formalism. Including spot elongation and the Rayleigh fratricide effect, edge launching produces similar performance to central launching and avoids the risk of possible underestimation of fratricide scatter. Performance improves slightly with an optimized centroid estimator and is not affected by a slight field-of-view truncation of the subapertures. Finally we discuss detector characteristics for a LGS Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor.

  10. Binary hologram based high speed zonal wavefront sensing with reduced estimation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Biswajit; Boruah, Bosanta R.

    2016-03-01

    Reduced wavefront estimation time in a Shack-Hartmann type wavefront sensor plays an important role in any high speed application of the sensor. Exploiting computer generated holography technique, one can generate an array of binary diffraction grating pattern to produce an array of focal spots, similar to that in a Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS). The transmittance functions of each of such a grating pattern can be configured to produce a one dimensional (1D) array of focal spots of a desired order. In this paper, we show that the formation of 1D array, further facilitates in the process of single indexed wavefront estimation in its true sense that considerably reduces the wavefront estimation time.

  11. Binary hologram based high speed zonal wavefront sensing with reduced estimation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Biswajit; Boruah, Bosanta R.

    2016-03-01

    Reduced wavefront estimation time in a Shack-Hartmann type wavefront sensor plays an important role in any high speed application of the sensor. Exploiting computer generated holography technique, one can generate an array of binary diffraction grating pattern to produce an array of focal spots, similar to that in a Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS). The transmittance functions of each of such a grating pattern can be configured to produce a one dimensional (1D) array of focal spots of a desired order. In this paper, we show that the formation of 1D array, further facilitates in the process of single indexed wavefront estimation in its true sense that considerably reduces the wavefront estimation time.

  12. Wavefront Sensing & Control for a Large Segmented Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redding, David; ATLAST Concept Study Team

    2009-01-01

    This poster presents an active optics control architecture for ATLAS-T16 - a proposed 16 m aperture space telescope, with a Primary Mirror composed of 32 separate hexagonal segments. ATLAS-T16 is intended to be launched in a in a large ARES rocket in the 2020 time frame. Like the James Webb Space Telescope, it would be launched in a folded configuration, and deployed after orbital insertion. The ATLAS wavefront control problem is to align the PM segments and other optics following deployment, with initial errors in the mm and mrad range, to achieve diffraction limited performance in the UV and visible wavelengths at under 50 nm WF error (RMS) across the field. In this it is similar to JWST, though with considerably tighter WF error requirements. ATLAS differs from JWST by being twice as large, with 4 times the collecting area, and with a correspondingly lighter and more flexible structure - factors that may require a continuous but low bandwidth WF and pointing control system to preserve optical quality throughout extended operational periods. The poster will describe a WFSC architecture that provides both the initial WF control and continuous metrology of the various PM segments and other optics to assure excellent optical quality throughout the mission. Control requirements will be driven by scientific mission objectives, with the most taxing being high dynamic-range imaging for exoplanet observation. Initialization will utilized image- and spectrum-based measurements for WF sensing. Continuous metrology will be provided by an "optical truss," made up of multiple Laser Distance Gauges to measure and maintain the optical state of all major optical elements in the telescope. Results from multiple testbeds and telescopes will be provided to illustrate control performance.

  13. Adaptive optics confocal microscopy using direct wavefront sensing.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xiaodong; Fernandez, Bautista; Azucena, Oscar; Fu, Min; Garcia, Denise; Zuo, Yi; Chen, Diana C; Kubby, Joel

    2011-04-01

    Optical aberrations due to the inhomogeneous refractive index of tissue degrade the resolution and brightness of images in deep-tissue imaging. We introduce a confocal fluorescence microscope with adaptive optics, which can correct aberrations based on direct wavefront measurements using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor with a fluorescent bead used as a point source reference beacon. The results show a 4.3× improvement in the Strehl ratio and a 240% improvement in the signal intensity for fixed mouse tissues at depths of up to 100 μm.

  14. Maximum-likelihood methods in wavefront sensing: stochastic models and likelihood functions

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Dainty, Christopher; Lara, David

    2008-01-01

    Maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation in wavefront sensing requires careful attention to all noise sources and all factors that influence the sensor data. We present detailed probability density functions for the output of the image detector in a wavefront sensor, conditional not only on wavefront parameters but also on various nuisance parameters. Practical ways of dealing with nuisance parameters are described, and final expressions for likelihoods and Fisher information matrices are derived. The theory is illustrated by discussing Shack–Hartmann sensors, and computational requirements are discussed. Simulation results show that ML estimation can significantly increase the dynamic range of a Shack–Hartmann sensor with four detectors and that it can reduce the residual wavefront error when compared with traditional methods. PMID:17206255

  15. Zonal wavefront sensing using a grating array printed on a polyester film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Biswajit; Kumar, Suraj; Boruah, Bosanta R.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a zonal wavefront sensor that comprises an array of binary diffraction gratings realized on a transparent sheet (i.e., polyester film) followed by a focusing lens and a camera. The sensor works in a manner similar to that of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The fabrication of the array of gratings is immune to certain issues associated with the fabrication of the lenslet array which is commonly used in zonal wavefront sensing. Besides the sensing method offers several important advantages such as flexible dynamic range, easy configurability, and option to enhance the sensing frame rate. Here, we have demonstrated the working of the proposed sensor using a proof-of-principle experimental arrangement.

  16. Zonal wavefront sensing using a grating array printed on a polyester film.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Biswajit; Kumar, Suraj; Boruah, Bosanta R

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a zonal wavefront sensor that comprises an array of binary diffraction gratings realized on a transparent sheet (i.e., polyester film) followed by a focusing lens and a camera. The sensor works in a manner similar to that of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The fabrication of the array of gratings is immune to certain issues associated with the fabrication of the lenslet array which is commonly used in zonal wavefront sensing. Besides the sensing method offers several important advantages such as flexible dynamic range, easy configurability, and option to enhance the sensing frame rate. Here, we have demonstrated the working of the proposed sensor using a proof-of-principle experimental arrangement.

  17. Zonal wavefront sensing using a grating array printed on a polyester film

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Biswajit; Boruah, Bosanta R.; Kumar, Suraj

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we describe the development of a zonal wavefront sensor that comprises an array of binary diffraction gratings realized on a transparent sheet (i.e., polyester film) followed by a focusing lens and a camera. The sensor works in a manner similar to that of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The fabrication of the array of gratings is immune to certain issues associated with the fabrication of the lenslet array which is commonly used in zonal wavefront sensing. Besides the sensing method offers several important advantages such as flexible dynamic range, easy configurability, and option to enhance the sensing frame rate. Here, we have demonstrated the working of the proposed sensor using a proof-of-principle experimental arrangement.

  18. Common-Path Interferometric Wavefront Sensing for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, James Kent

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an optical configuration for a common-path phase-shifting interferometric wavefront sensor.1 2 This sensor has a host of attractive features which make it well suited for space-based adaptive optics. First, it is strictly reflective and therefore operates broadband, second it is common mode and therefore does not suffer from systematic errors (like vibration) that are typical in other interferometers, third it is a phase-shifting interferometer and therefore benefits from both the sensitivity of interferometric sensors as well as the noise rejection afforded by synchronous detection. Unlike the Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor, it has nearly uniform sensitivity to all pupil modes. Optical configuration, theory and simulations for such a system will be discussed along with predicted performance.

  19. On the application of background oriented schlieren for wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bichal, A.; Thurow, B. S.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of utilizing a background oriented schlieren (BOS) imaging system to measure the distortion of a wavefront is presented and analyzed. It is shown that the fundamental equations characterizing the image distortion measured using BOS and the distortion of a wavefront are based on the same physical phenomena and can be easily related to one another. An analysis is performed to consider the influence of practical considerations, such as the field-of-view (FOV) and depth-of-field (DOF) on the sensitivity of the BOS measurement. It is found that when the FOV of the schlieren object is held constant and placement of both the medium and background is constrained to the DOF of the imaging system, the sensitivity of the BOS measurement is independent of the focal length of the imaging lens and overall length of the system, both of which are dependent on the FOV and DOF. An equation is derived that expresses the BOS sensitivity as a function of imaging lens f-number and the circle of confusion as these parameters are used in practice to determine the FOV and DOF. It is shown that allowing the background to be slightly out of focus can significantly increase the sensitivity of the measurement. The analysis is tested and confirmed using both computer generated model images and experiments performed to measure the wavefront distortion induced by a plano-convex lens. An uncertainty analysis is performed showing better than 0.1 pixel resolution in the image distortion, which results in an absolute error of the reconstructed wavefront that is better than 5% for the case considered here.

  20. Advanced wavefront measurement and analysis of laser system modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, C.R.; Auerback, J.M.

    1994-11-15

    High spatial resolution measurements of the reflected or transmitted wavefronts of large aperture optical components used in high peak power laser systems is now possible. These measurements are produced by phase shifting interferometry. The wavefront data is in the form of 3-D phase maps that reconstruct the wavefront shape. The emphasis of this work is on the characterization of wavefront features in the mid-spatial wavelength range (from 0.1 to 10.0 mm) and has been accomplished for the first time. Wavefront structure from optical components with spatial wavelengths in this range are of concern because their effects in high peak power laser systems. At high peak power, this phase modulation can convert to large magnitude intensity modulation by non-linear processes. This can lead to optical damage. We have developed software to input the measured phase map data into beam propagation codes in order to model this conversion process. We are analyzing this data to: (1) Characterize the wavefront structure produced by current optical components, (2) Refine our understanding of laser system performance, (3) Develop a database from which future optical component specifications can be derived.

  1. Modeling of high-precision wavefront sensing with new generation of CMT avalanche photodiode infrared detectors.

    PubMed

    Gousset, Silvère; Petit, Cyril; Michau, Vincent; Fusco, Thierry; Robert, Clelia

    2015-12-01

    Near-infrared wavefront sensing allows for the enhancement of sky coverage with adaptive optics. The recently developed HgCdTe avalanche photodiode arrays are promising due to their very low detector noise, but still present an imperfect cosmetic that may directly impact real-time wavefront measurements for adaptive optics and thus degrade performance in astronomical applications. We propose here a model of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront measurement in the presence of residual fixed pattern noise and defective pixels. To adjust our models, a fine characterization of such an HgCdTe array, the RAPID sensor, is proposed. The impact of the cosmetic defects on the Shack-Hartmann measurement is assessed through numerical simulations. This study provides both a new insight on the applicability of cadmium mercury telluride (CMT) avalanche photodiodes detectors for astronomical applications and criteria to specify the cosmetic qualities of future arrays. PMID:26836674

  2. Curvature wavefront sensing based on a single defocused image and intensity compensation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhixu; Bai, Hua; Cui, Xiangqun

    2016-04-01

    Curvature wavefront sensing usually requires the measurement of two defocused images at equal distances before and after the focus. In this paper, a new wavefront recovery algorithm based on only one defocused image is proposed. This algorithm contains the following four steps: response matrix calculation, establishment of intensity distribution equations, Zernike coefficients solution derived from the least squares method, and defocused image compensation with the solved Zernike coefficients. The performance of the algorithm in a large obscuration ratio and fast focal ratio optical system on axis and the edge of the field of view (FOV) is examined. Two optical systems of the Hubble telescope and a modified Paul-Baker telescope are employed to test the algorithm. The simulations show that the proposed algorithm outperforms in structural simplicity, and applications are expected in the wavefront recovery of the extreme environment (i.e., in space and the Antarctic). PMID:27139686

  3. Curvature wavefront sensing based on a single defocused image and intensity compensation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhixu; Bai, Hua; Cui, Xiangqun

    2016-04-01

    Curvature wavefront sensing usually requires the measurement of two defocused images at equal distances before and after the focus. In this paper, a new wavefront recovery algorithm based on only one defocused image is proposed. This algorithm contains the following four steps: response matrix calculation, establishment of intensity distribution equations, Zernike coefficients solution derived from the least squares method, and defocused image compensation with the solved Zernike coefficients. The performance of the algorithm in a large obscuration ratio and fast focal ratio optical system on axis and the edge of the field of view (FOV) is examined. Two optical systems of the Hubble telescope and a modified Paul-Baker telescope are employed to test the algorithm. The simulations show that the proposed algorithm outperforms in structural simplicity, and applications are expected in the wavefront recovery of the extreme environment (i.e., in space and the Antarctic).

  4. Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing using interferometric focusing of light onto guide-stars.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xiaodong; Dean, Ziah; Chien, Christopher; Azucena, Oscar; Bodington, Dare; Kubby, Joel

    2013-12-16

    Optical microscopy provides noninvasive imaging of biological tissues at subcellular level. The optical aberrations induced by the inhomogeneous refractive index of biological samples limits the resolution and can decrease the penetration depth. To compensate refractive aberrations, adaptive optics with Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing has been used in microscopes. Wavefront measurement requires light from a guide-star inside of the sample. The scattering effect limits the intensity of the guide-star, hence reducing the signal to noise ratio of the wavefront measurement. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of interferometric focusing of excitation light onto a guide-star embedded deeply in tissue to increase its fluorescent intensity, thus overcoming the excitation signal loss caused by scattering. With interferometric focusing, we more than doubled the signal to noise ratio of the laser guide-star through scattering tissue as well as potentially extend the imaging depth through using AO microscopy.

  5. Piston and tilt interferometry for segmented wavefront sensing.

    PubMed

    Deprez, M; Bellanger, C; Lombard, L; Wattellier, B; Primot, J

    2016-03-15

    We present a novel interferometric technique dedicated to the measurement of relative phase differences (pistons) and tilts of a periodically segmented wavefront. Potential applications include co-phasing of segmented mirrors of Keck-like telescopes as well as coherent laser beam combining. The setup only requires a holes mask selecting the center part of each element, a diffracting component, and a camera. Recorded interferogram is made of many subareas with sinusoidal fringe pattern. From each pattern, piston is extracted from fringe shift and tilts from fringe frequency and orientation. The pattern analysis is simple enough to enable kilohertz rate operation. The λ ambiguities are solved by a two-wavelength measurement. This technique is compatible with a very high number of elements and can be operated in the presence of atmospheric turbulence. PMID:26977638

  6. Adaptive optics for array telescopes using piston-and-tilt wave-front sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wizinowich, P.; Mcleod, B.; Lloyd-Yhart, M.; Angel, J. R. P.; Colucci, D.; Dekany, R.; Mccarthy, D.; Wittman, D.; Scott-Fleming, I.

    1992-01-01

    A near-infrared adaptive optics system operating at about 50 Hz has been used to control phase errors adaptively between two mirrors of the Multiple Mirror Telescope by stabilizing the position of the interference fringe in the combined unresolved far-field image. The resultant integrated images have angular resolutions of better than 0.1 arcsec and fringe contrasts of more than 0.6. Measurements of wave-front tilt have confirmed the wavelength independence of image motion. These results show that interferometric sensing of phase errors, when combined with a system for sensing the wave-front tilt of the individual telescopes, will provide a means of achieving a stable diffraction-limited focus with segmented telescopes or arrays of telescopes.

  7. Wavefront sensing in space from the PICTURE-B sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Ewan S.; Mendillo, Christopher B.; Cook, Timothy A.; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2016-07-01

    A NASA sounding rocket for high contrast imaging with a visible nulling coronagraph, the Planet Imaging Coronagraphic Technology Using a Reconfigurable Experimental Base (PICTURE-B) payload has made two suborbital attempts to observe the warm dust disk inferred around Epsilon Eridani. We present results from the November 2015 launch demonstrating active wavefront sensing in space with a piezoelectric mirror stage and a micromachine deformable mirror along with precision pointing and lightweight optics in space.

  8. Synthetic holography in microscopy: opportunities arising from advanced wavefront shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesacher, Alexander; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2016-01-01

    The advent of computer-generated or synthetic holography has created a wealth of possibilities for wavefront shaping in optics. We discuss the impact this has had on optical microscopy. Synthetic Holographic Microscopy utilises wavefront shaping by a computer-generated 'hologram' (CGH) to modify light on the illumination or the detection side, or both. This enables modifications of the general sample appearance concerning contrast, resolution and other aspects. Multiplexing CGHs can perform several tasks at once, for instance splitting the image into sub-images corresponding to different depths in the sample, or displaying differently contrasted images of the sample, e.g. bright field, darkfield or (spiral) phase contrast, in different sub-images. We give an overview of the options and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using programmable holographic elements inside an optical microscope.

  9. Review of the latest developments in fast low noise detectors for wavefront sensing in the visible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Sean M.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we describe the development of fast low noise detectors intended primarily for use in Shack Hartmann wavefront sensors for natural and laser guide star wavefront sensing in the future adaptive optics systems of the Thirty Meter Telescope Project and the Next Generation Adaptive Optics system at the W. M. Keck Observatory. This work results from collaboration among the W. M. Keck Observatory, the Thirty Meter Telescope Project, the Lincoln Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Starfire Optical Range of the Air Force Research Laboratory. Testing of backside thinned, packaged detectors has been completed and performance results including read noise, readout speed, charge diffusion, dark current, and quantum efficiency will be reported. Proposed developments of readout systems to compliment this detector will be described, and performance compared to alternative detector solutions.

  10. Fine optical alignment correction of astronomical spectrographs via in-situ full-field moment-based wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hanshin; Hill, Gary J.; Tuttle, Sarah E.; Vattiat, Brian L.

    2012-09-01

    The image moment-based wavefront sensing (IWFS) utilizes moments of focus-modulated focal plane images to determine modal wavefront aberrations. This permits fast, easy, and accurate measurement of wavefront error (WFE) on any available finite-sized isolated targets across the entire focal plane (FP) of an imaging system, thereby allowing not only in-situ full-field image quality assessment, but also deterministic fine alignment correction of the imaging system. We present an experimental demonstration where fine alignment correction of a fast camera system in a fiber-fed astronomical spectrograph, called VIRUS, is accomplished by using IWFS.

  11. Wavefront Sensing and Control Technology for Submillimeter and Far-Infrared Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, Dave

    2004-01-01

    The NGST wavefront sensing and control system will be developed to TRL6 over the next few years, including testing in a cryogenic vacuum environment with traceable hardware. Doing this in the far-infrared and submillimeter is probably easier, as some aspects of the problem scale with wavelength, and the telescope is likely to have a more stable environment; however, detectors may present small complications. Since this is a new system approach, it warrants a new look. For instance, a large space telescope based on the DART membrane mirror design requires a new actuation approach. Other mirror and actuation technologies may prove useful as well.

  12. Grazing Incidence Wavefront Sensing and Verification of X-Ray Optics Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.; Rohrbach, Scott; Zhang, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of interferometrically measured mirror metrology data and characterization of a telescope wavefront can be powerful tools in understanding of image characteristics of an x-ray optical system. In the development of soft x-ray telescope for the International X-Ray Observatory (IXO), we have developed new approaches to support the telescope development process. Interferometrically measuring the optical components over all relevant spatial frequencies can be used to evaluate and predict the performance of an x-ray telescope. Typically, the mirrors are measured using a mount that minimizes the mount and gravity induced errors. In the assembly and mounting process the shape of the mirror segments can dramatically change. We have developed wavefront sensing techniques suitable for the x-ray optical components to aid us in the characterization and evaluation of these changes. Hartmann sensing of a telescope and its components is a simple method that can be used to evaluate low order mirror surface errors and alignment errors. Phase retrieval techniques can also be used to assess and estimate the low order axial errors of the primary and secondary mirror segments. In this paper we describe the mathematical foundation of our Hartmann and phase retrieval sensing techniques. We show how these techniques can be used in the evaluation and performance prediction process of x-ray telescopes.

  13. Developmental Cryogenic Active Telescope Testbed, a Wavefront Sensing and Control Testbed for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Claudia M.; Davila, Pamela S.; Redding, David C.; Morell, Armando; Lowman, Andrew E.; Wilson, Mark E.; Young, Eric W.; Pacini, Linda K.; Coulter, Dan R.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the technology validation strategy of the next generation space telescope (NGST), a system testbed is being developed at GSFC, in partnership with JPL and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), which will include all of the component functions envisioned in an NGST active optical system. The system will include an actively controlled, segmented primary mirror, actively controlled secondary, deformable, and fast steering mirrors, wavefront sensing optics, wavefront control algorithms, a telescope simulator module, and an interferometric wavefront sensor for use in comparing final obtained wavefronts from different tests. The developmental. cryogenic active telescope testbed (DCATT) will be implemented in three phases. Phase 1 will focus on operating the testbed at ambient temperature. During Phase 2, a cryocapable segmented telescope will be developed and cooled to cryogenic temperature to investigate the impact on the ability to correct the wavefront and stabilize the image. In Phase 3, it is planned to incorporate industry developed flight-like components, such as figure controlled mirror segments, cryogenic, low hold power actuators, or different wavefront sensing and control hardware or software. A very important element of the program is the development and subsequent validation of the integrated multidisciplinary models. The Phase 1 testbed objectives, plans, configuration, and design will be discussed.

  14. Comparison of laser ray-tracing and skiascopic ocular wavefront-sensing devices

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, D-UG; Bessho, K; Gomez, L; Freeman, WR

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To compare two wavefront-sensing devices based on different principles. Methods Thirty-eight healthy eyes of 19 patients were measured five times in the reproducibility study. Twenty eyes of 10 patients were measured in the comparison study. The Tracey Visual Function Analyzer (VFA), based on the ray-tracing principle and the Nidek optical pathway difference (OPD)-Scan, based on the dynamic skiascopy principle were compared. Standard deviation (SD) of root mean square (RMS) errors was compared to verify the reproducibility. We evaluated RMS errors, Zernike terms and conventional refractive indexes (Sph, Cyl, Ax, and spherical equivalent). Results In RMS errors reading, both devices showed similar ratios of SD to the mean measurement value (VFA: 57.5±11.7%, OPD-Scan: 53.9±10.9%). Comparison on the same eye showed that almost all terms were significantly greater using the VFA than using the OPD-Scan. However, certain high spatial frequency aberrations (tetrafoil, pentafoil, and hexafoil) were consistently measured near zero with the OPD-Scan. Conclusion Both devices showed similar level of reproducibility; however, there was considerable difference in the wavefront reading between machines when measuring the same eye. Differences in the number of sample points, centration, and measurement algorithms between the two instruments may explain our results. PMID:17571088

  15. Study of an instrument for sensing errors in a telescope wavefront

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, L. J.; Shack, R. V.; Slater, P. N.

    1974-01-01

    Focal plane sensors for determining the error in a telescope wavefront were investigated. The construction of three candidate test instruments and their evaluation in terms of small wavefront error aberration measurements are described. A laboratory wavefront simulator was designed and fabricated to evaluate the test instruments. The laboratory wavefront error simulator was used to evaluate three tests; a Hartmann test, a polarization shearing interferometer test, and an interferometric Zernike test.

  16. Wide-field wavefront sensing in solar adaptive optics : modeling and effects on reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béchet, Clémentine; Tallon, Michel; Montilla, Icíar; Langlois, Maud

    2013-12-01

    The planned 4-meter diameter of the European Solar Telescope (EST) is aimed at providing high spatial resolution and large photon collecting area, in order to understand in particular the mechanisms of magnetic coupling in the chromosphere and the photosphere. To reach its goals in the visible and the near-infrared, EST is designed with both a conventional and a multi-conjugate adaptive optics (AO) of similar complexity than the ones featured for the Extremely Large Telescopes. In addition, the AO on EST has to face a particularity of solar AO: the wavefront sensing on extended sources with measurement fields of about 10'' in size. Reviewing recent literature together with an independent analysis, we investigate the impact of extended-field sensing in AO for large solar telescopes. Sensing modeling and its effect on reconstruction performance are analyzed, thanks to simulations performed with the Fractal Iterative Method for tomography (FRiM-3D), showing the difficulty to correct high altitude turbulence. We introduce a new approximate direct model of extended-source sensing which greatly improves the quality of the end-to-end simulations for EST AO. Next, we try to improve the conventional solar AO correction by using this new model in the reconstruction. Our simulations do not show significant benefits from using such tomographic model in this conventional AO configuration and under typical atmospheric conditions.

  17. Measuring aberrations in the rat brain by coherence-gated wavefront sensing using a Linnik interferometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinyu; Léger, Jean-François; Binding, Jonas; Boccara, A Claude; Gigan, Sylvain; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2012-10-01

    Aberrations limit the resolution, signal intensity and achievable imaging depth in microscopy. Coherence-gated wavefront sensing (CGWS) allows the fast measurement of aberrations in scattering samples and therefore the implementation of adaptive corrections. However, CGWS has been demonstrated so far only in weakly scattering samples. We designed a new CGWS scheme based on a Linnik interferometer and a SLED light source, which is able to compensate dispersion automatically and can be implemented on any microscope. In the highly scattering rat brain tissue, where multiply scattered photons falling within the temporal gate of the CGWS can no longer be neglected, we have measured known defocus and spherical aberrations up to a depth of 400 µm. PMID:23082292

  18. Measuring aberrations in the rat brain by coherence-gated wavefront sensing using a Linnik interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinyu; Léger, Jean-François; Binding, Jonas; Boccara, A. Claude; Gigan, Sylvain; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations limit the resolution, signal intensity and achievable imaging depth in microscopy. Coherence-gated wavefront sensing (CGWS) allows the fast measurement of aberrations in scattering samples and therefore the implementation of adaptive corrections. However, CGWS has been demonstrated so far only in weakly scattering samples. We designed a new CGWS scheme based on a Linnik interferometer and a SLED light source, which is able to compensate dispersion automatically and can be implemented on any microscope. In the highly scattering rat brain tissue, where multiply scattered photons falling within the temporal gate of the CGWS can no longer be neglected, we have measured known defocus and spherical aberrations up to a depth of 400 µm. PMID:23082292

  19. Measuring aberrations in the rat brain by coherence-gated wavefront sensing using a Linnik interferometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinyu; Léger, Jean-François; Binding, Jonas; Boccara, A Claude; Gigan, Sylvain; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2012-10-01

    Aberrations limit the resolution, signal intensity and achievable imaging depth in microscopy. Coherence-gated wavefront sensing (CGWS) allows the fast measurement of aberrations in scattering samples and therefore the implementation of adaptive corrections. However, CGWS has been demonstrated so far only in weakly scattering samples. We designed a new CGWS scheme based on a Linnik interferometer and a SLED light source, which is able to compensate dispersion automatically and can be implemented on any microscope. In the highly scattering rat brain tissue, where multiply scattered photons falling within the temporal gate of the CGWS can no longer be neglected, we have measured known defocus and spherical aberrations up to a depth of 400 µm.

  20. Modeling the effect of high altitude turbulence in wide-field correlating wavefront sensing and its impact on the performance of solar AO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla, I.; Tallon, M.; Langlois, M.; Béchet, C.; Collados Vera, M.

    2014-08-01

    Solar Adaptive Optics (AO) shares many issues with night-time AO, but it also has its own particularities. The wavefront sensing is performed using correlations to efficiently work on the solar granulation as a reference. The field of view for that measurement usually is around 10". A sensor collecting such a wide field of view averages wavefront information from different sky directions, and the anisoplanatism thus has a peculiar impact on the performance of solar AO and MCAO systems. Since we are entering the era of large solar telescopes (European Solar Telescope, Advanced Technology Solar Telescope) understanding this issue is crucial to evaluate its impact on the performance of future AO systems. In this paper we model the correlating wide field sensor and the way it senses the high altitude turbulence. Thanks to this improved modelling, we present an analysis of the influence of this sensing on the performance of each AO configuration, conventional AO and MCAO. In addition to the analytical study, simulations similar to the case of the EST AO systems with FRiM-3D (the Fractal Iterative Method for Atmospheric tomography) are used in order to highlight the relative influence of design parameters. In particular, results show the performance evolution when increasing the telescope diameter. We analyse the effect of high altitude turbulence correlation showing that increasing the diameter of the telescope does not degrade the performance when correcting on the same spatial and temporal scales.

  1. Measuring and modeling intraocular light scatter with Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing and the effects of nuclear cataract on the measurement of wavefront error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, William J., III

    Purpose. The purpose of this research is to determine if Shack/Hartmann (S/H) wavefront sensing (SHWS) can be used to objectively quantify ocular forward scatter. Methods. Patient S/H images from an study of nuclear cataract were analyzed to extract scattering data by examining characteristics of the lenslet point spread functions. Physical and computer eye models with simulated cataract were developed to control variables and to test the underlying assumptions for using SHWS to measure aberrations and light scatter from nuclear cataract. Results. (1) For patients with nuclear opalescence (NO) >=2.5, forward scatter metrics in a multiple regression analysis account for 33% of variance in Mesopic Low Contrast acuity. Prediction of visual acuity was improved by employing a multiple regression analysis that included both backscatter and forward scatter metrics (R2 = 51%) for Mesopic High Contrast acuity. (2) The physical and computer models identified areas of instrument noise (e.g., stray light and unwanted reflections) improving the design of a second generation SHWS for measuring both wavefront error and scatter. (3) Exposure time had the most influence on, and pupil size had negligible influence on forward scatter metrics. Scatter metric MAX_SD predicted changes in simulated cataract up to R2 = 92%. There were small but significant differences (alpha = 0.05) between 1.5-pass and 1-pass wavefront measurements inclusive of variable simulated nuclear cataract and exposure; however, these differences were not visually significant. Improvements to the SHWS imaging hardware, software, and test protocol were implemented in a second generation SHWS to be used in a longitudinal cataract study. Conclusions. Forward light scatter in real eyes can be quantified using a SHWS. In the presence of clinically significant nuclear opalescence, forward scatter metrics predicted acuity better than the LOCS III NO backscatter metric. The superiority of forward scatter metrics over back

  2. Advanced Remote Sensing Research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, Terrence; Jones, John W.; Price, Susan D.; Hogan, Dianna

    2008-01-01

    'Remote sensing' is a generic term for monitoring techniques that collect information without being in physical contact with the object of study. Overhead imagery from aircraft and satellite sensors provides the most common form of remotely sensed data and records the interaction of electromagnetic energy (usually visible light) with matter, such as the Earth's surface. Remotely sensed data are fundamental to geographic science. The Eastern Geographic Science Center (EGSC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is currently conducting and promoting the research and development of three different aspects of remote sensing science: spectral analysis, automated orthorectification of historical imagery, and long wave infrared (LWIR) polarimetric imagery (PI).

  3. Wave-front analysis of personal eye protection.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Timo; Zoric, Katja; Speck, Alexis; Zelzer, Benedikt; Götzelmann, Jens; Nagengast, Dieter; Langenbucher, Achim

    2012-07-30

    Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensing has been successfully applied to many fields of optical testing including the human eye itself. We propose wave-front measurement for testing protective eye wear for production control and investigation of aberrations. Refractive power data is derived from the wave-front data and compared to a subjective measurement technique based on a focimeter. Additional image quality classification was performed with a multivariate model using objective parameters to resample a subjectively determined visual quality. Wave-front measurement advances optical testing of protective eye wear and may be used for objective quality control.

  4. Study of an instrument for sensing errors in a telescope wavefront

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, L. J.; Shack, R. V.; Slater, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Partial results are presented of theoretical and experimental investigations of different focal plane sensor configurations for determining the error in a telescope wavefront. The coarse range sensor and fine range sensors are used in the experimentation. The design of a wavefront error simulator is presented along with the Hartmann test, the shearing polarization interferometer, the Zernike test, and the Zernike polarization test.

  5. Distributed Computing Architecture for Image-Based Wavefront Sensing and 2 D FFTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Dean, Bruce H.; Haghani, Shadan

    2006-01-01

    Image-based wavefront sensing (WFS) provides significant advantages over interferometric-based wavefi-ont sensors such as optical design simplicity and stability. However, the image-based approach is computational intensive, and therefore, specialized high-performance computing architectures are required in applications utilizing the image-based approach. The development and testing of these high-performance computing architectures are essential to such missions as James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Terrestial Planet Finder-Coronagraph (TPF-C and CorSpec), and Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT). The development of these specialized computing architectures require numerous two-dimensional Fourier Transforms, which necessitate an all-to-all communication when applied on a distributed computational architecture. Several solutions for distributed computing are presented with an emphasis on a 64 Node cluster of DSPs, multiple DSP FPGAs, and an application of low-diameter graph theory. Timing results and performance analysis will be presented. The solutions offered could be applied to other all-to-all communication and scientifically computationally complex problems.

  6. Pyramid wavefront sensing with a laser guide star for an ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Brice

    2010-07-01

    The wavefront sensor [WFS] is a key element of an Adaptive Optics [AO] system. It gives access to a direct measurement of the turbulent phase, its curvature or its slope, from which the mirror voltages are computed. The ability of the system to correct efficiently the atmospheric turbulence is strongly dependent on the performance of the WFS in estimating the turbulent phase. The Shack-Hartmann [SH] WFS has been for a long time the standard used in AO systems. In 1996, it has been proposed1 a new generation WFS, the pyramid WFS. It is a focal plane WFS, based on the principle of a Foucault knife-edge. It has been demonstrated that it provides a consistent gain with respect to the Shack-Hartmann.2,5-7 More recently, improvements were proposed to increase the pyramid performance.3, 4 On the framework of the developpement of extremely large telescopes, the interest of a pyramid wave front sensor appears clearly. But its behaviour with laser guide stars [LGS], most probably necessary in any Extremely Large Telescope [ELT], is still relatively unknown. Some WFS dedicated to LGS wave front sensing has already been proposed8,9 but a full study of the pyramid WFS behaviour is still necessary. This work's aim is to bring answers to this topic.

  7. HIGH-SPEED IMAGING AND WAVEFRONT SENSING WITH AN INFRARED AVALANCHE PHOTODIODE ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Baranec, Christoph; Atkinson, Dani; Hall, Donald; Jacobson, Shane; Chun, Mark; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas M.

    2015-08-10

    Infrared avalanche photodiode (APD) arrays represent a panacea for many branches of astronomy by enabling extremely low-noise, high-speed, and even photon-counting measurements at near-infrared wavelengths. We recently demonstrated the use of an early engineering-grade infrared APD array that achieves a correlated double sampling read noise of 0.73 e{sup −} in the lab, and a total noise of 2.52 e{sup −} on sky, and supports simultaneous high-speed imaging and tip-tilt wavefront sensing with the Robo-AO visible-light laser adaptive optics (AO) system at the Palomar Observatory 1.5 m telescope. Here we report on the improved image quality simultaneously achieved at visible and infrared wavelengths by using the array as part of an image stabilization control loop with AO-sharpened guide stars. We also discuss a newly enabled survey of nearby late M-dwarf multiplicity, as well as future uses of this technology in other AO and high-contrast imaging applications.

  8. Shack-Hartmann mask/pupil registration algorithm for wavefront sensing in segmented mirror telescopes.

    PubMed

    Piatrou, Piotr; Chanan, Gary

    2013-11-10

    Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing in general requires careful registration of the reimaged telescope primary mirror to the Shack-Hartmann mask or lenslet array. The registration requirements are particularly demanding for applications in which segmented mirrors are phased using a physical optics generalization of the Shack-Hartmann test. In such cases the registration tolerances are less than 0.1% of the diameter of the primary mirror. We present a pupil registration algorithm suitable for such high accuracy applications that is based on the one used successfully for phasing the segments of the Keck telescopes. The pupil is aligned in four degrees of freedom (translations, rotation, and magnification) by balancing the intensities of subimages formed by small subapertures that straddle the periphery of the mirror. We describe the algorithm in general terms and then in the specific context of two very different geometries: the 492 segment Thirty Meter Telescope, and the seven "segment" Giant Magellan Telescope. Through detailed simulations we explore the accuracy of the algorithm and its sensitivity to such effects as cross talk, noise/counting statistics, atmospheric scintillation, and segment reflectivity variations.

  9. Laboratory prototype for the demonstration of sodium laser guide star wavefront sensing on the E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patti, M.; Lombini, M.; Schreiber, L.; Bregoli, G.; Arcidiacono, C.; Cosentino, G.; Diolaiti, E.; Foppiani, I.

    The new class of Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT) relies on Sodium Laser Guide Stars (LGS) to improve the Adaptive Optics performance in terms of correction quality and sky coverage. The time instability and the vertical extension of the atmospheric Sodium layer density have a potential significant impact on the wavefront sensing accuracy. We describe a laboratory prototype which has been developed with the goal to investigate specific algorithms for wavefront sensing with these artificial sources under different conditions of sodium layer density profile, parallactic effects due to laser launch geometry and atmospheric turbulence. The prototype can emulate realistic elongated spots on the focal plane of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS), including their intensity variations due to the time variability of the Sodium density vertical profile. In addition, multiple LGSs can be simulated, one at a time, and a two-layer atmospheric turbulence model is available. Herein we report the verification of prototype performances, including optical performance, accuracy of emulated Sodium density profiles and atmospheric turbulence features.

  10. Advanced laser remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, J.; Czuchlewski, S.; Karl, R.

    1996-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Remote measurement of wind velocities is critical to a wide variety of applications such as environmental studies, weather prediction, aircraft safety, the accuracy of projectiles, bombs, parachute drops, prediction of the dispersal of chemical and biological warfare agents, and the debris from nuclear explosions. Major programs to develop remote sensors for these applications currently exist in the DoD and NASA. At present, however, there are no real-time, three-dimensional wind measurement techniques that are practical for many of these applications and we report on two new promising techniques. The first new technique uses an elastic backscatter lidar to track aerosol patterns in the atmosphere and to calculate three dimensional wind velocities from changes in the positions of the aerosol patterns. This was first done by Professor Ed Eloranta of the University of Wisconsin using post processing techniques and we are adapting Professor Eloranta`s algorithms to a real-time data processor and installing it in an existing elastic backscatter lidar system at Los Alamos (the XM94 helicopter lidar), which has a compatible data processing and control system. The second novel wind sensing technique is based on radio-frequency (RF) modulation and spatial filtering of elastic backscatter lidars. Because of their compactness and reliability, solid state lasers are the lasers of choice for many remote sensing applications, including wind sensing.

  11. Application of geometric phase to wavefront sensing for astronomical adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.

    2014-02-01

    Modern adaptive optics systems give high performance, both in terms of Strehl ratio (degree of correction) and corrected field of view. Arguably the most important subsystem is the wavefront sensor, which measures the deviation from flatness of the incident wavefront that has been perturbed by the turbulent atmosphere, and commands an actuated mirror to compensate. An aspect of the wavefront sensor essential to achieving high sensitivity is that it perform over a broad spectral bandwidth; operation without correction for guide star color is also desirable. With this in mind, wavefront sensors are considered that make use of the geometric (or topological) phase, which has the property that the value of the phase is independent of wavelength. Conceptual system designs and advantages are discussed.

  12. Correlation Wave-Front Sensing Algorithms for Shack-Hartmann-Based Adaptive Optics using a Point Source

    SciTech Connect

    Poynee, L A

    2003-05-06

    Shack-Hartmann based Adaptive Optics system with a point-source reference normally use a wave-front sensing algorithm that estimates the centroid (center of mass) of the point-source image 'spot' to determine the wave-front slope. The centroiding algorithm suffers for several weaknesses. For a small number of pixels, the algorithm gain is dependent on spot size. The use of many pixels on the detector leads to significant propagation of read noise. Finally, background light or spot halo aberrations can skew results. In this paper an alternative algorithm that suffers from none of these problems is proposed: correlation of the spot with a ideal reference spot. The correlation method is derived and a theoretical analysis evaluates its performance in comparison with centroiding. Both simulation and data from real AO systems are used to illustrate the results. The correlation algorithm is more robust than centroiding, but requires more computation.

  13. Implementation of adaptive optics in fluorescent microscopy using wavefront sensing and correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azucena, Oscar; Crest, Justin; Cao, Jian; Sullivan, William; Kner, Peter; Gavel, Donald; Dillon, Daren; Olivier, Scot; Kubby, Joel

    2010-02-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) improves the quality of astronomical imaging systems by using real time measurement of the turbulent medium in the optical path using a guide star (natural or artificial) as a point source reference beacon [1]. AO has also been applied to vision science to improve the view of the human eye. This paper will address our current research focused on the improvement of fluorescent microscopy for biological imaging utilizing current AO technology. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS) is used to measure the aberration introduced by a Drosophila Melanogaster embryo with an implanted 1 micron fluorescent bead that serves as a point source reference beacon. Previous measurements of the wavefront aberrations have found an average peak-to-valley and root-mean-square (RMS) wavefront error of 0.77 micrometers and 0.15 micrometers, respectively. Measurements of the Zernike coefficients indicated that the correction of the first 14 Zernike coefficients is sufficient to correct the aberrations we measured. Here we show that a MEMS deformable mirror with 3.5 microns of stroke and 140 actuators is sufficient to correct these aberrations. The design, assembly and initial results for the use of a MEMS deformable mirror, SHWS and implanted fluorescent reference beacon for wavefront correction are discussed.

  14. On-Sky Demonstration of Low-Order Wavefront Sensing and Control with Focal Plane Phase Mask Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Garima; Lozi, Julien; Guyon, Olivier; Baudoz, Pierre; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Martinache, Frantz; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Serabyn, Eugene; Kuhn, Jonas

    2015-09-01

    The ability to characterize exoplanets by spectroscopy of their atmospheres requires direct imaging techniques to isolate planet signal from the bright stellar glare. One of the limitations with the direct detection of exoplanets, either with ground- or space-based coronagraphs, is pointing errors and other low-order wavefront aberrations. The coronagraphic detection sensitivity at the diffraction limit therefore depends on how well low-order aberrations upstream of the focal plane mask are corrected. To prevent starlight leakage at the inner working angle of a phase mask coronagraph, we have introduced a Lyot-based low-order wavefront sensor (LLOWFS), which senses aberrations using the rejected starlight diffracted at the Lyot plane. In this article, we present the implementation, testing, and results of LLOWFS on the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics system (SCExAO) at the Subaru Telescope. We have controlled 35 Zernike modes of a H-band vector vortex coronagraph in the laboratory and 10 Zernike modes on-sky with an integrator control law. We demonstrated a closed-loop pointing residual of 0.02 mas in the laboratory and 0.15 mas on-sky for data sampled using the minimal 2-s exposure time of the science camera. We have also integrated the LLOWFS in the visible high-order control loop of SCExAO, which in closed-loop operation has validated the correction of the noncommon path pointing errors between the infrared science channel and the visible wavefront sensing channel with pointing residual of 0.23 mas on-sky.

  15. Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing with elongated sodium laser beacons: centroiding versus matched filtering.

    PubMed

    Gilles, Luc; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2006-09-01

    We describe modeling and simulation results for the Thirty Meter Telescope on the degradation of sodium laser guide star Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor measurement accuracy that will occur due to the spatial structure and temporal variations of the mesospheric sodium layer. By using a contiguous set of lidar measurements of the sodium profile, the performance of a standard centroid and of a more refined noise-optimal matched filter spot position estimation algorithm is analyzed and compared for a nominal mean signal level equal to 1000 photodetected electrons per subaperture per integration time, as a function of subaperture to laser launch telescope distance and CCD pixel readout noise. Both algorithms are compared in terms of their rms spot position estimation error due to noise, their associated wavefront error when implemented on the Thirty Meter Telescope facility adaptive optics system, their linear dynamic range, and their bias when detuned from the current sodium profile. PMID:16912797

  16. Wave-front sensing by use of a Green's function solution to the intensity transport equation.

    PubMed

    Woods, Simon C; Greenaway, Alan H

    2003-03-01

    A method for reconstructing an unknown wave front from measurements of its intensity distribution on two planes along the direction of propagation is described. The method solves the intensity transport equation by use of Neumann boundary conditions, leading to a solution that requires only matrix multiplication. The method provides real-time wave-front reconstruction with high accuracy and is easily reposed to permit reconstruction of the wave front in any orthonormal basis set. PMID:12630836

  17. Novel Adaptive Optics concepts : wavefront sensing with sodium laser guide stars at Extemely Large Telescopes and simultaneous differential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellner, Stephan Albert

    2005-12-01

    Since more than 15 years, Adaptive Optics (AO) is a proven concept to reach diffraction limited imaging at modern astronomical telescopes. In the case of next generation telescopes (Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs)) with aperture diameters of up to 100m, sodium laser guide star based multi-conjugated-AO systems will be a basic requirement to exploit their full capability in terms of resolution and light concentration. A drawback of such an approach emerges in the finite distance and vertical extent of the sodium beacon in the mesosphere with respect to the telescope. This induces effects such as perspective elongation, where conventional wavefront sensing mechanisms will fail. Although several engineering concepts are under development to counteract these constraints at the cost of overall light efficiency and increased system complexity, this thesis proposes a novel kind of wavefront sensing technique to overcome the imposed limitations in a more natural way. The sensing technique is composed of two independently working sensors, a reflective rod and a mask with circular slits, each a representative of a novel wavefront sensor class, the so called z-invariant and Inverse Bessel Beam technique. Both are discussed in this thesis with a focus on the Inverse Bessel Beam technique. The latter is compared to alternative concepts such as temporal gating, with respect to the photon efficiency. Furthermore, the reflective rod was tested for its feasibility in laboratory conditions and in a more realistic environment at the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) at La Palma. With this test run its sensing principle has been verified. A novel technique already intensively used at 8m class telescopes is Simultaneous Differential Imaging. The direct detection of giant extra-solar planets is and will be a major science driver for galactic astronomy in the coming years. Modern telescope facilities such as the VLT reach, by means of adaptive optics, potentially the capability in terms

  18. First Experimental Results Using Sparse Aperture Mask for Low Order Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, Hari; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Eldorado Riggs, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    We can determine the existence of life outside of earth by analyzing the spectra of exoplanets. Such direct imaging will provide the capability to thoroughly characterize an exoplanet's atmosphere. Direct imaging of exoplanets, however, has many technical challenges and difficulties: scattering and diffraction of light and the large difference in contrast, which is the ratio of brightness between the bright star and the dimmer planet. A coronagraph is an optical device that manipulates the diffraction of starlight and creates a region of high contrast (dark hole) where the dimmer planets can be seen. While in principle the level of contrast required for direct imaging of exoplanets can be achieved by stellar coronagraphic imaging, the resulting dark hole is highly sensitive to phase aberrations. In order to effectively suppress starlight for exoplanet imaging applications, low-order wavefront aberrations entering a coronagraph such as tip-tilt, defocus and coma must be determined and compensated for. A sparse-aperture mask (SAM) can be integrated in the telescopic imaging system to make precise estimate of low-order wavefront aberrations. In this technique, the starlight rejected by the coronagraph's focal plane stop is collimated to a relay pupil, where the mask forms an interference fringe pattern on a detector and the phase aberrations are inferred from this fringe pattern. At Princeton's High Contrast Imaging Lab (HCIL), we have numerically proved this concept and we are currently working on verifying it experimentally.

  19. Open-loop wavefront sensing scheme for specimen aberrations correction in two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles-Espinosa, Rodrigo; Andilla, Jordi; Porcar-Guezenec, Rafael; Levecq, Xavier; Artigas, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2011-07-01

    The recent linkage between adaptive optics, a technique borrowed from astronomy and various imaging devices, has enabled to push forward their imaging capabilities by improving its contrast and resolution. A specific case is nonlinear microscopy (NLM) that, although it brings several inherent advantages (compared to linear fluorescence techniques) due to its nonlinear dependence on the excitation beam, its enhanced capabilities can be limited by the sample inhomogeneous structure. In this work, we demonstrate how these imaging capabilities can be enhanced by, employing adaptive optics in a two step correction process. Firstly, a closed-loop methodology aided by Shack-Hartman Wavefront sensing scheme is implemented for compensating the aberrations produced by the laser and the optical elements before the high numerical aperture microscope objective, resulting in a one-time calibration process. Then the residual aberrations are produced by the microscope objective and the sample. These are measured in a similar way as it is done in astronomy (employing a laser guide-star), using the two-photon excited fluorescence. The properties of this incoherent emission produced inside a test sample are compared to a genetically modified Caenorhabditis. elegans nematode expressing GFP showing that the emission of this protein (at 810nm) can be sensed efficiently with our WFS by modifying the exposure time. Therefore the recorded wavefront will capture the sample aberrations which are used to shape a deformable mirror in an open-loop configuration. This correction principle is demonstrated in a test sample by correcting aberrations in a "single-shot" resulting in a reduced sample exposure.

  20. In-focus wavefront sensing using non-redundant mask-induced pupil diversity.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Alexandra Z; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand

    2016-07-11

    Wavefront estimation using in-focus image data is critical to many applications. This data is invariant to a sign flip with complex conjugation of the complex amplitude in the pupil, making for a non-unique solution. Information from an in-focus image taken through a non-redundant pupil mask (NRM) can break this ambiguity, enabling the true aberration to be determined. We demonstrate this by priming a full pupil Gerchberg-Saxton phase retrieval with NRM fringe phase information. We apply our method to measure simulated aberrations on the segmented James Webb space telescope (JWST) mirror using full pupil and NRM data from its near infrared imager and slitless spectrograph (NIRISS). PMID:27410825

  1. Sensing the wavefront of x-ray free-electron lasers using aerosol spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, N.Duane; Starodub, Dimitri; Lomb, Lukas; Hampton, Christina Y.; Martin, Andrew V.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Barty, Anton; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Steinbrener, Jan; Shoeman, Robert L.; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Hartmann, Robert; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Rudek, Benedikt; Foucar, Lutz

    2014-04-22

    Characterizing intense, focused x-ray free electron laser (FEL) pulses is crucial for their use in diffractive imaging. We describe how the distribution of average phase tilts and intensities on hard x-ray pulses with peak intensities of 10 21 W/m2 can be retrieved from an ensemble of diffraction patterns produced by 70 nm-radius polystyrene spheres, in a manner that mimics wave-front sensors. Besides showing that an adaptive geometric correction may be necessary for diffraction data from randomly injected sample sources, the paper demonstrates the possibility of collecting statistics on structured pulses using only the diffraction patterns they generate and highlights the imperative to study its impact on single-particle diffractive imaging.

  2. Sensing the wavefront of x-ray free-electron lasers using aerosol spheres.

    PubMed

    Loh, N Duane; Starodub, Dmitri; Lomb, Lukas; Hampton, Christina Y; Martin, Andrew V; Sierra, Raymond G; Barty, Anton; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Steinbrener, Jan; Shoeman, Robert L; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Hartmann, Robert; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Rudek, Benedikt; Foucar, Lutz; Kimmel, Nils; Weidenspointner, Georg; Hauser, Guenter; Holl, Peter; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Liang, Mengning; Hunter, Mark S; Gumprecht, Lars; Coppola, Nicola; Wunderer, Cornelia; Graafsma, Heinz; Maia, Filipe R N C; Ekeberg, Tomas; Hantke, Max; Fleckenstein, Holger; Hirsemann, Helmut; Nass, Karol; White, Thomas A; Tobias, Herbert J; Farquar, George R; Benner, W Henry; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Reich, Christian; Hartmann, Andreas; Soltau, Heike; Marchesini, Stefano; Bajt, Sasa; Barthelmess, Miriam; Strueder, Lothar; Ullrich, Joachim; Bucksbaum, Philip; Frank, Matthias; Schlichting, Ilme; Chapman, Henry N; Bogan, Michael J

    2013-05-20

    Characterizing intense, focused x-ray free electron laser (FEL) pulses is crucial for their use in diffractive imaging. We describe how the distribution of average phase tilts and intensities on hard x-ray pulses with peak intensities of 10(21) W/m(2) can be retrieved from an ensemble of diffraction patterns produced by 70 nm-radius polystyrene spheres, in a manner that mimics wavefront sensors. Besides showing that an adaptive geometric correction may be necessary for diffraction data from randomly injected sample sources, our paper demonstrates the possibility of collecting statistics on structured pulses using only the diffraction patterns they generate and highlights the imperative to study its impact on single-particle diffractive imaging.

  3. Sensing the wavefront of x-ray free-electron lasers using aerosol spheres.

    PubMed

    Loh, N Duane; Starodub, Dmitri; Lomb, Lukas; Hampton, Christina Y; Martin, Andrew V; Sierra, Raymond G; Barty, Anton; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Steinbrener, Jan; Shoeman, Robert L; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Hartmann, Robert; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Rudek, Benedikt; Foucar, Lutz; Kimmel, Nils; Weidenspointner, Georg; Hauser, Guenter; Holl, Peter; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Liang, Mengning; Hunter, Mark S; Gumprecht, Lars; Coppola, Nicola; Wunderer, Cornelia; Graafsma, Heinz; Maia, Filipe R N C; Ekeberg, Tomas; Hantke, Max; Fleckenstein, Holger; Hirsemann, Helmut; Nass, Karol; White, Thomas A; Tobias, Herbert J; Farquar, George R; Benner, W Henry; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Reich, Christian; Hartmann, Andreas; Soltau, Heike; Marchesini, Stefano; Bajt, Sasa; Barthelmess, Miriam; Strueder, Lothar; Ullrich, Joachim; Bucksbaum, Philip; Frank, Matthias; Schlichting, Ilme; Chapman, Henry N; Bogan, Michael J

    2013-05-20

    Characterizing intense, focused x-ray free electron laser (FEL) pulses is crucial for their use in diffractive imaging. We describe how the distribution of average phase tilts and intensities on hard x-ray pulses with peak intensities of 10(21) W/m(2) can be retrieved from an ensemble of diffraction patterns produced by 70 nm-radius polystyrene spheres, in a manner that mimics wavefront sensors. Besides showing that an adaptive geometric correction may be necessary for diffraction data from randomly injected sample sources, our paper demonstrates the possibility of collecting statistics on structured pulses using only the diffraction patterns they generate and highlights the imperative to study its impact on single-particle diffractive imaging. PMID:23736456

  4. Wave-front sensing and deformable-mirror control in strong scintillation

    PubMed

    Roggemann; Koivunen

    2000-05-01

    Recent studies of coherent wave propagation through turbulence have shown that under conditions where scintillation is significant a continuous phase function does not in general exist, owing to the presence of branch points in the complex optical field. Because of branch points and the associated branch cuts, least-squares approaches to wave-front reconstruction and deformable-mirror control can have large errors. Branch-point reconstructors are known to provide superior performance to least-squares reconstructors, but they require that branch points be explicitly detected. Detecting branch points is a significant practical impediment owing to spatial sampling and measurement noise in real wave-front sensors. Branch points are associated with real zeros in an optical field, and hence information about the phase of the field is encoded in the amplitude of the wave. We present a new wave-front-sensor processing algorithm that exploits this observation in the wave-front-reconstruction and deformable-mirror-control process. This algorithm jointly processes three intensity measurements by using light from the beacon field to develop a set of deformable-mirror actuator commands that are maximally consistent with three intensity measurements: (1) the entire wave-front-sensor image, (2) a pupil intensity image, and (3) a conventional image. Owing to the nonlinear nature of the resulting algorithm, we have used a simulation to evaluate performance. We find that in a focused laser beam projection paradigm that uses a point-source beacon, the new algorithm provides significantly improved performance over that of conventional Hartmann sensor least-squares deformable-mirror control based on centroid processing of wave-front-sensor outputs. The performance of the new algorithm approaches, the performance of an idealized branch-point reconstructor that requires pointwise phase differences for operation.

  5. Experimental measurements of estimator bias and the signal-to-noise ratio for deconvolution from wave-front sensing.

    PubMed

    Dayton, D; Gonglewski, J; Rogers, S

    1997-06-10

    Deconvolution from wave-front sensing (DWFS) has been proposed as a method for achieving high-resolution images of astronomical objects from ground-based telescopes. The technique consists of the simultaneous measurement of a short-exposure focal-plane speckled image, as well as the wave front, by use of a Shack-Hartmann sensor placed at the pupil plane. In early studies it was suspected that some problems would occur in poor seeing conditions; however, it was usually assumed that the technique would work well as long as the wave-front sensor subaperture spacing was less than r(0) (L/r(0) < 1). Atmosphere-induced phase errors in the pupil of a telescope imaging system produce both phase errors and magnitude errors in the effective short-exposure optical transfer function (OTF) of the system. Recently it has been shown that the commonly used estimator for this technique produces biased estimates of the magnitude errors. The significance of this bias problem is that one cannot properly estimate or correct for the frame-to-frame fluctuations in the magnitude of the OTF but can do so only for fluctuations in the phase. An auxiliary estimate must also be used to correct for the mean value of the magnitude error. The inability to compensate for the magnitude fluctuations results in a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that is less favorable for the technique than was previously thought. In some situations simpler techniques, such as the Knox-Thompson and bispectrum methods, which require only speckle gram data from the focal plane of the imaging system, can produce better results. We present experimental measurements based on observations of bright stars and the Jovian moon Ganymede that confirm previous theoretical predictions. PMID:18253416

  6. Application of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing technology to transmissive optic metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammage, Ron R.; Neal, Daniel R.; Copland, Richard J.

    2002-11-01

    Human vision correction optics must be produced in quantity to be economical. At the same time every human eye is unique and requires a custom corrective solution. For this reason the vision industries need fast, versatile and accurate methodologies for characterizing optics for production and research. Current methods for measuring these optics generally yield a cubic spline taken from less than 10 points across the surface of the lens. As corrective optics have grown in complexity this has become inadequate. The Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is a device that measures phase and irradiance of light in a single snapshot using geometric properties of light. Advantages of the Shack-Hartmann sensor include small size, ruggedness, accuracy, and vibration insensitivity. This paper discusses a methodology for designing instruments based on Shack-Hartmann sensors. The method is then applied to the development of an instrument for accurate measurement of transmissive optics such as gradient bifocal spectacle lenses, progressive addition bifocal lenses, intrarocular devices, contact lenses, and human corneal tissue. In addition, this instrument may be configured to provide hundreds of points across the surface of the lens giving improved spatial resolution. Methods are explored for extending the dynamic range and accuracy to meet the expanding needs of the ophthalmic and optometric industries. Data is presented demonstrating the accuracy and repeatability of this technique for the target optics.

  7. Coronagraphic wavefront sensing with COFFEE: high spatial-frequency diversity and other news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugnier, L. M.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Herscovici-Schiller, O.; Baudoz, P.; Galicher, R.; Le Duigou, J.-M.

    2016-07-01

    The final performance of current and future instruments dedicated to exoplanet detection and characterization is limited by intensity residuals in the scientific image plane, which originate in uncorrected optical aberrations. In order to reach very high contrasts, these aberrations needs to be compensated for. We have proposed a focalplane wave-font sensor called COFFEE (for COronagraphic Focal-plane wave-Front Estimation for Exoplanet detection), which consists in an extension of conventional phase diversity to a coronagraphic system. In this communication, we study the extension of COFFEE to the joint estimation of the phase and the amplitude in the context of space-based coronagraphic instruments: we optimize the diversity phase in order to minimize the reconstruction error; we also propose and optimize a novel low-amplitude high-frequency diversity that should allow the phase-diverse images to still be used for science. Lastly, we perform a first experimental validation of COFFEE in the very high, space-like contrast conditions of the THD bench and show that COFFEE is able to distinguish between phase and amplitude aberrations.

  8. Laser guide star wavefront sensing for ground-layer adaptive optics on extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Clare, Richard M; Le Louarn, Miska; Béchet, Clementine

    2011-02-01

    We propose ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO) to improve the seeing on the 42 m European Extremely Large Telescope. Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (WFSs) with laser guide stars (LGSs) will experience significant spot elongation due to off-axis observation. This spot elongation influences the design of the laser launch location, laser power, WFS detector, and centroiding algorithm for LGS GLAO on an extremely large telescope. We show, using end-to-end numerical simulations, that with a noise-weighted matrix-vector-multiply reconstructor, the performance in terms of 50% ensquared energy (EE) of the side and central launch of the lasers is equivalent, the matched filter and weighted center of gravity centroiding algorithms are the most promising, and approximately 10×10 undersampled pixels are optimal. Significant improvement in the 50% EE can be observed with a few tens of photons/subaperture/frame, and no significant gain is seen by adding more than 200 photons/subaperture/frame. The LGS GLAO is not particularly sensitive to the sodium profile present in the mesosphere nor to a short-timescale (less than 100 s) evolution of the sodium profile. The performance of LGS GLAO is, however, sensitive to the atmospheric turbulence profile. PMID:21283238

  9. Laser guide star wavefront sensing for ground-layer adaptive optics on extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Clare, Richard M; Le Louarn, Miska; Béchet, Clementine

    2011-02-01

    We propose ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO) to improve the seeing on the 42 m European Extremely Large Telescope. Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (WFSs) with laser guide stars (LGSs) will experience significant spot elongation due to off-axis observation. This spot elongation influences the design of the laser launch location, laser power, WFS detector, and centroiding algorithm for LGS GLAO on an extremely large telescope. We show, using end-to-end numerical simulations, that with a noise-weighted matrix-vector-multiply reconstructor, the performance in terms of 50% ensquared energy (EE) of the side and central launch of the lasers is equivalent, the matched filter and weighted center of gravity centroiding algorithms are the most promising, and approximately 10×10 undersampled pixels are optimal. Significant improvement in the 50% EE can be observed with a few tens of photons/subaperture/frame, and no significant gain is seen by adding more than 200 photons/subaperture/frame. The LGS GLAO is not particularly sensitive to the sodium profile present in the mesosphere nor to a short-timescale (less than 100 s) evolution of the sodium profile. The performance of LGS GLAO is, however, sensitive to the atmospheric turbulence profile.

  10. Field application of moment-based wavefront sensing to in-situ alignment and image quality assessment of astronomical spectrographs: results and analysis of aligning VIRUS unit spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hanshin; Hill, Gary J.; Tuttle, Sarah E.; Noyola, Eva; Peterson, Trent; Vattiat, Brian L.

    2014-07-01

    Teague introduced a phase retrieval method that uses the image shape moments. More recently, an independent study arrived at a similar technique, which was then applied to in-situ full-field image-quality evaluation of spectroscopic systems. This moment-based wavefront sensing (MWFS) method relies on the geometric relation between the image shape moments and the geometric wavefront modal coefficients. The MWFS method allows a non-iterative determination of the modal coefficients from focus-modulated images at arbitrary spatial resolutions. The determination of image moments is a direct extension of routine centroid and image size calculation, making its implementation easy. Previous studies showed that the MWFS works well in capturing large low-order modes, and is quite suitable for in-situ alignment diagnostics. At the Astronomical Instrumentation conference in 2012, we presented initial results of the application of the moment-based wavefront sensing to a fiber-fed astronomical spectrograph, called VIRUS (a set of replicated 150 identical integral-field unit spectrographs contained in 75 unit pairs). This initial result shows that the MWFS can provide accurate full-field image-quality assessment for efficiently aligning these 150 spectrographs. Since then, we have assembled more than 24 unit pairs using this technique. In this paper, we detail the technical update/progress made so far for the moment-based wavefront sensing method and the statistical estimates of the before/after alignment aberrations, image-quality, and various efficiency indicators of the unit spectrograph alignment process.

  11. Advanced wavefront engineering for improved imaging and overlay applications on a 1.35 NA immersion scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staals, Frank; Andryzhyieuskaya, Alena; Bakker, Hans; Beems, Marcel; Finders, Jo; Hollink, Thijs; Mulkens, Jan; Nachtwein, Angelique; Willekers, Rob; Engblom, Peter; Gruner, Toralf; Zhang, Youping

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we describe the basic principle of FlexWave, a new high resolution wavefront manipulator, and discuss experimental data on imaging, focus and overlay. For this we integrated the FlexWave module in a 1.35 NA immersion scanner. With FlexWave we can perform both static and dynamic wavefront corrections. Wavefront control with FlexWave minimizes lens aberrations under high productivity usage of the scanner, hence maintaining overlay and focus performance, but moreover, the high resolution wavefront tuning can be used to compensate for litho related effects. Especially now mask 3D effects are becoming a major error component, additional tuning is required. Optimized wavefront can be achieved with computational lithography, by either co-optimizing source, mask, and Wavefront Target prior to tape-out, or by tuning Wavefront Targets for specific masks and scanners after the reticle is made.

  12. Target-in-the-loop wavefront sensing and control with a Collett-Wolf beacon: speckle-average phase conjugation.

    PubMed

    Vorontsov, Mikhail A; Kolosov, Valeriy V; Polnau, Ernst

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive optical systems for laser beam projection onto an extended target embedded in an optically inhomogeneous medium are considered. A new adaptive optics wavefront control technique--speckle-average (SA) phase conjugation--is introduced. In this technique mitigation of speckle effects related to laser beam scattering off the rough target surface is achieved by measuring the SA wavefront slopes of the target return wave using a conventional Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. For statistically representative speckle averaging we consider the generation of an incoherent light source, referred to here as a Collett-Wolf beacon, directly on the target surface using a rapid steering (scanning) auxiliary laser beam. Our numerical simulations and experiment show that control of the outgoing beam phase using SA phase conjugation can lead to efficient compensation of turbulence effects and results in an increase of the projected laser beam power density on a remote extended target. The impact of both target anisoplanatism and the Collett-Wolf beacon size on adaptive system performance is studied.

  13. Remote sensing of soil moisture - Recent advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    Recent advancements in microwave remote sensing of soil moisture include a method for estimating the dependence of the soil dielectric constant on its texture, the use of a percent of field capacity to express soil moisture magnitudes independently of soil texture, methods of estimating soil moisture sampling depth, and models for describing the effect of surface roughness on microwave response in terms of surface height variance and horizontal correlation length, as well as the verification of radiative transfer model predictions of microwave emission from soils and methods for the estimation of vegetation effects on the microwave response to soil moisture. Such researches have demonstrated that it is possible to remotely sense soil moisture in the 0-5 cm soil surface layer, and simulation studies have indicated how remotely sensed surface soil moisture may be used to estimate evapotranspiration rates and root-zone soil moisture.

  14. Advanced sensing technology in environmental field.

    PubMed

    Wakida, Shin-ichi

    2009-01-01

    Before the introduction of advanced sensing technology in environmental fields, environmental issues were discussed as several categories, such as local environmental issues in the 1970s, global environmental issues in the 1980s, living environmental issues in the 2000s and environmental stress issues in near future, which are of increasing interest in Japan. Using advanced sensing technologies, such as electrochemical sensors, chemically-sensitive field-effect transistors (ChemFETs) based on micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS) micromachining technology and subsequently electrophoretic separation and microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip using MEMS technology, we have steered several kinds of environmental monitoring projects timely in response to the environmental issues for over the last 25 years. Among the local environmental issues, the global environmental issues and the living environmental issues, some fruits of R&D project will be introduced. Finally, our latest concern of the environmental stress monitoring was discussed and preliminary results were also introduced.

  15. Phase-Controlled Magnetic Mirror for Wavefront Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John; Wollack, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Typically, light interacts with matter via the electric field and interaction with weakly bound electrons. In a magnetic mirror, a patterned nanowire is fabricated over a metallic layer with a dielectric layer in between. Oscillation of the electrons in the nanowires in response to the magnetic field of incident photons causes a re-emission of photons and operation as a "magnetic mirror." By controlling the index of refraction in the dielectric layer using a local applied voltage, the phase of the emitted radiation can be controlled. This allows electrical modification of the reflected wavefront, resulting in a deformable mirror that can be used for wavefront control. Certain applications require wavefront quality in the few-nanometer regime, which is a major challenge for optical fabrication and alignment of mirrors or lenses. The use of a deformable magnetic mirror allows for a device with no moving parts that can modify the phase of incident light over many spatial scales, potentially with higher resolution than current approaches. Current deformable mirrors modify the incident wavefront by using nano-actuation of a substrate to physically bend the mirror to a desired shape. The purpose of the innovation is to modify the incident wavefront for the purpose of correction of fabrication and alignment-induced wavefront errors at the system level. The advanced degree of precision required for some applications such as gravity wave detection (LISA - Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) or planet finding (FKSI - Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer) requires wavefront control at the limits of the current state of the art. All the steps required to fabricate a magnetic mirror have been demonstrated. The modification is to apply a bias voltage to the dielectric layer so as to change the index of refraction and modify the phase of the reflected radiation. Light is reflected off the device and collected by a phase-sensing interferometer. The interferometer determines the

  16. Longitudinal chromatic aberration of the human eye in the visible and near infrared from wavefront sensing, double-pass and psychophysics

    PubMed Central

    Vinas, Maria; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Cortes, Daniel; Pascual, Daniel; Marcos, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal Chromatic Aberration (LCA) influences the optical quality of the eye. However, the reported LCA varies across studies, likely associated to differences in the measurement techniques. We present LCA measured in subjects using wavefront sensing, double-pass retinal images, and psychophysical methods with a custom-developed polychromatic Adaptive Optics system in a wide spectral range (450-950 nm), with control of subjects’ natural aberrations. LCA measured psychophysically was significantly higher than that from reflectometric techniques (1.51 D vs 1.00 D in the 488-700 nm range). Ours results indicate that the presence of natural aberrations is not the cause for the discrepancies across techniques. PMID:25798317

  17. Bringing it all together: a unique approach to requirements for wavefront sensing and control on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contos, Adam R.; Acton, D. Scott; Atcheson, Paul D.; Barto, Allison A.; Lightsey, Paul A.; Shields, Duncan M.

    2006-06-01

    The opto-mechanical design of the 6.6 meter James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), with its actively-controlled secondary and 18-segment primary mirror, presents unique challenges from a system engineering perspective. To maintain the optical alignment of the telescope on-orbit, a process called wavefront sensing and control (WFS&C) is employed to determine the current state of the mirrors and calculate the optimal mirror move updates. The needed imagery is downloaded to the ground, where the WFS&C algorithms to process the images reside, and the appropriate commands are uploaded to the observatory. Rather than use a dedicated wavefront sensor for the imagery as is done in most other applications, a science camera is used instead. For the success of the mission, WFS&C needs to perform flawlessly using the assets available among the combination of separate elements (ground operations, spacecraft, science instruments, optical telescope, etc.) that cross institutional as well as geographic borders. Rather than be yet another distinct element with its own set of requirements to flow to the other elements as was originally planned, a novel approach was selected. This approach entails reviewing and auditing other documents for the requirements needed to satisfy the needs of WFS&C. Three actions are taken: (1) when appropriate requirements exist, they are tracked by WFS&C ; (2) when an existing requirement is insufficient to meet the need, a requirement change is initiated; and finally (3) when a needed requirement is missing, a new requirement is established in the corresponding document. This approach, deemed a "best practice" at the customer's independent audit, allows for program confidence that the necessary requirements are complete, while still maintaining the responsibility for the requirement with the most appropriate entity. This paper describes the details and execution of the approach; the associated WFS&C requirements and verification documentation; and the

  18. High signal-to-noise ratio sensing with Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor based on auto gain control of electron multiplying CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhao-Yi; Li, Da-Yu; Hu, Li-Fa; Mu, Quan-Quan; Yang, Cheng-Liang; Cao, Zhao-Liang; Xuan, Li

    2016-09-01

    High signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved with the electron multiplying charge-coupled-device (EMCCD) applied in the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (S-H WFS) in adaptive optics (AO). However, when the brightness of the target changes in a large scale, the fixed electron multiplying (EM) gain will not be suited to the sensing limitation. Therefore an auto-gain-control method based on the brightness of light-spots array in S-H WFS is proposed in this paper. The control value is the average of the maximum signals of every light spot in an array, which has been demonstrated to be kept stable even under the influence of some noise and turbulence, and sensitive enough to the change of target brightness. A goal value is needed in the control process and it is predetermined based on the characters of EMCCD. Simulations and experiments have demonstrated that this auto-gain-control method is valid and robust, the sensing SNR reaches the maximum for the corresponding signal level, and especially is greatly improved for those dim targets from 6 to 4 magnitude in the visual band. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174274, 61205021, and 61405194) and the State Key Laboratory of Applied Optics, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  19. High signal-to-noise ratio sensing with Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor based on auto gain control of electron multiplying CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhao-Yi; Li, Da-Yu; Hu, Li-Fa; Mu, Quan-Quan; Yang, Cheng-Liang; Cao, Zhao-Liang; Xuan, Li

    2016-09-01

    High signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved with the electron multiplying charge-coupled-device (EMCCD) applied in the Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor (S–H WFS) in adaptive optics (AO). However, when the brightness of the target changes in a large scale, the fixed electron multiplying (EM) gain will not be suited to the sensing limitation. Therefore an auto-gain-control method based on the brightness of light-spots array in S–H WFS is proposed in this paper. The control value is the average of the maximum signals of every light spot in an array, which has been demonstrated to be kept stable even under the influence of some noise and turbulence, and sensitive enough to the change of target brightness. A goal value is needed in the control process and it is predetermined based on the characters of EMCCD. Simulations and experiments have demonstrated that this auto-gain-control method is valid and robust, the sensing SNR reaches the maximum for the corresponding signal level, and especially is greatly improved for those dim targets from 6 to 4 magnitude in the visual band. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174274, 61205021, and 61405194) and the State Key Laboratory of Applied Optics, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  20. Wavefront Measurement in Ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molebny, Vasyl

    Wavefront sensing or aberration measurement in the eye is a key problem in refractive surgery and vision correction with laser. The accuracy of these measurements is critical for the outcome of the surgery. Practically all clinical methods use laser as a source of light. To better understand the background, we analyze the pre-laser techniques developed over centuries. They allowed new discoveries of the nature of the optical system of the eye, and many served as prototypes for laser-based wavefront sensing technologies. Hartmann's test was strengthened by Platt's lenslet matrix and the CCD two-dimensional photodetector acquired a new life as a Hartmann-Shack sensor in Heidelberg. Tscherning's aberroscope, invented in France, was transformed into a laser device known as a Dresden aberrometer, having seen its reincarnation in Germany with Seiler's help. The clinical ray tracing technique was brought to life by Molebny in Ukraine, and skiascopy was created by Fujieda in Japan. With the maturation of these technologies, new demands now arise for their wider implementation in optometry and vision correction with customized contact and intraocular lenses.

  1. Advanced Dispersed Fringe Sensing Algorithm for Coarse Phasing Segmented Mirror Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spechler, Joshua A.; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Sigrist, Norbert; Shi, Fang; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa A.

    2013-01-01

    Segment mirror phasing, a critical step of segment mirror alignment, requires the ability to sense and correct the relative pistons between segments from up to a few hundred microns to a fraction of wavelength in order to bring the mirror system to its full diffraction capability. When sampling the aperture of a telescope, using auto-collimating flats (ACFs) is more economical. The performance of a telescope with a segmented primary mirror strongly depends on how well those primary mirror segments can be phased. One such process to phase primary mirror segments in the axial piston direction is dispersed fringe sensing (DFS). DFS technology can be used to co-phase the ACFs. DFS is essentially a signal fitting and processing operation. It is an elegant method of coarse phasing segmented mirrors. DFS performance accuracy is dependent upon careful calibration of the system as well as other factors such as internal optical alignment, system wavefront errors, and detector quality. Novel improvements to the algorithm have led to substantial enhancements in DFS performance. The Advanced Dispersed Fringe Sensing (ADFS) Algorithm is designed to reduce the sensitivity to calibration errors by determining the optimal fringe extraction line. Applying an angular extraction line dithering procedure and combining this dithering process with an error function while minimizing the phase term of the fitted signal, defines in essence the ADFS algorithm.

  2. Heightened sense for sensing: recent advances in pathogen immunoassay sensing platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, N; Tarasow, T; Tok, J B

    2007-01-09

    As part of its own defense mechanism, most bacteria have developed an innate ability to enable toxic secretion to ward off potential predators or invaders. However, this naturally occurring process has been abused since over production of the bacteria's toxin molecules could render them as potential bioweapons. As these processes (also known as ''black biology'') can be clandestinely performed in a laboratory, the threat of inflicting enormous potential damage to a nation's security and economy is invariably clear and present. Thus, efficient detection of these biothreat agents in a timely and accurate manner is highly desirable. A wealth of publications describing various pathogen immuno-sensing advances has appeared over the last few years, and it is not the intent of this review article to detail each reported approach. Instead, we aim to survey a few recent highlights in hopes of providing the reader an overall sense of the breath of these sensing systems and platforms. Antigen targets are diverse and complex as they encompass proteins, whole viruses, and bacterial spores. The signaling processes for these reported immunoassays are usually based on colorimetric, optical, or electrochemical changes. Of equal interest is the type of platform in which the immunoassay can be performed. A few platforms suitable for pathogen detection are described.

  3. Wavefront Control for Extreme Adaptive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A

    2003-07-16

    Current plans for Extreme Adaptive Optics systems place challenging requirements on wave-front control. This paper focuses on control system dynamics, wave-front sensing and wave-front correction device characteristics. It may be necessary to run an ExAO system after a slower, low-order AO system. Running two independent systems can result in very good temporal performance, provided specific design constraints are followed. The spatially-filtered wave-front sensor, which prevents aliasing and improves PSF sensitivity, is summarized. Different models of continuous and segmented deformable mirrors are studied. In a noise-free case, a piston-tip-tilt segmented MEMS device can achieve nearly equivalent performance to a continuous-sheet DM in compensating for a static phase aberration with use of spatial filtering.

  4. Proposal for a field experiment of elongated Na LGS wave-front sensing in the perspective of the E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, G.; Gratadour, D.; Gendron, E.; Buey, T.; Myers, R.; Morris, T.; Basden, A.; Talbot, G.; Bonaccini Calia, D.; Marchetti, E.; Pfrommer, T.

    2014-08-01

    Wavefront (WF) sensing using Sodium (Na) Laser Guide Stars (LGS) is a key concern for the design of a number of first generation Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) Adaptive Optics (AO) modules. One of the main challenges is the mitigation of the effects induced by extreme LGS spot elongation on the WF measurements. Before the final design studies of the E-ELT instruments, a Na LGS WF sensing on-sky experiment at the E-ELT scale is mandatory to achieve the full validation of the proposed mitigation strategies and their performance. This experiment will provide unique spatial and temporal WF measurements on a true Na LGS, perturbed by the atmospheric turbulence and mesospheric variability. The fine comparative analysis of such data with synchronously acquired WF measurements on at least one natural guide star (NGS) will be fundamental to test a number of algorithms, configurations for spot sampling and truncation and WF reconstruction schemes including multi-LGS configurations. A global error budget for the whole experiment will be derived with time to feed into the numerical simulation and the design of subsequent E-ELT LGS-AO modules. The data produced will be made available to the E-ELT community. We propose to use CANARY, the Multi-Object AO demonstrator installed at the 4.2m WHT which is a modular AO platform, equipped with several NGS WF Sensor (WFS) and Rayleigh multi-LGS unit and WFS. The transportable 20W Sodium laser unit (WLGSU), developed at ESO, will be positioned at a varying distance from the WHT to provide off-axis launching (up to 40m), simulating the whole range of LGS spot elongations obtained on the E-ELT. In such a case, the WHT pupil will represent an off-axis sub-pupil of the main E-ELT pupil. In addition, this experiment will include a Na layer profiler and the capability for open and closed loop operations. The experiment is scheduled before the end of 2016.

  5. Wavefront Control Testbed (WCT) Experiment Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Laura A.; Basinger, Scott A.; Campion, Scott D.; Faust, Jessica A.; Feinberg, Lee D.; Hayden, William L.; Lowman, Andrew E.; Ohara, Catherine M.; Petrone, Peter P., III

    2004-01-01

    The Wavefront Control Testbed (WCT) was created to develop and test wavefront sensing and control algorithms and software for the segmented James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Last year, we changed the system configuration from three sparse aperture segments to a filled aperture with three pie shaped segments. With this upgrade we have performed experiments on fine phasing with line-of-sight and segment-to-segment jitter, dispersed fringe visibility and grism angle;. high dynamic range tilt sensing; coarse phasing with large aberrations, and sampled sub-aperture testing. This paper reviews the results of these experiments.

  6. Relaying an optical wavefront

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Vawter, G. Allen

    2007-03-06

    A wavefront rely devices samples an incoming optical wavefront at different locations, optically relays the samples while maintaining the relative position of the samples and the relative phase between the samples. The wavefront is reconstructed due to interference of the samples. Devices can be designed for many different wavelengths, including for example the ultraviolet, visible, infrared and even longer wavelengths such as millimeter waves. In one application, the device function as a telescope but with negligible length.

  7. Coronagraphic Wavefront Control for the ATLAST-9.2m Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, RIchard G.; Oegerle, William R.; Feinberg, Lee D.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Dean, Bruce H.; Mosier, Gary E.; Postman, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Technology for Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) concept was assessed as one of the NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concepts (ASMC) studies. Herein we discuss the 9.2-meter diameter segmented aperture version and its wavefront sensing and control (WFSC) with regards to coronagraphic detection and spectroscopic characterization of exoplanets. The WFSC would consist of at least two levels of sensing and control: (i) an outer coarser level of sensing and control to phase and control the segments and secondary mirror in a manner similar to the James Webb Space Telescope but operating at higher temporal bandwidth, and (ii) an inner, coronagraphic instrument based, fine level of sensing and control for both amplitude and wavefront errors operating at higher temporal bandwidths. The outer loop would control rigid-body actuators on the primary and secondary mirrors while the inner loop would control one or more segmented deformable mirror to suppress the starlight within the coronagraphic field-of view. Herein we discuss the visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) and the requirements it levies on wavefront sensing and control and show the results of closed-loop simulations to assess performance and evaluate the trade space of system level stability versus control bandwidth.

  8. Advanced technologies for remote sensing imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, L.L.

    1993-06-07

    Generating and returning imagery from great distances has been generally associated with national security activities, with emphasis on reliability of system operation. (While the introduction of such capabilities was usually characterized by high levels of innovation, the evolution of such systems has followed the classical track of proliferation of ``standardized items`` expressing ever more incremental technological advances.) Recent focusing of interest on the use of remote imaging systems for commercial and scientific purposes can be expected to induce comparatively rapid advances along the axes of efficiency and technological sophistication, respectively. This paper reviews the most basic reasons for expecting the next decade of advances to dwarf the impressive accomplishments of the past ten years. The impact of these advances clearly will be felt in all major areas of large-scale human endeavor, commercial, military and scientific.

  9. Advanced mobile networking, sensing, and controls.

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, John Todd; Kilman, Dominique Marie; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Young, Joseph G.; Lewis, Christopher L.; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.; Robinett, Rush D. III; Harrington, John J.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes an integrated approach for designing communication, sensing, and control systems for mobile distributed systems. Graph theoretic methods are used to analyze the input/output reachability and structural controllability and observability of a decentralized system. Embedded in each network node, this analysis will automatically reconfigure an ad hoc communication network for the sensing and control task at hand. The graph analysis can also be used to create the optimal communication flow control based upon the spatial distribution of the network nodes. Edge coloring algorithms tell us that the minimum number of time slots in a planar network is equal to either the maximum number of adjacent nodes (or degree) of the undirected graph plus some small number. Therefore, the more spread out that the nodes are, the fewer number of time slots are needed for communication, and the smaller the latency between nodes. In a coupled system, this results in a more responsive sensor network and control system. Network protocols are developed to propagate this information, and distributed algorithms are developed to automatically adjust the number of time slots available for communication. These protocols and algorithms must be extremely efficient and only updated as network nodes move. In addition, queuing theory is used to analyze the delay characteristics of Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) networks. This report documents the analysis, simulation, and implementation of these algorithms performed under this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort.

  10. Recent Advances in Laser Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, Frank E.

    1999-01-01

    Current terrestrial and hydrographic laser remote sensing research and applications are briefly reviewed. New progress in airborne oceanic lidar instrumentation and applications is then highlighted. Topics include a discussion of the unique role of airborne active-passive (laser-solar) correlation spectroscopy methods in oceanic radiative transfer studies and satellite ocean color algorithm development. Based on a perceived need for high resolution laser-induced resonance Raman and atomic emission spectra of oceanic constituents, future airborne lidar transmitter and receiver configurations are suggested.

  11. ADVANCED REMOTE SENSING MONITORING OF MINE WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The OEI-EAD and NERL-ESD have been cooperating on development of monitoring technologies and research to better use remote sensor-derived information and to ultimately disseminate that information to users. This work has focused on NASA'S airborne advanced remote sensor systems ...

  12. Fixed mount wavefront sensor

    DOEpatents

    Neal, Daniel R.

    2000-01-01

    A rigid mount and method of mounting for a wavefront sensor. A wavefront dissector, such as a lenslet array, is rigidly mounted at a fixed distance relative to an imager, such as a CCD camera, without need for a relay imaging lens therebetween.

  13. Recent advancement in optical fiber sensing for aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Takeda, Nobuo

    2013-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors have attracted considerable attention in health monitoring of aerospace composite structures. This paper briefly reviews our recent advancement mainly in Brillouin-based distributed sensing. Damage detection, life cycle monitoring and shape reconstruction systems applicable to large-scale composite structures are presented, and new technical concepts, "smart crack arrester" and "hierarchical sensing system", are described as well, highlighting the great potential of optical fiber sensors for the structural health monitoring (SHM) field.

  14. An Improved Wavefront Control Algorithm for Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Basinger, Scott A.; Redding, David C.

    2008-01-01

    Wavefront sensing and control is required throughout the mission lifecycle of large space telescopes such as James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). When an optic of such a telescope is controlled with both surface-deforming and rigid-body actuators, the sensitivity-matrix obtained from the exit pupil wavefront vector divided by the corresponding actuator command value can sometimes become singular due to difference in actuator types and in actuator command values. In this paper, we propose a simple approach for preventing a sensitivity-matrix from singularity. We also introduce a new "minimum-wavefront and optimal control compensator". It uses an optimal control gain matrix obtained by feeding back the actuator commands along with the measured or estimated wavefront phase information to the estimator, thus eliminating the actuator modes that are not observable in the wavefront sensing process.

  15. The Role of Advanced Sensing in Smart Cities

    PubMed Central

    Hancke, Gerhard P.; de Carvalho e Silva, Bruno; Hancke, Gerhard P.

    2013-01-01

    In a world where resources are scarce and urban areas consume the vast majority of these resources, it is vital to make cities greener and more sustainable. Advanced systems to improve and automate processes within a city will play a leading role in smart cities. From smart design of buildings, which capture rain water for later use, to intelligent control systems, which can monitor infrastructures autonomously, the possible improvements enabled by sensing technologies are immense. Ubiquitous sensing poses numerous challenges, which are of a technological or social nature. This paper presents an overview of the state of the art with regards to sensing in smart cities. Topics include sensing applications in smart cities, sensing platforms and technical challenges associated with these technologies. In an effort to provide a holistic view of how sensing technologies play a role in smart cities, a range of applications and technical challenges associated with these applications are discussed. As some of these applications and technologies belong to different disciplines, the material presented in this paper attempts to bridge these to provide a broad overview, which can be of help to researchers and developers in understanding how advanced sensing can play a role in smart cities. PMID:23271603

  16. The role of advanced sensing in smart cities.

    PubMed

    Hancke, Gerhard P; Silva, Bruno de Carvalho E; Hancke, Gerhard P

    2012-12-27

    In a world where resources are scarce and urban areas consume the vast majority of these resources, it is vital to make cities greener and more sustainable. Advanced systems to improve and automate processes within a city will play a leading role in smart cities. From smart design of buildings, which capture rain water for later use, to intelligent control systems, which can monitor infrastructures autonomously, the possible improvements enabled by sensing technologies are immense. Ubiquitous sensing poses numerous challenges, which are of a technological or social nature. This paper presents an overview of the state of the art with regards to sensing in smart cities. Topics include sensing applications in smart cities, sensing platforms and technical challenges associated with these technologies. In an effort to provide a holistic view of how sensing technologies play a role in smart cities, a range of applications and technical challenges associated with these applications are discussed. As some of these applications and technologies belong to different disciplines, the material presented in this paper attempts to bridge these to provide a broad overview, which can be of help to researchers and developers in understanding how advanced sensing can play a role in smart cities.

  17. The role of advanced sensing in smart cities.

    PubMed

    Hancke, Gerhard P; Silva, Bruno de Carvalho E; Hancke, Gerhard P

    2013-01-01

    In a world where resources are scarce and urban areas consume the vast majority of these resources, it is vital to make cities greener and more sustainable. Advanced systems to improve and automate processes within a city will play a leading role in smart cities. From smart design of buildings, which capture rain water for later use, to intelligent control systems, which can monitor infrastructures autonomously, the possible improvements enabled by sensing technologies are immense. Ubiquitous sensing poses numerous challenges, which are of a technological or social nature. This paper presents an overview of the state of the art with regards to sensing in smart cities. Topics include sensing applications in smart cities, sensing platforms and technical challenges associated with these technologies. In an effort to provide a holistic view of how sensing technologies play a role in smart cities, a range of applications and technical challenges associated with these applications are discussed. As some of these applications and technologies belong to different disciplines, the material presented in this paper attempts to bridge these to provide a broad overview, which can be of help to researchers and developers in understanding how advanced sensing can play a role in smart cities. PMID:23271603

  18. Advanced laser diodes for sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    VAWTER,GREGORY A.; MAR,ALAN; CHOW,WENG W.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-01-01

    The authors have developed diode lasers for short pulse duration and high peak pulse power in the 0.01--100.0 m pulsewidth regime. A primary goal of the program was producing up to 10 W while maintaining good far-field beam quality and ease of manufacturability for low cost. High peak power, 17 W, picosecond pulses have been achieved by gain switching of flared geometry waveguide lasers and amplifiers. Such high powers area world record for this type of diode laser. The light emission pattern from diode lasers is of critical importance for sensing systems such as range finding and chemical detection. They have developed a new integrated optical beam transformer producing rib-waveguide diode lasers with a symmetric, low divergence, output beam and increased upper power limits for irreversible facet damage.

  19. Final Scientific Report - Wireless and Sensing Solutions Advancing Industrial Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Budampati, Rama; McBrady, Adam; Nusseibeh, Fouad

    2009-09-28

    The project team's goal for the Wireless and Sensing Solution Advancing Industrial Efficiency award (DE-FC36-04GO14002) was to develop, demonstrate, and test a number of leading edge technologies that could enable the emergence of wireless sensor and sampling systems for the industrial market space. This effort combined initiatives in advanced sensor development, configurable sampling and deployment platforms, and robust wireless communications to address critical obstacles in enabling enhanced industrial efficiency.

  20. Curvature sensor for ocular wavefront measurement.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Doutón, Fernando; Pujol, Jaume; Arjona, Montserrat; Luque, Sergio O

    2006-08-01

    We describe a new wavefront sensor for ocular aberration determination, based on the curvature sensing principle, which adapts the classical system used in astronomy for the living eye's measurements. The actual experimental setup is presented and designed following a process guided by computer simulations to adjust the design parameters for optimal performance. We present results for artificial and real young eyes, compared with the Hartmann-Shack estimations. Both methods show a similar performance for these cases. This system will allow for the measurement of higher order aberrations than the currently used wavefront sensors in situations in which they are supposed to be significant, such as postsurgery eyes. PMID:16832447

  1. Curvature sensor for ocular wavefront measurement.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Doutón, Fernando; Pujol, Jaume; Arjona, Montserrat; Luque, Sergio O

    2006-08-01

    We describe a new wavefront sensor for ocular aberration determination, based on the curvature sensing principle, which adapts the classical system used in astronomy for the living eye's measurements. The actual experimental setup is presented and designed following a process guided by computer simulations to adjust the design parameters for optimal performance. We present results for artificial and real young eyes, compared with the Hartmann-Shack estimations. Both methods show a similar performance for these cases. This system will allow for the measurement of higher order aberrations than the currently used wavefront sensors in situations in which they are supposed to be significant, such as postsurgery eyes.

  2. Advanced laser sensing receiver concepts based on FPA technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, P. L.; Petrin, R. R.; Jolin, J. L.; Foy, B. R.; Lowrance, J. L.; Renda, G.

    2002-01-01

    The ultimate performance of any remote sensor is ideally governed by the hardware signal-to-noise capability and allowed signal-averaging time. In real-world scenarios, this may not be realizable and the limiting factors may suggest the need for more advanced capabilities. Moving from passive to active remote sensors offers the advantage of control over the illumination source, the laser. Added capabilities may include polarization discrimination, instantaneous imaging, range resolution, simultaneous multi-spectral measurement, or coherent detection. However, most advanced detection technology has been engineered heavily towards the straightforward passive sensor requirements, measuring an integrated photon flux. The need for focal plane array technology designed specifically for laser sensing has been recognized for some time, but advances have only recently made the engineering possible. This paper will present a few concepts for laser sensing receiver architectures, the driving specifications behind those concepts, and test/modeling results of such designs.

  3. Efficacy of Wavefront-guided Photorefractive Keratectomy with Iris Registration for Management of Moderate to High Astigmatism by Advanced Personalized Treatment Nomogram

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadpour, Mehrdad; Hashemi, Hassan; Jabbarvand, Mahmoud; Rahmatnejad, Kamran; Sabet, Fatemeh Alsadat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) using the advanced personalized treatment (APT) nomogram for correction of moderate to high astigmatism. Methods: This prospective interventional case series included 60 consecutive eyes of 30 patients undergoing wavefront-guided PRK (Zyoptix 217 Z100 excimer laser, Bausch & Lomb, Munich, Germany) using the APT nomogram and iris registration for myopic astigmatism. Mitomycin-C was applied intraoperatively in all eyes. Ophthalmic examination was performed preoperatively and 1, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Results: Preoperatively, mean sphere was -1.68 ± 2.08 diopters (D), mean refractive astigmatism was -3.04 ± 1.05 D and mean spherical equivalent (SE) was -3.12 ± 1.77 D. Six months postoperatively, mean sphere was + 0.60 ± 0.64 D (P < 0.005), mean cylinder was -0.43 ± 0.46 D (P < 0.005) and mean SE was + 0.28 ± 0.48 D (P < 0.005). Hyperopic overcorrection (≥ +1.0 D) occurred in 3 (5%) eyes. Postoperatively, root mean square (RMS) of higher order aberrations (HOAs) was significantly increased (P = 0.041). RMS of spherical aberration (Z [4, 0]) showed no significant change after surgery (P = 0.972). Conclusion: Considering the acceptable residual refractive error, low rate of hyperopic overcorrection, acceptable uncorrected visual acuity, and low risk of postoperative corneal haze, PRK using the APT nomogram with iris registration and mitomycin-C use is a safe and effective modality for treatment of moderate to high astigmatism. PMID:27413491

  4. Advances in remote sensing of vegetation function and traits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houborg, Rasmus; Fisher, Joshua B.; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing of vegetation function and traits has advanced significantly over the past half-century in the capacity to retrieve useful plant biochemical, physiological and structural quantities across a range of spatial and temporal scales. However, the translation of remote sensing signals into meaningful descriptors of vegetation function and traits is still associated with large uncertainties due to complex interactions between leaf, canopy, and atmospheric mediums, and significant challenges in the treatment of confounding factors in spectrum-trait relations. This editorial provides (1) a background on major advances in the remote sensing of vegetation, (2) a detailed timeline and description of relevant historical and planned satellite missions, and (3) an outline of remaining challenges, upcoming opportunities and key research objectives to be tackled. The introduction sets the stage for thirteen Special Issue papers here that focus on novel approaches for exploiting current and future advancements in remote sensor technologies. The described enhancements in spectral, spatial and temporal resolution and radiometric performance provide exciting opportunities to significantly advance the ability to accurately monitor and model the state and function of vegetation canopies at multiple scales on a timely basis.

  5. Interactive and cooperative sensing and control for advanced teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the paradigm of interactive and cooperative sensing and control as a fundamental mechanism of integrating and fusing the strengths of man and machine for advanced teleoperation. The interactive and cooperative sensing and control is considered as an extended and generalized form of traded and shared control. The emphasis of interactive and cooperative sensing and control is given to the distribution of mutually nonexclusive subtasks to man and machine, the interactive invocation of subtasks under the man/machine symbiotic relationship, and the fusion of information and decisionmaking between man and machine according to their confidence measures. The proposed interactive and cooperative sensing and control system is composed of such major functional blocks as the logical sensor system, the sensor-based local autonomy, the virtual environment formation, and the cooperative decision-making between man and machine. The Sensing-Knowledge-Command (SKC) fusion network is proposed as a fundamental architecture for implementing cooperative and interactive sensing and control. Simulation results are shown.

  6. Advances in Remote Sensing for Vegetation Dynamics and Agricultural Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Compton; Puma, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Spaceborne remote sensing has led to great advances in the global monitoring of vegetation. For example, the NASA Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) group has developed widely used datasets from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensors as well as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) map imagery and normalized difference vegetation index datasets. These data are valuable for analyzing vegetation trends and variability at the regional and global levels. Numerous studies have investigated such trends and variability for both natural vegetation (e.g., re-greening of the Sahel, shifts in the Eurasian boreal forest, Amazonian drought sensitivity) and crops (e.g., impacts of extremes on agricultural production). Here, a critical overview is presented on recent developments and opportunities in the use of remote sensing for monitoring vegetation and crop dynamics.

  7. Interactive and cooperative sensing and control for advanced teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan; Zapata, Eduardo; Schenker, Paul S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the paradigm of interactive and cooperative sensing and control as a fundamental mechanism of integrating and fusing the strengths of man and machine for advanced teleoperation. The interactive and cooperative sensing and control is considered as an extended and generalized form of traded and shared control. The emphasis of interactive and cooperative sensing and control is given to the distribution of mutually nonexclusive subtasks to man and machine, the interactive invocation of subtasks under the man/machine symbiotic relationship, and the fusion of information and decision-making between man and machine according to their confidence measures. The proposed interactive and cooperative sensing and control system is composed of such major functional blocks as the logical sensor system, the sensor-based local autonomy, the virtual environment formation, and the cooperative decision-making between man and machine. A case study is performed to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing the fundamental theory and system architecture of interactive and cooperative sensing and control, proposed for the new generation of teleoperation.

  8. Phase discrepancy induced from least squares wavefront reconstruction of wrapped phase measurements with high noise or large localized wavefront gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbock, Michael J.; Hyde, Milo W.

    2012-10-01

    Adaptive optics is used in applications such as laser communication, remote sensing, and laser weapon systems to estimate and correct for atmospheric distortions of propagated light in real-time. Within an adaptive optics system, a reconstruction process interprets the raw wavefront sensor measurements and calculates an estimate for the unwrapped phase function to be sent through a control law and applied to a wavefront correction device. This research is focused on adaptive optics using a self-referencing interferometer wavefront sensor, which directly measures the wrapped wavefront phase. Therefore, its measurements must be reconstructed for use on a continuous facesheet deformable mirror. In testing and evaluating a novel class of branch-point- tolerant wavefront reconstructors based on the post-processing congruence operation technique, an increase in Strehl ratio compared to a traditional least squares reconstructor was noted even in non-scintillated fields. To investigate this further, this paper uses wave-optics simulations to eliminate many of the variables from a hardware adaptive optics system, so as to focus on the reconstruction techniques alone. The simulation results along with a discussion of the physical reasoning for this phenomenon are provided. For any applications using a self-referencing interferometer wavefront sensor with low signal levels or high localized wavefront gradients, understanding this phenomena is critical when applying a traditional least squares wavefront reconstructor.

  9. MOSAIC: a new wavefront metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Christopher; Naulleau, Patrick

    2009-02-02

    MOSAIC is a new wavefront metrology that enables complete wavefront characterization from print or aerial image based measurements. Here we describe MOSAIC and verify its utility with a model-based proof of principle.

  10. Improving active space telescope wavefront control using predictive thermal modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersh-Range, Jessica; Perrin, Marshall D.

    2015-01-01

    Active control algorithms for space telescopes are less mature than those for large ground telescopes due to differences in the wavefront control problems. Active wavefront control for space telescopes at L2, such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), requires weighing control costs against the benefits of correcting wavefront perturbations that are a predictable byproduct of the observing schedule, which is known and determined in advance. To improve the control algorithms for these telescopes, we have developed a model that calculates the temperature and wavefront evolution during a hypothetical mission, assuming the dominant wavefront perturbations are due to changes in the spacecraft attitude with respect to the sun. Using this model, we show that the wavefront can be controlled passively by introducing scheduling constraints that limit the allowable attitudes for an observation based on the observation duration and the mean telescope temperature. We also describe the implementation of a predictive controller designed to prevent the wavefront error (WFE) from exceeding a desired threshold. This controller outperforms simpler algorithms even with substantial model error, achieving a lower WFE without requiring significantly more corrections. Consequently, predictive wavefront control based on known spacecraft attitude plans is a promising approach for JWST and other future active space observatories.

  11. Advanced Telescopes and Observatories Capability Roadmap Presentation to the NRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of the NASA Advanced Planning and Integration Office (APIO) roadmap for developing technological capabilities for telescopes and observatories in the following areas: Optics; Wavefront Sensing and Control and Interferometry; Distributed and Advanced Spacecraft; Large Precision Structures; Cryogenic and Thermal Control Systems; Infrastructure.

  12. Absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The distinction between the uses of relative and absolute spectroradiometric calibration of remote sensing systems is discussed. The advantages of detector-based absolute calibration are described, and the categories of relative and absolute system calibrations are listed. The limitations and problems associated with three common methods used for the absolute calibration of remote sensing systems are addressed. Two methods are proposed for the in-flight absolute calibration of advanced multispectral linear array systems. One makes use of a sun-illuminated panel in front of the sensor, the radiance of which is monitored by a spectrally flat pyroelectric radiometer. The other uses a large, uniform, high-radiance reference ground surface. The ground and atmospheric measurements required as input to a radiative transfer program to predict the radiance level at the entrance pupil of the orbital sensor are discussed, and the ground instrumentation is described.

  13. Wavefront Correction for Large, Flexible Antenna Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.; Jammejad, Vahraz; Rajagopalan, Harish; Xu, Shenheng

    2010-01-01

    A wavefront-correction system has been proposed as part of an outer-space radio communication system that would include a large, somewhat flexible main reflector antenna, a smaller subreflector antenna, and a small array feed at the focal plane of these two reflector antennas. Part of the wavefront-correction system would reside in the subreflector, which would be a planar patch-element reflectarray antenna in which the phase shifts of the patch antenna elements would be controlled via microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) radio -frequency (RF) switches. The system would include the following sensing-and-computing subsystems: a) An optical photogrammetric subsystem built around two cameras would estimate geometric distortions of the main reflector; b) A second subsystem would estimate wavefront distortions from amplitudes and phases of signals received by the array feed elements; and c) A third subsystem, built around small probes on the subreflector plane, would estimate wavefront distortions from differences among phases of signals received by the probes. The distortion estimates from the three subsystems would be processed to generate control signals to be fed to the MEMS RF switches to correct for the distortions, thereby enabling collimation and aiming of the received or transmitted radio beam to the required precision.

  14. Tomographic Errors From Wavefront Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malcolm, A. E.; Trampert, J.

    2008-12-01

    Despite recent advances in full-waveform modeling ray theory is still, for good reasons, the preferred method in global tomography. It is well known that ray theory is most accurate for anomalies that are large compared to the wavelength. Exactly what errors result from the failure of this assumption is less well understood, in spite of the fact that anomalies found in the Earth from ray-based tomography methods are often outside the regime in which ray theory is known to be valid. Using the spectral element method, we have computed exact delay times and compared them to ray-theoretical traveltimes for two classic anomalies, one large and disk-shaped near the core mantle boundary, and the other a plume-like structure extending throughout the mantle. Wavefront healing is apparent in the traveltime anomalies generated by these structures; its effects are strongly asymmetric between P and S arrivals due to wavelength differences and source directionality. Simple computations in two dimensions allow us to develop the intuition necessary to understand how diffractions around the anomalies explain these results. When inverting the exact travel time anomalies with ray theory we expect wavefront healing to have a strong influence on the resulting structures. We anticipate that the asymmetry will be of particular importance in anomalies in the bulk velocity structure.

  15. Imaging spectrometer technologies for advanced Earth remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellman, J. B.; Breckinridge, J. B.; Kuperfman, P.; Salazar, R. P.; Sigurdson, K. B.

    1982-01-01

    A major requirement of multispectral imaging systems for advanced Earth remote sensing is the provision for greater spectral resolution and more versatile spectral band selection. The imaging spectrometer instrument concept provides this versatility by the combination of pushbroom imaging and spectrally dispersing optics using area array detectors in the focal plane. The shuttle imaging spectrometer concept achieves 10- and 20-meter ground instantaneous fields of view with 20-nanometer spectral resolution from Earth Orbit. Onboard processing allows the selection of spectral bands during flight; this, in turn, permits the sensor parameters to be tailored to the experiment objectives. Advances in optical design, infrared detector arrays, and focal plane cooling indicate the feasibility of the instrument concept and support the practicability of a validation flight experiment for the shuttle in the late 1980s.

  16. Advanced Multispectral Scanner (AMS) study. [aircraft remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The status of aircraft multispectral scanner technology was accessed in order to develop preliminary design specifications for an advanced instrument to be used for remote sensing data collection by aircraft in the 1980 time frame. The system designed provides a no-moving parts multispectral scanning capability through the exploitation of linear array charge coupled device technology and advanced electronic signal processing techniques. Major advantages include: 10:1 V/H rate capability; 120 deg FOV at V/H = 0.25 rad/sec; 1 to 2 rad resolution; high sensitivity; large dynamic range capability; geometric fidelity; roll compensation; modularity; long life; and 24 channel data acquisition capability. The field flattening techniques of the optical design allow wide field view to be achieved at fast f/nos for both the long and short wavelength regions. The digital signal averaging technique permits maximization of signal to noise performance over the entire V/H rate range.

  17. Myopic aberrations: Simulation based comparison of curvature and Hartmann Shack wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basavaraju, Roopashree M.; Akondi, Vyas; Weddell, Stephen J.; Budihal, Raghavendra Prasad

    2014-02-01

    In comparison with a Hartmann Shack wavefront sensor, the curvature wavefront sensor is known for its higher sensitivity and greater dynamic range. The aim of this study is to numerically investigate the merits of using a curvature wavefront sensor, in comparison with a Hartmann Shack (HS) wavefront sensor, to analyze aberrations of the myopic eye. Aberrations were statistically generated using Zernike coefficient data of 41 myopic subjects obtained from the literature. The curvature sensor is relatively simple to implement, and the processing of extra- and intra-focal images was linearly resolved using the Radon transform to provide Zernike modes corresponding to statistically generated aberrations. Simulations of the HS wavefront sensor involve the evaluation of the focal spot pattern from simulated aberrations. Optical wavefronts were reconstructed using the slope geometry of Southwell. Monte Carlo simulation was used to find critical parameters for accurate wavefront sensing and to investigate the performance of HS and curvature sensors. The performance of the HS sensor is highly dependent on the number of subapertures and the curvature sensor is largely dependent on the number of Zernike modes used to represent the aberration and the effective propagation distance. It is shown that in order to achieve high wavefront sensing accuracy while measuring aberrations of the myopic eye, a simpler and cost effective curvature wavefront sensor is a reliable alternative to a high resolution HS wavefront sensor with a large number of subapertures.

  18. Wavefront detection method of a single-sensor based adaptive optics system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chongchong; Hu, Lifa; Xu, Huanyu; Wang, Yukun; Li, Dayu; Wang, Shaoxin; Mu, Quanquan; Yang, Chengliang; Cao, Zhaoliang; Lu, Xinghai; Xuan, Li

    2015-08-10

    In adaptive optics system (AOS) for optical telescopes, the reported wavefront sensing strategy consists of two parts: a specific sensor for tip-tilt (TT) detection and another wavefront sensor for other distortions detection. Thus, a part of incident light has to be used for TT detection, which decreases the light energy used by wavefront sensor and eventually reduces the precision of wavefront correction. In this paper, a single Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor based wavefront measurement method is presented for both large amplitude TT and other distortions' measurement. Experiments were performed for testing the presented wavefront method and validating the wavefront detection and correction ability of the single-sensor based AOS. With adaptive correction, the root-mean-square of residual TT was less than 0.2 λ, and a clear image was obtained in the lab. Equipped on a 1.23-meter optical telescope, the binary stars with angle distance of 0.6″ were clearly resolved using the AOS. This wavefront measurement method removes the separate TT sensor, which not only simplifies the AOS but also saves light energy for subsequent wavefront sensing and imaging, and eventually improves the detection and imaging capability of the AOS. PMID:26367988

  19. [The strict sense nursing postgraduation in Brazil: advances and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan; Munari, Denize Bouttelet; Gelbcke, Francine Lima; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; de Gutiérrez, Maria Gaby Rivero; Rodrigues, Rosalina Aparecida Partezani

    2013-09-01

    Nursing is a specific field of knowledge and social practice that has been consolidated and strengthened as science. In Brazil, it has been developed due to the increase and qualification of strict sense post-graduate programs. This study aims to present a historical review of the strict sense post-graduate nursing courses in Brazil and to reflect on their evolution, progress, challenges and future perspectives. It explores the creation of strict sense post-graduate courses, highlighting the movement to build a culture of academic and professional post-graduation in nursing. The historical path of their consolidation, expansion, conquest of excellence and international visibility over four decades, and the challenges and future perspectives are showed. It is found that the post-graduate programs in the field has contributed to the advancement and consolidation of scientific, technological knowledge and innovation in nursing and health care, having as philosophy the respect for diversity and the free exchange of ideas, the improvement of quality of life and health, and the effectiveness of citizenship.

  20. A Wavefront Sensor to Detect Dim Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateen, M.; Guyon, O.; Hart, M.; Codona, J.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we present the progress made towards building the non-linear Curvature wavefront sensor (nlCWFS) to be used in an adaptive optics system for the direct imaging of exoplanets without the use of a laser guide star (LGS). Commonly used wavefront sensors such as the Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) do a good job of reconstructing high order modes but due to design limitations are poor at reconstructing low order modes. The nlCWFS is able to use the full spatial coherence of the pupil allowing it to reconstruct all spatial frequencies equally well. The nlCWFS senses at the diffraction limit as opposed to the SHWFS which senses at the seeing limit. This awards the nlCWFS a gain in flux of (D/r0)2. In this paper we present results from putting the nlCWFS on the 6.5m MMT Observatory and detail the progress being made to build the nlCWFS for the 1.5 m Air Force Research Laboratory/RDS Optics Division telescope.

  1. Adaptive Full Aperture Wavefront Sensor Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    This grant and the work described was in support of a Seven Segment Demonstrator (SSD) and review of wavefront sensing techniques proposed by the Government and Contractors for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Program. A team developed the SSD concept. For completeness, some of the information included in this report has also been included in the final report of a follow-on contract (H-27657D) entitled "Construction of Prototype Lightweight Mirrors". The original purpose of this GTRI study was to investigate how various wavefront sensing techniques might be most effectively employed with large (greater than 10 meter) aperture space based telescopes used for commercial and scientific purposes. However, due to changes in the scope of the work performed on this grant and in light of the initial studies completed for the NGST program, only a portion of this report addresses wavefront sensing techniques. The wavefront sensing techniques proposed by the Government and Contractors for the NGST were summarized in proposals and briefing materials developed by three study teams including NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, TRW, and Lockheed-Martin. In this report, GTRI reviews these approaches and makes recommendations concerning the approaches. The objectives of the SSD were to demonstrate functionality and performance of a seven segment prototype array of hexagonal mirrors and supporting electromechanical components which address design issues critical to space optics deployed in large space based telescopes for astronomy and for optics used in spaced based optical communications systems. The SSD was intended to demonstrate technologies which can support the following capabilities: Transportation in dense packaging to existing launcher payload envelopes, then deployable on orbit to form a space telescope with large aperture. Provide very large (greater than 10 meters) primary reflectors of low mass and cost. Demonstrate the capability to form a segmented primary or

  2. Advanced 3D imaging lidar concepts for long range sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, K. J.; Hiskett, P. A.; Lamb, R. A.

    2014-06-01

    Recent developments in 3D imaging lidar are presented. Long range 3D imaging using photon counting is now a possibility, offering a low-cost approach to integrated remote sensing with step changing advantages in size, weight and power compared to conventional analogue active imaging technology. We report results using a Geiger-mode array for time-of-flight, single photon counting lidar for depth profiling and determination of the shape and size of tree canopies and distributed surface reflections at a range of 9km, with 4μJ pulses with a frame rate of 100kHz using a low-cost fibre laser operating at a wavelength of λ=1.5 μm. The range resolution is less than 4cm providing very high depth resolution for target identification. This specification opens up several additional functionalities for advanced lidar, for example: absolute rangefinding and depth profiling for long range identification, optical communications, turbulence sensing and time-of-flight spectroscopy. Future concepts for 3D time-of-flight polarimetric and multispectral imaging lidar, with optical communications in a single integrated system are also proposed.

  3. Sensing parasites: Proteomic and advanced bio-detection alternatives.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ovejero, Carlos; Benito-Lopez, Fernando; Díez, Paula; Casulli, Adriano; Siles-Lucas, Mar; Fuentes, Manuel; Manzano-Román, Raúl

    2016-03-16

    Parasitic diseases have a great impact in human and animal health. The gold standard for the diagnosis of the majority of parasitic infections is still conventional microscopy, which presents important limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity and commonly requires highly trained technicians. More accurate molecular-based diagnostic tools are needed for the implementation of early detection, effective treatments and massive screenings with high-throughput capacities. In this respect, sensitive and affordable devices could greatly impact on sustainable control programmes which exist against parasitic diseases, especially in low income settings. Proteomics and nanotechnology approaches are valuable tools for sensing pathogens and host alteration signatures within microfluidic detection platforms. These new devices might provide novel solutions to fight parasitic diseases. Newly described specific parasite derived products with immune-modulatory properties have been postulated as the best candidates for the early and accurate detection of parasitic infections as well as for the blockage of parasite development. This review provides the most recent methodological and technological advances with great potential for bio-sensing parasites in their hosts, showing the newest opportunities offered by modern "-omics" and platforms for parasite detection and control.

  4. Advances in Unmixing of Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burazerovic, Dzevdet

    Remote sensing technology has advanced tremendously in recent decades. An important driver for this development has been the offering of wide spatial and temporal coverage by space- and airborne platforms, as well as the ever-improving capability of their sensors to record images with high spatial and spectral resolution. A modality that produces a bulk of data for remote sensing is hyperspectral imaging. This modality records the reflected solar radiation in contiguous and often numerous spectral bands, thereby extending the standard photography by enabling to treat each pixel individually as a spectrum discernible for each class of materials. One limitation of such imaging, where the spatial and spectral resolutions are inherently traded against each other, is the occurrence of mixed pixels and spectral mixing. The unraveling of spectral mixtures has been widely studied as spectral unmixing, where two main aspects are of interest: the estimation of the constituent spectra, and of their fractions or abundances, in the mixture. The work described in the thesis regards spectral unmixing from two objectives: advancement of methodology and introduction of unmixing in new applications. The first part, specifically, is concerned with the development of data-driven methods for spectral unmixing that can mitigate the dependency on physical parameters and models, and reduce high computational complexity due to the typical use of optimization techniques. A concrete realization consists of several algorithms that reformulate the known geometrical framework of spectral unmixing by introducing linear and nonlinear distance-based and analytical formulations. The second part introduces or elaborates spectral unmixing for detection of the atmospheric adjacency-effect and the estimation of quality of inland and coastal waters. The presented unmixing-based approaches in this context have been validated through theoretical and empirical comparison using available datasets and

  5. Enabling Possibility: Women Associate Professors' Sense of Agency in Career Advancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terosky, Aimee LaPointe; O'Meara, KerryAnn; Campbell, Corbin M.

    2014-01-01

    In this multimethod, qualitative study we examined associate women professors' sense of agency in career advancement from the rank of associate to full. Defining agency as strategic perspectives or actions toward goals that matter to the professor, we explore the perceptions of what helps and/or hinders a sense of agency in career advancement. Our…

  6. A role for AVIRIS in the Landsat and Advanced Land Remote Sensing Systems program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Simmonds, John J.

    1993-01-01

    As a calibrated imaging spectrometer flying at a 20 km altitude, AVIRIS may contribute to the Landsat and the Advanced Land Remote Sensing System efforts. These contributions come in the areas of: (1) on-orbit calibration, (2) specification of new spectral bands, (3) validation of algorithms, and (4) investigation of an imaging spectrometer of the Advanced Land Remote Sensing System.

  7. Extremely large telescopes' optical design and wavefront correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Alexander Vladimirovich

    An overview of the state of art within optical design of large astronomical telescopes is given. Recent advances within the field are presented. The importance of new computer-controlled mirror-polishing methods is emphasized. Some important aspects of atmospheric optics are presented together with current compensation methods using adaptive optics, with or without laser guide stars. An overview of wavefront sensing, wavefront reconstruction and techniques for compensation is given. Methods for optical design of large, optical telescopes with fast primary mirrors are presented in a systematic way. Three different approaches are outlined and commented. They include an algebraic method, a method based on optimization through ray tracing and an analytical method based on Fermat's principle and the Abbe sine condition. Studies of optical designs for large telescopes with fast, spherical primary mirrors are examined and discussed. For two-mirror designs, an analytical method has been derived using aberration control based on Fermat's principle. Intrinsic apodization for design of extremely fast primary mirrors is analyzed. For four- mirror designs with spherical primary minors, a ray tracing approach has been chosen. A total of fifteen different four-mirror designs have been analyzed and discussed. For the 50 m optical telescope. Euro50, a two-mirror design was chosen. This optical design is presented in detail, together with the optical layout of an adaptive optical system that forms an integrated part of the telescope. An analysis of essential components of the Euro50 is given. Finally, an analytical approach is presented for control of two or more deformable mirrors for adaptive optics in extremely large telescopes for optical wavelengths. The same algorithms are used to evaluate and predict the performance of the adaptive optics for the Euro50.

  8. Fiber coupler end face wavefront surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compertore, David C.; Ignatovich, Filipp V.; Marcus, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Despite significant technological advances in the field of fiber optic communications, one area remains surprisingly `low-tech': fiber termination. In many instances it involves manual labor and subjective visual inspection. At the same time, high quality fiber connections are one of the most critical parameters in constructing an efficient communication link. The shape and finish of the fiber end faces determines the efficiency of a connection comprised of coupled fiber end faces. The importance of fiber end face quality becomes even more critical for fiber connection arrays and for in the field applications. In this article we propose and demonstrate a quantitative inspection method for the fiber connectors using reflected wavefront technology. The manufactured and polished fiber tip is illuminated by a collimated light from a microscope objective. The reflected light is collected by the objective and is directed to a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. A set of lenses is used to create the image of the fiber tip on the surface of the sensor. The wavefront is analyzed by the sensor, and the measured parameters are used to obtain surface properties of the fiber tip, and estimate connection loss. For example, defocus components in the reflected light indicate the presence of bow in the fiber end face. This inspection method provides a contact-free approach for quantitative inspection of fiber end faces and for estimating the connection loss, and can potentially be integrated into a feedback system for automated inspection and polishing of fiber tips and fiber tip arrays.

  9. JWST Wavefront Control Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Shahram Ron; Aronstein, David L.

    2011-01-01

    A Matlab-based toolbox has been developed for the wavefront control and optimization of segmented optical surfaces to correct for possible misalignments of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) using influence functions. The toolbox employs both iterative and non-iterative methods to converge to an optimal solution by minimizing the cost function. The toolbox could be used in either of constrained and unconstrained optimizations. The control process involves 1 to 7 degrees-of-freedom perturbations per segment of primary mirror in addition to the 5 degrees of freedom of secondary mirror. The toolbox consists of a series of Matlab/Simulink functions and modules, developed based on a "wrapper" approach, that handles the interface and data flow between existing commercial optical modeling software packages such as Zemax and Code V. The limitations of the algorithm are dictated by the constraints of the moving parts in the mirrors.

  10. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOEpatents

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1999-08-10

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed. 21 figs.

  11. The NGS Pyramid wavefront sensor for ERIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, A.; Antichi, J.; Quirós-Pacheco, F.; Esposito, S.; Carbonaro, L.; Agapito, G.; Biliotti, V.; Briguglio, R.; Di Rico, G.; Dolci, M.; Ferruzzi, D.; Pinna, E.; Puglisi, A.; Xompero, M.; Marchetti, E.; Fedrigo, E.; Le Louarn, M.; Conzelmann, R.; Delabre, B.; Amico, P.; Hubin, N.

    2014-07-01

    ERIS is the new Single Conjugate Adaptive Optics (AO) instrument for VLT in construction at ESO with the collaboration of Max-Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, ETH-Institute for Astronomy and INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri. The ERIS AO system relies on a 40×40 sub-aperture Pyramid Wavefront Sensor (PWFS) for two operating modes: a pure Natural Guide Star high-order sensing for high Strehl and contrast correction and a low-order visible sensing in support of the Laser Guide Star AO mode. In this paper we present in detail the preliminary design of the ERIS PWFS that is developed under the responsibility of INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri in collaboration with ESO.

  12. Advances in remote sensing and modeling of terrestrial hydro-meteorological processes and extremes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing is an indispensable tool for monitoring and detecting the evolution of the Earth’s hydro-meteorological processes. Fast-growing remote sensing observations and technologies have been a primary impetus to advancing our knowledge of hydro-meteorological processes and their extremes ove...

  13. Estimate Low and High Order Wavefront Using P1640 Calibrator Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhai, C.; Vasisht, G.; Shao, M.; Lockhart, T.; Cady, E.; Oppenheimer, B.; Burruss, R.; Roberts, J.; Beichman, C.; Brenner, D.; Crepp, J.; Dekany, R.; Hillenbrand, L.; Hinkley, S.; Parry, I.; Pueyo, L.; Rice, E.; Roberts, L. C. Jr.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Soummer, R.; Tang, H.; Vescelus, F.; Wallace, K.; Zimmerman, N.

    2013-01-01

    P1640 high contrast imaging system on the Palomar 200 inch Telescope consists of an apodized-pupil Lyot coronagraph, the PALM-3000 adaptive optics (P3K-AO), and P1640 Calibrator (CAL). Science images are recorded by an integral field spectrograph covering J-H bands for detecting and characterizing stellar companions. With aberrations from atmosphere corrected by the P3K-AO, instrument performance is limited mainly by the quasi-static speckles due to noncommon path wavefront aberrations for the light to propagate to the P3K-AO wavefront sensor and to the coronagraph mask. The non-common path wavefront aberrations are sensed by CAL, which measures the post-coronagraph E-field using interferometry, and can be effectively corrected by offsetting the P3K-AO deformable mirror target position accordingly. Previously, we have demonstrated using CAL measurements to correct high order wavefront aberrations, which is directly connected to the static speckles in the image plane. Low order wavefront, on the other hand, usually of larger amplitudes, causes light to leak through the coronagraph making the whole image plane brighter. Knowledge error in low order wavefront aberrations can also affect the estimation of the high order wavefront. Even though, CAL is designed to sense efficiently high order wavefront aberrations, the low order wavefront front can be inferred with less sensitivity. Here, we describe our method for estimating both low and high order wavefront aberrations using CAL measurements by propagating the post-coronagraph E-field to a pupil before the coronagraph. We present the results from applying this method to both simulated and experiment data.

  14. On numerical simulation of high-speed CCD/CMOS-based wavefront sensors in adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konnik, Mikhail V.; Welsh, James Stuart

    2011-10-01

    Wavefront sensors, which use solid-state CCD or CMOS photosensors, are sources of errors in adaptive optic systems. Inaccuracy in the detection of wavefront distortions introduces considerable errors into wavefront reconstruction and leads to overall performance degradation of the adaptive optics system. The accuracy of wavefront sensors is significantly affected by photosensor noise. Thus, it is crucial to formulate high-level photosensor models that enable adaptive optic engineers to simulate realistic effects of noise from wavefront sensors. However, the complexity of solid-state photosensors and multiple noise sources makes it difficult to formulate an adequate model of the photosensor. Moreover, the characterisation of the simulated sensor and comparison with real hardware is often incomplete due to lack of comprehensive standards and guidelines. Owe to these difficulties, engineers work with oversimplified models of the wavefront sensors and consequently have imprecise numerical simulation results. The paper presents an approach for the modelling of noise sources for CCD and CMOS sensors that are used for wavefront sensing in adaptive optics. Both dark and light noise such as fixed pattern noise, photon shot noise, and read noises, as well as, charge-to-voltage noises are described. Procedures for characterisation of both light and dark noises of the simulated photosensors are provided. Numerical simulation results of a photosensor for a high-frame rate Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor are presented.

  15. A non-linear curvature wavefront sensor reconstruction speed and the broadband design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateen, Mala; Guyon, Olivier; Sasián, José; Garrel, Vincent; Hart, Michael

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we explain why a non-linear curvature wavefront sensor (nlCWFS) is more sensitive than conventional wavefront sensors such as the Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) and the conventional curvature wavefront sensor (cCWFS) for sensing mV < 14 natural guide stars. The non-linear approach builds on the successful curvature wavefront sensing concept but uses a non-linear Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) phase diversity algorithm to reconstruct the wavefront. The nonlinear reconstruction algorithm is an advantage for sensitivity but a challenge for fast computation. The current speed is a factor of 10 to 100 times slower than needed for high performance groundbased AO. We present a two step strategy to increase the speed of the algorithm. In the last paper3 we presented laboratory results obtained with a monochromatic source, here we extend our experiment to incorporate a broadband source. The sensitivity of the nlCWFS depends on the ability to extract wavefront phase from diffraction limited speckles therefore it is essential that the speckles do not suffer from chromatic aberration when used with a polychromatic source. We discuss the design for the chromatic re-imaging optics, which through chromatic compensation, allow us to obtain diffraction limited speckles in Fresnel propagated planes on either side of the pupil plane.

  16. Advanced and applied remote sensing of environmental conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, E. Terrence; Fisher, Gary B.; Marr, David A.; Milheim, Lesley E.; Roig-Silva, Coral M.

    2013-01-01

    "Remote sensing” is a general term for monitoring techniques that collect information without being in physical contact with the object of study. Overhead imagery from aircraft and satellite sensors provides the most common form of remotely sensed data and records the interaction of electromagnetic energy (usually visible light) with matter, such as the Earth’s surface. Remotely sensed data are fundamental to geographic science. The U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Eastern Geographic Science Center (EGSC) is currently conducting and promoting the research and development of several different aspects of remote sensing science in both the laboratory and from overhead instruments. Spectroscopy is the science of recording interactions of energy and matter and is the bench science for all remote sensing. Visible and infrared analysis in the laboratory with special instruments called spectrometers enables the transfer of this research from the laboratory to multispectral (5–15 broad bands) and hyperspectral (50–300 narrow contiguous bands) analyses from aircraft and satellite sensors. In addition, mid-wave (3–5 micrometers, µm) and long-wave (8–14 µm) infrared data analysis, such as attenuated total reflectance (ATR) spectral analysis, are also conducted. ATR is a special form of vibrational infrared spectroscopy that has many applications in chemistry and biology but has recently been shown to be especially diagnostic for vegetation analysis.

  17. Advancing Adventure Education Using Digital Motion-Sensing Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ju-Ling; Hsu, Yu-Jen

    2016-01-01

    This study used the Xbox Kinect and Unity 3D game engine to develop two motion-sensing games in which the participants, in simulated scenarios, could experience activities that are unattainable in real life, become immersed in collaborative activities, and explore the value of adventure education. Adventure Education involves courses that…

  18. Wavefront modifier with integrated sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Mike; Laycock, Leslie; Rowe, Duncan; Cairns, Lee

    2009-09-01

    We present a novel method for integrating a wavefront sensor into a deformable mirror. This development should simplify the design of laser and electro-optic systems, and lead to smart mirrors which need no external control systems. In operation, a small fraction of the incident light is transmitted through the mirror coating and is sampled by a Hartmann Mask. Options include open loop, traditional closed loop or fully integrated operation whereby the wavefront sensor is used to provide direct feedback to the mirror actuators, enabling automatic alignment or phase conjugation.

  19. One-Dimensional Wavefront Sensor Analysis

    1996-04-25

    This software analyzes one-dimensional wavefront sensor data acquired with any of several data acquisition systems. It analyzes the data to determine centroids, wavefront slopes and overall wavefront error. The data can be displayed in many formats, with plots of various parameters vs time and position, including computer generated movies. Data can also be exported for use by other programs.

  20. Technology advances in active and passive microwave sensing through 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.

    1977-01-01

    As a result of a growing awareness by the remote sensing community of the unique capabilities of passive and active microwave sensors, these instruments are expected to grow in the next decade in numbers, versatility and complexity. The Nimbus-G and Seasat-A Scanning Multichannel Microwave Spectrometer (SMMR), the Seasat-A radar altimeter, scatterometer and synthetic aperture radar represent the first systematic attempt at exploring a wide variety of applications utilizing microwave sensing techniques and are indicators of the directions in which the pertinent technology is likely to evolve. The trend is toward high resolution multi-frequency imagers spanning wide frequency ranges and wide swaths requiring sophisticated receivers, real-time data processors and most importantly, complex antennas.

  1. Recent advances in understanding the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor

    PubMed Central

    Colella, Matilde; Gerbino, Andrea; Hofer, Aldebaran M.; Curci, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaR), a ubiquitous class C G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is responsible for the control of calcium homeostasis in body fluids. It integrates information about external Ca 2+ and a surfeit of other endogenous ligands into multiple intracellular signals, but how is this achieved? This review will focus on some of the exciting concepts in CaR signaling and pharmacology that have emerged in the last few years. PMID:27803801

  2. New CCD imagers for adaptive optics wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuette, Daniel R.; Reich, Robert K.; Prigozhin, Ilya; Burke, Barry E.; Johnson, Robert

    2014-08-01

    We report on two recently developed charge-coupled devices (CCDs) for adaptive optics wavefront sensing, both designed to provide exceptional sensitivity (low noise and high quantum efficiency) in high-frame-rate low-latency readout applications. The first imager, the CCID75, is a back-illuminated 16-port 160×160-pixel CCD that has been demonstrated to operate at frame rates above 1,300 fps with noise of < 3 e-. We will describe the architecture of this CCD that enables this level of performance, present and discuss characterization data, and review additional design features that enable unique operating modes for adaptive optics wavefront sensing. We will also present an architectural overview and initial characterization data of a recently designed variation on the CCID75 architecture, the CCID82, which incorporates an electronic shutter to support adaptive optics using Rayleigh beacons.

  3. Adaptive wavefront sensor based on the Talbot phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Podanchuk, Dmytro V; Goloborodko, Andrey A; Kotov, Myhailo M; Kovalenko, Andrey V; Kurashov, Vitalij N; Dan'ko, Volodymyr P

    2016-04-20

    A new adaptive method of wavefront sensing is proposed and demonstrated. The method is based on the Talbot self-imaging effect, which is observed in an illuminating light beam with strong second-order aberration. Compensation of defocus and astigmatism is achieved with an appropriate choice of size of the rectangular unit cell of the diffraction grating, which is performed iteratively. A liquid-crystal spatial light modulator is used for this purpose. Self-imaging of rectangular grating in the astigmatic light beam is demonstrated experimentally. High-order aberrations are detected with respect to the compensated second-order aberration. The comparative results of wavefront sensing with a Shack-Hartmann sensor and the proposed sensor are adduced. PMID:27140122

  4. Advancements for Three-Dimensional Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, William George Kulesz

    Climate modeling efforts depend on remote sensing observations of clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere. This dissertation presents a foundation for using three-dimensional (3D) remote sensing techniques to retrieve cloud and aerosol properties in complex cloud fields. The initial research was aimed at establishing a set of single-scattering properties that could be used in subsequent 3D remote sensing applications. A theoretical stability analysis was used to evaluate what information about the particulate scattering material could be determined from in situ radiance and polarization measurements, and particle size and refractive index were retrieved from synthetic measurements with noise levels comparable to those of existing laboratory instruments. Subsequent research focused on the techniques necessary to retrieve 3D atmosphere and surface properties from images taken by an airborne or space-borne instrument. With the goal of using 3D retrieval methods to extend monitoring capabilities to regions with broken cloud fields, we formulated an efficient procedure for using codes that solve the 3D vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) to adjust atmosphere and surface properties to fit multi-angle/multi-pixel polarimetric measurements of the atmosphere. Taken together, these two bodies of work contribute to ongoing research which focuses on developing new methods for retrieving aerosols in complex 3D cloud fields, and may extend monitoring capabilities to these currently unresolved scenes.

  5. Advanced 3D Sensing and Visualization System for Unattended Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.J.; Little, C.Q.; Nelson, C.L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to create a reliable, 3D sensing and visualization system for unattended monitoring. The system provides benefits for several of Sandia's initiatives including nonproliferation, treaty verification, national security and critical infrastructure surety. The robust qualities of the system make it suitable for both interior and exterior monitoring applications. The 3D sensing system combines two existing sensor technologies in a new way to continuously maintain accurate 3D models of both static and dynamic components of monitored areas (e.g., portions of buildings, roads, and secured perimeters in addition to real-time estimates of the shape, location, and motion of humans and moving objects). A key strength of this system is the ability to monitor simultaneous activities on a continuous basis, such as several humans working independently within a controlled workspace, while also detecting unauthorized entry into the workspace. Data from the sensing system is used to identi~ activities or conditions that can signi~ potential surety (safety, security, and reliability) threats. The system could alert a security operator of potential threats or could be used to cue other detection, inspection or warning systems. An interactive, Web-based, 3D visualization capability was also developed using the Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML). The intex%ace allows remote, interactive inspection of a monitored area (via the Internet or Satellite Links) using a 3D computer model of the area that is rendered from actual sensor data.

  6. Terahertz wavefront measurement with a Hartmann sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, H.; Greiner-Bär, M.; Deßmann, N.; Pfund, J.; Wienold, M.; Schrottke, L.; Hey, R.; Grahn, H. T.; Hübers, H.-W.

    2012-07-01

    The measurement of the wavefront of a terahertz (THz) beam is essential for the development of any optical instrument operating at THz frequencies. We have realized a Hartmann wavefront sensor for the THz frequency range. The sensor is based on an aperture plate consisting of a regular square pattern of holes and a microbolometer camera. The performance of the sensor is demonstrated by characterizing the wavefront of a THz beam emitted by a quantum-cascade laser. The wavefront determined by the sensor agrees well with that expected from a Gaussian-shaped beam. The spatial resolution is 1 mm, and a single-wavefront measurement takes less than 1 s.

  7. Potential rainwater harvesting improvement using advanced remote sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Elhag, Mohamed; Bahrawi, Jarbou A

    2014-01-01

    The amount of water on earth is the same and only the distribution and the reallocation of water forms are altered in both time and space. To improve the rainwater harvesting a better understanding of the hydrological cycle is mandatory. Clouds are major component of the hydrological cycle; therefore, clouds distribution is the keystone of better rainwater harvesting. Remote sensing technology has shown robust capabilities in resolving challenges of water resource management in arid environments. Soil moisture content and cloud average distribution are essential remote sensing applications in extracting information of geophysical, geomorphological, and meteorological interest from satellite images. Current research study aimed to map the soil moisture content using recent Landsat 8 images and to map cloud average distribution of the corresponding area using 59 MERIS satellite imageries collected from January 2006 to October 2011. Cloud average distribution map shows specific location in the study area where it is always cloudy all the year and the site corresponding soil moisture content map came in agreement with cloud distribution. The overlay of the two previously mentioned maps over the geological map of the study area shows potential locations for better rainwater harvesting.

  8. Potential Rainwater Harvesting Improvement Using Advanced Remote Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Elhag, Mohamed; Bahrawi, Jarbou A.

    2014-01-01

    The amount of water on earth is the same and only the distribution and the reallocation of water forms are altered in both time and space. To improve the rainwater harvesting a better understanding of the hydrological cycle is mandatory. Clouds are major component of the hydrological cycle; therefore, clouds distribution is the keystone of better rainwater harvesting. Remote sensing technology has shown robust capabilities in resolving challenges of water resource management in arid environments. Soil moisture content and cloud average distribution are essential remote sensing applications in extracting information of geophysical, geomorphological, and meteorological interest from satellite images. Current research study aimed to map the soil moisture content using recent Landsat 8 images and to map cloud average distribution of the corresponding area using 59 MERIS satellite imageries collected from January 2006 to October 2011. Cloud average distribution map shows specific location in the study area where it is always cloudy all the year and the site corresponding soil moisture content map came in agreement with cloud distribution. The overlay of the two previously mentioned maps over the geological map of the study area shows potential locations for better rainwater harvesting. PMID:25114973

  9. [Advances in researches on hyperspectral remote sensing forestry information-extracting technology].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Peng, Dao-Li

    2011-09-01

    The hyperspectral remote sensing technology has become one of the leading technologies in forestry remote sensing domain. In the present review paper, the advances in researches on hyperspectral remote sensing technology in forestry information extraction both at home and abroad were reviewed, and the five main research aspects including the hyperspectral classification and recognition of forest tree species, the hyperspectral inversion and extraction of forest ecological physical parameters, the hyperspectral monitoring and diagnosis of forest nutrient element, the forest crown density information extraction and the hyperspectral monitoring of forest disasters were summarized. The unresolved problems of hyperspectral technology in the forestry remote sensing applications were pointed out and the possible ways to solve these problems were expounded. Finally, the application prospect of hyperspectral remote sensing technology in forestry was analyzed.

  10. Recent advances in radar remote sensing of forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letoan, Thuy

    1993-01-01

    On a global scale, forests represent most of the terrestrial standing biomass (80 to 90 percent). Thus, natural and anthropogenic change in forest covers can have major impacts not only on local ecosystems but also on global hydrologic, climatic, and biogeochemical cycles that involve exchange of energy, water, carbon, and other elements between the earth and atmosphere. Quantitative information on the state and dynamics of forest ecosystems and their interactions with the global cycles appear necessary to understand how the earth works as a natural system. The information required includes the lateral and vertical distribution of forest cover, the estimates of standing biomass (woody and foliar volume), the phenological and environmental variations and disturbances (clearcutting, fires, flood), and the longer term variations following deforestation (regeneration, successional stages). To this end, seasonal, annual, and decadal information is necessary in order to separate the long term effects in the global ecosystem from short term seasonal and interannual variations. Optical remote sensing has been used until now to study the forest cover at local, regional, and global scales. Radar remote sensing, which provides recent SAR data from space on a regular basis, represents an unique means of consistently monitoring different time scales, at all latitudes and in any atmospheric conditions. Also, SAR data have shown the potential to detect several forest parameters that cannot be inferred from optical data. The differences--and complementarity--lie in the penetration capabilities of SAR data and their sensitivity to dielectric and geometric properties of the canopy volume, whereas optical data are sensitive to the chemical composition of the external foliar layer of the vegetation canopy.

  11. Recent Advances in Maya Studies Using Remotely Sensed Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sever, Tom; Irwin, Daniel; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Peten region of northern Guatemala is one of the last places on earth where major archeological sites remain to be discovered. It was in this region that the Maya civilization began, flourished, and abruptly disappeared. Remote sensing technology is helping to locate and map ancient Maya sites that are threatened today by accelerating deforestation and looting. Thematic Mapper and IKONOS satellite and airborne Star3i radar data, combined with Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, are successfully detecting ancient Maya features such as cities, roadways, canals, and water reservoirs. Satellite imagery is also being used to map the baJos, which are seasonally flooded swamps that cover over 40% of the land surface. The use of bajos for farming has been a source of debate within the professional community for many years. But the recent detection and verification of cultural features within the bajo system by our research team are providing conclusive evidence that the ancient Maya had adapted well to wetland environments from the earliest times and utilized them until the time of the Maya collapse. The combination of water management and bajo farming is an important resource for the future of the current inhabitants who are experiencing rapid population growth. Remote sensing imagery is also demonstrating that in the Preclassic period (600 BC- AD 250), the Maya had already achieved a high organizational level as evidenced by the construction of massive temples and an elaborate inter-connecting roadway system. Although they experienced several setbacks such as droughts and hurricanes, the Maya nevertheless managed the delicate forest ecosystem successfully for several centuries. However, around AD 800, something happened to the Maya to cause their rapid decline and eventual disappearance from the region. The evidence indicates that at this time there was increased climatic dryness, extensive deforestation, overpopulation, and widespread warfare. This raises a

  12. Advanced polychromator systems for remote chemical sensing (LDRD project 52575).

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant; Allen, James Joe

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this LDRD project was to develop a programmable diffraction grating fabricated in SUMMiT V{trademark}. Two types of grating elements (vertical and rotational) were designed and demonstrated. The vertical grating element utilized compound leveraged bending and the rotational grating element used vertical comb drive actuation. This work resulted in two technical advances and one patent application. Also a new optical configuration of the Polychromator was demonstrated. The new optical configuration improved the optical efficiency of the system without degrading any other aspect of the system. The new configuration also relaxes some constraint on the programmable diffraction grating.

  13. Closed-loop focal plane wavefront control with the SCExAO instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinache, Frantz; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Guyon, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Aims: This article describes the implementation of a focal plane based wavefront control loop on the high-contrast imaging instrument SCExAO (Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics). The sensor relies on the Fourier analysis of conventional focal-plane images acquired after an asymmetric mask is introduced in the pupil of the instrument. Methods: This absolute sensor is used here in a closed-loop to compensate for the non-common path errors that normally affects any imaging system relying on an upstream adaptive optics system.This specific implementation was used to control low-order modes corresponding to eight zernike modes (from focus to spherical). Results: This loop was successfully run on-sky at the Subaru Telescope and is used to offset the SCExAO deformable mirror shape used as a zero-point by the high-order wavefront sensor. The paper details the range of errors this wavefront-sensing approach can operate within and explores the impact of saturation of the data and how it can be bypassed, at a cost in performance. Conclusions: Beyond this application, because of its low hardware impact, the asymmetric pupil Fourier wavefront sensor (APF-WFS) can easily be ported in a wide variety of wavefront sensing contexts, for ground- as well space-borne telescopes, and for telescope pupils that can be continuous, segmented or even sparse. The technique is powerful because it measures the wavefront where it really matters, at the level of the science detector.

  14. Recent Advances in Maya Studies Using Remotely Sensed Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sever, Tom; Irwin, Daniel; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Peten region of northern Guatemala is one of the last places on earth where major archeological sites remain to be discovered. It was in this region that the Maya civilization began, flourished, and abruptly disappeared. Remote sensing technology is helping to locate and map ancient Maya sites that are threatened today by accelerating deforestation and looting. Thematic Mapper and IKONOS satellite and airborne Star3i radar data, combined with Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, are successfully detecting ancient Maya features such as cities, roadways, canals, and water reservoirs. Satellite imagery is also being used to map the bajos, which are seasonally flooded swamps that cover over 40% of the land surface. The use of baJos for farming has been a source of debate within the professional community for many years. But the recent detection and verification of cultural features within the baJo system by our research team are providing conclusive evidence that the ancient Maya had adapted well to wetland environments from the earliest times and utilized them until the time of the Maya collapse. The combination of water management and baJo farming is an important resource for the future of the current inhabitants who are experiencing rapid population growth. Remote sensing imagery is also demonstrating that in the Preclassic period (600 BC- AD 250), the Maya had already achieved a high organizational level as evidenced by the construction of massive temples and an elaborate inter-connecting roadway system. Although they experienced several setbacks such as droughts and hurricanes, the Maya nevertheless managed the delicate forest ecosystem successfully for several centuries. However, around AD 800, something happened to the Maya to cause their rapid decline and eventual disappearance from the region. The evidence indicates that at this time there was increased climatic dryness, extensive deforestation, overpopulation, and widespread warfare. This raises a

  15. Wavefront control with a spatial light modulator containing dual-frequency liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Dong-Feng; Winker, Bruce; Wen, Bing; Taber, Don; Brackley, Andrew; Wirth, Allan; Albanese, Marc; Landers, Frank

    2004-10-01

    A versatile, scalable wavefront control approach based upon proven liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology was extended for potential use in high-energy near-infrared laser applications. The reflective LC SLM module demonstrated has a two-inch diameter active aperture with 812 pixels. Using an ultra-low absorption transparent conductor in the LC SLM, a high laser damage threshold was demonstrated. Novel dual frequency liquid crystal materials and addressing schemes were implemented to achieve fast switching speed (<1ms at 1.31 microns). Combining this LCSLM with a novel wavefront sensing method, a closed loop wavefront controller is being demonstrated. Compared to conventional deformable mirrors, this non-mechanical wavefront control approach offers substantial improvements in speed (bandwidth), resolution, power consumption and system weight/volume.

  16. Feasibility study of a layer-oriented wavefront sensor for solar telescopes.

    PubMed

    Marino, Jose; Wöger, Friedrich

    2014-02-01

    Solar multiconjugate adaptive optics systems rely on several wavefront sensors, which measure the incoming turbulent phase along several field directions to produce a tomographic reconstruction of the turbulent phase. In this paper, we explore an alternative wavefront sensing approach that attempts to directly measure the turbulent phase present at a particular height in the atmosphere: a layer-oriented cross-correlating Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS). In an experiment at the Dunn Solar Telescope, we built a prototype layer-oriented cross-correlating SHWFS system conjugated to two separate atmospheric heights. We present the data obtained in the observations and complement these with ray-tracing computations to achieve a better understanding of the instrument's performance and limitations. The results obtained in this study strongly indicate that a layer-oriented cross-correlating SHWFS is not a practical design to measure the wavefront at a high layer in the atmosphere.

  17. Advanced development of internal calibration sources for remote sensing telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kintner, Eric C.; Hartley, Jeanne M.; Jacobs, Eric S.; Cucchiaro, Paul J.

    2004-11-01

    Contemporary and emerging sensor systems typically require in-flight calibration reference sources. These are required to satisfy increasingly stringent specifications for stability, repeatability, dynamic range, absolute irradiance accuracy, and irradiance distribution uniformity, while meeting stray light, weight, and power constraints. While SSG has successfully designed and flight-qualified an internal calibration source for a telescope in a Schmidt configuration, future remote sensing programs are more likely to require telescopes in a 3-mirror off-axis re-imaging configuration. A major advantage to developing an internal calibration reference source for a re-imaging telescope is the availability of an intermediate field stop where the illumination from the calibration source can be inserted into the optical train. SSG's internal source design offers important advantages over existing approaches using in-flight blackbodies, including reduced volume, weight, and power requirements and the ability to generate multiple irradiance levels over a short period of time. The GIFTS (Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer) telescope has been used as a representative platform to demonstrate this new internal calibration source, as it is representative of a design that may be used for future programs including the HES (Hyperspectral Environmental Suite) telescopes.

  18. Advances in Data Management in Remote Sensing and Climate Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, P. G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent commercial interest in "Big Data" information systems has yielded little more than a sense of deja vu among scientists whose work has always required getting their arms around extremely large databases, and writing programs to explore and analyze it. On the flip side, there are some commercial DBMS startups building "Big Data" platform using techniques taken from earth science, astronomy, high energy physics and high performance computing. In this talk, we will introduce one such platform; Paradigm4's SciDB, the first DBMS designed from the ground up to combine the kinds of quality-of-service guarantees made by SQL DBMS platforms—high level data model, query languages, extensibility, transactions—with the kinds of functionality familiar to scientific users—arrays as structural building blocks, integrated linear algebra, and client language interfaces that minimize the learning curve. We will review how SciDB is used to manage and analyze earth science data by several teams of scientific users.

  19. High resolution wavefront measurement of aspheric optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erichsen, I.; Krey, S.; Heinisch, J.; Ruprecht, A.; Dumitrescu, E.

    2008-08-01

    With the recently emerged large volume production of miniature aspheric lenses for a wide range of applications, a new fast fully automatic high resolution wavefront measurement instrument has been developed. The Shack-Hartmann based system with reproducibility better than 0.05 waves is able to measure highly aspheric optics and allows for real time comparison with design data. Integrated advanced analysis tools such as calculation of Zernike coefficients, 2D-Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Point Spread Function (PSF), Strehl-Ratio and the measurement of effective focal length (EFL) as well as flange focal length (FFL) allow for the direct verification of lens properties and can be used in a development as well as in a production environment.

  20. Advanced materials and techniques for fibre-optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Philip J.

    2014-06-01

    Fibre-optic monitoring systems came of age in about 1999 upon the emergence of the world's first significant commercialising company - a spin-out from the UK's collaborative MAST project. By using embedded fibre-optic technology, the MAST project successfully measured transient strain within high-performance composite yacht masts. Since then, applications have extended from smart composites into civil engineering, energy, military, aerospace, medicine and other sectors. Fibre-optic sensors come in various forms, and may be subject to embedment, retrofitting, and remote interrogation. The unique challenges presented by each implementation require careful scrutiny before widespread adoption can take place. Accordingly, various aspects of design and reliability are discussed spanning a range of representative technologies that include resonant microsilicon structures, MEMS, Bragg gratings, advanced forms of spectroscopy, and modern trends in nanotechnology. Keywords: Fibre-optic sensors, fibre Bragg gratings, MEMS, MOEMS, nanotechnology, plasmon.

  1. Advances in remote sensing of the Martian upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronoff, G.; Simon, C.; Mertens, C. J.; Lilensten, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Martian upper atmosphere undergoes large seasonal neutral density variations. Their amplitude on the composition is however unknown, and up to now theoretical studies did not succeed in explaining accurately the observations. "Retrieval" efforts must be done to understand correctly the mesosphere and upper atmosphere of Mars, one of the best strategy being the inversion of IR-UV emissions. Such works involve a better understanding of the present data, and the definition of future dedicated instruments. Thanks to the SPICAM spectrometer onboard Mars Express, recent results include the first unambiguous observation of the double peak of O(1S) in the atmosphere of Mars. Along with other emissions (such as CO(a3Π ) and CO2+(B) ), the atmospheric composition of the main components of the diurnal atmosphere can be retrieved. The retrieval of these atmospheric parameters necessitates to use a forward model. However, uncertainties on that model (especially on the cross sections and reaction rates) could prevent to obtain a good accuracy. In this work, we present the advances in the retrieval of the atmospheric parameters, along with the computation of uncertainties in the forward model and retrieved datasets. We show the need for a NASA/TIMED-like mission to Mars (Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics) to understand the mesosphere-upper atmosphere of Mars, for which we give recommendations on the observing channels and retrieval techniques.

  2. Wavefront-Error Performance Characterization for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) Science Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronstein, David L.; Smith, J. Scott; Zielinski, Thomas P.; Telfer, Randal; Tournois, Severine C.; Moore, Dustin B.; Fienup, James R.

    2016-01-01

    The science instruments (SIs) comprising the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) were tested in three cryogenic-vacuum test campaigns in the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)'s Space Environment Simulator (SES) test chamber. In this paper, we describe the results of optical wavefront-error performance characterization of the SIs. The wavefront error is determined using image-based wavefront sensing, and the primary data used by this process are focus sweeps, a series of images recorded by the instrument under test in its as-used configuration, in which the focal plane is systematically changed from one image to the next. High-precision determination of the wavefront error also requires several sources of secondary data, including 1) spectrum, apodization, and wavefront-error characterization of the optical ground-support equipment (OGSE) illumination module, called the OTE Simulator (OSIM), 2) F-number and pupil-distortion measurements made using a pseudo-nonredundant mask (PNRM), and 3) pupil geometry predictions as a function of SI and field point, which are complicated because of a tricontagon-shaped outer perimeter and small holes that appear in the exit pupil due to the way that different light sources are injected into the optical path by the OGSE. One set of wavefront-error tests, for the coronagraphic channel of the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) Longwave instruments, was performed using data from transverse translation diversity sweeps instead of focus sweeps, in which a sub-aperture is translated and/or rotated across the exit pupil of the system. Several optical-performance requirements that were verified during this ISIM-level testing are levied on the uncertainties of various wavefront-error-related quantities rather than on the wavefront errors themselves. This paper also describes the methodology, based on Monte Carlo simulations of the wavefront-sensing analysis of focus-sweep data, used to establish

  3. Wavefront-Error Performance Characterization for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) Science Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronstein, David L.; Smith, J. Scott; Zielinski, Thomas P.; Telfer, Randal; Tournois, Severine C.; Moore, Dustin B.; Fienup, James R.

    2016-01-01

    The science instruments (SIs) comprising the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) were tested in three cryogenic-vacuum test campaigns in the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)'s Space Environment Simulator (SES). In this paper, we describe the results of optical wavefront-error performance characterization of the SIs. The wavefront error is determined using image-based wavefront sensing (also known as phase retrieval), and the primary data used by this process are focus sweeps, a series of images recorded by the instrument under test in its as-used configuration, in which the focal plane is systematically changed from one image to the next. High-precision determination of the wavefront error also requires several sources of secondary data, including 1) spectrum, apodization, and wavefront-error characterization of the optical ground-support equipment (OGSE) illumination module, called the OTE Simulator (OSIM), 2) plate scale measurements made using a Pseudo-Nonredundant Mask (PNRM), and 3) pupil geometry predictions as a function of SI and field point, which are complicated because of a tricontagon-shaped outer perimeter and small holes that appear in the exit pupil due to the way that different light sources are injected into the optical path by the OGSE. One set of wavefront-error tests, for the coronagraphic channel of the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) Longwave instruments, was performed using data from transverse translation diversity sweeps instead of focus sweeps, in which a sub-aperture is translated andor rotated across the exit pupil of the system.Several optical-performance requirements that were verified during this ISIM-level testing are levied on the uncertainties of various wavefront-error-related quantities rather than on the wavefront errors themselves. This paper also describes the methodology, based on Monte Carlo simulations of the wavefront-sensing analysis of focus-sweep data, used to establish the

  4. Broadband, Common-path, Interferometric Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, James Kent (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid sensors comprising Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor (S-HWFS) and Zernike Wavefront Sensor (Z-WFS) capabilities are presented. The hybrid sensor includes a Z-WFS optically arranged in-line with a S-HWFS such that the combined wavefront sensor operates across a wide dynamic range and noise conditions. The Z-WFS may include the ability to introduce a dynamic phase shift in both transmissive and reflective modes.

  5. Sparse aperture mask wavefront sensor testbed results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, Hari; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Riggs, A. J. E.

    2016-07-01

    Coronagraphic exoplanet detection at very high contrast requires the estimation and control of low-order wave- front aberrations. At Princeton High Contrast Imaging Lab (PHCIL), we are working on a new technique that integrates a sparse-aperture mask (SAM) with a shaped pupil coronagraph (SPC) to make precise estimates of these low-order aberrations. We collect the starlight rejected from the coronagraphic image plane and interfere it using a sparse aperture mask (SAM) at the relay pupil to estimate the low-order aberrations. In our previous work we numerically demonstrated the efficacy of the technique, and proposed a method to sense and control these differential aberrations in broadband light. We also presented early testbed results in which the SAM was used to sense pointing errors. In this paper, we will briefly overview the SAM wavefront sensor technique, explain the design of the completed testbed, and report the experimental estimation results of the dominant low-order aberrations such as tip/tit, astigmatism and focus.

  6. Wavefront reconstruction from tangential and sagittal curvature.

    PubMed

    Canales, Javier; Barbero, Sergio; Portilla, Javier; López-Alonso, José Manuel

    2014-12-10

    In a previous contribution [Appl. Opt.51, 8599 (2012)], a coauthor of this work presented a method for reconstructing the wavefront aberration from tangential refractive power data measured using dynamic skiascopy. Here we propose a new regularized least squares method where the wavefront is reconstructed not only using tangential but also sagittal curvature data. We prove that our new method provides improved quality reconstruction for typical and also for highly aberrated wavefronts, under a wide range of experimental error levels. Our method may be applied to any type of wavefront sensor (not only dynamic skiascopy) able to measure either just tangential or tangential plus sagittal curvature data.

  7. The investigation of advanced remote sensing techniques for the measurement of aerosol characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.; Becher, J.

    1979-01-01

    Advanced remote sensing techniques and inversion methods for the measurement of characteristics of aerosol and gaseous species in the atmosphere were investigated. Of particular interest were the physical and chemical properties of aerosols, such as their size distribution, number concentration, and complex refractive index, and the vertical distribution of these properties on a local as well as global scale. Remote sensing techniques for monitoring of tropospheric aerosols were developed as well as satellite monitoring of upper tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols. Computer programs were developed for solving multiple scattering and radiative transfer problems, as well as inversion/retrieval problems. A necessary aspect of these efforts was to develop models of aerosol properties.

  8. Multivariate assimilation of satellite-derived land remote sensing datasets: Advances, gaps and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Mocko, D. M.; Jasinski, M. F.; Reichle, R. H.; Zaitchik, B. F.; Getirana, A.; Rodell, M.; Xia, Y.; Ek, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing advancements in recent years have enabled monitoring of the Earth's land surface with unprecedented scale and frequency. In the past decade, remote sensing observations of the land surface have become available from a number of satellite instruments and platforms including soil moisture (AMSR-E, ASCAT, AMSR2, SMOS, SMAP), snow depth (AMSR-E, AMSR2), snow cover (MODIS, VIIRS), terrestrial water storage (GRACE) and land surface temperature (MODIS, VIIRS, GOES). To support the effective exploitation of the information content of the remote sensing observations, computational tools such as data assimilation are necessary. In this presentation, I will describe the efforts towards the concurrent use of all available remote sensing observations in a multivariate data assimilation configuration in the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). Though NLDAS has produced over 34 years (Jan 1979 to present) of hourly land-surface meteorology and surface states using the best-available observations and reanalyses for "off-line" land surface model (LSM) simulations, to-date it has not included the assimilation of relevant hydrological remote sensing datasets. The new phase of NLDAS attempts to bridge this gap by assimilating all land relevant datasets in the NLDAS configuration using the NASA Land Information System (LIS). The results from individually assimilating the soil moisture, snow and terrestrial water storage datasets indicate that improvements can be obtained not only in soil moisture and snow states, but also on evapotranspiration and streamflow estimates. The results from the multivariate, multisensor assimilation of the above-mentioned remote sensing datasets in NLDAS and an evaluation of the resulting improvements and trends in soil moisture, snowpack, evapotranspiration and streamflow will also be presented. Through this talk, I will describe the advances made towards the effective utilization of remote sensing data for hydrologic

  9. Advanced Nanoporous Materials for Micro-Gravimetric Sensing to Trace-Level Bio/Chemical Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pengcheng; Li, Xinxin; Yu, Haitao; Xu, Tiegang

    2014-01-01

    Functionalized nanoporous materials have been developed recently as bio/chemical sensing materials. Due to the huge specific surface of the nano-materials for molecular adsorption, high hopes have been placed on gravimetric detection with micro/nano resonant cantilevers for ultra-sensitive sensing of low-concentration bio/chemical substances. In order to enhance selectivity of the gravimetric resonant sensors to the target molecules, it is crucial to modify specific groups onto the pore-surface of the nano-materials. By loading the nanoporous sensing material onto the desired region of the mass-type transducers like resonant cantilevers, the micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensors can be formed. Recently, such micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensors have been successfully applied for rapid or on-the-spot detection of various bio/chemical molecules at the trace-concentration level. The applicable nanoporous sensing materials include mesoporous silica, zeolite, nanoporous graphene oxide (GO) and so on. This review article focuses on the recent achievements in design, preparation, functionalization and characterization of advanced nanoporous sensing materials for micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensing. PMID:25313499

  10. Advanced nanoporous materials for micro-gravimetric sensing to trace-level bio/chemical molecules.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengcheng; Li, Xinxin; Yu, Haitao; Xu, Tiegang

    2014-10-13

    Functionalized nanoporous materials have been developed recently as bio/chemical sensing materials. Due to the huge specific surface of the nano-materials for molecular adsorption, high hopes have been placed on gravimetric detection with micro/nano resonant cantilevers for ultra-sensitive sensing of low-concentration bio/chemical substances. In order to enhance selectivity of the gravimetric resonant sensors to the target molecules, it is crucial to modify specific groups onto the pore-surface of the nano-materials. By loading the nanoporous sensing material onto the desired region of the mass-type transducers like resonant cantilevers, the micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensors can be formed. Recently, such micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensors have been successfully applied for rapid or on-the-spot detection of various bio/chemical molecules at the trace-concentration level. The applicable nanoporous sensing materials include mesoporous silica, zeolite, nanoporous graphene oxide (GO) and so on. This review article focuses on the recent achievements in design, preparation, functionalization and characterization of advanced nanoporous sensing materials for micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensing.

  11. Zernike-like Orthogonal Basis Functions for Wavefront Characterization over Sampled, Irregular Apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronstein, David L.; Dean, Bruce H.; Smith, J. Scott

    2007-01-01

    For optical systems with circular apertures, wavefronts are often analyzed using Zernike polynomials, and individual Zernike functions are associated with familiar optical aberrations. For systems with noncircular apertures, or in practical situations in which wavefronts are measured at a limited number of points in the aperture, the Zernike polynomials are no longer an orthogonal basis for the measured data. Although there are an endless number of ways to create a basis for such measured data, a "Zernike-like" basis is useful to connect with our experience with the usual optical aberrations. In this paper, the steps required to identify a Zernike-like basis for wavefronts over sampled, irregular apertures are presented, based on the Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization technique. The benefits of analyzing optical wavefronts using an orthogonal basis specific to an optical system's aperture shape and wavefront sampling, instead of using the traditional Zernike polynomials, are detailed in two examples, from image-based wavefront sensing on a segmented-aperture telescope (the James Webb Space Telescope Testbed Telescope at Ball Aerospace) and from interferometer characterization for surface metrology of a hexagonal mirror segment.

  12. Recent Advances Combining Remote Sensing Data with Advanced Models to Assess Disturbance Related Plant-Climate Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtt, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem dynamics are strongly influenced by processes of disturbance and recovery across a range of spatial and temporal scales, from large catastrophic events including tropical cyclones, fires, and pest outbreaks, to fine-scale forest canopy gap dynamics. Natural disturbances episodically alter vegetation structure and create important fluxes of carbon from vegetation to coarse woody debris and litter, and can alter land surface properties important for climate. Similarly, anthropogenic disturbances have the capacity to alter important land surface properties. Recovery following disturbances tends to restore vegetation structure and carbon over longer time scales as vegetation regrows and debris decomposes and land surface properties are restored. The complex spatial pattern from a legacy of past events, together with ongoing and potentially changing future events, presents a challenge not only for understanding, but also for prediction. As many disturbance processes are climate related, being climate driven and/or producing affects on climate through biophysical or biogeochemical alterations of the land surface, disturbance is a critical link in understanding plant-climate interactions. Here we review past progress, current results, and future priorities for utilizing remote sensing data in advanced models to understand of the role of disturbance in plant-climate interactions. Recent advances have helped to quantify the long term impacts of hurricanes on forests, account for recent forest disturbance events, quantify the vulnerability of ecosystems to potential future disturbance rates, and project future vegetation change in response to climate change, and reduce uncertainty through improved initial conditions accounting for the history of past disturbance events. Now, a new generation of land use data are being developed constrained by remote sensing to drive the next generation of Earth system models to estimate the effects of anthropogenic

  13. Advancements in Open Geospatial Standards for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing from Ogc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percivall, George; Simonis, Ingo

    2016-06-01

    The necessity of open standards for effective sharing and use of remote sensing continues to receive increasing emphasis in policies of agencies and projects around the world. Coordination on the development of open standards for geospatial information is a vital step to insure that the technical standards are ready to support the policy objectives. The mission of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is to advance development and use of international standards and supporting services that promote geospatial interoperability. To accomplish this mission, OGC serves as the global forum for the collaboration of geospatial data / solution providers and users. Photogrammetry and remote sensing are sources of the largest and most complex geospatial information. Some of the most mature OGC standards for remote sensing include the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) standards, the Web Coverage Service (WCS) suite of standards, encodings such as NetCDF, GMLJP2 and GeoPackage, and the soon to be approved Discrete Global Grid Systems (DGGS) standard. In collaboration with ISPRS, OGC working with government, research and industrial organizations continue to advance the state of geospatial standards for full use of photogrammetry and remote sensing.

  14. A smooth introduction to the wavefront set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouder, Christian; Viet Dang, Nguyen; Hélein, Frédéric

    2014-11-01

    The wavefront set of a distribution describes not only the points where the distribution is singular, but also the ‘directions’ of the singularities. Because of its ability to control the product of distributions, the wavefront set was a key element of recent progress in renormalized quantum field theory in curved spacetime, quantum gravity, the discussion of time machines or quantum energy inequalitites. However, the wavefront set is a somewhat subtle concept whose standard definition is not easy to grasp. This paper is a step-by-step introduction to the wavefront set, with examples and motivation. Many different definitions and new interpretations of the wavefront set are presented. Some of them involve a Radon transform.

  15. High stability wavefront reference source

    DOEpatents

    Feldman, Mark; Mockler, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    A thermally and mechanically stable wavefront reference source which produces a collimated output laser beam. The output beam comprises substantially planar reference wavefronts which are useful for aligning and testing optical interferometers. The invention receives coherent radiation from an input optical fiber, directs a diverging input beam of the coherent radiation to a beam folding mirror (to produce a reflected diverging beam), and collimates the reflected diverging beam using a collimating lens. In a class of preferred embodiments, the invention includes a thermally and mechanically stable frame comprising rod members connected between a front end plate and a back end plate. The beam folding mirror is mounted on the back end plate, and the collimating lens mounted to the rods between the end plates. The end plates and rods are preferably made of thermally stable metal alloy. Preferably, the input optical fiber is a single mode fiber coupled to an input end of a second single mode optical fiber that is wound around a mandrel fixedly attached to the frame of the apparatus. The output end of the second fiber is cleaved so as to be optically flat, so that the input beam emerging therefrom is a nearly perfect diverging spherical wave.

  16. High stability wavefront reference source

    DOEpatents

    Feldman, M.; Mockler, D.J.

    1994-05-03

    A thermally and mechanically stable wavefront reference source which produces a collimated output laser beam is disclosed. The output beam comprises substantially planar reference wavefronts which are useful for aligning and testing optical interferometers. The invention receives coherent radiation from an input optical fiber, directs a diverging input beam of the coherent radiation to a beam folding mirror (to produce a reflected diverging beam), and collimates the reflected diverging beam using a collimating lens. In a class of preferred embodiments, the invention includes a thermally and mechanically stable frame comprising rod members connected between a front end plate and a back end plate. The beam folding mirror is mounted on the back end plate, and the collimating lens mounted to the rods between the end plates. The end plates and rods are preferably made of thermally stable metal alloy. Preferably, the input optical fiber is a single mode fiber coupled to an input end of a second single mode optical fiber that is wound around a mandrel fixedly attached to the frame of the apparatus. The output end of the second fiber is cleaved so as to be optically flat, so that the input beam emerging therefrom is a nearly perfect diverging spherical wave. 7 figures.

  17. NASA capabilities roadmap: advanced telescopes and observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Telescopes and Observatories (ATO) Capability Roadmap addresses technologies necessary for NASA to enable future space telescopes and observatories collecting all electromagnetic bands, ranging from x-rays to millimeter waves, and including gravity-waves. It has derived capability priorities from current and developing Space Missions Directorate (SMD) strategic roadmaps and, where appropriate, has ensured their consistency with other NASA Strategic and Capability Roadmaps. Technology topics include optics; wavefront sensing and control and interferometry; distributed and advanced spacecraft systems; cryogenic and thermal control systems; large precision structure for observatories; and the infrastructure essential to future space telescopes and observatories.

  18. Correction of the wavefront using the irradiance transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, M.; Granados, F.; Cornejo, A.

    2008-07-01

    The correction of the wavefront in optical systems implies the use of wavefront sensors, software, and auxiliary optical systems. We propose evaluated the wavefront using the fact that the wavefront and its intensity are related in the mathematical expression the irradiance transport equation (ITE)

  19. Recent Advances in Registration, Integration and Fusion of Remotely Sensed Data: Redundant Representations and Frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czaja, Wojciech; Le Moigne-Stewart, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, sophisticated mathematical techniques have been successfully applied to the field of remote sensing to produce significant advances in applications such as registration, integration and fusion of remotely sensed data. Registration, integration and fusion of multiple source imagery are the most important issues when dealing with Earth Science remote sensing data where information from multiple sensors, exhibiting various resolutions, must be integrated. Issues ranging from different sensor geometries, different spectral responses, differing illumination conditions, different seasons, and various amounts of noise need to be dealt with when designing an image registration, integration or fusion method. This tutorial will first define the problems and challenges associated with these applications and then will review some mathematical techniques that have been successfully utilized to solve them. In particular, we will cover topics on geometric multiscale representations, redundant representations and fusion frames, graph operators, diffusion wavelets, as well as spatial-spectral and operator-based data fusion. All the algorithms will be illustrated using remotely sensed data, with an emphasis on current and operational instruments.

  20. Scalable analog wavefront sensor with subpixel resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Michael

    2006-06-01

    Standard Shack-Hartman wavefront sensors use a CCD element to sample position and distortion of a target or guide star. Digital sampling of the element and transfer to a memory space for subsequent computation adds significant temporal delay, thus, limiting the spatial frequency and scalability of the system as a wavefront sensor. A new approach to sampling uses information processing principles in an insect compound eye. Analog circuitry eliminates digital sampling and extends the useful range of the system to control a deformable mirror and make a faster, more capable wavefront sensor.

  1. Advances in electrospun carbon fiber-based electrochemical sensing platforms for bioanalytical applications.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xianwen; Tian, Wenda; Hatton, T Alan; Rutledge, Gregory C

    2016-02-01

    Electrochemical sensing is an efficient and inexpensive method for detection of a range of chemicals of biological, clinical, and environmental interest. Carbon materials-based electrodes are commonly employed for the development of electrochemical sensors because of their low cost, biocompatibility, and facile electron transfer kinetics. Electrospun carbon fibers (ECFs), prepared by electrospinning of a polymeric precursor and subsequent thermal treatment, have emerged as promising carbon systems for biosensing applications since the electrochemical properties of these carbon fibers can be easily modified by processing conditions and post-treatment. This review addresses recent progress in the use of ECFs for sensor fabrication and analyte detection. We focus on the modification strategies of ECFs and identification of the key components that impart the bioelectroanalytical activities, and point out the future challenges that must be addressed in order to advance the fundamental understanding of the ECF electrochemistry and to realize the practical applications of ECF-based sensing devices. PMID:26650731

  2. Advances in electrospun carbon fiber-based electrochemical sensing platforms for bioanalytical applications.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xianwen; Tian, Wenda; Hatton, T Alan; Rutledge, Gregory C

    2016-02-01

    Electrochemical sensing is an efficient and inexpensive method for detection of a range of chemicals of biological, clinical, and environmental interest. Carbon materials-based electrodes are commonly employed for the development of electrochemical sensors because of their low cost, biocompatibility, and facile electron transfer kinetics. Electrospun carbon fibers (ECFs), prepared by electrospinning of a polymeric precursor and subsequent thermal treatment, have emerged as promising carbon systems for biosensing applications since the electrochemical properties of these carbon fibers can be easily modified by processing conditions and post-treatment. This review addresses recent progress in the use of ECFs for sensor fabrication and analyte detection. We focus on the modification strategies of ECFs and identification of the key components that impart the bioelectroanalytical activities, and point out the future challenges that must be addressed in order to advance the fundamental understanding of the ECF electrochemistry and to realize the practical applications of ECF-based sensing devices.

  3. Wavefront Control and Image Restoration with Less Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    PseudoDiversity is a method of recovering the wavefront in a sparse- or segmented- aperture optical system typified by an interferometer or a telescope equipped with an adaptive primary mirror consisting of controllably slightly moveable segments. (PseudoDiversity should not be confused with a radio-antenna-arraying method called pseudodiversity.) As in the cases of other wavefront- recovery methods, the streams of wavefront data generated by means of PseudoDiversity are used as feedback signals for controlling electromechanical actuators of the various segments so as to correct wavefront errors and thereby, for example, obtain a clearer, steadier image of a distant object in the presence of atmospheric turbulence. There are numerous potential applications in astronomy, remote sensing from aircraft and spacecraft, targeting missiles, sighting military targets, and medical imaging (including microscopy) through such intervening media as cells or water. In comparison with prior wavefront-recovery methods used in adaptive optics, PseudoDiversity involves considerably simpler equipment and procedures and less computation. For PseudoDiversity, there is no need to install separate metrological equipment or to use any optomechanical components beyond those that are already parts of the optical system to which the method is applied. In Pseudo- Diversity, the actuators of a subset of the segments or subapertures are driven to make the segments dither in the piston, tilt, and tip degrees of freedom. Each aperture is dithered at a unique frequency at an amplitude of a half wavelength of light. During the dithering, images on the focal plane are detected and digitized at a rate of at least four samples per dither period. In the processing of the image samples, the use of different dither frequencies makes it possible to determine the separate effects of the various dithered segments or apertures. The digitized image-detector outputs are processed in the spatial

  4. Zernike wavefront sensor modeling development for LOWFS on WFIRST-AFTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Wallace, J. Kent; Shi, Fang

    2015-09-01

    WFIRST-AFTA design makes use of an existing 2.4m telescope for direct imaging of exoplanets. To maintain the high contrast needed for the coronagraph, wavefront error (WFE) of the optical system needs to be continuously sensed and controlled. Low Order Wavefront Sensing (LOWFS) uses the rejected starlight from an immediate focal plane to sense wavefront changes (mostly thermally induced low order WFE) by combining the LOWFS mask (a phase plate located at the small center region with reflective layer) with the starlight rejection masks, i.e. Hybrid Lyot Coronagraph (HLC)'s occulter or Shaped Pupil Coronagraph (SPC)'s field stop. Zernike wavefront sensor (ZWFS) measures phase via the phase-contrast method and is known to be photon noise optimal for measuring low order aberrations. Recently, ZWFS was selected as the baseline LOWFS technology on WFIST/AFTA for its good sensitivity, accuracy, and its easy integration with the starlight rejection mask. In this paper, we review the theory of ZWFS operation, describe the ZWFS algorithm development, and summarize various numerical sensitivity studies on the sensor performance. In the end, the predicted sensor performance on SPC and HLC configurations are presented.

  5. Optical wavefront shaping for the enhancement of Raman signal in scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Jonathan V.; Throckmorton, Graham A.; Hokr, Brett H.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to non-invasively focus light through scattering media has significant applications in many fields ranging from nanotechnology to deep tissue sensing. Until recently, the multiple light scattering events that occur in complex media such as biological tissue have inhibited the focusing ability and penetration depth of optical tools. Through the use of optical wavefront shaping, the spatial distortions due to these scattering events can be corrected, and the incident light can be focused through the scattering medium. Here, we demonstrate that wavefront shaping can be used to non-invasively enhance the Raman signal of a material through a scattering medium. Raman signal enhancement was achieved using backscattered light and a continuous sequential algorithm. Our results show the potential of wavefront shaping as an important addition to non-invasive detection techniques.

  6. Advanced Remote-Sensing Imaging Emission Spectrometer (ARIES): AIRS Spectral Resolution with MODIS Spatial Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; OCallaghan, Fred

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Remote-sensing Imaging Emission Spectrometer (ARIES) will measure a wide range of earth quantities fundamental to the study of global climate change. It will build upon the success of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instruments currently flying on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft. Both instruments are facility instruments for NASA providing data to thousands of scientists investigating land, ocean and atmospheric Earth System processes. ARIES will meet all the requirements of AIRS and MODIS in a single compact instrument, while providing the next-generation capability of improved spatial resolution for AIRS and improved spectral resolution for MODIS.

  7. Advancements in sensing and perception using structured lighting techniques :an LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, David Keith; Padilla, Denise D.; Davidson, Patrick A. Jr.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2005-09-01

    This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled ''Advancements in Sensing and Perception using Structured Lighting Techniques''. There is an ever-increasing need for robust, autonomous ground vehicles for counterterrorism and defense missions. Although there has been nearly 30 years of government-sponsored research, it is undisputed that significant advancements in sensing and perception are necessary. We developed an innovative, advanced sensing technology for national security missions serving the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and other government agencies. The principal goal of this project was to develop an eye-safe, robust, low-cost, lightweight, 3D structured lighting sensor for use in broad daylight outdoor applications. The market for this technology is wide open due to the unavailability of such a sensor. Currently available laser scanners are slow, bulky and heavy, expensive, fragile, short-range, sensitive to vibration (highly problematic for moving platforms), and unreliable for outdoor use in bright sunlight conditions. Eye-safety issues are a primary concern for currently available laser-based sensors. Passive, stereo-imaging sensors are available for 3D sensing but suffer from several limitations : computationally intensive, require a lighted environment (natural or man-made light source), and don't work for many scenes or regions lacking texture or with ambiguous texture. Our approach leveraged from the advanced capabilities of modern CCD camera technology and Center 6600's expertise in 3D world modeling, mapping, and analysis, using structured lighting. We have a diverse customer base for indoor mapping applications and this research extends our current technology's lifecycle and opens a new market base for outdoor 3D mapping. Applications include precision mapping, autonomous navigation, dexterous manipulation, surveillance and

  8. Clustering of solitons in weakly correlated wavefronts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhigang; Sears, Suzanne M.; Martin, Hector; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Segev, Mordechai

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally the spontaneous clustering of solitons in partially coherent wavefronts during the final stages of pattern formation initiated by modulation instability and noise. PMID:16578870

  9. An ocular wavefront sensor based on binary phase element: design and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sanjay Kumar; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Sharma, Anurag

    2012-07-01

    A modal wavefront sensor for ocular aberrations exhibits two main advantages compared to a conventional Shack-Hartmann sensor. As the wavefront is detected in the Fourier plane, the method is robust against local loss of information (e.g. local opacity of ocular lens as in the case of cataract), and is not dependent on the spatial distribution of wavefront sampling. We have proposed a novel method of wavefront sensing for ocular aberrations that directly detects the strengths of Zernike aberrations. A multiplexed Fourier computer-generated hologram has been designed as the binary phase element (BPE) for the detection of second-order and higher-order ocular aberrations (HOAs). The BPE design has been validated by comparing the simulated far-field pattern with the experimental results obtained by displaying it on a spatial light modulator. Simulation results have demonstrated the simultaneous wavefront detection with an accuracy better that ∼λ/30 for a measurement range of ±2.1λ with reduced cross-talk. Sensor performance is validated by performing a numerical experiment using the City data set for test waves containing second-order and HOAs and measurement errors of 0.065 µm peak-to-valley (PV) and 0.08 µm (PV) have been obtained, respectively.

  10. Compliant deformable mirror approach for wavefront improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, James H.; Penado, F. Ernesto

    2016-04-01

    We describe a compliant static deformable mirror approach to reduce the wavefront concavity at the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI). A single actuator pressing on the back surface of just one of the relay mirrors deforms the front surface in a correcting convex shape. Our design uses the mechanical advantage gained from a force actuator sandwiched between a rear flexure plate and the back surface of the mirror. We superimpose wavefront contour measurements with our finite element deformed mirror model. An example analysis showed improvement from 210-nm concave-concave wavefront to 51-nm concave-concave wavefront. With our present model, a 100-nm actuator increment displaces the mirror surface by 1.1 nm. We describe the need for wavefront improvement that arises from the NPOI reconfigurable array, offer a practical design approach, and analyze the support structure and compliant deformable mirror using the finite element method. We conclude that a 20.3-cm-diameter, 1.9-cm-thick Zerodur® mirror shows that it is possible to deform the reflective surface and cancel out three-fourths of the wavefront deformation without overstressing the material.

  11. Advanced end-to-end fiber optic sensing systems for demanding environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Richard J.; Moslehi, Behzad

    2010-09-01

    Optical fibers are small-in-diameter, light-in-weight, electromagnetic-interference immune, electrically passive, chemically inert, flexible, embeddable into different materials, and distributed-sensing enabling, and can be temperature and radiation tolerant. With appropriate processing and/or packaging, they can be very robust and well suited to demanding environments. In this paper, we review a range of complete end-to-end fiber optic sensor systems that IFOS has developed comprising not only (1) packaged sensors and mechanisms for integration with demanding environments, but (2) ruggedized sensor interrogators, and (3) intelligent decision aid algorithms software systems. We examine the following examples: " Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) optical sensors systems supporting arrays of environmentally conditioned multiplexed FBG point sensors on single or multiple optical fibers: In conjunction with advanced signal processing, decision aid algorithms and reasoners, FBG sensor based structural health monitoring (SHM) systems are expected to play an increasing role in extending the life and reducing costs of new generations of aerospace systems. Further, FBG based structural state sensing systems have the potential to considerably enhance the performance of dynamic structures interacting with their environment (including jet aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and medical or extravehicular space robots). " Raman based distributed temperature sensing systems: The complete length of optical fiber acts as a very long distributed sensor which may be placed down an oil well or wrapped around a cryogenic tank.

  12. Assessment of fiber optic sensors and other advanced sensing technologies for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.

    1996-03-01

    As a result of problems such as calibration drift in nuclear plant pressure sensors and the recent oil loss syndrome in some models of Rosemount pressure transmitters, the nuclear industry has become interested in fiber optic pressure sensors. Fiber optic sensing technologies have been considered for the development of advanced instrumentation and control (I&C) systems for the next generation of reactors and in older plants which are retrofitted with new I&C systems. This paper presents the results of a six-month Phase I study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. This initial Phase I study has recently been granted a two-year extension by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The next phase will evaluate fiber optic pressure sensors in specific nuclear plant applications in addition to other advanced methods for monitoring critical nuclear plant equipment.

  13. Design of Optical Systems with Extended Depth of Field: An Educational Approach to Wavefront Coding Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferran, C.; Bosch, S.; Carnicer, A.

    2012-01-01

    A practical activity designed to introduce wavefront coding techniques as a method to extend the depth of field in optical systems is presented. The activity is suitable for advanced undergraduate students since it combines different topics in optical engineering such as optical system design, aberration theory, Fourier optics, and digital image…

  14. Generalised optical differentiation wavefront sensor: a sensitive high dynamic range wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Haffert, S Y

    2016-08-22

    Current wavefront sensors for high resolution imaging have either a large dynamic range or a high sensitivity. A new kind of wavefront sensor is developed which can have both: the Generalised Optical Differentiation wavefront sensor. This new wavefront sensor is based on the principles of optical differentiation by amplitude filters. We have extended the theory behind linear optical differentiation and generalised it to nonlinear filters. We used numerical simulations and laboratory experiments to investigate the properties of the generalised wavefront sensor. With this we created a new filter that can decouple the dynamic range from the sensitivity. These properties make it suitable for adaptive optic systems where a large range of phase aberrations have to be measured with high precision. PMID:27557179

  15. A Broad-Band Phase-Contrast Wave-Front Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, Eric; Wallace, J. Kent

    2005-01-01

    A broadband phase-contrast wave-front sensor has been proposed as a real-time wave-front sensor in an adaptive-optics system. The proposed sensor would offer an alternative to the Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensors now used in high-order adaptive-optics systems of some astronomical telescopes. Broadband sensing gives higher sensitivity than does narrow-band sensing, and it appears that for a given bandwidth, the sensitivity of the proposed phase-contrast sensor could exceed that of a Shack-Hartmann sensor. Relative to a Shack-Hartmann sensor, the proposed sensor may be optically and mechanically simpler. As described below, an important element of the principle of operation of a phase-contrast wave-front sensor is the imposition of a 90deg phase shift between diffracted and undiffracted parts of the same light beam. In the proposed sensor, this phase shift would be obtained by utilizing the intrinsic 90 phase shift between the transmitted and reflected beams in an ideal (thin, symmetric) beam splitter. This phase shift can be characterized as achromatic or broadband because it is 90deg at every wavelength over a broad wavelength range.

  16. Development of a Pyramid Wave-front Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hadi, Kacem; Vignaux, Mael; Fusco, Thierry

    2013-12-01

    Within the framework of the E-ELT studies, several laboratories are involved on some instruments: HARMONY with its ATLAS adaptive optics [AO] system, EAGLE or EPICS. Most of the AO systems will probably integrate one or several pyramidal wavefront sensors, PWFS (R. Ragazzoni [1]). The coupling in an AO loop and the control in laboratory (then on sky) of this type of sensor is fundamental for the continuation of the projects related to OA systems on the E-ELT. LAM (Laboratory of Astrophysics of Marseille) is involved in particular in the VLT-SPHERE, ATLAS, EPICS projects. For the last few years, our laboratory has been carrying out different R&D activities in AO instrumentation for ELTs. An experimental AO bench is designed and being developed to allow the validation of new wave-front sensing and control concepts [2]. One the objectives of this bench, is the experimental validation of a pyramid WFS. Theoretical investigations on its behavior have been already made. The world's fastest and most sensitive camera system (OCAM2) has been recently developed at LAM (J.L Gach [3], First Light Imaging). Conjugating this advantage with the pyramid concept, we plan to demonstrate a home made Pyramid sensor for Adaptive Optics whose the speed and the precision are the key points. As a joint collaboration with ONERA and Shaktiware, our work aims at the optimization (measurement process, calibration and operation) in laboratory then on the sky of a pyramid sensor dedicated to the first generation instruments for ELTs. The sensor will be implemented on the ONERA ODISSEE AO bench combining thus a pyramid and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. What would give the possibility to compare strictly these two WFS types and make this bench unique in France and even in Europe. Experimental work on laboratory demonstration is undergoing. The status of our development will presented at the conference.

  17. Opportunities for the application of advanced remotely-sensed data in ecological studies of terrestrial animal movement.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Wiebke; Martinuzzi, Sebastian; Estes, Anna B; Pidgeon, Anna M; Dettki, Holger; Ericsson, Göran; Radeloff, Volker C

    2015-01-01

    Animal movement patterns in space and time are a central aspect of animal ecology. Remotely-sensed environmental indices can play a key role in understanding movement patterns by providing contiguous, relatively fine-scale data that link animal movements to their environment. Still, implementation of newly available remotely-sensed data is often delayed in studies of animal movement, calling for a better flow of information to researchers less familiar with remotely-sensed data applications. Here, we reviewed the application of remotely-sensed environmental indices to infer movement patterns of animals in terrestrial systems in studies published between 2002 and 2013. Next, we introduced newly available remotely-sensed products, and discussed their opportunities for animal movement studies. Studies of coarse-scale movement mostly relied on satellite data representing plant phenology or climate and weather. Studies of small-scale movement frequently used land cover data based on Landsat imagery or aerial photographs. Greater documentation of the type and resolution of remotely-sensed products in ecological movement studies would enhance their usefulness. Recent advancements in remote sensing technology improve assessments of temporal dynamics of landscapes and the three-dimensional structures of habitats, enabling near real-time environmental assessment. Online movement databases that now integrate remotely-sensed data facilitate access to remotely-sensed products for movement ecologists. We recommend that animal movement studies incorporate remotely-sensed products that provide time series of environmental response variables. This would facilitate wildlife management and conservation efforts, as well as the predictive ability of movement analyses. Closer collaboration between ecologists and remote sensing experts could considerably alleviate the implementation gap. Ecologists should not expect that indices derived from remotely-sensed data will be directly

  18. Self-calibration for transmitted wavefront measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bergner, Brent C.; Davies, Angela

    2007-01-01

    Micro-optic components and subsystems are becoming increasingly important in optical sensors, communications, data storage, and many other diverse applications. To adequately predict the performance of the final system, it is important to understand the element's effect on the wavefront as it propagates through the system. The wavefront can be measured using interferometric means, however, random and systematic errors contribute to the measurement. Self-calibration techniques exploit symmetries of the measurement or averaging techniques to separate the systematic errors of the instrument from the errors in the test lens. If the transmitted wavefront of a ball lens is measured in a number of random orientations and the measurements are averaged, the only remaining deviations from a perfect wavefront will be spherical aberration from the ball lens and the systematic errors of the interferometer. If the radius, aperture, and focal length of the ball lens are known, the spherical aberration can be calculated and subtracted, leaving only the systematic errors of the interferometer. We develop the theory behind the technique and illustrate the approach with a description of the calibration of a microinterferometer used to measure the transmitted wavefront error of micro-optics.

  19. Variability of wavefront aberration measurements in small pupil sizes using a clinical Shack-Hartmann aberrometer

    PubMed Central

    Ginis, Harilaos S; Plainis, Sotiris; Pallikaris, Aristophanis

    2004-01-01

    Background Recently, instruments for the measurement of wavefront aberration in the living human eye have been widely available for clinical applications. Despite the extensive background experience on wavefront sensing for research purposes, the information derived from such instrumentation in a clinical setting should not be considered a priori precise. We report on the variability of such an instrument at two different pupil sizes. Methods A clinical aberrometer (COAS Wavefront Scienses, Ltd) based on the Shack-Hartmann principle was employed in this study. Fifty consecutive measurements were perfomed on each right eye of four subjects. We compared the variance of individual Zernike expansion coefficients as determined by the aberrometer with the variance of coefficients calculated using a mathematical method for scaling the expansion coefficients to reconstruct wavefront aberration for a reduced-size pupil. Results Wavefront aberration exhibits a marked variance of the order of 0.45 microns near the edge of the pupil whereas the central part appears to be measured more consistently. Dispersion of Zernike expansion coefficients was lower when calculated by the scaling method for a pupil diameter of 3 mm as compared to the one introduced when only the central 3 mm of the Shack – Hartmann image was evaluated. Signal-to-noise ratio was lower for higher order aberrations than for low order coefficients corresponding to the sphero-cylindrical error. For each subject a number of Zernike expansion coefficients was below noise level and should not be considered trustworthy. Conclusion Wavefront aberration data used in clinical care should not be extracted from a single measurement, which represents only a static snapshot of a dynamically changing aberration pattern. This observation must be taken into account in order to prevent ambiguous conclusions in clinical practice and especially in refractive surgery. PMID:15018630

  20. Advances in Remote Sensing of Vegetation Merging NDVI, Soil Moisture, and Chlorophyll Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Compton

    2016-04-01

    I will describe an advance in remote sensing of vegetation in the time domain that combines simultaneous measurements of the normalized difference vegetation index, soil moisture, and chlorophyll fluorescence, all from different satellite sensors but acquired for the same areas at the same time step. The different sensor data are MODIS NDVI data from both Terra and Aqua platforms, soil moisture data from SMOS & SMP (aka SMAP but with only the passive radiometer), and chlorophyll fluorescence data from GOME-2. The complementary combination of these data provide important crop yield information for agricultural production estimates at critical phenological times in the growing season, provide a scientific basis to map land degradation, and enable quantitative determination of the end of the growing season in temperate zones.

  1. Advanced optical sensing and processing technologies for the distributed control of large flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, G. M.; Fraser, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to examine state-of-the-art optical sensing and processing technology applied to control the motion of flexible spacecraft. Proposed large flexible space systems, such an optical telescopes and antennas, will require control over vast surfaces. Most likely distributed control will be necessary involving many sensors to accurately measure the surface. A similarly large number of actuators must act upon the system. The used technical approach included reviewing proposed NASA missions to assess system needs and requirements. A candidate mission was chosen as a baseline study spacecraft for comparison of conventional and optical control components. Control system requirements of the baseline system were used for designing both a control system containing current off-the-shelf components and a system utilizing electro-optical devices for sensing and processing. State-of-the-art surveys of conventional sensor, actuator, and processor technologies were performed. A technology development plan is presented that presents a logical, effective way to develop and integrate advancing technologies.

  2. Recent Advances in Intracellular and In Vivo ROS Sensing: Focus on Nanoparticle and Nanotube Applications

    PubMed Central

    Uusitalo, Larissa M.; Hempel, Nadine

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are increasingly being implicated in the regulation of cellular signaling cascades. Intracellular ROS fluxes are associated with cellular function ranging from proliferation to cell death. Moreover, the importance of subtle, spatio-temporal shifts in ROS during localized cellular signaling events is being realized. Understanding the biochemical nature of the ROS involved will enhance our knowledge of redox-signaling. An ideal intracellular sensor should therefore resolve real-time, localized ROS changes, be highly sensitive to physiologically relevant shifts in ROS and provide specificity towards a particular molecule. For in vivo applications issues such as bioavailability of the probe, tissue penetrance of the signal and signal-to-noise ratio also need to be considered. In the past researchers have heavily relied on the use of ROS-sensitive fluorescent probes and, more recently, genetically engineered ROS sensors. However, there is a great need to improve on current methods to address the above issues. Recently, the field of molecular sensing and imaging has begun to take advantage of the unique physico-chemical properties of nanoparticles and nanotubes. Here we discuss the recent advances in the use of these nanostructures as alternative platforms for ROS sensing, with particular emphasis on intracellular and in vivo ROS detection and quantification. PMID:23109815

  3. Development of an ultrahigh-performance infrared detector platform for advanced spectroscopic sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Manish; Wicks, Gary; Marshall, Andrew; Craig, Adam; Golding, Terry; Hossain, Khalid; McEwan, Ken; Howle, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Laser-based stand-off sensing of threat agents (e.g. explosives, toxic industrial chemicals or chemical warfare agents), by detection of distinct infrared spectral absorption signature of these materials, has made significant advances recently. This is due in part to the availability of infrared and terahertz laser sources with significantly improved power and tunability. However, there is a pressing need for a versatile, high performance infrared sensor that can complement and enhance the recent advances achieved in laser technology. This work presents new, high performance infrared detectors based on III-V barrier diodes. Unipolar barrier diodes, such as the nBn, have been very successful in the MWIR using InAs(Sb)-based materials, and in the MWIR and LWIR using type-II InAsSb/InAs superlattice-based materials. This work addresses the extension of the barrier diode architecture into the SWIR region, using GaSb-based and InAs-based materials. The program has resulted in detectors with unmatched performance in the 2-3 μm spectral range. Temperature dependent characterization has shown dark currents to be diffusion limited and equal to, or within a factor of 5, of the Rule 07 expression for Auger-limited HgCdTe detectors. Furthermore, D* values are superior to those of existing detectors in the 2-3 μm band. Of particular significance to spectroscopic sensing systems is the ability to have near-background limited performance at operation temperatures compatible with robust and reliable solid state thermoelectric coolers.

  4. Summary of NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory Capability Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Feinberg, Lee

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory (ATO) Capability Roadmap addresses technologies necessary for NASA to enable future space telescopes and observatories operating in all electromagnetic bands, from x-rays to millimeter waves, and including gravity-waves. It lists capability priorities derived from current and developing Space Missions Directorate (SMD) strategic roadmaps. Technology topics include optics; wavefront sensing and control and interferometry; distributed and advanced spacecraft systems; cryogenic and thermal control systems; large precision structure for observatories; and the infrastructure essential to future space telescopes and observatories.

  5. Summary of NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory Capability Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Phil; Feinberg, Lee

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Telescope and Observatory (ATO) Capability Roadmap addresses technologies necessary for NASA to enable future space telescopes and observatories operating in all electromagnetic bands, from x-rays to millimeter waves, and including gravity-waves. It lists capability priorities derived from current and developing Space Missions Directorate (SMD) strategic roadmaps. Technology topics include optics; wavefront sensing and control and interferometry; distributed and advanced spacecraft systems; cryogenic and thermal control systems; large precision structure for observatories; and the infrastructure essential to future space telescopes and observatories.

  6. Visual optics under the wavefront perspective.

    PubMed

    Faria-e-Sousa, Sidney Júlio; Victor, Gustavo; Alves, Milton Ruiz

    2014-08-01

    Some intriguing concepts of visual optics cannot be explained by ray tracing. However, they can be clarified using wavefront formalism. Its main advantage is in the use of the concept of vergence, which is very helpful in interpreting the optical phenomena involved in the neutralization of the ametropias. In this line of thinking, the major role of a lens is in the creation of a new light source (the image point) that orientates the refracted waves. Once the nature and position of this source is known, one can easily predict the behavior of the wavefronts. The formalism also allows for an easier understanding on how wavefronts relate to light rays and on how algebraic signs are assigned to optical distances.

  7. Wavefront control for the Gemini Planet Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Veran, J; Dillon, D; Severson, S; Macintosh, B

    2006-04-14

    The wavefront control strategy for the proposed Gemini Planet Imager, an extreme adaptive optics coronagraph for planet detection, is presented. Two key parts of this strategy are experimentally verified in a testbed at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics, which features a 32 x 32 MEMS device. Detailed analytic models and algorithms for Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor alignment and calibration are presented. It is demonstrated that with these procedures, the spatially filtered WFS and the Fourier Transform reconstructor can be used to flatten to the MEMS to 1 nm RMS in the controllable band. Performance is further improved using the technique of modifying the reference slopes using a measurement of the static wavefront error in the science leg.

  8. Feedback controlled optics with wavefront compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, William G. (Inventor); Redding, David C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The sensitivity model of a complex optical system obtained by linear ray tracing is used to compute a control gain matrix by imposing the mathematical condition for minimizing the total wavefront error at the optical system's exit pupil. The most recent deformations or error states of the controlled segments or optical surfaces of the system are then assembled as an error vector, and the error vector is transformed by the control gain matrix to produce the exact control variables which will minimize the total wavefront error at the exit pupil of the optical system. These exact control variables are then applied to the actuators controlling the various optical surfaces in the system causing the immediate reduction in total wavefront error observed at the exit pupil of the optical system.

  9. Wavefront-error performance characterization for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) science instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronstein, David L.; Smith, J. S.; Zielinski, Thomas P.; Telfer, Randal; Tournois, Severine C.; Moore, Dustin B.; Fienup, James R.

    2016-07-01

    The science instruments (SIs) comprising the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) were tested in three cryogenic-vacuum test campaigns in the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)'s Space Environment Simulator (SES) test chamber. In this paper, we describe the results of optical wavefront-error performance characterization of the SIs. The wavefront error is determined using image-based wavefront sensing, and the primary data used by this process are focus sweeps, a series of images recorded by the instrument under test in its as-used configuration, in which the focal plane is systematically changed from one image to the next. High-precision determination of the wavefront error also requires several sources of secondary data, including 1) spectrum, apodization, and wavefront-error characterization of the optical ground-support equipment (OGSE) illumination module, called the OTE Simulator (OSIM), 2) f/# and pupil-distortion measurements made using a pseudo-nonredundant mask (PNRM), and 3) pupil-geometry predictions for each SI field point tested, which are complicated because of a tricontagon-shaped outer perimeter and small holes that appear in the exit pupil due to the way that different light sources are injected into the optical path by the OGSE. One set of wavefront-error tests, for the coronagraphic channel of the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) Longwave instruments, was performed using data from transverse-translation diversity (TTD) sweeps instead of focus sweeps, in which a subaperture is translated and/or rotated across the exit pupil of the system from one image to the next. Several optical-performance requirements that were verified during this ISIM Element-level testing are levied on the uncertainties of various wavefront-error-related quantities rather than on the wavefront errors themselves. This paper also gives an overview of the methodology, based on Monte Carlo simulations of the wavefront-sensing analysis

  10. Hyperspectral imaging camera using wavefront division interference.

    PubMed

    Bahalul, Eran; Bronfeld, Asaf; Epshtein, Shlomi; Saban, Yoram; Karsenty, Avi; Arieli, Yoel

    2016-03-01

    An approach for performing hyperspectral imaging is introduced. The hyperspectral imaging is based on Fourier transform spectroscopy, where the interference is performed by wavefront division interference rather than amplitude division interference. A variable phase delay between two parts of the wavefront emanating from each point of an object is created by a spatial light modulator (SLM) to obtain variable interference patterns. The SLM is placed in the exit pupil of an imaging system, thus enabling conversion of a general imaging optical system into an imaging hyperspectral optical system. The physical basis of the new approach is introduced, and an optical apparatus is built. PMID:26974085

  11. Remotely-Sensed Glacial Velocities: Mt. Shasta Advance vs. Sierra Nevada Retreat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. A.; Bookhagen, B.; Burbank, D. W.

    2008-12-01

    Monitoring changes in alpine glaciers is crucial to understanding the impacts of global climate change because alpine glacier systems respond quickly to changes in the earth´s climate. The glaciers of the Sierra Nevada and southern Cascades are of particular interest because they provide a major water reservoir to the state of California. Oddly, while most glaciers worldwide (including in the Sierra Nevada) are retreating, glaciers in northern California are advancing, and examining differences between these two locations will help resolve this paradox. Whereas previous studies have mapped the spatial extents of glaciers from aerial and satellite imagery, this study utilizes glacial velocities as a monitoring tool to examine the differences of the glaciers in the Sierra Nevada and on Mount Shasta. Using the program COSI-Corr in ENVI, horizontal surface ice flow velocities are calculated at the subpixel level from a time-series of co-registered, orthorectified, and correlated, late-summer satellite imagery. Through a combination of 15-meter Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission Radiometer (ASTER) and 5-meter SPOT imagery, orthorectified using a 15-meter resampled Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM), glacial velocities are derived on major glaciers on Mount Shasta and in the Palisades of the Sierra Nevada for 2000-2008. This study demonstrates the utility of combining various types of remote sensing imagery to create a complete time record, and from this record derive glacial velocities for use in monitoring climate change effectively.

  12. Concepts, laboratory, and telescope test results of the plenoptic camera as a wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Ramos, L. F.; Montilla, I.; Fernández-Valdivia, J. J.; Trujillo-Sevilla, J. L.; Rodríguez-Ramos, J. M.

    2012-07-01

    The plenoptic camera has been proposed as an alternative wavefront sensor adequate for extended objects within the context of the design of the European Solar Telescope (EST), but it can also be used with point sources. Originated in the field of the Electronic Photography, the plenoptic camera directly samples the Light Field function, which is the four - dimensional representation of all the light entering a camera. Image formation can then be seen as the result of the photography operator applied to this function, and many other features of the light field can be exploited to extract information of the scene, like depths computation to extract 3D imaging or, as it will be specifically addressed in this paper, wavefront sensing. The underlying concept of the plenoptic camera can be adapted to the case of a telescope by using a lenslet array of the same f-number placed at the focal plane, thus obtaining at the detector a set of pupil images corresponding to every sampled point of view. This approach will generate a generalization of Shack-Hartmann, Curvature and Pyramid wavefront sensors in the sense that all those could be considered particular cases of the plenoptic wavefront sensor, because the information needed as the starting point for those sensors can be derived from the plenoptic image. Laboratory results obtained with extended objects, phase plates and commercial interferometers, and even telescope observations using stars and the Moon as an extended object are presented in the paper, clearly showing the capability of the plenoptic camera to behave as a wavefront sensor.

  13. Exact wavefront surface refracted by a smooth arbitrary surface considering a plane wavefront incident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avendaño-Alejo, Maximino M.

    2015-08-01

    We study the formation of wavefronts produced by smooth arbitrary surfaces with symmetry of revolution considering a plane wavefront propagating parallel to the optical axis and impinging on the refracting surface. The wavefronts are obtained by using the Malus-Dupin theorem and they represent the monochromatic aberrations which can be called image errors, furthermore their shapes could be modified by changing the parameters of the lens in such a way that if a caustic surface is vanished the optical system produces a perfect image, on the other hand for a caustic possessing a large area it could be applied to design non-imaging optical systems. The shape of the wavefront depends only on the indices of refraction and geometrical properties of the refracting surface such as the first derivative and their parameters associated. This analytic formula has potential applications in the microscopy field, illumination or corrector plates.

  14. Experimental results of ground-layer and tomographic wavefront reconstruction from multiple laser guide stars.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Hart, Michael; Baranec, Christoph; Milton, N Mark; Snyder, Miguel; Stalcup, Thomas; Angel, J Roger P

    2006-08-21

    We describe results from the first multi-laser wavefront sensing system designed to support tomographic modes of adaptive optics (AO). The system, now operating at the 6.5 m MMT telescope in Arizona, creates five beacons by Rayleigh scattering of laser beams at 532 nm integrated over a range from 20 to 29 km by dynamic refocus of the telescope optics. The return light is analyzed by a Shack-Hartmann sensor that places all five beacons on a single detector, with electronic shuttering to implement the beacon range gate. A separate high-order Shack-Hartmann sensor records simultaneous measurements of wavefronts from a natural star. From open-loop measurements, we find the average beacon wavefront gives a good estimate of ground layer aberration. We present results of full tomographic wavefront analysis, enabled by supplementing the laser data with simultaneous fast image motion measurements from three stars in the field. We describe plans for an early demonstration at the MMT of closed-loop ground layer AO, and later tomographic AO.

  15. Depth aberrations characterization in linear and nonlinear microscopy schemes using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles-Espinosa, Rodrigo; Andilla, Jordi; Porcar-Guezenec, Rafael; Levecq, Xavier; Artigas, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2012-03-01

    The performance of imaging devices such as linear and nonlinear microscopes (NLM) can be limited by the optical properties of the imaged sample. Such an important aspect has already been described using theoretical models due to the difficulties of implementing a direct wavefront sensing scheme. However, these only stand for simple interfaces and cannot be generalized to biological samples given its structural complexity. This has leaded to the development of sensor-less adaptive optics (AO) implementations. In this approach, aberrations are iteratively corrected trough an image related parameter (aberrations are not measured), being prone of causing sample damage. In this work, we perform a practical implementation of a Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor to compensate for sample induced aberrations, demonstrating its applicability in linear and NLM. We perform an extensive analysis of wavefront distortion effects through different depths employing phantom samples. Aberration effects originated by the refractive index mismatch and depth are quantified using the linear and nonlinear guide-star concept. More over we analyze offaxis aberrations in NLM, an important aspect that is commonly overlooked. In this case spherical aberration behaves similarly to the wavefront error compared with the on-axis case. Finally we give examples of aberration compensation using epi-fluorescence and nonlinear microscopy.

  16. X-ray pulse wavefront metrology using speckle tracking

    PubMed Central

    Berujon, Sebastien; Ziegler, Eric; Cloetens, Peter

    2015-01-01

    An instrument allowing the quantitative analysis of X-ray pulsed wavefronts is presented and its processing method explained. The system relies on the X-ray speckle tracking principle to accurately measure the phase gradient of the X-ray beam from which beam optical aberrations can be deduced. The key component of this instrument, a semi-transparent scintillator emitting visible light while transmitting X-rays, allows simultaneous recording of two speckle images at two different propagation distances from the X-ray source. The speckle tracking procedure for a reference-less metrology mode is described with a detailed account on the advanced processing schemes used. A method to characterize and compensate for the imaging detector distortion, whose principle is also based on speckle, is included. The presented instrument is expected to find interest at synchrotrons and at the new X-ray free-electron laser sources under development worldwide where successful exploitation of beams relies on the availability of an accurate wavefront metrology. PMID:26134791

  17. X-ray pulse wavefront metrology using speckle tracking.

    PubMed

    Berujon, Sebastien; Ziegler, Eric; Cloetens, Peter

    2015-07-01

    An instrument allowing the quantitative analysis of X-ray pulsed wavefronts is presented and its processing method explained. The system relies on the X-ray speckle tracking principle to accurately measure the phase gradient of the X-ray beam from which beam optical aberrations can be deduced. The key component of this instrument, a semi-transparent scintillator emitting visible light while transmitting X-rays, allows simultaneous recording of two speckle images at two different propagation distances from the X-ray source. The speckle tracking procedure for a reference-less metrology mode is described with a detailed account on the advanced processing schemes used. A method to characterize and compensate for the imaging detector distortion, whose principle is also based on speckle, is included. The presented instrument is expected to find interest at synchrotrons and at the new X-ray free-electron laser sources under development worldwide where successful exploitation of beams relies on the availability of an accurate wavefront metrology. PMID:26134791

  18. Fourier optics for wavefront engineering and wavelength control of lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Romain

    Since their initial demonstration in 1994, quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have become prominent sources of mid-infrared radiation. Over the years, a large scientific and engineering effort has led to a dramatic improvement in their efficiency and power output, with continuous wave operation at room temperature and Watt-level output power now standard. However, beyond this progress, new functionalities and capabilities need to be added to this compact source to enable its integration into consumer-ready systems. Two main areas of development are particularly relevant from an application standpoint and were pursued during the course of this thesis: wavelength control and wavefront engineering of QCLs. The first research direction, wavelength control, is mainly driven by spectroscopic applications of QCLs, such as trace gas sensing, process monitoring or explosive detection. We demonstrated three different capabilities, corresponding to different potential spectroscopic measurement techniques: widely tunable single longitudinal mode lasing, simultaneous lasing on multiple well-defined longitudinal modes, and simultaneous lasing over a broad and continuous range of the spectrum. The second research direction, wavefront engineering of QCLs, i.e. the improvement of their beam quality, is relevant for applications necessitating transmission of the QCL output over a large distance, for example for remote sensing or military countermeasures. To address this issue, we developed plasmonic lenses directly integrated on the facets of QCLs. The plasmonic structures designed are analogous to antenna arrays imparting directionality to the QCLs, as well as providing means for polarization control. Finally, a research interest in plasmonics led us to design passive flat optical elements using plasmonic antennas. All these projects are tied together by the involvement of Fourier analysis as an essential design tool to predict the interaction of light with various gratings and periodic

  19. Method and apparatus for holographic wavefront diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1995-01-01

    A wavefront diagnostic apparatus has an optic and a measuring system. The optic forms a holographic image in response to a beam of light striking a hologram formed on a surface of the optic. The measuring system detects the position of the array of holographic images and compares the positions of the array of holographic images to a reference holographic image.

  20. 2D Wavefront Sensor Analysis and Control

    1996-02-19

    This software is designed for data acquisition and analysis of two dimensional wavefront sensors. The software includes data acquisition and control functions for an EPIX frame grabber to acquire data from a computer and all the appropriate analysis functions necessary to produce and display intensity and phase information. This software is written in Visual Basic for windows.

  1. Method and apparatus for holographic wavefront diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, J.S.

    1995-04-25

    A wavefront diagnostic apparatus has an optic and a measuring system. The optic forms a holographic image in response to a beam of light striking a hologram formed on a surface of the optic. The measuring system detects the position of the array of holographic images and compares the positions of the array of holographic images to a reference holographic image. 3 figs.

  2. Tomographic wavefront correction for the LSST

    SciTech Connect

    Phillion, D W; Olivier, S S; Baker, K; Seppala, L; Hvisc, S

    2006-05-03

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is a three mirror modified Paul-Baker design with an 8.4m primary, a 3.4m secondary, and a 5.0m tertiary followed by a 3-element refractive corrector producing a 3.5 degree field of view. This design produces image diameters of <0.3 arcsecond 80% encircled energy over its full field of view. The image quality of this design is sufficient to ensure that the final images produced by the telescope will be limited by the atmospheric seeing at an excellent astronomical site. In order to maintain this image quality, the deformations and rigid body motions of the three large mirrors must be actively controlled to minimize optical aberrations. By measuring the optical wavefront produced by the telescope at multiple points in the field, mirror deformations and rigid body motions that produce a good optical wavefront across the entire field may be determined. We will describe the details of the techniques for obtaining these solutions. We will show that, for the expected mirror deformations and rigid body misalignments, the solutions that are found using these techniques produce an image quality over the field that is close to optimal. We will discuss how many wavefront sensors are needed and the tradeoffs between the number of wavefront sensors, their layout and noise sensitivity.

  3. Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks for Advanced Soil Sensing and Ecosystem Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollenhauer, Hannes; Schima, Robert; Remmler, Paul; Mollenhauer, Olaf; Hutschenreuther, Tino; Toepfer, Hannes; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2015-04-01

    For an adequate characterization of ecosystems it is necessary to detect individual processes with suitable monitoring strategies and methods. Due to the natural complexity of all environmental compartments, single point or temporally and spatially fixed measurements are mostly insufficient for an adequate representation. The application of mobile wireless sensor networks for soil and atmosphere sensing offers significant benefits, due to the simple adjustment of the sensor distribution, the sensor types and the sample rate (e.g. by using optimization approaches or event triggering modes) to the local test conditions. This can be essential for the monitoring of heterogeneous and dynamic environmental systems and processes. One significant advantage in the application of mobile ad-hoc wireless sensor networks is their self-organizing behavior. Thus, the network autonomously initializes and optimizes itself. Due to the localization via satellite a major reduction in installation and operation costs and time is generated. In addition, single point measurements with a sensor are significantly improved by measuring at several optimized points continuously. Since performing analog and digital signal processing and computation in the sensor nodes close to the sensors a significant reduction of the data to be transmitted can be achieved which leads to a better energy management of nodes. Furthermore, the miniaturization of the nodes and energy harvesting are current topics under investigation. First results of field measurements are given to present the potentials and limitations of this application in environmental science. In particular, collected in-situ data with numerous specific soil and atmosphere parameters per sensor node (more than 25) recorded over several days illustrates the high performance of this system for advanced soil sensing and soil-atmosphere interaction monitoring. Moreover, investigations of biotic and abiotic process interactions and optimization

  4. Modular, Reconfigurable, and Rapid Response Space Systems: The Remote Sensing Advanced Technology Microsatellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime; Andary, Jim; Oberright, John; So, Maria; Wegner, Peter; Hauser, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Modular, Reconfigurable, and Rapid-response (MR(sup 2)) space systems represent a paradigm shift in the way space assets of all sizes are designed, manufactured, integrated, tested, and flown. This paper will describe the MR(sup 2) paradigm in detail, and will include guidelines for its implementation. The Remote Sensing Advanced Technology microsatellite (RSAT) is a proposed flight system test-bed used for developing and implementing principles and best practices for MR(sup 2) spacecraft, and their supporting infrastructure. The initial goal of this test-bed application is to produce a lightweight (approx. 100 kg), production-minded, cost-effective, and scalable remote sensing micro-satellite capable of high performance and broad applicability. Such applications range from future distributed space systems, to sensor-webs, and rapid-response satellite systems. Architectures will be explored that strike a balance between modularity and integration while preserving the MR(sup 2) paradigm. Modularity versus integration has always been a point of contention when approaching a design: whereas one-of-a-kind missions may require close integration resulting in performance optimization, multiple and flexible application spacecraft benefit &om modularity, resulting in maximum flexibility. The process of building spacecraft rapidly (< 7 days), requires a concerted and methodical look at system integration and test processes and pitfalls. Although the concept of modularity is not new and was first developed in the 1970s by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (Multi-Mission Modular Spacecraft), it was never modernized and was eventually abandoned. Such concepts as the Rapid Spacecraft Development Office (RSDO) became the preferred method for acquiring satellites. Notwithstanding, over the past 30 years technology has advanced considerably, and the time is ripe to reconsider modularity in its own right, as enabler of R(sup 2), and as a key element of transformational systems. The

  5. A multi-tiered wavefront sensor using binary optics

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.R.; Warren, M.E.; Gruetzner, J.K.; Smith, T.G.; Rosenthal, R.R.; McKechnie, T.S.

    1994-05-01

    Wavefront sensors have been used to make measurements in fluid- dynamics and for closed loop control of adaptive optics. In most common Shack-Hartmann wavefront wavefront sensors, the light is broken up into series of rectangular or hexagonal apertures that divide the light into a series of focal spots. The position of these focal spots is used to determine the wavefront slopes over each subaperture. Using binary optics technology, we have developed a hierarchical or fractal wavefront sensor that divides the subapertures up on a more optimal fashion. We have demonstrated this concept for up to four tiers and developed the wavefront reconstruction methods for both segmented adaptive optics and continous wavefront measurement.

  6. Advances in Remote Sensing Approaches for Hazard Mitigation and Natural Resource Protection in Pacific Latin America: A Workshop for Advanced Graduate Students, Post- Doctoral Researchers, and Junior Faculty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierke, J. S.; Rose, W. I.; Waite, G. P.; Palma, J. L.; Gross, E. L.

    2008-12-01

    Though much of the developing world has the potential to gain significantly from remote sensing techniques in terms of public health and safety, they often lack resources for advancing the development and practice of remote sensing. All countries share a mutual interest in furthering remote sensing capabilities for natural hazard mitigation and resource development. With National Science Foundation support from the Partnerships in International Research and Education program, we are developing a new educational system of applied research and engineering for advancing collaborative linkages among agencies and institutions in Pacific Latin American countries (to date: Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, and Ecuador) in the development of remote sensing tools for hazard mitigation and water resources management. The project aims to prepare students for careers in science and engineering through their efforts to solve suites of problems needing creative solutions: collaboration with foreign agencies; living abroad immersed in different cultures; and adapting their academic training to contend with potentially difficult field conditions and limited resources. The ultimate goal of integrating research with education is to encourage cross-disciplinary, creative, and critical thinking in problem solving and foster the ability to deal with uncertainty in analyzing problems and designing appropriate solutions. In addition to traditional approaches for graduate and undergraduate research, we have built new educational systems of applied research and engineering: (1) the Peace Corp/Master's International program in Natural Hazards which features a 2-year field assignment during service in the U.S. Peace Corps, (2) the Michigan Tech Enterprise program for undergraduates, which gives teams of students from different disciplines the opportunity to work for three years in a business-like setting to solve real-world problems, and (3) a unique university exchange

  7. TiO2 Nanotubes: Recent Advances in Synthesis and Gas Sensing Properties

    PubMed Central

    Galstyan, Vardan; Comini, Elisabetta; Faglia, Guido; Sberveglieri, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis—particularly by electrochemical anodization-, growth mechanism and chemical sensing properties of pure, doped and mixed titania tubular arrays are reviewed. The first part deals on how anodization parameters affect the size, shape and morphology of titania nanotubes. In the second part fabrication of sensing devices based on titania nanotubes is presented, together with their most notable gas sensing performances. Doping largely improves conductivity and enhances gas sensing performances of TiO2 nanotubes. PMID:24184919

  8. Advanced IR sensing technology research in the city of Tomsk, USSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilov, Vladimir P.; Ivanov, A. I.; Isakov, A. V.; Reino, V. V.; Shiryaev, Vladimir V.; Tsvyk, Ruvim S.

    1990-03-01

    Some large scientific organisations in the city of Tomsk, Siberia, USSR are involved into the researchings on the advanced IR sensing technology. They are Polytechnic Institute founded in 1896, Uriiversity of Tomsk founded in 1888, Institute of Atmosphere's Optics, Academy of Sciences arid Institute of Automatized Control Systems and Radio electronics. Main fields are as follows: 1) thermal (IR) nondestructive testing of materials, machines and systems; 2) optoelectronics; 3) laser optics, transmission of infrared through the atmosphere and investigation of energy distribution in laser beams. Researching equipment includes Western and Russian industrial thermovisers, lasers, personal computers, IR detectors etc and some borne-made devices and components. There are optical arid JR detectors Lndustry in Tomsk that allows i.e produce spheric and aspheric mirrors and lenses, JR filters, cadmium-mercury-teilur and indium anlymonide T1 receivers arid to develop the scanning and measuring devices on the base mentioned above. Seine projects to develop the specific Tomsk thermoviser so far have nOt come true so the main accent was made onto the computerized thermographic systems suitable for solution of particular scientific problems.

  9. [Research advance in the function of quorum sensing in the biological aggregates].

    PubMed

    Dai, Xin; Zhou, Jia-Heng; Zhu, Liang; Xu, Xiang-Yang

    2014-04-01

    Quorum sensing is a microbial phenomenon that microorganisms use signal molecules to perceive environmental conditions and regulate specific gene expressions. As the communication function of quorum sensing is increasingly highlighted in the microbial field, researches on quorum sensing in the formation process of biological aggregates (biofilm and granules) attract wide attentions. The paper reviewed autoinducers (AI) classification and the corresponding regulation methods in quorum sensing, and provided an up-to-date account on research progress of AIs regulating biological aggregates formation and structural stability. New territories and future of quorum sensing were also outlined.

  10. Measuring aberrations in the rat brain by a new coherence-gated wavefront sensor using a Linnik interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinyu; Leger, Jean-Francois; Binding, Jonas; Boccara, Claude; Gigan, Sylvain; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2012-03-01

    Wavefront distortions due to refractive index mismatch and tissue inhomogeneity may limit the resolution, contrast, signal strength and achievable imaging depth of microscope. Traditional Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors can't be used in strongly scattering biological samples since there is no selection of the ballistic photons originating from the reference point in the sample amongst all the backscattered photons. In contrast, coherence-gated wavefront sensing (CGWS) allows the fast measurement of aberrations in scattering samples and therefore should permit adaptive corrections. We have implemented a new CGWS scheme based on a Linnik interferometer with Super Luminescent Emission Diode as low temporal coherence light source. Compared to the previously described CGWS system based on a femtosecond laser, its main advantages are the automatic compensation of dispersion between the two arms and its easy implementation on any microscope. The configuration of virtual Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for wavefront reconstruction was optimized, and the measurement precision was analyzed when multiple scattering was not negligible. In fresh rat brain slices, we successfully measured up to about 400 μm depth a known defocus aberration, obtained by axially displacing the coherence gate with respect to the actual focus in the sample.

  11. A First Order Wavefront Estimation Algorithm for P1640 Calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhaia, C.; Vasisht, G.; Shao, M.; Lockhart, T.; Cady, E.; Oppenheimer, B.; Burruss, R.; Roberts, J.; Beichman, C.; Brenner, D.; Crepp, J.; Dekany, R.; Hinkley, S.; Hillenbrand, L.; Parry, I.; Pueyo, L.; Rice, E.; Roberts, L. C. Jr.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Soummer, R.; Vescelus, F.; Wallace, K.; Zimmerman, N.

    2012-01-01

    P1640 calibrator is a wavefront sensor working with the P1640 coronagraph and the Palomar 3000 actuator adaptive optics system (P3K) at the Palomar 200 inch Hale telescope. It measures the wavefront by interfering post-coronagraph light with a reference beam formed by low-pass filtering the blocked light from the coronagraph focal plane mask. The P1640 instrument has a similar architecture to the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) and its performance is currently limited by the quasi-static speckles due to non-common path wavefront errors, which comes from the non-common path for the light to arrive at the AO wavefront sensor and the coronagraph mask. By measuring the wavefront after the coronagraph mask, the non-common path wavefront error can be estimated and corrected by feeding back the error signal to the deformable mirror (DM) of the P3K AO system. Here, we present a first order wavefront estimation algorithm and an instrument calibration scheme used in experiments done recently at Palomar observatory. We calibrate the P1640 calibrator by measuring its responses to poking DM actuators with a sparse checkerboard pattern at different amplitudes. The calibration yields a complex normalization factor for wavefront estimation and establishes the registration of the DM actuators at the pupil camera of the P1640 calibrator, necessary for wavefront correction. Improvement of imaging quality after feeding back the wavefront correction to the AO system demonstrated the efficacy of the algorithm.

  12. Real-time wavefront reconstruction from intensity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Carlas; Marinica, Raluca; Verhaegen, Michel

    2013-12-01

    for the rst time puts Adaptive Optics based on intensity measurements in an optimal H2 controller setting. A computationally ecient solution is presented for this H2 controller for the case the mirror dynamics can be considered as a static system. The advantage of this new dynamic aberration correction is also demonstrated in the simulation study. References [1] C. Keller, V. Korkiakoski, N. Doelman, R. Fraanje, R. Andrei, and M. Verhaegen. Extremely fast focal-plane wavefront sensing for extreme adaptive optics. arXiv preprint arXiv:1207.3273, 2012

  13. Program plan and summary, remote fluvial experimental (REFLEX) series: Research experiments using advanced remote sensing technologies with emphasis on hydrologic transport, and hydrologic-ecologic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wobber, F.J.

    1986-10-01

    This document describes research designed to evaluate advanced remote sensing technologies for environmental research. A series of Remote Fluvial Experiments (REFLEX) - stressing new applications of remote sensing systems and use of advanced digital analysis methods - are described. Program strategy, experiments, research areas, and future initiatives are summarized. The goals of REFLEX are: (1) to apply new and developing aerial and satellite remote sensing technologies - including both advanced sensor systems and digital/optical processing - for interdisciplinary scientific experiments in hydrology and to hydrologic/ecologic interactions; (2) to develop new concepts for processing and analyzing remote sensing data for general scientific application; and (3) to demonstrate innovative analytical technologies that advance the state of the art in applying information from remote sensing systems, for example, supercomputer processing and analysis.

  14. Adaptable Diffraction Gratings With Wavefront Transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iazikov, Dmitri; Mossberg, Thomas W.; Greiner, Christoph M.

    2010-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are optical components with regular patterns of grooves, which angularly disperse incoming light by wavelength. Traditional diffraction gratings have static planar, concave, or convex surfaces. However, if they could be made so that they can change the surface curvature at will, then they would be able to focus on particular segments, self-calibrate, or perform fine adjustments. This innovation creates a diffraction grating on a deformable surface. This surface could be bent at will, resulting in a dynamic wavefront transformation. This allows for self-calibration, compensation for aberrations, enhancing image resolution in a particular area, or performing multiple scans using different wavelengths. A dynamic grating gives scientists a new ability to explore wavefronts from a variety of viewpoints.

  15. Propofol effects on atrial fibrillation wavefront delays.

    PubMed

    Cervigón, Raquel; Moreno, Javier; Millet, José; Pérez-Villacastín, Julián; Castells, Francisco

    2010-08-01

    Since the cardiac activity during atrial fibrillation (AF) may be influenced by autonomic modulations, in this study, a novel method to quantify the effects of the most common anesthetic agent (propofol) in AF ablation procedures is introduced. This study has two main objectives: first, to assess whether the sedation earlier to radio frequency ablation affects the arrhythmia itself, and second, to provide new information that contributes to a better understanding of the influence of the autonomic nervous system on AF. The methodology presented is based on the measurement of synchronization and delay indexes between two atrial activations at adjacent intracavitary electrodes. These parameters aim to estimate whether two activations at different sites may be caused by the same propagating wavefront, or otherwise, are the consequence of independent wavefronts. The results showed that the mentioned indexes have a different behavior at both atria: the right atrium becomes more synchronized with propofol administration, whereas the synchronization index decreases at the left atrium.

  16. Extended scene wavefront sensor for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomer, Thierry; Ravel, Karen; Corlay, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    The spatial resolution of optical monitoring satellites increases continuously and it is more and more difficult to satisfy the stability constraints of the instrument. The compactness requirements induce high sensitivity to drift during storage and launching. The implementation of an active loop for the control of the performances for the telescope becomes essential, in the same way of astronomy telescopes on ground. The active loop requires disposing of informations in real time of optical distortions of the wavefront, due to mirror deformations. It is the role of the Shack-Hartmann wave front sensor studied by Sodern. It is located in the focal plane of the telescope, in edge of field of view, in order not to disturb acquisition by the main instrument. Its particular characteristic, compared to a traditional wavefront sensor is not only to work on point source as star image, but also on extended scenes, as those observed by the instrument. The exit pupil of the telescope is imaged on a micro lenses array by a relay optics. Each element of the micro lenses array generates a small image, drifted by the local wavefront slope. The processing by correlation between small images allows to measure local slope and to recover the initial wavefront deformation according to Zernike decomposition. Sodern has realized the sensor dimensioning and has studied out the comparison of various algorithms of images correlation making it possible to measure the local slopes of the wave front. Simulations, taking into account several types of detectors, enabled to compare the performances of these solutions and a choice of detector was carried out. This article describes the state of progress of the work done so far. It shows the result of the comparisons on the choice of the detector, the main features of the sensor definition and the performances obtained.

  17. Transmission-grating-based wavefront tilt sensor.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Koichi; Fukuda, Hiroki; Moriwaki, Kousuke

    2009-07-10

    We propose a new type of tilt sensor. It consists of a grating and an image sensor. It detects the tilt of the collimated wavefront reflected from a plane mirror. Its principle is described and analyzed based on wave optics. Experimental results show its validity. Simulations of the ordinary autocollimator and the proposed tilt sensor show that the effect of noise on the measured angle is smaller for the latter. These results show a possibility of making a smaller and simpler tilt sensor.

  18. Advanced Ionospheric Sensing using GROUP-C and LITES aboard the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzien, S. A.; Stephan, A. W.; Chakrabarti, S.; Finn, S. C.; Cook, T.; Powell, S. P.; O'Hanlon, B.; Bishop, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    The GPS Radio Occultation and Ultraviolet Photometer Co-located (GROUP-C) and Limb-imaging Ionospheric and Thermospheric Extreme-ultraviolet Spectrograph (LITES) experiments are manifested for flight aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2016 as part of the Space Test Program Houston #5 payload. The two experiments provide technical development and risk-reduction for future DoD space weather sensors suitable for ionospheric specification, space situational awareness, and data products for global ionosphere assimilative models. In addition, the combined instrument complement of these two experiments offers a unique opportunity to study structures of the nighttime ionosphere. GROUP-C includes an advanced GPS receiver providing ionospheric electron density profiles and scintillation measurements and a high-sensitivity far-ultraviolet photometer measuring horizontal ionospheric gradients. LITES is an imaging spectrograph that spans 60-140 nm and will obtain high-cadence limb profiles of the ionosphere and thermosphere from 150-350 km altitude. In the nighttime ionosphere, recombination of O+ and electrons produces optically thin emissions at 91.1 and 135.6 nm that can be used to tomographically reconstruct the two-dimensional plasma distribution in the orbital plane below ISS altitudes. Ionospheric irregularities, such as plasma bubbles and blobs, are transient features of the low and middle latitude ionosphere with important implications for operational systems. Irregularity structures have been studied primarily using ground-based systems, though some spaced-based remote and in-situ sensing has been performed. An ionospheric observatory aboard the ISS would provide new capability to study low- and mid-latitude ionospheric structures on a global scale. By combining for the first time high-sensitivity in-track photometry, vertical ionospheric airglow spectrographic imagery, and recent advancements in UV tomography, high-fidelity tomographic reconstruction of

  19. Can the Natural Diversity of Quorum-Sensing Advance Synthetic Biology?

    PubMed Central

    Davis, René Michele; Muller, Ryan Yue; Haynes, Karmella Ann

    2015-01-01

    Quorum-sensing networks enable bacteria to sense and respond to chemical signals produced by neighboring bacteria. They are widespread: over 100 morphologically and genetically distinct species of eubacteria are known to use quorum sensing to control gene expression. This diversity suggests the potential to use natural protein variants to engineer parallel, input-specific, cell–cell communication pathways. However, only three distinct signaling pathways, Lux, Las, and Rhl, have been adapted for and broadly used in engineered systems. The paucity of unique quorum-sensing systems and their propensity for crosstalk limits the usefulness of our current quorum-sensing toolkit. This review discusses the need for more signaling pathways, roadblocks to using multiple pathways in parallel, and strategies for expanding the quorum-sensing toolbox for synthetic biology. PMID:25806368

  20. Can the natural diversity of quorum-sensing advance synthetic biology?

    PubMed

    Davis, René Michele; Muller, Ryan Yue; Haynes, Karmella Ann

    2015-01-01

    Quorum-sensing networks enable bacteria to sense and respond to chemical signals produced by neighboring bacteria. They are widespread: over 100 morphologically and genetically distinct species of eubacteria are known to use quorum sensing to control gene expression. This diversity suggests the potential to use natural protein variants to engineer parallel, input-specific, cell-cell communication pathways. However, only three distinct signaling pathways, Lux, Las, and Rhl, have been adapted for and broadly used in engineered systems. The paucity of unique quorum-sensing systems and their propensity for crosstalk limits the usefulness of our current quorum-sensing toolkit. This review discusses the need for more signaling pathways, roadblocks to using multiple pathways in parallel, and strategies for expanding the quorum-sensing toolbox for synthetic biology.

  1. Experimental results for absolute cylindrical wavefront testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, Patrick J.; Alatawi, Ayshah

    2014-09-01

    Applications for Cylindrical and near-cylindrical surfaces are ever-increasing. However, fabrication of high quality cylindrical surfaces is limited by the difficulty of accurate and affordable metrology. Absolute testing of such surfaces represents a challenge to the optical testing community as cylindrical reference wavefronts are difficult to produce. In this paper, preliminary results for a new method of absolute testing of cylindrical wavefronts are presented. The method is based on the merging of the random ball test method with the fiber optic reference test. The random ball test assumes a large number of interferograms of a good quality sphere with errors that are statistically distributed such that the average of the errors goes to zero. The fiber optic reference test utilizes a specially processed optical fiber to provide a clean high quality reference wave from an incident line focus from the cylindrical wave under test. By taking measurements at different rotation and translations of the fiber, an analogous procedure can be employed to determine the quality of the converging cylindrical wavefront with high accuracy. This paper presents and discusses the results of recent tests of this method using a null optic formed by a COTS cylindrical lens and a free-form polished corrector element.

  2. Specialized wavefront sensors for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Daniel R.; Mansell, J. D.; Gruetzner, James K.; Morgan, R.; Warren, Mial E.

    1995-08-01

    The performance of an adaptive optical system is strongly dependent upon correctly measuring the wavefront of the arriving light. The most common wavefront measurement techniques used to date are the shearing interferometer and the Shack-Hartmann sensor. Shack-Hartmann sensors rely on the use of lenslet arrays to sample the aperture appropriately. These have traditionally been constructed using MLM or step and repeat technology, and more recently with binary optics technology. Diffractive optics fabrication methodology can be used to remove some of the limitations of the previous technologies and can allow for low-cost production of sophisticated elements. We have investigated several different specialized wavefront sensor configurations using both Shack-Hartmann and shearing interferometer principles. We have taken advantage of the arbitrary nature of these elements to match pupil shapes of detector and telescope aperture and to introduce magnification between the lenslet array and the detector. We have fabricated elements that facilitate matching the sampling to the current atmospheric conditions. The sensors were designed using a far-field diffraction model and a photolithography layout program. They were fabricated using photolithography and RIE etching. Several different designs are presented with some experimental results from a small-scale adaptive optics brass-board.

  3. Wavefront reconstruction using computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Christian; Flamm, Daniel; Schmidt, Oliver A.; Duparré, Michael

    2012-02-01

    We propose a new method to determine the wavefront of a laser beam, based on modal decomposition using computer-generated holograms (CGHs). Thereby the beam under test illuminates the CGH with a specific, inscribed transmission function that enables the measurement of modal amplitudes and phases by evaluating the first diffraction order of the hologram. Since we use an angular multiplexing technique, our method is innately capable of real-time measurements of amplitude and phase, yielding the complete information about the optical field. A measurement of the Stokes parameters, respectively of the polarization state, provides the possibility to calculate the Poynting vector. Two wavefront reconstruction possibilities are outlined: reconstruction from the phase for scalar beams and reconstruction from the Poynting vector for inhomogeneously polarized beams. To quantify single aberrations, the reconstructed wavefront is decomposed into Zernike polynomials. Our technique is applied to beams emerging from different kinds of multimode optical fibers, such as step-index, photonic crystal and multicore fibers, whereas in this work results are exemplarily shown for a step-index fiber and compared to a Shack-Hartmann measurement that serves as a reference.

  4. Coherence gated wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for two photon excited fluorescence retinal imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Yifan; Cua, Michelle; Bonora, Stefano; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel system for adaptive optics two photon imaging. We utilize the bandwidth of the femtosecond excitation beam to perform coherence gated imaging (OCT) of the sample. The location of the focus is directly observable in the cross sectional OCT images, and adjusted to the desired depth plane. Next, using real time volumetric OCT, we perform Wavefront Sensorless Adaptive Optics (WSAO) aberration correction using a multi-element adaptive lens capable of correcting up to 4th order Zernike polynomials. The aberration correction is performed based on an image quality metric, for example intensity. The optimization time is limited only by the OCT acquisition rate, and takes ~30s. Following aberration correction, two photon fluorescence images are acquired, and compared to results without adaptive optics correction. This technique is promising for multiphoton imaging in multi-layered, scattering samples such as eye and brain, in which traditional wavefront sensing and guide-star sensorless adaptive optics approaches may not be suitable.

  5. Wavefronts and mechanical signaling in early Drosophila embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idema, Timon; Dubuis, Julien; Manning, Lisa; Nelson, Philip; Liu, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Mitosis in the early syncytial Drosophila embryo has a high degree of spatial and temporal correlations, visible as mitotic wavefronts that travel across the embryo. This mitosis wavefront is preceded by another wavefront which corresponds to chromosome condensation. The two wavefronts are separated by a time interval that is independent of cell cycle and propagate at the same speed for a given embryo in a given cycle. We study the wavefronts in the context of excitable medium theory, using two different models, one with biochemical signaling and one with mechanical signaling. We find that the dependence of wavefront speed on cell cycle number is most naturally explained via a mechanical signaling, and that the entire process suggests a scenario in which biochemical and mechanical signaling are coupled.

  6. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy in the human eye.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Heidi; Sredar, Nripun; Queener, Hope; Li, Chaohong; Porter, Jason

    2011-07-18

    Wavefront sensor noise and fidelity place a fundamental limit on achievable image quality in current adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes. Additionally, the wavefront sensor 'beacon' can interfere with visual experiments. We demonstrate real-time (25 Hz), wavefront sensorless adaptive optics imaging in the living human eye with image quality rivaling that of wavefront sensor based control in the same system. A stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm directly optimized the mean intensity in retinal image frames acquired with a confocal adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). When imaging through natural, undilated pupils, both control methods resulted in comparable mean image intensities. However, when imaging through dilated pupils, image intensity was generally higher following wavefront sensor-based control. Despite the typically reduced intensity, image contrast was higher, on average, with sensorless control. Wavefront sensorless control is a viable option for imaging the living human eye and future refinements of this technique may result in even greater optical gains.

  7. Sub-pixel spatial resolution wavefront phase imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip (Inventor); Mooney, James T. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A phase imaging method for an optical wavefront acquires a plurality of phase images of the optical wavefront using a phase imager. Each phase image is unique and is shifted with respect to another of the phase images by a known/controlled amount that is less than the size of the phase imager's pixels. The phase images are then combined to generate a single high-spatial resolution phase image of the optical wavefront.

  8. PREFACE: 3rd International Symposium on Laser Ultrasonics and Advanced Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    Based on the use of laser as a coherent and intense light source, the photo-acoustics originated from the discovery made by Alexander Graham Bell was extended to laser-ultrasonics (LU), and it has been applied to wide area of ultrasonics, optics, material characterization and nondestructive inspection. In 1996, a research group for LU was started in the Japanese Society for Nondestructive Inspection (JSNDI), and researches on LU and related topics such as noncontact measurements and elastic wave theories were discussed. Similar activities were pursued also in North America and in Europe. The international symposium on LU was started in Montreal, Canada in 2008 by Jean Pierre Monchalin in order to offer a forum for involved with basic researches and industrial applications of LU. In the second symposium in Bordeaux, France nearly 120 papers were presented. It is our honor to have organized the third symposium, LU2013 on 25-28 June in Yokohama, Japan. The articles published here provide a sample of achievements presented there. In LU2013, we focused on the laser generation and/or detection of acoustic waves, application to nondestructive testing, ultrafast-optoacoustics and innovative instruments. Research achievements in biomedical applications, advanced sensing including noncontact, micro/nanoscale or nonlinear measurements, as well as theory and simulation of ultrasound were also included, considering the interdisciplinary nature of this field. We enjoyed very excellent and informative 3 plenary talks, 11 invited talks, 81 oral and 41 poster presentations with 168 attendees. According to requests, we organized a post deadline poster session to give an opportunity to present recent achievements after the deadline. Contributions of the participants, the scientific and organizing committees are highly appreciated. The conference tour was a dinner cruise to the Tokyo bay, and we hope this experience will remain as a pleasant memory in attendees. As decided in the

  9. Advanced remote sensing techniques for forestry applications: an application case in Sarawak, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezry, Edmond; Yakam-Simen, Francis; Romeijn, Paul P.; Supit, Iwan; Demargne, Louis

    2001-02-01

    12 This paper reports the operational implementation of new techniques for the exploitation of remote sensing data (SAR and optical) in the framework of forestry applications. In particular, we present a new technique for standing timber volume estimation. This technique is based on remote sensing knowledge (SAR and optical synergy) and forestry knowledge (forest structure models), proved fairly accurate. To illustrate the application of these techniques, an operational commercial case study regarding forest concessions in Sarawak is presented. Validation of this technique by comparison of the remote sensing results and the database of the customer has shown that this technique is fairly accurate.

  10. Auto gain control of EMCCD in Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaoyi; Li, Dayu; Hu, Lifa; Mu, QuanQuan; Cao, Zhaoliang; Wang, Yukun; Wang, Shaoxin; Xuan, Li

    2016-12-01

    Electron multiplying charge-coupled-device (EMCCD) applied in Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (S-H WFS) makes the wavefront sensing more efficient for adaptive optics (AO). However when the brightness of the observed target changes in large ranges in a few minutes, a fixed electron multiplying (EM) gain may not be optimum. Thus an auto-gain-control (AGC) method based on the spots image of the S-H WFS is proposed. The designed control value is the average value of the maximum signals of all the light spots in a frame. It has been demonstrated in the experiments that the control value is sensitive to the change of the target brightness, and is stable in the presence of detecting noises and turbulence influence. The goal value for control is predetermined based on the linear relation of the signal with the EM gain and the number of photons collected in sub-apertures. The conditions of the self-protection of the EMCCD are also considered for the goal value. Simulations and experiments indicate that the proposed control method is efficient, and keeps the sensing in a high SNR which reaches the upper SNR limit when sensing with EMCCD. The self-protection of the EMCCD is avoided during the whole sensing process.

  11. Wavefront Measurement over an Extended Horizontal Path Using a Wavefront Curvature Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, J.; Woods, S.; Turner, A.; Scott, A.

    This paper reports on the results of wavefront curvature sensor measurements over horizontal paths of 66m and 4 km. The wavefront curvature sensor used has been developed at QinetiQ and is based on the use of a quadratically distorted diffraction grating to enable the simultaneous recording of two symmetrically separated planes about the entrance pupil of a telescope. The measurements allow us to characterize the spatio-temporal nature of the wavefront errors and therefore enable us to estimate the wavefront sensor (WFS) and deformable mirror (DM) requirements for the development of an adaptive optic system (AOS). For the 66m path the dynamic range and frame-rate of the WFS camera was found to be adequate to drive the AOS, although the software based control resulted in intermittent performance. The data for the 4 km path suggested that the frame-rate of the WFS camera was at least a factor of 3 slower than would be necessary to either drive the AOS or make any detailed conclusions about the spatial analysis.

  12. Liquid Crystal on Silicon Wavefront Corrector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John; Miranda, Felix; Wang, Xinghua; Bos, Philip, J.

    2004-01-01

    A low cost, high resolution, liquid crystal on silicon, spatial light modulator has been developed for the correction of huge aberrations in an optical system where the polarization dependence and the chromatic nature are tolerated. However, the overall system performance suggests that this device is also suitable for real time correction of aberration in human eyes. This device has a resolution of 1024 x 768, and is driven by an XGA display driver. The effective stroke length of the device is 700 nm and 2000 nm for the visible and IR regions of the device, respectively. The response speeds are 50 Hz and 5 Hz, respectively, which are fast enough for real time adaptive optics for aberrations in human eyes. By modulating a wavefront of 2 pi, this device can correct for arbitrary high order wavefront aberrations since the 2-D pixel array is independently controlled by the driver. The high resolution and high accuracy of the device allow for diffraction limited correction of the tip and tilt or defocus without an additional correction loop. We have shown that for every wave of aberration, an 8 step blazed grating is required to achieve high diffraction efficiency around 80%. In light of this, up to 125 waves peak to valley of tip and tilt can be corrected if we choose the simplest aberration. Corrections of 34 waves of aberration, including high order Zernicke terms in a high magnification telescope, to diffraction limited performance (residual wavefront aberration less than 1/30 lambda at 632.8 nm) have been observed at high efficiency.

  13. The 2012 Charles Prentice medal lecture: wavefront measurement of refractive state.

    PubMed

    Thibos, Larry N

    2013-09-01

    Modern efforts to define and measure the refractive state of aberrated eyes have led to new insights about the nature of refractive error, the quality of the retinal image, the interplay of the crystalline lens, and the eye's pupil during accommodation. Our change in mind-set engendered by wavefront concepts has the power to alter our way of thinking about many clinical issues that are fundamentally optical in nature, such as dynamic changes in optical quality of eyes caused by tear film deterioration, outcome assessment of refractive therapies, and myopia progression. The aim of this lecture is to help make advances in these areas of optometric science broadly accessible to educators, clinicians, and patients by explaining in simple terms the underlying optical concepts of wavefront aberrometry. PMID:23958715

  14. Initial Demonstration of Mercury Wavefront Correction System

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Z M

    2006-02-01

    High average power operation of the Mercury Laser induces dynamic aberrations to the laser beam wavefront. Analysis of recent data indicates that up to 4 waves of low order aberration (mainly focus error or power, with spatial resolution < 0.5 cm{sup -1}) could be expected at each pass. Because of the magnitude of the wavefront error, the logical position is to place a deformable mirror (DM) at the M11 position, where the DM will correct the beam between passes 1 & 2 and 3 & 4. Currently, there are only two established commercial vendors offering complete adaptive optic (AO) systems that can accommodate the Mercury beam size (45 x 75 mm) which are compatible with high damage threshold coatings. Xinetics (MA, USA) offers a complete AO system along with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The Xinetics DM is based on lead magnesium niobate (PMN) technology. A number of US aerospace firms as well as NIF use Xinetics PMN technology for their DMs. Phasics (Paris, France) offers a complete AO solution with its proprietary SID-4, a four-way shearing interferometric wavefront sensor capable of high resolution (over 100 x 100 sampling points). The Phasics system includes a bimorph deformable mirror from Night-n-Opt (Moscow, Russia) that uses lead zirconate titanate (PZT) technology. Various high power laser laboratories around the world such as LULI (France), HELEN (UK), and GEKKO (Japan) are using the PZT-based bimorph DM in their system. While both DM technologies are equivalent and have been deployed in high-energy laser systems, the PZT based bimorph DM offers two distinct features that makes it more attractive for high average power laser systems. The bimorph DM uses two layers of PZT actuators with the outer layer acting as power correctors, capable of correcting up to 20 waves of power. The Xinetics DM offers a maximum stroke of 4 waves. In addition, Night-N-Opt has also designed a water-cooled DM with a silicon based substrate (as opposed to a glass substrate

  15. Lenses that provide the transformation between two given wavefronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criado, C.; Alamo, N.

    2016-12-01

    We give an original method to design four types of lenses solving the following problems: focusing a given wavefront in a given point, and performing the transformation between two arbitrary incoming and outgoing wavefronts. The method to design the lenses profiles is based on the optical properties of the envelopes of certain families of Cartesian ovals of revolution.

  16. The investigation of advanced remote sensing, radiative transfer and inversion techniques for the measurement of atmospheric constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, Adarsh; Wang, Pi-Huan

    1985-01-01

    The research program is documented for developing space and ground-based remote sensing techniques performed during the period from December 15, 1977 to March 15, 1985. The program involved the application of sophisticated radiative transfer codes and inversion methods to various advanced remote sensing concepts for determining atmospheric constituents, particularly aerosols. It covers detailed discussions of the solar aureole technique for monitoring columnar aerosol size distribution, and the multispectral limb scattered radiance and limb attenuated radiance (solar occultation) techniques, as well as the upwelling scattered solar radiance method for determining the aerosol and gaseous characteristics. In addition, analytical models of aerosol size distribution and simulation studies of the limb solar aureole radiance technique and the variability of ozone at high altitudes during satellite sunrise/sunset events are also described in detail.

  17. Mitotic wavefronts mediated by mechanical signaling in early Drosophila embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Louis; Idema, Timon; Liu, Andrea; Lubensky, Tom

    2013-03-01

    Mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo demonstrates spatial and temporal correlations in the form of wavefronts that travel across the embryo in each cell cycle. This coordinated phenomenon requires a signaling mechanism, which we suggest is mechanical in origin. We have constructed a theoretical model that supports nonlinear wavefront propagation in a mechanically-excitable medium. Previously, we have shown that this model captures quantitatively the wavefront speed as it varies with cell cycle number, for reasonable values of the elastic moduli and damping coefficient of the medium. Now we show that our model also captures the displacements of cell nuclei in the embryo in response to the traveling wavefront. This new result further supports that mechanical signaling may play an important role in mediating mitotic wavefronts.

  18. [Advances in the research of LuxR family protein in quorum-sensing system of gram-negative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Xiang, J

    2016-09-20

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-density-dependent method for information transmission among bacteria, as well as a mechanism for the bacteria to adapt to environment. LuxR family protein plays a key role in gram-negative bacterial QS system as a kind of transcription regulators and participates in a variety of biological behaviors with LuxI protein and signal molecules, such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation, virulence factors production, and so on. The advances in the research of LuxR family protein in QS system of gram-negative bacteria were summarized in this review. PMID:27647069

  19. Advances in the development of remote sensing technology for agricultural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, J. E.; Erb, R. B.; Hall, F. G.; Macdonald, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    The application of remote sensing technology to crop forecasting is discussed. The importance of crop forecasts to the world economy and agricultural management is explained, and the development of aerial and spaceborne remote sensing for global crop forecasting by the United States is outlined. The structure, goals and technical aspects of the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment (LACIE) are presented, and main findings on the accuracy, efficiency, applicability and areas for further study of the LACIE procedure are reviewed. The current status of NASA crop forecasting activities in the United States and worldwide is discussed, and the objectives and organization of the newly created Agriculture and Resources Inventory Surveys through Aerospace Remote Sensing (AgRISTARS) program are presented.

  20. Advanced Sensing and Control Techniques to Facilitate Semi-Autonomous Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Schalkoff, Robert J.

    1999-06-01

    This research is intended to advance the technology of semi-autonomous teleoperated robotics as applied to Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) tasks. Specifically, research leading to a prototype dual-manipulator mobile work cell is underway. This cell is supported and enhanced by computer vision, virtual reality and advanced robotics technology.

  1. Advanced Fiber Optic-Based Sensing Technology for Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Piazza, Anthony; Ko, William L.; Chan, Patrick; Bakalyar, John

    2011-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of fiber optic sensing technology development activities performed at NASA Dryden in support of Unmanned Aircraft Systems. Examples of current and previous work are presented in the following categories: algorithm development, system development, instrumentation installation, ground R&D, and flight testing. Examples of current research and development activities are provided.

  2. Phase and amplitude wave front sensing and reconstruction with a modified plenoptic camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chensheng; Ko, Jonathan; Nelson, William; Davis, Christopher C.

    2014-10-01

    A plenoptic camera is a camera that can retrieve the direction and intensity distribution of light rays collected by the camera and allows for multiple reconstruction functions such as: refocusing at a different depth, and for 3D microscopy. Its principle is to add a micro-lens array to a traditional high-resolution camera to form a semi-camera array that preserves redundant intensity distributions of the light field and facilitates back-tracing of rays through geometric knowledge of its optical components. Though designed to process incoherent images, we found that the plenoptic camera shows high potential in solving coherent illumination cases such as sensing both the amplitude and phase information of a distorted laser beam. Based on our earlier introduction of a prototype modified plenoptic camera, we have developed the complete algorithm to reconstruct the wavefront of the incident light field. In this paper the algorithm and experimental results will be demonstrated, and an improved version of this modified plenoptic camera will be discussed. As a result, our modified plenoptic camera can serve as an advanced wavefront sensor compared with traditional Shack- Hartmann sensors in handling complicated cases such as coherent illumination in strong turbulence where interference and discontinuity of wavefronts is common. Especially in wave propagation through atmospheric turbulence, this camera should provide a much more precise description of the light field, which would guide systems in adaptive optics to make intelligent analysis and corrections.

  3. Advanced Spatial-Division Multiplexed Measurement Systems Propositions-From Telecommunication to Sensing Applications: A Review.

    PubMed

    Weng, Yi; Ip, Ezra; Pan, Zhongqi; Wang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    The concepts of spatial-division multiplexing (SDM) technology were first proposed in the telecommunications industry as an indispensable solution to reduce the cost-per-bit of optical fiber transmission. Recently, such spatial channels and modes have been applied in optical sensing applications where the returned echo is analyzed for the collection of essential environmental information. The key advantages of implementing SDM techniques in optical measurement systems include the multi-parameter discriminative capability and accuracy improvement. In this paper, to help readers without a telecommunication background better understand how the SDM-based sensing systems can be incorporated, the crucial components of SDM techniques, such as laser beam shaping, mode generation and conversion, multimode or multicore elements using special fibers and multiplexers are introduced, along with the recent developments in SDM amplifiers, opto-electronic sources and detection units of sensing systems. The examples of SDM-based sensing systems not only include Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry or Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDR/BOTDA) using few-mode fibers (FMF) and the multicore fiber (MCF) based integrated fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, but also involve the widely used components with their whole information used in the full multimode constructions, such as the whispering gallery modes for fiber profiling and chemical species measurements, the screw/twisted modes for examining water quality, as well as the optical beam shaping to improve cantilever deflection measurements. Besides, the various applications of SDM sensors, the cost efficiency issue, as well as how these complex mode multiplexing techniques might improve the standard fiber-optic sensor approaches using single-mode fibers (SMF) and photonic crystal fibers (PCF) have also been summarized. Finally, we conclude with a prospective outlook for the opportunities and challenges of SDM

  4. Advanced Spatial-Division Multiplexed Measurement Systems Propositions—From Telecommunication to Sensing Applications: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Yi; Ip, Ezra; Pan, Zhongqi; Wang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    The concepts of spatial-division multiplexing (SDM) technology were first proposed in the telecommunications industry as an indispensable solution to reduce the cost-per-bit of optical fiber transmission. Recently, such spatial channels and modes have been applied in optical sensing applications where the returned echo is analyzed for the collection of essential environmental information. The key advantages of implementing SDM techniques in optical measurement systems include the multi-parameter discriminative capability and accuracy improvement. In this paper, to help readers without a telecommunication background better understand how the SDM-based sensing systems can be incorporated, the crucial components of SDM techniques, such as laser beam shaping, mode generation and conversion, multimode or multicore elements using special fibers and multiplexers are introduced, along with the recent developments in SDM amplifiers, opto-electronic sources and detection units of sensing systems. The examples of SDM-based sensing systems not only include Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry or Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDR/BOTDA) using few-mode fibers (FMF) and the multicore fiber (MCF) based integrated fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, but also involve the widely used components with their whole information used in the full multimode constructions, such as the whispering gallery modes for fiber profiling and chemical species measurements, the screw/twisted modes for examining water quality, as well as the optical beam shaping to improve cantilever deflection measurements. Besides, the various applications of SDM sensors, the cost efficiency issue, as well as how these complex mode multiplexing techniques might improve the standard fiber-optic sensor approaches using single-mode fibers (SMF) and photonic crystal fibers (PCF) have also been summarized. Finally, we conclude with a prospective outlook for the opportunities and challenges of SDM

  5. Recent Advances in Understanding Amino Acid Sensing Mechanisms that Regulate mTORC1

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Liufeng; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Yuanfei; Li, Fengna; Wei, Hongkui; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is the central regulator of mammalian cell growth, and is essential for the formation of two structurally and functionally distinct complexes: mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1 can sense multiple cues such as nutrients, energy status, growth factors and hormones to control cell growth and proliferation, angiogenesis, autophagy, and metabolism. As one of the key environmental stimuli, amino acids (AAs), especially leucine, glutamine and arginine, play a crucial role in mTORC1 activation, but where and how AAs are sensed and signal to mTORC1 are not fully understood. Classically, AAs activate mTORC1 by Rag GTPases which recruit mTORC1 to lysosomes, where AA signaling initiates. Plasma membrane transceptor L amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1)-4F2hc has dual transporter-receptor function that can sense extracellular AA availability upstream of mTORC1. The lysosomal AA sensors (PAT1 and SLC38A9) and cytoplasmic AA sensors (LRS, Sestrin2 and CASTOR1) also participate in regulating mTORC1 activation. Importantly, AAs can be sensed by plasma membrane receptors, like G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) T1R1/T1R3, and regulate mTORC1 without being transported into the cells. Furthermore, AA-dependent mTORC1 activation also initiates within Golgi, which is regulated by Golgi-localized AA transporter PAT4. This review provides an overview of the research progress of the AA sensing mechanisms that regulate mTORC1 activity. PMID:27690010

  6. Advanced Spatial-Division Multiplexed Measurement Systems Propositions-From Telecommunication to Sensing Applications: A Review.

    PubMed

    Weng, Yi; Ip, Ezra; Pan, Zhongqi; Wang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    The concepts of spatial-division multiplexing (SDM) technology were first proposed in the telecommunications industry as an indispensable solution to reduce the cost-per-bit of optical fiber transmission. Recently, such spatial channels and modes have been applied in optical sensing applications where the returned echo is analyzed for the collection of essential environmental information. The key advantages of implementing SDM techniques in optical measurement systems include the multi-parameter discriminative capability and accuracy improvement. In this paper, to help readers without a telecommunication background better understand how the SDM-based sensing systems can be incorporated, the crucial components of SDM techniques, such as laser beam shaping, mode generation and conversion, multimode or multicore elements using special fibers and multiplexers are introduced, along with the recent developments in SDM amplifiers, opto-electronic sources and detection units of sensing systems. The examples of SDM-based sensing systems not only include Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry or Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDR/BOTDA) using few-mode fibers (FMF) and the multicore fiber (MCF) based integrated fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, but also involve the widely used components with their whole information used in the full multimode constructions, such as the whispering gallery modes for fiber profiling and chemical species measurements, the screw/twisted modes for examining water quality, as well as the optical beam shaping to improve cantilever deflection measurements. Besides, the various applications of SDM sensors, the cost efficiency issue, as well as how these complex mode multiplexing techniques might improve the standard fiber-optic sensor approaches using single-mode fibers (SMF) and photonic crystal fibers (PCF) have also been summarized. Finally, we conclude with a prospective outlook for the opportunities and challenges of SDM

  7. Optical fiber evanescent wave adsorption sensors for high-temperature gas sensing in advanced coal-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Buric, M.; Ohodnicky, P.; Duy, J.

    2012-01-01

    Modern advanced energy systems such as coal-fired power plants, gasifiers, or similar infrastructure present some of the most challenging harsh environments for sensors. The power industry would benefit from new, ultra-high temperature devices capable of surviving in hot and corrosive environments for embedded sensing at the highest value locations. For these applications, we are currently exploring optical fiber evanescent wave absorption spectroscopy (EWAS) based sensors consisting of high temperature core materials integrated with novel high temperature gas sensitive cladding materials. Mathematical simulations can be used to assist in sensor development efforts, and we describe a simulation code that assumes a single thick cladding layer with gas sensitive optical constants. Recent work has demonstrated that Au nanoparticle-incorporated metal oxides show a potentially useful response for high temperature optical gas sensing applications through the sensitivity of the localized surface plasmon resonance absorption peak to ambient atmospheric conditions. Hence, the simulation code has been applied to understand how such a response can be exploited in an optical fiber based EWAS sensor configuration. We demonstrate that interrogation can be used to optimize the sensing response in such materials.

  8. AIS wavefront sensor: a robust optical test of exposure tools using localized wavefront curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Ryan; Zhou, Xibin; Goldstein, Michael; Ashworth, Dominic; Cummings, Kevin; Fan, Yu-Jen; Shroff, Yashesh; Denbeaux, Greg; Kandel, Yudhi; Naulleau, Patrick

    2014-04-01

    We present an update of the AIS wavefront sensor, a diagnostic sensor set for insertion in the upgraded 0.5 NA SEMATECH Albany and Berkeley METs. AIS works by using offset monopole illumination to probe localized regions of the test optic pupil. Variations in curvature manifest as focus shifts, which are measured using a photodiode- based grating-on- grating contrast monitor, and the wavefront aberrations are reconstructed using a least-squares approach. We present results from an optical prototype of AIS demonstrating an accuracy of better than λ/30 rms for Zernike polynomials Z4 through Z10. We also discuss integration strategies and requirements as well as specifications on system alignment.

  9. Fluorescent copper nanoparticles: recent advances in synthesis and applications for sensing metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yongming; Cao, Fengpu; Lei, Xiaoling; Mang, Lianghong; Cheng, Shengjuan; Song, Jintong

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent copper nanoparticles (F-CuNPs) have received great attention due to their attractive features, such as water solubility, wide availability, ease of functionalization and good biocompatibility, and considerable efforts have been devoted to the preparation and applications of F-CuNPs. This review article comprises three main parts. In the first part, we briefly present the fluorescence properties of F-CuNPs. Then we cover the fabrication strategies of various F-CuNPs functionalized by different ligands. In the third part, we focus on the applications of F-CuNPs for sensing metal ions, including Hg2+, Pb2+, Cu2+, Fe3+ and other metal ions. Lastly, we further discuss the opportunities and challenges of F-CuNPs in the synthetic strategies and applications for sensing metal ions.

  10. Fluorescent copper nanoparticles: recent advances in synthesis and applications for sensing metal ions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongming; Cao, Fengpu; Lei, Xiaoling; Mang, Lianghong; Cheng, Shengjuan; Song, Jintong

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescent copper nanoparticles (F-CuNPs) have received great attention due to their attractive features, such as water solubility, wide availability, ease of functionalization and good biocompatibility, and considerable efforts have been devoted to the preparation and applications of F-CuNPs. This review article comprises three main parts. In the first part, we briefly present the fluorescence properties of F-CuNPs. Then we cover the fabrication strategies of various F-CuNPs functionalized by different ligands. In the third part, we focus on the applications of F-CuNPs for sensing metal ions, including Hg(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+) and other metal ions. Lastly, we further discuss the opportunities and challenges of F-CuNPs in the synthetic strategies and applications for sensing metal ions. PMID:26879547

  11. Recent advancements in sensing techniques based on functional materials for organophosphate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Deep, Akash

    2015-08-15

    The use of organophosphate pesticides (OPs) for pest control in agriculture has caused serious environmental problems throughout the world. OPs are highly toxic with the potential to cause neurological disorders in humans. As the application of OPs has greatly increased in various agriculture activities, it has become imperative to accurately monitor their concentration levels for the protection of ecological systems and food supplies. Although there are many conventional methods available for the detection of OPs, the development of portable sensors is necessary to facilitate routine analysis with more convenience. Some of these potent alternative techniques based on functional materials include fluorescence nanomaterials based sensors, molecular imprinted (MIP) sensors, electrochemical sensors, and biosensors. This review explores the basic features of these sensing approaches through evaluation of their performance. The discussion is extended further to describe the challenges and opportunities for these unique sensing techniques.

  12. COxSwAIN: Compressive Sensing for Advanced Imaging and Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurwitz, Richard; Pulley, Marina; LaFerney, Nathan; Munoz, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The COxSwAIN project focuses on building an image and video compression scheme that can be implemented in a small or low-power satellite. To do this, we used Compressive Sensing, where the compression is performed by matrix multiplications on the satellite and reconstructed on the ground. Our paper explains our methodology and demonstrates the results of the scheme, being able to achieve high quality image compression that is robust to noise and corruption.

  13. [Research advances in simulating regional crop growth under water stress by remote sensing].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Shili; Ma, Yuping

    2005-06-01

    It is of practical significance to simulate the regional crop growth under water stress, especially at regional scale. Combined with remote sensing information, crop growth simulation model could provide an effective way to estimate the regional crop growth, development and yield formation under water stress. In this paper, related research methods and results were summarized, and some problems needed to be further studied and resolved were discussed.

  14. Using Advanced Remote Sensing Data Fusion Techniques for Studying Earth Surface Processes and Hazards: A Landslide Detection Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulslander, D.

    2014-12-01

    A major problem in earth surface process and hazards research is we have little to no knowledge of precisely where and when the next significant event may occur. This makes it nearly impossible to set up adequate instrumentation and observation ahead of time. Furthermore, it is not practical to overcome this challenge by instrumenting and observing everywhere all the time. We can't be everywhere and see everything. Remote sensing helps us to fill that gap with missions such as Landsat and WorldView2 offering regular global coverage. However, remote sensing systems for global monitoring have several inherent compromises. Tradeoffs must be made between data storage, processing capacity, spatial resolution, spectral resolution, and temporal resolution. Additionally, instruments and systems must be designed in advance and from a generalized standpoint to serve as many purposes as possible, often at the expense of high performance in specific tasks. Because of these practical constraints, when using remote sensing data to study earth surface processes it is critical to maximize signal content or information obtained from all available data. Several approaches, including multi-temporal data fusion, multi-sensor data fusion, and fusion with derivative products such as band ratios or vegetation indices can help expand how much information can be extracted from remote sensing acquisitions. Fused dataset results contain more coherent information than the sum of their individual constituents. Examples using Landsat and WorldView2 data in this study show this added information makes it possible to map earth surface processes and events, such as the 2011 Cinque Terre landslides, in a more automated and repeatable fashion over larger areas than is possible with manual imagery analysis techniques and with greater chance of successful detection.

  15. Advanced Soil Moisture Network Technologies; Developments in Collecting in situ Measurements for Remote Sensing Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, M.; Silva, A. R. D.; Akbar, R.; Clewley, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil moisture Sensing Controller And oPtimal Estimator (SoilSCAPE) wireless sensor network has been developed to support Calibration and Validation activities (Cal/Val) for large scale soil moisture remote sensing missions (SMAP and AirMOSS). The technology developed here also readily supports small scale hydrological studies by providing sub-kilometer widespread soil moisture observations. An extensive collection of semi-sparse sensor clusters deployed throughout north-central California and southern Arizona provide near real time soil moisture measurements. Such a wireless network architecture, compared to conventional single points measurement profiles, allows for significant and expanded soil moisture sampling. The work presented here aims at discussing and highlighting novel and new technology developments which increase in situ soil moisture measurements' accuracy, reliability, and robustness with reduced data delivery latency. High efficiency and low maintenance custom hardware have been developed and in-field performance has been demonstrated for a period of three years. The SoilSCAPE technology incorporates (a) intelligent sensing to prevent erroneous measurement reporting, (b) on-board short term memory for data redundancy, (c) adaptive scheduling and sampling capabilities to enhance energy efficiency. A rapid streamlined data delivery architecture openly provides distribution of in situ measurements to SMAP and AirMOSS cal/val activities and other interested parties.

  16. Manipulation of wavefront using helical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhaokun; Tao, Huan; Zhao, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Helical metamaterials, a kind of 3-dimensional structure, has relatively strong coupling effect among the helical nano-wires. Therefore, it is expected to be a good candidate for generating phase shift and controlling wavefront with high efficiency. In this paper, using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we studied the phase shift properties in the helical metamaterials. It is found that the phase shift occurs for both transmitted and reflected light waves. And the maximum of reflection coefficients can reach over 60%. In addition, the phase shift (φ) is dispersionless in the range of 600 nm to 860 nm, that is, it is only dominated by the initial angle (θ) of the helix. The relationship between them is φ = ± 2θ. Using Jones calculus we give a further explanation for these properties. Finally, by arranging the helixes in an array with a constant phase gradient, the phenomenon of anomalous refraction was also observed in a broad wavelength range.

  17. Telescope Multi-Field Wavefront Control with a Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, John Z.; Redding, David; Sigrist, Norbert; Basinger, Scott

    2008-01-01

    An effective multi-field wavefront control (WFC) approach is demonstrated for an actuated, segmented space telescope using wavefront measurements at the exit pupil, and the optical and computational implications of this approach are discussed. The integration of a Kalman Filter as an optical state estimator into the wavefront control process to further improve the robustness of the optical alignment of the telescope will also be discussed. Through a comparison of WFC performances between on-orbit and ground-test optical system configurations, the connection (and a possible disconnection) between WFC and optical system alignment under these circumstances are analyzed. Our MACOS-based computer simulation results will be presented and discussed.

  18. Propagation of aberrated wavefronts using a ray transfer matrix.

    PubMed

    Raasch, Thomas W

    2014-05-01

    A ray transfer matrix is used to calculate the propagation of aberrated wavefronts across a homogeneous refractive index. The wavefront is represented by local surface normals, i.e., by a ray bundle, and the propagation is accomplished by transferring those rays across the space. Wavefront shape is generated from the slopes and positions of the collection of rays. Calculation methods are developed for the paraxial case, for higher-order expansions, and for the exact tangent case. A numerical example is used to compare results between an analytical method and the methods developed here.

  19. Initial Performance of the Keck AO Wavefront Controller System

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, E M; Acton, D S; An, J R; Avicola, K; Beeman, B V; Brase, J M; Carrano, C J; Gathright, J; Gavel, D T; Hurd, R L; Lai, O; Lupton, W; Macintosh, B A; Max, C E; Olivier, S S; Shelton, J C; Stomski, P J; Tsubota, K; Waltjen, K E; Watson, J A; Wizinowich, P L

    2001-03-01

    The wavefront controller for the Keck Observatory AO system consists of two separate real-time control loops: a tip-tilt control loop to remove tilt from the incoming wavefront, and a deformable mirror control loop to remove higher-order aberrations. In this paper, we describe these control loops and analyze their performance using diagnostic data acquired during the integration and testing of the AO system on the telescope. Disturbance rejection curves for the controllers are calculated from the experimental data and compared to theory. The residual wavefront errors due to control loop bandwidth are also calculated from the data, and possible improvements to the controller performance are discussed.

  20. Earth remote sensing as an effective tool for the development of advanced innovative educational technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorova, Vera; Mayorov, Kirill

    2009-11-01

    Current educational system is facing a contradiction between the fundamentality of engineering education and the necessity of applied learning extension, which requires new methods of training to combine both academic and practical knowledge in balance. As a result there are a number of innovations being developed and implemented into the process of education aimed at optimizing the quality of the entire educational system. Among a wide range of innovative educational technologies there is an especially important subset of educational technologies which involve learning through hands-on scientific and technical projects. The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation of educational technologies based on small satellites development as well as the usage of Earth remote sensing data acquired from these satellites. The increase in public attention to the education through Earth remote sensing is based on the concern that although there is a great progress in the development of new methods of Earth imagery and remote sensing data acquisition there is still a big question remaining open on practical applications of this kind of data. It is important to develop the new way of thinking for the new generation of people so they understand that they are the masters of their own planet and they are responsible for its state. They should desire and should be able to use a powerful set of tools based on modern and perspective Earth remote sensing. For example NASA sponsors "Classroom of the Future" project. The Universities Space Research Association in United States provides a mechanism through which US universities can cooperate effectively with one another, with the government, and with other organizations to further space science and technology, and to promote education in these areas. It also aims at understanding the Earth as a system and promoting the role of humankind in the destiny of their own planet. The Association has founded a Journal of Earth System

  1. Development of a pyramidal wavefront sensor test-bench at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbide, Simon; Wang, Min; Gauvin, Jonny; Martin, Olivier; Savard, Maxime; Bourqui, Pascal; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Deschenes, William; Anctil, Genevieve; Chateauneuf, François

    2013-12-01

    The key technical element of the adaptive optics in astronomy is the wavefront sensing (WFS). One of the advantages of the pyramid wavefront sensor (P-WFS) over the widely used Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor seems to be the increased sensitivity in closed-loop applications. A high-sensitivity and large dynamic-range WFS, such as P-WFS technology, still needs to be further investigated for proper justification in future Extremely Large Telescopes application. At INO, we have recently carried out the optical design, testing and performance evaluation of a P-WFS bench setup. The optical design of the bench setup mainly consists of the super-LED fiber source, source collimator, spatial light modulator (SLM), relay lenses, tip-tilt mirror, Fourier-transforming lens, and a four-faceted glass pyramid with a large vertex angle as well as pupil re-imaged optics. The phase-only SLM has been introduced in the bench setup to generate atmospheric turbulence with a maximum phase shift of more than 2π at each pixel (256 grey levels). Like a modified Foucault knife-edge test, the refractive pyramid element is used to produce four images of the entrance pupil on a CCD camera. The Fourier-transforming lens, which is used before the pyramid prism, is designed for telecentric output to allow dynamic modulation (rotation of the beam around the pyramid-prism center) from a tip-tilt mirror. Furthermore, a P-WFS diffraction-based model has been developed. This model includes most of the system limitations such as the SLM discrete voltage steps and the CCD pixel pitch. The pyramid effects (edges and tip) are considered as well. The modal wavefront reconstruction algorithm relies on the construction of an interaction matrix (one for each modulation's amplitude). Each column of the interaction matrix represents the combination of the four pupil images for a given wavefront aberration. The nice agreement between the data and the model suggest that the limitation of the system is not the P

  2. Scale in Remote Sensing and GIS: An Advancement in Methods Towards a Science of Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    The term "scale", both in space and time, is central to remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The emergence and widespread use of GIS technologies, including remote sensing, has generated significant interest in addressing scale as a generic topic, and in the development and implementation of techniques for dealing explicitly with the vicissitudes of scale as a multidisciplinary issue. As science becomes more complex and utilizes databases that are capable of performing complex space-time data analyses, it becomes paramount that we develop the tools and techniques needed to operate at multiple scales, to work with data whose scales are not necessarily ideal, and to produce results that can be aggregated or disaggregated ways that suit the decision-making process. Contemporary science is constantly coping with compromises, and the data available for a particular study rarely fit perfectly with the scales at which the processes being investigated operate, or the scales that policy-makers require to make sound, rational decisions. This presentation discusses some of the problems associated with scale as related to remote sensing and GIS, and describes some of the questions that need to be addressed in approaching the development of a multidisciplinary "science of scale". Techniques for dealing with multiple scaled data that have been developed or explored recently are described as a means for recognizing scale as a generic issue, along with associated theory and tools that can be of simultaneous value to a large number of disciplines. These can be used to seek answers to a host of interrelated questions in the interest of providing a formal structure for the management and manipulation of scale and its universality as a key concept from a multidisciplinary perspective.

  3. Scale in Remote Sensing and GIS: An Advancement in Methods Towards a Science of Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    1998-01-01

    The term "scale", both in space and time, is central to remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS). The emergence and widespread use of GIS technologies, including remote sensing, has generated significant interest in addressing scale as a generic topic, and in the development and implementation of techniques for dealing explicitly with the vicissitudes of scale as a multidisciplinary issue. As science becomes more complex and utilizes databases that are capable of performing complex space-time data analyses, it becomes paramount that we develop the tools and techniques needed to operate at multiple scales, to work with data whose scales are not necessarily ideal, and to produce results that can be aggregated or disaggregated in ways that suit the decision-making process. Contemporary science is constantly coping with compromises, and the data available for a particular study rarely fit perfectly with the scales at which the processes being investigated operate, or the scales that policy-makers require to make sound, rational decisions. This presentation discusses some of the problems associated with scale as related to remote sensing and GIS, and describes some of the questions that need to be addressed in approaching the development of a multidisciplinary "science of scale". Techniques for dealing with multiple scaled data that have been developed or explored recently are described as a means for recognizing scale as a generic issue, along with associated theory and tools that can be of simultaneous value to a large number of disciplines. These can be used to seek answers to a host of interrelated questions in the interest of providing a formal structure for the management and manipulation of scale and its universality as a key concept from a multidisciplinary perspective.

  4. Recent Advances in Remote Sensing of Natural Hazards-Induced Atmospheric and Ionospheric Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. M.; Komjathy, A.; Meng, X.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Langley, R. B.; Mannucci, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) induced by acoustic-gravity waves in the neutral atmosphere have significant impact on trans-ionospheric radio waves such as Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS, including Global Position System (GPS)) measurements. Natural hazards and solid Earth events, such as earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic eruptions are actual sources that may trigger acoustic and gravity waves resulting in traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) in the upper atmosphere. Trans-ionospheric radio wave measurements sense the total electron content (TEC) along the signal propagation path. In this research, we introduce a novel GPS-based detection and estimation technique for remote sensing of atmospheric wave-induced TIDs including space weather phenomena induced by major natural hazard events, using TEC time series collected from worldwide ground-based dual-frequency GNSS (including GPS) receiver networks. We demonstrate the ability of using ground- and space-based dual-frequency GPS measurements to detect and monitor tsunami wave propagation from the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake and tsunami. Major wave trains with different propagation speeds and wavelengths were identified through analysis of the GPS remote sensing observations. Dominant physical characteristics of atmospheric wave-induced TIDs are found to be associated with specific tsunami propagations and oceanic Rayleigh waves. In this research, we compared GPS-based observations, corresponding model simulations and tsunami wave propagation. Results are shown to lead to a better understanding of the tsunami-induced ionosphere responses. Based on current distribution of Plate Boundary Observatory GPS stations, the results indicate that tsunami-induced TIDs may be detected about 60 minutes prior to tsunamis arriving at the U.S. west coast. It is expected that this GNSS-based technology will become an integral part of future early-warning systems.

  5. Area-selected Ion Milling for Reflection Wavefront Error Correction of Soft X-ray Multilayer Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuru, Toshihide; Sakai, Yu; Hatano, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Masaki

    2010-06-01

    For accurate reflection wavefront error correction of imaging soft X-ray multilayer mirrors, a period-by-period ion milling system was developed. A stable and homogenized radial distribution of ion beam was realized for an ion milling over a whole area of 100 mm-wide multilayer. To demonstrate the wavefront error correction principle, a dielectric multilayer mirror for visible light was locally milled by our system. Wavefront as measured by a phase shifting interferometer showed the reflection phase of local milling multilayer advanced. Area-selected ion millings with mask templates made of Mo and Si, and by photoresist contact masks were carried out. Although striped patterns generated by the difference of spectroscopic reflectance between Mo and Si were observed at peripherals of milling area when templates were used, a clear and sharp edge pattern was obtained with contact mask. Soft X-ray reflectance of a Mo/Si multilayer milled with photoresist contact mask showed good feasibility of precise wavefront error correction of multilayers. These results proved our phase correction method is promising and practical for the 0.1 nm-period correction of soft X-ray multilayer mirror.

  6. Wavefront sensor sampling plane fabricated by maskless grayscale lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirino, G. A.; Amaral, F. T.; Lopera, S. A.; Montagnolil, A. N.; Arruda, A.; Mansano, R. D.; M.-Brahim, T.; Monteiro, D. W. L.

    2014-05-01

    In this work we report the design and characterization of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sampling plane based on a microlens array (MLA) composed of 12 X 12 hexagonal contiguous diffractive lenslet, with 355 μm pitch, 4.5 mm focal length, and 4.3 X 4.3 mm lateral dimensions. The device was fabricated by maskless grayscale lithography based on Digital Light Projector (DLP) technology. Optical characterization was performed in order to measure wavefront aberrations in Zernike polynomials terms. Intraocular lenses were used as test elements because they yield well-known optical aberrations, such as defocus and spherical aberration. For the wavefront reconstruction, the modal approach was used, in which the first derivatives of Zernike polynomials are used as the set of orthogonal basis functions. The corresponding polynomial coefficients up to the first 10 Zernike terms were obtained and the resulting reconstructed wavefront presents an RMS reconstruction error compliant to most optical systems of interest.

  7. Manipulating acoustic wavefront by inhomogeneous impedance and steerable extraordinary reflection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiajun; Li, Baowen; Chen, Zhining; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    We unveil the connection between the acoustic impedance along a flat surface and the reflected acoustic wavefront, in order to empower a wide wariety of novel applications in acoustic community. Our designed flat surface can generate double reflections: the ordinary reflection and the extraordinary one whose wavefront is manipulated by the proposed impedance-governed generalized Snell's law of reflection (IGSL). IGSL is based on Green's function and integral equation, instead of Fermat's principle for optical wavefront manipulation. Remarkably, via the adjustment of the designed specific acoustic impedance, extraordinary reflection can be steered for unprecedented acoustic wavefront while that ordinary reflection can be surprisingly switched on or off. The realization of the complex discontinuity of the impedance surface has been proposed using Helmholtz resonators. PMID:23985717

  8. Manipulating Acoustic Wavefront by Inhomogeneous Impedance and Steerable Extraordinary Reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiajun; Li, Baowen; Chen, Zhining; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-08-01

    We unveil the connection between the acoustic impedance along a flat surface and the reflected acoustic wavefront, in order to empower a wide wariety of novel applications in acoustic community. Our designed flat surface can generate double reflections: the ordinary reflection and the extraordinary one whose wavefront is manipulated by the proposed impedance-governed generalized Snell's law of reflection (IGSL). IGSL is based on Green's function and integral equation, instead of Fermat's principle for optical wavefront manipulation. Remarkably, via the adjustment of the designed specific acoustic impedance, extraordinary reflection can be steered for unprecedented acoustic wavefront while that ordinary reflection can be surprisingly switched on or off. The realization of the complex discontinuity of the impedance surface has been proposed using Helmholtz resonators.

  9. Lens testing with a simple wavefront shearing interferometer.

    PubMed

    Nyyssonen, D; Jerke, J M

    1973-09-01

    A lens-testing system using a simple wavefront shearing interferometer is described. This simple cube interferometer has all the interferometric adjustments built in at manufacture. In contrast to most interferometric test systems, the wavefront shearing interferometer is inexpensive, portable, relatively insensitive to vibration, does not need laser illumination, and requires only a minimum of experimental time and operational expertise. Reading of the interferograms and subsequent data reduction require the major effort in testing with the wavefront shearing interferometer. However, with automatic scanning of the interferograms and a high-speed electronic computer to perform the analysis, the data reduction may be completely automated. Operation of the wavefront shearing interferometer is described together with the method of data reduction. Experimental results are also presented.

  10. Wavefront shaping through emulated curved space in waveguide settings

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Chong; Bekenstein, Rivka; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Segev, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed remarkable progress in wavefront shaping, including shaping of beams in free space, of plasmonic wavepackets and of electronic wavefunctions. In all of these, the wavefront shaping was achieved by external means such as masks, gratings and reflection from metasurfaces. Here, we propose wavefront shaping by exploiting general relativity (GR) effects in waveguide settings. We demonstrate beam shaping within dielectric slab samples with predesigned refractive index varying so as to create curved space environment for light. We use this technique to construct very narrow non-diffracting beams and shape-invariant beams accelerating on arbitrary trajectories. Importantly, the beam transformations occur within a mere distance of 40 wavelengths, suggesting that GR can inspire any wavefront shaping in highly tight waveguide settings. In such settings, we demonstrate Einstein's Rings: a phenomenon dating back to 1936. PMID:26899285

  11. Wavefront shaping through emulated curved space in waveguide settings.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chong; Bekenstein, Rivka; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Segev, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed remarkable progress in wavefront shaping, including shaping of beams in free space, of plasmonic wavepackets and of electronic wavefunctions. In all of these, the wavefront shaping was achieved by external means such as masks, gratings and reflection from metasurfaces. Here, we propose wavefront shaping by exploiting general relativity (GR) effects in waveguide settings. We demonstrate beam shaping within dielectric slab samples with predesigned refractive index varying so as to create curved space environment for light. We use this technique to construct very narrow non-diffracting beams and shape-invariant beams accelerating on arbitrary trajectories. Importantly, the beam transformations occur within a mere distance of 40 wavelengths, suggesting that GR can inspire any wavefront shaping in highly tight waveguide settings. In such settings, we demonstrate Einstein's Rings: a phenomenon dating back to 1936. PMID:26899285

  12. Zonal wavefront estimation using an array of hexagonal grating patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Biswajit E-mail: brboruah@iitg.ernet.in; Boruah, Bosanta R. E-mail: brboruah@iitg.ernet.in

    2014-10-15

    Accuracy of Shack-Hartmann type wavefront sensors depends on the shape and layout of the lenslet array that samples the incoming wavefront. It has been shown that an array of gratings followed by a focusing lens provide a substitution for the lensslet array. Taking advantage of the computer generated holography technique, any arbitrary diffraction grating aperture shape, size or pattern can be designed with little penalty for complexity. In the present work, such a holographic technique is implemented to design regular hexagonal grating array to have zero dead space between grating patterns, eliminating the possibility of leakage of wavefront during the estimation of the wavefront. Tessellation of regular hexagonal shape, unlike other commonly used shapes, also reduces the estimation error by incorporating more number of neighboring slope values at an equal separation.

  13. Zonal wavefront estimation using an array of hexagonal grating patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Biswajit; Boruah, Bosanta R.

    2014-10-01

    Accuracy of Shack-Hartmann type wavefront sensors depends on the shape and layout of the lenslet array that samples the incoming wavefront. It has been shown that an array of gratings followed by a focusing lens provide a substitution for the lensslet array. Taking advantage of the computer generated holography technique, any arbitrary diffraction grating aperture shape, size or pattern can be designed with little penalty for complexity. In the present work, such a holographic technique is implemented to design regular hexagonal grating array to have zero dead space between grating patterns, eliminating the possibility of leakage of wavefront during the estimation of the wavefront. Tessellation of regular hexagonal shape, unlike other commonly used shapes, also reduces the estimation error by incorporating more number of neighboring slope values at an equal separation.

  14. Adaptive Wavefront Calibration and Control for the Gemini Planet Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Veran, J

    2007-02-02

    Quasi-static errors in the science leg and internal AO flexure will be corrected. Wavefront control will adapt to current atmospheric conditions through Fourier modal gain optimization, or the prediction of atmospheric layers with Kalman filtering.

  15. Manipulating Acoustic Wavefront by Inhomogeneous Impedance and Steerable Extraordinary Reflection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiajun; Li, Baowen; Chen, Zhining; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    We unveil the connection between the acoustic impedance along a flat surface and the reflected acoustic wavefront, in order to empower a wide wariety of novel applications in acoustic community. Our designed flat surface can generate double reflections: the ordinary reflection and the extraordinary one whose wavefront is manipulated by the proposed impedance-governed generalized Snell's law of reflection (IGSL). IGSL is based on Green's function and integral equation, instead of Fermat's principle for optical wavefront manipulation. Remarkably, via the adjustment of the designed specific acoustic impedance, extraordinary reflection can be steered for unprecedented acoustic wavefront while that ordinary reflection can be surprisingly switched on or off. The realization of the complex discontinuity of the impedance surface has been proposed using Helmholtz resonators. PMID:23985717

  16. Concept of an advanced hyperspectral remote sensing system for pipeline monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskin, Göksu; Teutsch, Caroline D.; Lenz, Andreas; Middelmann, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Areas occupied by oil pipelines and storage facilities are prone to severe contamination due to leaks caused by natural forces, poor maintenance or third parties. These threats have to be detected as quickly as possible in order to prevent serious environmental damage. Periodical and emergency monitoring activities need to be carried out for successful disaster management and pollution minimization. Airborne remote sensing stands out as an appropriate choice to operate either in an emergency or periodically. Hydrocarbon Index (HI) and Hydrocarbon Detection Index (HDI) utilize the unique absorption features of hydrocarbon based materials at SWIR spectral region. These band ratio based methods require no a priori knowledge of the reference spectrum and can be calculated in real time. This work introduces a flexible airborne pipeline monitoring system based on the online quasi-operational hyperspectral remote sensing system developed at Fraunhofer IOSB, utilizing HI and HDI for oil leak detection on the data acquired by an SWIR imaging sensor. Robustness of HI and HDI compared to state of the art detection algorithms is evaluated in an experimental setup using a synthetic dataset, which was prepared in a systematic way to simulate linear mixtures of selected background and oil spectra consisting of gradually decreasing percentages of oil content. Real airborne measurements in Ettlingen, Germany are used to gather background data while the crude oil spectrum was measured with a field spectrometer. The results indicate that the system can be utilized for online and offline monitoring activities.

  17. Advances in NO2 sensing with individual single-walled carbon nanotube transistors

    PubMed Central

    Muoth, Matthias; Roman, Cosmin; Haluska, Miroslav; Hierold, Christofer

    2014-01-01

    Summary The charge carrier transport in carbon nanotubes is highly sensitive to certain molecules attached to their surface. This property has generated interest for their application in sensing gases, chemicals and biomolecules. With over a decade of research, a clearer picture of the interactions between the carbon nanotube and its surroundings has been achieved. In this review, we intend to summarize the current knowledge on this topic, focusing not only on the effect of adsorbates but also the effect of dielectric charge traps on the electrical transport in single-walled carbon nanotube transistors that are to be used in sensing applications. Recently, contact-passivated, open-channel individual single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors have been shown to be operational at room temperature with ultra-low power consumption. Sensor recovery within minutes through UV illumination or self-heating has been shown. Improvements in fabrication processes aimed at reducing the impact of charge traps have reduced the hysteresis, drift and low-frequency noise in carbon nanotube transistors. While open challenges such as large-scale fabrication, selectivity tuning and noise reduction still remain, these results demonstrate considerable progress in transforming the promise of carbon nanotube properties into functional ultra-low power, highly sensitive gas sensors. PMID:25551046

  18. The Earth Climate Hyperspectral Observatory: Advances in Cloud and Aerosol Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilewskie, Peter; Schmidt, Sebastian; Coddington, Odele; Kopp, Greg

    2015-04-01

    Future satellite missions to monitor global change require the establishment of high-accuracy spectrally resolved benchmark data records of reflected shortwave radiation for trend detection and attribution. Not surprisingly, these same attributes also provide substantial improvements in the retrieval of microphysical and optical properties of clouds and aerosols over current discrete-band observations. The NASA Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission, currently in pre-formulation, defines a set of fundamental direct observations of spectrally resolved reflected shortwave and emitted longwave radiation, and GNSS radio occultation in order to detect climate trends and to test and improve climate prediction models. The Earth Climate Hyperspectral Observatory (ECHO), a proposed pathfinder mission to CLARREO, focuses on measuring spectrally resolved Earth-reflected shortwave radiation over a spectral range that comprised approximately 95% of the solar radiative energy incident at the top-of-atmosphere. This paper will report on the ECHO requirements specifically directed at objectives related to cloud and aerosol remote sensing, and more generally, characterizing the physical parameters responsible for the observed spectral and temporal variability in a benchmark data record. These objectives are centered on targeted remote sensing and data assimilation analyses to derive the dominant contributors to the observed spectral, temporal, and spatial perturbations in the reflected shortwave signal. Specific improvements in the retrieval of cloud and aerosol properties due to increased spectral coverage, spectral resolution, and radiometric accuracy will be discussed.

  19. A technology review of time-of-flight photon counting for advanced remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Robert A.

    2010-04-01

    Time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) has made tremendous progress during the past ten years enabling improved performance in precision time-of-flight (TOF) rangefinding and lidar. In this review the development and performance of several ranging systems is presented that use TCSPC for accurate ranging and range profiling over distances up to 17km. A range resolution of a few millimetres is routinely achieved over distances of several kilometres. These systems include single wavelength devices operating in the visible; multi-wavelength systems covering the visible and near infra-red; the use of electronic gating to reduce in-band solar background and, most recently, operation at high repetition rates without range aliasing- typically 10MHz over several kilometres. These systems operate at very low optical power (<100μW). The technique therefore has potential for eye-safe lidar monitoring of the environment and obvious military, security and surveillance sensing applications. The review will highlight the theoretical principles of photon counting and progress made in developing absolute ranging techniques that enable high repetition rate data acquisition that avoids range aliasing. Technology trends in TCSPC rangefinding are merging with those of quantum cryptography and its future application to revolutionary quantum imaging provides diverse and exciting research into secure covert sensing, ultra-low power active imaging and quantum rangefinding.

  20. Te oxide nanowires as advanced materials for amperometric nonenzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensing.

    PubMed

    Guascito, Maria Rachele; Chirizzi, Daniela; Malitesta, Cosimino; Siciliano, Tiziana; Tepore, Antonio

    2013-10-15

    A new nonenzymatic platinum Te oxide nanowires modified electrode (Pt/TeO2-NWs) for amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is proposed. The modified electrode has been developed by direct drop casting, with TeO2 nanowires (TeO2-NWs), synthesized by thermal evaporation of Te(0) in an oxygen atmosphere. The morphological and spectroscopic characterization of the TeO2-NWs as synthesized on Pt foil was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. XPS and XRD analyses are especially involved to gain information on the chemical environment of TeO2-NWs in contact with Pt surface. Moreover electrochemical characterization of these new modified Pt/TeO2-NWs modified electrodes was performed by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and Cronoamperometry (CA) in phosphate buffer (pH=7; I=0.2) to investigate the sensing properties of this material against H2O2. The proposed sensor exhibits a wide linear and dynamic range from 2 µM to 16 mM (R(2)=0.9998) and the detection limit is estimated to be 0.6 µM (S/N=3). Moreover, this sensor shows a rapid amperometric response time of less than 5s and possessed good reproducibility. These results indicate that Pt/TeO2-NWs composite is suitable to be used as material for sensing applications.

  1. Advanced Sensing and Control Techniques to Facilitate Semi-Autonomous Decommissioning of Hazardous Sites - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schalkoff, R.J.

    2000-12-01

    This report summarizes work after 4 years of a 3-year project (no-cost extension of the above-referenced project for a period of 12 months granted). The fourth generation of a vision sensing head for geometric and photometric scene sensing has been built and tested. Estimation algorithms for automatic sensor calibration updating under robot motion have been developed and tested. We have modified the geometry extraction component of the rendering pipeline. Laser scanning now produces highly accurate points on segmented curves. These point-curves are input to a NURBS (non-uniform rational B-spline) skinning procedure to produce interpolating surface segments. The NURBS formulation includes quadrics as a sub-class, thus this formulation allows much greater flexibility without the attendant instability of generating an entire quadric surface. We have also implemented correction for diffuse lighting and specular effects. The QRobot joint level control was extended to a complete semi-autonomous robot control system for D and D operations. The imaging and VR subsystems have been integrated and tested.

  2. Bidirectional phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer for wavefronts testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sanbin; Zhou, Shouhuan; Tang, Xiaojun; Hong, Zhao

    2015-10-01

    The wavefront of the laser beam was tested by a point-diffraction interferometer with bidirectional phase-shifting. The phase-shifting is obtained by the bidirectional modulated of the electro-optic effect lithium niobate crystal combining with a pinhole filter in half-wave film. The wavefront aberration of incoming beam is directly measured by analyzing five frames phase-shifted interferograms captured by a CCD camera.

  3. Optical differentiation wavefront sensor based on binary pixelated transmission filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, J.; Travinsky, A.; Ding, G.; Dorrer, C.

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution wavefront sensors are used in a wide range of applications. The Shack-Hartmann sensor is the industry standard and mostly used for this kind of analysis. However, with this sensor the analysis can only be performed for narrowband radiation, the recoverable curvature of the wavefront slopes is also restricted by the size of a single lens in the microlens array. The high-resolution Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor (>128×128) is also significantly expensive. The optical differentiation wavefront sensor, on the other hand, consists of only simple and therefore inexpensive components, offers greater signal to noise ratio, allows for high-resolution analysis of wavefront curvature, and is potentially capable of performing broadband measurements. When a transmission mask with linear attenuation along a spatial direction modulates the far field of an optical wave, the spatial wavefront slope along that direction can be recovered from the fluence in the near field after modulation. With two orthogonal measurements one can recover the complete wavefront of the optical wave. In this study the characteristics of such a wavefront sensor are investigated when the linear transmission modulation is implemented with a pixelated binary filter. Such a filter can be produced as a gray-scale quasi-continuous transmission pattern constructed using arrays of small (e.g., 10-micron) transparent or opaque pixels and therefore it can simply be fabricated by conventional lithography techniques. Simulations demonstrate the potential ability of such a pixelated filter to match the performance of a filter with continuously varying transmission, while offering the advantage of better transmission control and reduction of fabrication costs.

  4. Cumulative Reconstructor: fast wavefront reconstruction algorithm for Extremely Large Telescopes.

    PubMed

    Rosensteiner, Matthias

    2011-10-01

    The Cumulative Reconstructor (CuRe) is a new direct reconstructor for an optical wavefront from Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor measurements. In this paper, the algorithm is adapted to realistic telescope geometries and the transition from modified Hudgin to Fried geometry is discussed. After a discussion of the noise propagation, we analyze the complexity of the algorithm. Our numerical tests confirm that the algorithm is very fast and accurate and can therefore be used for adaptive optics systems of Extremely Large Telescopes.

  5. Advances in Small Remotely Piloted Aircraft Communications and Remote Sensing in Maritime Environments including the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillivary, P. A.; Borges de Sousa, J.; Wackowski, S.; Walker, G.

    2011-12-01

    Small remotely piloted aircraft have recently been used for maritime remote sensing, including launch and retrieval operations from land, ships and sea ice. Such aircraft can also function to collect and communicate data from other ocean observing system platforms including moorings, tagged animals, drifters, autonomous surface vessels (ASVs), and autonomous underwater vessels (AUVs). The use of small remotely piloted aircraft (or UASs, unmanned aerial systems) with a combination of these capabilities will be required to monitor the vast areas of the open ocean, as well as in harsh high-latitude ecosystems. Indeed, these aircraft are a key component of planned high latitude maritime domain awareness environmental data collection capabilities, including use of visible, IR and hyperspectral sensors, as well as lidar, meteorological sensors, and interferometric synthetic aperture radars (ISARs). We here first describe at-sea demonstrations of improved reliability and bandwidth of communications from ocean sensors on autonomous underwater vehicles to autonomous surface vessels, and then via remotely piloted aircraft to shore, ships and manned aircraft using Delay and Disruption Tolerant (DTN) communication protocols. DTN enables data exchange in communications-challenged environments, such as remote regions of the ocean including high latitudes where low satellite angles and auroral disturbances can be problematic. DTN provides a network architecture and application interface structured around optionally-reliable asynchronous message forwarding, with limited expectations of end-to-end connectivity and node resources. This communications method enables aircraft and surface vessels to function as data mules to move data between physically disparate nodes. We provide examples of the uses of this communication protocol for environmental data collection and data distribution with a variety of different remotely piloted aircraft in a coastal ocean environment. Next, we

  6. Advances in Remote Sensing for Oil Spill Disaster Management: State-of-the-Art Sensors Technology for Oil Spill Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Maya Nand; Levy, Jason; Gao, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Reducing the risk of oil spill disasters is essential for protecting the environment and reducing economic losses. Oil spill surveillance constitutes an important component of oil spill disaster management. Advances in remote sensing technologies can help to identify parties potentially responsible for pollution and to identify minor spills before they cause widespread damage. Due to the large number of sensors currently available for oil spill surveillance, there is a need for a comprehensive overview and comparison of existing sensors. Specifically, this paper examines the characteristics and applications of different sensors. A better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of oil spill surveillance sensors will improve the operational use of these sensors for oil spill response and contingency planning. Laser fluorosensors were found to be the best available sensor for oil spill detection since they not only detect and classify oil on all surfaces but also operate in either the day or night. For example, the Scanning Laser Environmental Airborne Fluorosensor (SLEAF) sensor was identified to be a valuable tool for oil spill surveillance. However, no single sensor was able to provide all information required for oil spill contingency planning. Hence, combinations of sensors are currently used for oil spill surveillance. Specifically, satellite sensors are used for preliminary oil spill assessment while airborne sensors are used for detailed oil spill analysis. While satellite remote sensing is not suitable for tactical oil spill planning it can provide a synoptic coverage of the affected area.

  7. Sensing with Advanced Computing Technology: Fin Field-Effect Transistors with High-k Gate Stack on Bulk Silicon.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Sara; Scarbolo, Paolo; Wipf, Mathias; Stoop, Ralph L; Bedner, Kristine; Buitrago, Elizabeth; Bazigos, Antonios; Bouvet, Didier; Calame, Michel; Schönenberger, Christian; Ionescu, Adrian M

    2015-05-26

    Field-effect transistors (FETs) form an established technology for sensing applications. However, recent advancements and use of high-performance multigate metal-oxide semiconductor FETs (double-gate, FinFET, trigate, gate-all-around) in computing technology, instead of bulk MOSFETs, raise new opportunities and questions about the most suitable device architectures for sensing integrated circuits. In this work, we propose pH and ion sensors exploiting FinFETs fabricated on bulk silicon by a fully CMOS compatible approach, as an alternative to the widely investigated silicon nanowires on silicon-on-insulator substrates. We also provide an analytical insight of the concept of sensitivity for the electronic integration of sensors. N-channel fully depleted FinFETs with critical dimensions on the order of 20 nm and HfO2 as a high-k gate insulator have been developed and characterized, showing excellent electrical properties, subthreshold swing, SS ∼ 70 mV/dec, and on-to-off current ratio, Ion/Ioff ∼ 10(6), at room temperature. The same FinFET architecture is validated as a highly sensitive, stable, and reproducible pH sensor. An intrinsic sensitivity close to the Nernst limit, S = 57 mV/pH, is achieved. The pH response in terms of output current reaches Sout = 60%. Long-term measurements have been performed over 4.5 days with a resulting drift in time δVth/δt = 0.10 mV/h. Finally, we show the capability to reproduce experimental data with an extended three-dimensional commercial finite element analysis simulator, in both dry and wet environments, which is useful for future advanced sensor design and optimization.

  8. Sensing with Advanced Computing Technology: Fin Field-Effect Transistors with High-k Gate Stack on Bulk Silicon.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Sara; Scarbolo, Paolo; Wipf, Mathias; Stoop, Ralph L; Bedner, Kristine; Buitrago, Elizabeth; Bazigos, Antonios; Bouvet, Didier; Calame, Michel; Schönenberger, Christian; Ionescu, Adrian M

    2015-05-26

    Field-effect transistors (FETs) form an established technology for sensing applications. However, recent advancements and use of high-performance multigate metal-oxide semiconductor FETs (double-gate, FinFET, trigate, gate-all-around) in computing technology, instead of bulk MOSFETs, raise new opportunities and questions about the most suitable device architectures for sensing integrated circuits. In this work, we propose pH and ion sensors exploiting FinFETs fabricated on bulk silicon by a fully CMOS compatible approach, as an alternative to the widely investigated silicon nanowires on silicon-on-insulator substrates. We also provide an analytical insight of the concept of sensitivity for the electronic integration of sensors. N-channel fully depleted FinFETs with critical dimensions on the order of 20 nm and HfO2 as a high-k gate insulator have been developed and characterized, showing excellent electrical properties, subthreshold swing, SS ∼ 70 mV/dec, and on-to-off current ratio, Ion/Ioff ∼ 10(6), at room temperature. The same FinFET architecture is validated as a highly sensitive, stable, and reproducible pH sensor. An intrinsic sensitivity close to the Nernst limit, S = 57 mV/pH, is achieved. The pH response in terms of output current reaches Sout = 60%. Long-term measurements have been performed over 4.5 days with a resulting drift in time δVth/δt = 0.10 mV/h. Finally, we show the capability to reproduce experimental data with an extended three-dimensional commercial finite element analysis simulator, in both dry and wet environments, which is useful for future advanced sensor design and optimization. PMID:25817336

  9. Synthesis by pulsed laser ablation of 2D nanostructures for advanced biomedical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusso, S.; Zanchi, C.; Bombelli, A.; Lucotti, A.; Tommasini, M.; de Grazia, U.; Ciusani, E.; Romito, L. M.; Ossi, P. M.

    2016-05-01

    Au nanoparticle arrays with controlled nanostructure were produced by pulsed laser ablation on glass. Such substrates were optimized for biomedical sensing by means of SERS keeping fixed all process parameters but the laser pulse (LP) number that is a key deposition parameter. It allows to fine-tune the Au surface nanostructure with a considerable improvement in the SERS response towards the detection of apomorphine in blood serum (3.3 × 10-6 M), when LP number is increased from 1 × 104 to 2 × 104. This result is the starting point to correlate the intensity of selected SERS signals of apomorphine to its concentration in the blood of patients with Parkinson's disease.

  10. Recent and future advances in remote sensing of volcanic ash clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, M.; Mackie, S.; Wilkins, K.; Western, L.

    2013-12-01

    The recent eruptions of Icelandic volcanoes have reaffirmed the importance of accurate quantification of a number of key parameters from remotely sensed data. Only through the synoptic perspective afforded satellite sensors can such variables, include cloud mass, concentration, height, and particle size be retrieved on the cloud scale. These parameters are vital to aircraft hazard mitigation as they have a profound impact on the severity of the effects on aircraft, on ash cloud transport and fallout, and can be used to drive dispersion models. This paper will detail recent work on (1) understanding how uncertainty in a priori assumptions impact observations, (2) detection limits for commonly used satellite sensors under a variety of environmental conditions, and (3) present first results from a Bayesian retrieval scheme.

  11. CO2 Sensing and CO2 Regulation of Stomatal Conductance: Advances and Open Questions.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Cawas B; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Negi, Juntaro; Israelsson-Nordström, Maria; Azoulay-Shemer, Tamar; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Iba, Koh; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells form epidermal stomatal gas-exchange valves in plants and regulate the aperture of stomatal pores in response to changes in the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration ([CO2]) in leaves. Moreover, the development of stomata is repressed by elevated CO2 in diverse plant species. Evidence suggests that plants can sense [CO2] changes via guard cells and via mesophyll tissues in mediating stomatal movements. We review new discoveries and open questions on mechanisms mediating CO2-regulated stomatal movements and CO2 modulation of stomatal development, which together function in the CO2 regulation of stomatal conductance and gas exchange in plants. Research in this area is timely in light of the necessity of selecting and developing crop cultivars that perform better in a shifting climate. PMID:26482956

  12. Advanced feature extraction in remote sensing using artificial intelligence and geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, John E.; Friedl, Mark A.; Star, Jeffrey L.

    1988-01-01

    Traditional computer-assisted image-analysis techniques in remote sensing lag well behind human abilities in terms of both speed and accuracy. A fundamental limitation of computer-assisted techniques is their inability to assimilate a variety of different data types leading to an interpretation in a manner similar to human image interpretation. Expert systems and computer-vision techniques are proposed as a potential solution to these limitations. Some aspects of human expertise in image analysis may be codified into expert systems. Image understanding and symbolic reasoning provide a means of assimilating spatial information and spatial reasoning into the analysis procedure. Knowledge-based image-analysis systems incorporate many of these concepts and have been implemented for some well defined problem domains. Geographic information systems represent an excellent environment for this type of analysis, providing both analytic tools and contextual information to the analysis procedure.

  13. Advances in soil erosion modelling through remote sensing data availability at European scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagos, Panos; Karydas, Christos; Borrelli, Pasqualle; Ballabio, Cristiano; Meusburger, Katrin

    2014-08-01

    Under the European Union's Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection, the European Commission's Directorate-General for the Environment (DG Environment) has identified the mitigation of soil losses by erosion as a priority area. Policy makers call for an overall assessment of soil erosion in their geographical area of interest. They have asked that risk areas for soil erosion be mapped under present land use and climate conditions, and that appropriate measures be taken to control erosion within the legal and social context of natural resource management. Remote sensing data help to better assessment of factors that control erosion, such as vegetation coverage, slope length and slope angle. In this context, the data availability of remote sensing data during the past decade facilitates the more precise estimation of soil erosion risk. Following the principles of the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE), various options to calculate vegetative cover management (C-factor) have been investigated. The use of the CORINE Land Cover dataset in combination with lookup table values taken from the literature is presented as an option that has the advantage of a coherent input dataset but with the drawback of static input. Recent developments in the Copernicus programme have made detailed datasets available on land cover, leaf area index and base soil characteristics. These dynamic datasets allow for seasonal estimates of vegetation coverage, and their application in the G2 soil erosion model which represents a recent approach to the seasonal monitoring of soil erosion. The use of phenological datasets and the LUCAS land use/cover survey are proposed as auxiliary information in the selection of the best methodology.

  14. Extension of the modal wave-front reconstruction algorithm to non-uniform illumination.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoyu; Mu, Jie; Rao, ChangHui; Yang, Jinsheng; Rao, XueJun; Tian, Yu

    2014-06-30

    Attempts are made to eliminate the effects of non-uniform illumination on the precision of wave-front measurement. To achieve this, the relationship between the wave-front slope at a single sub-aperture and the distributions of the phase and light intensity of the wave-front were first analyzed to obtain the relevant theoretical formulae. Then, based on the principle of modal wave-front reconstruction, the influence of the light intensity distribution on the wave-front slope is introduced into the calculation of the reconstruction matrix. Experiments were conducted to prove that the corrected modal wave-front reconstruction algorithm improved the accuracy of wave-front reconstruction. Moreover, the correction is conducive to high-precision wave-front measurement using a Hartmann wave-front sensor in the presence of non-uniform illumination.

  15. Recent advances on optical reflectometry for access network diagnostics and distributed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zuyuan; Fan, Xinyu; Liu, Qingwen; Du, Jiangbing

    2015-07-01

    In this invited talk, we will present the advances in research and development activities of optical reflectometry in our laboratory. The performance of phase-sensitive coherent OTDR, which is developed for distributed vibration measurement, is reported with the results of field tests. The performance of time-gated digital OFDR, which is developed for optical access network diagnostics, is also reported. We will also discuss how to increase the frequency sweep span of the linearly-swept optical source, a very important part for improving the performance of optical reflectometry.

  16. Challenges and Opportunities for Advancing Ionosphere-Thermosphere Understanding through Remote Sensing from Space (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    The ionosphere and thermosphere (IT) system was among the first fields explored at the beginning of the space age. Much progress in understanding the system has been made over the ensuing decades, so much so that the vernacular has evolved from 'IT Exploration' to 'Space Weather'. This evolution is largely a consequence of the recognition that space weather can seriously compromise a host of technological systems in space and on the ground. Societal demands for forecasting space weather place extraordinary requirements on both observational capabilities and detailed understanding. Important challenges remain to be addressed in order to approach a level of capability similar to that of tropospheric weather. These include understanding of the IT response to forcing from solar radiation and solar wind, to forcing from lower altitude processes, understanding of the internal processes that constitute the responses, and identification of the causes of long-term climate change. A systematic approach for meeting many of the challenges has been laid out in the Solar and Space Physics 2012 Decadal Survey. Several space missions have been recommended for implementation in the latter part of the decade. However, near term opportunities to lay the foundation for these missions come with the selection by NASA of ICON and GOLD. Their operational periods are expected to overlap with each other as well as with complementary missions from other agencies, such as SSULI, SSUSI, and COSMIC. Remote sensing instrumentation on these missions fulfills a uniquely important role. From low earth orbit, limb imagers deliver altitude profiles of composition, temperature and winds on local and regional scales. Earth disk imagers from a high altitude perspective not only provide context for local observations, but also column measurements of the O/N2 ratio and temperature. The O/N2 ratio has proven to be an exceptionally useful diagnostic of IT dynamics, especially when paired with independent

  17. Advances in Remote Sensing for Assessing High Altitude Glacio-Hydrology - with a Focus on High Mountain Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolch, T.

    2014-12-01

    Meltwater released by glaciers can be of high importance for the overall run-off and thus affect society and development of mountainous regions and their forelands. However, glaciers are mostly located in harsh and remote environment and detailed in-situ measurements are impossible or limited to few glaciers. This lack of measurements of glacier characteristics (e.g. area, debris cover, flow) and mass budgets hampers a correct glacio-hydrologic modelling and representation of processes in advanced simulation models. Remote sensing has been proven a powerful tool in providing essential data to fill this gap. The most basic information in this respect is the location and area of the glaciers. A global and some regional inventories exist, but the uncertainties and differences among them are high, especially with respect to the upper accumulation area and debris cover. I here present a multi-method approach to map glaciers more precisely based on remote sensing data and combining image ratioing (using visible, infrared and thermal bands), micro-wave coherence images, terrain analysis, differencing of digital elevation models (DEMs) and, if available, high resolution images. DEM differencing is used to provide region-wide mass balance assessments, but volume to mass conversion and data voids introduce uncertainties. For High Mountain Asia (HMA), a crucial region in terms of water resources and glacier changes, most studies concentrate on the period after the year 2000 with the SRTM-DEM as baseline data set. However, declassified satellite data from the 1960s and 1970s also exist and allowed to extend the data record back in time for several regions in HMA. Using an example from an ice-covered area of ~5000 km² in the Aksu-Tarim catchment in Central Tien Shan the importance of remote sensing for glacio-hydrological modelling is shown. This is especially true for debris-covered and surge-type glaciers whose reaction to climate is still not fully understood. Therefore

  18. Advanced retrieval method in satellite remote sensing atmosphere: the technique of computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Xun, Yulong

    1998-08-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a modern medical diagnostic technique in which x-ray transmission measurements at numerous angles through the human body are processed by computer to produce cross-sectional pictures of the body. This technique also has found applications in such diverse fields as materials testing, astronomy, microscopy, image processing and oceanography.In this paper, a modification of this technique, using emitted IR or microwave radiation instead of transmitted x-ray radiation, can be applied to satellite radiance measurements taken along the orbital track at various angles. The channels of IR sensors for the CT retrieval are selected from HITRAN Database, and analyzed by Eigen-value analysis. We discuss in detail the effect retrieval result of CT technique form projection-angle. Finally, using the balloon sounding data, the result of CT are compared with the result of conventional method. Because the advantage over conventional remote sensing methods is the additional information acquired by viewing a given point in the atmosphere at several angles as well as several frequencies. The results show that the temperature profiles by CT retrieval are better than the conventional method.

  19. Advances in three-dimensional integral imaging: sensing, display, and applications [Invited].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; Javidi, Bahram; Martinez-Corral, Manuel; Stern, Adrian

    2013-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sensing and imaging technologies have been extensively researched for many applications in the fields of entertainment, medicine, robotics, manufacturing, industrial inspection, security, surveillance, and defense due to their diverse and significant benefits. Integral imaging is a passive multiperspective imaging technique, which records multiple two-dimensional images of a scene from different perspectives. Unlike holography, it can capture a scene such as outdoor events with incoherent or ambient light. Integral imaging can display a true 3D color image with full parallax and continuous viewing angles by incoherent light; thus it does not suffer from speckle degradation. Because of its unique properties, integral imaging has been revived over the past decade or so as a promising approach for massive 3D commercialization. A series of key articles on this topic have appeared in the OSA journals, including Applied Optics. Thus, it is fitting that this Commemorative Review presents an overview of literature on physical principles and applications of integral imaging. Several data capture configurations, reconstruction, and display methods are overviewed. In addition, applications including 3D underwater imaging, 3D imaging in photon-starved environments, 3D tracking of occluded objects, 3D optical microscopy, and 3D polarimetric imaging are reviewed. PMID:23385893

  20. New DEMs may stimulate significant advancements in remote sensing of soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Matt; Fatland, Dennis R.

    From Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo to increasing corn yields in Kansas to greenhouse gas flux in the Arctic, the importance of soil moisture is endemic to world affairs and merits the considerable attention it receives from the scientific community. This importance can hardly be overstated, though it often goes unstated.Soil moisture is one of the key variables in a variety of broad areas critical to the conduct of societies' economic and political affairs and their well-being; these include the health of agricultural crops, global climate dynamics, military trafficability planning, and hazards such as flooding and forest fires. Unfortunately the in situ measurement of the spatial distribution of soil moisture on a watershed-scale is practically impossible. And despite decades of international effort, a satellite remote sensing technique that can reliably measure soil moisture with a spatial resolution of meters has not yet been identified or implemented. Due to the lack of suitable measurement techniques and, until recently digital elevation models (DEMs), our ability to understand and predict soil moisture dynamics through modeling has largely remained crippled from birth [Grayson and Bloschl, 200l].

  1. Development of the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE): An Advanced Airborne DIAL Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Alvah S., Jr.; Brown, Kevin E.; Hall, William M.; Barnes, James C.; Edwards, William C.; Petway, Larry B.; Little, Alan D.; Luck, William S., Jr.; Jones, Irby W.; Antill, Charles W., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) Instrument is the first fully-engineered, autonomous Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) System for the measurement of water vapor in the troposphere (aerosol and cloud measurements are included). LASE uses a double-pulsed Ti:Sapphire laser for the transmitter with a 30 ns pulse length and 150 mJ/pulse. The laser beam is "seeded" to operate on a selected water vapor absorption line in the 815-nm region using a laser diode and an onboard absorption reference cell. A 40 cm diameter telescope collects the backscattered signals and directs them onto two detectors. LASE collects DIAL data at 5 Hz while onboard a NASA/Ames ER-2 aircraft flying at altitudes from 16-21 km. LASE was designed to operate autonomously within the environment and physical constraints of the ER-2 aircraft and to make water vapor profile measurements across the troposphere to better than 10% accuracy. LASE has flown 19 times during the development of the instrument and the validation of the science data. This paper describes the design, operation, and reliability of the LASE Instrument.

  2. Advancement in polarimetric glucose sensing: simulation and measurement of birefringence properties of cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Bilal H.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2011-03-01

    Clinical guidelines dictate that frequent blood glucose monitoring in diabetic patients is critical towards proper management of the disease. Although, several different types of glucose monitors are now commercially available, most of these devices are invasive, thereby adversely affecting patient compliance. To this end, optical polarimetric glucose sensing through the eye has been proposed as a potential noninvasive means to aid in the control of diabetes. Arguably, the most critical and limiting factor towards successful application of such a technique is the time varying corneal birefringence due to eye motion artifact. We present a spatially variant uniaxial eye model to serve as a tool towards better understanding of the cornea's birefringence properties. The simulations show that index-unmatched coupling of light is spatially limited to a smaller range when compared to the index-matched situation. Polarimetric measurements on rabbits' eyes indicate relative agreement between the modeled and experimental values of corneal birefringence. In addition, the observed rotation in the plane of polarized light for multiple wavelengths demonstrates the potential for using a dual-wavelength polarimetric approach to overcome the noise due to timevarying corneal birefringence. These results will ultimately aid us in the development of an appropriate eye coupling mechanism for in vivo polarimetric glucose measurements.

  3. Spatial and Temporal Dust Source Variability in Northern China Identified Using Advanced Remote Sensing Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taramelli, A.; Pasqui, M.; Barbour, J.; Kirschbaum, D.; Bottai, L.; Busillo, C.; Calastrini, F.; Guarnieri, F.; Small, C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to provide a detailed characterization of spatial patterns and temporal trends in the regional and local dust source areas within the desert of the Alashan Prefecture (Inner Mongolia, China). This problem was approached through multi-scale remote sensing analysis of vegetation changes. The primary requirements for this regional analysis are high spatial and spectral resolution data, accurate spectral calibration and good temporal resolution with a suitable temporal baseline. Landsat analysis and field validation along with the low spatial resolution classifications from MODIS and AVHRR are combined to provide a reliable characterization of the different potential dust-producing sources. The representation of intra-annual and inter-annual Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) trend to assess land cover discrimination for mapping potential dust source using MODIS and AVHRR at larger scale is enhanced by Landsat Spectral Mixing Analysis (SMA). The combined methodology is to determine the extent to which Landsat can distinguish important soils types in order to better understand how soil reflectance behaves at seasonal and inter-annual timescales. As a final result mapping soil surface properties using SMA is representative of responses of different land and soil cover previously identified by NDVI trend. The results could be used in dust emission models even if they are not reflecting aggregate formation, soil stability or particle coatings showing to be critical for accurately represent dust source over different regional and local emitting areas.

  4. Photon counting arrays for AO wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, John; Tremsin, Anton; McPhate, Jason; Mikulec, Bettina; Clark, Allan; Siegmund, Oswald

    2005-08-01

    Future wavefront sensors for AO on large telescopes will require a large number of pixels and must operate at high frame rates. Unfortunately for CCDs, there is a readout noise penalty for operating faster, and this noise can add up rather quickly when considering the number of pixels required for the extended shape of a sodium laser guide star observed with a large telescope. Imaging photon counting detectors have zero readout noise and many pixels, but have suffered in the past with low QE at the longer wavelengths (> 500 nm). Recent developments in GaAs photocathode technology, CMOS ASIC readouts and FPGA processing electronics have resulted in noiseless WFS detector designs that are competitive with silicon array detectors, though at ~ 40% the QE of CCDs. We review noiseless array detectors and compare their centroiding performance with CCDs using the best available characteristics of each. We show that for sub-aperture binning of 6x6 and greater that noiseless detectors have a smaller centroid error at fluences of 60 photons or less, though the specific number is dependent on seeing conditions and the centroid algorithm used. We then present the status of a 256x256 noiseless MCP/Medipix2 hybrid detector being developed for AO.

  5. Manipulation of wavefront using helical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhaokun; Tao, Huan; Zhao, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Helical metamaterials, a kind of 3-dimensional structure, has relatively strong coupling effect among the helical nano-wires. Therefore, it is expected to be a good candidate for generating phase shift and controlling wavefront with high efficiency. In this paper, using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we studied the phase shift properties in the helical metamaterials. It is found that the phase shift occurs for both transmitted and reflected light waves. And the maximum of reflection coefficients can reach over 60%. In addition, the phase shift (φ) is dispersionless in the range of 600 nm to 860 nm, that is, it is only dominated by the initial angle (θ) of the helix. The relationship between them is φ = ± 2θ. Using Jones calculus we give a further explanation for these properties. Finally, by arranging the helixes in an array with a constant phase gradient, the phenomenon of anomalous refraction was also observed in a broad wavelength range. PMID:27505790

  6. Technology Advancements for Active Remote Sensing of Carbon Dioxide from Space using the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obland, M. D.; Nehrir, A. R.; Liu, Z.; Chen, S.; Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Kooi, S. A.; Fan, T. F.; Choi, Y.; Plant, J.; Yang, M. M.; Browell, E. V.; Harrison, F. W.; Meadows, B.; Dobler, J. T.; Zaccheo, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    This work describes advances in critical lidar technologies and techniques developed as part of the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) system for measuring atmospheric column carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in support of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The ACES design demonstrates advancements in: (1) enhanced power-aperture product through the use and operation of multiple co-aligned laser transmitters and a multi-aperture telescope design; (2) high-efficiency, high-power Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifiers (EDFAs); (3) high-bandwidth, low-noise HgCdTe detector and transimpedence amplifier (TIA) subsystem capable of long-duration operation; and (4) advanced algorithms for cloud and aerosol discrimination. The ACES instrument, an Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar, was designed for high-altitude aircraft operations and can be directly applied to space instrumentation to meet the ASCENDS mission requirements. Specifically, the lidar simultaneously transmits three IM-CW laser beams from the high power EDFAs operating near 1571 nm. The outgoing laser beams are aligned to the field of view of three fiber-coupled 17.8-cm diameter telescopes, and the backscattered light collected by the same three telescopes is sent to the detector/TIA subsystem, which has a bandwidth of 4.9 MHz and operates service-free with a tactical Dewar and cryocooler. The electronic bandwidth is only slightly higher than 1 MHz, effectively limiting the noise level. Two key laser modulation approaches are being tested to significantly mitigate the effects of thin clouds on the retrieved CO2 column amounts. This work provides an over view of these technologies, the modulation approaches, and results from recent test flights.

  7. Advancements in the development of a directional-position sensing fast neutron detector using acoustically tensioned metastable fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, Brian C.; Webster, Jeffrey A.; Grimes, Thomas F.; Fischer, Kevin F.; Hagen, Alex R.; Taleyakhan, Rusi P.

    2015-06-01

    Advancements in the development of a direction and position sensing fast neutron detector which utilizes the directional acoustic tensioned metastable fluid detector (D-ATMFD) are described. The resulting D-ATMFD sensor is capable of determining the direction of neutron radiation with a single compact detector versus use of arrays of detectors in conventional directional systems. Directional neutron detection and source positioning offer enhanced detection speeds in comparison to traditional proximity searching; including enabling determination of the neutron source shape, size, and strength in near real time. This paper discusses advancements that provide the accuracy and precision of ascertaining directionality and source localization information utilizing enhanced signal processing-cum-signal analysis, refined computational algorithms, and on-demand enlargement capability of the detector sensitive volume. These advancements were accomplished utilizing experimentation and theoretical modeling. Benchmarking and qualifications studies were successfully conducted with random and fission based special nuclear material (SNM) neutron sources (239Pu-Be and 252Cf). These results of assessments have indicated that the D-ATMFD compares well in technical performance with banks of competing directional fast neutron detector technologies under development worldwide, but it does so with a single detector unit, an unlimited field of view, and at a significant reduction in both cost and size while remaining completely blind to common background (e.g., beta-gamma) radiation. Rapid and direct SNM neutron source imaging with two D-ATMFD sensors was experimentally demonstrated, and furthermore, validated via multidimensional nuclear particle transport simulations utilizing MCNP-PoliMi. Characterization of a scaled D-ATMFD based radiation portal monitor (RPM) as a cost-effective and efficient 3He sensor replacement was performed utilizing MCNP-PoliMi simulations, the results of which

  8. High altitude airborne remote sensing mission using the advanced microwave precipitation radiometer (AMPR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galliano, J.; Platt, R. H.; Spencer, Roy; Hood, Robbie

    1991-01-01

    The advanced microwave precipitation radiometer (AMPR) is an airborne multichannel imaging radiometer used to better understand how the earth's climate structure works. Airborne data results from the October 1990 Florida thunderstorm mission in Jacksonville, FL, are described. AMPR data on atmospheric precipitation in mesoscale storms were retrieved at 10.7, 19.35, 37.1, and 85.5 GHz onboard the ER-2 aircraft at an altitude of 20 km. AMPR's three higher-frequency data channels were selected to operate at the same frequencies as the spaceborne special sensor microwave/imager (SSM/I) presently in orbit. AMPR uses two antennas to receive the four frequencies: the lowest frequency channel uses a 9.7-in aperture lens antennas, while the three higher-frequency channels share a separate 5.3-in aperture lens antenna. The radiometer's temperature resolution performance is summarized.

  9. Advanced sensing and control techniques to facilitate semi-autonomous decommissioning. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Schalkoff, R.J.; Geist, R.M.; Dawson, D.M.

    1998-06-01

    'This research is intended to advance the technology of semi-autonomous teleoperated robotics as applied to Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) tasks. Specifically, research leading to a prototype dual-manipulator mobile work cell is underway. This cell is supported and enhanced by computer vision, virtual reality and advanced robotics technology. This report summarizes work after approximately 1.5 years of a 3-year project. The autonomous, non-contact creation of a virtual environment from an existing, real environment (virtualization) is an integral part of the workcell functionality. This requires that the virtual world be geometrically correct. To this end, the authors have encountered severe sensitivity in quadric estimation. As a result, alternative procedures for geometric rendering, iterative correction approaches, new calibration methods and associated hardware, and calibration quality examination software have been developed. Following geometric rendering, the authors have focused on improving the color and texture recognition components of the system. In particular, the authors have moved beyond first-order illumination modeling to include higher order diffuse effects. This allows us to combine the surface geometric information, obtained from the laser projection and surface recognition components of the system, with a stereo camera image. Low-level controllers for Puma 560 robotic arms were designed and implemented using QNX. The resulting QNX/PC based low-level robot control system is called QRobot. A high-level trajectory generator and application programming interface (API) as well as a new, flexible robot control API was required. Force/torque sensors and interface hardware have been identified and ordered. A simple 3-D OpenGL-based graphical Puma 560 robot simulator was developed and interfaced with ARCL and RCCL to assist in the development of robot motion programs.'

  10. Advances in Using Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing to Identify the Mixing of Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, M. A.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Rosenberry, D. O.; Harvey, J. W.; Lane, J. W., Jr.; Hare, D. K.; Boutt, D. F.; Voytek, E. B.; Buckley, S.

    2014-12-01

    Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) provides thermal data through space and time along linear cables. When installed along a streambed, FO-DTS can capture the influence of upwelling groundwater (GW) as thermal anomalies. The planning of labor-intensive physical measurements can make use of FO-DTS data to target areas of focused GW discharge that can disproportionately affect surface-water (SW) quality and temperature. Typical longitudinal FO-DTS spatial resolution ranges 0.25 to1.0 m, and cannot resolve small-scale water-column mixing or sub-surface diurnal fluctuations. However, configurations where the cable is wrapped around rods can improve the effective vertical resolution to sub-centimeter scales, and the pipes can be actively heated to induce a thermal tracer. Longitudinal streambed and high-resolution vertical arrays were deployed at the upper Delaware River (PA, USA) and the Quashnet River (MA, USA) for aquatic habitat studies. The resultant datasets exemplify the varied uses of FO-DTS. Cold anomalies found along the Delaware River steambed coincide with zones of known mussel populations, and high-resolution vertical array data showed relatively stable in-channel thermal refugia. Cold anomalies at the Quashnet River identified in 2013 were found to persist in 2014, and seepage measurements and water samples at these locations showed high GW flux with distinctive chemistry. Cable location is paramount to seepage identification, particularly in faster flowing deep streams such as the Quashnet and Delaware Rivers where steambed FO-DTS identified many seepage zones with no surface expression. The temporal characterization of seepage dynamics are unique to FO-DTS. However, data from Tidmarsh Farms, a cranberry bog restoration site in MA, USA indicate that in slower flowing shallow steams GW inflow affects surface temperature; therefore infrared imaging can provide seepage location information similar to FO-DTS with substantially less effort.

  11. Advances in Fluorescence Sensing Systems for the Remote Assessment of Nitrogen Supply in Field Corn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corp, L. A.; Chappelle, E. W.; McMurtrey, J. E.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Kim, M. S.

    2000-01-01

    The studies described herein were conducted to better define changes in fluorescence properties of leaves from field grown corn (Zea mays L.) as they relate to varying levels of nitrogen (N) fertilization. This research was directed toward: 1) providing a remote non-destructive sensing technique to aid in the determination of optimal rates of N fertilization in corn crops and, 2) defining parameters for further development of fluorescence instrumentation to be operated remotely at field canopy levels. Fluorescence imaging bands centered in the blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), red (680 nm), and far-red (740 nm) and ratios of these bands were compared with the following plant parameters: rates of photosynthesis, N:C ratio, pigment concentrations, and grain yields. Both the fluorescence and physiological measures exhibited similar curvilinear responses to N fertilization level while significant linear correlations were obtained among fluorescence bands and band ratios to certain physiological measures of plant productivity. The red / blue, red / green, far-red / blue, far-red /green fluorescence ratios are well suited for remote observation and provided high correlations to grain yield, LAI, N:C, and chlorophyll contents. The results from this investigation indicate that fluorescence technology could aid in the determination of N fertilization requirements for corn. This discussion will also address design concepts and preliminary field trials of a mobile field-based Laser Induced Fluorescence Imaging System (LIFIS) capable of simultaneously acquiring images of four fluorescence emission bands from areas of plant canopies equaling 1 sq m and greater without interference of ambient solar radiation.

  12. The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) Technology Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahle, Carl; Balasubramanian, K.; Bolcar, M.; Clampin, M.; Feinberg, L.; Hartman, K.; Mosier, C.; Quijada, M.; Rauscher, B.; Redding, D.; Shaklan, S.; Stahl, P.; Thronson, H.

    2014-01-01

    We present the key technologies and capabilities that will enable a future, large-aperture ultravioletopticalinfrared (UVOIR) space observatory. These include starlight suppression systems, vibration isolation and control systems, lightweight mirror segments, detector systems, and mirror coatings. These capabilities will provide major advances over current and near-future observatories for sensitivity, angular resolution, and starlight suppression. The goals adopted in our study for the starlight suppression system are 10-10 contrast with an inner working angle of 40 milliarcsec and broad bandpass. We estimate that a vibration and isolation control system that achieves a total system vibration isolation of 140 dB for a vibration-isolated mass of 5000 kg is required to achieve the high wavefront error stability needed for exoplanet coronagraphy. Technology challenges for lightweight mirror segments include diffraction-limited optical quality and high wavefront error stability as well as low cost, low mass, and rapid fabrication. Key challenges for the detector systems include visible-blind, high quantum efficiency UV arrays, photon counting visible and NIR arrays for coronagraphic spectroscopy and starlight wavefront sensing and control, and detectors with deep full wells with low persistence and radiation tolerance to enable transit imaging and spectroscopy at all wavelengths. Finally, mirror coatings with high reflectivity ( 90), high uniformity ( 1) and low polarization ( 1) that are scalable to large diameter mirror substrates will be essential for ensuring that both high throughput UV observations and high contrast observations can be performed by the same observatory.

  13. McIDAS-V: Advanced Visualization for 3D Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rink, T.; Achtor, T. H.

    2010-12-01

    McIDAS-V is a Java-based, open-source, freely available software package for analysis and visualization of geophysical data. Its advanced capabilities provide very interactive 4-D displays, including 3D volumetric rendering and fast sub-manifold slicing, linked to an abstract mathematical data model with built-in metadata for units, coordinate system transforms and sampling topology. A Jython interface provides user defined analysis and computation in terms of the internal data model. These powerful capabilities to integrate data, analysis and visualization are being applied to hyper-spectral sounding retrievals, eg. AIRS and IASI, of moisture and cloud density to interrogate and analyze their 3D structure, as well as, validate with instruments such as CALIPSO, CloudSat and MODIS. The object oriented framework design allows for specialized extensions for novel displays and new sources of data. Community defined CF-conventions for gridded data are understood by the software, and can be immediately imported into the application. This presentation will show examples how McIDAS-V is used in 3-dimensional data analysis, display and evaluation.

  14. The advanced microwave precipitation radiometer: A new aircraft radiometer for passive precipitation remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Robbie E.; Spencer, Roy W.; James, Mark W.

    1991-01-01

    Past studies of passive microwave measurements of precipitating systems have yielded broad empirical relationships between hydrometeors and microwave transmission. In general, these relationships fall into two categories of passive microwave precipitation retrievals rely upon the observed effect of liquid precipitation to increase the brightness temperature of a radiometrically cold background such as an ocean surface. A scattering-based method is based upon the effect that frozen hydrometeors tend to decrease the brightness temperature of a radiometrically warm background such as land. One step toward developing quantitative brightness temperature-rain rate relationships is the recent construction of a new aircraft instrument sponsored by National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC). This instrument is the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) designed and built by Georgia Tech Research Institute to fly aboard high altitude research aircraft such as the NASA ER-2. The AMPR and its accompanying data acquisition system are mounted in the Q-bay compartment of the NASA ER-2.

  15. AgriSense-STARS: Advancing Methods of Agricultural Monitoring for Food Security in Smallholder Regions - the Case for Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempewolf, J.; Becker-Reshef, I.; Nakalembe, C. L.; Tumbo, S.; Maurice, S.; Mbilinyi, B.; Ntikha, O.; Hansen, M.; Justice, C. J.; Adusei, B.; Kongo, V.

    2015-12-01

    In-season monitoring of crop conditions provides critical information for agricultural policy and decision making and most importantly for food security planning and management. Nationwide agricultural monitoring in countries dominated by smallholder farming systems, generally relies on extensive networks of field data collectors. In Tanzania, extension agents make up this network and report on conditions across the country, approaching a "near-census". Data is collected on paper which is resource and time intensive, as well as prone to errors. Data quality is ambiguous and there is a general lack of clear and functional feedback loops between farmers, extension agents, analysts and decision makers. Moreover, the data are not spatially explicit, limiting the usefulness for analysis and quality of policy outcomes. Despite significant advances in remote sensing and information communication technologies (ICT) for monitoring agriculture, the full potential of these new tools is yet to be realized in Tanzania. Their use is constrained by the lack of resources, skills and infrastructure to access and process these data. The use of ICT technologies for data collection, processing and analysis is equally limited. The AgriSense-STARS project is developing and testing a system for national-scale in-season monitoring of smallholder agriculture using a combination of three main tools, 1) GLAM-East Africa, an automated MODIS satellite image processing system, 2) field data collection using GeoODK and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and 3) the Tanzania Crop Monitor, a collaborative online portal for data management and reporting. These tools are developed and applied in Tanzania through the National Food Security Division of the Ministry of Agriculture, Food Security and Cooperatives (MAFC) within a statistically representative sampling framework (area frame) that ensures data quality, representability and resource efficiency.

  16. Hyperspectral remote sensing for advanced detection of early blight (Alternaria solani) disease in potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Daniel

    Early detection of disease and insect infestation within crops and precise application of pesticides can help reduce potential production losses, reduce environmental risk, and reduce the cost of farming. The goal of this study was the advanced detection of early blight (Alternaria solani) in potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants using hyperspectral remote sensing data captured with a handheld spectroradiometer. Hyperspectral reflectance spectra were captured 10 times over five weeks from plants grown to the vegetative and tuber bulking growth stages. The spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA), spectral change (ratio) analysis, partial least squares (PLS), cluster analysis, and vegetative indices. PCA successfully distinguished more heavily diseased plants from healthy and minimally diseased plants using two principal components. Spectral change (ratio) analysis provided wavelengths (490-510, 640, 665-670, 690, 740-750, and 935 nm) most sensitive to early blight infection followed by ANOVA results indicating a highly significant difference (p < 0.0001) between disease rating group means. In the majority of the experiments, comparisons of diseased plants with healthy plants using Fisher's LSD revealed more heavily diseased plants were significantly different from healthy plants. PLS analysis demonstrated the feasibility of detecting early blight infected plants, finding four optimal factors for raw spectra with the predictor variation explained ranging from 93.4% to 94.6% and the response variation explained ranging from 42.7% to 64.7%. Cluster analysis successfully distinguished healthy plants from all diseased plants except for the most mildly diseased plants, showing clustering analysis was an effective method for detection of early blight. Analysis of the reflectance spectra using the simple ratio (SR) and the normalized difference vegetative index (NDVI) was effective at differentiating all diseased plants from healthy plants, except for the

  17. A discussion of two wavefront aberration correction procedures.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, B D

    1992-10-01

    This review paper discusses the basic properties of two adaptive signal processing procedures for dealing with weak scattering in a phased array transducer system. A fundamental improvement in the lateral resolution of ultrasonic echo scanners will result if the weight vector of a large phased array transducer can be modified to account for distortion in the propagation medium. Lateral resolution in most tissue is limited to a few mm by wavefront-distortion-induced sound-speed variations. One important wavefront-distortion source is scattering from local speed variations within large and reasonably homogeneous tissue beds such as the liver. Scattering disperses some energy from the beam and perturbs the wavefront, thereby distorting the image and limiting the resolution to the scale of the distortion. Often, such scattering is weak, meaning that most of the energy in the beam is unscattered. The total field at the receiving transducer is the vector sum of the unscattered and scattered fields. In weak scattering the unscattered field is dominant and the resultant field can be treated as the unscattered field plus a perturbation. The net effect is primarily a distorted phasefront, while the amplitude or modulus of the wavefront remains reasonably intact. Refraction and strong scattering effect the wavefront more severely and are less responsive to these algorithms.

  18. Mid-Infrared Laser Beam Diagnostic Wavefront Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goranson, Rex; Blea, Joe; Chipps, Art; Denton, Grant; Houchard, Jeff

    1988-08-01

    The Rockwell Wavefront Analyzer (RWA) is an integrated beam diagnostic tool developed for the US Army, STEWS, WSMR, for the MIRACL device. It accepts a 2.5 cm square nominally collimated DF laser beam input of approximately 5 W power level. The electrical signals are reduced and analyzed by an on-line computer processor. The ultimate outputs are plots including total beam power and angular jitter in the x and y axes, an irradiance map of the beam on a 32 X 32 square grid, and a wavefront map of the beam on the same grid. Wavefront aberration poly-nomial coefficient listings are also generated. The wavefront is obtained from measurements of its local slope in two axes by means of a classical Hartmann test done by scanning the pupil with holes in a rotating drum. Earlier versions of this instrument we called SHAPE, for Scanning Hartmann Analyzer Plate Experiment. This design would be SHAPE IV. A single indium antimonide photopot detector measures the transverse ray aberrations, which are then subjected to elaborate processing to extract the polynomial wavefront coefficients. Another photopot is the jitter sensor. Each photopot measures power to normalize the X and Y signals; these "Z" signals also provide the beam power and local irradiance signals.

  19. Wavefront measurement of plastic lenses for mobile-phone applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Li-Ting; Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Wang, Chung-Yen; Wang, Pei-Jen

    2016-08-01

    In camera lenses for mobile-phone applications, all lens elements have been designed with aspheric surfaces because of the requirements in minimal total track length of the lenses. Due to the diffraction-limited optics design with precision assembly procedures, element inspection and lens performance measurement have become cumbersome in the production of mobile-phone cameras. Recently, wavefront measurements based on Shack-Hartmann sensors have been successfully implemented on injection-molded plastic lens with aspheric surfaces. However, the applications of wavefront measurement on small-sized plastic lenses have yet to be studied both theoretically and experimentally. In this paper, both an in-house-built and a commercial wavefront measurement system configured on two optics structures have been investigated with measurement of wavefront aberrations on two lens elements from a mobile-phone camera. First, the wet-cell method has been employed for verifications of aberrations due to residual birefringence in an injection-molded lens. Then, two lens elements of a mobile-phone camera with large positive and negative power have been measured with aberrations expressed in Zernike polynomial to illustrate the effectiveness in wavefront measurement for troubleshooting defects in optical performance.

  20. Genesis of return stroke current evolution at the wavefront

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Udaya; Raysaha, Rosy Balaram

    2013-07-01

    The channel dynamics at the wavefront is complex and is primarily responsible for the evolution of return stroke current. The enhancement of channel conductance at the wavefront is necessary for the evolution of current and hence, return stroke. In this regard several questions arise like: (i) what causes the enhancement of conductance, (ii) as the channel core temperature and electrical conductance are closely related, does one support the other and (iii) is the increase in core temperature on the nascent section of the channel the result of free burning arc of the wavefront just below. The present work investigates on these issues with appropriate transient thermal analysis and a macroscopic physical model for the lightning return stroke. Results clearly indicate that the contribution from the thermal field of the wavefront region to the adjacent nascent channel section is negligible as compared to the field enhancement brought in by the same. In other words, the whole process of return stroke evolution is dependent on the local heat generation at the nascent section caused by the enhancement of electric field due to the arrival of the wavefront.

  1. Aero-optical jitter estimation using higher-order wavefronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteley, Matthew R.; Goorskey, David J.; Drye, Richard

    2013-07-01

    Wavefront measurements from wind tunnel or flight testing of an optical system are affected by jitter sources due to the measurement platform, system vibrations, or aero-mechanical buffeting. Depending on the nature of the testing, the wavefront jitter will be a composite of several effects, one of which is the aero-optical jitter; i.e., the wavefront tilt due to random air density fluctuations. To isolate the aero-optical jitter component from recent testing, we have developed an estimation technique that uses only higher-order wavefront measurements to determine the jitter. By analogy with work done previously with free-stream turbulence, we have developed a minimum mean-square error estimator using higher-order wavefront modes to compute the current-frame tilt components through a linear operation. The estimator is determined from computational fluid dynamics evaluation of aero-optical disturbances, but does not depend on the strength of such disturbances. Applying this technique to turret flight test data, we found aero-optical jitter to be 7.7±0.8 μrad and to scale with (ρ/ρSL)M2 (˜1 μrad in the actual test cases examined). The half-power point of the aero-optical jitter variance was found to be ˜2u∞/Dt and to roll off in temporal frequency with a power law between f and f.

  2. GIS-based analysis and modelling with empirical and remotely-sensed data on coastline advance and retreat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Sajid Rashid

    With the understanding that far more research remains to be done on the development and use of innovative and functional geospatial techniques and procedures to investigate coastline changes this thesis focussed on the integration of remote sensing, geographical information systems (GIS) and modelling techniques to provide meaningful insights on the spatial and temporal dynamics of coastline changes. One of the unique strengths of this research was the parameterization of the GIS with long-term empirical and remote sensing data. Annual empirical data from 1941--2007 were analyzed by the GIS, and then modelled with statistical techniques. Data were also extracted from Landsat TM and ETM+ images. The band ratio method was used to extract the coastlines. Topographic maps were also used to extract digital map data. All data incorporated into ArcGIS 9.2 were analyzed with various modules, including Spatial Analyst, 3D Analyst, and Triangulated Irregular Networks. The Digital Shoreline Analysis System was used to analyze and predict rates of coastline change. GIS results showed the spatial locations along the coast that will either advance or retreat over time. The linear regression results highlighted temporal changes which are likely to occur along the coastline. Box-Jenkins modelling procedures were utilized to determine statistical models which best described the time series (1941--2007) of coastline change data. After several iterations and goodness-of-fit tests, second-order spatial cyclic autoregressive models, first-order autoregressive models and autoregressive moving average models were identified as being appropriate for describing the deterministic and random processes operating in Guyana's coastal system. The models highlighted not only cyclical patterns in advance and retreat of the coastline, but also the existence of short and long-term memory processes. Long-term memory processes could be associated with mudshoal propagation and stabilization while short

  3. Wavefront sampling technique : VHE gamma-ray experiments in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, P. N.

    2002-03-01

    Atmospheric Cverenkov techniques is the only method which has been successfully used to probe the sky in the TeV energy band. However it has certain intrinsic drawbacks arising primarily out of the presence of cosmic rays which out-number gamma-rays by around a factor of ~ 1000. Second generation experiments in the field have developed some novel techniques by which a bulk of the cosmic rays could be rejected thus increasing the signal to noise ratio. Thus the field emerged from an era when the confidence level of positive results were rarely larger than a few standard deviations. The underlying technique responsible for this phenomenal success was the ability to identify the primary species from the Cverenkov images recorded at the observation level, first demonstrated by simulation studies. Subsequently, it was found again through simulation techniques, that the spatial sampling of Cverenkov photons too is potentially a viable as well as powerful technique which is yet to be fully exploited. Several Cverenkov telescope arrays are now in advanced stages of operation which employ this technique in order to reduce the cosmic ray background. This technique, also called the wavefront sampling technique, is being employed for studying TeV gamma-rays at the Pachmarhi Array of Cverenkov Telescopes (PACT). While comparing the two power ful techniques, we will also discuss the progress made by the PACT team in trying to achieve a significant signal to noise ratio by this method. PACT has detected a steady flux of TeV gamma-rays from the Crab Nebula at a significance level of 13.4?. PACT also detectred the TeV ?-ays flares from Mkn421 during two episodes, one in January 2000 and the other in January 2001. The variability of gamma-ray count rate is consistent with other contemporaneous observations of the sources.

  4. Advances in regional crop yield estimation over the United States using satellite remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D. M.; Dorn, M. F.; Crawford, C.

    2015-12-01

    Since the dawn of earth observation imagery, particularly from systems like Landsat and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer, there has been an overarching desire to regionally estimate crop production remotely. Research efforts integrating space-based imagery into yield models to achieve this need have indeed paralleled these systems through the years, yet development of a truly useful crop production monitoring system has been arguably mediocre in coming. As a result, relatively few organizations have yet to operationalize the concept, and this is most acute in regions of the globe where there are not even alternative sources of crop production data being collected. However, the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) has continued to push for this type of data source as a means to complement its long-standing, traditional crop production survey efforts which are financially costly to the government and create undue respondent burden on farmers. Corn and soybeans, the two largest field crops in the United States, have been the focus of satellite-based production monitoring by NASS for the past decade. Data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has been seen as the most pragmatic input source for modeling yields primarily based on its daily revisit capabilities and reasonable ground sample resolution. The research methods presented here will be broad but provides a summary of what is useful and adoptable with satellite imagery in terms of crop yield estimation. Corn and soybeans will be of particular focus but other major staple crops like wheat and rice will also be presented. NASS will demonstrate that while MODIS provides a slew of vegetation related products, the traditional normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is still ideal. Results using land surface temperature products, also generated from MODIS, will also be shown. Beyond the MODIS data itself, NASS research has also focused efforts on understanding a

  5. Wavefront reconstruction and piston measurement using Ronchi test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penalver, Dayana H.; Granados-Agustin, Fermin; Romero-Antequera, David L.

    2011-10-01

    Ronchi test represents an economical alternative, with ease implementation and uncertainties in the order of wavelength, to measure the piston between the elements of a segmented mirror. The current trend of using non monolithic surfaces as imaging systems in telescopes or adaptive optical systems in medical devices, open the field for the development of new wavefront sensors that would retrieve information allowing an optimal disposition of the segments to form an image with minimum of optical aberration. This paper uses the Ronchi test to reconstruct the wavefront, and measure the piston between two adjacent mirrors. Based on a geometrical relation, we have developed a computer software that determine the distance between the mirrors and the light source using a nonlinear optimization algorithm. In order to achieve this goal, it is necessary to perform a several stages processing to the input images. Finally, the wavefront reconstruction is carried out using a combined nonlinear optimization and least square algorithm.

  6. Reflected wavefront manipulation based on ultrathin planar acoustic metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Liang, Bin; Gu, Zhong-ming; Zou, Xin-ye; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of metasurfaces has renewed the Snell's law and opened up new degrees of freedom to tailor the optical wavefront at will. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that the generalized Snell's law can be achieved for reflected acoustic waves based on ultrathin planar acoustic metasurfaces. The metasurfaces are constructed with eight units of a solid structure to provide discrete phase shifts covering the full 2π span with steps of π/4 by coiling up the space. By careful selection of the phase profiles in the transverse direction of the metasurfaces, some fascinating wavefront engineering phenomena are demonstrated, such as anomalous reflections, conversion of propagating waves into surface waves, planar aberration-free lens and nondiffracting Bessel beam generated by planar acoustic axicon. Our results could open up a new avenue for acoustic wavefront engineering and manipulations. PMID:23986034

  7. Hartmann wavefront sensors and their application at FLASH.

    PubMed

    Keitel, Barbara; Plönjes, Elke; Kreis, Svea; Kuhlmann, Marion; Tiedtke, Kai; Mey, Tobias; Schäfer, Bernd; Mann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Different types of Hartmann wavefront sensors are presented which are usable for a variety of applications in the soft X-ray spectral region at FLASH, the free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg. As a typical application, online measurements of photon beam parameters during mirror alignment are reported on. A compact Hartmann sensor, operating in the wavelength range from 4 to 38 nm, was used to determine the wavefront quality as well as aberrations of individual FEL pulses during the alignment procedure. Beam characterization and alignment of the focusing optics of the FLASH beamline BL3 were performed with λ(13.5 nm)/116 accuracy for wavefront r.m.s. (w(rms)) repeatability, resulting in a reduction of w(rms) by 33% during alignment. PMID:26698044

  8. Hartmann wavefront sensors and their application at FLASH.

    PubMed

    Keitel, Barbara; Plönjes, Elke; Kreis, Svea; Kuhlmann, Marion; Tiedtke, Kai; Mey, Tobias; Schäfer, Bernd; Mann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Different types of Hartmann wavefront sensors are presented which are usable for a variety of applications in the soft X-ray spectral region at FLASH, the free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg. As a typical application, online measurements of photon beam parameters during mirror alignment are reported on. A compact Hartmann sensor, operating in the wavelength range from 4 to 38 nm, was used to determine the wavefront quality as well as aberrations of individual FEL pulses during the alignment procedure. Beam characterization and alignment of the focusing optics of the FLASH beamline BL3 were performed with λ(13.5 nm)/116 accuracy for wavefront r.m.s. (w(rms)) repeatability, resulting in a reduction of w(rms) by 33% during alignment.

  9. Accelerated wavefront determination technique for optical imaging through scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hexiang; Wong, Kam Sing

    2016-03-01

    Wavefront shaping applied on scattering light is a promising optical imaging method in biological systems. Normally, optimized modulation can be obtained by a Liquid-Crystal Spatial Light Modulator (LC-SLM) and CCD hardware iteration. Here we introduce an improved method for this optimization process. The core of the proposed method is to firstly detect the disturbed wavefront, and then to calculate the modulation phase pattern by computer simulation. In particular, phase retrieval method together with phase conjugation is most effective. In this way, the LC-SLM based system can complete the wavefront optimization and imaging restoration within several seconds which is two orders of magnitude faster than the conventional technique. The experimental results show good imaging quality and may contribute to real time imaging recovery in scattering medium.

  10. High-contrast imager for complex aperture telescopes (HiCAT): 3. first lab results with wavefront control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'Diaye, Mamadou; Mazoyer, Johan; Choquet, Élodie; Pueyo, Laurent; Perrin, Marshall D.; Egron, Sylvain; Leboulleux, Lucie; Levecq, Olivier; Carlotti, Alexis; Long, Chris A.; Lajoie, Rachel; Soummer, Rémi

    2015-09-01

    HiCAT is a high-contrast imaging testbed designed to provide complete solutions in wavefront sensing, control and starlight suppression with complex aperture telescopes. The pupil geometry of such observatories includes primary mirror segmentation, central obstruction, and spider vanes, which make the direct imaging of habitable worlds very challenging. The testbed alignment was completed in the summer of 2014, exceeding specifications with a total wavefront error of 12nm rms over a 18mm pupil. The installation of two deformable mirrors for wavefront control is to be completed in the winter of 2015. In this communication, we report on the first testbed results using a classical Lyot coronagraph. We also present the coronagraph design for HiCAT geometry, based on our recent development of Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph (APLC) with shaped-pupil type optimizations. These new APLC-type solutions using two-dimensional shaped-pupil apodizer render the system quasi-insensitive to jitter and low-order aberrations, while improving the performance in terms of inner working angle, bandpass and contrast over a classical APLC.

  11. Broadband Interferometer for Measuring Transmitted Wavefronts of Optical Bandpass Filters for HST (ACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boucarut, R. A.; Leviton, D. B.

    1998-01-01

    The transmitted wavefronts of optical filters for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) are characterized using the Wildly and Openly Modified Broadband Achromatic Twyman Green (WOMBAT) Interferometer developed in the NASA/GSFC Optics Branch's Diffraction Grating Evaluation Facility (DGEF). Because only four of thirty-three of ACS's optical bandpass filters transmit the 633 nm light of most commercial interferometers, a broadband interferometer is required to verify specified transmitted wavefront of ACS filters. WOMBAT's design is a hybrid of the BAT interferometer developed by JPL used for HST Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) filters and a WYKO 400 phase shifting interferometer. It includes a broadband light source, monochromator, off-axis, parabolic collimating and camera mirrors, an aluminum-coated fused silica beam splitter, flat retroreflecting mirrors for the test and reference arms, and a LTV-sensitive CCD camera. An outboarded, piezo-electric phase shifter holds the flat mirror in the interferometer's reference arm. The interferometer is calibrated through interaction between the WYKO system's software and WONMAT hardware for the test wavelength of light entering the beam splitter. Phase-shifted interferograms of the filter mounted in the test arm are analyzed using WYKO's Vision' software. Filters as large as 90 mm in diameter have been measured over a wavelength range from 200 to 1100 nm with a sensitivity of lambda/200 rms at lambda = 633 nm. Results of transmitted wavefront measurements are shown for ACS fixed band pass and spatially-variable bandpass filters for a variety of wavelengths.

  12. Asphericity analysis using corneal wavefront and topographic meridional fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arba-Mosquera, Samuel; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; de Ortueta, Diego

    2010-03-01

    The calculation of corneal asphericity as a 3-D fit renders more accurate results when it is based on the corneal wavefront aberrations rather than on the corneal topography of the principal meridians. A more accurate prediction could be obtained for hyperopic treatments compared to myopic treatments. We evaluate a method to calculate corneal asphericity and asphericity changes after refractive surgery. Sixty eyes of 15 consecutive myopic patients and 15 consecutive hyperopic patients (n=30 each) are retrospectively evaluated. Preoperative and 3-month-postoperative topographic and corneal wavefront analyses are performed using corneal topography. Ablations are performed using a laser with an aberration-free profile. Topographic changes in asphericity and corneal aberrations are evaluated for a 6-mm corneal diameter. The induction of corneal spherical aberrations and asphericity changes correlates with the achieved defocus correction. Preoperatively as well as postoperatively, asphericity calculated from the topography meridians correlates with asphericity calculated from the corneal wavefront in myopic and hyperopic treatments. A stronger correlation between postoperative asphericity and the ideally expected/predicted asphericity is obtained based on aberration-free assumptions calculated from corneal wavefront values rather than from the meridians. In hyperopic treatments, a better correlation can be obtained compared to the correlation in myopic treatments. Corneal asphericity calculated from corneal wavefront aberrations represents a 3-D fit of the corneal surface; asphericity calculated from the main topographic meridians represents a 2-D fit of the principal corneal meridians. Postoperative corneal asphericity can be calculated from corneal wavefront aberrations with higher fidelity than from corneal topography of the principal meridians. Hyperopic treatments show a greater accuracy than myopic treatments.

  13. Advancements for Active Remote Sensing of Carbon Dioxide from Space using the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obland, M. D.; Nehrir, A. R.; Lin, B.; Harrison, F. W.; Kooi, S. A.; Choi, Y.; Plant, J.; Yang, M. M.; Antill, C.; Campbell, J. F.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E. V.; Meadows, B.; Dobler, J. T.; Zaccheo, T. S.; Moore, B., III; Crowell, S.

    2014-12-01

    The ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) is an Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave lidar system recently developed at NASA Langley Research Center that seeks to advance technologies and techniques critical to measuring atmospheric column carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in support of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. These advancements include: (1) increasing the power-aperture product to approach ASCENDS mission requirements by implementing multi-aperture telescopes and multiple co-aligned laser transmitters; (2) incorporating high-efficiency, high-power Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifiers (EDFAs); (3) developing and incorporating a high-bandwidth, low-noise HgCdTe detector and transimpedence amplifier (TIA) subsystem capable of long-duration operation on Global Hawk aircraft, and (4) advancing algorithms for cloud and aerosol discrimination. The ACES instrument architecture is being developed for operation on high-altitude aircraft and will be directly scalable to meet the ASCENDS mission requirements. ACES simultaneously transmits five laser beams: three from commercial EDFAs operating near 1571 nm, and two from the Exelis oxygen (O2) Raman fiber laser amplifier system operating near 1260 nm. The Integrated-Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar approach is used at both wavelengths to independently measure the CO2 and O2 column number densities and retrieve the average column CO2 mixing ratio. The outgoing laser beams are aligned to the field of view of ACES' three fiber-coupled 17.8-cm diameter athermal telescopes. The backscattered light collected by the three telescopes is sent to the detector/TIA subsystem, which has a bandwidth of 4.7 MHz and operates service-free using a tactical dewar and cryocooler. Two key laser modulation approaches are being tested to significantly mitigate the effects of thin clouds on the retrieved CO2 column amounts. Full instrument development concluded in the

  14. Broadband manipulation of acoustic wavefronts by pentamode metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Wei, Qi; Cheng, Ying; Xu, Zheng; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-11-01

    An acoustic metasurface with a sub-wavelength thickness can manipulate acoustic wavefronts freely by the introduction of abrupt phase variation. However, the existence of a narrow bandwidth and a low transmittance limits further applications. Here, we present a broadband and highly transparent acoustic metasurface based on a frequency-independent generalized acoustic Snell's law and pentamode metamaterials. The proposal employs a gradient velocity to redirect refracted waves and pentamode metamaterials to improve impedance matching between the metasurface and the background medium. Excellent wavefront manipulation based on the metasurface is further demonstrated by anomalous refraction, generation of non-diffracting Bessel beam, and sub-wavelength flat focusing.

  15. Broadband manipulation of acoustic wavefronts by pentamode metasurface

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Ye; Wei, Qi Cheng, Ying; Xu, Zheng; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-11-30

    An acoustic metasurface with a sub-wavelength thickness can manipulate acoustic wavefronts freely by the introduction of abrupt phase variation. However, the existence of a narrow bandwidth and a low transmittance limits further applications. Here, we present a broadband and highly transparent acoustic metasurface based on a frequency-independent generalized acoustic Snell's law and pentamode metamaterials. The proposal employs a gradient velocity to redirect refracted waves and pentamode metamaterials to improve impedance matching between the metasurface and the background medium. Excellent wavefront manipulation based on the metasurface is further demonstrated by anomalous refraction, generation of non-diffracting Bessel beam, and sub-wavelength flat focusing.

  16. One dimensional wavefront distortion sensor comprising a lens array system

    DOEpatents

    Neal, D.R.; Michie, R.B.

    1996-02-20

    A 1-dimensional sensor for measuring wavefront distortion of a light beam as a function of time and spatial position includes a lens system which incorporates a linear array of lenses, and a detector system which incorporates a linear array of light detectors positioned from the lens system so that light passing through any of the lenses is focused on at least one of the light detectors. The 1-dimensional sensor determines the slope of the wavefront by location of the detectors illuminated by the light. The 1 dimensional sensor has much greater bandwidth that 2 dimensional systems. 8 figs.

  17. One dimensional wavefront distortion sensor comprising a lens array system

    DOEpatents

    Neal, Daniel R.; Michie, Robert B.

    1996-01-01

    A 1-dimensional sensor for measuring wavefront distortion of a light beam as a function of time and spatial position includes a lens system which incorporates a linear array of lenses, and a detector system which incorporates a linear array of light detectors positioned from the lens system so that light passing through any of the lenses is focused on at least one of the light detectors. The 1-dimensional sensor determines the slope of the wavefront by location of the detectors illuminated by the light. The 1 dimensional sensor has much greater bandwidth that 2 dimensional systems.

  18. Generation of atmospheric wavefronts using binary micromirror arrays.

    PubMed

    Anzuola, Esdras; Belmonte, Aniceto

    2016-04-10

    To simulate in the laboratory the influence that a turbulent atmosphere has on light beams, we introduce a practical method for generating atmospheric wavefront distortions that considers digital holographic reconstruction using a programmable binary micromirror array. We analyze the efficiency of the approach for different configurations of the micromirror array and experimentally demonstrate the benchtop technique. Though the mirrors on the digital array can only be positioned in one of two states, we show that the holographic technique can be used to devise a wide variety of atmospheric wavefront aberrations in a controllable and predictable way for a fraction of the cost of phase-only spatial light modulators. PMID:27139872

  19. Adaptive optics in ophthalmology: human eye wavefront generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galetskiy, Sergey O.; Cherezova, Tatyana Y.; Kudryashov, Alexis V.

    2008-02-01

    We present human eye wavefront generator (HEWG) introduced inside aberrometer for dynamic reproduction of human eye aberrations. It's main element is bimorph deformable mirror and a telescope. Deformable mirror generates human eye aberrations in real time. We have recorded aberrations time traces for plurality of subjects using aberrometer and reproduced them with the help of the generator at 10Hz frequency, that is inherit to human eye aberrations dynamics. Experimental results indicate that HEWG can reproduce dynamics of human eye aberrations with residual error less than λ/10 microns. Such a model can be useful for testing, for example, customized contact lenses or wavefront guided aberrometers.

  20. Measurement of wavefront aberrations of diffractive imaging elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajac, Marek; Dubik, Boguslawa

    1998-01-01

    Diffractive optics is more and more widely used nowadays. One of its most important applications is diffractive imaging element (DIE). The DIE can be a lens (Holo-lens, diffractive lens, hybrid lens) or a part of complex imaging system (e.g. an aberration corrector). Apart of such problems occurring when dealing with DIE as its design, manufacture or copying the problem of its control is important. By this we mean the measurement of wavefront generated by DIE, i.e. the evaluation of wavefront aberrations. To this aim we propose two different experimental methods: one of them employs diffraction interferometer, the other one holographic shearing interferometer.

  1. Subaperture test of wavefront error of large telescopes: error sources and stitching performance simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shanyong; Li, Shengyi; Wang, Guilin

    2014-11-01

    The wavefront error of large telescopes requires to be measured to check the system quality and also estimate the misalignment of the telescope optics including the primary, the secondary and so on. It is usually realized by a focal plane interferometer and an autocollimator flat (ACF) of the same aperture with the telescope. However, it is challenging for meter class telescopes due to high cost and technological challenges in producing the large ACF. Subaperture test with a smaller ACF is hence proposed in combination with advanced stitching algorithms. Major error sources include the surface error of the ACF, misalignment of the ACF and measurement noises. Different error sources have different impacts on the wavefront error. Basically the surface error of the ACF behaves like systematic error and the astigmatism will be cumulated and enlarged if the azimuth of subapertures remains fixed. It is difficult to accurately calibrate the ACF because it suffers considerable deformation induced by gravity or mechanical clamping force. Therefore a selfcalibrated stitching algorithm is employed to separate the ACF surface error from the subaperture wavefront error. We suggest the ACF be rotated around the optical axis of the telescope for subaperture test. The algorithm is also able to correct the subaperture tip-tilt based on the overlapping consistency. Since all subaperture measurements are obtained in the same imaging plane, lateral shift of the subapertures is always known and the real overlapping points can be recognized in this plane. Therefore lateral positioning error of subapertures has no impact on the stitched wavefront. In contrast, the angular positioning error changes the azimuth of the ACF and finally changes the systematic error. We propose an angularly uneven layout of subapertures to minimize the stitching error, which is very different from our knowledge. At last, measurement noises could never be corrected but be suppressed by means of averaging and

  2. Device for wavefront correction in an ultra high power laser

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Earl R.; Comaskey, Brian J.; Kuklo, Thomas C.

    2002-01-01

    A system for wavefront correction in an ultra high power laser. As the laser medium flows past the optical excitation source and the fluid warms its index of refraction changes creating an optical wedge. A system is provided for correcting the thermally induced optical phase errors.

  3. Dispersionless Manipulation of Reflected Acoustic Wavefront by Subwavelength Corrugated Surface

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Li, Rui-Qi; Jiang, Xue; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Free controls of optic/acoustic waves for bending, focusing or steering the energy of wavefronts are highly desirable in many practical scenarios. However, the dispersive nature of the existing metamaterials/metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation necessarily results in limited bandwidth. Here, we propose the concept of dispersionless wavefront manipulation and report a theoretical, numerical and experimental work on the design of a reflective surface capable of controlling the acoustic wavefront arbitrarily without bandwidth limitation. Analytical analysis predicts the possibility to completely eliminate the frequency dependence with a specific gradient surface which can be implemented by designing a subwavelength corrugated surface. Experimental and numerical results, well consistent with the theoretical predictions, have validated the proposed scheme by demonstrating a distinct phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic reflection within an ultra-broad band. For acquiring a deeper insight into the underlying physics, a simple physical model is developed which helps to interpret this extraordinary phenomenon and predict the upper cutoff frequency precisely. Generations of planar focusing and non-diffractive beam have also been exemplified. With the dispersionless wave-steering capability and deep discrete resolution, our designed structure may open new avenue to fully steer classical waves and offer design possibilities for broadband optical/acoustical devices. PMID:26077772

  4. Dispersionless Manipulation of Reflected Acoustic Wavefront by Subwavelength Corrugated Surface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Li, Rui-Qi; Jiang, Xue; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Free controls of optic/acoustic waves for bending, focusing or steering the energy of wavefronts are highly desirable in many practical scenarios. However, the dispersive nature of the existing metamaterials/metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation necessarily results in limited bandwidth. Here, we propose the concept of dispersionless wavefront manipulation and report a theoretical, numerical and experimental work on the design of a reflective surface capable of controlling the acoustic wavefront arbitrarily without bandwidth limitation. Analytical analysis predicts the possibility to completely eliminate the frequency dependence with a specific gradient surface which can be implemented by designing a subwavelength corrugated surface. Experimental and numerical results, well consistent with the theoretical predictions, have validated the proposed scheme by demonstrating a distinct phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic reflection within an ultra-broad band. For acquiring a deeper insight into the underlying physics, a simple physical model is developed which helps to interpret this extraordinary phenomenon and predict the upper cutoff frequency precisely. Generations of planar focusing and non-diffractive beam have also been exemplified. With the dispersionless wave-steering capability and deep discrete resolution, our designed structure may open new avenue to fully steer classical waves and offer design possibilities for broadband optical/acoustical devices. PMID:26077772

  5. Dispersionless Manipulation of Reflected Acoustic Wavefront by Subwavelength Corrugated Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Li, Rui-Qi; Jiang, Xue; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Free controls of optic/acoustic waves for bending, focusing or steering the energy of wavefronts are highly desirable in many practical scenarios. However, the dispersive nature of the existing metamaterials/metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation necessarily results in limited bandwidth. Here, we propose the concept of dispersionless wavefront manipulation and report a theoretical, numerical and experimental work on the design of a reflective surface capable of controlling the acoustic wavefront arbitrarily without bandwidth limitation. Analytical analysis predicts the possibility to completely eliminate the frequency dependence with a specific gradient surface which can be implemented by designing a subwavelength corrugated surface. Experimental and numerical results, well consistent with the theoretical predictions, have validated the proposed scheme by demonstrating a distinct phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic reflection within an ultra-broad band. For acquiring a deeper insight into the underlying physics, a simple physical model is developed which helps to interpret this extraordinary phenomenon and predict the upper cutoff frequency precisely. Generations of planar focusing and non-diffractive beam have also been exemplified. With the dispersionless wave-steering capability and deep discrete resolution, our designed structure may open new avenue to fully steer classical waves and offer design possibilities for broadband optical/acoustical devices.

  6. Wavefront Derived Refraction and Full Eye Biometry in Pseudophakic Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xinjie; Banta, James T.; Ke, Bilian; Jiang, Hong; He, Jichang; Liu, Che; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess wavefront derived refraction and full eye biometry including ciliary muscle dimension and full eye axial geometry in pseudophakic eyes using spectral domain OCT equipped with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Methods Twenty-eight adult subjects (32 pseudophakic eyes) having recently undergone cataract surgery were enrolled in this study. A custom system combining two optical coherence tomography systems with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor was constructed to image and monitor changes in whole eye biometry, the ciliary muscle and ocular aberration in the pseudophakic eye. A Badal optical channel and a visual target aligning with the wavefront sensor were incorporated into the system for measuring the wavefront-derived refraction. The imaging acquisition was performed twice. The coefficients of repeatability (CoR) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were calculated. Results Images were acquired and processed successfully in all patients. No significant difference was detected between repeated measurements of ciliary muscle dimension, full-eye biometry or defocus aberration. The CoR of full-eye biometry ranged from 0.36% to 3.04% and the ICC ranged from 0.981 to 0.999. The CoR for ciliary muscle dimensions ranged from 12.2% to 41.6% and the ICC ranged from 0.767 to 0.919. The defocus aberrations of the two measurements were 0.443 ± 0.534 D and 0.447 ± 0.586 D and the ICC was 0.951. Conclusions The combined system is capable of measuring full eye biometry and refraction with good repeatability. The system is suitable for future investigation of pseudoaccommodation in the pseudophakic eye. PMID:27010674

  7. Derivation of preliminary specifications for transmitted wavefront and surface roughness for large optics used in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Aikens, D.; Roussel, A.; Bray, M.

    1995-06-27

    In preparation for beginning the design of the Nation Ignition Facility (NIF) in the United States and the Laser Mega-Joule (LMJ) in France, the authors are in the process of deriving new specifications for the large optics required for these facilities. Traditionally, specifications for transmitted wavefront and surface roughness of large ICF optics have been based on parameters which were easily measured during the early 1980`s, such as peak-to-valley wavefront error (PV) and root-mean-square (RMS) surface roughness, as well as wavefront gradients in terms of waves per cm. While this was convenient from a fabrication perspective, since the specifications could be easily interpreted by fabricators in terms which were understood and conventionally measurable, it did not accurately reflect the requirements of the laser system. For the NIF and LMJ laser systems, the authors use advances in metrology and interferometry and an enhanced understanding of laser system performance to derive specifications which are based on power spectral densities (PSD`s.) Such requirements can more accurately reflect the requirements of the laser system for minimizing the amplitude of mid- and high-spatial frequency surface and transmitted wavefront errors, while not over constraining the fabrication in terms of low spatial frequencies, such as residual coma or astigmatism, which are typically of a very large amplitude compared to periodic errors. In order to study the effect of changes in individual component tolerances, it is most useful to have a model capable of simulating real behavior. The basis of this model is discussed in this paper, outlining the general approach to the {open_quotes}theoretical{close_quotes} study of ICF optics specifications, and an indication of the type of specification to be expected will be shown, based upon existing ICF laser optics.

  8. Recent advances in remote sensing; Proceedings of the First International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, Washington, DC, June 8-10, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, R.

    1982-01-01

    The state of the art in remote sensing of the earth and the planets was discussed in terms of sensor performance, signal processing, and data interpretation. Particular attention was given to lidar for characterizing atmospheric particulates, the modulation of short waves by long ocean gravity waves, and runoff modeling for snow-covered areas. The use of NOAA-6 spacecraft AVHRR data to explore hydrologic land surface features, the effects of soil moisture and vegetation canopies on microwave and thermal microwave emissions, and regional scale evapotranspiration rate determination through satellite IR data are examined. A Shuttle experiment to demonstrate high accuracy global time and frequency transfer is described, along with features of the proposed Gravsat, radar image processing for rock-type discrimination, and passive microwave sensing of temperature and salinity in coastal zones.

  9. Tropospheric Passive Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The long term role of airborne/spaceborne passive remote sensing systems for tropospheric air quality research and the identification of technology advances required to improve the performance of passive remote sensing systems were discussed.

  10. Real-time phasing and co-phasing of a ground-based interferometer with a pyramid wavefront sensor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vérinaud, Christophe; Esposito, Simone

    The feasibility and remarkable performances of pyramid wavefront sensing in adaptive optics have already been demonstrated. In this paper, we investigate another potential of the pyramid wavefront sensor which is differential piston sensing in interferometry: this can be done by using a glass pyramid placed in a combined focal plane of the interferometer, and a CCD sampling the usual four diffracted images of the pupil, composed here by the interferometer apertures. From a purely geometrical point of view, no information about the differential phase between two pupils could be retrieved. However, as the sensor main component, the pyramid, is located directly in the interference pattern of the interferometer, the piston information present in the electric field of the combined focal plane modifies, after diffraction by the pyramid, the intensity distribution in the pupil plane. Thus, with only one sensor, the differential piston can be measured, in addition to the classical local tilts determination. In this paper we present the concept and give some simulation results showing the performances of a closed-loop adaptive optics correction for a ground-based two-telescope interferometer like the Large Binocular Telescope.

  11. Experience with wavefront sensor and deformable mirror interfaces for wide-field adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, A. G.; Atkinson, D.; Bharmal, N. A.; Bitenc, U.; Brangier, M.; Buey, T.; Butterley, T.; Cano, D.; Chemla, F.; Clark, P.; Cohen, M.; Conan, J.-M.; de Cos, F. J.; Dickson, C.; Dipper, N. A.; Dunlop, C. N.; Feautrier, P.; Fusco, T.; Gach, J. L.; Gendron, E.; Geng, D.; Goodsell, S. J.; Gratadour, D.; Greenaway, A. H.; Guesalaga, A.; Guzman, C. D.; Henry, D.; Holck, D.; Hubert, Z.; Huet, J. M.; Kellerer, A.; Kulcsar, C.; Laporte, P.; Le Roux, B.; Looker, N.; Longmore, A. J.; Marteaud, M.; Martin, O.; Meimon, S.; Morel, C.; Morris, T. J.; Myers, R. M.; Osborn, J.; Perret, D.; Petit, C.; Raynaud, H.; Reeves, A. P.; Rousset, G.; Sanchez Lasheras, F.; Sanchez Rodriguez, M.; Santos, J. D.; Sevin, A.; Sivo, G.; Stadler, E.; Stobie, B.; Talbot, G.; Todd, S.; Vidal, F.; Younger, E. J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in adaptive optics (AO) have led to the implementation of wide field-of-view AO systems. A number of wide-field AO systems are also planned for the forthcoming Extremely Large Telescopes. Such systems have multiple wavefront sensors of different types, and usually multiple deformable mirrors (DMs). Here, we report on our experience integrating cameras and DMs with the real-time control systems of two wide-field AO systems. These are CANARY, which has been operating on-sky since 2010, and DRAGON, which is a laboratory AO real-time demonstrator instrument. We detail the issues and difficulties that arose, along with the solutions we developed. We also provide recommendations for consideration when developing future wide-field AO systems.

  12. Advanced In vivo Use of CRISPR/Cas9 and Anti-sense DNA Inhibition for Gene Manipulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Brandon J.; Azam, Amber B.; Gillon, Colleen J.; Josselyn, Sheena A.; Zovkic, Iva B.

    2016-01-01

    Gene editing tools are essential for uncovering how genes mediate normal brain–behavior relationships and contribute to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent progress in gene editing technology now allows neuroscientists unprecedented access to edit the genome efficiently. Although many important tools have been developed, here we focus on approaches that allow for rapid gene editing in the adult nervous system, particularly CRISPR/Cas9 and anti-sense nucleotide-based techniques. CRISPR/Cas9 is a flexible gene editing tool, allowing the genome to be manipulated in diverse ways. For instance, CRISPR/Cas9 has been successfully used to knockout genes, knock-in mutations, overexpress or inhibit gene activity, and provide scaffolding for recruiting specific epigenetic regulators to individual genes and gene regions. Moreover, the CRISPR/Cas9 system may be modified to target multiple genes at one time, affording simultaneous inhibition and overexpression of distinct genetic targets. Although many of the more advanced applications of CRISPR/Cas9 have not been applied to the nervous system, the toolbox is widely accessible, such that it is poised to help advance neuroscience. Anti-sense nucleotide-based technologies can be used to rapidly knockdown genes in the brain. The main advantage of anti-sense based tools is their simplicity, allowing for rapid gene delivery with minimal technical expertise. Here, we describe the main applications and functions of each of these systems with an emphasis on their many potential applications in neuroscience laboratories. PMID:26793235

  13. Branch-point reconstruction in laser beam projection through turbulence with finite-degree-of-freedom phase-only wave-front correction.

    PubMed

    Roggemann, M C; Koivunen, A C

    2000-01-01

    Wave-front sensing and deformable mirror control algorithms in adaptive optics systems are designed on the premise that a continuous phase function exists in the telescope pupil that can be conjugated with a deformable mirror for the purpose of projecting a laser beam. However, recent studies of coherent wave propagation through turbulence have shown that under conditions where scintillation is not negligible, a truly continuous phase function does not in general exist as a result of the presence of branch points in the complex optical field. Because of branch points and the associated branch cuts, least-squares wave-front reconstruction paradigms can have large errors. We study the improvement that can be obtained by implementing wave-front reconstructors that can sense the presence of branch points and reconstruct a discontinuous phase function in the context of a laser beam projection system. This study was conducted by fitting a finite-degree-of-freedom deformable mirror to branch-point and least-squares reconstructions of the phase of the beacon field, propagating the corrected field to the beacon plane, and evaluating performance in the beacon plane. We find that the value of implementing branch-point reconstructors with a finite-degree-of-freedom deformable mirror is significant for optical paths that cause saturated log-amplitude fluctuations.

  14. Global Monitoring for Food Security and Sustainable Land Management - Recent Advances of Remote Sensing Applications to African and Siberian Show Cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komp, K. U.; Haub, C.

    2012-07-01

    After four decades of space borne remote sensing, the unmapped white patches have mostly disappeared. Those basic information give the foundations to the observation of changes and even the introduction of monitoring programmes for a various number of features in the natural and human landscape of our planet. Recent indicators for climatic change together with worrisome alterations in regional food production versus the constantly increase of human population demand the design and implementation of reliable land management tools which will serve the food security as well as the sustainable use of resources of the ecosystem in its respective regional context. The positive responses and convincing results of ESA service elements in the efforts towards food security in several African countries have been the basis for the transfer of the methods into another region, the Western Siberian corn-belt. The large extends of cropping schemes in West Siberia demand advanced remote sensing methods to be applied in order to compare the impacts of climatic change not only on the agricultural production but also on risks for the ecosystem. A multi scale approach of remote sensing methods is introduced in analogy to the African activities. An adopted monitoring concept is developed using a nearly daily product of medium resolution for wide areas, high resolution sensors for stratified sample areas and in-situ observations. Beyond methodological research, the ability of remote sensing is contributing to operational solutions that can ensure the nutritional and ecological future of our planet.

  15. Applications of ultrafast wavefront rotation in highly nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quéré, F.; Vincenti, H.; Borot, A.; Monchocé, S.; Hammond, T. J.; Taec Kim, Kyung; Wheeler, J. A.; Zhang, Chunmei; Ruchon, T.; Auguste, T.; Hergott, J. F.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Lopez-Martens, R.

    2014-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of ultrafast wavefront rotation of femtosecond laser pulses and its various applications in highly nonlinear optics, focusing on processes that lead to the generation of high-order harmonics and attosecond pulses. In this context, wavefront rotation can be exploited in different ways, to obtain new light sources for time-resolved studies, called ‘attosecond lighthouses’, to perform time-resolved measurements of nonlinear optical processes, using ‘photonic streaking’, or to track changes in the carrier-envelope relative phase of femtosecond laser pulses. The basic principles are explained qualitatively from different points of view, the experimental evidence obtained so far is summarized, and the perspectives opened by these effects are discussed.

  16. Analysis of optical wavefront reconstruction and deconvolution in adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, David Russell

    2001-11-01

    It was in the spirit of ``reuniting divergent trends by clarifying the common features and interconnections of many distinct and diverse scientific facts'' that Courant and Hilbert published their book Methods of Mathematical Physics [43]. This thesis is written in the same spirit and with the same goal. We focus our attention on the problem of wavefront reconstruction and deconvolution in adaptive optics. This is an ill-posed, non-linear inverse problem that touches on the theory of harmonic analysis, variational analysis, signal processing, nonconvex optimization, regularization, statistics and probability. Numerical solutions rely on spectral and operator-splitting methods as well as limited memory and multi-resolution techniques. We introduce novel methods for wavefront reconstruction and compare our results against common techniques. Previous work on this problem is reviewed and unified in a non-parametric, analytic framework.

  17. Ultrasonically encoded wavefront shaping for focusing into random media

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Jian Wei; Lai, Puxiang; Suzuki, Yuta; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Phase distortions due to scattering in random media restrict optical focusing beyond one transport mean free path. However, scattering can be compensated for by applying a correction to the illumination wavefront using spatial light modulators. One method of obtaining the wavefront correction is by iterative determination using an optimization algorithm. In the past, obtaining a feedback signal required either direct optical access to the target region, or invasive embedding of molecular probes within the random media. Here, we propose using ultrasonically encoded light as feedback to guide the optimization dynamically and non-invasively. In our proof-of-principle demonstration, diffuse light was refocused to the ultrasound focal zone, with a focus-to-background ratio of more than one order of magnitude after 600 iterations. With further improvements, especially in optimization speed, the proposed method should find broad applications in deep tissue optical imaging and therapy. PMID:24472822

  18. Terahertz wavefront control by tunable metasurface made of graphene ribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Yatooshi, Takumi; Ishikawa, Atsushi Tsuruta, Kenji

    2015-08-03

    We propose a tunable metasurface consisting of an array of graphene ribbons on a silver mirror with a SiO{sub 2} gap layer to control reflected wavefront at terahertz frequencies. The graphene ribbons exhibit localized plasmon resonances depending on their Fermi levels to introduce abrupt phase shifts along the metasurface. With interference of the Fabry-Perot resonances in the SiO{sub 2} layer, phase shift through the system is largely accumulated, covering the 0-to-2π range for full control of the wavefront. Numerical simulations prove that wide-angle beam steering up to 53° with a high reflection efficiency of 60% is achieved at 5 THz within a switching time shorter than 0.6 ps.

  19. Wavefront scanning method for minimum traveltime calculations in 3-D

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, F.; Liu, H.; Li, Y.

    1994-12-31

    This paper proposes an efficient way to calculate the shortest travel-time and its correspondent ray-path in three dimension, by using point secondary approximation to depict the wavefront and propagate the travel-time computation along recursively expanding and contracting cubic boxes. Due to its following advantages: (1) the computation order is O(N), where N is the total number of discrete secondary nodes; (2) the memory occupation is relatively small; (3) the algorithm is robust even for high velocity contrast; (4) the minimum travel-time and raypath are computed accurately, this 3-D wavefront scanning raytracing method promises to be real tool for 3-D seismic prestack migration, velocity analysis as well as forward waveform modeling by Maslov asymptotic ray theory.

  20. Optimization-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Jacopo; van Werkhoven, Tim; Verhaegen, Michel; Truong, Hoa H; Keller, Christoph U; Gerritsen, Hans C

    2014-06-01

    Optical aberrations have detrimental effects in multiphoton microscopy. These effects can be curtailed by implementing model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics, which only requires the addition of a wavefront shaping device, such as a deformable mirror (DM) to an existing microscope. The aberration correction is achieved by maximizing a suitable image quality metric. We implement a model-based aberration correction algorithm in a second-harmonic microscope. The tip, tilt, and defocus aberrations are removed from the basis functions used for the control of the DM, as these aberrations induce distortions in the acquired images. We compute the parameters of a quadratic polynomial that is used to model the image quality metric directly from experimental input-output measurements. Finally, we apply the aberration correction by maximizing the image quality metric using the least-squares estimate of the unknown aberration.

  1. An adaptive optic for correcting low-order wavefront aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C A; Wilhelmsen, J

    1999-09-02

    Adaptive Optics used for correcting low-order wavefront aberrations were tested and compared using interferometry, beam propagation, and a far-field test. Results confirm that the design and manufacturing specifications were met. Experimental data also confirms theoretical performance expectations, indicating the usefulness of these optics (especially in a laser-beam processing system), and identifying the resulting differences between the two fabrication methods used to make the optics.

  2. The entire beam wavefront control of high power laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wanjun; Wang, Deen; Hu, Dongxia; Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Wei; Yuan, Qiang; Deng, Xuewei; Wang, Yuancheng; Deng, Wu; Yang, Ying; Zhu, Qihua; Jing, Feng

    2015-02-01

    Experiment of entire beam wavefront compensation was carried out in a beamline of a high power laser facility, and two adaptive optics systems with different intentions were applied in the chosen beamline. After correction, the far-filed irradiance distribution is concentrated evidently and the entrance rate of 3ω focal spot to a 500-μm hole is improved to be about 95% under number kilojoules energy.

  3. Ophthalmic Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor Applications - Oral Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most common applications of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is to measure the human eye. There are a number of instruments that have been designed for this purpose and are used extensively in laser refractive surgery. While conceptually the sensor is similar to those used for astronomy applications, there are key differences adaptive optic and measurement sensors. These sensors have led to a range of applications and diagnostics that are providing key new information about how the eye functions.

  4. The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Science Drivers and Technology Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Giavalisco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Phillip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Remi; Hyde, Tupper

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers and the resulting performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsecond angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 m to 2.4 m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We also discuss the priorities for technology development needed to enable the construction of ATLAST for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions. Keywords: Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST); ultraviolet/optical space telescopes; astrophysics; astrobiology; technology development.

  5. Research on technique of wavefront retrieval based on Foucault test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Lvjun; Wu, Zhonghua

    2010-05-01

    During finely grinding the best fit sphere and initial stage of polishing, surface error of large aperture aspheric mirrors is too big to test using common interferometer. Foucault test is widely used in fabricating large aperture mirrors. However, the optical path is disturbed seriously by air turbulence, and changes of light and dark zones can not be identified, which often lowers people's judging ability and results in making mistake to diagnose surface error of the whole mirror. To solve the problem, the research presents wavefront retrieval based on Foucault test through digital image processing and quantitative calculation. Firstly, real Foucault image can be gained through collecting a variety of images by CCD, and then average these image to eliminate air turbulence. Secondly, gray values are converted into surface error values through principle derivation, mathematical modeling, and software programming. Thirdly, linear deviation brought by defocus should be removed by least-square method to get real surface error. At last, according to real surface error, plot wavefront map, gray contour map and corresponding pseudo color contour map. The experimental results indicates that the three-dimensional wavefront map and two-dimensional contour map are able to accurately and intuitively show surface error on the whole mirrors under test, and they are beneficial to grasp surface error as a whole. The technique can be used to guide the fabrication of large aperture and long focal mirrors during grinding and initial stage of polishing the aspheric surface, which improves fabricating efficiency and precision greatly.

  6. One dimensional wavefront sensor development for tomographic flow measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.; Pierson, R.; Chen, E.

    1995-08-01

    Optical diagnostics are extremely useful in fluid mechanics because they generally have high inherent bandwidth, and are non-intrusive. However, since optical probe measurements inherently integrate all information along the optical path, it is often difficult to isolate out-of-plane components in 3-dimensional flow events. It is also hard to make independent measurements of internal flow structure. Using an arrangement of one-dimensional wavefront sensors, we have developed a system that uses tomographic reconstruction to make two-dimensional measurements in an arbitrary flow. These measurements provide complete information in a plane normal to the flow. We have applied this system to the subsonic free jet because of the wide range of flow scales available. These measurements rely on the development of a series of one-dimensional wavefront sensors that are used to measure line-integral density variations in the flow of interest. These sensors have been constructed using linear CCD cameras and binary optics lenslet arrays. In designing these arrays, we have considered the coherent coupling between adjacent lenses and have made comparisons between theory and experimental noise measurements. The paper will present examples of the wavefront sensor development, line-integral measurements as a function of various experimental parameters, and sample tomographic reconstructions.

  7. Active compensation of wavefront aberrations by controllable heating of lens with electric film heater matrix.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Hou, Lv; Zhou, Xinglin

    2016-08-20

    We present a new apparatus for active compensation of wavefront aberrations by controllable heating of a lens using a film heater matrix. The annular electric film heater matrix, comprising 24 individual heaters, is attached to the periphery of a lens. Utilizing the linear superposition, and wavefront change proportional to the heating energy properties induced by heating, a controllable wavefront can be defined by solving a linear function. The two properties of wavefront change of a lens have been confirmed through a specially designed experiment. The feasibility of the compensation method is validated by compensating the wavefront of a plate lens. The results show that the wavefront of the lens changes from 12.52 to 2.95 nm rms after compensation. With a more precise electric controlling board, better results could be achieved. PMID:27556982

  8. Simulation of wavefront reconstruction in beam reshaping system for rectangular laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiong; Liu, Wenguang; Jiang, Zongfu

    2014-05-01

    A new method to calculating the wavefront of slap laser is studied in this paper. The method is based on the ray trace theory of geometrical optics. By using the Zemax simulation software and Matlab calculation software, the wavefront of rectangular beam in beam reshaping system is reconstructed. Firstly, with the x- and y-slope measurement of reshaping beam the direction cosine of wavefront can be calculated. Then, the inverse beam path of beam reshaping system is built by using Zemax simulation software and the direction cosine of rectangular beam can be given, too. Finally, Southwell zonal model is used to reconstruct the wavefront of rectangular beam in computer simulation. Once the wavefront is received, the aberration of laser can be eliminated by using the proper configuration of beam reshaping system. It is shown that this method to reconstruct the wavefront of rectangular beam can evidently reduce the negative influence of additional aberration induced by beam reshaping system.

  9. High-precision method for submicron-aperture fiber point-diffraction wavefront measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daodang; Xu, Yangbo; Liang, Rongguang; Kong, Ming; Zhao, Jun; Zhang, Baowu; Li, Wei

    2016-04-01

    It is a key issue to measure the point-diffraction wavefront error, which determines the achievable accuracy of point-diffraction interferometer (PDI). A high-precision method based on shearing interferometry is proposed to measure submicron-aperture fiber point-diffraction wavefront with high numerical aperture (NA). To obtain the true shearing point-diffraction wavefront, a double-step calibration method based on three-dimensional coordinate reconstruction and symmetric lateral displacement compensation is proposed to calibrate the geometric aberration in the case of high NA and large lateral wavefront displacement. The calibration can be carried out without any prior knowledge about the system configuration parameters. With the true shearing wavefront, the differential Zernike polynomials fitting method is applied to reconstruct the point-diffraction wavefront. Numerical simulation and experiments have been carried out to demonstrate the accuracy and feasibility of the proposed measurement method, and a good measurement accuracy is achieved. PMID:27137002

  10. Volumetric imaging of fast biological dynamics in deep tissue via wavefront engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingjie; Tang, Jianyong; Cui, Meng

    2016-03-01

    To reveal fast biological dynamics in deep tissue, we combine two wavefront engineering methods that were developed in our laboratory, namely optical phase-locked ultrasound lens (OPLUL) based volumetric imaging and iterative multiphoton adaptive compensation technique (IMPACT). OPLUL is used to generate oscillating defocusing wavefront for fast axial scanning, and IMPACT is used to compensate the wavefront distortions for deep tissue imaging. We show its promising applications in neuroscience and immunology.

  11. Wavefront Imaging in Fractured Transversely-Isotropic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, S.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2013-12-01

    Fractures in the Earth's crust are a source of stress-dependent mechanical anisotropy that affect seismic wave attenuation and velocity. While many theoretical and experimental studies have investigated seismic wave propagation in single or multi- fractured isotropic rocks, few studies have examined the seismic response of a fractured anisotropic medium. Fractures and layering each contribute to the mechanical anisotropy of the crust. The coexistence of these two sources of anisotropy complicates the interpretation of the seismic properties of crustal rock. In this study, laboratory wavefront imaging was performed to capture the seismic response of layered media containing multiple parallel fractures. We determined that whether the observed anisotropy is dominated by the matrix anisotropy or by the fracture orientation depends on the applied stress and that late-arriving guided-modes provide information on the orientation of the fractures. Four cubic garolite samples (~102 mm on edge) each containing 5 parallel fractures were used in this study. The fractures were oriented normal, parallel or at acute angles (30 degrees, 60 degrees) to the layering. The fracture and layer spacing were approximately 10mm and 0.5mm, respectively. An intact sample containing no fractures was used as a standard orthorhombic medium for reference. Stress was applied to the samples with a servo-controlled loading machine. Two spherically-focused water-coupled transducers (central frequency 1MHz) were used; one as a fixed-source and the other as a translating receiver. Each sample was scanned over a 60mm×60mm region in 1 mm increments to map out the arriving wavefront (i.e. 3600 signals were recorded) as a function of time. The measured wavefront in the intact reference sample (which contained no fractures) was elliptical with the major axis parallel to the layers as expected and was stress-independent. When the fracture samples were subjected to low stress (<4 MPa), the observed seismic

  12. High-accuracy wavefront control for retinal imaging with Adaptive-Influence-Matrix Adaptive Optics

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Weiyao; Burns, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an iterative technique for improving adaptive optics (AO) wavefront correction for retinal imaging, called the Adaptive-Influence-Matrix (AIM) method. This method is based on the fact that the deflection-to-voltage relation of common deformable mirrors used in AO are nonlinear, and the fact that in general the wavefront errors of the eye can be considered to be composed of a static, non-zero wavefront error (such as the defocus and astigmatism), and a time-varying wavefront error. The aberrated wavefront is first corrected with a generic influence matrix, providing a mirror compensation figure for the static wavefront error. Then a new influence matrix that is more accurate for the specific static wavefront error is calibrated based on the mirror compensation figure. Experimental results show that with the AIM method the AO wavefront correction accuracy can be improved significantly in comparison to the generic AO correction. The AIM method is most useful in AO modalities where there are large static contributions to the wavefront aberrations. PMID:19997241

  13. A Phase-Shifting Zernike Wavefront Sensor for the Palomar P3K Adaptive Optics System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Crawford, Sam; Loya, Frank; Moore, James

    2012-01-01

    A phase-shifting Zernike wavefront sensor has distinct advantages over other types of wavefront sensors. Chief among them are: 1) improved sensitivity to low-order aberrations and 2) efficient use of photons (hence reduced sensitivity to photon noise). We are in the process of deploying a phase-shifting Zernike wavefront sensor to be used with the realtime adaptive optics system for Palomar. Here we present the current state of the Zernike wavefront sensor to be integrated into the high-order adaptive optics system at Mount Palomar's Hale Telescope.

  14. Airborne Particles: What We Have Learned About Their Role in Climate from Remote Sensing, and Prospects for Future Advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    Desert dust, wildfire smoke, volcanic ash, biogenic and urban pollution particles, all affect the regional-scale climate of Earth in places and at times; some have global-scale impacts on the column radiation balance, cloud properties, atmospheric stability structure, and circulation patterns. Remote sensing has played a central role in identifying the sources and transports of airborne particles, mapping their three-dimensional distribution and variability, quantifying their amount, and constraining aerosol air mass type. The measurements obtained from remote sensing have strengths and limitations, and their value for characterizing Earths environment is enhanced immensely when they are combined with direct, in situ observations, and used to constrain aerosol transport and climate models. A similar approach has been taken to study the role particles play in determining the climate of Mars, though based on far fewer observations. This presentation will focus what we have learned from remote sensing about the impacts aerosol have on Earths climate; a few points about how aerosols affect the climate of Mars will also be introduced, in the context of how we might assess aerosol-climate impacts more generally on other worlds.

  15. Revisiting the comparison between the Shack-Hartmann and the pyramid wavefront sensors via the Fisher information matrix.

    PubMed

    Plantet, C; Meimon, S; Conan, J-M; Fusco, T

    2015-11-01

    Exoplanet direct imaging with large ground based telescopes requires eXtreme Adaptive Optics that couples high-order adaptive optics and coronagraphy. A key element of such systems is the high-order wavefront sensor. We study here several high-order wavefront sensing approaches, and more precisely compare their sensitivity to noise. Three techniques are considered: the classical Shack-Hartmann sensor, the pyramid sensor and the recently proposed LIFTed Shack-Hartmann sensor. They are compared in a unified framework based on precise diffractive models and on the Fisher information matrix, which conveys the information present in the data whatever the estimation method. The diagonal elements of the inverse of the Fisher information matrix, which we use as a figure of merit, are similar to noise propagation coefficients. With these diagonal elements, so called "Fisher coefficients", we show that the LIFTed Shack-Hartmann and pyramid sensors outperform the classical Shack-Hartmann sensor. In photon noise regime, the LIFTed Shack-Hartmann and modulated pyramid sensors obtain a similar overall noise propagation. The LIFTed Shack-Hartmann sensor however provides attractive noise properties on high orders.

  16. OCAM2S: an integral shutter ultrafast and low noise wavefront sensor camera for laser guide stars adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gach, Jean-Luc; Feautrier, Philippe; Balard, Philippe; Guillaume, Christian; Stadler, Eric

    2014-07-01

    To date, the OCAM2 system has demonstrated to be the fastest and lowest noise production ready wavefront sensor, achieving 2067 full frames per second with subelectron readout noise. This makes OCAM2 the ideal system for natural as well as continuous wave laser guide star wavefront sensing. In this paper we present the new gated version of OCAM2 named OCAM2-S, using E2V's CCD219 sensor with integral shutter. This new camera offers the same superb characteristics than OCAM2 both in terms of speed and readout noise but also offers a shutter function that makes the sensor only sensitive to light for very short periods, at will. We will report on gating time and extinction ratio performances of this new camera. This device opens new possibilities for Rayleigh pulsed lasers adaptive optics systems. With a shutter time constant well below 1 microsecond, this camera opens new solutions for pulsed sodium lasers with backscatter suppression or even spot elongation minimization for ELT LGS.

  17. Revisiting the comparison between the Shack-Hartmann and the pyramid wavefront sensors via the Fisher information matrix.

    PubMed

    Plantet, C; Meimon, S; Conan, J-M; Fusco, T

    2015-11-01

    Exoplanet direct imaging with large ground based telescopes requires eXtreme Adaptive Optics that couples high-order adaptive optics and coronagraphy. A key element of such systems is the high-order wavefront sensor. We study here several high-order wavefront sensing approaches, and more precisely compare their sensitivity to noise. Three techniques are considered: the classical Shack-Hartmann sensor, the pyramid sensor and the recently proposed LIFTed Shack-Hartmann sensor. They are compared in a unified framework based on precise diffractive models and on the Fisher information matrix, which conveys the information present in the data whatever the estimation method. The diagonal elements of the inverse of the Fisher information matrix, which we use as a figure of merit, are similar to noise propagation coefficients. With these diagonal elements, so called "Fisher coefficients", we show that the LIFTed Shack-Hartmann and pyramid sensors outperform the classical Shack-Hartmann sensor. In photon noise regime, the LIFTed Shack-Hartmann and modulated pyramid sensors obtain a similar overall noise propagation. The LIFTed Shack-Hartmann sensor however provides attractive noise properties on high orders. PMID:26561131

  18. Utilization of the Wavefront Sensor and Short-exposure Images for Simultaneous Estimation of Quasi-static Aberration and Exoplanet Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazin, Richard A.

    2013-04-01

    Heretofore, the literature on exoplanet detection with coronagraphic telescope systems has paid little attention to the information content of short exposures and methods of utilizing the measurements of adaptive optics wavefront sensors. This paper provides a framework for the incorporation of the wavefront sensor measurements in the context of observing modes in which the science camera takes millisecond exposures. In this formulation, the wavefront sensor measurements provide a means to jointly estimate the static speckle and the planetary signal. The ability to estimate planetary intensities in as little as a few seconds has the potential to greatly improve the efficiency of exoplanet search surveys. For simplicity, the mathematical development assumes a simple optical system with an idealized Lyot coronagraph. Unlike currently used methods, in which increasing the observation time beyond a certain threshold is useless, this method produces estimates whose error covariances decrease more quickly than inversely proportional to the observation time. This is due to the fact that the estimates of the quasi-static aberrations are informed by a new random (but approximately known) wavefront every millisecond. The method can be extended to include angular (due to diurnal field rotation) and spectral diversity. Numerical experiments are performed with wavefront data from the AEOS Adaptive Optics System sensing at 850 nm. These experiments assume a science camera wavelength λ of 1.1 μ, that the measured wavefronts are exact, and a Gaussian approximation of shot-noise. The effects of detector read-out noise and other issues are left to future investigations. A number of static aberrations are introduced, including one with a spatial frequency exactly corresponding the planet location, which was at a distance of ≈3λ/D from the star. Using only 4 s of simulated observation time, a planetary intensity, of ≈1 photon ms-1, and a stellar intensity of ≈105 photons ms-1

  19. Twisted speckle entities inside wave-front reversal mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Okulov, A. Yu

    2009-07-15

    The previously unknown property of the optical speckle pattern reported. The interference of a speckle with the counterpropagating phase-conjugated (PC) speckle wave produces a randomly distributed ensemble of a twisted entities (ropes) surrounding optical vortex lines. These entities appear in a wide range of a randomly chosen speckle parameters inside the phase-conjugating mirrors regardless to an internal physical mechanism of the wave-front reversal. These numerically generated interference patterns are relevant to the Brillouin PC mirrors and to a four-wave mixing PC mirrors based upon laser trapped ultracold atomic cloud.

  20. Towards feasible and effective predictive wavefront control for adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Veran, J

    2008-06-04

    We have recently proposed Predictive Fourier Control, a computationally efficient and adaptive algorithm for predictive wavefront control that assumes frozen flow turbulence. We summarize refinements to the state-space model that allow operation with arbitrary computational delays and reduce the computational cost of solving for new control. We present initial atmospheric characterization using observations with Gemini North's Altair AO system. These observations, taken over 1 year, indicate that frozen flow is exists, contains substantial power, and is strongly detected 94% of the time.

  1. Expected gain in the pyramid wavefront sensor with limited Strehl ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viotto, V.; Ragazzoni, R.; Bergomi, M.; Magrin, D.; Farinato, J.

    2016-09-01

    Context. One of the main properties of the pyramid wavefront sensor is that, once the loop is closed, and as the reference star image shrinks on the pyramid pin, the wavefront estimation signal-to-noise ratio can considerably improve. This has been shown to translate into a gain in limiting magnitude when compared with the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, in which the sampling on the wavefront is performed before the light is split into four quadrants, which does not allow the quality of the focused spot to increase. Since this property is strictly related to the size of the re-imaged spot on the pyramid pin, the better the wavefront correction, the higher the gain. Aims: The goal of this paper is to extend the descriptive and analytical computation of this gain that was given in a previous paper, to partial wavefront correction conditions, which are representative for most of the wide field correction adaptive optics systems. Methods: After focusing on the low Strehl ratio regime, we analyze the minimum spatial sampling required for the wavefront sensor correction to still experience a considerable gain in sensitivity between the pyramid and the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. Results: We find that the gain can be described as a function of the sampling in terms of the Fried parameter.

  2. Optical testing of bifocal diffractive-refractive intraocular lenses using Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutman, A. S.; Shchesyuk, I. V.; Korolkov, V. P.

    2010-05-01

    Applicability of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for the bifocal diffractive-refractive intraocular lens testing is discussed. Measurement method based on quasi-continuous wavefront has been suggested. Light source requirements for testing of MIOL-Accord intraocular lens have been validated. The method has been realized in dioptrimeter including Shack-Hartman sensor and multi-wavelength coherent light source.

  3. Examples of the topographies of the wavefront-variance merit function at different aberration orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Steve C.

    1991-01-01

    The wavefront variance merit function is constructed with aberration orders identified and partitioned. The partitioned merit function topographies of three optical systems are examined. 1. INTRODUCFION The study of the behavior of individual wavefront aberration coefficients with respect to optical system parameters has long been successfully employed to gain insight into the properties of optical systems. However for many optical systems it is more appropriate to examine the wavefront aberrations collectively rather than individually. New insight into the imaging characteristics of optical systems may be obtained by using the individual wavefront aberration coefficients to construct the average wavefront variance function. This can be done in such a way that the merit function may be separated into partitions which are associated with a single aberration order. The partitions are a small number of image quality indicators that may be examined individually. Each indicator ifiustrates the behavior of the optical system at a particular aberration order. 2. FORMULATION OF THE MERIT FUNCTION The wavefront variance merit function is defined by K w2 )ftuld '' (1) where the angle brackets denote averaging over the pupil or field as indicated in the equation and W is the wavefront aberration function as a function of pupil position p. and field position H. For axially symmetric optical systems the aberration coefficients are introduced by writing the wavefront aberration function as a Taylor series expansion in p and

  4. Military target task performance after wavefront-guided (WFG) and wavefront-optimized (WFO) photorefractive keratectomy (PRK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Tana; Deaver, Dawne; Howell, Christopher; Moyer, Steve; Nguyen, Oanh; Mueller, Greg; Ryan, Denise; Sia, Rose K.; Stutzman, Richard; Pasternak, Joseph; Bower, Kraig

    2014-06-01

    Major decisions regarding life and death are routinely made on the modern battlefield, where visual function of the individual soldier can be of critical importance in the decision-making process. Glasses in the combat environment have considerable disadvantages: degradation of short term visual performance can occur as dust and sweat accumulate on lenses during a mission or patrol; long term visual performance can diminish as lenses become increasingly scratched and pitted; during periods of intense physical trauma, glasses can be knocked off the soldier's face and lost or broken. Although refractive surgery offers certain benefits on the battlefield when compared to wearing glasses, it is not without potential disadvantages. As a byproduct of refractive surgery, elevated optical aberrations can be induced, causing decreases in contrast sensitivity and increases in the symptoms of glare, halos, and starbursts. Typically, these symptoms occur under low light level conditions, the same conditions under which most military operations are initiated. With the advent of wavefront aberrometry, we are now seeing correction not only of myopia and astigmatism but of other, smaller optical aberrations that can cause the above symptoms. In collaboration with the Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program and Research Center (WRESP-RC) at Fort Belvoir and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC), the overall objective of this study is to determine the impact of wavefront guided (WFG) versus wavefront-optimized (WFO) photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) on military task visual performance. Psychophysical perception testing was conducted before and after surgery to measure each participant's performance regarding target detection and identification using thermal imagery. The results are presented here.

  5. Modal wavefront reconstruction over general shaped aperture by numerical orthogonal polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jingfei; Li, Xinhua; Gao, Zhishan; Wang, Shuai; Sun, Wenqing; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Qun

    2015-03-01

    In practical optical measurements, the wavefront data are recorded by pixelated imaging sensors. The closed-form analytical base polynomial will lose its orthogonality in the discrete wavefront database. For a wavefront with an irregularly shaped aperture, the corresponding analytical base polynomials are laboriously derived. The use of numerical orthogonal polynomials for reconstructing a wavefront with a general shaped aperture over the discrete data points is presented. Numerical polynomials are orthogonal over the discrete data points regardless of the boundary shape of the aperture. The performance of numerical orthogonal polynomials is confirmed by theoretical analysis and experiments. The results demonstrate the adaptability, validity, and accuracy of numerical orthogonal polynomials for estimating the wavefront over a general shaped aperture from regular boundary to an irregular boundary.

  6. Optical compensation for hologram distortion using wavefront interpolation in angle-multiplexed holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muroi, Tetsuhiko; Kinoshita, Nobuhiro; Ishii, Norihiko; Kamijo, Koji; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Kikuchi, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    Distortion of the hologram may occur when the photopolymer material used in the medium shrinks or expands. We analyzed interference fringe distortion for plane waves and a reference beam with an angular gap between recording and reproducing for the purpose of compensating for the distortion. We found that the wavefronts that could compensate for the distortion could approximately be obtained by linear interpolation of such angle-multiplexed holograms. We recorded 80 data pages with the angle-multiplexing method and obtained an optimized wavefront to compensate for hologram distortion on the first, fortieth, and eightieth data pages using adaptive optics with genetic algorithms and linear interpolated wavefronts at the other data pages. The calculation time for 80 wavefronts to compensate for distortion fell to 3/80th of that of having to calculate optimizations for all pages. The bit error rates were lower than 1.0 × 10-2 on all data pages reproduced using these wavefronts.

  7. Aberrations measurement of freeform spectacle lenses based on Hartmann wavefront technology.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Fang, Fengzhou; Qiu, Zhongjun

    2015-02-10

    Freeform spectacle lenses have been popularized in the past few years. Traditional evaluation methods only focused on the refractive power parameters. The inspection technology of wavefront aberration has been introduced to optometry. In this paper, the wavefront aberration is used to evaluate the freeform spectacle lenses. The Shack-Hartmann wavefront technology is used to measure the same zones on the lenses with different designed forms. It shows that the aberration distributions are different from each other. The design with the freeform surface on the back can obtain the smallest aberrations in the entire surface. The aberrations on different zones for the same lens are analyzed. The blending zones show the greatest aberrations. The aberration on the progressive corridor is greater than the other zones. The Hartmann wavefront technology can be used to measure the wavefront aberration of freeform spectacle lenses. PMID:25968012

  8. Wavefront-error evaluation by mathematical analysis of experimental Foucault-test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    The diffraction theory of the Foucault test provides an integral formula expressing the complex amplitude and irradiance distribution in the Foucault pattern of a test mirror (lens) as a function of wavefront error. Recent literature presents methods of inverting this formula to express wavefront error in terms of irradiance in the Foucault pattern. The present paper describes a study in which the inversion formulation was applied to photometric Foucault-test measurements on a nearly diffraction-limited mirror to determine wavefront errors for direct comparison with ones determined from scatter-plate interferometer measurements. The results affirm the practicability of the Foucault test for quantitative wavefront analysis of very small errors, and they reveal the fallacy of the prevalent belief that the test is limited to qualitative use only. Implications of the results with regard to optical testing and the potential use of the Foucault test for wavefront analysis in orbital space telescopes are discussed.

  9. Shack Hartmann wave-front measurement with a large F-number plastic microlens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Geun Young; Jitsuno, Takahisa; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Nakai, Sadao

    1996-01-01

    A new plastic microlens array, consisting of 900 lenslets, has been developed for the Shack Hartmann wave-front sensor. The individual lens, is 300 mu m \\times 300 mu m and has a focal length of 10 mm, which provides the same focal size, 60 mu m in diameter, with a constant peak intensity. One can improve the wave-front measurement accuracy by reducing the spot centroiding error by averaging a few frame memories of an image processor. A deformable mirror for testing the wave-front sensor gives an appropriate defocus and astigmatism, and the laser wave front is measured with a Shack Hartmann wave-front sensor. The measurement accuracy and reproducibility of our wave-front sensor are better than lambda /20 and lambda /50 ( lambda = 632.8 nm), respectively, in rms.

  10. Advances in the Two Source Energy Balance (TSEB) model using very high resolution remote sensing data in vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto Solana, H.; Kustas, W. P.; Torres-Rua, A. F.; ELarab, M.; Song, L.; Alfieri, J. G.; Prueger, J. H.; McKee, L.; Anderson, M. C.; Alsina, M. M.; Jensen, A.; McKee, M.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal-based Two Source Energy Balance (TSEB) model partitions the water and energy fluxes from vegetation and soil components providing thus the ability for estimating soil evaporation (E) and canopy transpiration (T) separately. However, it is crucial for ET partitioning to retrieve reliable estimates of canopy and soil temperatures as well as the net radiation partitioning (ΔRn), as the latter determines the available energy for water and heat exchange from soil and canopy sources. These two factors become especially relevant in agricultural areas, with vegetation clumped along rows and hence only partially covering the soil surface for much of the growing season. The effects on radiation and temperature partitioning is extreme for vineyards and orchards, where there is often significant separation between plants, resulting in strongly clumped vegetation with significant fraction of bare soil/substrate. To better understand the effects of strongly clumped vegetation on radiation and Land Surface Temperature (LST) partitioning very high spatial resolution remote sensing data acquired from an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) were collected over vineyards in Califronia, as part of the Grape Remote sensing and Atmospheric Profile and Evapotranspiration eXperiment (GRAPEX).The multi-temporal observations from the UAS and very high pixel resolution permitted the estimation of reliable soil and leaf temperatures using a contextual algorithm based on the inverse relationship between LST and a vegetation index. An improvement in the algorithm estimating the effective leaf area index explicitly developed for vine rows and ΔRn using the 4SAIL Radiative Transfer Model is as well developed. The revisions to the TSEB model are evaluated with in situ measurements of energy fluxes and transmitted solar radiation. Results show that the modifications to the TSEB resulted in closer agreement with the flux tower measurements compared to the original TSEB model formulations. The

  11. Anti-aliasing Wiener filtering for wave-front reconstruction in the spatial-frequency domain for high-order astronomical adaptive-optics systems.

    PubMed

    Correia, Carlos M; Teixeira, Joel

    2014-12-01

    Computationally efficient wave-front reconstruction techniques for astronomical adaptive-optics (AO) systems have seen great development in the past decade. Algorithms developed in the spatial-frequency (Fourier) domain have gathered much attention, especially for high-contrast imaging systems. In this paper we present the Wiener filter (resulting in the maximization of the Strehl ratio) and further develop formulae for the anti-aliasing (AA) Wiener filter that optimally takes into account high-order wave-front terms folded in-band during the sensing (i.e., discrete sampling) process. We employ a continuous spatial-frequency representation for the forward measurement operators and derive the Wiener filter when aliasing is explicitly taken into account. We further investigate and compare to classical estimates using least-squares filters the reconstructed wave-front, measurement noise, and aliasing propagation coefficients as a function of the system order. Regarding high-contrast systems, we provide achievable performance results as a function of an ensemble of forward models for the Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor (using sparse and nonsparse representations) and compute point-spread-function raw intensities. We find that for a 32×32 single-conjugated AOs system the aliasing propagation coefficient is roughly 60% of the least-squares filters, whereas the noise propagation is around 80%. Contrast improvements of factors of up to 2 are achievable across the field in the H band. For current and next-generation high-contrast imagers, despite better aliasing mitigation, AA Wiener filtering cannot be used as a standalone method and must therefore be used in combination with optical spatial filters deployed before image formation actually takes place.

  12. SUPY: an infrared pyramid wavefront sensor for Subaru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldt, M.; Hayano, Y.; Takami, H.; Usuda, T.; Watanabe, M.; Iye, M.; Goto, M.; Bizenberger, P.; Egner, S.; Peter, D.

    2006-06-01

    The 8 m SUBARU telescope atop Mauna Kea on Hawaii will shortly be equipped with a 188 actuator adaptive optics system (AO 188). Additionally it will be equipped with a Laser guide star (LGS) system to increase the sky coverage of that system. One of the additional tip-tilt sensor which is required to operate AO 188 in LGS mode will be working in the infrared to further enhance the coverage in highly obscured regions of the sky. Currently, various options for this sensor are under study, however the baseline design is a pyramid wavefront sensor. It is currently planned to have this sensor be able to provide also information on higher modes in order to feed AO 188 alone, i.e. without the LGS when NIR-bright guide stars are available. In this paper, we will present the results of the basic design tradeoffs, the performance analysis, and the project plan. Choices to be made concern the number of subapertures available across the primary mirror, the number of corrected modes, control of the AO system in combination with and without LGS, the detector of the wavefront sensor, the operation wavelength range and so forth. We will also present initial simulation results on the expected performance of the device, and the overall timeline and project structure.

  13. Wavefront modulation of water surface wave by a metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hai-Tao; Cheng, Ying; Wang, Jing-Shi; Liu, Xiao-Jun

    2015-10-01

    We design a planar metasurface to modulate the wavefront of a water surface wave (WSW) on a deep sub-wavelength scale. The metasurface is composed of an array of coiling-up-space units with specially designed parameters, and can take on the work of steering the wavefront when it is pierced into water. Like their acoustic counterparts, the modulation of WSW is ascribed to the gradient phase shift of the coiling-up-space units, which can be perfectly tuned by changing the coiling plate length and channel number inside the units. According to the generalized Snell’s law, negative refraction and ‘driven’ surface mode of WSW are also demonstrated at certain incidences. Specially, the transmitted WSW could be efficiently guided out by linking a symmetrically-corrugated channel in ‘driven’ surface mode. This work may have potential applications in water wave energy extraction and coastal protection. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921504), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474162, 11274171, 11274099, and 11204145), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant Nos. 20110091120040 and 20120091110001).

  14. Measurements of Pupillary Diameter and Wavefront Aberrations in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Altay, Mehmet Metin; Demirok, Gulizar; Balta, Ozgur; Bolu, Hulya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To show whether pregnancy affects the measurements of pupillary diameter and wavefront (WF) aberrations. Methods. This was a case-control study including 34 healthy pregnant women in the third trimester and age-matched 34 nonpregnant women. Only women who had no ocular abnormalities and no refractive error were included. We measured photopic and mesopic pupil diameter and WF aberrations at the third trimester and at the second postpartum month. Measurements of the right eyes were used in this study. The differences between groups were analysed by paired t-test and t-test. Results. Pregnant women's mean photopic pupil size in the third trimester was significantly higher than in postpartum period and in control group (3.74 ± 0.77, 3.45 ± 0.53, and 3.49 ± 0.15 mm, p < 0.05, resp.). Mesopic pupil size in the third trimester was also higher than in postpartum period and in control group (6.77 ± 0.52, 6.42 ± 0.55, and 6.38 ± 0.21 mm, p < 0.05, resp.). RMS-3 and RMS-5 values were higher in pregnancy but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion. Pregnancy increased photopic and mesopic pupil size significantly but did not increase wavefront aberrations notably. Increased pupil size may be due to increased sympathetic activity during pregnancy. And this activity can be noninvasively determined by measuring pupil size. PMID:26998383

  15. Wavefront construction Kirchhoff migration with ray-amplitude corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Fehler, Michael C.; Hildebrand, S. T.; Huang, L.; Alde, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    Kirchhoff migration using ray tracing travel times has been a popular imaging method for many years. There are significant limitations in the ability of Kirchhoff migration using only first arrivals to reliably image regions of complex structure. Thus, new methods for imaging have been sought. One approach for improving imaging capability is to use ray tracing methods that allow the calculation of multiple-valued travel time tables to be used in migration. Additional improvements in ray-based imaging methods may be obtained by including amplitudes and phases of rays calculated using some ray tracing approach. One approach for calculating multiple-valued travel time tables along with estimates of amplitudes and phases is the use of wavefront construction ray tracing. We introduce our wavefront construction-based migration algorithm and present some example images obtained using the method. We compare the images obtained with those obtained using a dual-domain wave-equation migration method that we call Extended Local Rytov Fourier migration method.

  16. Wavefront shaping based on three-dimensional optoacoustic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deán-Ben, X. L.; Estrada, Héctor; Ozbek, Ali; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Wavefront shaping techniques have recently evolved as a promising tool to control the light distribution in optically-scattering media. These techniques are based on spatially-modulating the phase of an incident light beam to create positive interference (focusing) at specific locations in the speckle pattern of the scattered wavefield. The optimum phase distribution (mask) of the spatial light modulator that allows focusing at the target location(s) is determined iteratively by monitoring the light intensity at such target. In this regard, optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging may provide the convenient advantage of simultaneous feedback information on light distribution in an entire region of interest. Herein, we showcase that volumetric optoacoustic images can effectively be used as a feedback mechanism in an iterative optimization algorithm allowing controlling the light distribution after propagation through a scattering sample. Experiments performed with absorbing microparticles distributed in a three-dimensional region showcase the feasibility of enhancing the light intensity at specific points. The advantages provided by optoacoustic imaging in terms of spatial and temporal resolution anticipate new capabilities of wavefront shaping techniques in biomedical optics.

  17. The association of wavefront aberration and accommodative lag in myopes.

    PubMed

    He, Ji C; Gwiazda, Jane; Thorn, Frank; Held, Richard; Vera-Diaz, Fuensanta A

    2005-02-01

    Accommodative lags, induced by a target at 33 cm (distance-induced condition) and by a -3.0 D lens (lens-induced condition), and wavefront aberrations were measured in 27 young myopic eyes. The accommodative lags and Strehl ratios derived from the wavefront aberrations in myopes were compared with those from 57 emmetropes. Accommodation was measured using a Canon R-1 autorefractor, while aberrations were measured using a psychophysical ray-tracing technique. In accord with previous results, larger accommodative lags were found for the myopes than the emmetropes in both the lens-induced and distance-induced conditions. The mean Strehl ratio was smaller in the myopes (0.079) than the emmetropes (0.091); this difference approached significance (p = 0.055). In addition, for myopes the accommodative lag was significantly correlated with the Strehl ratio in the lens-induced condition (r = -0.45, p < 0.02) and approached significance in the distance-induced condition (r = -0.35, p = 0.07). No significant correlations were found for emmetropes. Possible reasons to account for these results are discussed.

  18. A laser guide star wavefront sensor bench demonstrator for TMT.

    PubMed

    Lardiere, Olivier; Conan, Rodolphe; Bradley, Colin; Jackson, Kate; Herriot, Glen

    2008-04-14

    Sodium laser guide stars (LGSs) allow, in theory, Adaptive Optics (AO) systems to reach a full sky coverage, but they have their own limitations. The artificial star is elongated due to the sodium layer thickness, and the temporal and spatial variability of the sodium atom density induces changing errors on wavefront measurements, especially with Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) for which the LGS elongation is larger. In the framework of the Thirty-Meter-Telescope project (TMT), the AO-Lab of the University of Victoria (UVic) has built an LGS-simulator test bed in order to assess the performance of new centroiding algorithms for LGS Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (SH-WFS). The design of the LGS-bench is presented, as well as laboratory SH-WFS images featuring 29x29 radially elongated spots, simulated for a 30-m pupil. The errors induced by the LGS variations, such as focus and spherical aberrations, are characterized and discussed. This bench is not limited to SH-WFS and can serve as an LGS-simulator test bed to any other LGS-AO projects for which sodium layer fluctuations are an issue. PMID:18542656

  19. X-ray ptychography with highly-curved wavefront

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Shapiro, D.; Kaznatcheev, K.

    2013-10-01

    The recent development of scanning coherent x-ay diffraction microscopy (also known as ptychography) eliminates several constraints exerted by coherent imaging. In particular, an illuminating wave (the probe) can have an arbitrary shape, as a diffraction data redundancy due to multiple measurements at overlapping neighboring probe positions permits its independent reconstruction along with the scattering potential (the object wave). A priori knowledge, such as a finite sample support, is reduced to a recording of sequential probe positions and a plausible guess to be used as a starting estimate for iterative phase retrieval. Using a focusing probe, such as one produced by a zone plate, we investigate the effectiveness of the reconstruction algorithm and find that it is significantly less successful at reconstructing wavefronts with large curvature (extended phase variation) than the wavefronts with almost flat phase structure. Our simulations show that when the actual probe has large phase variation, the amount of overlap required for a successful reconstruction of both object and probe depends upon the phase difference between the actual probe and the probe used as a starting estimate for the reconstruction. We quantitatively define the circumstances for successful reconstruction of an object placed away from focus. We use an experimental dataset measured with a moderate amount of overlap to show that a successful reconstruction of the test sample can be done using a curved probe as an initial guess.

  20. Measuring seeing with a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor during an active-optics experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Yang, Dehua; Cui, Xiangqun

    2004-02-01

    We describe the measurement of atmospheric enclosure seeing along a 120-m light path by use of a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor (S-H WFS) for the first time to our knowledge in the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) outdoor active-optics experiment system, based on the differential image motion method and a S-H WFS. Seeing estimates that were gained with the S-H WFS were analyzed and found to be in close agreement with the actual seeing conditions, the estimates of refractive-index structure constant, and the thin-mirror active optics results, which usually include the shape sensing precision and the active correction precision of the experimental system. Finally, some countermeasures against poor seeing conditions were considered and adopted.

  1. On-chip image-processing algorithm for real-time CCD-based star trackers and wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielowski, Marek

    1994-05-01

    In this paper, we describe on-chip and off-chip image-processing algorithms utilizing the internal architecture of recently developed CCD sensors to provide high-speed readout of selected portions of the imager or accelerated scanning of an entire CCD frame. Image-processing time comparable to the star-tracker sensor exposure time and to the characteristic time of the atmospheric fluctuations (10 ms) has been achieved. On-chip image processing is particularly suitable for space or ground-based real-time applications (position determination, tip-tilt correctors, wavefront sensing for adaptive optics systems) where the speed of acquisition and processing data from the 'regions of interest' is critical. An example of a star tracker (based on the Texas Instruments TC217 CCD image sensor) for space applications capable of providing real-time multiple position updates with high angular resolution is given and achieved performance is discussed.

  2. Feasibility study of a layer-oriented wavefront sensor for solar telescopes: comment.

    PubMed

    Kellerer, Aglaé

    2014-11-10

    The future generation of telescopes will be equipped with multi-conjugate adaptive-optics (MCAO) systems in order to obtain high angular resolution over large fields of view. MCAO comes in two flavors: star- and layer-oriented. Existing solar MCAO systems rely exclusively on the star-oriented approach. Earlier we suggested a method to implement the layer-oriented approach, and in view of recent concerns by Marino and Wöger [Appl. Opt.53, 685 (2014)10.1364/AO.53.000685APOPAI1559-128X], we now explain the proposed scheme in further detail. We note that in any layer-oriented system one sensor is conjugated to the pupil and the others are conjugated to higher altitudes. For the latter, not all the sensing surface is illuminated by the entire field of view. The successful implementation of nighttime layer-oriented systems shows that the field reduction is no crucial limitation. In the solar approach the field reduction is directly noticeable because it causes vignetting of the Shack-Hartmann subaperture images. It can be accounted for by a suitable adjustment of the algorithms to calculate the local wavefront slopes. We discuss a further concern related to the optical layout of a layer-oriented solar system.

  3. The 2014 Tanana Inventory Pilot: A USFS­NASA partnership to leverage advanced remote sensing technologies for forest inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, H. E.; Babcock, C. R.; Cook, B.; Morton, D. C.; Pattison, R.; Finley, A. O.

    2015-12-01

    Interior Alaska (approx. 50 million forested hectacres in size) is the last remaining forested area in the United States (US) where the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program is not currently implemented. A joint NASA-FIA inventory pilot project was carried out in 2014 to evaluate the utility of state-of-the-art high-resolution remote sensing information (lidar, hyperspectral and thermal airborne imaging) to support a future FIA inventory program in interior Alaska. FIA plots were established at a 1:4 intensity (or 1 plot per 9,715 hectares) on a regular (i.e. systematic) hexagonal grid across the Tanana Valley State Forest and Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge; both of which fall within the Tanana valley of interior Alaska. The relatively sparse FIA field plot sample collection was augmented with samples of airborne remotely sensed data acquired with Goddard's Lidar Hyperspectral and Thermal (GLiHT) imager to increase the precision of inventory parameter estimates. G-LiHT is a portable, airborne imaging system, developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, that simultaneously maps the composition, structure, and function of terrestrial ecosystems. G-LiHT data supports local-scale mapping and regional-scale sampling of plant biomass, photosynthesis, and disturbance. The data is accurately georeferenced and can be matched precisely with field plot data that are georeferenced using survey-grade GPS. G-LiHT data was acquired in July-August, 2014 along single swaths (250 meters wide) spaced 9.3 km apart over the entire Tanana inventory unit (135,000 km2). We examine three methodological approaches to estimate forest inventory variables of interest; focusing initially on aboveground biomass (AGB) estimation. The three estimation procedures include 1) the standard, fully design-based approach currently used by the FIA; 2) A model-assisted technique; and 3) a Bayesian multi-level modeling approach where the sampling design can be explicitly accommodated within the

  4. Wind-Snow Interactions and Treeline Advance in the Medicine Bow Mountains, Wyoming: A Coupled Examination Using Dendroecology and Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, G.; Crawford, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Research suggests that broad-scale increases in temperature facilitated an abrupt initiation of upper treeline advance beginning in the 1950s at climatic treelines throughout a large portion of the southern and central Rocky Mountains. Despite this regional trend, patterns of finer scale variability often imply the likely influence of both wind-snow interactions and temperature on driving regeneration dynamics in these climatically-sensitive ecotones. This is particularly true for mountain ranges subject to consistently strong winds, such as the Medicine Bow Mountains of southeast Wyoming. A rich history of treeline work exists for this area, yet questions remain regarding how influential wind and snowpack variability are in governing climate-vegetation interactions within upper treeline ecotones and whether this varies according to the level of wind exposure. Here we present a coupled examination using dendroecology and remote sensing to test the hypothesis that sufficient snow cover is required in order for the ecological manifestation of increasing temperatures to appear at upper treeline; namely treeline advance. We used dendroecological methods to reconstruct the history of colonization on the two highest peaks in the range (Medicine Bow Peak Massif and Kannaday Peak). We sampled a total of six sites by placing nested-belt transects on two south-facing and one north-facing site for each peak. To gauge the influence of wind-snow interactions at each site, we analyzed remotely-sensed images. We selected three sets of LANDSAT images for each mountain peak based on years with maximum, minimum, and mean snowfall conditions to capture the entire range of variability. Results demonstrate that snow cover can be a critical modifier of treeline advance, especially on wind-exposed slopes and on mountain peaks with a relatively dry hydroclimatology, where a protective snow layer is only evident during high snow years. Overall, this research suggests that the role of wind

  5. Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope: Science Drivers and Technology Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Glavallsco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Remi; Hyde, Tupper

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8- to 16-m ultraviolet optical near Infrared space observatory for launch in the 2025 to 2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including: Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy? We present a range of science drivers and the resulting performance requirements for ATLAST (8- to 16-marcsec angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 micron wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 sq m, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 to 2.4 micron, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We also discuss the priorities for technology development needed to enable the construction of ATLAST for a cost that is comparable to that of current generation observatory-class space missions.

  6. Environmental remote sensing using the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR). (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the acquisition, processing, and applications of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) used on polar satellites operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for the Department of Commerce. AVHRR provides global visible and infrared imagery. The cited reports contain information on calibration, registration, and image processing of AVHRR data. Included are reports on AHVRR use in the study of aerosols, atmospheric circulation, agriculture, forest fires, deforestation, sun glint, sedimentation, cloud classification, sea ice, snowmelts, ocean productivity, sea surface temperatures, and vegetation. (Contains a minimum of 120 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Advancing the Remote Sensing of Land Surface-Atmosphere Interactions: Field Campaign Needs in the Next Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, F. G.; Sellers, P. J.; Hummerich, K. F.

    2008-12-01

    Field Campaigns have played a vital role in the development of remote sensing measurement techniques and models to observe the changing nature of the Earth's vegetated land surface and to compute the exchange of carbon, water and energy from the vegetated land surface. Importantly, they have pioneered and fostered a culture of interdisciplinary research focusing and integrating the efforts of the hydrology, ecology and remote sensing communities toward the resolution of a critical question for life on the planet earth; How are the Earth's energy, water and carbon cycles changing, and what are the consequences for the Earth's climate, the sustainability of its ecosystems and biodiversity? Not only have the research results from these campaigns contributed substantially to the resolution of this critical question, the interdisciplinary data sets acquired and made easily accessible to the global scientific community, continue to contribute, remaining heavily utilized more than 20 years following the completion of the earliest campaigns. A new generation of earth science satellites is now on the drawing board; in the US to extend the 30+ year data record from the Landsat series; some to extend the data record from NOAA's AVHRR, NASA's Terra and Aqua; and a growing constellation of satellites from Europe, Japan, India and China. In addition to continuing the existing satellite data record, new satellite concepts, utilizing combined radar and lidar measurements, are being designed in the US and abroad to map the earth's vegetation, ice and solid surfaces in three dimensions. These capabilities will permit global mapping of the vertical and horizontal structure of vegetation, critical to measuring biomass and biomass change needed to understand and project future changes in the earth's carbon cycle, climate and biodiversity. New space capabilities require new field campaigns To be effective these campaigns must be formulated with a rigorous experiment design focused on

  8. Wave-front correction of a femtosecond laser using a deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Elizabeth; Dainty, Christopher; O'Connor, Gerard; Glynn, Thomas

    2005-04-01

    Typical applications of ultra-high-power femtosecond lasers include precision drilling and surface micro-machining of metals, and micro-structuring of transparent materials. However, high peak-power pulsed lasers are difficult to focus close to the diffraction limit because of aberrations that induce deviations from a perfect spatial wave-front. The sources of these aberrations include thermally induced and nonlinear optical distortions, as well as static distortions such as those introduced by gratings used in chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A spatially clean beam is desirable to achieve the highest possible intensity on-target, and to minimize the energy deposited outside the central focus. One way to achieve this is to correct the wave-front using an adaptive optical element such as a deformable mirror, a more cost-effective solution than increasing peak intensity by providing further pulse amplification. The wave-front of the femtosecond system is measured using a Hartmann-Shack wave-front sensor, and corrected with a 37-channel deformable membrane mirror used slightly off-axis. The deformable mirror has been tested with a FISBA OPTIK μPhase HR digital interferometer, which is also used to calibrate the performance of the wave-front sensor. The influence of fluctuations of the laser on the measurement is minimised by averaging the centroid positions obtained from several consecutive frames. The distorted wave-front is compared to a reference flat wave-front which is obtained from a collimated laser diode operating at the same wavelength as the femtosecond system. The voltages on the deformable mirror actuators are then set to minimise the difference between the measured and reference wave-fronts using a simple least squares approach. Wave-front sensor and correction software is implemented in Matlab.

  9. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-11-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell’s law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  10. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-11-24

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  11. The effect of wavefront aberrations in atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schkolnik, V.; Leykauf, B.; Hauth, M.; Freier, C.; Peters, A.

    2015-08-01

    Wavefront aberrations are one of the largest uncertainty factors in present atom interferometers. We present a detailed numerical and experimental analysis of this effect based on measured aberrations from optical windows. By placing windows into the Raman beam path of our atomic gravimeter, we verify for the first time the induced bias in very good agreement with theory. Our method can be used to reduce the uncertainty in atomic gravimeters by one order of magnitude, resulting in an error of <3 × 10-10g, and it is suitable in a wide variety of atom interferometers with thermal or ultracold atoms. We discuss the limitations of our method, potential improvements, and its role in future generation experiments.

  12. Polarization-independent silicon metadevices for efficient optical wavefront control

    DOE PAGES

    Chong, Katie E.; Staude, Isabelle; James, Anthony Randolph; Dominguez, Jason James; Liu, Sheng; Campione, Salvatore; Subramania, Ganapathi Subramanian; Luk, Ting S.; Decker, Manuel; Neshev, Dragomir N.; et al

    2015-07-20

    In this study, we experimentally demonstrate a functional silicon metadevice at telecom wavelengths that can efficiently control the wavefront of optical beams by imprinting a spatially varying transmittance phase independent of the polarization of the incident beam. Near-unity transmittance efficiency and close to 0–2π phase coverage are enabled by utilizing the localized electric and magnetic Mie-type resonances of low-loss silicon nanoparticles tailored to behave as electromagnetically dual-symmetric scatterers. We apply this concept to realize a metadevice that converts a Gaussian beam into a vortex beam. The required spatial distribution of transmittance phases is achieved by a variation of the latticemore » spacing as a single geometric control parameter.« less

  13. Polarization-Independent Silicon Metadevices for Efficient Optical Wavefront Control.

    PubMed

    Chong, Katie E; Staude, Isabelle; James, Anthony; Dominguez, Jason; Liu, Sheng; Campione, Salvatore; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Luk, Ting S; Decker, Manuel; Neshev, Dragomir N; Brener, Igal; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2015-08-12

    We experimentally demonstrate a functional silicon metadevice at telecom wavelengths that can efficiently control the wavefront of optical beams by imprinting a spatially varying transmittance phase independent of the polarization of the incident beam. Near-unity transmittance efficiency and close to 0-2π phase coverage are enabled by utilizing the localized electric and magnetic Mie-type resonances of low-loss silicon nanoparticles tailored to behave as electromagnetically dual-symmetric scatterers. We apply this concept to realize a metadevice that converts a Gaussian beam into a vortex beam. The required spatial distribution of transmittance phases is achieved by a variation of the lattice spacing as a single geometric control parameter. PMID:26192100

  14. Broadband reflected wavefronts manipulation using structured phase gradient metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Peng; Wan, Le-Le; Chen, Tian-Ning; Song, Ai-Ling; Du, Xiao-Wen

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic metasurface (AMS) is a good candidate to manipulate acoustic waves due to special acoustic performs that cannot be realized by traditional materials. In this paper, we design the AMS by using circular-holed cubic arrays. The advantages of our AMS are easy assemble, subwavelength thickness, and low energy loss for manipulating acoustic waves. According to the generalized Snell's law, acoustic waves can be manipulated arbitrarily by using AMS with different phase gradients. By selecting suitable hole diameter of circular-holed cube (CHC), some interesting phenomena are demonstrated by our simulations based on finite element method, such as the conversion of incoming waves into surface waves, anomalous reflections (including negative reflection), acoustic focusing lens, and acoustic carpet cloak. Our results can provide a simple approach to design AMSes and use them in wavefront manipulation and manufacturing of acoustic devices.

  15. Polarization-independent silicon metadevices for efficient optical wavefront control

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Katie E.; Staude, Isabelle; James, Anthony Randolph; Dominguez, Jason James; Liu, Sheng; Campione, Salvatore; Subramania, Ganapathi Subramanian; Luk, Ting S.; Decker, Manuel; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Brener, Igal; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2015-07-20

    In this study, we experimentally demonstrate a functional silicon metadevice at telecom wavelengths that can efficiently control the wavefront of optical beams by imprinting a spatially varying transmittance phase independent of the polarization of the incident beam. Near-unity transmittance efficiency and close to 0–2π phase coverage are enabled by utilizing the localized electric and magnetic Mie-type resonances of low-loss silicon nanoparticles tailored to behave as electromagnetically dual-symmetric scatterers. We apply this concept to realize a metadevice that converts a Gaussian beam into a vortex beam. The required spatial distribution of transmittance phases is achieved by a variation of the lattice spacing as a single geometric control parameter.

  16. Compressive Sensing for Quantum Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howland, Gregory A.

    . Entanglement imaging is demonstrated at 1024 dimensions-per-photon with channel capacities exceeding 8.4 bits-per-photon. In practice, the measurement time is reduced from 310 days for the standard technique to 8 hours for the compressive technique. An entropic steering inequality is violated to witness entanglement. The final application is a compressive wavefront sensor that unites compressive sensing with weak measurement. We show how a twisted-nematic spatial light modulator can be be used to weakly couple an optical field's position and polarization degrees of freedom. The complex nature of the weak value is used to directly measure random projections of the real and imaginary parts of the optical field, where polarization serves as an ancillary meter. We obtain 256 x 256 pixel wavefronts from only 10,000 random projections. Photon-counting detectors provide sub-picowatt sensitivity.

  17. Variable wavefront tuning with a SLM for tailored femtosecond fiber Bragg grating inscription.

    PubMed

    Voigtländer, Christian; Krämer, Ria G; Goebel, Thorsten A; Richter, Daniel; Nolte, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We report on the inscription of fiber Bragg gratings using femtosecond laser pulses and the phase-mask technique. The wavefront of the inscription laser is variably tuned with a spatial light modulator (SLM). By applying Fresnel lenses with different focal lengths, the period of the fiber Bragg gratings could be shifted. A linear change of the grating period for a FBG inscribed with a third-order deformed wavefront and a quadratic-period behavior for a fourth-order wavefront could be verified experimentally for the first time. PMID:26696147

  18. Iterative Transform Phase Diversity: An Image-Based Object and Wavefront Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The Iterative Transform Phase Diversity algorithm is designed to solve the problem of recovering the wavefront in the exit pupil of an optical system and the object being imaged. This algorithm builds upon the robust convergence capability of Variable Sampling Mapping (VSM), in combination with the known success of various deconvolution algorithms. VSM is an alternative method for enforcing the amplitude constraints of a Misell-Gerchberg-Saxton (MGS) algorithm. When provided the object and additional optical parameters, VSM can accurately recover the exit pupil wavefront. By combining VSM and deconvolution, one is able to simultaneously recover the wavefront and the object.

  19. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  20. Vector wavefront propagation modeling for the TPF coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieber, Michael D.; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Ceperley, Dan; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Ter-Gabrielyan, Nikolay

    2004-10-01

    The TPF mission to search for exo-solar planets is extremely challenging both technically and from a performance modeling perspective. For the visible light coronagraph approach, the requirements for 1e10 rejection of star light to planet signal has not yet been achieved in laboratory testing and full-scale testing on the ground has many more obstacles and may not be possible. Therefore, end-to-end performance modeling will be relied upon to fully predict performance. One of the key technologies developed for achieving the rejection ratios uses shaped pupil masks to selectively cancel starlight in planet search regions by taking advantage of diffraction. Modeling results published to date have been based upon scalar wavefront propagation theory to compute the residual star and planet images. This ignores the 3D structure of the mask and the interaction of light with matter. In this paper we discuss previous work with a system model of the TPF coronagraph and propose an approach for coupling in a vector propagation model using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. This method, implemented in a software package called TEMPEST, allows us to propagate wavefronts through a mask structure to an integrated system model to explore the vector propagation aspects of the problem. We can then do rigorous mask scatter modeling to understand the effects of real physical mask structures on the magnitude, phase, polarization, and wavelength dependence of the transmitted light near edges. Shaped mask technology is reviewed, and computational aspects and interface issues to a TPF integrated system model are also discussed.

  1. Remote Sensing Observatory Validation of Surface Soil Moisture Using Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer E, Common Land Model, and Ground Based Data: Case Study in SMEX03 Little River Region, Georgia, U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimal soil moisture estimation may be characterized by inter-comparisons among remotely sensed measurements, ground-based measurements, and land surface models. In this study, we compared soil moisture from Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer E (AMSR-E), ground-based measurements, and Soil-Vege...

  2. Verification procedure for the wavefront quality of the primary mirrors for the MRO interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Eric J.; Olivares, Andres; Schmell, Reed A.; Schmell, Rodney A.; Gartner, Darren; Jaramillo, Anthony; Romero, Kelly; Rael, Andres; Lewis, Jeff

    2009-08-01

    We present the verification procedure for the 1.4 meter primary mirrors of the Magdalena Ridge Observatory Interferometer (MROI). Six mirrors are in mass production at Optical Surface Technologies (OST) in Albuquerque. The six identical parabolic mirrors will have a radius of curvature of 6300 mm and a final surface wavefront quality of 29 nm rms. The mirrors will be tested in a tower using a computer generated hologram, and the Intellium⢠H2000 interferometer from Engineering Synthesis Design, Inc. (ESDI). The mirror fabrication activities are currently in the early stage of polishing and have already delivered some promising results with the interferometer. A complex passive whiffle tree has been designed and fabricated by Advanced Mechanical and Optical Systems (AMOS, Belgium) that takes into account the gravity loading for an alt-alt mount. The final testing of the primary mirrors will be completed with the mirror cells that will be used in the telescopes. In addition we report on shear tests performed on the mirror cell pads on the back of the primary mirrors. These pads are glued to the mirror. The shear test has demonstrated that the glue can withstand at least 4.9 kilo Newton. This is within the requirements.

  3. Remote sensing of nutrient deficiency in Lactuca sativa using neural networks for terrestrial and advanced life support applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Edie Seldon

    2000-12-01

    A remote sensing study using reflectance and fluorescence spectra of hydroponically grown Lactuca sativa (lettuce) canopies was conducted. An optical receiver was designed and constructed to interface with a commercial fiber optic spectrometer for data acquisition. Optical parameters were varied to determine effects of field of view and distance to target on vegetation stress assessment over the test plant growth cycle. Feedforward backpropagation neural networks (NN) were implemented to predict the presence of canopy stress. Effects of spatial and spectral resolutions on stress predictions of the neural network were also examined. Visual inspection and fresh mass values failed to differentiate among controls, plants cultivated with 25% of the recommended concentration of phosphorous (P), and those cultivated with 25% nitrogen (N) based on fresh mass and visual inspection. The NN's were trained on input vectors created using reflectance and test day, fluorescence and test day, and reflectance, fluorescence, and test day. Four networks were created representing four levels of spectral resolution: 100-nm NN, 10-nm NN, 1-nm NN, and 0.1-nm NN. The 10-nm resolution was found to be sufficient for classifying extreme nitrogen deficiency in freestanding hydroponic lettuce. As a result of leaf angle and canopy structure broadband scattering intensity in the 700-nm to 1000-nm range was found to be the most useful portion of the spectrum in this study. More subtle effects of "greenness" and fluorescence emission were believed to be obscured by canopy structure and leaf orientation. As field of view was not as found to be as significant as originally believed, systems implementing higher repetitions over more uniformly oriented, i.e. smaller, flatter, target areas would provide for more discernible neural network input vectors. It is believed that this technique holds considerable promise for early detection of extreme nitrogen deficiency. Further research is recommended using

  4. MERTIS-thermal infrared imaging of Mercury: advances in mid-IR remote sensing technology for planetary exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Gabriele E.; Hiesinger, Harald; Helbert, Jörn; Peter, Gisbert; Walter, Ingo

    2010-09-01

    MERTIS (MErcury Radiometer and Thermal infrared Imaging Spectrometer) is part of ESA's BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter mission to the innermost planet of the Solar system. MERTIS is designed to identify rock-forming minerals, to map the surface composition, and to study the surface temperature variations with an uncooled microbolometer detector in the hot environment of Mercury. MERTIS is an advanced IR instrument combining a pushbroom IR grating spectrometer (TIS) with a radiometer (TIR) sharing the same optics, instrument electronics and in-fight calibration components for a wavelength range of 7-14 and 7-40 μm, respectively. First results of the ongoing MESSENGER project at Mercury have shown a more complex geology and higher variability of features than previously thought. The MESSENGER studies have demonstrated the need to gain global high-resolution mid-IR spectral and temperature data to achieve a better understanding of the planetary genesis. The MERTIS measurements will acquire this currently missing data set. This article gives a summary of the instrument requirements and its design. We are reporting on the actual instrument development progress, and the status of system and subsystem qualification efforts.

  5. Effects of turbulent flow field on wavefront aberration in liquid-convection-cooled disk laser oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peilin; Fu, Xing; Liu, Qiang; Gong, Mali

    2015-05-01

    A liquid-convection-cooled Nd:YAG disk laser oscillator with an output power of 30.7 W and a slope efficiency of 14.1 % is built. By using large-eddy simulation model, the wavefront aberration induced by the turbulent flow is numerically calculated. In the experiment, a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is used to measure the wavefront aberration and the laser intensity distribution. The RMS values and PV values of the beam wavefront and the phase stability of three feature points have been investigated. The experimental results prove that the turbulent flow with high flow velocity and high turbulent intensity can reduce the aberration of the flow field.

  6. Wavefront measurements of a laser-induced breakdown spark in still air.

    PubMed

    Rennie, R Mark; Goorskey, David; Whiteley, Matthew R; Jumper, Eric J

    2012-05-01

    Experimental measurements of the wavefronts of the light from a laser-induced breakdown (LIB) spark in non-moving air are presented and compared to spark dimensional data acquired from photographic measurements of the spark. The data show that the variation in the spark emitted wavefront between ignitions can be directly related to the motion of the spark volumetric centroid. The dominant modal components of the emitted wavefront variations are presented, as well as quantitative results for the magnitude of the wavefront variations. The results are relevant to the use of LIB as a light source for the measurement of optical aberrations such as those caused by compressible (i.e., "aero-optic") flows around an aircraft in flight, and data are shown indicating that LIB could be successfully used to measure the aberrating effect of compressible shear layers and boundary layers at typical cruise Mach numbers. PMID:22614405

  7. Performance and scalability analysis of teraflop-scale parallel architectures using multidimensional wavefront applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hoisie, A.; Lubeck, O.; Wasserman, H.

    1998-12-31

    The authors develop a model for the parallel performance of algorithms that consist of concurrent, two-dimensional wavefronts implemented in a message passing environment. The model, based on a LogGP machine parameterization, combines the separate contributions of computation and communication wavefronts. They validate the model on three important supercomputer systems, on up to 500 processors. They use data from a deterministic particle transport application taken from the ASCI workload, although the model is general to any wavefront algorithm implemented on a 2-D processor domain. They also use the validated model to make estimates of performance and scalability of wavefront algorithms on 100-TFLOPS computer systems expected to be in existence within the next decade as part of the ASCI program and elsewhere. In this context, they analyze two problem sizes. The model shows that on the largest such problem (1 billion cells), inter-processor communication performance is not the bottleneck. Single-node efficiency is the dominant factor.

  8. Reduction of artefacts and noise for a wavefront coding athermalized infrared imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Shi, Zelin; Xu, Baoshu; Zhang, Chengshuo

    2016-07-01

    Because of obvious drawbacks including serious artefacts and noise in a decoded image, the existing wavefront coding infrared imaging systems are seriously restricted in application. The proposed ultra-precision diamond machining technique manufactures an optical phase mask with a form manufacturing errors of approximately 770 nm and a surface roughness value Ra of 5.44 nm. The proposed decoding method outperforms the classical Wiener filtering method in three indices of mean square errors, mean structural similarity index and noise equivalent temperature difference. Based on the results mentioned above and a basic principle of wavefront coding technique, this paper further develops a wavefront coding infrared imaging system. Experimental results prove that our wavefront coding infrared imaging system yields a decoded image with good quality over a temperature range from ‑40 °C to +70 °C.

  9. Zonal representation-based residual-wavefront reconstruction using multiframe Shack-Hartmann measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shiping; Zhang, Rongzhi; Li, Jisheng; Zou, Jianhua; Xu, Rong; Liu, Changhai

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric turbulence-induced wavefront deformation can be only partially corrected by adaptive optics (AO) techniques in astronomical or artificial space object imaging; an accurate estimation of the residual-wavefront phase is still needed to approach the diffraction-limited resolution. The discrete phase gradients measured by Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (SHWFS) can help with the estimation. In this study, we build a dynamic average slopes measurement model for SHWFS in short-exposure AO images postprocessing; the proposed model is based on a zonal representation of the wavefront phase using Bernstein basis polynomials instead of the traditional Zernike modal expansion. Further, the turbulence's frozen flow hypothesis is adopted to update the initial model using multiframe SHWFS measurement data to achieve a more accurate reconstruction. Numerical experiments show the reconstruction errors significantly decrease even in poor seeing conditions, and show that our method is less sensitive to different SHWFS measurement noise levels.

  10. Integrating Remote Sensing Data, Hybrid-Cloud Computing, and Event Notifications for Advanced Rapid Imaging & Analysis (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, H.; Owen, S. E.; Yun, S.; Lundgren, P.; Fielding, E. J.; Agram, P.; Manipon, G.; Stough, T. M.; Simons, M.; Rosen, P. A.; Wilson, B. D.; Poland, M. P.; Cervelli, P. F.; Cruz, J.

    2013-12-01

    Space-based geodetic measurement techniques such as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) are now important elements in our toolset for monitoring earthquake-generating faults, volcanic eruptions, hurricane damage, landslides, reservoir subsidence, and other natural and man-made hazards. Geodetic imaging's unique ability to capture surface deformation with high spatial and temporal resolution has revolutionized both earthquake science and volcanology. Continuous monitoring of surface deformation and surface change before, during, and after natural hazards improves decision-making from better forecasts, increased situational awareness, and more informed recovery. However, analyses of InSAR and GPS data sets are currently handcrafted following events and are not generated rapidly and reliably enough for use in operational response to natural disasters. Additionally, the sheer data volumes needed to handle a continuous stream of InSAR data sets also presents a bottleneck. It has been estimated that continuous processing of InSAR coverage of California alone over 3-years would reach PB-scale data volumes. Our Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis for Monitoring Hazards (ARIA-MH) science data system enables both science and decision-making communities to monitor areas of interest with derived geodetic data products via seamless data preparation, processing, discovery, and access. We will present our findings on the use of hybrid-cloud computing to improve the timely processing and delivery of geodetic data products, integrating event notifications from USGS to improve the timely processing for response, as well as providing browse results for quick looks with other tools for integrative analysis.

  11. Wavefront metrology for coherent hard X-rays by scanning a microsphere.

    PubMed

    Skjønsfjell, Eirik Torbjørn Bakken; Chushkin, Yuriy; Zontone, Federico; Patil, Nilesh; Gibaud, Alain; Breiby, Dag W

    2016-05-16

    Characterization of the wavefront of an X-ray beam is of primary importance for all applications where coherence plays a major role. Imaging techniques based on numerically retrieving the phase from interference patterns are often relying on an a-priori assumption of the wavefront shape. In Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging (CXDI) a planar incoming wave field is often assumed for the inversion of the measured diffraction pattern, which allows retrieving the real space image via simple Fourier transformation. It is therefore important to know how reliable the plane wave approximation is to describe the real wavefront. Here, we demonstrate that the quantitative wavefront shape and flux distribution of an X-ray beam used for CXDI can be measured by using a micrometer size metal-coated polymer sphere serving in a similar way as the hole array in a Hartmann wavefront sensor. The method relies on monitoring the shape and center of the scattered intensity distribution in the far field using a 2D area detector while raster-scanning the microsphere with respect to the incoming beam. The reconstructed X-ray wavefront was found to have a well-defined central region of approximately 16 µm diameter and a weaker, asymmetric, intensity distribution extending 30 µm from the beam center. The phase front distortion was primarily spherical with an effective radius of 0.55 m which matches the distance to the last upstream beam-defining slit, and could be accurately represented by Zernike polynomials. PMID:27409892

  12. Research on encoding multi-gray-scale phase hologram and wavefront reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxin; Zhou, Hao; Li, Jingyao; Qiao, Yujing; Gao, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Application of computer-generated holography for wavefront generation is beneficial for optical interferometry and 3D image display. However, there is a noticeable encoding error in computer-generated holograms, which is encoded by using the object's wavefront function in a computer. The encoding error will be transmitted and amplified during fabrication of a hologram, which can cause a reconstructed error in the generated wavefront. A correction method of encoding errors based on the least-squares fitting is proposed. A validating experiment is completed by using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator to reconstruct a group of paraboloid wavefronts. The results show that encoding errors increase the reconstructed error of a wavefront less than optical system errors, and the root-mean-square value drops 0.022λ after the correction of the encoding error, but it falls 0.092λ after the correction of optical system errors. The total error has been reduced by 0.114λ. This research is helpful for prediction of encoding errors and improvement of wavefront reconstruction accuracy.

  13. Wavefront metrology for coherent hard X-rays by scanning a microsphere.

    PubMed

    Skjønsfjell, Eirik Torbjørn Bakken; Chushkin, Yuriy; Zontone, Federico; Patil, Nilesh; Gibaud, Alain; Breiby, Dag W

    2016-05-16

    Characterization of the wavefront of an X-ray beam is of primary importance for all applications where coherence plays a major role. Imaging techniques based on numerically retrieving the phase from interference patterns are often relying on an a-priori assumption of the wavefront shape. In Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging (CXDI) a planar incoming wave field is often assumed for the inversion of the measured diffraction pattern, which allows retrieving the real space image via simple Fourier transformation. It is therefore important to know how reliable the plane wave approximation is to describe the real wavefront. Here, we demonstrate that the quantitative wavefront shape and flux distribution of an X-ray beam used for CXDI can be measured by using a micrometer size metal-coated polymer sphere serving in a similar way as the hole array in a Hartmann wavefront sensor. The method relies on monitoring the shape and center of the scattered intensity distribution in the far field using a 2D area detector while raster-scanning the microsphere with respect to the incoming beam. The reconstructed X-ray wavefront was found to have a well-defined central region of approximately 16 µm diameter and a weaker, asymmetric, intensity distribution extending 30 µm from the beam center. The phase front distortion was primarily spherical with an effective radius of 0.55 m which matches the distance to the last upstream beam-defining slit, and could be accurately represented by Zernike polynomials.

  14. Large field-of-view wavefront control for deep brain imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Cui, Meng

    2016-03-01

    The biggest obstacle for deep tissue imaging is the scattering of light due to the heterogeneous distribution of biological tissue. In this respect, multiphoton microscopy has an inherent advantage as the scattering is significantly reduced by the use of longer excitation wavelengths. However, as we go deeper into the brain, effects of scattering still accumulate resulting in a loss of resolution and increased background noise. Adaptive optics is an ideal tool of choice to correct for such distortions of the excitation wavefront; the incident light can be tuned to cancel out the wavefront distortion experienced while propagating into greater depths resulting in a diffraction limited focus at the depth of interest. However, the biggest limitation of adaptive optics for in vivo brain imaging is its limited corrected field-of-view (FOV). For typical multiphoton laser scanning microscopes, the wavefront corrector for adaptive optics is placed at the pupil plane. This means that a single correction wavefront is applied to the entire scanned FOV which results in inefficient correction as the correction is averaged over the entire FOV. In this work, we demonstrate a novel approach to measure and display different correction wavefronts over different segments of the FOV. The application of the different correction wavefronts for each segment is realized in parallel resulting in fast aberration corrected imaging over a large FOV for high resolution in vivo brain imaging.

  15. Research on encoding multi-gray-scale phase hologram and wavefront reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxin; Zhou, Hao; Li, Jingyao; Qiao, Yujing; Gao, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Application of computer-generated holography for wavefront generation is beneficial for optical interferometry and 3D image display. However, there is a noticeable encoding error in computer-generated holograms, which is encoded by using the object's wavefront function in a computer. The encoding error will be transmitted and amplified during fabrication of a hologram, which can cause a reconstructed error in the generated wavefront. A correction method of encoding errors based on the least-squares fitting is proposed. A validating experiment is completed by using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator to reconstruct a group of paraboloid wavefronts. The results show that encoding errors increase the reconstructed error of a wavefront less than optical system errors, and the root-mean-square value drops 0.022λ after the correction of the encoding error, but it falls 0.092λ after the correction of optical system errors. The total error has been reduced by 0.114λ. This research is helpful for prediction of encoding errors and improvement of wavefront reconstruction accuracy. PMID:27139675

  16. The shape of the radio wavefront of extensive air showers as measured with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corstanje, A.; Schellart, P.; Nelles, A.; Buitink, S.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Frieswijk, W.; Hörandel, J. R.; Krause, M.; Rachen, J. P.; Scholten, O.; ter Veen, S.; Thoudam, S.; Trinh, T. N. G.; van den Akker, M.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Avruch, I. M.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Ciardi, B.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; de Vos, M.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Engels, D.; Fallows, R. A.; Ferrari, C.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Gunst, A. W.; Hamaker, J. P.; Hoeft, M.; Horneffer, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kohler, J.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Mevius, M.; Munk, H.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Schwarz, D.; Smirnov, O.; Stewart, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Toribio, C.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.

    2015-02-01

    Extensive air showers, induced by high energy cosmic rays impinging on the Earth's atmosphere, produce radio emission that is measured with the LOFAR radio telescope. As the emission comes from a finite distance of a few kilometers, the incident wavefront is non-planar. A spherical, conical or hyperbolic shape of the wavefront has been proposed, but measurements of individual air showers have been inconclusive so far. For a selected high-quality sample of 161 measured extensive air showers, we have reconstructed the wavefront by measuring pulse arrival times to sub-nanosecond precision in 200 to 350 individual antennas. For each measured air shower, we have fitted a conical, spherical, and hyperboloid shape to the arrival times. The fit quality and a likelihood analysis show that a hyperboloid is the best parameterization. Using a non-planar wavefront shape gives an improved angular resolution, when reconstructing the shower arrival direction. Furthermore, a dependence of the wavefront shape on the shower geometry can be seen. This suggests that it will be possible to use a wavefront shape analysis to get an additional handle on the atmospheric depth of the shower maximum, which is sensitive to the mass of the primary particle.

  17. Recent advances in the development of a novel aerosol sorting and deposition system for bio-threat sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletcher, Timothy; McGinn, Joseph; Keller, David; Huston, Alan; Eversole, Jay; Sivaprakasum, Vasanthi

    2007-10-01

    Sarnoff Corporation and the Naval Research Laboratory, through support of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, are developing an automated, high throughput bio-aerosol physical enrichment system designed for use as part of a biological-threat protection system. The Biological Aerosol-Capture-Enrichment (BioACE) system is a bio-aerosol collection system that combines three unique technologies to create physically enriched aerosol samples that can be subsequently interrogated by any number of bio-threat detection systems for the presence of threat agents. An air-to-air concentrator uses an inertial separation technique to highly concentrate an aerosol sample presented to a dual wavelength ultra-violet laser induced fluorescence (UVLIF) optical trigger used to discriminate potential threat particles from non-threat particles conveyed in a collimated particle stream. This particle classification information is used to trigger an electrostatic deposition mechanism to deposit only those particles determined to be potential bio-threats onto a stainless steel substrate. Non-threat particles are discarded with the exiting airflow. The goal for the most recent development effort has been the integration and optimization of these technologies into a unit capable of producing highly enriched particulate samples from ambient air containing variable background aerosol loading and type. Several key technical and engineering challenges were overcome during the course of this development including a unique solution for compensating particle velocity dispersion within the airflow, development of a real-time signal acquisition and detection algorithm for determining material type on a particle by particle basis at rates greater than 2000 particles per second, and the introduction of a robust method for transferring deposited particulate into a 50ul wet sample suitable for most advanced bio-detection techniques. This paper will briefly describe the overall system architecture and

  18. Dispersed Fringe Sensing Analysis - DFSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigrist, Norbert; Shi, Fang; Redding, David C.; Basinger, Scott A.; Ohara, Catherine M.; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa A.; Spechler, Joshua A.

    2012-01-01

    Dispersed Fringe Sensing (DFS) is a technique for measuring and phasing segmented telescope mirrors using a dispersed broadband light image. DFS is capable of breaking the monochromatic light ambiguity, measuring absolute piston errors between segments of large segmented primary mirrors to tens of nanometers accuracy over a range of 100 micrometers or more. The DFSA software tool analyzes DFS images to extract DFS encoded segment piston errors, which can be used to measure piston distances between primary mirror segments of ground and space telescopes. This information is necessary to control mirror segments to establish a smooth, continuous primary figure needed to achieve high optical quality. The DFSA tool is versatile, allowing precise piston measurements from a variety of different optical configurations. DFSA technology may be used for measuring wavefront pistons from sub-apertures defined by adjacent segments (such as Keck Telescope), or from separated sub-apertures used for testing large optical systems (such as sub-aperture wavefront testing for large primary mirrors using auto-collimating flats). An experimental demonstration of the coarse-phasing technology with verification of DFSA was performed at the Keck Telescope. DFSA includes image processing, wavelength and source spectral calibration, fringe extraction line determination, dispersed fringe analysis, and wavefront piston sign determination. The code is robust against internal optical system aberrations and against spectral variations of the source. In addition to the DFSA tool, the software package contains a simple but sophisticated MATLAB model to generate dispersed fringe images of optical system configurations in order to quickly estimate the coarse phasing performance given the optical and operational design requirements. Combining MATLAB (a high-level language and interactive environment developed by MathWorks), MACOS (JPL s software package for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical

  19. The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Science Drivers, Technology Developments, and Synergies with Other Future Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Giavalisco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Remi; Hyde, Tupper

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers that define the main performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsec angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 m to 2.4 m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We will also discuss the synergy between ATLAST and other anticipated future facilities (e.g., TMT, EELT, ALMA) and the priorities for technology development that will enable the construction for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions.

  20. Telescope Alignment From Sparsely Sampled Wavefront Measurements Over Pupil Subapertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, Eric E.; An, Xin; Kuan, Gary M.; Moore, Douglas M.; OShay, Joseph F.; Tang, Hong; Page, Norman A.

    2012-01-01

    Alignment of two-element telescopes is a classic problem. During recent integration and test of the Space Interferometry Mission s (SIM s) Astrometric Beam Combiner (ABC), the innovators were faced with aligning two such telescope subsystems in the presence of a further complication: only two small subapertures in each telescope s pupil were accessible for measuring the wavefront with a Fizeau interferometer. This meant that the familiar aberrations that might be interpreted to infer system misalignments could be viewed only over small sub-regions of the pupil, making them hard to recognize. Further, there was no contiguous surface of the pupil connecting these two subapertures, so relative phase piston information was lost; the underlying full-aperture aberrations therefore had an additional degree of ambiguity. The solution presented here is to recognize that, in the absence of phase piston, the Zygo measurements primarily provide phase tilt in the subaperture windows of interest. Because these windows are small and situated far from the center of the (inaccessible) unobscured full aperture, any aberrations that are higher-order than tilt will be extremely high-order on the full aperture, and so not necessary or helpful to the alignment. Knowledge of the telescope s optical prescription allows straightforward evaluation of sensitivities (subap mode strength per unit full-aperture aberration), and these can be used in a predictive matrix approach to move with assurance to an aligned state. The technique is novel in every operational way compared to the standard approach of alignment based on full-aperture aberrations or searching for best rms wavefront. This approach is closely grounded in the observable quantities most appropriate to the problem. It is also more intuitive than inverting full phase maps (or subaperture Zernike spectra) with a ray-tracing program, which must certainly work in principle, but in practice met with limited success. Even if such