Science.gov

Sample records for advanced weather satellites

  1. Weather Prediction Improvement Using Advanced Satellite Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Einaudi, Franco; Uccellini, L.; Purdom, J.; Rogers, D.; Gelaro, R.; Dodge, J.; Atlas, R.; Lord, S.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss in this paper some of the problems that exist today in the fall utilization of satellite data to improve weather forecasts and we propose specific recommendations to solve them. This discussion can be viewed as an aspect of the general debate on how best to organize the transition from research to operational satellites and how to evaluate the impact of a research instrument on numerical weather predictions. A method for providing this transition is offered by the National Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP). This mission will bridge the time between the present NOAA and Department of Defense (DOD) polar orbiting missions and the initiation of the converged NPOESS series and will evaluate some of the Earth Observing System (EOS) instruments as appropriate for operational missions. Thus, this mission can be viewed as an effort to meet the operational requirements of NOAA and DOD and the research requirements of NASA. More generally, however, it can be said that the process of going from the conception of new, more advanced instruments to their operational implementation and full utilization by the weather forecast communities is not optimal. Instruments developed for research purposes may have insufficient funding to explore their potential operational capabilities. Furthermore, instrument development programs designed for operational satellites typically have insufficient funding for assimilation algorithms needed to transform the satellite observations into data that can be used by sophisticated global weather forecast models. As a result, years often go by before satellite data are efficiently used for operational forecasts. NASA and NOAA each have unique expertise in the design of satellite instruments, their use for basic and applied research and their utilization in weather and climate research. At a time of limited resources, the two agencies must combine their efforts to work toward common

  2. Next generation Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite: GOES-R, the United States' advanced weather sentinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, Hal J.

    2009-08-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-series (GOES-R) is the follow-on to the existing GOES system, completing a transition from 1980's technology to state-of-the-art. The product of a collaborative development effort between NOAA, NASA, DOC and industry, the first GOES-R satellite is planned to be launched in April 2015 with readiness to fully replace the heritage GOES constellation in 2017. This next-generation system will continue as the United States' weather sentinel for forecasting hurricanes, severe storms, and flash floods while providing information about air quality, winds, sea surface temperature, and space weather. It will provide advanced capabilities by providing five times more spectral information, temporal coverage six times faster than the current system, and 50% higher spatial resolution. The heart of the GOES-R system is the ABI instrument, a sixteen-channel imager with six visible channels and 10 infrared channels. The GLM instrument will be the first geostationary sensor to detect and monitor lightning strikes. GOES-R also includes several space environment sensors that will increase the capability to monitor and predict solar flare activity. Additionally, GOES-R will continue to provide heritage search and rescue capabilities, a data collection system, and other direct readout capabilities.

  3. Satellite Weather Watch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, R. Joe

    1982-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive (about $1,500) direct-readout ground station for use in secondary school science/mathematics programs. Includes suggested activities including, among others, developing map overlays, operating station equipment, interpreting satellite data, developing weather forecasts, and using microcomputers for data storage, orbit…

  4. Advancing Satellite-Based Flood Prediction in Complex Terrain Using High-Resolution Numerical Weather Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Nikolopoulos, E. I.; Bartsotas, N. S.

    2015-12-01

    Floods constitute one of the most significant and frequent natural hazard in mountainous regions. Satellite-based precipitation products offer in many cases the only available source of QPE. However, satellite-based QPE over complex terrain suffer from significant bias that limits their applicability for hydrologic modeling. In this work we investigate the potential of a new correction procedure, which involves the use of high-resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP) model simulations to adjust satellite QPE. Adjustment is based on the pdf matching of satellite and NWP (used as reference) precipitation distribution. The impact of correction procedure on simulating the hydrologic response is examined for 15 storm events that generated floods over the mountainous Upper Adige region of Northern Italy. Atmospheric simulations were performed at 1-km resolution from a state-of-the-art atmospheric model (RAMS/ICLAMS). The proposed error correction procedure was then applied on the widely used TRMM 3B42 satellite precipitation product and the evaluation of the correction was based on independent in situ precipitation measurements from a dense rain gauge network (1 gauge / 70 km2) available in the study area. Satellite QPE, before and after correction, are used to simulate flood response using ARFFS (Adige River Flood Forecasting System), a semi-distributed hydrologic model, which is used for operational flood forecasting in the region. Results showed that bias in satellite QPE before correction was significant and had a tremendous impact on the simulation of flood peak, however the correction procedure was able to reduce bias in QPE and therefore improve considerably the simulated flood hydrograph.

  5. Polar orbiting operational weather satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stampfl, R. A.; Albert, G.

    1972-01-01

    The progress in the development of operational weather satellites is reviewed, covering their chronology from Explorer 7 of 1959 through Meteor 12 of June, 1972. Special attention is given to the development of the TIROS series satellites with the evolution of their operational sensors, data systems and performance requirements. The topics also include the data collection system designs, to Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), the sounder radiometer, the Solar Environment Monitor (SEM), the data processor, and TIROS-N operation and orbital characteristics. It is expected that TIROS-N and its forthcoming advanced versions will provide an effective technology for sensing environmental data on a global scale in the latter half of the decade.

  6. Weather Satellite Enterprise Information Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Grant, K. D.; Miller, S. W.; Cochran, S.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA & NASA are acquiring the next-generation civilian operational weather satellite: Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). Contributing the afternoon orbit & ground system (GS) to replace current NOAA POES Satellites, its sensors will collect meteorological, oceanographic & climatological data. The JPSS Common Ground System (CGS), consisting of C3 and IDP segments, is developed by Raytheon. It now flies the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, transferring data between ground facilities, processing them into environmental products for NOAA weather centers, and expanding to support JPSS-1 in 2017. As a multi-mission system, CGS provides combinations of C3, data processing, and product delivery for numerous NASA, NOAA, DoD and international missions.The CGS provides a wide range of support to a number of missions: Command and control and mission management for the S-NPP mission today, expanding this support to the JPSS-1 satellite mission in 2017 Data acquisition for S-NPP, the JAXA's Global Change Observation Mission - Water (GCOM-W1), POES, and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and Coriolis/WindSat for the DoD Data routing over a global fiber network for S-NPP, JPSS-1, GCOM-W1, POES, DMSP, Coriolis/WindSat, NASA EOS missions, MetOp for EUMETSAT and the National Science Foundation Environmental data processing and distribution for S-NPP, GCOM-W1 and JPSS-1 The CGS plays a key role in facilitating the movement and value-added enhancement of data all the way from satellite-based sensor data to delivery to the consumers who generate forecasts and produce watches and warnings. This presentation will discuss the information flow from sensors, through data routing and processing, and finally to product delivery. It will highlight how advances in architecture developed through lessons learned from S-NPP and implemented for JPSS-1 will increase data availability and reduce latency for end user applications.

  7. Meteorological satellites in support of weather modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, D. W.; Vonder Haar, T. H.; Grant, L. O.

    1978-01-01

    During the past several years, many weather modification programs have been incorporating meteorological satellite data into both the operations and the analysis phase of these projects. This has occurred because of the advancement of the satellite as a mesoscale measurement platform, both temporally and spatially, and as the availability of high quality data has increased. This paper surveys the applications of meteorological satellite data to both summer and winter weather modification programs. A description of the types of observations needed by the programs is given, and an assessment of how accurately satellites can determine these necessary parameters is made.

  8. Weather, land satellite sale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    President Ronald Reagan announced on March 8 plans to sell to private industry the nation's land and meteorological remote-sensing satellites, including the responsibility for any future ocean-observing systems. According to the plan, the private firm successful in its bid to buy the five satellites would sell back to the government the data received by the satellites. The Reagan administration says the sale will save money and will put activities appropriate for commercial ventures into the commercial sector. Response to the announcement from scientists and congressmen has been anything but dulcet; one senator, in fact, charges that the Commerce Department and the corporation most likely to purchase the satellites are engaged in a ‘sweetheart deal.’

  9. Sentinels in the Sky: Weather Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Robert

    This publication describes forecasting weather activity using satellites. Information is included on the development of weather satellites, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Satellite System (including the polar-orbiting satellites), and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). The publication…

  10. GOES Weather Satellite Watches The Sun

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA satellites such as STEREO, SOHO, and SDO are dedicated to studying the sun. GOES is a weather satellite but also watches the sun constantly. Watch this video and learn why space weather data i...

  11. Weather and climate. [review of satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, D.

    1981-01-01

    Highlights of recent progress and the directions of future advances in the application of space observations to weather and climate are reviewed. In mesometeorology and severe storms, satellite stereography of cloud topography and temperature profiling from GOES-VAS promise dramatic developments in both nowcasting and prediction. In global weather, the initial results from the year long Global Weather Experiment conclusively demonstrate the enhanced forecast skill emanating from the use of satellite data, especially cloud track winds and temperature profiles. In climate, empirical studies and numerical experiments point to the feasibility of useful climate predictions on monthly and seasonal time scales. They also indicate the kinds of surface boundary conditions to which climate is sensitive and which need to be observed from space.

  12. Cockpit weather graphics using mobile satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seth, Shashi

    1993-01-01

    Many new companies are pushing state-of-the-art technology to bring a revolution in the cockpits of General Aviation (GA) aircraft. The vision, according to Dr. Bruce Holmes - the Assistant Director for Aeronautics at National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Langley Research Center, is to provide such an advanced flight control system that the motor and cognitive skills you use to drive a car would be very similar to the ones you would use to fly an airplane. We at ViGYAN, Inc., are currently developing a system called the Pilot Weather Advisor (PWxA), which would be a part of such an advanced technology flight management system. The PWxA provides graphical depictions of weather information in the cockpit of aircraft in near real-time, through the use of broadcast satellite communications. The purpose of this system is to improve the safety and utility of GA aircraft operations. Considerable effort is being extended for research in the design of graphical weather systems, notably the works of Scanlon and Dash. The concept of providing pilots with graphical depictions of weather conditions, overlaid on geographical and navigational maps, is extremely powerful.

  13. COST Action ES1206 : Advanced Global Navigation Satellite Systems Tropospheric Products for Monitoring Severe Weather Events and Climate (GNSS4SWEC) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J.

    2013-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have revolutionised positioning, navigation, and timing, becoming a common part of our everyday life. Aside from these well-known civilian and commercial applications, GNSS is now an established atmospheric observing system which can accurately sense water vapour, the most abundant greenhouse gas, accounting for 60-70% of atmospheric warming. Severe weather forecasting is challenging, in part due to the high temporal and spatial variation of atmospheric water vapour. Water vapour is under-sampled in the current meteorological and climate observing systems, obtaining and exploiting more high-quality humidity observations is essential to weather forecasting and climate monitoring. The new COST Action, ES1206, will address new and improved capabilities from con-current developments in both the GNSS and meteorological communities. For the first time, the synergy of the three GNSS systems (GPS, GLONASS and Galileo) will be used to develop new, advanced tropospheric products, exploiting the full potential of multi-GNSS water vapour estimates on a wide range of temporal and spatial scales, from real-time monitoring and forecasting of severe weather, to climate research. In addition the Action will promote the use of meteorological data in GNSS positioning, navigation, and timing services. The Action will stimulate knowledge transfer and data sharing throughout Europe.

  14. COST Action ES1206 : Advanced Global Navigation Satellite Systems Tropospheric Products for Monitoring Severe Weather Events and Climate (GNSS4SWEC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jonathan; Guerova, Guergana; Dousa, Jan; de Haan, Siebren; Bock, Olivier; Dick, Galina; Pottiaux, Eric; Pacione, Rosa

    2014-05-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have revolutionised positioning, navigation, and timing, becoming a common part of our everyday life. Aside from these well-known civilian and commercial applications, GNSS is now an established atmospheric observing system which can accurately sense water vapour, the most abundant greenhouse gas, accounting for 60-70% of atmospheric warming. Severe weather forecasting is challenging, in part due to the high temporal and spatial variation of atmospheric water vapour. Water vapour is under-sampled in the current meteorological and climate observing systems, obtaining and exploiting more high-quality humidity observations is essential to weather forecasting and climate monitoring. The new COST Action, ES1206, will address new and improved capabilities from con-current developments in both the GNSS and meteorological communities. For the first time, the synergy of the three GNSS systems (GPS, GLONASS and Galileo) will be used to develop new, advanced tropospheric products, exploiting the full potential of multi-GNSS water vapour estimates on a wide range of temporal and spatial scales, from real-time monitoring and forecasting of severe weather, to climate research. In addition the Action will promote the use of meteorological data in GNSS positioning, navigation, and timing services. The Action will stimulate knowledge transfer and data sharing throughout Europe.

  15. Satellite Broadcast of Graphical Weather Data Flight Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallasch, Paul G.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field's aviation Weather Information Communications (WINCOMM) and NASA Langley Research Center's Aviation Weather Information (AWIN) programs collaborated in a flight test and evaluation of a worldwide weather data-link capability using satellites. This successful flight testing moves NASA closer to its goal of developing advanced communications and information technologies to enable high-quality and timely dissemination of aviation weather information to all relevant users on the aviation information network. Recognized as a major contributing factor in aviation accidents and incidents, weather contributes directly or indirectly to nearly 80 percent of fatal general aviation (small private aircraft) accidents. In 1997, the Aeronautics Safety Investment Strategy Team s weather team produced a prioritized list of investment areas under weather accident prevention. Weather data dissemination is the most critical and highest ranked priority on the list. NASA's Aviation Safety Program founded the Aviation Weather Information initiative to focus efforts on significantly reducing the number of weather-related aviation fatalities. Access to accurate and timely weather data could contribute to a major reduction of weather-related incidents and accidents. However, a cost-effective solution has eluded most general aviation pilots because of the high cost of onboard weather radar equipment. Rockwell Collins, through a contract with NASA and in cooperation with WorldSpace Corporation, successfully completed ground and flight testing of a receiver and antenna in Johannesburg, South Africa. This NASA/Rockwell Collins project is an evaluation of worldwide weather data-link capability using transmissions from the Satellite Digital Audio Radio Services (S DARS) AfriStar satellite. Owned and operated by WorldSpace, AfriStar is a geostationary satellite that broadcasts commercial digital audio services to stationary and mobile platforms. S DARS

  16. Weather satellites: Systems, data, and environmental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, P.K.; Holmes, S.J.; Anderson, R.K.; Winston, J.S.; Lehr, P.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The present review of weather-satellite systems, data, and environmental applications encompasses the evolution of space-based weather observation, national observing capabilities, sensor data and processing, climate and meteorological applications, applications to land, agriculture, and ocean sciences, and some future directions. Specific issues addressed include U.S. operational polar and geostationary satellites, the Japanese GMS, remote sensing instrumentation, the Argos data collection and location system, satellite data product processing and archiving, atmospheric soundings, and image display and analysis systems. Also addressed are stereoscopic measurements, convective-scale weather analysis and forecasting, aviation and marine applications, and applications to the study of thermal anomalies, the earth-radiation budget, stratospheric monitoring, and vegetation monitoring, and reference is made to the potential of a polar orbiting platform.

  17. Weather Satellite Pictures and How to Obtain Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petit, Noel J.; Johnson, Philip

    1982-01-01

    An introduction to satellite meteorology is presented to promote use of live weather satellite photographs in the classroom. Topics addressed include weather satellites, how they work, earth emissions, satellite photography, satellite image analysis, obtaining satellite pictures, and future considerations. Includes sources for materials to…

  18. Satellite Delivery of Aviation Weather Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Haendel, Richard

    2001-01-01

    With aviation traffic continuing to increase worldwide, reducing the aviation accident rate and aviation schedule delays is of critical importance. In the United States, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established the Aviation Safety Program and the Aviation System Capacity Program to develop and test new technologies to increase aviation safety and system capacity. Weather is a significant contributor to aviation accidents and schedule delays. The timely dissemination of weather information to decision makers in the aviation system, particularly to pilots, is essential in reducing system delays and weather related aviation accidents. The NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating improved methods of weather information dissemination through satellite broadcasting directly to aircraft. This paper describes an on-going cooperative research program with NASA, Rockwell Collins, WorldSpace, Jeppesen and American Airlines to evaluate the use of satellite digital audio radio service (SDARS) for low cost broadcast of aviation weather information, called Satellite Weather Information Service (SWIS). The description and results of the completed SWIS Phase 1 are presented, and the description of the on-going SWIS Phase 2 is given.

  19. Advanced communications satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivo, J. N.

    1983-01-01

    There is a rapidly growing demand for satellite circuits, particularly for domestic service within the U.S. NASA's current program is aimed at developing the high risk, advanced satellite communications technologies required to significantly increase the capacity of future satellite communications systems. Attention is given to aspects of traffic distribution and service scenario, problems related to effects of rain attenuation, details regarding system configuration, a 30/20 GHz technology development approach, an experimental flight system, the communications payload for the experimental flight system, a typical experiment flight system coverage, and a typical three axis stabilized flight spacecraft.

  20. Advanced communications satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivo, J. N.

    1980-01-01

    The increase in demand for satellite communications services brought about shortages in available transponder capacity, especially at C-band. Interest shifted to the Ku-band frequency and currently carriers are rapidly moving to secure orbital slots for future satellite development. Projections of communications service demands over the next decade indiate growth in voice, data, and video services such that saturation of both C-band and Ku-band will occur by 1990. Emphasis must and will shift to Ka-band (20/30 GHz) frequency for fixed-satellite service. Advanced technologies such as multibeam antennas coupled with on-board satellite switching to allow implementation in this band of very high capacity satellite systems will be applied to meet the demand. Satellite system concepts that are likely in the 1990's and are likely to bring a new dimension to satellite delivered communication service are presented. The NASA 30/20 GHz communications satellite system demonstration program is discussed with emphasis on the related technology development.

  1. Space Weather, Cosmic Rays, and Satellite Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Dorman

    Results are presented of the Satellite Anomaly Project, which aims to improve the methods of safeguarding satellites in the Earth’s magnetosphere from the negative effects of the space environment. Anomaly data from the USSR and Russian “Kosmos” series satellites in the period 1971-1999 are combined into one database, together with similar information on other spacecraft. This database contains, beyond the anomaly information, various characteristics of space weather: geomagnetic activity indices (Ap, AE and Dst), fluxes and fluencies of electrons and protons at different energies, high energy cosmic ray variations and other solar, interplanetary and solar wind data. A comparative analysis of the distribution of each of these parameters relative to satellite anomalies was carried out for the total number of anomalies (about 6000 events), and separately for high altitude orbit satellites ( 5000 events) and low altitude (about 800 events). No relation was found between low and high altitude satellite anomalies. Daily numbers of satellite anomalies, averaged by a superposed epoch method around sudden storm commencements and proton event onsets for high (>1500 km) and low (<1500 km) altitude orbits revealed a big difference in behavior. Satellites were divided into several groups according to their orbital characteristics (altitude and inclination). The relation of satellite anomalies to the environmental parameters was found to be different for various orbits, and this should be taken into account when developing anomaly frequency models. The preliminary anomaly frequency models are presented.

  2. Advances in satellite oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, O. B.; Cheney, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Technical advances and recent applications of active and passive satellite remote sensing techniques to the study of oceanic processes are summarized. The general themes include infrared and visible radiometry, active and passive microwave sensors, and buoy location systems. The surface parameters of sea surface temperature, windstream, sea state, altimetry, color, and ice are treated as applicable under each of the general methods.

  3. Using Satellite Data in Weather Forecasting: I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Suggs, Ronnie J.; Lecue, Juan M.

    2006-01-01

    The GOES Product Generation System (GPGS) is a set of computer codes and scripts that enable the assimilation of real-time Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) data into regional-weather-forecasting mathematical models. The GPGS can be used to derive such geophysical parameters as land surface temperature, the amount of precipitable water, the degree of cloud cover, the surface albedo, and the amount of insolation from satellite measurements of radiant energy emitted by the Earth and its atmosphere. GPGS incorporates a priori information (initial guesses of thermodynamic parameters of the atmosphere) and radiometric measurements from the geostationary operational environmental satellites along with mathematical models of physical principles that govern the transfer of energy in the atmosphere. GPGS solves the radiative-transfer equation and provides the resulting data products in formats suitable for use by weather-forecasting computer programs. The data-assimilation capability afforded by GPGS offers the potential to improve local weather forecasts ranging from 3 hours to 2 days - especially with respect to temperature, humidity, cloud cover, and the probability of precipitation. The improvements afforded by GPGS could be of interest to news media, utility companies, and other organizations that utilize regional weather forecasts.

  4. Advanced satellite communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staples, Edward J.; Lie, Sen

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research program was to develop an innovative advanced satellite receiver/demodulator utilizing surface acoustic wave (SAW) chirp transform processor and coherent BPSK demodulation. The algorithm of this SAW chirp Fourier transformer is of the Convolve - Multiply - Convolve (CMC) type, utilizing off-the-shelf reflective array compressor (RAC) chirp filters. This satellite receiver, if fully developed, was intended to be used as an on-board multichannel communications repeater. The Advanced Communications Receiver consists of four units: (1) CMC processor, (2) single sideband modulator, (3) demodulator, and (4) chirp waveform generator and individual channel processors. The input signal is composed of multiple user transmission frequencies operating independently from remotely located ground terminals. This signal is Fourier transformed by the CMC Processor into a unique time slot for each user frequency. The CMC processor is driven by a waveform generator through a single sideband (SSB) modulator. The output of the coherent demodulator is composed of positive and negative pulses, which are the envelopes of the chirp transform processor output. These pulses correspond to the data symbols. Following the demodulator, a logic circuit reconstructs the pulses into data, which are subsequently differentially decoded to form the transmitted data. The coherent demodulation and detection of BPSK signals derived from a CMC chirp transform processor were experimentally demonstrated and bit error rate (BER) testing was performed. To assess the feasibility of such advanced receiver, the results were compared with the theoretical analysis and plotted for an average BER as a function of signal-to-noise ratio. Another goal of this SBIR program was the development of a commercial product. The commercial product developed was an arbitrary waveform generator. The successful sales have begun with the delivery of the first arbitrary waveform generator.

  5. Space Weather and Satellite Engineering: An Interview With Michael Bodeau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2010-03-01

    Michael Bodeau is a technical fellow at Northrop Grumman. Over his career, which has included positions at TRW, Hughes, and Boeing, he has designed telecommunications and scientific satellites for government and commercial operators and has studied the effects of space weather on satellites. In this interview, Bodeau describes how satellite engineers create "building codes" to help them design satellites that can withstand space weather events.

  6. Gigabit Satellite Network for NASA's Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoder, Douglas; Bergamo, Marcos

    1996-01-01

    The advanced communication technology satellite (ACTS) gigabit satellite network provides long-haul point-to-point and point-to-multipoint full-duplex SONET services over NASA's ACTS. at rates up to 622 Mbit/s (SONET OC-12), with signal quality comparable to that obtained with terrestrial fiber networks. Data multiplexing over the satellite is accomplished using time-division multiple access (TDMA) techniques coordinated with the switching and beam hopping facilities provided by ACTS. Transmissions through the satellite are protected with Reed-Solomon encoding. providing virtually error-free transmission under most weather conditions. Unique to the system are a TDMA frame structure and satellite synchronization mechanism that allow: (a) very efficient utilization of the satellite capacity: (b) over-the-satellite dosed-loop synchronization of the network in configurations with up to 64 ground stations: and (c) ground station initial acquisition without collisions with existing signalling or data traffic. The user interfaces are compatible with SONET standards, performing the function of conventional SONET multiplexers and. as such. can be: readily integrated with standard SONET fiber-based terrestrial networks. Management of the network is based upon the simple network management protocol (SNMP). and includes an over-the-satellite signalling network and backup terrestrial internet (IP-based) connectivity. A description of the ground stations is also included.

  7. Weather satellite lost in launch accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    A $57.5-million weather satellite was lost on May 3, 1986, when the unmanned Delta rocket that carried it went out of control 71 s after liftoff and was destroyed by command from the ground. It was the third consecutive launching failure for the U.S. space program, following the losses of the space shuttle Challenger in January and an Air Force Titan rocket in April.As Eos went to press, a team of officials from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and its contractors were meeting at the Kennedy Space Center (Cape Canaveral, Fla.) to review telemetry data from the launch. Two surges of current were found to have occurred in the electrical system of the rocket's main engine just prior to the engine's shutdown; it was this shutdown that caused the rocket to go out of control.

  8. Managing an archive of weather satellite images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaman, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    The author's experiences of building and maintaining an archive of hourly weather satellite pictures at NOAO are described. This archive has proven very popular with visiting and staff astronomers - especially on windy days and cloudy nights. Given access to a source of such pictures, a suite of simple shell and IRAF CL scripts can provide a great deal of robust functionality with little effort. These pictures and associated data products such as surface analysis (radar) maps and National Weather Service forecasts are updated hourly at anonymous ftp sites on the Internet, although your local Atsmospheric Sciences Department may prove to be a more reliable source. The raw image formats are unfamiliar to most astronomers, but reading them into IRAF is straightforward. Techniques for performing this format conversion at the host computer level are described which may prove useful for other chores. Pointers are given to sources of data and of software, including a package of example tools. These tools include shell and Perl scripts for downloading pictures, maps, and forecasts, as well as IRAF scripts and host level programs for translating the images into IRAF and GIF formats and for slicing & dicing the resulting images. Hints for displaying the images and for making hardcopies are given.

  9. Asian Dust Weather Categorization with Satellite and Surface Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Tang-Huang; Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Huang, Shih-Jen

    2011-01-01

    This study categorizes various dust weather types by means of satellite remote sensing over central Asia. Airborne dust particles can be identified by satellite remote sensing because of the different optical properties exhibited by coarse and fine particles (i.e. varying particle sizes). If a correlation can be established between the retrieved aerosol optical properties and surface visibility, the intensity of dust weather can be more effectively and consistently discerned using satellite rather than surface observations. In this article, datasets consisting of collocated products from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Aqua and surface measurements are analysed. The results indicate an exponential relationship between the surface visibility and the satellite-retrieved aerosol optical depth, which is subsequently used to categorize the dust weather. The satellite-derived spatial frequency distributions in the dust weather types are consistent with China s weather station reports during 2003, indicating that dust weather classification using satellite data is highly feasible. Although the period during the springtime from 2004 to 2007 may be not sufficient for statistical significance, our results reveal an increasing tendency in both intensity and frequency of dust weather over central Asia during this time period.

  10. Satellite contributions to convective scale weather analysis and forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdom, James F. W.

    1986-01-01

    Severe weather phenomena which are amenable to remote sensing by satellite instruments and having resolution fine enough to discern mesoscale features are described. GOES satellites acquire imagery with 1 km resolution in the visible band and 8 km at IR wavelengths. Animation of the images allows tracking the evolution and motions of clouds, which are the prime indicators of convective activity. Sample satellite imagery of sea, lake and river breezes which reveal differential heating processes, the effect of early morning cloud cover, thunderstorm outflow processes, and mesoscale convective systems are provided. Techniques for analyzing the satellite data to predict the onset of severe weather are discussed.

  11. Future development of IR thermovision weather satellite equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Listratov, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    The self radiation of the surface being viewed is used for image synthesis in IR thermovision equipment. The installation of such equipment aboard weather satellites makes it possible to obtain cloud cover pictures of the earth's surface in a complete orbit, regardless of the illumination conditions, and also provides quantitative information on the underlying surface temperature and cloud top height. Such equipment is used successfully aboard the Soviet satellites of the Meteor system, and experimentally on the American satellites of the Nimbus series. With regard to surface resolution, the present-day IR weather satellite equipment is inferior to the television equipment. This is due primarily to the comparatively low detectivity of the IR detectors used. While IR equipment has several fundamental advantages in comparison with the conventional television equipment, the problem arises of determining the possibility for future development of weather satellite IR thermovision equipment. Criteria are examined for evaluating the quality of IR.

  12. Evolution of the NOAA National Weather Service Satellite Broadcast Network (SBN) to Europe's DVB-S satellite communications technology standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cragg, Phil; Brockman, William E.

    2006-08-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) uses a commercial Satellite Broadcast Network (SBN) to distribute weather data to the NWS AWIPS workstations and National Centers and to NWS Family of Service Users. Advances in science and technology from NOAA's observing systems, such as remote sensing satellites and NEXRAD radars, and advances in Numeric Weather Prediction have greatly increased the volume of data to be transmitted via the SBN. The NOAA-NWS SBN Evolution Program did a trade study resulting in the selection of Europe's DVB-S communication protocol as the basis for enabling a significant increase in the SBN capacity. The Digital Video Broadcast (DVB) group, started to develop digital TV for Europe through satellite broadcasting, has become the current standard for defining technology for satellite broadcasting of digital data for much of the world. NOAA-NWS implemented the DVB-S with inexpensive, Commercial Off The Shelf receiving equipment. The modernized NOAA-NWS SBN meets current performance goals and provides the basis for continued future expansion with no increase in current communication costs. This paper discusses aspects of the NOAA-NWS decision and the migration to the DVB-S standard for its commercial satellite broadcasts of observations and Numerical Weather Prediction data.

  13. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedney, Richard T.; Schertler, Ronald J.

    1989-06-01

    The NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) was conceived to help maintain U.S. leadership in the world's communications-satellite market. This experimental satellite is expected to be launched by NASA in 1992 and to furnish the technology necessary for establishing very small aperture terminal digital networks which provide on-demand full-mesh connectivity, and 1.544-MBPS services with only a single hop. Utilizing on-board switching and processing, each individual voice or data circuit can be separately routed to any location in the network. This paper provides an overview of the ACTS and discusses the value of the technology for future communications systems.

  14. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, Richard T.; Schertler, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) was conceived to help maintain U.S. leadership in the world's communications-satellite market. This experimental satellite is expected to be launched by NASA in 1992 and to furnish the technology necessary for establishing very small aperture terminal digital networks which provide on-demand full-mesh connectivity, and 1.544-MBPS services with only a single hop. Utilizing on-board switching and processing, each individual voice or data circuit can be separately routed to any location in the network. This paper provides an overview of the ACTS and discusses the value of the technology for future communications systems.

  15. Use of meteorological satellite observations in weather modification programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, A. S.; Smith, P. L., Jr.; Biswas, K. R.

    1973-01-01

    The potential value of weather satellite data in field operations of weather modification is appraised. It was found that satellites could play a useful role in operational weather modification projects, particularly in the recognition of treatment opportunities. Satellite cloud photographs and infrared observations appear promising in the identification of treatment opportunities in seeding orographic cloud systems for increased snowpack, in seeding convective clouds for increased rainfall, in identifying hail threats, and in tracking and observing hurricanes as an aid to timing and location of seeding treatments. It was concluded that the potential value of satellite data in the treatment and evaluation phases of operational projects is not as great as in the recognition of treatment opportunity.

  16. Satellite observations of weather and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, W. W.

    1974-01-01

    The SEASAT-A program is viewed as a new way to obtain atmospheric observations for weather and climatic studies in the framework of the Global Atmospheric Research Program (GARP). Total information derived from SEASAT-A sensor package provides a synoptic picture of the upper parts of the world's oceans as a prerequisite to the development of dynamic ocean models and combined ocean/atmospheric models for weather forecasting requirements.

  17. The Evolution of Spaceborne Microwave Sounders for the U.S. Polar-Orbiting Weather Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiue, James C.; Krimschansky, Sergey; Patel, Probodh; Hildebrand, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is the next generation space-borne microwave sounder. It is the latest and most advanced version of a series of satellite-based microwave sounders, currently under development by NASA for the future U.S. operational polar-orbiting weather satellite system, called the NPOESS (National Polar-orbiting Operational Environment Satellite System), slated to begin orbiting around the end of this decade. This paper will present a brief history of the evolution of the space-borne microwave sounders, from its early-day scientific experiments, through the operational sounder aboard today's polar orbiting weather satellites, and ending in the ATMS development. It will also describe the evolution of microwave radiometer technology that enabled the space-borne microwave radiometry, from its early versions with simple, nadir-viewing, fixed-horn antennas to the present-day scanning reflector antennas with broad-band MMIC Low Noise Amplifiers, plus on-board calibrations.

  18. Space Weathering on Icy Satellites in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. N.; Perlman, Z.; Pearson, N.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    Space weathering produces well-known optical effects in silicate minerals in the inner Solar System, for example, on the Moon. Space weathering from solar wind and UV (ultraviolet radiation) is expected to be significantly weaker in the outer Solar System simply because intensities are low. However, cosmic rays and micrometeoroid bombardment would be similar to first order. That, combined with the much higher volatility of icy surfaces means there is the potential for space weathering on icy outer Solar System surfaces to show optical effects. The Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn is providing evidence for space weathering on icy bodies. The Cassini Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument has spatially mapped satellite surfaces and the rings from 0.35-5 microns and the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) instrument from 0.1 to 0.2 microns. These data have sampled a complex mixing space between H2O ice and non-ice components and they show some common spectral properties. Similarly, spectra of the icy Galilean satellites and satellites in the Uranian system have some commonality in spectral properties with those in the Saturn system. The UV absorber is spectrally similar on many surfaces. VIMS has identified CO2, H2 and trace organics in varying abundances on Saturn's satellites. We postulate that through the spatial relationships of some of these compounds that they are created and destroyed through space weathering effects. For example, the trapped H2 and CO2 observed by VIMS in regions with high concentrations of dark material may in part be space weathering products from the destruction of H2O and organic molecules. The dark material, particularly on Iapetus which has the highest concentration in the Saturn system, is well matched by space-weathered silicates in the .4 to 2.6 micron range, and the spectral shapes closely match those of the most mature lunar soils, another indicator of space weathered material.

  19. Satellite anomalies caused by disturbed space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J. H.

    2003-04-01

    Seven types of satellite anomalies are discussed and examples are given from historical reports. Types of anomalies and their causes are: o Single Event Upsets (SEU) caused by penetrating energetic ions; o Deep dielectric ("bulk") charging (DDC) by high-energy electrons; o Surface charging by thermal electrons causing electrostatic discharge (ESD) and Phantom Commands (PC); o Magnetopause crossing events (MPE) that reverse ambient fields at geostationary satellite altitudes; o dB/dT of field-aligned currents causing satellite tumbling at lower altitudes; o Optical effects of high-energy ions on star-trackers and limb sensors; and o Power panel degradation from high-energy ions. Recent and older events are considered, in part because the problems recur even though technology has changed to take them into account and awareness of the conditions causing them seems widespread. Systematic anomaly reporting is requested to increase the significance of records collected for particular events.

  20. Potential value of satellite cloud pictures in weather modification projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, K. R.

    1972-01-01

    Satellite imagery for one project season of cloud seeding programs in the northern Great Plains has been surveyed for its probable usefulness in weather modification programs. The research projects and the meteorological information available are described. A few illustrative examples of satellite imagery analysis are cited and discussed, along with local observations of weather and the seeding decisions made in the research program. This analysis indicates a definite correlation between satellite-observed cloud patterns and the types of cloud seeding activity undertaken, and suggests a high probability of better and/or earlier decisions if the imagery is available in real time. Infrared imagery provides better estimates of cloud height which can be useful in assessing the possibility of a hail threat. The satellite imagery appears to be of more value to area-seeding projects than to single-cloud seeding experiments where the imagery is of little value except as an aid in local forecasting and analysis.

  1. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plecity, Mark S.; Nall, Mark E.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) provides high risk technologies having the potential to dramatically enhance the capabilities of the satellite communications industry. This experimental satellite, which will be launched by NASA in 1993, will furnish the technology necessary for providing a range of services. Utilizing the ACTS very-high-gain-hopping spot-beam antennas with on-board routing and processing, Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) digital networks which provide on-demand, full-mesh-convectivity 1.544-MBPS services with only a single hop can be established. The high-gain spot-beam antenna at Ka-band permits wide area, flexible networks providing high data rate services between modest-size earth terminals.

  2. First geosynchronous weather satellite prepared for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The Synchronous Meteorological Satellite (SMS), which is scheduled for launch 16 May 1974 is described along with the data transmission system. The Carrier Balloon System is discussed. The primary type of data to be obtained in conjunction with SMS and Nimbus F are meteorological, oceanographic, seismic, and tsunami information. The Space Environment Monitoring System is also described.

  3. Providing satellite systems for the national weather satellite services.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. G.; Press, H.; Stampfl, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of cooperative arrangements and agreements among NASA, the Department of Commerce, and other governmental agencies in developing and operating meteorological satellite systems. The development of present interagency agreements and their conditions are discussed along with differences from the usual NASA program introduced by the supplier-client relationship between NASA and NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration).

  4. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Zhang, X.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    Data assimilation has been demonstrated very useful in improving both global and regional numerical weather prediction. Alaska has very coarser surface observation sites. On the other hand, it gets much more satellite overpass than lower 48 states. How to utilize satellite data to improve numerical prediction is one of hot topics among weather forecast community in Alaska. The Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at University of Alaska is conducting study on satellite data assimilation for WRF model. AIRS/CRIS sounder profile data are used to assimilate the initial condition for the customized regional WRF model (GINA-WRF model). Normalized standard deviation, RMSE, and correlation statistic analysis methods are applied to analyze one case of 48 hours forecasts and one month of 24-hour forecasts in order to evaluate the improvement of regional numerical model from Data assimilation. The final goal of the research is to provide improved real-time short-time forecast for Alaska regions.

  5. Space Weather Phenomena at the Galilean Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, Gaël; Barthelemy, Mathieu

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the JUICE mission, characterization of Galilean satellites atmospheres is a priority. Although Ganymede and Europa possess a faint atmosphere, their exosphere show emissions features due to both solar UV flux as well as precipitating particles. Using the atmospheric model proposed by Marconi (2006,2007), we have developed a model of exospheric emissions by only considering primary collisions. Two regions will be considered for Ganymede, a polar one mainly dominated by oxygen, and an equatorial one with the predominance of water. Model of Europa's atmosphere presents an uniform one dominated by oxygen. Since Ganymede has its own magnetic field, the polar regions are mainly affected by particle precipitations while in case of Europe, the whole atmosphere has to be considered. Comparison with direct observations such as local measurements from Galileo (electronic density), or remote observations with the Hubble Space Telescope in the UV (oxygen lines at 130.5 and 135.5 nm), shows a good agreement which ensures us to provide reasonable constraints for the JUICE mission.

  6. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zhang, X.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    A case study and monthly statistical analysis using sounder data assimilation to improve the Alaska regional weather forecast model are presented. Weather forecast in Alaska faces challenges as well as opportunities. Alaska has a large land with multiple types of topography and coastal area. Weather forecast models must be finely tuned in order to accurately predict weather in Alaska. Being in the high-latitudes provides Alaska greater coverage of polar orbiting satellites for integration into forecasting models than the lower 48. Forecasting marine low stratus clouds is critical to the Alaska aviation and oil industry and is the current focus of the case study. NASA AIRS/CrIS sounder profiles data are used to do data assimilation for the Alaska regional weather forecast model to improve Arctic marine stratus clouds forecast. Choosing physical options for the WRF model is discussed. Preprocess of AIRS/CrIS sounder data for data assimilation is described. Local observation data, satellite data, and global data assimilation data are used to verify and/or evaluate the forecast results by the MET tools Model Evaluation Tools (MET).

  7. Weather satellite picture receiving stations, APT digital scan converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermillion, C. H.; Kamowski, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The automatic picture transmission digital scan converter is used at ground stations to convert signals received from scanning radiometers to data compatible with ground equipment designed to receive signals from vidicons aboard operational meteorological satellites. Information necessary to understand the circuit theory, functional operation, general construction and calibration of the converter is provided. Brief and detailed descriptions of each of the individual circuits are included, accompanied by a schematic diagram contained at the end of each circuit description. Listings of integral parts and testing equipment required as well as an overall wiring diagram are included. This unit will enable the user to readily accept and process weather photographs from the operational meteorological satellites.

  8. NACON - A Nano-Satellite Constellation for Space Weather Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappas, V.; van der Ha, J.; Schwartz, S.; Underwood, C. I.; da Silva Curiel, A.

    Space Weather has a tremendous effect not only on our day-to-day activities on Earth but also on our space assets. Communications, weather prediction, Internet, TV broadcasting and space mission planning depend heavily on ground and space infrastructure. Thus it becomes more important than ever to establish a space- based network which is capable of providing the necessary data to scientists. The data may be used to predict and analyse all types of weather phenomena, either in our atmosphere or near our planet (earth magneto-tail/ field) or in our solar system (Sun). Such a comprehensive, operational space weather network will heavily depend on the necessary science and data requirements, and of most importance in this study is to design a practical, affordable, autonomous and versatile space solution composed of multiple spacecraft. The number and configuration of these satellites is key into bringing the relevant space weather data to the end user. The paper details a new approach into defining a modular architecture composed of three-level (low, medium and high) solutions pending on the end user requirements. The goal is to design a pragmatic, innovative, versatile, low cost and complete end-to-end system for space weather monitoring with a 10-year lifetime.

  9. A framework of space weather satellite data pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuli; Zou, Ziming

    Various applications indicate a need of permanent space weather information. The diversity of available instruments enables a big variety of products. As an indispensable part of space weather satellite operation system, space weather data processing system is more complicated than before. The information handled by the data processing system has been used in more and more fields such as space weather monitoring and space weather prediction models. In the past few years, many satellites have been launched by China. The data volume downlinked by these satellites has achieved the so-called big data level and it will continue to grow fast in the next few years due to the implementation of many new space weather programs. Because of the huge amount of data, the current infrastructure is no longer incapable of processing data timely, so we proposed a new space weather data processing system (SWDPS) based on the architecture of cloud computing. Similar to Hadoop, SWDPS decomposes the tasks into smaller tasks which will be executed by many different work nodes. Control Center in SWDPS, just like NameNode and JobTracker within Hadoop which is the bond between the data and the cluster, will establish work plan for the cluster once a client submits data. Control Center will allocate node for the tasks and the monitor the status of all tasks. As the same of TaskTrakcer, Compute Nodes in SWDPS are the salves of Control Center which are responsible for calling the plugins(e.g., dividing and sorting plugins) to execute the concrete jobs. They will also manage all the tasks’ status and report them to Control Center. Once a task fails, a Compute Node will notify Control Center. Control Center decides what to do then; it may resubmit the job elsewhere, it may mark that specific record as something to avoid, and it may even blacklist the Compute Node as unreliable. In addition to these modules, SWDPS has a different module named Data Service which is used to provide file

  10. Economic project perspectives: An overview of the impact resulting from recent advances in satellite meteorology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, K. R.; Boness, F. H.

    1972-01-01

    The impact of advanced satellite meteorology on long range weather forecasts, agriculture, commerce, and resource utilization are examined. All data are geared to obtaining a picture of various user needs and possible benefits.

  11. NOAA Environmental Satellite Measurements of Extreme Space Weather Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denig, W. F.; Wilkinson, D. C.; Redmon, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    For over 40 years the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has continuously monitored the near-earth space environment in support of space weather operations. Data from this period have covered a wide range of geophysical conditions including periods of extreme space weather such as the great geomagnetic March 1989, the 2003 Halloween storm and the more recent St Patrick's Day storm of 2015. While not specifically addressed here, these storms have stressed our technology infrastructure in unexpected and surprising ways. Space weather data from NOAA geostationary (GOES) and polar (POES) satellites along with supporting data from the Air Force are presented to compare and contrast the space environmental conditions measured during extreme events.

  12. Observed Weather Satellite Thermal IR Responses Prior to Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, N. A.; Zobrist, A. L.; Logan, L. L.; Freund, F.; Nishenko, S.

    2002-12-01

    A number of observers claim to have seen thermal anomalies prior to earthquakes, but subsequent analysis by others have failed to produce similar findings. It was the purpose of this study to determine if thermal anomalies could be found in association with known earthquakes by systematically co-registering weather satellite images at the sub-pixel level and then determining if statistically significant responses had occurred prior to an event. Earthquakes associated with plate movement (strike-slip and thrust faulting), rather than volcanism, were to be considered. A new set of automatic co-registration procedures were developed for this task to accommodate all properties particular to weather satellite observations taken at night. Spacecraft and sensor ephemeris and the horizontal displacement due to elevation were all factored in, and final adjustment for minor satellite deviations (related to roll, pitch, and yaw) were made by using image-to-image tiepoint correlations. Reliance upon visual clues in an image (frequently the subject of debate in the past) is not required. The technique relies on the general condition where ground cools after sunset. The technique applies best to the use of the geosynchronous weather satellites (GOES, Meteosat, and GMS), where images are taken every thirty minutes. Use of the geosynchronous satellites also reduces the potential for miscalculation of trends due to weather front movement or local cloud/fog formation. The polar orbiting satellites have better resolution (1km vs 5km) and better signal-to-noise, but only acquire images twice during an evening, thereby making trend analysis difficult. Case studies investigated to date include the Hector Mine California and Ikrit Turkey earthquakes of 1999, and the Bhuj India quake of 2001. The result of the new analytic procedures has been the observance of apparent heating trends close to epicenters in satellite data acquisitions a few hours prior to an earthquake. When observations

  13. Space Weather Concerns for All-Electric Propulsion Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Richard B.; Pitchford, David

    2015-08-01

    The introduction of all-electric propulsion satellites is a game changer in the quest for low-cost access to space. It also raises new questions for satellite manufacturers, operators, and the insurance industry regarding the general risks and specifically the threat of adverse space weather. The issues surrounding this new concept were discussed by research scientists and up to 30 representatives from the space industry at a special meeting at the European Space Weather Week held in November 2014. Here we report on the discussions at that meeting. We show that for a satellite undergoing electric orbit raising for 200 days the radiation dose due to electrons is equivalent to approximately 6.7 year operation at geostationary orbit or approximately half the typical design life. We also show that electrons can be injected into the slot region (8000 km) where they pose a risk of satellite internal charging. The results highlight the importance of additional radiation protection. We also discuss the benefits, the operational considerations, the other risks from the Van Allen radiation belts, the new business opportunities for space insurance, and the need for space situation awareness in medium Earth orbit where electric orbit raising takes place.

  14. Weather Satellite Thermal IR Responses Prior to Earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnor, Daniel P.

    2005-01-01

    A number of observers claim to have seen thermal anomalies prior to earthquakes, but subsequent analysis by others has failed to produce similar findings. What exactly are these anomalies? Might they be useful for earthquake prediction? It is the purpose of this study to determine if thermal anomalies can be found in association with known earthquakes by systematically co-registering weather satellite images at the sub-pixel level and then determining if statistically significant responses occurred prior to the earthquake event. A new set of automatic co-registration procedures was developed for this task to accommodate all properties particular to weather satellite observations taken at night, and it relies on the general condition that the ground cools after sunset. Using these procedures, we can produce a set of temperature-sensitive satellite images for each of five selected earthquakes (Algeria 2003; Bhuj, India 2001; Izmit, Turkey 2001; Kunlun Shan, Tibet 2001; Turkmenistan 2000) and thus more effectively investigate heating trends close to the epicenters a few hours prior to the earthquake events. This study will lay tracks for further work in earthquake prediction and provoke the question of the exact nature of the thermal anomalies.

  15. Performance of Nickel-Cadmium Batteries on the POES Series of Weather Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Chetty, P. R. K.; Boyce, Ron; Smalls, Vanessa; Spitzer, Tom

    1998-01-01

    The advanced Television Infrared Observation satellite program is a cooperative effort between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the United Kingdom, Canada and France, for providing day and night global environmental and associated data. NASA is responsible for procurement launch, and checkout of these spacecraft before transferring them over to NOAA, who operates the spacecraft to support weather forecasting, severe storm tracking, and 'meteorological research by the National Weather Service. These spacecraft with all weather monitoring instruments imposed challenging requirements for the onboard electrical power subsystem (EPS). This paper provides first a brief overview of the overall power subsystem, followed by a description of batteries. A unique power subsystem design which provides 'tender-loving-care' to these batteries is highlighted. This is followed by the on-orbit maintenance and performance data of the batteries since launch.

  16. Atmospheric profiling via satellite to satellite occultations near water and ozone absorption lines for weather and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursinski, E. R.; Ward, D.; Otarola, A. C.; McGhee, J.; Stovern, M.; Sammler, K.; Reed, H.; Erickson, D.; McCormick, C.; Griggs, E.

    2016-05-01

    Significantly reducing weather and climate prediction uncertainty requires global observations with substantially higher information content than present observations provide. While GPS occultations have provided a major advance, GPS observations of the atmosphere are limited by wavelengths chosen specifically to minimize interaction with the atmosphere. Significantly more information can be obtained via satellite to satellite occultations made at wavelengths chosen specifically to characterize the atmosphere. Here we describe such a system that will probe cm- and mmwavelength water vapor absorption lines called the Active Temperature, Ozone and Moisture Microwave Spectrometer (ATOMMS). Profiling both the speed and absorption of light enables ATOMMS to profile temperature, pressure and humidity simultaneously, which GPS occultations cannot do, as well as profile clouds and turbulence. We summarize the ATOMMS concept and its theoretical performance. We describe field measurements made with a prototype ATOMMS instrument and several important capabilities demonstrated with those ground based measurements including retrieving temporal variations in path-averaged water vapor to 1%, in clear, cloudy and rainy conditions, up to optical depths of 17, remotely sensing turbulence and determining rain rates. We conclude with a vision of a future ATOMMS low Earth orbiting satellite constellation designed to take advantage of synergies between observational needs for weather and climate, ATOMMS unprecedented orbital remote sensing capabilities and recent cubesat technological innovations that enable a constellation of dozens of very small spacecraft to achieve many critical, but as yet unfulfilled, monitoring and forecasting needs.

  17. A web-based tool that combines satellite and weather station observations to support irrigation scheduling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract: The Satellite Irrigation Management Support (SIMS) project combines NASA's Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS), Landsat and MODIS satellite imagery, and reference evapotranspiration from surface weather station networks to map daily crop irrigation demand in California in ...

  18. Advanced ISDN satellite designs and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1992-01-01

    The research performed by GTE Government Systems and the University of Colorado in support of the NASA Satellite Communications Applications Research (SCAR) Program is summarized. Two levels of research were undertaken. The first dealt with providing interim services Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) satellite (ISIS) capabilities that accented basic rate ISDN with a ground control similar to that of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The ISIS Network Model development represents satellite systems like the ACTS orbiting switch. The ultimate aim is to move these ACTS ground control functions on-board the next generation of ISDN communications satellite to provide full-service ISDN satellite (FSIS) capabilities. The technical and operational parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite design are obtainable from the simulation of ISIS and FSIS engineering software models of the major subsystems of the ISDN communications satellite architecture. Discrete event simulation experiments would generate data for analysis against NASA SCAR performance measure and the data obtained from the ISDN satellite terminal adapter hardware (ISTA) experiments, also developed in the program. The Basic and Option 1 phases of the program are also described and include the following: literature search, traffic mode, network model, scenario specifications, performance measures definitions, hardware experiment design, hardware experiment development, simulator design, and simulator development.

  19. Select Methodology for Validating Advanced Satellite Measurement Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xi; Smith, William L.

    2008-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global measurements of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Measurement system validation is crucial to achieving this goal and maximizing research and operational utility of resultant data. Field campaigns including satellite under-flights with well calibrated FTS sensors aboard high-altitude aircraft are an essential part of the validation task. This presentation focuses on an overview of validation methodology developed for assessment of high spectral resolution infrared systems, and includes results of preliminary studies performed to investigate the performance of the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) instrument aboard the MetOp-A satellite.

  20. Advanced Topics in Wet-Weather Discharge Control

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report discusses four related but generally independent wet-weather flow (WWF) topic areas, namely: i) opportunities for advanced practices in WWF control technology, particularly as it applies to sewered systems; ii) tradeoffs between storage facilities (tanks) and enlarged...

  1. Pattern recognition of satellite cloud imagery for improved weather prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, Catherine; Somerville, Richard C. J.; Volfson, Leonid B.

    1986-01-01

    The major accomplishment was the successful development of a method for extracting time derivative information from geostationary meteorological satellite imagery. This research is a proof-of-concept study which demonstrates the feasibility of using pattern recognition techniques and a statistical cloud classification method to estimate time rate of change of large-scale meteorological fields from remote sensing data. The cloud classification methodology is based on typical shape function analysis of parameter sets characterizing the cloud fields. The three specific technical objectives, all of which were successfully achieved, are as follows: develop and test a cloud classification technique based on pattern recognition methods, suitable for the analysis of visible and infrared geostationary satellite VISSR imagery; develop and test a methodology for intercomparing successive images using the cloud classification technique, so as to obtain estimates of the time rate of change of meteorological fields; and implement this technique in a testbed system incorporating an interactive graphics terminal to determine the feasibility of extracting time derivative information suitable for comparison with numerical weather prediction products.

  2. Advanced Weather Awareness and Reporting Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busquets, Anthony M. (Technical Monitor); Ruokangas, Corinne Clinton; Kelly, Wallace E., III

    2005-01-01

    AWARE (Aviation Weather Awareness and Reporting Enhancements) was a NASA Cooperative Research and Development program conducted jointly by Rockwell Scientific, Rockwell Collins, and NASA. The effort culminated in an enhanced weather briefing and reporting tool prototype designed to integrate graphical and text-based aviation weather data to provide clear situational awareness in the context of a specific pilot, flight and equipment profile. The initial implementation of AWARE was as a web-based preflight planning tool, specifically for general aviation pilots, who do not have access to support such as the dispatchers available for commercial airlines. Initial usability tests showed that for VFR (Visual Flight Rules) pilots, AWARE provided faster and more effective weather evaluation. In a subsequent formal usability test for IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) pilots, all users finished the AWARE tests faster than the parallel DUAT tests, and all subjects graded AWARE higher for effectiveness, efficiency, and usability. The decision analysis basis of AWARE differentiates it from other aviation safety programs, providing analysis of context-sensitive data in a personalized graphical format to aid pilots/dispatchers in their complex flight requirements.

  3. Lunar magnetism, space weathering, and icy satellite interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemingway, Douglas

    An enduring mystery since Apollo is that, in spite of the Moon's lack of a global magnetic field, the surface is nevertheless dotted with regional magnetic fields strong enough to be detected from orbit. Did the Moon once have an intrinsic global field that magnetized parts of the crust but has since decayed away? This is a question of fundamental importance to understanding the formation and evolution of solid planetary bodies, and yet it remains unanswered due in part to limitations in our knowledge of these crustal magnetic anomalies. Adding to the puzzle, many of these magnetic anomalies are accompanied by enigmatic optical features, known as swirls, which may hold the key to understanding "space weathering"---a process by which airless bodies change color over time due to exposure to solar wind and micrometeoroids. Here we show both that swirl morphology provides information about the structure of the underlying magnetic sources, and that the color of the lunar surface varies systematically with latitude in a way that allows us to distinguish between the effects of solar wind ion and micrometeoroid bombardment, addressing a decades-old problem in remote sensing, and aiding in the interpretation of the spectra of airless bodies throughout the solar system. The remarkable diversity of the outer solar system's satellites provides important clues about the formation and evolution of the solar system. Many of the satellites have surprisingly young surfaces, owing in some cases to on-going geologic activity. Moreover, the existence of subsurface oceans within some of the satellites raises the intriguing possibility of extant habitable environments in the outer solar system. Determining the properties of their ice shells and the structures of their deep interiors places fundamental constraints on how the icy satellites formed and evolved, and on what governs their behavior today. Using gravity and topography data from Cassini, we develop analytical models showing

  4. Impact of space weather events on satellite-based navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, B.; DasGupta, A.; Paul, A.

    2013-12-01

    effects of the equatorial ionospheric irregularities on satellite-based communication and navigation systems have been studied over the past few decades as space weather events have the potential to seriously disturb the technological infrastructure of modern society. The present paper tries to understand operational compliance of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers to International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards under scintillation conditions by recording the received phase of the L1(1575.42 MHz) signal from two stations, namely Calcutta situated near the northern crest of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly and Siliguri, situated beyond the northern crest, at a subionospheric latitude separation of 4° along the same meridian. A causative approach is adopted whereby GPS phase scintillations have been monitored and receiver performance prior to loss of lock and cycle slips have been analyzed during August-October 2011 at Calcutta and September 2011 at Siliguri. The received phase at GPS-L1 frequency has often been found to fluctuate at kilohertz, often megahertz rates, thereby causing carrier-tracking loop malfunctions. It should be borne in mind that normal GPS receivers' carrier-tracking loops have a typical dynamic range of 14-18 Hz. Cycle slips have been observed with durations far exceeding ICAO specified levels for high dynamic platforms like aircrafts. Differences in cycle slips between Calcutta and Siliguri indicate possible evolution of irregularity structures even across small subionospheric swath. Significant improvement in present understanding of GPS phase scintillations should be developed and implemented in receiver designs prior to application of Satellite Based Augmentation System services for civil aviation, particularly in the geophysically sensitive equatorial region.

  5. Advanced technology satellite demodulator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Stephen A.

    1989-01-01

    Ford Aerospace has developed a proof-of-concept satellite 8 phase shift keying (PSK) modulation and coding system operating in the Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) mode at a data range of 200 Mbps using rate 5/6 forward error correction coding. The 80 Msps 8 PSK modem was developed in a mostly digital form and is amenable to an ASIC realization in the next phase of development. The codec was developed as a paper design only. The power efficiency goal was to be within 2 dB of theoretical at a bit error rate (BER) of 5x10(exp 7) while the measured implementation loss was 4.5 dB. The bandwidth efficiency goal was 2 bits/sec/Hz while the realized bandwidth efficiency was 1.8 bits/sec/Hz. The burst format used a preamble of only 40 8 PSK symbol times including 32 symbols of all zeros and an eight symbol unique word. The modem and associated special test equipment (STE) were fabricated mostly on a specially designed stitch-weld board although a few of the highest rate circuits were built on printed circuit cards. All the digital circuits were ECL to support the clock rates of from 80 MHz to 360 MHz. The transmitter and receiver matched filters were square-root Nyquist bandpass filters realized at the 3.37 GHz i.f. The modem operated as a coherent system although no analog phase locked (PLL) loop was employed. Within the budgetary constraints of the program, the approach to the demodulator has been proven and is eligible to proceed to the next phase of development of a satellite demodulator engineering model. This would entail the development of an ASIC version of the digital portion of the demodulator, and MMIC version of the quadrature detector, and SAW Nyquist filters to realize the bandwidth efficiency.

  6. Anvil Tool in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe, III; Bauman, William, III; Keen, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Meteorologists from the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) and Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have identified anvil forecasting as one of their most challenging tasks when predicting the probability of violations of the lightning Launch Commit Criteria and Space Shuttle Flight Rules. As a result, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) created a graphical overlay tool for the Meteorological Interactive Data Display Systems (MIDDS) to indicate the threat of thunderstorm anvil clouds, using either observed or model forecast winds as input. In order for the Anvil Tool to remain available to the meteorologists, the AMU was tasked to transition the tool to the Advanced Weather interactive Processing System (AWIPS). This report describes the work done by the AMU to develop the Anvil Tool for AWIPS to create a graphical overlay depicting the threat from thunderstorm anvil clouds. The AWIPS Anvil Tool is based on the previously deployed AMU MIDDS Anvil Tool. SMG and 45 WS forecasters have used the MIDDS Anvil Tool during launch and landing operations. SMG's primary weather analysis and display system is now AWIPS and the 45 WS has plans to replace MIDDS with AWIPS. The Anvil Tool creates a graphic that users can overlay on satellite or radar imagery to depict the potential location of thunderstorm anvils one, two, and three hours into the future. The locations are based on an average of the upper-level observed or forecasted winds. The graphic includes 10 and 20 nm standoff circles centered at the location of interest, in addition to one-, two-, and three-hour arcs in the upwind direction. The arcs extend outward across a 30 degree sector width based on a previous AMU study which determined thunderstorm anvils move in a direction plus or minus 15 degrees of the upper-level (300- to 150-mb) wind direction. This report briefly describes the history of the MIDDS Anvil Tool and then explains how the initial development of the AWIPS Anvil Tool was carried out. After testing was

  7. The NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, G. A.

    1984-10-01

    Forecasts indicate that a saturation of the capacity of the satellite communications service will occur in the U.S. domestic market by the early 1990s. In order to prevent this from happening, advanced technologies must be developed. NASA has been concerned with such a development. One key is the exploitation of the Ka-band (30/20 GHz), which is much wider than C- and Ku-bands together. Another is the use of multiple narrow antenna beams in the satellite to achieve large frequency reuse factors with very high antenna gains. NASA has developed proof-of-concept hardware components which form the basis for a flight demonstration. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) system will provide this demonstration. Attention is given to the ACTS Program definition, the ACTS Flight System, the Multibeam Communications Package, and the spacecraft bus.

  8. Utilization of satellite data and regional scale numerical models in short range weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreitzberg, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence was developed in a number of studies of satellite data impact on numerical weather prediction that it is unrealistic to expect satellite temperature soundings to improve detailed regional numerical weather prediction. It is likely that satellite data over the United States would substantially impact mesoscale dynamical predictions if the effort were made to develop a composite moisture analysis system. The horizontal variability of moisture, most clearly depicited in images from satellite water vapor channels, would not be determined from conventional rawinsondes even if that network were increased by a doubling of both the number of sites and the time frequency.

  9. NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, R. T.

    1983-01-01

    NASA recently restructured its Space Communications Program to emphasize the development of high risk communication technology useable in multiple frequency bands and to support a wide range of future communication needs. As part of this restructuring, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Project will develop and experimentally verify the technology associated with multiple fixed and scanning beam systems which will enable growth in communication satellite capacities and more effective utilization of the radio frequency spectrum. The ACTS requirements and operations as well as the technology significance for future systems are described.

  10. An advanced domestic satellite communications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An updated traffic projection for U.S. domestic satellite communications service covering a period of 15 years; mid-1980 to mid-1995 was prepared. This model takes into account expected technology advances and reductions in transmission costs, legislative and regulatory changes permitting increased competition, and rising energy costs which will encourage more extensive substitution of telecommunications for travel. The historical development and current status of satellite systems are discussed as well as the characteristics of follow-on systems. Orbital arc utilization, spacecraft configuration for single shuttle launch, Earth station configuration, and system costs are examined. Areas which require technology development include multiple beam frequency reuse antennas, on-board switching, intersatellite links, and ka-band operation. Packing and deployment schemes for enclosing the satellite within the shuttle orbiter bay must also be devised.

  11. New NOAA resources for safeguarding the satellite infrastructure from space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. C.; Denig, W. F.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Redmon, R. J.; Onsager, T. G.; Singer, H. J.; Murtagh, W.; Rutledge, R.; Stankiewicz, J.; Kunches, J.; Wilkinson, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    Satellites orbiting Earth are subjected to intense electron and proton radiation that can degrade spacecraft performance or cause complete failure. The radiation intensity near Earth fluctuates dramatically depending on the current space weather conditions. In response to this threat to the world's technological infrastructure, NOAA is enhancing its support for understanding and resolving satellite anomalies caused by space weather. Here we report on our efforts to turn data from the fleet of NOAA operational satellites into actionable information on the likely cause and probable occurrence of satellite anomalies. We focus on a list of products and services prioritized by satellite industry participants at the Space Weather Workshop. The list of desirable products includes information such as integrated proton event fluences, internal accumulated charge, and an anomaly database.

  12. Future plans by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for operational geosynchronous weather satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gird, Ronald S.; Shenk, William E.

    1991-01-01

    The present status of the GOES program and plans for the GOES I-M system schedules for initial launch in 1992 are reviewed. Plans for improving NASA's capabilities to monitor weather patterns by using operational geosynchronous weather satellites are considered. The requirements for the imager, sounder, Space Environment Monitor, and Data Collection System of GOES-N are presented.

  13. Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) network model for advanced satellite designs and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, Gerard R.; Hager, E. Paul

    1991-01-01

    The Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) Network Model for Advanced Satellite Designs and Experiments describes a model suitable for discrete event simulations. A top-down model design uses the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) as its basis. The ISDN modeling abstractions are added to permit the determination and performance for the NASA Satellite Communications Research (SCAR) Program.

  14. Detectors and Focal Plane Modules for Weather Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, A. I.; Robinson, E.; Masterjohn, S.; Ely, P.; Khalap, V.; Babu, S.; Smith, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Weather satellite instruments require detectors with a variety of wavelengths ranging from the visible to VLWIR. One of the remote sensing applications is the geostationary GOES-ABI imager covering wavelengths from the 450 to 490 nm band through the 13.0 to 13.6 micron band. There are a total of 16 spectral bands covered. The Cross-track infrared Sounder (CrIS) is a Polar Orbiting interferometric sensor that measures earth radiances at high spectral resolution, using the data to provide pressure, temperature and moisture profiles of the atmosphere. The pressure, temperature and moisture sounding data are used in weather prediction models that track storms, predict levels of precipitation etc. The CrIS instrument contains SWIR (lamba(sub c) approximately 5 micron at 98K), MWIR (lambda(sub c) approximately 9 micron at 98K) and LWIRs (lamba(sub c) approximately 15.5 micron at 81K) bands in three Focal Plane Array Assemblies (FPAAs). GOES-ABI contains three focal plane modules (FPMs), (i) a visible-near infrared module consisting of three visible and three near infrared channels, (ii) a MWIR module comprised of five channels from 3.9 micron to 8.6 micron and (iii) a 9.6 micron to 13.3 micron, five-channel LWIR module. The VNIR FPM operates at 205 K, and the MWIR and LWIR FPMs operate at 60 K. Each spectral channel has a redundant array built into a single detector chip. Switching is thus permitted from the primary selected array in each channel to the redundant array, given any degradation in performance of the primary array during the course of the mission. Silicon p-i-n detectors are used for the 0.47 micron to 0.86 micron channels. The thirteen channels above 1 micron are fabricated in various compositions of Hg1-xCdxTe, and in this particular case using two different detector architectures. The 1.38 micron to 9.61 micron channels are all fabricated in Hg1-xCdxTe grown by Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE) using the HDVIP detector architecture. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE

  15. Detectors and focal plane modules for weather satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, A. I.; Robinson, E.; Masterjohn, S.; Ely, P.; Khalap, V.; Babu, S.; Smith, D. S.

    2016-05-01

    Weather satellite instruments require detectors with a variety of wavelengths ranging from the visible to VLWIR. One of the remote sensing applications is the geostationary GOES-ABI imager covering wavelengths from the 450 to 490 nm band through the 13.0 to 13.6 μm band. There are a total of 16 spectral bands covered. The Cross-track infrared Sounder (CrIS) is a Polar Orbiting interferometric sensor that measures earth radiances at high spectral resolution, using the data to provide pressure, temperature and moisture profiles of the atmosphere. The pressure, temperature and moisture sounding data are used in weather prediction models that track storms, predict levels of precipitation etc. The CrIS instrument contains SWIR (λc ~ 5 μm at 98K), MWIR (λc ~ 9 μm at 98K) and LWIRs (λc ~ 15.5 μm at 81K) bands in three Focal Plane Array Assemblies (FPAAs). GOES-ABI contains three focal plane modules (FPMs), (i) a visible-near infrared module consisting of three visible and three near infrared channels, (ii) a MWIR module comprised of five channels from 3.9 μm to 8.6 μm and (iii) a 9.6 μm to 13.3 μm, five-channel LWIR module. The VNIR FPM operates at 205 K, and the MWIR and LWIR FPMs operate at 60 K. Each spectral channel has a redundant array built into a single detector chip. Switching is thus permitted from the primary selected array in each channel to the redundant array, given any degradation in performance of the primary array during the course of the mission. Silicon p-i-n detectors are used for the 0.47 μm to 0.86 μm channels. The thirteen channels above 1 μm are fabricated in various compositions of Hg1-xCdxTe, and in this particular case using two different detector architectures. The 1.38 μm to 9.61 μm channels are all fabricated in Hg1-xCdxTe grown by Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE) using the HDVIP detector architecture. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE)-grown Hg1-xCdxTe material are used for the LWIR 10.35 μm to 13.3 μm channels fabricated in Double

  16. Studies of satellite support to weather modification in the western US region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, W. R.; Grant, L. O.; Vonderhaar, T. H.

    1978-01-01

    The applications of meteorological satellite data to both summer and winter weather modification programs are addressed. Appraisals of the capability of satellites to assess seedability, to provide real-time operational support, and to assist in the post-experiment analysis of a seeding experiment led to the incorporation of satellite observing systems as a major component in the Bureau of Reclamations weather modification activities. Satellite observations are an integral part of the South Park Area cumulus experiment (SPACE) which aims to formulate a quantitative hypothesis for enhancing precipitation from orographically induced summertime mesoscale convective systems (orogenic mesoscale systems). Progress is reported in using satellite observations to assist in classifying the important mesoscale systems, and in defining their frequency and coverage, and potential area of effect. Satellite studies of severe storms are also covered.

  17. Attic or Roof? An Evaluation of Two Advanced Weatherization Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, Ken

    2012-06-01

    This project examines implementation of advanced retrofit measures in the context of a large-scale weatherization program and the archetypal Chicago brick bungalow. One strategy applies best practice air sealing methods and a standard insulation method to the attic floor. The other strategy creates an unvented roof assembly using materials and methods typically available to weatherization contractors. Through implementations of the retrofit strategies in a total of eight (8) test homes, the research found that the two different strategies achieve similar reductions in air leakage measurement (55%) and predicted energy performance (18%) relative to the pre-retrofit conditions.

  18. COSMIC Payload in NCAR-NASPO GPS Satellite System for Severe Weather Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai-Chen, C.

    Severe weather, such as cyclones, heavy rainfall, outburst of cold air, etc., results in great disaster all the world. It is the mission for the scientists to design a warning system, to predict the severe weather systems and to reduce the damage of the society. In Taiwan, National Satellite Project Office (NSPO) initiated ROCSAT-3 program at 1997. She scheduled the Phase I conceptual design to determine the mission for observation weather system. Cooperating with National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR), NSPO involved an international cooperation research and operation program to build a 32 GPS satellites system. NCAR will offer 24 GPS satellites. The total expanse will be US 100 millions. NSPO also provide US 80 millions for launching and system engineering operation. And NCAR will be responsible for Payload Control Center and Fiducial Network. The cooperative program contract has been signed by Taiwan National Science Council, Taipei Economic Cultural Office of United States and American Institute in Taiwan. One of the payload is COSMIC, Constellation Observation System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate. It is a GPS meteorology instrument system. The system will observe the weather information, e. g. electron density profiles, horizontal and vertical TEC and CFT scintillation and communication outage maps. The mission is to obtain the weather data such as vertical temperature profiles, water vapor distribution and pressure distribution over the world for global weather forecasting, especially during the severe weather period. The COSMIC Conference held on November, 1998. The export license was also issued by Department of Commerce of Unites States at November, 1998. Recently, NSPO begun to train their scientists to investigate the system. Scientists simulate the observation data to combine the existing routine satellite infrared cloud maps, radar echo and synoptic weather analysis for severe weather forecasting. It is hopeful to provide more accurate

  19. Space weather radiation effects on geostationary satellite solid-state power amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmeyer, W. Q.; Cahoy, K.

    2013-08-01

    In order to understand and mitigate the effects of space weather on the performance of geostationary (GEO) communications satellites, we analyze 16 years of archived telemetry data from Inmarsat, the UK-based telecommunications company. We compare 665,112 operational hours of housekeeping telemetry from two generations of satellites, designated as Fleet A and Fleet B. Each generation experienced 13 solid-state power amplifier (SSPA) anomalies for a total of 26 anomalies from 1996 to 2012. We compare telemetry from the Inmarsat anomalies with space weather observations, including data from the OMNI2 database, Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites, the Advanced Composition Explorer Satellite, and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) GEO observations; the evolution of the sunspot number; and the Kp index. Most SSPA anomalies for Fleet A occur as solar activity declines; Fleet B has not yet experienced a full solar cycle. For both fleets, the average value of Kp remained < 2 over time periods of 2 days, 3 days, and 2 weeks around the time of anomaly, which suggests that the anomalies occurred at times of relatively quiet geomagnetic activity and that they were probably not solely caused by surface charging. From 1996 to 2009, the average of the 1.8-3.5 MeV electron flux was 1.98 #/(cm2 s st keV). Five of the 26 anomalies, unfortunately, do not have corresponding science observations (specifically, electron flux data in the LANL data set), so part of this study focuses on the 21 anomalies when science observations were available. Six out of 21 anomalies experienced a high-energy electron flux greater than 1.5 standard deviations above the mean of the log10 of the flux between 7 and 14 days prior to the anomaly. By contrast, a Monte Carlo simulation finds that on average, only 2.8 out of 21 (13%) of randomly assigned "anomalies" occur between 7 and 14 days after an electron flux greater than 1.5 standard deviations above the mean. Our observations suggest

  20. Satellite-based Hyperspectral Sounder Retrievals in Real-time Weather Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, E.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time weather monitoring and forecasting abilities have significantly improved by the new generation of weather satellites, which provide routine access to observations and atmospheric data. In addition of providing visual images, satellite-based instrumentation also provide spectral radiance data that allow the computation of atmospheric temperature, moisture and trace gas profiles and other geophysical variables including cloud parameters. Hyperspectral sounders, AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder), IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) and CrIS (Cross-track Infrared Sounder) on low-Earth orbiting satellites, provide atmospheric profiles on a global scale with the spatial and temporal resolution needed to complement traditional profile data sources such as that obtained by radiosondes. The goal of this paper is to describe the information that hyperspectral sounders are capable of adding to weather monitoring and short-term forecasting systems. Retrievals derived from all four operational sounders are used in time-series to describe the pre-convective environment (including moisture advection and stability tendencies) antecedent to the initiation of severe weather. Temporal and spatial consistency and continuity is achieved among different instruments on different platforms through the use of a single atmospheric profile retrieval algorithm. Our results demonstrate the utility of using hyperspectral sounding products from multiple satellites for the real-time weather monitoring/prediction operation.

  1. Modeling Groundwater Depth in the Mississippi Delta Using Weather and ASTER Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boken, V. K.; Easson, G. L.

    2005-05-01

    Groundwater resources are often used for irrigating agricultural lands, urban and rural water supplies, and recreational and industrial purposes. In order to plan and regulate the groundwater usage in a sustainable manner, it is necessary to estimate depth to groundwater at a higher resolution in a region. In general, these depths are available only for a limited number of well locations. In this paper, we develop a model for predicting depth to ground water in the Mississippi Delta using variables derived from weather and satellite data. The Mississippi Delta is one of the six geomorphic regions in Mississippi; the other regions are the Coastal Plains, Valley Silty Uplands, Blackland Prairie, Gulf Coast Marsh, and Eastern Gulf Coast Flatwoods. This Delta encompasses approximately 35,000 sq. miles of agricultural lands in 19 of 82 counties of Mississippi. The soils in the Delta are rich in organic matter and are predominantly used for crops, such as cotton, soybean, rice, and corn. The data requirement to develop the model included groundwater depth, precipitation, elevation, and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) satellite data for the study area. We collected ground water depth for various well locations from the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, elevation and ASTER data from the United States Geological Survey (USGS), and precipitation data for various weather stations from the National Climate Data Center. Using ASTER data (in visible and infrared bands) a vegetation index was developed and used as a variable in the model. Using a geographic information system, geospatial interpolation techniques (inverse distance weighted, local polynomial, global polynomial, radial basis function, and kriging) were applied, and a continuous surface showing groundwater depth was created using the ordinary kriging which produced minimum error. The following data were tabulated for the weather station locations: interpolated

  2. A Space Weather Forecasting System with Multiple Satellites Based on a Self-Recognizing Network

    PubMed Central

    Tokumitsu, Masahiro; Ishida, Yoshiteru

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a space weather forecasting system at geostationary orbit for high-energy electron flux (>2 MeV). The forecasting model involves multiple sensors on multiple satellites. The sensors interconnect and evaluate each other to predict future conditions at geostationary orbit. The proposed forecasting model is constructed using a dynamic relational network for sensor diagnosis and event monitoring. The sensors of the proposed model are located at different positions in space. The satellites for solar monitoring equip with monitoring devices for the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind speed. The satellites orbit near the Earth monitoring high-energy electron flux. We investigate forecasting for typical two examples by comparing the performance of two models with different numbers of sensors. We demonstrate the prediction by the proposed model against coronal mass ejections and a coronal hole. This paper aims to investigate a possibility of space weather forecasting based on the satellite network with in-situ sensing. PMID:24803190

  3. Studying the Impact of Space Weather on the RASAT Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Mehmet; Hudaverdi, Murat; Ergin, Tulun

    Space radiation composed of highly energetic particles, such as protons, electrons, and heavy ions, has mainly two impacts on satellites: Cumulative effects and single event effects. The single event effect is caused by a single high energy particle interacting with the electronic component of the satellite. Most of the single event effects are not permanent, which are called Single Event Upsets (SEUs). SEUs might change the data in the micro-electronics but it won’t cause irreparable damage. RASAT is a Turkish Remote Sensing Satellite orbiting at LEO and keeping regular logs about SEUs happening on board. In this presentation, we show the results of our correlation studies about the anomalies in the RASAT SEU logs with the solar flares reported by GOES satellites during the period of 2011-2013. In order to better interpret the RASAT SEU logs especially during major solar events, we study the relations between the flux levels at LEO and GEO with the help of the models. So, here we report on our preliminary results about the comparisons between the data produced by the models available in SPENVIS and the measured data.

  4. Improved NOAA weather satellite scheduled for NASA launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A description of the GOES-E mission is presented and includes the instrumentation of the satellite, data acquisition, spacecraft description, and Delta Launch Vehicle description. The launch operations are presented and include major launch events, post-launch events, and a review of the Delta/GOES-E team.

  5. Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) network model for advanced ISDN satellite design and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1992-01-01

    The Full Service Integrated Services Digital Network (FSIS) network model for advanced satellite designs describes a model suitable for discrete event simulations. A top down model design uses the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) as its basis. The ACTS and the Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) perform ISDN protocol analyses and switching decisions in the terrestrial domain, whereas FSIS makes all its analyses and decisions on-board the ISDN satellite.

  6. Simulator design for advanced ISDN satellite design and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, Gerald R.

    1992-01-01

    This simulation design task completion report documents the simulation techniques associated with the network models of both the Interim Service ISDN (integrated services digital network) Satellite (ISIS) and the Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) architectures. The ISIS network model design represents satellite systems like the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) orbiting switch. The FSIS architecture, the ultimate aim of this element of the Satellite Communications Applications Research (SCAR) program, moves all control and switching functions on-board the next generation ISDN communication satellite. The technical and operational parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite design will be obtained from the simulation of ISIS and FSIS engineering software models for their major subsystems. Discrete events simulation experiments will be performed with these models using various traffic scenarios, design parameters and operational procedures. The data from these simulations will be used to determine the engineering parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite.

  7. Advancing Space Weather Modeling Capabilities at the CCMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. Leila; Kuznetsova, Maria; Boblitt, Justin; Chulaki, Anna; MacNeice, Peter; Mendoza, Michelle; Mullinix, Richard; Pembroke, Asher; Pulkkinen, Antti; Rastaetter, Lutz; Shim, Ja Soon; Taktakishvili, Aleksandre; Wiegand, Chiu; Zheng, Yihua

    2016-04-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC, http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov) serves as a community access point to an expanding collection of state-of-the-art space environment models and as a hub for collaborative development on next generation of space weather forecasting systems. In partnership with model developers and the international research and operational communities, the CCMC integrates new data streams and models from diverse sources into end-to-end space weather predictive systems, identifies weak links in data-model & model-model coupling and leads community efforts to fill those gaps. The presentation will focus on the latest model installations at the CCMC and advances in CCMC-led community-wide model validation projects.

  8. Advanced Technologies and Satellite Services for Enhancing Space Surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griethe, Wolfgang; Rieger, Philipp; Suess, Helmut; Neff, Thomas; Duerr, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    Space-based systems are becoming part of our infrastructure and our dependency on space-based services has grown. Therefore, the assured availability and operational readiness of space-based services is essential, undoubtedly. However, satellites are subject to a variety of damaging effects and potential threats. These are mostly caused by an increasingly crowded region of outer space, by space weather including solar events and, unfortunately, even attacks on space systems which are no longer sience fiction as impressively demonstrated in 2007 with the Chinese anti-satellite test and the intercept of USA-193 in 2008. Today, German armed forces use several space services primarily for reconnaissance, communications and navigation. As a matter of fact, Germany`s sovereignty and national security depend on the availability of multiple space services. This led the Federal Ministry of Defence to set up a dedicated military Space Situational Awareness Centre at Kalkar/Uedem, Germany, as a significant contribution to a national preventive security. This paper provides information on a range of technical issues related to space assets that are important for anyone involved in the debate over space security and gives a brief survey of the German SSA program. The paper deals with a subset of feasible man-made threats and its fatal effects on space assets. Furthermore, the preliminary conceptual design of an onboard sensor suitable for the instant detection of the previously described types of threats is presented. Finally, advanced technologies for the near real-time transfer of data are highlighted.

  9. Advanced technologies for encryption of satellite links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, Sherry S.

    The use of encryption on satellite links is discussed. Advanced technology exists to provide transmission security for large earth station with data rates up to 50 megabits per second. One of the major concerns in the use of encryption equipment with very small aperture terminals (VSAT) is the key management issue and the related operational costs. The low cost requirement and the lack of physical protection of remote VSATs place severe constraints on the design of encryption equipment. Encryption may be accomplished by embedding a tamper proof encryption module into the baseband unit of each VSAT. VSAT networks are usually star networks where there is a single large earth station that serves as a hub and all satellite communications takes place between each VSAT and the hub earth station. The hub earth station has the secret master key of each VSAT. These master keys are used to downline load encrypted session keys to each VSAT. A more secure alternative is to use public key techniques where each embedded VSAT encryption module internally generates its own secret and public numbers. The secret number never leaves the module while the public number is sent to the hub at the time of initialization of the encryption module into the VSAT. Physical access control to encryption modules of VSAT systems can be implemented using passwords, smart cards or biometrics.

  10. The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite and ISDN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Peter A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper depicts the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) system as a global central office switch. The ground portion of the system is the collection of earth stations or T1-VSAT's (T1 very small aperture terminals). The control software for the T1-VSAT's resides in a single CPU. The software consists of two modules, the modem manager and the call manager. The modem manager (MM) controls the RF modem portion of the T1-VSAT. It processes the orderwires from the satellite or from signaling generated by the call manager (CM). The CM controls the Recom Laboratories MSPs by receiving signaling messages from the stacked MSP shelves ro units and sending appropriate setup commands to them. There are two methods used to setup and process calls in the CM; first by dialing up a circuit using a standard telephone handset or, secondly by using an external processor connected to the CPU's second COM port, by sending and receiving signaling orderwires. It is the use of the external processor which permits the ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network) Signaling Processor to implement ISDN calls. In August 1993, the initial testing of the ISDN Signaling Processor was carried out at ACTS System Test at Lockheed Marietta, Princeton, NJ using the spacecraft in its test configuration on the ground.

  11. Applications technology satellites advanced mission study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, L. M.

    1972-01-01

    Three spacecraft configurations were designed for operation as a high powered synchronous communications satellite. Each spacecraft includes a 1 kw TWT and a 2 kw Klystron power amplifier feeding an antenna with multiple shaped beams. One of the spacecraft is designed to be boosted by a Thor-Delta launch vehicle and raised to synchronous orbit with electric propulsion. The other two are inserted into a elliptical transfer orbit with an Atlas Centaur and injected into final orbit with an apogee kick motor. Advanced technologies employed in the several configurations include tubes with multiple stage collectors radiating directly to space, multiple-contoured beam antennas, high voltage rollout solar cell arrays with integral power conditioning, electric propulsion for orbit raising and on-station attitude control and station-keeping, and liquid metal slip rings.

  12. Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) simulator development for advanced satellite designs and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1992-01-01

    The simulation development associated with the network models of both the Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) and the Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) architectures is documented. The ISIS Network Model design represents satellite systems like the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) orbiting switch. The FSIS architecture, the ultimate aim of this element of the Satellite Communications Applications Research (SCAR) Program, moves all control and switching functions on-board the next generation ISDN communications satellite. The technical and operational parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite design will be obtained from the simulation of ISIS and FSIS engineering software models for their major subsystems. Discrete event simulation experiments will be performed with these models using various traffic scenarios, design parameters, and operational procedures. The data from these simulations will be used to determine the engineering parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite.

  13. Satellite-derived mineral mapping and monitoring of weathering, deposition and erosion

    PubMed Central

    Cudahy, Thomas; Caccetta, Mike; Thomas, Matilda; Hewson, Robert; Abrams, Michael; Kato, Masatane; Kashimura, Osamu; Ninomiya, Yoshiki; Yamaguchi, Yasushi; Collings, Simon; Laukamp, Carsten; Ong, Cindy; Lau, Ian; Rodger, Andrew; Chia, Joanne; Warren, Peter; Woodcock, Robert; Fraser, Ryan; Rankine, Terry; Vote, Josh; de Caritat, Patrice; English, Pauline; Meyer, Dave; Doescher, Chris; Fu, Bihong; Shi, Pilong; Mitchell, Ross

    2016-01-01

    The Earth’s surface comprises minerals diagnostic of weathering, deposition and erosion. The first continental-scale mineral maps generated from an imaging satellite with spectral bands designed to measure clays, quartz and other minerals were released in 2012 for Australia. Here we show how these satellite mineral maps improve our understanding of weathering, erosional and depositional processes in the context of changing weather, climate and tectonics. The clay composition map shows how kaolinite has developed over tectonically stable continental crust in response to deep weathering during northwardly migrating tropical conditions from 45 to 10 Ma. The same clay composition map, in combination with one sensitive to water content, enables the discrimination of illite from montmorillonite clays that typically develop in large depositional environments over thin (sinking) continental crust such as the Lake Eyre Basin. Cutting across these clay patterns are sandy deserts that developed <10 Ma and are well mapped using another satellite product sensitive to the particle size of silicate minerals. This product can also be used to measure temporal gains/losses of surface clay caused by periodic wind erosion (dust) and rainfall inundation (flood) events. The accuracy and information content of these satellite mineral maps are validated using published data. PMID:27025192

  14. Satellite-derived mineral mapping and monitoring of weathering, deposition and erosion.

    PubMed

    Cudahy, Thomas; Caccetta, Mike; Thomas, Matilda; Hewson, Robert; Abrams, Michael; Kato, Masatane; Kashimura, Osamu; Ninomiya, Yoshiki; Yamaguchi, Yasushi; Collings, Simon; Laukamp, Carsten; Ong, Cindy; Lau, Ian; Rodger, Andrew; Chia, Joanne; Warren, Peter; Woodcock, Robert; Fraser, Ryan; Rankine, Terry; Vote, Josh; de Caritat, Patrice; English, Pauline; Meyer, Dave; Doescher, Chris; Fu, Bihong; Shi, Pilong; Mitchell, Ross

    2016-01-01

    The Earth's surface comprises minerals diagnostic of weathering, deposition and erosion. The first continental-scale mineral maps generated from an imaging satellite with spectral bands designed to measure clays, quartz and other minerals were released in 2012 for Australia. Here we show how these satellite mineral maps improve our understanding of weathering, erosional and depositional processes in the context of changing weather, climate and tectonics. The clay composition map shows how kaolinite has developed over tectonically stable continental crust in response to deep weathering during northwardly migrating tropical conditions from 45 to 10 Ma. The same clay composition map, in combination with one sensitive to water content, enables the discrimination of illite from montmorillonite clays that typically develop in large depositional environments over thin (sinking) continental crust such as the Lake Eyre Basin. Cutting across these clay patterns are sandy deserts that developed <10 Ma and are well mapped using another satellite product sensitive to the particle size of silicate minerals. This product can also be used to measure temporal gains/losses of surface clay caused by periodic wind erosion (dust) and rainfall inundation (flood) events. The accuracy and information content of these satellite mineral maps are validated using published data. PMID:27025192

  15. Building and Operating Weather Satellite Ground Stations for High School Science. Teachers Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, R. Joe; Gotwald, Timothy

    Automatic Picture Transmission (APT) images are real-time weather pictures transmitted from satellites on a radio frequency in a video format. Amateur radio enthusiasts and electronic experimenters have for a number of years designed, built, and operated direct readout stations capable of receiving APT photographs. The equipment to receive weather…

  16. Satellite-derived mineral mapping and monitoring of weathering, deposition and erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cudahy, Thomas; Caccetta, Mike; Thomas, Matilda; Hewson, Robert; Abrams, Michael; Kato, Masatane; Kashimura, Osamu; Ninomiya, Yoshiki; Yamaguchi, Yasushi; Collings, Simon; Laukamp, Carsten; Ong, Cindy; Lau, Ian; Rodger, Andrew; Chia, Joanne; Warren, Peter; Woodcock, Robert; Fraser, Ryan; Rankine, Terry; Vote, Josh; de Caritat, Patrice; English, Pauline; Meyer, Dave; Doescher, Chris; Fu, Bihong; Shi, Pilong; Mitchell, Ross

    2016-03-01

    The Earth’s surface comprises minerals diagnostic of weathering, deposition and erosion. The first continental-scale mineral maps generated from an imaging satellite with spectral bands designed to measure clays, quartz and other minerals were released in 2012 for Australia. Here we show how these satellite mineral maps improve our understanding of weathering, erosional and depositional processes in the context of changing weather, climate and tectonics. The clay composition map shows how kaolinite has developed over tectonically stable continental crust in response to deep weathering during northwardly migrating tropical conditions from 45 to 10 Ma. The same clay composition map, in combination with one sensitive to water content, enables the discrimination of illite from montmorillonite clays that typically develop in large depositional environments over thin (sinking) continental crust such as the Lake Eyre Basin. Cutting across these clay patterns are sandy deserts that developed <10 Ma and are well mapped using another satellite product sensitive to the particle size of silicate minerals. This product can also be used to measure temporal gains/losses of surface clay caused by periodic wind erosion (dust) and rainfall inundation (flood) events. The accuracy and information content of these satellite mineral maps are validated using published data.

  17. Advanced Satellite Research Project: SCAR Research Database. Bibliographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelton, Joseph N.

    1991-01-01

    The literature search was provided to locate and analyze the most recent literature that was relevant to the research. This was done by cross-relating books, articles, monographs, and journals that relate to the following topics: (1) Experimental Systems - Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), and (2) Integrated System Digital Network (ISDN) and Advance Communication Techniques (ISDN and satellites, ISDN standards, broadband ISDN, flame relay and switching, computer networks and satellites, satellite orbits and technology, satellite transmission quality, and network configuration). Bibliographic essay on literature citations and articles reviewed during the literature search task is provided.

  18. Anvil Forecast Tool in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Hood, Doris

    2009-01-01

    Meteorologists from the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) and National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have identified anvil forecasting as one of their most challenging tasks when predicting the probability of violations of the Lightning Launch Commit Criteria and Space Shuttle Flight Rules. As a result, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) was tasked to create a graphical overlay tool for the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS) that indicates the threat of thunderstorm anvil clouds, using either observed or model forecast winds as input. The tool creates a graphic depicting the potential location of thunderstorm anvils one, two, and three hours into the future. The locations are based on the average of the upper level observed or forecasted winds. The graphic includes 10 and 20 n mi standoff circles centered at the location of interest, as well as one-, two-, and three-hour arcs in the upwind direction. The arcs extend outward across a 30 sector width based on a previous AMU study that determined thunderstorm anvils move in a direction plus or minus 15 of the upper-level wind direction. The AMU was then tasked to transition the tool to the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). SMG later requested the tool be updated to provide more flexibility and quicker access to model data. This presentation describes the work performed by the AMU to transition the tool into AWIPS, as well as the subsequent improvements made to the tool.

  19. Geographic correlation of television pictures obtained from weather satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushuyev, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    The geographical control of satellite pictures, using the terminology of aerial photography, can be treated as the problem of analysis of a single picture with the objective of obtaining a ground contour map. Studies have shown the possibility and capability of the method of composing photographic maps from transformed television pictures. Optico-mechanical transformation solves the problem of geographical correlation for operational purposes. However, this technique does not compensate for electronic distortion, and accounts for earth sphericity only approximately. However, for certain purposes (studying ice drift), the maximum possible accuracy is required. Analytic geographical correlation methods using digital computers should be considered promising.

  20. Identifying Hail Signatures in Satellite Imagery from the 9-10 August 2011 Severe Weather Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryden, Rachel L.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Cole, Tony A.; Bell, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    Severe thunderstorms can produce large hail that causes property damage, livestock fatalities, and crop failure. However, detailed storm surveys of hail damage conducted by the National Weather Service (NWS) are not required. Current gaps also exist between Storm Prediction Center (SPC) hail damage estimates and crop-insurance payouts. NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites can be used to support NWS damage assessments, particularly to crops during the growing season. The two-day severe weather event across western Nebraska and central Kansas during 9-10 August 2011 offers a case study for investigating hail damage signatures by examining changes in Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from MODIS imagery. By analyzing hail damage swaths in satellite imagery, potential economic losses due to crop damage can be quantified and further improve the estimation of weather impacts on agriculture without significantly increasing manpower requirements.

  1. Advanced Solar Cells for Satellite Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, Dennis J.; Weinberg, Irving

    1994-01-01

    The multiple natures of today's space missions with regard to operational lifetime, orbital environment, cost and size of spacecraft, to name just a few, present such a broad range of performance requirements to be met by the solar array that no single design can suffice to meet them all. The result is a demand for development of specialized solar cell types that help to optimize overall satellite performance within a specified cost range for any given space mission. Historically, space solar array performance has been optimized for a given mission by tailoring the features of silicon solar cells to account for the orbital environment and average operating conditions expected during the mission. It has become necessary to turn to entirely new photovoltaic materials and device designs to meet the requirements of future missions, both in the near and far term. This paper will outline some of the mission drivers and resulting performance requirements that must be met by advanced solar cells, and provide an overview of some of the advanced cell technologies under development to meet them. The discussion will include high efficiency, radiation hard single junction cells; monolithic and mechanically stacked multiple bandgap cells; and thin film cells.

  2. Tethered Satellites as an Enabling Platform for Operational Space Weather Monitoring Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, Brian E.; Krause, Linda Habash; Gallagher, Dennis Lee; Bilen, Sven Gunnar; Fuhrhop, Keith; Hoegy, Walt R.; Inderesan, Rohini; Johnson, Charles; Owens, Jerry Keith; Powers, Joseph; Voronka, Nestor; Williams, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Tethered satellites offer the potential to be an important enabling technology to support operational space weather monitoring systems. Space weather "nowcasting" and forecasting models rely on assimilation of near-real-time (NRT) space environment data to provide warnings for storm events and deleterious effects on the global societal infrastructure. Typically, these models are initialized by a climatological model to provide "most probable distributions" of environmental parameters as a function of time and space. The process of NRT data assimilation gently pulls the climate model closer toward the observed state (e.g., via Kalman smoothing) for nowcasting, and forecasting is achieved through a set of iterative semi-empirical physics-based forward-prediction calculations. Many challenges are associated with the development of an operational system, from the top-level architecture (e.g., the required space weather observatories to meet the spatial and temporal requirements of these models) down to the individual instruments capable of making the NRT measurements. This study focuses on the latter challenge: we present some examples of how tethered satellites (from 100s of m to 20 km) are uniquely suited to address certain shortfalls in our ability to measure critical environmental parameters necessary to drive these space weather models. Examples include long baseline electric field measurements, magnetized ionospheric conductivity measurements, and the ability to separate temporal from spatial irregularities in environmental parameters. Tethered satellite functional requirements are presented for two examples of space environment observables.

  3. Anvil Forecast Tool in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Hood, Doris

    2009-01-01

    Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) from the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) and forecasters from the National Weather Service (NWS) Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have identified anvil forecasting as one of their most challenging tasks when predicting the probability of violating the Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LLCC) (Krider et al. 2006; Space Shuttle Flight Rules (FR), NASA/JSC 2004)). As a result, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a tool that creates an anvil threat corridor graphic that can be overlaid on satellite imagery using the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS, Short and Wheeler, 2002). The tool helps forecasters estimate the locations of thunderstorm anvils at one, two, and three hours into the future. It has been used extensively in launch and landing operations by both the 45 WS and SMG. The Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) is now used along with MIDDS for weather analysis and display at SMG. In Phase I of this task, SMG tasked the AMU to transition the tool from MIDDS to AWIPS (Barrett et aI., 2007). For Phase II, SMG requested the AMU make the Anvil Forecast Tool in AWIPS more configurable by creating the capability to read model gridded data from user-defined model files instead of hard-coded files. An NWS local AWIPS application called AGRID was used to accomplish this. In addition, SMG needed to be able to define the pressure levels for the model data, instead of hard-coding the bottom level as 300 mb and the top level as 150 mb. This paper describes the initial development of the Anvil Forecast Tool for MIDDS, followed by the migration of the tool to AWIPS in Phase I. It then gives a detailed presentation of the Phase II improvements to the AWIPS tool.

  4. Cosmic rays and other space weather effects influenced on satellite operation, technologies, biosphere and people health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Dorman

    2016-07-01

    Satellite anomalies (or malfunctions), including total distortion of electronics and loose of some satellites cost for Insurance Companies billions dollars per year. During especially active periods the probability of big satellite anomalies and their loosing increased very much. Now, when a great number of civil and military satellites are continuously worked for our practice life, the problem of satellite anomalies became very important. Many years ago about half of satellite anomalies were caused by technical reasons (for example, for Russian satellites Kosmos), but with time with increasing of production quality, this part became smaller and smaller. The other part, which now is dominated, caused by different space weather effects (energetic particles of CR and generated/trapped in the magnetosphere, and so on). We consider only satellite anomalies not caused by technical reasons: the total number of such anomalies about 6000 events, and separately for high and low altitude orbit satellites (5000 and about 800 events, correspondingly for high and low altitude satellites). No relation was found between low and high altitude satellite anomalies. Daily numbers of satellite anomalies, averaged by a superposed epoch method around sudden storm commencements and solar proton event onsets for high (>1500 km) and low (<1500 km) altitude orbits revealed a big difference in a behavior. Satellites were divided on several groups according to the orbital characteristics (altitude and inclination). The relation of satellite anomalies to the environmental parameters was found to be different for various orbits that should be taken into account under developing of the anomaly frequency models and forecasting. We consider also influence of CR on frequency of gene mutations and evolution of biosphere (we show that if it will be no CR, the Earth's civilization will be start only after milliards years later, what will be too late), CR role in thunderstorm phenomena and discharges

  5. Development of Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuzuki, Toshiyuki; Iwasaki, Nobuo; Hara, Norikazu

    ADEOS ia a large satellite which could be called a polar orbiting platform. The weight is 3.5 tons and power is 4.5 KW at the end of three years of mission life. It is scheduled to be launched in early 1995 by the H-II launch vehicle from Tanegashima Space Center. ADEOS carries two core sensors and six Announcement Opportunity (AO) sensors. The core sensors are called the Ocean Color and Temperature Scanner (OCTS) and the Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer (ANVIR), which are being developed by NASDA. The AO sensors are the NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT), the NASA Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), the Polarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectances of CNES, the Interferometric Monitor for Greenhouse gases of MITI, the Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer of Environment Agency (EA) of the Japanese government, and the EA Retroreflector In Space. This paper discusses the present status of the design and development of ADEOS putting emphasis on several features incorporated in the ADEOS bus system and several issues imposed at the system Preliminary Design Review.

  6. Data compression for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration /NOAA/ weather satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. F.; Schlutsmeyer, A. P.

    1980-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) receives high quality infrared weather images from each of its two geostationary weather satellites at an average data rate of 57 kilobits/second. These images are currently distributed to field stations over 3 kilohertz analog phone lines. The resulting loss in image quality renders the images unacceptable for proposed digital image processing. This paper documents the study leading to a current effort to implement a microprocessor-based universal noiseless coder/decoder to satisfy NOAA's requirements of high quality, good coverage and timely transmission of its infrared images.

  7. On the assimilation of satellite sounder data in cloudy skies in numerical weather prediction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Wang, Pei; Han, Hyojin; Li, Jinlong; Zheng, Jing

    2016-04-01

    Satellite measurements are an important source of global observations in support of numerical weather prediction (NWP). The assimilation of satellite radiances under clear skies has greatly improved NWP forecast scores. However, the application of radiances in cloudy skies remains a significant challenge. In order to better assimilate radiances in cloudy skies, it is very important to detect any clear field-of-view (FOV) accurately and assimilate cloudy radiances appropriately. Research progress on both clear FOV detection methodologies and cloudy radiance assimilation techniques are reviewed in this paper. Overview on approaches being implemented in the operational centers and studied by the satellite data assimilation research community is presented. Challenges and future directions for satellite sounder radiance assimilation in cloudy skies in NWP models are also discussed.

  8. Advanced satellite design and ISDN compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, Joseph N.

    1992-03-01

    The present evaluation of numerous strategies that can be pursued to upgrade satellite-based communications notes that such services will remain an important option for users even in a world of broadband Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) and Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) services. Standards organizations concerned with satellite communications should accordingly develop ISDN and ATM standards that are compatible with satellites, fiber-optics, and hybrid systems, including those standards relating to improving satellite performance in such areas of strategic weakness as onboard processing and artificially intelligent ultrasmall aperture terminals.

  9. Satellite switched FDMA advanced communication technology satellite program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, S.; Higton, G. H.; Wood, K.; Kline, A.; Furiga, A.; Rausch, M.; Jan, Y.

    1982-01-01

    The satellite switched frequency division multiple access system provided a detailed system architecture that supports a point to point communication system for long haul voice, video and data traffic between small Earth terminals at Ka band frequencies at 30/20 GHz. A detailed system design is presented for the space segment, small terminal/trunking segment at network control segment for domestic traffic model A or B, each totaling 3.8 Gb/s of small terminal traffic and 6.2 Gb/s trunk traffic. The small terminal traffic (3.8 Gb/s) is emphasized, for the satellite router portion of the system design, which is a composite of thousands of Earth stations with digital traffic ranging from a single 32 Kb/s CVSD voice channel to thousands of channels containing voice, video and data with a data rate as high as 33 Mb/s. The system design concept presented, effectively optimizes a unique frequency and channelization plan for both traffic models A and B with minimum reorganization of the satellite payload transponder subsystem hardware design. The unique zoning concept allows multiple beam antennas while maximizing multiple carrier frequency reuse. Detailed hardware design estimates for an FDMA router (part of the satellite transponder subsystem) indicate a weight and dc power budget of 353 lbs, 195 watts for traffic model A and 498 lbs, 244 watts for traffic model B.

  10. Weather Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    WxLink is an aviation weather system based on advanced airborne sensors, precise positioning available from the satellite-based Global Positioning System, cockpit graphics and a low-cost datalink. It is a two-way system that uplinks weather information to the aircraft and downlinks automatic pilot reports of weather conditions aloft. Manufactured by ARNAV Systems, Inc., the original technology came from Langley Research Center's cockpit weather information system, CWIN (Cockpit Weather INformation). The system creates radar maps of storms, lightning and reports of surface observations, offering improved safety, better weather monitoring and substantial fuel savings.

  11. Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) hardware experiment design for advanced ISDN satellite design and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1992-01-01

    The Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) Hardware Experiment Design for Advanced Satellite Designs describes the design of the ISDN Satellite Terminal Adapter (ISTA) capable of translating ISDN protocol traffic into time division multiple access (TDMA) signals for use by a communications satellite. The ISTA connects the Type 1 Network Termination (NT1) via the U-interface on the line termination side of the CPE to the V.35 interface for satellite uplink. The same ISTA converts in the opposite direction the V.35 to U-interface data with a simple switch setting.

  12. Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) hardware experiment development for advanced ISDN satellite designs and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1992-01-01

    The Interim Service Integrated Service Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) Hardware Experiment Development for Advanced Satellite Designs describes the development of the ISDN Satellite Terminal Adapter (ISTA) capable of translating ISDN protocol traffic into Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) signals for use by a communications satellite. The ISTA connects the Type 1 Network Termination (NT1) via the U-interface on the line termination side of the CPE to the RS-499 interface for satellite uplink. The same ISTA converts in the opposite direction the RS-499 to U-interface data with a simple switch setting.

  13. Mitigating Aviation Communication and Satellite Orbit Operations Surprises from Adverse Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    2008-01-01

    Adverse space weather affects operational activities in aviation and satellite systems. For example, large solar flares create highly variable enhanced neutral atmosphere and ionosphere electron density regions. These regions impact aviation communication frequencies as well as precision orbit determination. The natural space environment, with its dynamic space weather variability, is additionally changed by human activity. The increase in orbital debris in low Earth orbit (LEO), combined with lower atmosphere CO2 that rises into the lower thermosphere and causes increased cooling that results in increased debris lifetime, adds to the environmental hazards of navigating in near-Earth space. This is at a time when commercial space endeavors are posed to begin more missions to LEO during the rise of the solar activity cycle toward the next maximum (2012). For satellite and aviation operators, adverse space weather results in greater expenses for orbit management, more communication outages or aviation and ground-based high frequency radio used, and an inability to effectively plan missions or service customers with space-based communication, imagery, and data transferal during time-critical activities. Examples of some revenue-impacting conditions and solutions for mitigating adverse space weather are offered.

  14. Tethered Satellites as Enabling Platforms for an Operational Space Weather Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. Habash; Gilchrist, B. E.; Bilen, S.; Owens, J.; Voronka, N.; Furhop, K.

    2013-01-01

    Space weather nowcasting and forecasting models require assimilation of near-real time (NRT) space environment data to improve the precision and accuracy of operational products. Typically, these models begin with a climatological model to provide "most probable distributions" of environmental parameters as a function of time and space. The process of NRT data assimilation gently pulls the climate model closer toward the observed state (e.g. via Kalman smoothing) for nowcasting, and forecasting is achieved through a set of iterative physics-based forward-prediction calculations. The issue of required space weather observatories to meet the spatial and temporal requirements of these models is a complex one, and we do not address that with this poster. Instead, we present some examples of how tethered satellites can be used to address the shortfalls in our ability to measure critical environmental parameters necessary to drive these space weather models. Examples include very long baseline electric field measurements, magnetized ionospheric conductivity measurements, and the ability to separate temporal from spatial irregularities in environmental parameters. Tethered satellite functional requirements will be presented for each space weather parameter considered in this study.

  15. Optical Multiple Access Network (OMAN) for advanced processing satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendez, Antonio J.; Gagliardi, Robert M.; Park, Eugene; Ivancic, William D.; Sherman, Bradley D.

    1991-01-01

    An OMAN breadboard for exploring advanced processing satellite circuit switch applications is introduced. Network architecture, hardware trade offs, and multiple user interference issues are presented. The breadboard test set up and experimental results are discussed.

  16. Advanced tracking and data relay satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this communication satellite system are as follows: to provide NASA needs for satellite tracking and communications through the year 2012; to maintain and augment the current TDRS system when available satellite resources are expended in the latter part of the decade; to provide the necessary ground upgrade to support the augmented services; and to introduce new technology to reduce the system life cycle cost. It is concluded that no ATDRS spacecraft requirement for new modulation techniques, that data rate of 650 MBps is required, and that Space Station Freedom requirement is for 650 MBps data some time after the year 2000.

  17. Satellite-observed sensitivity of weather condition for forecasting malaria vector distribution in Bandarban District, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizamuddin, Mohammad; Rahman, Atiqur; Roytman, Leonid; Kogan, Felix; Powell, Al; Goldberg, Mitch; Khan, Mohammad M.

    2008-10-01

    Malaria is a serious public health problem in Bangladesh. Almost thirteen districts in Bangladesh experience epidemics of malaria. Epidemics occur mainly in the highlands of Bangladesh, notably in Bandarban district. This study examined the relationship between environmental factors and malaria incidence in Bandarban district in Bangladesh. This paper examines the association between malaria cases and weekly vegetation health condition index for the region for last fourteen years. The vegetation health index derived from a combination of Advance Very High Resolution Radiometer based normalized difference vegetation index and 10 micrometer (μm) to 11 micrometer (μm) thermal radiances, was designed for monitoring moisture and thermal impacts on vegetation health. It estimates the correlation between malaria cases and Vegetation Health (VH) Indices (Vegetation Condition Index (VCI) and Temperature Condition Index (TCI)) computed for each week over a period of 14 years (1992-2005). Following the results of correlation analysis the principal components regression (PCR) method was performed on weather components of satellite data and climate variability during each of the two annual malaria seasons to construct a model to predict malaria as a function of the TCI computed for this period. A good correlation was found between malaria cases and TCI characterizing thermal condition during the month of August and September. Furthermore the simulated results found from PCR model were compared with observed malaria statistics showing that the error of the estimates of malaria is less than 10%. Remote sensing therefore demonstrates the potential of a seasonal forecasting which can provide information about peak mosquito to breading conditions. The derived results are potential important for decision makers in the region to control malaria particularly under constraint of limited budget allocations.

  18. A space weather forecasting system with multiple satellites based on a self-recognizing network.

    PubMed

    Tokumitsu, Masahiro; Ishida, Yoshiteru

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a space weather forecasting system at geostationary orbit for high-energy electron flux (>2 MeV). The forecasting model involves multiple sensors on multiple satellites. The sensors interconnect and evaluate each other to predict future conditions at geostationary orbit. The proposed forecasting model is constructed using a dynamic relational network for sensor diagnosis and event monitoring. The sensors of the proposed model are located at different positions in space. The satellites for solar monitoring equip with monitoring devices for the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind speed. The satellites orbit near the Earth monitoring high-energy electron flux. We investigate forecasting for typical two examples by comparing the performance of two models with different numbers of sensors. We demonstrate the prediction by the proposed model against coronal mass ejections and a coronal hole. This paper aims to investigate a possibility of space weather forecasting based on the satellite network with in-situ sensing. PMID:24803190

  19. GOES-R Rapid Refresh Imagery Advancements for the Earth and Space Weather Enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, S. J.; Schmit, T. J.; Lindsey, D. T.; Denig, W. F.

    2014-12-01

    The next generation of GOES, the GOES-R series, with planned launch in early 2016 offers improved spacecraft and instrument technology to provide more accurate, detailed and timely detection of high impact environmental phenomena, and at the same time significant opportunities and challenges in quickly creating, updating, and disseminating data and products in near real-time to produce more accurate forecasts and warnings. The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) will provide three times more spectral information, four times the spatial resolution, and more than five times faster temporal coverage than the current system with rapid scan imagery of severe storms, tropical cyclones, volcanic eruptions, and fires potentially as often as every thirty seconds in mesoscale mode and at least every 5 min or 15 min (as opposed to the 7.5, 15 or 30 min data from today's imager). Additional advancements over current GOES capabilities include continuous total lightning detection and mapping of in-cloud and cloud-to-ground flashes from the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) with only twenty second latency or less, and increased dynamic range, resolution, and sensitivity imaging solar activity with the Solar UV Imager (SUVI) every ten seconds. The total lightning is very useful for identifying hazardous and severe thunderstorms, monitoring storm intensification and tracking evolution. Used in tandem with radar, visible satellite, and surface observations, total lightning data has great potential to increase lead time for severe storm warnings and improve public safety. The space weather instruments provide more detailed observations of coronal mass ejection, solar flares, and energetic particles to produce more accurate forecasts and warnings of solar storms. The data from the ABI, GLM and space weather instruments will have a wide-range of uses and multiple societal benefits in areas such as severe weather, energy, transportation, and commerce. This presentation will highlight the

  20. New advanced radio diagnostics tools for Space Weather Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krankowski, A.; Rothkaehl, H.; Atamaniuk, B.; Morawski, M.; Zakharenkova, I.; Cherniak, I.; Otmianowska-Mazur, K.

    2013-12-01

    data retrieved from FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC radio occultation measurements. The main purpose of this presentation is to describe new advanced diagnostic techniques of the near-Earth space plasma and point out the scientific challenges of the radio frequency analyser located on board of low orbiting satellites and LOFAR facilities.

  1. Modeled Forecasts of Dengue Fever in San Juan, Puerto Rico Using NASA Satellite Enhanced Weather Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, C.; Quattrochi, D. A.; Zavodsky, B.; Case, J.

    2015-12-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is an important mosquito transmitted disease that is strongly influenced by meteorological and environmental conditions. Recent research has focused on forecasting DF case numbers based on meteorological data. However, these forecasting tools have generally relied on empirical models that require long DF time series to train. Additionally, their accuracy has been tested retrospectively, using past meteorological data. Consequently, the operational utility of the forecasts are still in question because the error associated with weather and climate forecasts are not reflected in the results. Using up-to-date weekly dengue case numbers for model parameterization and weather forecast data as meteorological input, we produced weekly forecasts of DF cases in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Each week, the past weeks' case counts were used to re-parameterize a process-based DF model driven with updated weather forecast data to generate forecasts of DF case numbers. Real-time weather forecast data was produced using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical weather prediction (NWP) system enhanced using additional high-resolution NASA satellite data. This methodology was conducted in a weekly iterative process with each DF forecast being evaluated using county-level DF cases reported by the Puerto Rico Department of Health. The one week DF forecasts were accurate especially considering the two sources of model error. First, weather forecasts were sometimes inaccurate and generally produced lower than observed temperatures. Second, the DF model was often overly influenced by the previous weeks DF case numbers, though this phenomenon could be lessened by increasing the number of simulations included in the forecast. Although these results are promising, we would like to develop a methodology to produce longer range forecasts so that public health workers can better prepare for dengue epidemics.

  2. Forecasting irrigation demand by assimilating satellite images and numerical weather predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelosi, Anna; Medina, Hanoi; Villani, Paolo; Falanga Bolognesi, Salvatore; D'Urso, Guido; Battista Chirico, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Forecasting irrigation water demand, with small predictive uncertainty in the short-medium term, is fundamental for an efficient planning of water resource allocation among multiple users and for decreasing water and energy consumptions. In this study we present an innovative system for forecasting irrigation water demand, applicable at different spatial scales: from the farm level to the irrigation district level. The forecast system is centred on a crop growth model assimilating data from satellite images and numerical weather forecasts, according to a stochastic ensemble-based approach. Different sources of uncertainty affecting model predictions are represented by an ensemble of model trajectories, each generated by a possible realization of the model components (model parameters, input weather data and model state variables). The crop growth model is based on a set of simplified analytical relations, with the aim to assess biomass, leaf area index (LAI) growth and evapotranspiration rate with a daily time step. Within the crop growth model, LAI dynamics is let be governed by temperature and leaf dry matter supply, according to the development stage of the crop. The model assimilates LAI data retrieved from VIS-NIR high-resolution multispectral satellite images. Numerical weather model outputs are those from the European limited area ensemble prediction system (COSMO-LEPS), which provides forecasts up to five days with a spatial resolution of seven kilometres. Weather forecasts are sequentially bias corrected based on data from ground weather stations. The forecasting system is evaluated in experimental areas of southern Italy during three irrigation seasons. The performance analysis shows very accurate irrigation water demand forecasts, which make the proposed system a valuable support for water planning and saving at farm level as well as for water management at larger spatial scales.

  3. Potential markets for advanced satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, Steven; Roberts, David; Schubert, Leroy; Smith, Brian; Sogegian, Robert; Walters, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    This report identifies trends in the volume and type of traffic offered to the U.S. domestic communications infrastructure and extrapolates these trends through the year 2011. To describe how telecommunications service providers are adapting to the identified trends, this report assesses the status, plans, and capacity of the domestic communications infrastructure. Cable, satellite, and radio components of the infrastructure are examined separately. The report also assesses the following major applications making use of the infrastructure: (1) Broadband services, including Broadband Integrated Services Digital Network (BISDN), Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS), and frame relay; (2) mobile services, including voice, location, and paging; (3) Very Small Aperture Terminals (VSAT), including mesh VSAT; and (4) Direct Broadcast Satellite (DBS) for audio and video. The report associates satellite implementation of specific applications with market segments appropriate to their features and capabilities. The volume and dollar value of these market segments are estimated. For the satellite applications able to address the needs of significant market segments, the report also examines the potential of each satellite-based application to capture business from alternative technologies.

  4. Potential markets for advanced satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, Steven; Roberts, David; Schubert, Leroy; Smith, Brian; Sogegian, Robert; Walters, Daniel

    1993-09-01

    This report identifies trends in the volume and type of traffic offered to the U.S. domestic communications infrastructure and extrapolates these trends through the year 2011. To describe how telecommunications service providers are adapting to the identified trends, this report assesses the status, plans, and capacity of the domestic communications infrastructure. Cable, satellite, and radio components of the infrastructure are examined separately. The report also assesses the following major applications making use of the infrastructure: (1) Broadband services, including Broadband Integrated Services Digital Network (BISDN), Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS), and frame relay; (2) mobile services, including voice, location, and paging; (3) Very Small Aperture Terminals (VSAT), including mesh VSAT; and (4) Direct Broadcast Satellite (DBS) for audio and video. The report associates satellite implementation of specific applications with market segments appropriate to their features and capabilities. The volume and dollar value of these market segments are estimated. For the satellite applications able to address the needs of significant market segments, the report also examines the potential of each satellite-based application to capture business from alternative technologies.

  5. Google Earth as a Vehicle to Integrating Multiple Layers of Environmental Satellite Data for Weather and Science Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turk, F. J.; Miller, S. D.

    2007-12-01

    satellite data would be utilized within a geobrowser in a near real-time setting, we present a demonstration from the 2007 hurricane season, developed within the Google Earth framework. A menu of imagery based sequential satellite overpasses (GOES and other geostationary satellites, TRMM, CloudSat, Terra, Aqua, DMSP, NOAA, QuikScat) during the storm lifecycle, are presented to the Earth client in an structured folder format. The remapping of these satellite data follows the hurricane track, enabling the user to view, animate, zoom, overlay and combine visible, infrared and passive microwave imagery and combine with other data (surface reports, forecasts, surface winds, ground and spaceborne radars, etc.) at various stages of the hurricane lifecycle. Pop-up balloons provide training that explains the properties and capabilities of the satellite datasets and what components of the underlying weather are represented. Future satellite overpass tracks are provided so that the user can anticipate imagery updates several days in advance (e.g., as a hurricane approaches landfall). This combination of geo-navigable data provides a convenient framework for efficiently demonstrating meteorological, oceanographic and weather and climate concepts to students, planners, and the public at large.

  6. Plan of advanced satellite communications experiment using ETS-VI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiomi, Tadashi

    1988-01-01

    Communications Research Laboratory (CRL, Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications, Japan) has been engaged in development of three advanced satellite communication payloads aiming at experiments by Japan's 2-ton class Engineering Test Satellite VI (ETS-VI) which is to be launched in H-II rocket by NASDA in August 1992. CRL's three experimental systems are: (1) S-band inter-satellite communications; (2) millimeter-wave inter-satellite and personal-satellite communications; and (3) optical inter-satellite communications. CRL develops experimental optical communication system with telescope of 75 mm diameter which has gimbal mirror beam pointing/tracking mechanism. The onboard system has fundamental optical communication functions with laser diode transmitter of wavelength 0.83 micron, laser beam point-ahead mechanism, receiver of wavelength 0.51 micron, modulation/demodulation subsystem, and so on.

  7. Advanced mobile satellite communications using COMETS satellite in MM-wave and Ka-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohmori, Shingo; Isobe, Shunkichi; Takeuchi, Makoto; Naito, Hideyuki

    1993-01-01

    Early in the 21st century, the demand for personal communications using mobile, hand-held, and VSAT terminals will rapidly increase. In a future system, many different types of services should be provided with one-hop connection. The Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) has studied a future advanced mobile satellite communications system using millimeter wave and Ka band. In 1990, CRL started the Communications and Broadcasting Engineering Test Satellite (COMETS) project. The satellite has been developed in conjunction with NASDA and will be launched in 1997. This paper describes the COMETS payload configuration and the experimental system for the advanced mobile communications mission.

  8. Resilient Sensor Networks with Spatiotemporal Interpolation of Missing Sensors: An Example of Space Weather Forecasting by Multiple Satellites.

    PubMed

    Tokumitsu, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Ishida, Yoshiteru

    2016-01-01

    This paper attempts to construct a resilient sensor network model with an example of space weather forecasting. The proposed model is based on a dynamic relational network. Space weather forecasting is vital for a satellite operation because an operational team needs to make a decision for providing its satellite service. The proposed model is resilient to failures of sensors or missing data due to the satellite operation. In the proposed model, the missing data of a sensor is interpolated by other sensors associated. This paper demonstrates two examples of space weather forecasting that involves the missing observations in some test cases. In these examples, the sensor network for space weather forecasting continues a diagnosis by replacing faulted sensors with virtual ones. The demonstrations showed that the proposed model is resilient against sensor failures due to suspension of hardware failures or technical reasons. PMID:27092508

  9. Resilient Sensor Networks with Spatiotemporal Interpolation of Missing Sensors: An Example of Space Weather Forecasting by Multiple Satellites

    PubMed Central

    Tokumitsu, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Ishida, Yoshiteru

    2016-01-01

    This paper attempts to construct a resilient sensor network model with an example of space weather forecasting. The proposed model is based on a dynamic relational network. Space weather forecasting is vital for a satellite operation because an operational team needs to make a decision for providing its satellite service. The proposed model is resilient to failures of sensors or missing data due to the satellite operation. In the proposed model, the missing data of a sensor is interpolated by other sensors associated. This paper demonstrates two examples of space weather forecasting that involves the missing observations in some test cases. In these examples, the sensor network for space weather forecasting continues a diagnosis by replacing faulted sensors with virtual ones. The demonstrations showed that the proposed model is resilient against sensor failures due to suspension of hardware failures or technical reasons. PMID:27092508

  10. Accuracy Advances in Measuring Earth Emission Spectra for Weather and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revercomb, H. E.; Best, F. A.; Tobin, D. C.; Knuteson, R. O.; Taylor, J. K.; Gero, P.; Adler, D. P.; Pettersen, C.; Mulligan, M.

    2011-12-01

    Launch of the first component of the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) in late October is expected to initiate a new series of US afternoon satellites to complement the EUMETSAT MetOp EPS morning observations. A key component is the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) designed for advanced temperature and water vapor profiling for weather and climate applications. We have worked on getting this operational capability in space ever since conducting a Phase A instrument design in 1990, and will report on what is expected to be its highly accurate radiometric and spectral performance post launch. The expectation from thermal/vacuum testing is that the accuracy will exceed 0.2 K (k=3) brightness temperature at scene temperature for all three bands in the region from 3.5 to 15 microns. CrIS is expected to offer further confirmation of techniques that have proven to offer significant accuracy improvements for the new family of advanced sounding instruments including AIRS on NASA Aqua platform and IASI on MetOp A and that are needed in the new IR Decadal Survey measurements. CrIS and these other advanced sounders help set the stage for a new era in establishing spectrally resolved IR climate benchmark measurements from space. Here we report on being able to achieve even higher accuracy with instruments designed specifically for climate missions similar to the Decadal Survey Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO). Results will be presented from our NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) effort for which a new concept for on-orbit verification and test has been developed. This system is capable of performing fundamental radiometric calibration, spectral characterization and calibration, and other key performance tests that are normally only performed prior to launch in thermal/vacuum testing. By verifying accuracy directly on-orbit, this capability should provide the ultra-high confidence in data sets needed for societal decision making.

  11. Standardizing orbit planning, satellite operations, and communication activities that are affected by space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W.

    2007-12-01

    Precision satellite orbit determination, constellation station-keeping, debris avoidance, reentry timing, satellite subsystem performance and safety, and communication link enhancement are among the major technological activities that are affected by space weather. There are numerous applications being developed to mitigate space weather affects on these domains. However, the common language for information exchange still needs community attention. We report on progress towards a) providing applications and services that mitigate adverse effects caused by space weather and b) developing international standards for exchange of information. For applications and services, Space Environment Technologies (SET) has developed a) new solar indices that reduce 1-sigma uncertainty by 50 percent in atmosphere density calculations, b) new spacecraft surface charging characterizations, and c) new solar irradiances that capture solar flare effects on transionospheric communications. These solar products have been developed and tested for: 1) daily time resolution for historical, nowcast, and intermediate-term forecast periods (1-day granularity, 1-hour cadence, and 1-hour latency extending 4.5 months); 2) high time resolution for recent, nowcast, and short-term forecast periods (3-hour granularity, 1-hour cadence, and 1-hour latency extending 96 hours); and 3) precision time resolution for recent, current epoch, and near-term forecast periods (1-minute granularity, 2-minute cadence, and 5-minute latency extending 6 hours). These indices and solar irradiances are used for improving atmosphere density and ionosphere models' outputs and we describe specific case studies as well as coupled applications that serve space systems users in orbit planning, satellite operations, and communication activities. For standards, we report on the activities of ISO TC20/SC14/WG4, which has the authority to develop international standards related to the space environment.

  12. Geostationary Communications Satellites as Sensors for the Space Weather Environment: Telemetry Event Identification Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlton, A.; Cahoy, K.

    2015-12-01

    Reliability of geostationary communication satellites (GEO ComSats) is critical to many industries worldwide. The space radiation environment poses a significant threat and manufacturers and operators expend considerable effort to maintain reliability for users. Knowledge of the space radiation environment at the orbital location of a satellite is of critical importance for diagnosing and resolving issues resulting from space weather, for optimizing cost and reliability, and for space situational awareness. For decades, operators and manufacturers have collected large amounts of telemetry from geostationary (GEO) communications satellites to monitor system health and performance, yet this data is rarely mined for scientific purposes. The goal of this work is to acquire and analyze archived data from commercial operators using new algorithms that can detect when a space weather (or non-space weather) event of interest has occurred or is in progress. We have developed algorithms, collectively called SEER (System Event Evaluation Routine), to statistically analyze power amplifier current and temperature telemetry by identifying deviations from nominal operations or other events and trends of interest. This paper focuses on our work in progress, which currently includes methods for detection of jumps ("spikes", outliers) and step changes (changes in the local mean) in the telemetry. We then examine available space weather data from the NOAA GOES and the NOAA-computed Kp index and sunspot numbers to see what role, if any, it might have played. By combining the results of the algorithm for many components, the spacecraft can be used as a "sensor" for the space radiation environment. Similar events occurring at one time across many component telemetry streams may be indicative of a space radiation event or system-wide health and safety concern. Using SEER on representative datasets of telemetry from Inmarsat and Intelsat, we find events that occur across all or many of

  13. Impact of geostationary satellite water vapor channel data on weather analysis and forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velden, Christopher S.

    1995-01-01

    Preliminary results from NWP impact studies are indicating that upper-tropospheric wind information provided by tracking motions in sequences of geostationary satellite water vapor imagery can positively influence forecasts on regional scales, and possibly on global scales as well. The data are complimentary to cloud-tracked winds by providing data in cloud-free regions, as well as comparable in quality. First results from GOES-8 winds are encouraging, and further efforts and model impacts will be directed towards optimizing these data in numerical weather prediction (NWP). Assuming successful launches of GOES-J and GMS-5 satellites in 1995, high quality and resolution water vapor imagers will be available to provide nearly complete global upper-tropospheric wind coverage.

  14. Our Understanding of Space Weather features responsible for geostationary satellite anamolies (P39)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, G.; et al.

    2006-11-01

    girija60@yahoo.com The topic of space weather effects on operational anomalies on spacecraft is one of considerable research investigation, with both pure and applied aspects. This is because of the very high costs involved in fabricating and operating spacecraft, and in insuring them against the harmful effects of space weather. This is more true for geostationary satellites than of low-orbiting spacecraft, as the former operate in the high-risk environment of the Earth’s outer radiation belts, with its large vagaries in spatial and time variations of high- energy electron and proton distributions (BAKER 2003). Without doubt, plasma and magnetic field emissions from active regions on the Sun are the root cause for spacecraft anomalies. Our study for 2005 shows that over 95% of anomalies can be related to some definite activity on the Sun, ranging from high-speed solar wind streams with their 27-day recurrence patterns/coronal holes/coronal mass ejections preceded by X or M type of flares/and magnetic cloud events. The most energetic solar activity events are generally accompanied by a large rise in solar MeV proton densities at geo-stationary orbit (WILKINSON 1994), and they account for definite anomalies classified as SEU (Single Event Upsets which most often are reversible through resetting commands). Any particles in the low energy ranges (eV and keV, and these could be of magnetospheric or ionospheric origin), are believed to cause external charging effects in exposed parts of the spacecraft such as solar power arrays and power cables. These mainly result in power losses which are debilitating over a period of time. The most dangerous and often irrecoverable damage is due to electronics in the 1-5 MeV range which cause deep dielectric discharge of arc type in semi-conductors comprising spacecraft instruments. Following major solar activity, the populations of these rise to more than (5x103) particles/cm2.ster.sec, with large spatial and time variations (LOVE

  15. Recent advances in analytical satellite theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Recent work on analytical satellite perturbation theory has involved the completion of a revision to 4th order for zonal harmonics, the addition of a treatment for ocean tides, an extension of the treatment for the noninertial reference system, and the completion of a theory for direct solar-radiation pressure and earth-albedo pressure. Combined with a theory for tesseral-harmonics, lunisolar, and body-tide perturbations, these formulations provide a comprehensive orbit-computation program. Detailed comparisons with numerical integration and observations are presented to assess the accuracy of each theoretical development.

  16. Weather.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This subject guide to weather resources includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, audios, magazines, and professional resources. Related disciplines are indicated, age levels are specified, and a student activity is included. (LRW)

  17. Trends and uncertainties in U.S. cloud cover from weather stations and satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Free, M. P.; Sun, B.; Yoo, H. L.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud cover data from ground-based weather observers can be an important source of climate information, but the record of such observations in the U.S. is disrupted by the introduction of automated observing systems and other artificial shifts that interfere with our ability to assess changes in cloudiness at climate time scales. A new dataset using 54 National Weather Service (NWS) and 101 military stations that continued to make human-augmented cloud observations after the 1990s has been adjusted using statistical changepoint detection and visual scrutiny. The adjustments substantially reduce the trends in U.S. mean total cloud cover while increasing the agreement between the cloud cover time series and those of physically related climate variables such as diurnal temperature range and number of precipitation days. For 1949-2009, the adjusted time series give a trend in U.S. mean total cloud of 0.11 ± 0.22 %/decade for the military data, 0.55 ± 0.24 %/decade for the NWS data, and 0.31 ± 0.22 %/decade for the combined dataset. These trends are less than half those in the original data. For 1976-2004, the original data give a significant increase but the adjusted data show an insignificant trend of -0.17 (military stations) to 0.66 %/decade (NWS stations). The differences between the two sets of station data illustrate the uncertainties in the U.S. cloud cover record. We compare the adjusted station data to cloud cover time series extracted from several satellite datasets: ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project), PATMOS-x (AVHRR Pathfinder Atmospheres Extended) and CLARA-a1 (CM SAF cLoud Albedo and RAdiation), and the recently developed PATMOS-x diurnally corrected dataset. Like the station data, satellite cloud cover time series may contain inhomogeneities due to changes in the observing systems and problems with retrieval algorithms. Overall we find good agreement between interannual variability in most of the satellite data and that in our

  18. Global Weather States and Their Properties from Passive and Active Satellite Cloud Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tselioudis, George; Rossow, William; Zhang, Yuanchong; Konsta, Dimitra

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the authors apply a clustering algorithm to International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud optical thickness-cloud top pressure histograms in order to derive weather states (WSs) for the global domain. The cloud property distribution within each WS is examined and the geographical variability of each WS is mapped. Once the global WSs are derived, a combination of CloudSat and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) vertical cloud structure retrievals is used to derive the vertical distribution of the cloud field within each WS. Finally, the dynamic environment and the radiative signature of the WSs are derived and their variability is examined. The cluster analysis produces a comprehensive description of global atmospheric conditions through the derivation of 11 WSs, each representing a distinct cloud structure characterized by the horizontal distribution of cloud optical depth and cloud top pressure. Matching those distinct WSs with cloud vertical profiles derived from CloudSat and CALIPSO retrievals shows that the ISCCP WSs exhibit unique distributions of vertical layering that correspond well to the horizontal structure of cloud properties. Matching the derived WSs with vertical velocity measurements shows a normal progression in dynamic regime when moving from the most convective to the least convective WS. Time trend analysis of the WSs shows a sharp increase of the fair-weather WS in the 1990s and a flattening of that increase in the 2000s. The fact that the fair-weather WS is the one with the lowest cloud radiative cooling capability implies that this behavior has contributed excess radiative warming to the global radiative budget during the 1990s.

  19. Distributed networks enable advances in US space weather operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Bouwer, S. Dave

    2011-06-01

    Space weather, the shorter-term variable impact of the Sun’s photons, solar wind particles, and interplanetary magnetic field upon the Earth’s environment, adversely affects our technological systems. These technological systems, including their space component, are increasingly being seen as a way to help solve 21st Century problems such as climate change, energy access, fresh water availability, and transportation coordination. Thus, the effects of space weather on space systems and assets must be mitigated and operational space weather using automated distributed networks has emerged as a common operations methodology. The evolution of space weather operations is described and the description of distributed network architectures is provided, including their use of tiers, data objects, redundancy, and time domain definitions. There are several existing distributed networks now providing space weather information and the lessons learned in developing those networks are discussed along with the details of examples for the Solar Irradiance Platform (SIP), Communication Alert and Prediction System (CAPS), GEO Alert and Prediction System (GAPS), LEO Alert and Prediction System (LAPS), Radiation Alert and Prediction System (RAPS), and Magnetosphere Alert and Prediction System (MAPS).

  20. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite - Performance, Reliability and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krawczyk, Richard J.; Ignaczak, Louis R.

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Satellite (ACTS) was conceived and developed in the mid- 1980s as an experimental satellite to demonstrate unproven Ka-band technology, and potential new commercial applications and services. Since launch into geostationary orbit in September 1993. ACTS has accumulated almost seven years of essentially trouble-free operation and met all program objectives. The unique technology, service experiments. and system level demonstrations accomplished by ACTS have been reported in many forums over the past several years. As ACTS completes its final experiments activity, this paper will relate the top-level program goals that have been achieved in the design, operation, and performance of the particular satellite subsystems. Pre-launch decisions to ensure satellite reliability and the subsequent operational experiences contribute to lessons learned that may be applicable to other comsat programs.

  1. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS): Four-Year System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Bauer, Robert; Krawczyk, Richard J.; Reinhart, Richard C.; Zernic, Michael J.; Gargione, Frank

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) was conceived at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the late 1970's as a follow-on program to ATS and CTS to continue NASA's long history of satellite communications projects. The ACTS project set the stage for the C-band satellites that started the industry, and later the ACTS project established the use of Ku-band for video distribution and direct-to-home broadcasting. ACTS, launched in September 1993 from the space shuttle, created a revolution in satellite system architecture by using digital communications techniques employing key technologies such as a fast hopping multibeam antenna, an on-board baseband processor, a wide-band microwave switch matrix, adaptive rain fade compensation, and the use of 900 MHz transponders operating at Ka-band frequencies. This paper describes the lessons learned in each of the key ACTS technology areas, as well as in the propagation investigations.

  2. New Opportunities with the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) ACTS program review; 2) Spot beam locations; 3) Key ACTS technologies; 4) ACTS accomplishments; 5) Experiments operations; 6) Inclined orbit opportunity, mission and impact; 7) Modifications summary; 8) Experiment opportunity, categories, processes; and 9) Recent and ongoing activity.

  3. Post Launch Calibration and Testing of the Advanced Baseline Imager on the GOES-R Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebair, William; Rollins, C.; Kline, John; Todirita, M.; Kronenwetter, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R (GOES-R) series is the planned next generation of operational weather satellites for the United State's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The first launch of the GOES-R series is planned for October 2016. The GOES-R series satellites and instruments are being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). One of the key instruments on the GOES-R series is the Advance Baseline Imager (ABI). The ABI is a multi-channel, visible through infrared, passive imaging radiometer. The ABI will provide moderate spatial and spectral resolution at high temporal and radiometric resolution to accurately monitor rapidly changing weather. Initial on-orbit calibration and performance characterization is crucial to establishing baseline used to maintain performance throughout mission life. A series of tests has been planned to establish the post launch performance and establish the parameters needed to process the data in the Ground Processing Algorithm. The large number of detectors for each channel required to provide the needed temporal coverage presents unique challenges for accurately calibrating ABI and minimizing striping. This paper discusses the planned tests to be performed on ABI over the six-month Post Launch Test period and the expected performance as it relates to ground tests.

  4. Post launch calibration and testing of the Advanced Baseline Imager on the GOES-R satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebair, William; Rollins, C.; Kline, John; Todirita, M.; Kronenwetter, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R (GOES-R) series is the planned next generation of operational weather satellites for the United State's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The first launch of the GOES-R series is planned for October 2016. The GOES-R series satellites and instruments are being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). One of the key instruments on the GOES-R series is the Advance Baseline Imager (ABI). The ABI is a multi-channel, visible through infrared, passive imaging radiometer. The ABI will provide moderate spatial and spectral resolution at high temporal and radiometric resolution to accurately monitor rapidly changing weather. Initial on-orbit calibration and performance characterization is crucial to establishing baseline used to maintain performance throughout mission life. A series of tests has been planned to establish the post launch performance and establish the parameters needed to process the data in the Ground Processing Algorithm. The large number of detectors for each channel required to provide the needed temporal coverage presents unique challenges for accurately calibrating ABI and minimizing striping. This paper discusses the planned tests to be performed on ABI over the six-month Post Launch Test period and the expected performance as it relates to ground tests.

  5. Influence of Space Weather Effects on the Upper Atmosphere According to the Drag of Artificial Earth Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komendant, V. H.; Koshkin, N. I.; Ryabov, M. I.; Sukharev, A. L.

    The applying of the method of timefrequency analysis allows to reveal the detailed structure of the manifestations of the influence of the space weather's state on the upper atmosphere of the Earth. The sensitive indicator of such changes are low-orbit satellites. The drag dynamics of five low-orbit satellites was viewed as indicators manifestations of the influence of space weather on the Earth upper atmosphere. The study period includes phases of decay and a long minimum of 23-rd solar cycle, phases of growth and maximum of 24-th solar cycle. In drag dynamics of all the analyzed satellites strongly marked regular drag effects with long periods (2-4 years) and short-period effects with periods less than one year. The satellites with orbital inclinations close to the equator shows periods with trend from 25 days to 1,3 months.

  6. Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) multibeam antenna technology verification experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Larko, Jeffrey M.; Lagin, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) is a key to reaching NASA's goal of developing high-risk, advanced communications technology using multiple frequency bands to support the nation's future communication needs. Using the multiple, dynamic hopping spot beams, and advanced on board switching and processing systems, ACTS will open a new era in communications satellite technology. One of the key technologies to be validated as part of the ACTS program is the multibeam antenna with rapidly reconfigurable hopping and fixed spot beam to serve users equipped with small-aperature terminals within the coverage areas. The proposed antenna technology experiments are designed to evaluate in-orbit ACTS multibeam antenna performance (radiation pattern, gain, cross pol levels, etc.).

  7. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite Now Operating in an Inclined Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) system has been modified to support operation in an inclined orbit that is virtually transparent to users, and plans are to continue this final phase of its operation through September 2000. The next 2 years of ACTS will provide a new opportunity for using the technologies that this system brought online over 5 years ago and that are still being used to resolve the technical issues that face NASA and the satellite industry in the area of seamless networking and interoperability with terrestrial systems. New goals for ACTS have been defined that align the program with recent changes in NASA and industry. ACTS will be used as a testbed to: Show how NASA and other Government agencies can use commercial systems for 1. future support of their operations Test, characterize, and resolve technical issues in using advanced communications 2. protocols such as asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) and transmission control protocol/Internet protocol (TCP/IP) over long latency links as found when interoperating satellites with terrestrial systems Evaluate narrow-spot-beam Ka-band satellite operation in an inclined orbit 3. Verify Ka-band satellite technologies since no other Ka-band system is yet 4. available in the United States

  8. Innovative Networking Concepts Tested on the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Daniel; Gupta, Sonjai; Zhang, Chuanguo; Ephremides, Anthony

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a program of experiments conducted over the advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) and the associated TI-VSAT (very small aperture terminal). The experiments were motivated by the commercial potential of low-cost receive only satellite terminals that can operate in a hybrid network environment, and by the desire to demonstrate frame relay technology over satellite networks. The first experiment tested highly adaptive methods of satellite bandwidth allocation in an integrated voice-data service environment. The second involved comparison of forward error correction (FEC) and automatic repeat request (ARQ) methods of error control for satellite communication with emphasis on the advantage that a hybrid architecture provides, especially in the case of multicasts. Finally, the third experiment demonstrated hybrid access to databases and compared the performance of internetworking protocols for interconnecting local area networks (LANs) via satellite. A custom unit termed frame relay access switch (FRACS) was developed by COMSAT Laboratories for these experiments; the preparation and conduct of these experiments involved a total of 20 people from the University of Maryland, the University of Colorado and COMSAT Laboratories, from late 1992 until 1995.

  9. Solar Power Satellite Development: Advances in Modularity and Mechanical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Dorsey, John T.; Watson, Judith J.

    2010-01-01

    Space solar power satellites require innovative concepts in order to achieve economically and technically feasible designs. The mass and volume constraints of current and planned launch vehicles necessitate highly efficient structural systems be developed. In addition, modularity and in-space deployment will be enabling design attributes. This paper reviews the current challenges of launching and building very large space systems. A building block approach is proposed in order to achieve near-term solar power satellite risk reduction while promoting the necessary long-term technology advances. Promising mechanical systems technologies anticipated in the coming decades including modularity, material systems, structural concepts, and in-space operations are described

  10. The advanced stellar compass onboard the Oersted satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, John L.; Liebe, Carl Christian; Eisenman, Allan R.; Jensen, Gunnar B.

    1997-01-01

    The advanced stellar compass (ASC) star tracker installed onboard the Danish Oersted satellite designed to map the earth's magnetic vector field is presented. The ASC instrument will provide attitude data for the satellite and its payload. It consists of a CCD camera connected to a microcomputer, and operates by comparing star images from camera frames with its internal star catalogs. The instrument design is detailed, considering its key parameters, operating principles, and the different types of noise and error sources. A ground-based real sky evaluation and the calibration of the ASC are reported.

  11. Advances in Optimizing Weather Driven Electric Power Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clack, C.; MacDonald, A. E.; Alexander, A.; Dunbar, A. D.; Xie, Y.; Wilczak, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of weather-driven renewable energies for the United States (and global) energy portfolio is growing. The main perceived problems with weather-driven renewable energies are their intermittent nature, low power density, and high costs. The National Energy with Weather System Simulator (NEWS) is a mathematical optimization tool that allows the construction of weather-driven energy sources that will work in harmony with the needs of the system. For example, it will match the electric load, reduce variability, decrease costs, and abate carbon emissions. One important test run included existing US carbon-free power sources, natural gas power when needed, and a High Voltage Direct Current power transmission network. This study shows that the costs and carbon emissions from an optimally designed national system decrease with geographic size. It shows that with achievable estimates of wind and solar generation costs, that the US could decrease its carbon emissions by up to 80% by the early 2030s, without an increase in electric costs. The key requirement would be a 48 state network of HVDC transmission, creating a national market for electricity not possible in the current AC grid. These results were found without the need for storage. Further, we tested the effect of changing natural gas fuel prices on the optimal configuration of the national electric power system. Another test that was carried out was an extension to global regions. The extension study shows that the same properties found in the US study extend to the most populous regions of the planet. The extra test is a simplified version of the US study, and is where much more research can be carried out. We compare our results to other model results.

  12. Performance of Nickel-Cadmium Batteries on the GOES I-K Series of Weather Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Sat P.; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Alsbach, Walter G.

    1997-01-01

    The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) spacecraft (among others) to support weather forecasting, severe storm tracking, and meteorological research by the National Weather Service (NWS). The latest in the GOES series consists of 5 spacecraft (originally named GOES I-M), three of which are in orbit and two more in development. Each of five spacecraft carry two Nickel-Cadmium batteries, with batteries designed and manufactured by Space Systems Loral (SS/L) and cells manufactured by Gates Aerospace Batteries (sold to SAFT in 1993). The battery, which consists of 28 cells with a 12 Ah capacity, provides the spacecraft power needs during the ascent phase and during the semi-annual eclipse seasons lasting for approximately 45 days each. The maximum duration eclipses are 72 minutes long which result in a 60 percent depth of discharge (DOD) of the batteries. This paper provides a description of the batteries, reconditioning setup, DOD profile during a typical eclipse season, and flight performance from the 3 launched spacecraft (now GOES 8, 9, and 10) in orbit.

  13. Performance of Nickel-Cadmium Batteries on the GOES 1-K Series of Weather Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Sat P.; Alsbach, Walter G.; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.

    1998-01-01

    The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) spacecraft (among others) to support weather forecasting, severe storm tracking, and meteorological research by the National Weather Service (NWS). The latest in the GOES series consists of five spacecraft (originally named GOES 1-M), three of which are in orbit and and two more in development. Each of the five spacecraft carries two Nickel-Cadmium battery, with batteries designed by Space Systems Loral (SS/L) and cells manufactured by Gates Aerospace Batteries (sold to SAFT in 1993). The battery, which consists of 28 cells with a 12 Ah capacity, provides the spacecraft power needs during the ascent phase and during the semi-annual eclipse seasons lasting for approximately 45 days each. The maximum duration eclipses are 72 minutes long which result in a 60 percent depth of discharge (DOD) of the batteries. This paper provides a description of the batteries, reconditioning setup, DOD profile during a typical eclipse season, and flight performance from the three launched spacecraft (now GOES 8, 9, and 10) in orbit.

  14. Advanced microelectronics technologies for future small satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkalai, Leon

    2000-03-01

    Future small satellite systems for both Earth observation as well as deep-space exploration are greatly enabled by the technological advances in deep sub-micron microelectronics technologies. Whereas these technological advances are being fueled by the commercial (non-space) industries, more recently there has been an exciting new synergism evolving between the two otherwise disjoint markets. In other words, both the commercial and space industries are enabled by advances in low-power, highly integrated, miniaturized (low-volume), lightweight, and reliable real-time embedded systems. Recent announcements by commercial semiconductor manufacturers to introduce Silicon On Insulator (SOI) technology into their commercial product lines is driven by the need for high-performance low-power integrated devices. Moreover, SOI has been the technology of choice for many space semiconductor manufacturers where radiation requirements are critical. This technology has inherent radiation latch-up immunity built into the process, which makes it very attractive to space applications. In this paper, we describe the advanced microelectronics and avionics technologies under development by NASA's Deep Space Systems Technology Program (also known as X2000). These technologies are of significant benefit to both the commercial satellite as well as the deep-space and Earth orbiting science missions. Such a synergistic technology roadmap may truly enable quick turn-around, low-cost, and highly capable small satellite systems for both Earth observation as well as deep-space missions.

  15. Advanced Microelectronics Technologies for Future Small Satellite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkalai, Leon

    1999-01-01

    Future small satellite systems for both Earth observation as well as deep-space exploration are greatly enabled by the technological advances in deep sub-micron microelectronics technologies. Whereas these technological advances are being fueled by the commercial (non-space) industries, more recently there has been an exciting new synergism evolving between the two otherwise disjointed markets. In other words, both the commercial and space industries are enabled by advances in low-power, highly integrated, miniaturized (low-volume), lightweight, and reliable real-time embedded systems. Recent announcements by commercial semiconductor manufacturers to introduce Silicon On Insulator (SOI) technology into their commercial product lines is driven by the need for high-performance low-power integrated devices. Moreover, SOI has been the technology of choice for many space semiconductor manufacturers where radiation requirements are critical. This technology has inherent radiation latch-up immunity built into the process, which makes it very attractive to space applications. In this paper, we describe the advanced microelectronics and avionics technologies under development by NASA's Deep Space Systems Technology Program (also known as X2000). These technologies are of significant benefit to both the commercial satellite as well as the deep-space and Earth orbiting science missions. Such a synergistic technology roadmap may truly enable quick turn-around, low-cost, and highly capable small satellite systems for both Earth observation as well as deep-space missions.

  16. Space weather effects on Solid State detectors on low altitude polar orbiting satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesnes Ødegaard, Linn-Kristine; Sandanger, Marit; Søraas, Finn; Nesse Tyssøy, Hilde; Stadsnes, Johan

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the degradation of the Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED) on board the Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) with respect to isolated events that severely accelerate the detector degradation. It is known that the proton detectors of the MEPED instrument are subjected over time to radiation damage. This is manifested with an increase in the energy thresholds of the detectors due to a thicker dead layer at the front of the detector as well as damage to the silicon lattice within the detector leading to reduced charge collection. By comparing energy spectra of old and recently launched POES the changes in the energy levels of the detectors can be monitored. Our preliminary analyses indicates that, on top of the gradually increase in the energy levels, there are rapid changes in these levels during SEP (Solar Energetic Particle) events and geomagnetic storms. These single events thus accelerate the degradation of the detectors, and can give information on Space Weather effects on satellite instrumentation.

  17. Using Satellite Imagery with ET Weather Station Networks to Map Crop Water Use for Irrigation Scheduling: TOPS-SIMS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evapotranspiration estimates for scheduling irrigation must be field specific and real time. Weather station networks provide daily reference ET values, but users need to select crop coefficients for their particular crop and field. A prototype system has been developed that combines satellite image...

  18. Current and Future Applications of Multispectral (RGB) Satellite Imagery for Weather Analysis and Forecasting Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Fuell, Kevin K.; LaFontaine, Frank; McGrath, Kevin; Smith, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Current and future satellite sensors provide remotely sensed quantities from a variety of wavelengths ranging from the visible to the passive microwave, from both geostationary and low ]Earth orbits. The NASA Short ]term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has a long history of providing multispectral imagery from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA fs Terra and Aqua satellites in support of NWS forecast office activities. Products from MODIS have recently been extended to include a broader suite of multispectral imagery similar to those developed by EUMETSAT, based upon the spectral channels available from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) aboard METEOSAT ]9. This broader suite includes products that discriminate between air mass types associated with synoptic ]scale features, assists in the identification of dust, and improves upon paired channel difference detection of fog and low cloud events. Future instruments will continue the availability of these products and also expand upon current capabilities. The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) on GOES ]R will improve the spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution of our current geostationary capabilities, and the recent launch of the Suomi National Polar ]Orbiting Partnership (S ]NPP) carries instruments such as the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), the Cross ]track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS), which have unrivaled spectral and spatial resolution, as precursors to the JPSS era (i.e., the next generation of polar orbiting satellites. New applications from VIIRS extend multispectral composites available from MODIS and SEVIRI while adding new capabilities through incorporation of additional CrIS channels or information from the Near Constant Contrast or gDay ]Night Band h, which provides moonlit reflectance from clouds and detection of fires or city lights. This presentation will

  19. Nimbus-F to carry advanced weather instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Meteorological research instruments launched aboard NASA's Nimbus-F spacecraft are briefly described along with the Nimbus satellite program initiated to develop an observatory system capable of meeting the research and development needs of the nation's atmospheric and earth sciences program. The following aspects of the mission are described: spacecraft design, launch operations, sequence of orbital events, and operations control and tracking. The Global Atmospheric Research program is discussed in terms of the Nimbus-F experiments and atmospheric sounding instruments.

  20. Concept for advanced satellite communications and required technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramler, J. R.; Salzman, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) program of NASA is aimed at the development of high risk technologies that will enable exploiting higher frequency bands and techniques for improving frequency reuse. The technologies under development include multiple beam spacecraft antennas, on-board switching and processing, RF devices and components and advanced earth stations. The program focus is on the Ka-band (30/20 GHz) as the implementing frequency since it has five times the bandwidth of either the C- or Ku-bands. However, the technology being developed is applicable to other frequency bands as well and will support a wide range of future communications systems required by NASA, other Government agencies and the commercial sector. An overview is presented of an operational 30/20 GHz satellite system that may evolve. How the system addresses service requirements is discussed, and the technology required and being developed is considered. Previously announced in STAR as N83-11210

  1. Concept for advanced satellite communications and required technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramler, J. R.; Salzman, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) program of NASA is aimed at the development of high risk technologies that will enable exploiting higher frequency bands and techniques for improving frequency reuse. The technologies under development include multiple beam spacecraft antennas, on-board switching and processing, RF devices and components and advanced Earth stations. The program focus is on the Ka-band (30/20 GHz) as the implementing frequency since it has five times the bandwidth of either the C- or Ku-bands. However, the technology being developed is applicable to other frequency bands as well and will support a wide range of future communications systems required by NASA, other Government agencies and the commercial sector. An overview is presented of an operational 30/20 GHz satellite system that may evolve. How the system addresses service requirements is discussed, and the technology required and being developed is considered.

  2. Attitude Control Subsystem for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewston, Alan W.; Mitchell, Kent A.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the on-orbit operation of the Attitude Control Subsystem (ACS) for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The three ACTS control axes are defined, including the means for sensing attitude and determining the pointing errors. The desired pointing requirements for various modes of control as well as the disturbance torques that oppose the control are identified. Finally, the hardware actuators and control loops utilized to reduce the attitude error are described.

  3. a Roadmap to Advance Understanding of the Science of Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, K.; Kauristie, K.; Aylward, A.; De Nardin, C. M.; Gibson, S. E.; Glover, A.; Gopalswamy, N.; Grande, M.; Hapgood, M. A.; Heynderickx, D.; Jakowski, N.; Kalegaev, V. V.; Lapenta, G.; Linker, J.; Liu, S.; Mandrini, C. H.; Mann, I. R.; Nagatsuma, T.; Nandy, D.; Obara, T.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Onsager, T. G.; Opgenoorth, H. J.; Terkildsen, M. B.; Valladares, C. E.; Vilmer, N.

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing appreciation that the environmental conditions that we call space weather impact the technological infrastructure that powers the coupled economies around the world. With that comes the need to better shield society against space weather by improving forecasts, environmental specifications, and infrastructure design. A COSPAR/ILWS team recently completed a roadmap that identifies the scientific focus areas and research infrastructure that are needed to significantly advance our understanding of space weather of all intensities and of its implications and costs for society. This presentation provides a summary of the highest-priority recommendations from that roadmap.

  4. Development and Application of Advanced Weather Prediction Technologies for the Wind Energy Industry (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, W. P.; Wiener, G.; Liu, Y.; Myers, W.; Johnson, D.

    2010-12-01

    Wind energy decision makers are required to make critical judgments on a daily basis with regard to energy generation, distribution, demand, storage, and integration. Accurate knowledge of the present and future state of the atmosphere is vital in making these decisions. As wind energy portfolios expand, this forecast problem is taking on new urgency because wind forecast inaccuracies frequently lead to substantial economic losses and constrain the national expansion of renewable energy. Improved weather prediction and precise spatial analysis of small-scale weather events are crucial for renewable energy management. In early 2009, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) began a collaborative project with Xcel Energy Services, Inc. to perform research and develop technologies to improve Xcel Energy's ability to increase the amount of wind energy in their generation portfolio. The agreement and scope of work was designed to provide highly detailed, localized wind energy forecasts to enable Xcel Energy to more efficiently integrate electricity generated from wind into the power grid. The wind prediction technologies are designed to help Xcel Energy operators make critical decisions about powering down traditional coal and natural gas-powered plants when sufficient wind energy is predicted. The wind prediction technologies have been designed to cover Xcel Energy wind resources spanning a region from Wisconsin to New Mexico. The goal of the project is not only to improve Xcel Energy’s wind energy prediction capabilities, but also to make technological advancements in wind and wind energy prediction, expand our knowledge of boundary layer meteorology, and share the results across the renewable energy industry. To generate wind energy forecasts, NCAR is incorporating observations of current atmospheric conditions from a variety of sources including satellites, aircraft, weather radars, ground-based weather stations, wind profilers, and even wind sensors on

  5. Pre-Launch Characterization of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) on the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 Satellite (JPSS-1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Edward; Leslie, Vince; Lyu, Joseph; Smith, Craig; McCormick, Lisa; Anderson, Kent

    2016-04-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is the newest generation of microwave sounder in the international fleet of polar-orbiting weather satellites, replacing the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) which first entered service in 1998. The first ATMS was launched aboard the Suomi NPP (S-NPP) satellite in late 2011. The second ATMS is manifested on the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 Satellite (JPSS-1). ATMS provides 22 channels of temperature and humidity sounding observations over a frequency range from 23 to 183 GHz. These microwave soundings provide the highest impact data ingested by operational Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models, and are the most critical of the polar-orbiting satellite observations, particularly because microwave sensing can penetrate clouds. This paper will present performance characterizations from pre-launch calibration measurements of the JPSS-1 ATMS just completed in December, 2015. The measurements were conducted in a thermal vacuum chamber with blackbody targets simulating cold space, ambient, and a variable Earth scene. They represent the best opportunity for calibration characterization of the instrument since the environment can be carefully controlled. We will present characterizations of the sensitivity (NEDT), accuracy, nonlinearity, noise spectral characteristics, gain stability, repeatability, and inter-channel correlation. An estimate of expected "striping" will be presented, and a discussion of reflector emissivity effects will also be provided. Comparisons will be made with the S-NPP flight unit. Finally, we will describe planned on-orbit characterizations - such as pitch and roll maneuvers - that will further improve both the measurement quality and the understanding of various error contributions.

  6. Verifying the Accuracy of Geostationary Weather Satellite Image Navigation and Registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, J. L.; Herndon, D.; Reehl, S.

    2012-12-01

    The next generation GOES-R geostationary weather satellites will provide imagery products with improved spatial and temporal resolutions and with more spectral bands than previous systems. Image Navigation and Registration (INR), which enables users to accurately pinpoint severe weather and stabilizes movie loops, will also improve. As INR performance improves, so must the technology for measuring INR performance. We describe our Product Monitoring (PM) system being deployed with the GOES-R ground system. It automatically measures INR performance using landmarks that are positioned with respect to a digital map created from the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM). Performance testing with Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) proxy data is part of the verification of the PM system, which is the main focus of this paper. A legacy system ironically called the Replacement Product Monitor (RPM) is in operational use on the GOES-NOP program. It is generally assumed that this system is capable of measuring the absolute position of landmark features relative to their mapped locations with an accuracy of about 0.5 pixels. This is plausible given that observed INR navigation error is about 1 pixel at the finest GOES-NOP resolution. However, a few landmark sites are observed to have biases possibly related to mapping error in the legacy digital map (not SRTM). Because the GOES-R system has finer spatial resolution than the GOES-NOP system and more stringent INR requirements, errors at the GOES-NOP pixel level are quite important. Our verification work with the GOES-R PM seeks to systematically characterize the measurement errors in a controlled test environment to demonstrate its suitability for a GOES-R mission with finer spatial resolution and more stringent INR requirements in comparison with GOES-NOP.

  7. Tropical Cyclone Activity in the North Atlantic Basin During the Weather Satellite Era, 1960-2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    This Technical Publication (TP) represents an extension of previous work concerning the tropical cyclone activity in the North Atlantic basin during the weather satellite era, 1960-2014, in particular, that of an article published in The Journal of the Alabama Academy of Science. With the launch of the TIROS-1 polar-orbiting satellite in April 1960, a new era of global weather observation and monitoring began. Prior to this, the conditions of the North Atlantic basin were determined only from ship reports, island reports, and long-range aircraft reconnaissance. Consequently, storms that formed far from land, away from shipping lanes, and beyond the reach of aircraft possibly could be missed altogether, thereby leading to an underestimate of the true number of tropical cyclones forming in the basin. Additionally, new analysis techniques have come into use which sometimes has led to the inclusion of one or more storms at the end of a nominal hurricane season that otherwise would not have been included. In this TP, examined are the yearly (or seasonal) and 10-year moving average (10-year moving average) values of the (1) first storm day (FSD), last storm day (LSD), and length of season (LOS); (2) frequencies of tropical cyclones (by class); (3) average peak 1-minute sustained wind speed () and average lowest pressure (); (4) average genesis location in terms of north latitudinal () and west longitudinal () positions; (5) sum and average power dissipation index (); (6) sum and average accumulated cyclone energy (); (7) sum and average number of storm days (); (8) sum of the number of hurricane days (NHD) and number of major hurricane days (NMHD); (9) net tropical cyclone activity index (NTCA); (10) largest individual storm (LIS) PWS, LP, PDI, ACE, NSD, NHD, NMHD; and (11) number of category 4 and 5 hurricanes (N4/5). Also examined are the December-May (D-M) and June-November (J-N) averages and 10-year moving average values of

  8. Near-Real Time Satellite-Retrieved Cloud and Surface Properties for Weather and Aviation Safety Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, Patrick; Smith, William L., Jr.; Bedka, Kristopher M.; Nguyen, Louis; Palikonda, Rabindra; Hong, Gang; Trepte, Qing Z.; Chee, Thad; Scarino, Benjamin; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Sun-Mack, Szedung; Fleeger, Cecilia; Ayers, J. Kirk; Chang, Fu-Lung; Heck, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Cloud properties determined from satellite imager radiances provide a valuable source of information for nowcasting and weather forecasting. In recent years, it has been shown that assimilation of cloud top temperature, optical depth, and total water path can increase the accuracies of weather analyses and forecasts. Aircraft icing conditions can be accurately diagnosed in near-­-real time (NRT) retrievals of cloud effective particle size, phase, and water path, providing valuable data for pilots. NRT retrievals of surface skin temperature can also be assimilated in numerical weather prediction models to provide more accurate representations of solar heating and longwave cooling at the surface, where convective initiation. These and other applications are being exploited more frequently as the value of NRT cloud data become recognized. At NASA Langley, cloud properties and surface skin temperature are being retrieved in near-­-real time globally from both geostationary (GEO) and low-­-earth orbiting (LEO) satellite imagers for weather model assimilation and nowcasting for hazards such as aircraft icing. Cloud data from GEO satellites over North America are disseminated through NCEP, while those data and global LEO and GEO retrievals are disseminated from a Langley website. This paper presents an overview of the various available datasets, provides examples of their application, and discusses the use of the various datasets downstream. Future challenges and areas of improvement are also presented.

  9. Near-Real Time Satellite-Retrieved Cloud and Surface Properties for Weather and Aviation Safety Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnis, P.; Smith, W., Jr.; Bedka, K. M.; Nguyen, L.; Palikonda, R.; Hong, G.; Trepte, Q.; Chee, T.; Scarino, B. R.; Spangenberg, D.; Sun-Mack, S.; Fleeger, C.; Ayers, J. K.; Chang, F. L.; Heck, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud properties determined from satellite imager radiances provide a valuable source of information for nowcasting and weather forecasting. In recent years, it has been shown that assimilation of cloud top temperature, optical depth, and total water path can increase the accuracies of weather analyses and forecasts. Aircraft icing conditions can be accurately diagnosed in near-real time (NRT) retrievals of cloud effective particle size, phase, and water path, providing valuable data for pilots. NRT retrievals of surface skin temperature can also be assimilated in numerical weather prediction models to provide more accurate representations of solar heating and longwave cooling at the surface, where convective initiation. These and other applications are being exploited more frequently as the value of NRT cloud data become recognized. At NASA Langley, cloud properties and surface skin temperature are being retrieved in near-real time globally from both geostationary (GEO) and low-earth orbiting (LEO) satellite imagers for weather model assimilation and nowcasting for hazards such as aircraft icing. Cloud data from GEO satellites over North America are disseminated through NCEP, while those data and global LEO and GEO retrievals are disseminated from a Langley website. This paper presents an overview of the various available datasets, provides examples of their application, and discusses the use of the various datasets downstream. Future challenges and areas of improvement are also presented.

  10. Improving stream temperature model predictions using high-resolution satellite-derived numerical weather forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, A.; Danner, E.; Lindley, S.; Melton, F. S.; Nemani, R. R.; Hashimoto, H.; Rajagopalan, B.; Caldwell, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    In the Central Valley of California, stream temperature is a critical indicator of habitat quality for endangered salmonid species and affects re-licensing of major water projects and dam operations worth billions of dollars. However, many water resource-related decisions in regulated rivers rely upon models using a daily-to-monthly mean temperature standard. Furthermore, current water temperature models are limited by the lack of spatially detailed meteorological forecasts. To address this issue, we utilize the coupled TOPS-WRF (Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System - Weather Research and Forecasting) framework—a high-resolution (15min, 1km) assimilation of satellite-derived meteorological observations and numerical weather forecasts— to improve the spatial and temporal resolution of stream temperature predictions. In this study, we developed a high-resolution mechanistic 1-dimensional stream temperature model (sub-hourly time step, sub-kilometer spatial resolution) for the Upper Sacramento River in northern California. The model uses a heat budget approach to calculate the rate of heat transfer to/from the river. Inputs for the heat budget formulation are atmospheric variables provided by the TOPS-WRF model. The hydrodynamics of the river (flow velocity and channel geometry) are characterized using densely-spaced channel cross-sections and flow data. Water temperatures are calculated by considering the hydrologic and thermal characteristics of the river and solving the advection-diffusion equation in a mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian framework. Modeled hindcasted temperatures for a test period (May - November 2008) substantially improve upon the existing daily-to-monthly mean temperature standards. Modeled values closely approximate both the magnitude and the phase of measured water temperatures. Furthermore, our model results reveal important longitudinal patterns in diel temperature variation that are unique to regulated rivers, and may be critical to

  11. Proceedings of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Conference 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert (Editor); Derwae, Robert (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The ACTS experiments program, which began in December 1993 and consisted of 103 different experiments, has made significant contributions to minimizing the risk of advanced satellite communications technology. The ACTS Conference 2000 (AC2000) was held to report the results of the program since the last ACTS conference was held in 1995 and to celebrate the end of a very successful satellite program. The conference was held on May 31, 2000, as part of the 6th Ka-band Utilization Conference in Cleveland, Ohio. Approximately 280 representatives of industry, academia, and government attended. The conference was organized into two parts: a technical session during the day and an evening reception. During the day, a series of five technical sessions included presentations of 17 papers covering the results of the experiment activity and technical performance of the satellite. In the evening, a reception was held to celebrate the end of the ACTS Experiments Program on one of NASA's most successful experimental communications satellite. These proceedings were developed to capture the entire event, including the evening reception.

  12. Advanced mobile satellite communications system using Ka and MM-wave bands in Japan's R and D satellite project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isobe, Shunkichi; Ohmori, Shingo; Hamamoto, Naokazu; Yamamoto, Minoru

    1991-01-01

    Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) studied an advanced mobile satellite communications system using Ka and millimeter-wave bands in the R&D Satellite project. The project started in 1990 and the satellite will be launched in 1997. On-board multi-beam interconnecting is one of basic functions to realize one-hop connection among Very Small Aperture Terminals (VSATs), mobile, and hand-held terminals in future mobile satellite communications system. An Intermediate Frequency (IF) filter bank and regenerative transponder are suitable for this function. The transponder configuration of an advanced mobile communications mission of the R&D Satellite for experiment is shown. High power transmitters of Ka and millimeter-wave bands, a 3x3 IF filter band and Single Channel Per Carrier/Time Division Multiplexing (SCPC/TDM) regenerative MODEMS, which will be boarded on the R&D Satellite, are being developed for the purpose of studying the feasibility of advanced mobile communications system.

  13. Study of repeater technology for advanced multifunctional communications satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Investigations are presented concerning design concepts and implementation approaches for the satellite communication repeater subsystems of advanced multifunctional satellites. In such systems the important concepts are the use of multiple antenna beams, repeater switching (routing), and efficient spectrum utilization through frequency reuse. An information base on these techniques was developed and tradeoff analyses were made of repeater design concepts, with the work design taken in a broad sense to include modulation beam coverage patterns. There were five major areas of study: requirements analysis and processing; study of interbeam interference in multibeam systems; characterization of multiple-beam switching repeaters; estimation of repeater weight and power for a number of alternatives; and tradeoff analyses based on these weight and power data.

  14. ACTS TDMA network control. [Advanced Communication Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inukai, T.; Campanella, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents basic network control concepts for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) System. Two experimental systems, called the low-burst-rate and high-burst-rate systems, along with ACTS ground system features, are described. The network control issues addressed include frame structures, acquisition and synchronization procedures, coordinated station burst-time plan and satellite-time plan changes, on-board clock control based on ground drift measurements, rain fade control by means of adaptive forward-error-correction (FEC) coding and transmit power augmentation, and reassignment of channel capacities on demand. The NASA ground system, which includes a primary station, diversity station, and master control station, is also described.

  15. From scientific understanding to operational utility: New concepts and tools for monitoring space weather effects on satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. C.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Denig, W. F.; Redmon, R. J.; Blake, J. B.; Mazur, J. E.; Fennell, J. F.; O'Brien, T. P.; Guild, T. B.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Singer, H. J.; Onsager, T. G.; Wilkinson, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    NOAA space weather sensors have monitored the near Earth space radiation environment for more than three decades providing one of the only long-term records of these energetic particles that can disable satellites and pose a threat to astronauts. These data have demonstrated their value for operations for decades, but they are also invaluable for scientific discovery. Here we describe the development of new NOAA tools for assessing radiation impacts to satellites and astronauts working in space. In particular, we discuss the new system implemented for processing and delivering near real time particle radiation data from the POES/MetOp satellites. We also describe the development of new radiation belt indices from the POES/MetOp data that capture significant global changes in the environment needed for operational decision making. Lastly, we investigate the physical processes responsible for dramatic changes of the inner proton belt region and the potential consequences these new belts may have for satellite operations.

  16. Forecasting ionospheric space weather with applications to satellite drag and radio wave communications and scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannucci, Anthony J.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Verkhoglyadova, Olga P.; Meng, Xing; Pi, Xiaoqing; Kuang, Da; Wang, Chunming; Rosen, Gary; Ridley, Aaron; Lynch, Erin; Sharma, Surja; Manchester, Ward B.; van der Holst, Bart

    2015-04-01

    The development of quantitative models that describe physical processes from the solar corona to the Earth’s upper atmosphere opens the possibility of numerical space weather prediction with a lead-time of a few days. Forecasting solar wind-driven variability in the ionosphere and thermosphere poses especially stringent tests of our scientific understanding and modeling capabilities, in particular of coupling processes to regions above and below. We will describe our work with community models to develop upper atmosphere forecasts starting with the solar wind driver. A number of phenomena are relevant, including high latitude energy deposition, its impact on global thermospheric circulation patterns and composition, and global electrodynamics. Improved scientific understanding of this sun to Earth interaction ultimately leads to practical benefits. We will focus on two ways the upper atmosphere affects life on Earth: by changing satellite orbits, and by interfering with long-range radio communications. Challenges in forecasting these impacts will be addressed, with a particular emphasis on the physical bases for the impacts, and how they connect upstream to the sun and the heliosphere.

  17. In situ detections of Space Weather by the LYRA radiometer on board the PROBA2 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsiyannis, Athanassios; Kruglanski, Michel; De Donder, Erwin; Dammasch, Ingolf; Dominique, Marie; Ben Moussa, Ali

    The Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) is an ultraviolet irradiance radiometer on-board ESA's PROBA2 micro-satellite. Since it's launch in 2009 it observes the Sun in four different passbands, chosen for their relevance to solar physics, aeronomy and space weather. Flying on an altitude of 735km, LYRA proved to be an excellent flare monitor and is involved in the analysis the atmospheric composition of the Earth. One of the most peculiar and intriguing results of LYRA is the detection of short, strong, bursts that do not directly correlate with solar coronal events, nor with pointing of the instrument to Earth's upper atmosphere, but correlate well with high K_{p} index on Earth's surface. As LYRA has the ability to observe in four different UV bandpasses, the comparison between the filters that allow the detection of this activity versus those that do not, reveals very interesting results as to the nature of those detections. This contribution will focus on the investigation and identification of this phenomenon and it will include crucial comparisons to other space-born instruments that do not detect the same effect.

  18. Study of a Winter Monsoon Front over the South China Sea by Multi-Sensor Satellite and Weather Radar Data, and a Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpers, Werner; Wong, Wai Kin; Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Chan, Pak Wai

    2013-03-01

    An atmospheric frontal system over the South China Sea (SCS) arising from the replenishment of the northeast monsoon is investigated by using multi-sensor satellite data, weather radar data, and a numerical model. The replenishment or freshening of the northeast monsoon results from the merging of high pressure areas over the Chinese Continent. The near-sea surface wind field associated with this event was measured by the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) onboard the European MetOp satellite and the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) onboard the European Envisat satellite. The high resolution ASAR image reveals that the frontal line separating this wind field from the synoptic-scale ambient wind field is as sharp as in the case of a cold air outbreak and contains embedded rain cells. Furthermore, it shows that this replenishment was associated with northeasterly winds with speeds of up to 13 ms-1 over the SCS at offshore distances larger than 60 km, but only with speeds of around 6 ms-1 near the coast. The comparison of the observational data with model results of the pre-operational version of the AIR (Atmospheric Integrated Rapid-cycle) forecast model of the Hong Kong Observatory shows that the AIR model can successfully simulate the time evolution of the frontal system and the wind field over the open ocean, but fails to simulate the wind field near the coast.

  19. Assimilation of Satellite Based Soil Moisture Data in the National Weather Service's Flash Flood Guidance System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, D.; Lakhankar, T.; Cosgrove, B.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change and variability increases the probability of frequency, timing, intensity, and duration of flood events. After rainfall, soil moisture is the most important factor dictating flash flooding, since rainfall infiltration and runoff are based on the saturation of the soil. It is difficult to conduct ground-based measurements of soil moisture consistently and regionally. As such, soil moisture is often derived from models and agencies such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Weather Service (NOAA/NWS) use proxy estimates of soil moisture at the surface in order support operational flood forecasting. In particular, a daily national map of Flash Flood Guidance (FFG) is produced that is based on surface soil moisture deficit and threshold runoff estimates. Flash flood warnings are issued by Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) and are underpinned by information from the Flash Flood Guidance (FFG) system operated by the River Forecast Centers (RFCs). This study analyzes the accuracy and limitations of the FFG system using reported flash flood cases in 2010 and 2011. The flash flood reports were obtained from the NWS Storm Event database for the Arkansas-Red Basin RFC (ABRFC). The current FFG system at the ABRFC provides gridded flash flood guidance (GFFG) System using the NWS Hydrology Laboratory-Research Distributed Hydrologic Model (HL-RDHM) to translate the upper zone soil moisture to estimates of Soil Conservation Service Curve Numbers. Comparison of the GFFG and real-time Multi-sensor Precipitation Estimator derived Quantitative Precipitation Estimate (QPE) for the same duration and location were used to analyze the success of the system. Improved flash flood forecasting requires accurate and high resolution soil surface information. The remote sensing observations of soil moisture can improve the flood forecasting accuracy. The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellites are two

  20. Regular and sporadic demonstration of space weather effects on Earth's upper atmosphere according to dragging of low satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshkin, Nikolay; Ryabov, Mikhail; Komendant, Volodymyr

    Dynamics drag of low orbital artificial satellites as development indicators of a influence of space weather on the upper atmosphere of the Earth is considered. The investigated period which actuates: phases of decrease and a long minimum of the 23rd cycle of solar activity (2005-2008yy), increase phase and a maximum of the 24th cycle of activity (2009-2013yy). In dynamics of drags of all investigated artificial satellites effects as results of x-ray and ultra-violet radiation of high-power solar flares, fluxes of electrons and protons, coronal mass ejection (СМЕ) are distinctly shown. Influences of magnetic storms with the sudden and gradual beginning on dynamics of satellite's drag are investigated. The particular interest represents studying of the periods of common effects of radiation and magnetic storms influence. In the absence of extreme developments of space weather in character of artificial satellites drags various periodic wave processes are shown. Among them there are long-term variations of a geomagnetic field, the gravitational and thermal tidal phenomena in the upper atmosphere etc. The results of identification of the impact of these wave processes on the nature of the artificial satellites drag will be presented.

  1. Advanced satellite workstation: An integrated workstation environment for operational support of satellite system planning and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Stewart A.

    1992-01-01

    A prototype integrated environment, the Advanced Satellite Workstation (ASW), is described that has been developed and delivered for evaluation and operator feedback in an operational satellite control center. The current ASW hardware consists of a Sun Workstation and Macintosh II Workstation connected via an ethernet Network Hardware and Software, Laser Disk System, Optical Storage System, and Telemetry Data File Interface. The central mission of ASW is to provide an intelligent decision support and training environment for operator/analysts of complex systems such as satellites. There have been many workstation implementations recently which incorporate graphical telemetry displays and expert systems. ASW is a considerably broader look at intelligent, integrated environments for decision support, based upon the premise that the central features of such an environment are intelligent data access and integrated toolsets. A variety of tools have been constructed in support of this prototype environment including: an automated pass planner for scheduling vehicle support activities, architectural modeler for hierarchical simulation and analysis of satellite vehicle subsystems, multimedia-based information systems that provide an intuitive and easily accessible interface to Orbit Operations Handbook and other relevant support documentation, and a data analysis architecture that integrates user modifiable telemetry display systems, expert systems for background data analysis, and interfaces to the multimedia system via inter-process communication.

  2. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) capabilities for serving science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Thomas R.

    1990-01-01

    Results of research on potential science applications of the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) are presented. Discussed here are: (1) general research on communications related issues; (2) a survey of science-related activities and programs in the local area; (3) interviews of selected scientists and associated telecommunications support personnel whose projects have communications requirements; (4) analysis of linkages between ACTS functionality and science user communications activities and modes of operation; and (5) an analysis of survey results and the projection of conclusions to a national scale.

  3. The employment of weather satellite imagery in an effort to identify and locate the forest-tundra ecotone in Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldrich, S. A.; Aldrich, F. T.; Rudd, R. D.

    1969-01-01

    Weather satellite imagery provides the only routinely available orbital imagery depicting the high latitudes. Although resolution is low on this imagery, it is believed that a major natural feature, notably linear in expression, should be mappable on it. The transition zone from forest to tundra, the ecotone, is such a feature. Locational correlation is herein established between a linear signature on the imagery and several ground truth positions of the ecotone in Canada.

  4. Proposed Use of the NASA Ames Nebula Cloud Computing Platform for Numerical Weather Prediction and the Distribution of High Resolution Satellite Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2010-01-01

    The development of the Nebula Cloud Computing Platform at NASA Ames Research Center provides an open-source solution for the deployment of scalable computing and storage capabilities relevant to the execution of real-time weather forecasts and the distribution of high resolution satellite data to the operational weather community. Two projects at Marshall Space Flight Center may benefit from use of the Nebula system. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center facilitates the use of unique NASA satellite data and research capabilities in the operational weather community by providing datasets relevant to numerical weather prediction, and satellite data sets useful in weather analysis. SERVIR provides satellite data products for decision support, emphasizing environmental threats such as wildfires, floods, landslides, and other hazards, with interests in numerical weather prediction in support of disaster response. The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model Environmental Modeling System (WRF-EMS) has been configured for Nebula cloud computing use via the creation of a disk image and deployment of repeated instances. Given the available infrastructure within Nebula and the "infrastructure as a service" concept, the system appears well-suited for the rapid deployment of additional forecast models over different domains, in response to real-time research applications or disaster response. Future investigations into Nebula capabilities will focus on the development of a web mapping server and load balancing configuration to support the distribution of high resolution satellite data sets to users within the National Weather Service and international partners of SERVIR.

  5. Weather Information Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Science Communications International (SCI), formerly General Science Corporation, has developed several commercial products based upon experience acquired as a NASA Contractor. Among them are METPRO, a meteorological data acquisition and processing system, which has been widely used, RISKPRO, an environmental assessment system, and MAPPRO, a geographic information system. METPRO software is used to collect weather data from satellites, ground-based observation systems and radio weather broadcasts to generate weather maps, enabling potential disaster areas to receive advance warning. GSC's initial work for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center resulted in METPAK, a weather satellite data analysis system. METPAK led to the commercial METPRO system. The company also provides data to other government agencies, U.S. embassies and foreign countries.

  6. Simulation studies of the impact of advanced observing systems on numerical weather prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R.; Kalnay, E.; Susskind, J.; Reuter, D.; Baker, W. E.; Halem, M.

    1984-01-01

    To study the potential impact of advanced passive sounders and lidar temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind observing systems on large-scale numerical weather prediction, a series of realistic simulation studies between the European Center for medium-range weather forecasts, the National Meteorological Center, and the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences is conducted. The project attempts to avoid the unrealistic character of earlier simulation studies. The previous simulation studies and real-data impact tests are reviewed and the design of the current simulation system is described. Consideration is given to the simulation of observations of space-based sounding systems.

  7. GeoSTAR: Developing a Microwave Sounder for Geostationary Weather Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrigtsen, B.; Wilson, W.; Tanner, A.; Kangaslahti, P.; Gaier, T.; Dinardo, S.; Brown, S.; Piepmeier, J.; Ruf, C.

    2005-12-01

    The Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) is a new concept for a microwave sounder, intended to be deployed on NOAA's next generation of geostationary weather satellites, the GOES-R series. A ground based prototype has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, under NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) sponsorship, and is now undergoing tests and performance characterization. With the aperture synthesis approach used by GeoSTAR it is possible to achieve very high spatial resolutions even in the crucial 50-GHz temperature sounding band without having to deploy the impractically large parabolic reflector antenna that is required with the conventional approach. GeoSTAR will finally, after many years of searching for a solution, make it possible to add a microwave sounder to the GOES instrument suite - a capability that is crucial for monitoring cloudy regions and severe storms. The technology and system design required for GeoSTAR are rapidly maturing, and it is expected that a space demonstration mission can be developed before the first GOES-R launch. GeoSTAR will be ready for operational deployment 2-3 years after that. The prototype developed under IIP implements a small version of the temperature sounding component of GeoSTAR, is fully functional as a sounder and has all of the features and capabilities of an operational system with the exception of spatial resolution. It therefore represents a complete proof of concept as well as significant risk reduction for a space implementation. Further technology risk reduction, with particular focus on the 183-GHz water vapor sounding band, is also under way.

  8. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Used for Inclined Orbit Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) is operated by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. ACTS, which was launched in September 1993, is in its 7th year of operations, far exceeding the system s planned 2 years of operations and 4 years of designed mission life. After 5 successful years of operating as a geostationary satellite, the spacecraft s North-South stationkeeping was discontinued in August 1998. The system is now operating in an inclined orbit that increases at a rate of 0.8 /yr. With only scarce fuel remaining, operating in this mode extends the usage of the still totally functional payload. Although tracking systems are now needed on the experimenter Earth stations, experiment operations have continued with very little disruption. This is the only known geosynchronous Ka-band (30/20 GHz) spot-beam satellite operating in an inclined orbit. The project began its transition from geostationary operations to inclined operations in August 1998. This did not interrupt operations and was transparent to the experimenters on the system. For the space segment, new daily procedures were implemented to maintain the pointing of the system s narrow 0.3 spot beams while the spacecraft drifts in the North-South direction. For the ground segment, modifications were designed, developed, and fielded for the three classes of experimenter Earth stations. With the next generation of commercial satellite systems still being developed, ACTS remains the only operational testbed for Ka-band geosynchronous satellite communications over the Western hemisphere. Since inclined orbit operations began, the ACTS experiments program has supported 43 investigations by industry, Government, and academic organizations, as well as four demonstrations. The project s goals for inclined-orbit operations now reflect a narrower focus in the types of experiments that will be done. In these days of "faster, better, cheaper," NASA is seeking

  9. Scenarios and performance measures for advanced ISDN satellite design and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1991-01-01

    Described here are the contemplated input and expected output for the Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) and Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) Models. The discrete event simulations of these models are presented with specific scenarios that stress ISDN satellite parameters. Performance measure criteria are presented for evaluating the advanced ISDN communication satellite designs of the NASA Satellite Communications Research (SCAR) Program.

  10. Evaluation of Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM with All Weather Gauge Observations over CONUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Qi, Y.; Hu, B.; Hu, J.; Hong, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is composed of an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow. Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) is the state-of-art precipitation products with high spatio-temporal resolution of 0.1°/30min. IMERG unifies precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites with the core sensors dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) and microwave imager (GMI) on board a "Core" satellite. Additionally, IMERG blends the advantages of currently most popular satellite-based quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE) algorithms, i.e. TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), Climate Prediction Center morphing technique (CMORPH), Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks-Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS). The real-time and post real-time IMERG products are now available online at https://stormpps.gsfc.nasa.gov/storm. In this study, the final run post real-time IMERG is evaluated with all-weather manual gauge observations over CONUS from June 2014 through May 2015. Relative Bias (RB), Root-Mean-Squared Error (RMSE), Correlation Coefficient (CC), Probability Of Detection (POD), False Alarm Ratio (FAR), and Critical Success Index (CSI) are used to quantify the performance of IMERG. The performance of IMERG in estimating snowfall precipitation is highlighted in the study. This timely evaluation with all-weather gauge observations is expected to offer insights into performance of IMERG and thus provide useful feedback to the algorithm developers as well as the GPM data users.

  11. The long view of weather: Learning how to read the climate several seasons in advance

    SciTech Connect

    Monastersky, R.

    1993-11-20

    Eighteen countries have participated in a decade-long project, The Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere study, aimed at understanding how the Pacific waters and atmosphere conspire to bring about El Ninos and La Ninas. As part of the study, computer models for predicting when the tropical Pacific will swing toward warm or cool temperatures have been developed. Although this year a subtle el Nino was difficult to anticipate, major warmings and coolings advertise themselves and the models have started to show skill at detecting such events 12-18 months in advance. This article discusses the ramifications of such investigative modeling on other predictions - for example, how weather patterns will be disrupted in the US by El Nino and other 3-6 month weather predictions. General Circulation Models are being used as a basis for these investigations, marking a major shift in meteorlogical philosophy from concentrating on weather statistics, analogies with previous situations, and judgments.

  12. A stochastic ensemble-based model to predict crop water requirements from numerical weather forecasts and VIS-NIR high resolution satellite images in Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelosi, Anna; Falanga Bolognesi, Salvatore; De Michele, Carlo; Medina Gonzalez, Hanoi; Villani, Paolo; D'Urso, Guido; Battista Chirico, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    Irrigation agriculture is one the biggest consumer of water in Europe, especially in southern regions, where it accounts for up to 70% of the total water consumption. The EU Common Agricultural Policy, combined with the Water Framework Directive, imposes to farmers and irrigation managers a substantial increase of the efficiency in the use of water in agriculture for the next decade. Ensemble numerical weather predictions can be valuable data for developing operational advisory irrigation services. We propose a stochastic ensemble-based model providing spatial and temporal estimates of crop water requirements, implemented within an advisory service offering detailed maps of irrigation water requirements and crop water consumption estimates, to be used by water irrigation managers and farmers. The stochastic model combines estimates of crop potential evapotranspiration retrieved from ensemble numerical weather forecasts (COSMO-LEPS, 16 members, 7 km resolution) and canopy parameters (LAI, albedo, fractional vegetation cover) derived from high resolution satellite images in the visible and near infrared wavelengths. The service provides users with daily estimates of crop water requirements for lead times up to five days. The temporal evolution of the crop potential evapotranspiration is simulated with autoregressive models. An ensemble Kalman filter is employed for updating model states by assimilating both ground based meteorological variables (where available) and numerical weather forecasts. The model has been applied in Campania region (Southern Italy), where a satellite assisted irrigation advisory service has been operating since 2006. This work presents the results of the system performance for one year of experimental service. The results suggest that the proposed model can be an effective support for a sustainable use and management of irrigation water, under conditions of water scarcity and drought. Since the evapotranspiration term represents a staple

  13. Advanced solar irradiances applied to satellite and ionospheric operational systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Schunk, Robert; Eccles, Vince; Bouwer, Dave

    Satellite and ionospheric operational systems require solar irradiances in a variety of time scales and spectral formats. We describe the development of a system using operational grade solar irradiances that are applied to empirical thermospheric density models and physics-based ionospheric models used by operational systems that require a space weather characterization. The SOLAR2000 (S2K) and SOLARFLARE (SFLR) models developed by Space Environment Technologies (SET) provide solar irradiances from the soft X-rays (XUV) through the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) spectrum. The irradiances are provided as integrated indices for the JB2006 empirical atmosphere density models and as line/band spectral irradiances for the physics-based Ionosphere Forecast Model (IFM) developed by the Space Environment Corporation (SEC). We describe the integration of these irradiances in historical, current epoch, and forecast modes through the Communication Alert and Prediction System (CAPS). CAPS provides real-time and forecast HF radio availability for global and regional users and global total electron content (TEC) conditions.

  14. The North Carolina Field Test: Field Performance of the Preliminary Version of an Advanced Weatherization Audit for the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, T.R.

    1994-01-01

    The field performance of weatherizations based on a newly-developed advanced technique for selecting residential energy conservation measures was tested alongside current Retro-Tech-based weatherizations in North Carolina. The new technique is computer-based and determines measures based on the needs of an individual house. In addition, it recommends only those measures that it determines will have a benefit-to-cost ratio greater than 1 for the house being evaluated. The new technique also considers the interaction of measures in computing the benefit-to-cost ratio of each measure. The two weatherization approaches were compared based on implementation ease, measures installed, labor and cost requirements, and both heating and cooling energy savings achieved. One-hundred and twenty houses with the following characteristics participated: the occupants were low-income, eligible for North Carolina's current weatherization program, and responsible for their own fuel and electric bills. Houses were detached single-family dwellings, not mobile homes; were heated by kerosene, fuel oil, natural gas, or propane; and had one or two operating window air conditioners. Houses were divided equally into one control group and two weatherization groups. Weekly space heating and cooling energy use, and hourly indoor and outdoor temperatures were monitored between November 1989 and September 1990 (pre-period) and between December 1990 and August 1991 (post-period). House consumption models were used to normalize for annual weather differences and a 68 F indoor temperature. Control group savings were used to adjust the savings determined for the weatherization groups. The two weatherization approaches involved installing attic and floor insulations in near equivalent quantities, and installing storm windows and wall insulation in drastically different quantities. Substantial differences also were found in average air leakage reductions for the two weatherization groups. Average

  15. The ACTS Flight System - Cost-Effective Advanced Communications Technology. [Advanced Communication Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, W. M., Jr.; Beck, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The multibeam communications package (MCP) for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be STS-launched by NASA in 1988 for experimental demonstration of satellite-switched TDMA (at 220 Mbit/sec) and baseband-processor signal routing (at 110 or 27.5 Mbit/sec) is characterized. The developmental history of the ACTS, the program definition, and the spacecraft-bus and MCP parameters are reviewed and illustrated with drawings, block diagrams, and maps of the coverage plan. Advanced features of the MPC include 4.5-dB-noise-figure 30-GHz FET amplifiers and 20-GHz TWTA transmitters which provide either 40-W or 8-W RF output, depending on rain conditions. The technologies being tested in ACTS can give frequency-reuse factors as high as 20, thus greatly expanding the orbit/spectrum resources available for U.S. communications use.

  16. Advancements in design of an autonomous satellite docking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Anthony B.; Tchoryk, Peter, Jr.; Pavlich, Jane C.; Ritter, Greg A.; Wassick, Gregory J.

    2004-08-01

    The past five years has witnessed a significant increase in the attention given to on-orbit satellite docking and servicing. Recent world events have proven how we have come to rely on our space assets, especially during times of crisis. It has become abundantly clear that the ability to autonomously rendezvous, dock, inspect and service both military and civilian assets is no longer a nicety, but a necessity. Reconnaissance and communications satellites, even the space shuttle and International Space Station, could benefit from this capability. Michigan Aerospace Corporation, with funding from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), has been refining a compact, light, compliant soft-docking system. Earlier prototypes have been tested on the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) flat-floor as well as on the Johnson Space Flight Center (JSC) KC-135 micro-gravity aircraft. Over the past year, refinements have been made to the mechanism based on the lessons learned from these tests. This paper discusses the optimal design that has resulted.

  17. MIDAS: Advanced Remote Sensing for the Exploration of Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieboldt, S. E.; Wong, M. H.; Adamkovics, M.; Delory, G. T.; de Pater, I.; Manga, M.; Lipps, J. H.; Dalton, J. B.; Pitman, J.; Kendrick, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    The Multiple Instrument Distributed Aperture Sensor (MIDAS) is a diffraction-limited, wide-field imaging spectrometer that utilizes distributed apertures and optical interferometer techniques to achieve simultaneous high spatial and spectral resolution. Here we describe the results of a science and technical feasibility study of MIDAS prototypes funded under the NASA High Capability Instrument Concepts and Technology (HCICT) program as a potential science payload for missions to the outer planets and their icy satellites. The high spatial resolution capabilities of MIDAS combined with nm spectral resolution will greatly advance our understanding of icy satellite surface composition in terms of minerals, organics, volatiles, and their mixtures. From 100 km mapping orbits, cm-scale imagery from MIDAS could revolutionize our understanding of the geology, dynamics, and history of icy moon surfaces. From higher orbits, MIDAS can engage in global, high resolution imaging spectroscopy with m-scale resolution for months at a time. Beyond traditional remote sensing, MIDAS is well suited to active techniques, including remote Raman, Fluorescence, and IR illumination investigations, in order to resolve surface composition and explore otherwise dim regions.

  18. The Army's Use of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilse, Kenneth

    1996-01-01

    Tactical operations require military commanders to be mobile and have a high level of independence in their actions. Communications capabilities providing intelligence and command orders in these tactical situations have been limited to simple voice communications or low-rate narrow bandwidth communications because of the need for immediate reliable connectivity. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) has brought an improved communications tool to the tactical commander giving the ability to gain access to a global communications system using high data rates and wide bandwidths. The Army has successfully tested this new capability of bandwidth-on-demand and high data rates for commanders in real-world conditions during Operation UPHOLD DEMOCRACY in Haiti during the fall and winter of 1994. This paper examines ACTS use by field commanders and details the success of the ACTS system in support of a wide variety of field condition command functions.

  19. Experiments applications guide: Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This applications guide first surveys the capabilities of the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) system (both the flight and ground segments). This overview is followed by a description of the baseband processor (BBP) and microwave switch matrix (MSM) operating modes. Terminals operating with the baseband processor are referred to as low burst rate (LBR); and those operating with the microwave switch matrix, as high burst rate (HBR). Three very small-aperture terminals (VSATs), LBR-1, LBR-2, and HBR, are described for various ACTS operating modes. Also described is the NASA Lewis link evaluation terminal. A section on ACTS experiment opportunities introduces a wide spectrum of network control, telecommunications, system, and scientific experiments. The performance of the VSATs is discussed in detail. This guide is intended as a catalyst to encourage participation by the telecommunications, business, and science communities in a broad spectrum of experiments.

  20. Advanced DTM Generation from Very High Resolution Satellite Stereo Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perko, R.; Raggam, H.; Gutjahr, K. H.; Schardt, M.

    2015-03-01

    This work proposes a simple filtering approach that can be applied to digital surface models in order to extract digital terrain models. The method focusses on robustness and computational efficiency and is in particular tailored to filter DSMs that are extracted from satellite stereo images. It represents an evolution of an existing DTM generation method and includes distinct advancement through the integration of multi-directional processing as well as slope dependent filtering, thus denoted "MSD filtering". The DTM generation workflow is fully automatic and requires no user interaction. Exemplary results are presented for a DSM generated from a Pléiades tri-stereo image data set. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations with respect to highly accurate reference LiDAR data confirm the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  1. NASA ACTS Multibeam Antenna (MBA) System. [Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choung, Youn H.; Stiles, W. Herschel; Wu, Joseph; Wong, William C.; Chen, C. Harry

    1986-01-01

    The design of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite MBA system, which provides both spot beam and scanning beam coverage to both high and low burst rates data-users is examined. The MBA consists of receive and transmit antennas installed on a common precision mounting platform that is integrated to the bus through three flexures; a lightweight system with low thermal distortion is obtained by using composite materials for the MBA structures. The RF design, which is a Cassegrain reflector with a large equivalent focal length/aperture size, is described. Consideration is given to the position of the feed in order to minimize scan loss and sidelobe levels, the size of the subreflector in order to minimize feed spillover, and antenna performance degradation caused by reflector surface distortion. Breadbroad model test result reveal that the maximum sidelobe level outside the 2.5 HPBW region is -30 dB or lower relative to the power.

  2. Application of dynamical systems theory to global weather phenomena revealed by satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltzman, Barry; Ebisuzaki, Wesley; Maasch, Kirk A.; Oglesby, Robert; Pandolfo, Lionel; Tang, Chung-Muh

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical studies of low frequency and seasonal weather variability; dynamical properties of observational and general circulation model (GCM)-generated records; effects of the hydrologic cycle and latent heat release on extratropical weather; and Earth-system science studies are summarized.

  3. Satellite Imagery Via Personal Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Automatic Picture Transmission (APT) was incorporated by NASA in the Tiros 8 weather satellite. APT included an advanced satellite camera that immediately transmitted a picture as well as low cost receiving equipment. When an advanced scanning radiometer was later introduced, ground station display equipment would not readily adjust to the new format until GSFC developed an APT Digital Scan Converter that made them compatible. A NASA Technical Note by Goddard's Vermillion and Kamoski described how to build a converter. In 1979, Electro-Services, using this technology, built the first microcomputer weather imaging system in the U.S. The company changed its name to Satellite Data Systems, Inc. and now manufactures the WeatherFax facsimile display graphics system which converts a personal computer into a weather satellite image acquisition and display workstation. Hardware, antennas, receivers, etc. are also offered. Customers include U.S. Weather Service, schools, military, etc.

  4. Plan of advanced satellite communication experiments using ETS-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikegami, Tetsushi

    1989-01-01

    In 1992, an Engineering Test Satellite 6 is scheduled to be launched by an H-2 rocket. The missions of ETS-6 are to establish basic technologies of inter-satellite communications using S-band, millimeter waves and optical beams and of fixed and mobile satellite communications using multibeam antenna on board the satellite. A plan of the experiments is introduced.

  5. Periodic components of the atmospheric drag of Earth artificial satellites and their dependence on the state of space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komendant, Volodymyr; Koshkin, Nikolay; Ryabov, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Based on the accumulated in the University Observatory extensive database of evolving orbital elements of low-orbit satellites, the behavior of the parameterwas studied, which characterizes their drag in the atmosphere of the Earth. The time spectra structure of drag of 25 artificial satellites is being studied by applying various methods of spectral analysis. Fifteen artificial satellites with circular orbits and ten artificial satellites with elliptical orbits are studied. The processed information includes ten years of observations that covers: declining and minimum phases of 23 ^{rd}(2005-2008) solar cycle; phases of rise and maximum of 24th(2009-2014) solar cycle. Time-frequency analysis of solar and geomagnetic activity indexes has been conducted. These indexes are: W - Wolf numbers; Sp - the total area of sunspot groups of the northern and southern hemispheres of the Sun, F10.7 - the solar radio flux at 10,7 cm; E - electron flux with energies more than 0,6 MeV i 2 MeV; planetary, high latitude and middle latitude geomagnetic index Ap. Periodograms of satellite's drag data, solar and geomagnetic activity indexes were constructed. In the atmospheric drag dynamics of satellites,the following periodswere detected: 6-year, 2.1-year, annual, semi-annual, 27-days, 13- and 11-days. Similar periods are identified in indexes of solar and geomagnetic activity. The ratios of the amplitudes of the spectral power of these periods vary in different phases of the solar cycle. The tables of the main periods in the drag of the artificial satellites and the main periods in the solar and geomagnetic activity indexes were obtained with the help of spectrograms. Their presence in certain phases of the solar cycle was researched. The calculation of multiple correlation' models of the orbital parameter characterizing the drag of satellites on various orbits, depending on the basic parameters of space weather has been done. These results have practical application for models

  6. Advancing Weather and Climate Literacy via NOAA Science On a Sphere Exhibits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley, P.; Pisut, D.; Ackerman, S. A.; Mooney, M. E.; Schollaert Uz, S.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthNow project (http://sphere.ssec.wisc.edu/) regularly creates weather and climate visualizations for spherical display exhibits, like Science On a Sphere (SOS), using near real-time data such as NOAA's National Climate Data Center's (NCDC) monthly climate reports and the Climate Prediction Center's (CPC) seasonal outlooks. Viewing timely weather and climate stories on a large sphere-format allows museum visitors to more intuitively learn about global-scale earth system science. Along with producing large animations for SOS exhibits with background content, the EarthNow team also visits SOS museums (there are now over 100 SOS sites around the world) to conduct best-practice trainings and consultancies. These training sessions provide museums with implementation methods tailored to each museum's goals, allowing for a more personalized learning experience for museum visitors. This presentation will convey evaluation and feedback results from these training sites. The EarthNow project is led by the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS), in collaboration with the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites (CICS-MD) and the NOAA Environmental Visualization Lab.

  7. Online Access to Weather Satellite Imagery Through the World Wide Web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, W.; Baldwin, D.

    1998-01-01

    Both global area coverage (GAC) and high-resolution picture transmission (HRTP) data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) are made available to laternet users through an online data access system. Older GOES-7 data am also available. Created as a "testbed" data system for NASA's future Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), this testbed provides an opportunity to test both the technical requirements of an onune'd;ta system and the different ways in which the -general user, community would employ such a system. Initiated in December 1991, the basic data system experienced five major evolutionary changes In response to user requests and requirements. Features added with these changes were the addition of online browse, user subsetting, dynamic image Processing/navigation, a stand-alone data storage system, and movement,from an X-windows graphical user Interface (GUI) to a World Wide Web (WWW) interface. Over Its lifetime, the system has had as many as 2500 registered users. The system on the WWW has had over 2500 hits since October 1995. Many of these hits are by casual users that only take the GIF images directly from the interface screens and do not specifically order digital data. Still, there b a consistent stream of users ordering the navigated image data and related products (maps and so forth). We have recently added a real-time, seven- day, northwestern United States normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) composite that has generated considerable Interest. Index Terms-Data system, earth science, online access, satellite data.

  8. The Impact of Current and Future Polar Orbiting Satellite Data on Numerical Weather Prediction at NASA/GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The lack of adequate observational data continues to be recognized as a major factor limiting both atmospheric research and numerical prediction on a variety of temporal and spatial scales. Since the advent of meteorological satellites in the 1960's, a considerable research effort has been directed toward the design of space-borne meteorological sensors, the development of optimal methods for the utilization of these data, (and an assessment of the influence of existing satellite data and the potential influence of future satellite observations on numerical weather prediction. This has included both Observing System Experiments (OSEs) and Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). OSEs are conducted to evaluate the impact of specific observations or classes of observations on analyses and forecasts. While OSEs are performed with existing data, OSSEs are conducted to evaluate the potential for future observing systems to improve-NWP, as well as to evaluate trade-offs in observing system design, and to develop and test improved methods for data assimilation. At the conference, results from OSEs to evaluate satellite data sets that have recently become available to the global observing system, such as AIRS and Seawinds, and results from OSSEs to determine the potential impact of space-based lidar winds will be presented.

  9. The North Carolina Field Test: Field performance of the preliminary version of an advanced weatherization audit for the Department of Energy`s Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, T.R.

    1994-06-01

    The field performance of weatherizations based on a newly-developed advanced technique for selecting residential energy conservation measures was tested alongside current Retro-Tech-based weatherizations in North Carolina. The new technique is computer-based and determines measures based on the needs of an individual house. In addition, it recommends only those measures that it determines will have a benefit-to-cost ratio greater than 1 for the house being evaluated. The new technique also considers the interaction of measures in computing the benefit-to-cost ratio of each measure. The two weatherization approaches were compared based on implementation ease, measures installed, labor and cost requirements, and both heating and cooling energy savings achieved. One-hundred and twenty houses with the following characteristics participated: the occupants were low-income, eligible for North Carolina`s current weatherization program, and responsible for their own fuel and electric bills. Houses were detached single-family dwellings, not mobile homes; were heated by kerosene, fuel oil, natural gas, or propane; and had one or two operating window air conditioners. Houses were divided equally into one control group and two weatherization groups. Weekly space heating and cooling energy use, and hourly indoor and outdoor temperatures were monitored between November 1989 and September 1990 (pre-period) and between December 1990 and August 1991 (post-period). House consumption models were used to normalize for annual weather differences and a 68{degrees}F indoor temperature. Control group savings were used to adjust the savings determined for the weatherization groups. The two weatherization approaches involved installing attic and floor insulations in near equivalent quantities, and installing storm windows and wall insulation in drastically different quantities. Substantial differences also were found in average air leakage reductions for the two weatherization groups.

  10. Open Discussion Session: Challenges and Advancements in Coordinated Space Weather Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauristie, Kirsti

    2016-07-01

    Besides addressing the key questions in space weather research the Cospar/ILWS Roadmap presents also recommendations for teaming in the research environment and for collaboration between agencies and communities. Coordinated work of different research groups facilitate our efforts for a holistic view on the entire Sun-Earth system with its complicated feedback processes in different scale sizes. Seamless knowledge transfer from research to operational services is a crucial factor for the success of space weather research field. In this open discussion session we encourage the participants to share their views on most important challenges and advancements in our field, both in science and in collaboration. We also welcome comments on the roadmap recommendations and guidance for similar activities in the future.

  11. Cold climate mapping using satellite high resolution thermal imagery. [weather forecasting improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartholic, J. F.; Sutherland, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    In an attempt to improve cold climate mapping and freeze forecasting techniques, thermal imagery from the NOAA-2 and -3 satellites and the Synchronous Meteorological Satellite (SMS) were obtained and analyzed. Enhanced image transparencies showed detailed temperature patterns over the peninsula of Florida. The analysis was superior to hand-drawn isotherms drawn from the 300 to 500 thermograph stations presently in use. Satellite data on several cold nights with similar synoptic conditions showed that similar cold patterns existed. Thus, cold climate mapping is possible.

  12. Proposed Use of the NASA Ames Nebula Cloud Computing Platform for Numerical Weather Prediction and the Distribution of High Resolution Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, A.; Molthan, A.

    2010-12-01

    The development of the Nebula Cloud Computing Platform at NASA Ames Research Center provides an open-source solution for the deployment of scalable computing and storage capabilities relevant to the execution of real-time weather forecasts and the distribution of high resolution satellite data to the operational weather community. Two projects at Marshall Space Flight Center may benefit from use of the Nebula system. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center facilitates the use of unique NASA satellite data and research capabilities in the operational weather community by providing datasets relevant to numerical weather prediction, and satellite data sets useful in weather analysis. SERVIR provides satellite data products for decision support, emphasizing environmental threats such as wildfires, floods, landslides, and other hazards, with interests in numerical weather prediction in support of disaster response. The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model Environmental Modeling System (WRF-EMS) has been configured for Nebula cloud computing use via the creation of a disk image and deployment of repeated instances. Given the available infrastructure within Nebula and the “infrastructure as a service” concept, the system appears well-suited for the rapid deployment of additional forecast models over different domains, in response to real-time research applications or disaster response. Future investigations into Nebula capabilities will focus on the development of a web mapping server and load balancing configuration to support the distribution of high resolution satellite data sets to users within the National Weather Service and international partners of SERVIR.

  13. Small electromagnetically clean satellite platform and advanced space instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korepanov, Valery; Makarov, Oleksander; Belyayev, Serhiy; Lukenyuk, Adolf; Marusenkov, Andriy

    The Ukrainian space program in the branch of space scientific research is based on recent achievements in the development of small microsatellite platforms and advanced onboard instrumentation. The present state of both these activities is outlined in the report. First, the design and composition peculiarities of a new microsatellite platform dedicated to carry the high sensitive electromagnetic sensors and mass-spectrometers are presented. An open nonhermetic construction gives possibilities to divide efficiently service and scientific payload. This feature as well as special measures foreseen by the solar panels and cable harness layout allows electromagnetic interference decreasing and easy introducing of shielding and compensating facilities. Up to 4 booms deployment is foreseen by the platform construction to move away far enough the electromagnetic sensors from the satellite body allow realizing the ultimate sensors sensitivity up to highest international standards. An onboard data collection and processing unit is organized in such a way that it controls efficiently both service and scientific systems. Second, some recent advances are reported in the branch of onboard electromagnetic instrumentation creation. New combined sensor - wave probe - is developed and experimentally tested in laboratory plasma chamber and in spatial experiment. This is a unique device which permits measuring simultaneously in one point three physical values - spatial current density, magnetic field fluctuations and electric potential. Other recent versions of super-light flux-gate and induction coil sensors are described. The performances of both microsatellite platform and mentioned electromagnetic sensors are discussed and the results of experimental verification of their parameters are presented. This works were supported by NSAU contract No 1-02/03 and STCU grant 3165.

  14. Review: Advances in delta-subsidence research using satellite methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Stephanie A.

    2016-05-01

    Most of the world's major river deltas are sinking relative to local sea level. The effects of subsidence can include aquifer salinization, infrastructure damage, increased vulnerability to flooding and storm surges, and permanent inundation of low-lying land. Consequently, determining the relative importance of natural vs. anthropogenic pressures in driving delta subsidence is a topic of ongoing research. This article presents a review of knowledge with respect to delta surface-elevation loss. The field is rapidly advancing due to applications of space-based techniques: InSAR (interferometric synthetic aperture radar), GPS (global positioning system), and satellite ocean altimetry. These techniques have shed new light on a variety of subsidence processes, including tectonics, isostatic adjustment, and the spatial and temporal variability of sediment compaction. They also confirm that subsidence associated with fluid extraction can outpace sea-level rise by up to two orders of magnitude, resulting in effective sea-level rise that is one-hundred times faster than the global average rate. In coming years, space-based and airborne instruments will be critical in providing near-real-time monitoring to facilitate management decisions in sinking deltas. However, ground-based observations continue to be necessary for generating complete measurements of surface-elevation change. Numerical modeling should seek to simulate couplings between subsidence processes for greater predictive power.

  15. Infrared Satellite Data Indicates Severe Weather For South Central U.S.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Infrared and visible data from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite from March 17 to March 19 at 1740 UTC (1:40 p.m. EST) shows convection (rising air/thunderstorm development) exploding around 0245 UTC on Mar...

  16. Using satellite fire detection to calibrate components of the fire weather index system in Malaysia and Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Dymond, Caren C; Field, Robert D; Roswintiarti, Orbita; Guswanto

    2005-04-01

    Vegetation fires have become an increasing problem in tropical environments as a consequence of socioeconomic pressures and subsequent land-use change. In response, fire management systems are being developed. This study set out to determine the relationships between two aspects of the fire problems in western Indonesia and Malaysia, and two components of the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index System. The study resulted in a new method for calibrating components of fire danger rating systems based on satellite fire detection (hotspot) data. Once the climate was accounted for, a problematic number of fires were related to high levels of the Fine Fuel Moisture Code. The relationship between climate, Fine Fuel Moisture Code, and hotspot occurrence was used to calibrate Fire Occurrence Potential classes where low accounted for 3% of the fires from 1994 to 2000, moderate accounted for 25%, high 26%, and extreme 38%. Further problems arise when there are large clusters of fires burning that may consume valuable land or produce local smoke pollution. Once the climate was taken into account, the hotspot load (number and size of clusters of hotspots) was related to the Fire Weather Index. The relationship between climate, Fire Weather Index, and hotspot load was used to calibrate Fire Load Potential classes. Low Fire Load Potential conditions (75% of an average year) corresponded with 24% of the hotspot clusters, which had an average size of 30% of the largest cluster. In contrast, extreme Fire Load Potential conditions (1% of an average year) corresponded with 30% of the hotspot clusters, which had an average size of 58% of the maximum. Both Fire Occurrence Potential and Fire Load Potential calibrations were successfully validated with data from 2001. This study showed that when ground measurements are not available, fire statistics derived from satellite fire detection archives can be reliably used for calibration. More importantly, as a result of this work, Malaysia and

  17. Using Satellite Imagery to Identify Tornado Damage Tracks and Recovery from the April 27, 2011 Severe Weather Outbreak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Tony A.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Bell, Jordan R.

    2014-01-01

    Emergency response to natural disasters requires coordination between multiple local, state, and federal agencies. Single, relatively weak tornado events may require comparatively simple response efforts; but larger "outbreak" events with multiple strong, long-track tornadoes can benefit from additional tools to help expedite these efforts. Meteorologists from NOAA's National Weather Service conduct field surveys to map tornado tracks, assess damage, and determine the tornado intensity following each event. Moderate and high resolution satellite imagery can support these surveys by providing a high-level view of the affected areas. Satellite imagery could then be used to target areas for immediate survey or to corroborate the results of the survey after it is completed. In this study, the feasibility of using satellite imagery to identify tornado damage tracks was determined by comparing the characteristics of tracks observed from low-earth orbit to tracks assessed during the official NWS storm survey process. Of the 68 NWS confirmed centerlines, 24 tracks (35.3%) could be distinguished from other surface features using satellite imagery. Within each EF category, 0% of EF-0, 3% of EF-1, 50% of EF-2, 77.7% of EF-3, 87.5% of EF-4 and 100% of EF-5 tornadoes were detected. It was shown that satellite data can be used to identify tornado damage tracks in MODIS and ASTER NDVI imagery, where damage to vegetation creates a sharp drop in values though the minimum EF-category which can be detected is dependent upon the type of sensor used and underlying vegetation. Near-real time data from moderate resolution sensors compare favorably to field surveys after the event and suggest that the data can provide some value in the assessment process.

  18. Advances in Satellite Microwave Precipitation Retrieval Algorithms Over Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, N. Y.; You, Y.; Ferraro, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation plays a key role in the earth's climate system, particularly in the aspect of its water and energy balance. Satellite microwave (MW) observations of precipitation provide a viable mean to achieve global measurement of precipitation with sufficient sampling density and accuracy. However, accurate precipitation information over land from satellite MW is a challenging problem. The Goddard Profiling Algorithm (GPROF) algorithm for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is built around the Bayesian formulation (Evans et al., 1995; Kummerow et al., 1996). GPROF uses the likelihood function and the prior probability distribution function to calculate the expected value of precipitation rate, given the observed brightness temperatures. It is particularly convenient to draw samples from a prior PDF from a predefined database of observations or models. GPROF algorithm does not search all database entries but only the subset thought to correspond to the actual observation. The GPM GPROF V1 database focuses on stratification by surface emissivity class, land surface temperature and total precipitable water. However, there is much uncertainty as to what is the optimal information needed to subset the database for different conditions. To this end, we conduct a database stratification study of using National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor Quantitative Precipitation Estimation, Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) and Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) and reanalysis data from Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). Our database study (You et al., 2015) shows that environmental factors such as surface elevation, relative humidity, and storm vertical structure and height, and ice thickness can help in stratifying a single large database to smaller and more homogeneous subsets, in which the surface condition and precipitation vertical profiles are similar. It is found that the probability of detection (POD) increases

  19. PREDICTION OF PEROMYSCUS MANICULATUS (DEER MOUSE) POPULATION DYNAMICS IN MONTANA, USA, USING SATELLITE-DRIVEN VEGETATION PRODUCTIVITY AND WEATHER DATA

    PubMed Central

    Loehman, Rachel A.; Elias, Joran; Douglass, Richard J.; Kuenzi, Amy J.; Mills, James N.; Wagoner, Kent

    2013-01-01

    Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) are the main reservoir host for Sin Nombre virus, the primary etiologic agent of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in North America. Sequential changes in weather and plant productivity (trophic cascades) have been noted as likely catalysts of deer mouse population irruptions, and monitoring and modeling of these phenomena may allow for development of early-warning systems for disease risk. Relationships among weather variables, satellite-derived vegetation productivity, and deer mouse populations were examined for a grassland site east of the Continental Divide and a sage-steppe site west of the Continental Divide in Montana, USA. We acquired monthly deer mouse population data for mid-1994 through 2007 from long-term study sites maintained for monitoring changes in hantavirus reservoir populations, and we compared these with monthly bioclimatology data from the same period and gross primary productivity data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer sensor for 2000–06. We used the Random Forests statistical learning technique to fit a series of predictive models based on temperature, precipitation, and vegetation productivity variables. Although we attempted several iterations of models, including incorporating lag effects and classifying rodent density by seasonal thresholds, our results showed no ability to predict rodent populations using vegetation productivity or weather data. We concluded that trophic cascade connections to rodent population levels may be weaker than originally supposed, may be specific to only certain climatic regions, or may not be detectable using remotely sensed vegetation productivity measures, although weather patterns and vegetation dynamics were positively correlated. PMID:22493110

  20. Prediction of Peromyscus maniculatus (deer mouse) population dynamics in Montana, USA, using satellite-driven vegetation productivity and weather data.

    PubMed

    Loehman, Rachel A; Elias, Joran; Douglass, Richard J; Kuenzi, Amy J; Mills, James N; Wagoner, Kent

    2012-04-01

    Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) are the main reservoir host for Sin Nombre virus, the primary etiologic agent of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in North America. Sequential changes in weather and plant productivity (trophic cascades) have been noted as likely catalysts of deer mouse population irruptions, and monitoring and modeling of these phenomena may allow for development of early-warning systems for disease risk. Relationships among weather variables, satellite-derived vegetation productivity, and deer mouse populations were examined for a grassland site east of the Continental Divide and a sage-steppe site west of the Continental Divide in Montana, USA. We acquired monthly deer mouse population data for mid-1994 through 2007 from long-term study sites maintained for monitoring changes in hantavirus reservoir populations, and we compared these with monthly bioclimatology data from the same period and gross primary productivity data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer sensor for 2000-06. We used the Random Forests statistical learning technique to fit a series of predictive models based on temperature, precipitation, and vegetation productivity variables. Although we attempted several iterations of models, including incorporating lag effects and classifying rodent density by seasonal thresholds, our results showed no ability to predict rodent populations using vegetation productivity or weather data. We concluded that trophic cascade connections to rodent population levels may be weaker than originally supposed, may be specific to only certain climatic regions, or may not be detectable using remotely sensed vegetation productivity measures, although weather patterns and vegetation dynamics were positively correlated. PMID:22493110

  1. All-weather estimates of the land surface skin temperatures from combined analyses of microwave and infrared satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, C.; Aires, F.; Prigent, C.; Catherinot, J.; Rossow, W. B.

    2011-12-01

    The surface skin temperature (Ts) is a key parameter at the land-atmosphere interface. Global datasets of Ts are traditionally estimated from satellite infrared radiance observations, under clear sky conditions. First, the inter-comparison of different IR land surface temperature satellite datasets (ISCCP, MODIS, and AIRS) is presented, along with an evaluation with in situ measurements at selected stations archived during CEOP (Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period). The objective is to assess the accuracy of the Ts estimates, and to evidence the major error sources in the retrieval. Results show that the major sources of differences between the different satellite products come from instrument calibration differences, especially for high Ts, followed by the impact of the water vapor treatment in the algorithm, and the differences in surface emissivities. The main limitation of satellite infrared measurements of Ts is their inability to penetrate clouds, limiting them to clear conditions. Microwave wavelengths, being much less affected by clouds than the infrared, are an attractive alternative in cloudy regions as they can be used to derive an all-sky skin Ts product. A neural network inversion scheme has been developed to retrieve surface Ts along with atmospheric water vapor, cloud liquid water, and surface emissivities over land from a combined analysis of Special Sensor Microwave /Imager (SSM/I) and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) data. In the absence of routine in situ Ts measurements, retrieved all-weather Ts values are first evaluated globally by comparison to the surface air temperature (Tair) measured by the meteorological station network. The Ts-Tair difference from the global comparisons showed all the expected variations with solar flux, soil characteristics, and cloudiness. This evaluation has been recently extended locally at a few sites by using the Ts in-situ measurements from several CEOP stations representing different

  2. Application of the advanced communications technology satellite for teleradiology and telemedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Brent K.; Carter, Stephen J.; Rowberg, Alan H.

    1995-05-01

    The authors have an in-kind grant from NASA to investigate the application of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to teleradiology and telemedicine using the JPL developed ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) uplink. This experiment involves the transmission of medical imagery (CT, MR, CR, US and digitized radiographs including mammograms), between the ACTS/AMT and the University of Washington. This is accomplished by locating the AMT experiment van in various locations throughout Washington state, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Hawaii. The medical images are transmitted from the ACTS to the downlink at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, consisting of AMT equipment and the high burst rate-link evaluation terminal (HBR-LET). These images are then routed from LeRC to the University of Washington School of Medicine (UWSoM) through the Internet and public switched Integrated Serviced Digital Network (ISDN). Once images arrive in the UW Radiology Department, they are reviewed using both video monitor softcopy and laser-printed hardcopy. Compressed video teleconferencing and transmission of real-time ultrasound video between the AMT van and the UWSoM are also tested. Image quality comparisons are made using both subjective diagnostic criteria and quantitative engineering analysis. Evaluation is performed during various weather conditions (including rain to assess rain fade compensation algorithms). Compression techniques also are tested to evaluate their effects on image quality, allowing further evaluation of portable teleradiology/telemedicine at lower data rates and providing useful information for additional applications (e.g., smaller remote units, shipboard, emergency disaster, etc.). The medical images received at the UWSoM over the ACTS are directly evaluated against the original digital images. The project demonstrates that a portable satellite-land connection can provide subspecialty consultation and education for rural and remote

  3. Near-Real-Time Satellite Cloud Products for Icing Detection and Aviation Weather over the USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, Patrick; Smith, William L., Jr.; Nguyen, Louis; Murray, J. J.; Heck, Patrick W.; Khaiyer, Mandana M.

    2003-01-01

    A set of physically based retrieval algorithms has been developed to derive from multispectral satellite imagery a variety of cloud properties that can be used to diagnose icing conditions when upper-level clouds are absent. The algorithms are being applied in near-real time to the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) data over Florida, the Southern Great Plains, and the midwestern USA. The products are available in image and digital formats on the world-wide web. The analysis system is being upgraded to analyze GOES data over the CONUS. Validation, 24-hour processing, and operational issues are discussed.

  4. VIIRS Nighttime Lights: Advances in Satellite Low-Light Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, F.; Baugh, K.; Elvidge, C.; Zhizhin, M. N.

    2013-12-01

    The Soumi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day-Night Band (DNB) represents a major advance in low-light imaging over previous data sources. Building on 18 years of experience compositing nighttime data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS), NOAA's NGDC Earth Observation Group created the first global VIIRS nighttime lights composite product by adapting their algorithms to process these new data. Compositing nighttime data involves combining only high quality data components over a period of time to improve sensitivity and coverage. Flag image were compiled to describe image quality. The initial flag categories included: daytime, twilight, stray light, non-zero lunar illuminance, noisy edge of scan data, clouds, and no data. High quality data included in the nighttime lights composite is defined as not having any of these attributes present. After the initial adaptation of heritage OLS algorithms, the authors sought to improve the sharpness of lights in the composite by adding additional flag categories. These include a refined VIIRS cloud mask, a mask based on cloud optical thickness, and a ranking of sharpness of light.. The VIIRS cloud mask, which is a JPSS retained intermediate product cloud mask (IICMO) is refined to reject the misclassification of hot sources like gas flares as cloud. Another JPSS retained intermediate product, cloud optical thickness, also provides valuable information about the clarity of atmosphere. The authors also implemented a sharp light detector to further characterize the quality of light for each pixel. Results of compositing multiple months in 2013 using these new flag categories are presented to demonstrate the improvements in nighttime lights composite quality.

  5. Identifying Hail Signatures in Satellite Imagery from the 9-10 August 2011 Severe Weather Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryden, Rachel L.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Cole, Tony A.; Bell, Jordan R.

    2014-01-01

    Hail scars are identifiable in MODIS satellite imagery based on NDVI change, which was dominantly negative. Hail damage spatially correlates with SPC hail reports and MESH. This study developed a proxy for quantifying crop loss at varying thresholds to address the gap between SPC damage estimates and insurance payouts.

  6. Community Access to the C/NOFS Satellite Data -- Facilitating New Opportunities for Space Weather Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S.; de La Beaujardiere, O.; Hunton, D.; Wilson, G.; Roddy, P.; Coley, R.; Heelis, R.; Earle, G.; Straus, P.; Bernhardt, P.; Bromund, K.; Candey, R.; Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Holzworth, R.; Kessel, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite was launched on April 17, 2008 into a low latitude orbit (401 by 867 km, 13 deg inclination) and is designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of ionospheric irregularities that cause scintillations and other radiowave disruptions. Its instruments include those that sample the plasma density and temperature, DC/AC electric fields, DC magnetic fields, ion drift velocity, neutral density, and GPS occultations. A radiowave tomography experiment and a lightning detector are also included on the satellite. C/NOFS provides a tremendous opportunity to merge space-based and ground-based observations and research, while engendering comparisons with, and data input to, the latest ionospheric models and theoretical calculations and simulations. To help coordinate this research and exchange of data products, the C/NOFS satellite data will be made available to the community through the Coordinated Data Analysis web site (http://cdaweb.gsfc.nasa.gov/) that resides at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. The data will be distributed via FTP, OPENDAP (data streaming), HTTP, and web services with output in CDF, ASCII listings, PDF, and PS formats. This activity is sponsored by the NASA/Living With a Star program. This data distribution web site is in addition to the main Air Force Research Laboratory web site for the C/NOFS program that is located at http://www.kirtland.af.mil/library/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=12776 and includes links to the C/NOFS instrument web sites, ground-based research, and satellite updates. A description of the C/NOFS satellite instruments and their standard data products available to the community via the CDA web site will be provided.

  7. Traffic model for advanced satellite designs and experiments for ISDN services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, Gerard R.; Hager, E. Paul

    1991-01-01

    The data base structure and fields for categorizing and storing Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) user characteristics is outlined. This traffic model data base will be used to exercise models of the ISDN Advanced Communication Satellite to determine design parameters and performance for the NASA Satellite Communications Applications Research (SCAR) Program.

  8. Slow advance of the weathering front during deep, supply-limited saprolite formation in the tropical Highlands of Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewawasam, Tilak; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Bouchez, Julien; Dixon, Jean L.; Schuessler, Jan A.; Maekeler, Ricarda

    2013-10-01

    Silicate weathering - initiated by major mineralogical transformations at the base of ten meters of clay-rich saprolite - generates the exceptionally low weathering flux found in streams draining the crystalline rocks of the mountainous and humid tropical Highlands of Sri Lanka. This conclusion is reached from a thorough investigation of the mineralogical, chemical, and Sr isotope compositions of samples within a regolith profile extending >10 m from surface soil through the weathering front in charnockite bedrock (a high-grade metamorphic rock), corestones formed at the weathering front, as well as from the chemical composition of the dissolved loads in nearby streams. Weatherable minerals and soluble elements are fully depleted at the top of the profile, showing that the system is supply-limited, such that weathering fluxes are controlled directly by the supply of fresh minerals. We determine the weathering rates using two independent means: (1) in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides in surface soil and creek sediments in the close vicinity of the regolith combined with immobile element mass balance across the regolith and (2) river dissolved loads. Silicate weathering rates determined from both approaches range from 16 to 36 t km-2 y-1, corresponding to a weathering front advance rate of 6-14 mm ky-1. These rates agree across the 101 to 104 y time scales over which our rate metrics integrate, suggesting that the weathering system operates at steady state. Within error these rates are furthermore compatible with those obtained by modeling the advance rate of the weathering front from chemical gradients and mineral dissolution rates. The silicate weathering flux out of the weathering profile, measured on small creeks, amounts to 84% of the profile’s export flux; the remaining 16% is contributed by non-silicate, atmospheric-derived input. The silicate weathering flux, as measured by dissolved loads in large catchments, amounts to ca. 50% of the total dissolved flux

  9. Advanced multiple access concepts in mobile satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ananasso, Fulvio

    1990-01-01

    Some multiple access strategies for Mobile Satellite Systems (MSS) are discussed. These strategies were investigated in the context of three separate studies conducted for the International Maritime Satellite Organization (INMARSAT) and the European Space Agency (ESA). Satellite-Switched Frequency Division Multiple Access (SS-FDMA), Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA), and Frequency-Addressable Beam architectures are addressed, discussing both system and technology aspects and outlining advantages and drawbacks of either solution with associated relevant hardware issues. An attempt is made to compare the considered option from the standpoint of user terminal/space segment complexity, synchronization requirements, spectral efficiency, and interference rejection.

  10. Advanced satellite system architecture for VSATs with ISDN compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorasch, Ronald E.; Price, Kent M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a future communications satellite system architecture concept which allows the use of Very Small Aperature Terminals (VSATs) of 1.2 m to 1.8 m diameter and which provides access according to the international Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) standard. This satellite system design could make dial-up integrated voice and data service available nationwide and perhaps worldwide. The paper gives a conceptual system design based on the year 1995 technology for the communications satellite, the earth terminal, and the ground-based master control station and interface to the terrestrial ISDN network.

  11. Advanced EHF technologies for lightweight augmentation/restoration communications satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolba, Dean P.; Greenberg, William L.; McElroy, David R.; Semprucci, Marilyn D.

    Small EHF satellites can significantly complement the anti-jam service provided by basic EHF MILSATCOM space segments. Mobile/survivable launch vehicles with rapid launch preparations can be utilized to responsively deploy these small satellites into high-altitude elliptical or circular orbits. From such orbits, only a few satellites are needed to provide high-duty-cycle coverage of a critical area. The communications capabilities provided by these EHF payloads can range from (75-2400 bps per channel to 10 Mbps or more per links, depending on the payload configuration. Through the use of EHF waveform standards, these augmentation/restoration satellites will be compatible with existing and planned EHF terminals.

  12. NASA's Advancements in Space-Based Spectrometry Lead to Improvements in Weather Prediction and Understanding of Climate Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena

    2010-01-01

    AIRS (Atmospheric Infra-Red Sounder), was launched, in conjunction with AMSU-A (Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A) on the NASA polar orbiting research satellite EOS (Earth Observing System) Aqua satellite in May 2002 as a next generation atmospheric sounding system. Atmospheric sounders provide information primarily about the vertical distribution of atmospheric temperature and water vapor distribution. This is achieved by measuring outgoing radiation in discrete channels (spectral intervals) which are sensitive primarily to variations of these geophysical parameters. The primary objectives of AIRS/AMSU were to utilize such information in order to improve the skill of numerical weather prediction as well as to measure climate variability and trends. AIRS is a multi-detector array grating spectrometer with 2378 channels covering the spectral range 650/cm (15 microns) to 2660/cm (3.6 microns) with a resolving power (i/a i) of roughly 1200 where a i is the spectral channel bandpass. Atmospheric temperature profile can be determined from channel observations taken within the 15 micron (the long-wave CO2 absorption band) and within the 4.2 micron (the short-wave CO2 absorption band). Radiances in these (and all other) spectral intervals in the infrared are also sensitive to the presence of clouds in the instrument?s field of view (FOV), which are present about 95% of the time. AIRS was designed so as to allow for the ability to produce accurate Quality Controlled atmospheric soundings under most cloud conditions. This was achieved by having 1) extremely low channel noise values in the shortwave portion of the spectrum and 2) a very flat spatial response function within a channel?s FOV. IASI, the high spectral resolution IR interferometer flying on the European METOP satellite, does not contain either of these important characteristics. The AIRS instrument was also designed to be extremely stabile with regard to its spectral radiometric characteristics, which is

  13. Performance of an Advanced MOS System in the 1996-97 National Collegiate Weather Forecasting Contest.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vislocky, Robert L.; Fritsch, J. Michael

    1997-12-01

    A prototype advanced model output statistics (MOS) forecast system that was entered in the 1996-97 National Collegiate Weather Forecast Contest is described and its performance compared to that of widely available objective guidance and to contest participants. The prototype system uses an optimal blend of aviation (AVN) and nested grid model (NGM) MOS forecasts, explicit output from the NGM and Eta guidance, and the latest surface weather observations from the forecast site. The forecasts are totally objective and can be generated quickly on a personal computer. Other "objective" forms of guidance tracked in the contest are 1) the consensus forecast (i.e., the average of the forecasts from all of the human participants), 2) the combination of NGM raw output (for precipitation forecasts) and NGM MOS guidance (for temperature forecasts), and 3) the combination of Eta Model raw output (for precipitation forecasts) and AVN MOS guidance (for temperature forecasts).Results show that the advanced MOS system finished in 20th place out of 737 original entrants, or better than approximately 97% of the human forecasters who entered the contest. Moreover, the advanced MOS system was slightly better than consensus (23d place). The fact that an objective forecast system finished ahead of consensus is a significant accomplishment since consensus is traditionally a very formidable "opponent" in forecast competitions. Equally significant is that the advanced MOS system was superior to the traditional guidance products available from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). Specifically, the combination of NGM raw output and NGM MOS guidance finished in 175th place, and the combination of Eta Model raw output and AVN MOS guidance finished in 266th place. The latter result is most intriguing since the proposed elimination of all NGM products would likely result in a serious degradation of objective products disseminated by NCEP, unless they are replaced with equal

  14. Advances Made in the Next Generation of Satellite Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.

    1999-01-01

    Because of the unique networking characteristics of communications satellites, global satellite networks are moving to the forefront in enhancing national and global information infrastructures. Simultaneously, broadband data services, which are emerging as the major market driver for future satellite and terrestrial networks, are being widely acknowledged as the foundation for an efficient global information infrastructure. In the past 2 years, various task forces and working groups around the globe have identified pivotal topics and key issues to address if we are to realize such networks in a timely fashion. In response, industry, government, and academia undertook efforts to address these topics and issues. A workshop was organized to provide a forum to assess the current state-of-the-art, identify key issues, and highlight the emerging trends in the next-generation architectures, data protocol development, communication interoperability, and applications. The Satellite Networks: Architectures, Applications, and Technologies Workshop was hosted by the Space Communication Program at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Nearly 300 executives and technical experts from academia, industry, and government, representing the United States and eight other countries, attended the event (June 2 to 4, 1998). The program included seven panels and invited sessions and nine breakout sessions in which 42 speakers presented on technical topics. The proceedings covers a wide range of topics: access technology and protocols, architectures and network simulations, asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) over satellite networks, Internet over satellite networks, interoperability experiments and applications, multicasting, NASA interoperability experiment programs, NASA mission applications, and Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) over satellite: issues, relevance, and experience.

  15. The assimilation of hyperspectral satellite radiances in Global Numerical Weather Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, James Alan

    Hyperspectral infrared radiance data present opportunities for significant improvements in data assimilation and Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP). The increase in spectral resolution available from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) sensor, for example, will make it possible to improve the accuracy of temperature and moisture fields. Improved accuracy of the NWP analyses and forecasts should result. In this thesis we incorporate these hyperspectral data, using new assimilation methods, into the National Centers for Environmental Prediction's (NCEP) operational Global Data Assimilation System/Global Forecast System (GDAS/GFS) and investigate their impact on the weather analysis and forecasts. The spatial and spectral resolution of AIRS data used by NWP centers was initially based on theoretical calculations. Synthetic data were used to determine channel selection and spatial density for real time data assimilation. Several problems were previously not fully addressed. These areas include: cloud contamination, surface related issues, dust, and temperature inversions. In this study, several improvements were made to the methods used for assimilation. Spatial resolution was increased to examine every field of view, instead of one in nine or eighteen fields of view. Improved selection criteria were developed to find the best profile for assimilation from a larger sample. New cloud and inversion tests were used to help identify the best profiles to be assimilated in the analysis. The spectral resolution was also increased from 152 to 251 channels. The channels added were mainly near the surface, in the water vapor absorption band, and in the shortwave region. The GFS was run at or near operational resolution and contained all observations available to the operational system. For each experiment the operational version of the GFS was used during that time. The use of full spatial and enhanced spectral resolution data resulted in the first demonstration of

  16. Advancing Fire Weather Research via Interagency Collaboration: The NOAA/USFS MOU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schranz, S.; Pouyat, R.

    2012-12-01

    In 2005, the Western Governors' Association (WGA) first articulated the need for closer collaboration between NOAA and the land management agencies to improve our services - and to ensure the best new technology and scientific advances are infused into fire weather information and services. NOAA has taken the WGA advice very seriously and, over the past few years, have followed up by polling users of our fire weather information. This was done both by our Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology, and via an examination of internal and collaborative research activities as conducted by NOAA's Science Advisory Board. Through these processes, and given the tight budget environment, it's become clear we can't make needed progress alone. We need to call upon our joint expertise, along with the expertise of partners across the federal, state, academic, and research communities. This talk will outline the NOAA/USFS MOU signed in August, 2012 and the collaborative research already begun with the USFS and other partners.

  17. Displaying Composite and Archived Soundings in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Volkmer, Matthew R.; Blottman, Peter F.; Sharp, David W.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation describes work done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to add composite soundings to the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). This allows National Weather Service (NWS) forecasters to compare the current atmospheric state with climatology. In a previous task, the AMU created composite soundings for four rawinsonde observation stations in Florida, for each of eight flow regimes. The composite soundings were delivered to the NWS Melbourne (MLB) office for display using the NSHARP software program. NWS MLB requested that the AMU make the composite soundings available for display in AWIPS. The AMU first created a procedure to customize AWIPS so composite soundings could be displayed. A unique four-character identifier was created for each of the 32 composite soundings. The AMIU wrote a Tool Command Language/Tool Kit (TclITk) software program to convert the composite soundings from NSHARP to Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) format. The NetCDF files were then displayable by AWIPS.

  18. Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, J.A.; Matthews, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present work is based on a conference: Natural Satellites, Colloquium 77 of the IAU, held at Cornell University from July 5 to 9, 1983. Attention is given to the background and origins of satellites, protosatellite swarms, the tectonics of icy satellites, the physical characteristics of satellite surfaces, and the interactions of planetary magnetospheres with icy satellite surfaces. Other topics include the surface composition of natural satellites, the cratering of planetary satellites, the moon, Io, and Europa. Consideration is also given to Ganymede and Callisto, the satellites of Saturn, small satellites, satellites of Uranus and Neptune, and the Pluto-Charon system.

  19. Phenology model from weather station meteorology does not predict satellite-based onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J. I.; Richardson, A. D.; Mustard, J. F.

    2006-12-01

    Seasonal temperature changes in temperate forests are known to trigger the start of spring growth, and both interannual and spatial variations in spring growth have been tied to climatic variability. Satellite data are finding increased use in regional and global phenological studies, but to date there have been few efforts to rigorously tie remotely sensed phenology to surface climate records. Where satellite records have been compared to broad-scale climate patterns, broadleaf deciduous forests have typically been characterized as a single functional type and differences between communities ignored. We used a simple two-parameter spring warming model to explore the relationship between interannual climate variability and satellite-based phenology in New England broadleaf temperate forests. We employed daily air temperature records between 2000 and 2005 from 171 NOAA meteorological stations to parameterize a simple spring warming model predicting the date of MODIS half-maximum greenness (spring onset). We find that the best model starts accumulating heating degree days (HDD) after March 20th and when average daily temperatures exceed 5°C. Critical heat sums to reach onset range from 150 to 300 degree-days, with increasing requirements southward and in coastal regions. In our findings, the spring warming model offers little improvement on the photoperiod null model (i.e. the average date of onset). However, differences between the relative goodness-of-fit of the spring warming model compared to the null (coined the 'climate sensitivity ratio', or CSR) displayed unexpected spatial coherency. The spatial variation in CSR appears to be related to differences in forest composition, with clear differences between northern (beech-maple-birch) and central (oak-hickory) hardwood forests. The two forest types may respond to climate differently, with disparate sensitivities to the minimum temperature initiating spring growth (3 and 6°C, respectively). We conclude that

  20. Use of TV pictures obtained from weather satellites to study the geological structure of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashilova, I. I.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of Soviet investigations into the use of television imagery obtained from meteorological satellites for the interpretation of tectonics, lithology, and structural properties of the earth. The area investigated encompassed the eastern part of Iran, and the western regions of Afghanistan and Pakistan. Interpretation of the features identified during the analysis was accomplished by comparing these features with physical, geographic, geological, and tectonic maps. It was concluded that television pictures of the earth from space can be used for geological and structural analysis.

  1. Modeled Forecasts of Dengue Fever in San Juan, PR Using NASA Satellite Enhanced Weather Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Cory; Quattrochi, Dale; Zavodsky, Bradley; Case, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus is transmitted between humans and mosquitoes of the genus Aedes and causes approximately 96 million cases of disease (dengue fever) each year (Bhatet al. 2013). Symptoms of dengue fever include fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, and eye, muscle and joint pain (CDC). More sever manifestations such as abdominal pain, bleeding from nose and gums, vomiting of blood, and clammy skin occur in rare cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (CDC). Dengue fever occurs throughout tropical and sub-tropical regions worldwide, however, the geographical range and size of epidemics is increasing. Weather and climate are drivers of dengue virus transmission dynamics (Morin et al. 2013) by affecting mosquito proliferation and the virus extrinsic incubation period (i.e. required time for the virus to replicate and disseminate within the mosquito before it can retransmit the virus).

  2. A roadmap towards advanced space weather science to protect society's technological infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, Carolus

    As mankind’s technological capabilities grow, society constructs a rapidly deepening insight into the workings of the universe at large, being guided by exploring space near to our home. But at the same time our societal dependence on technology increases and with that comes a growing appreciation of the challenges presented by the phenomena that occur in that space around our home planet: Magnetic explosions on the Sun and their counterparts in the geomagnetic field can in extreme cases endanger our all-pervasive electrical infrastructure. Powerful space storms occasionally lower the reliability of the globe-spanning satellite navigation systems and interrupt radio communications. Energetic particle storms lead to malfunctions and even failures in satellites that are critical to the flow of information in the globally connected economies. These and other Sun-driven effects on Earth’s environment, collectively known as space weather, resemble some other natural hazards in the sense that they pose a risk for the safe and efficient functioning of society that needs to be understood, quantified, and - ultimately - mitigated against. The complexity of the coupled Sun-Earth system, the sparseness by which it can be covered by remote-sensing and in-situ instrumentation, and the costs of the required observational and computational infrastructure warrant a well-planned and well-coordinated approach with cost-efficient solutions. Our team is tasked with the development of a roadmap with the goal of demonstrably improving our observational capabilities, scientific understanding, and the ability to forecast. This paper summarizes the accomplishments of the roadmap team in identifying the highest-priority challenges to achieve these goals.

  3. A roadmap towards advanced space weather science to protect society's technological infrastructure: Panel Discussion 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, Carolus; Kauristie, Kirsti

    This single 90minute slot will follow on from the morning plenary presentation of the roadmap, providing an opportunity for further discussion of the panel’s findings with an invited panel of key stakeholders. --- As mankind’s technological capabilities grow, society constructs a rapidly deepening insight into the workings of the universe at large, being guided by exploring space near to our home. But at the same time our societal dependence on technology increases and with that comes a growing appreciation of the challenges presented by the phenomena that occur in that space around our home planet: Magnetic explosions on the Sun and their counterparts in the geomagnetic field can in extreme cases endanger our all-pervasive electrical infrastructure. Powerful space storms occasionally lower the reliability of the globe-spanning satellite navigation systems and interrupt radio communications. Energetic particle storms lead to malfunctions and even failures in satellites that are critical to the flow of information in the globally connected economies. These and other Sun-driven effects on Earth’s environment, collectively known as space weather, resemble some other natural hazards in the sense that they pose a risk for the safe and efficient functioning of society that needs to be understood, quantified, and - ultimately - mitigated against. The complexity of the coupled Sun-Earth system, the sparseness by which it can be covered by remote-sensing and in-situ instrumentation, and the costs of the required observational and computational infrastructure warrant a well-planned and well-coordinated approach with cost-efficient solutions. Our team is tasked with the development of a roadmap with the goal of demonstrably improving our observational capabilities, scientific understanding, and the ability to forecast. This paper summarizes the accomplishments of the roadmap team in identifying the highest-priority challenges to achieve these goals.

  4. A roadmap towards advanced space weather science to protect society's technological infrastructure: Panel Discussion 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, Carolus; Kauristie, Kirsti

    This single 90minute slot will follow on from the morning plenary presentation of the roadmap, providing an opportunity for further discussion of the panel’s findings with an invited panel of key stakeholders. --- As mankind’s technological capabilities grow, society constructs a rapidly deepening insight into the workings of the universe at large, being guided by exploring space near to our home. But at the same time our societal dependence on technology increases and with that comes a growing appreciation of the challenges presented by the phenomena that occur in that space around our home planet: Magnetic explosions on the Sun and their counterparts in the geomagnetic field can in extreme cases endanger our all-pervasive electrical infrastructure. Powerful space storms occasionally lower the reliability of the globe-spanning satellite navigation systems and interrupt radio communications. Energetic particle storms lead to malfunctions and even failures in satellites that are critical to the flow of information in the globally connected economies. These and other Sun-driven effects on Earth’s environment, collectively known as space weather, resemble some other natural hazards in the sense that they pose a risk for the safe and efficient functioning of society that needs to be understood, quantified, and - ultimately - mitigated against. The complexity of the coupled Sun-Earth system, the sparseness by which it can be covered by remote-sensing and in-situ instrumentation, and the costs of the required observational and computational infrastructure warrant a well-planned and well-coordinated approach with cost-efficient solutions. Our team is tasked with the development of a roadmap with the goal of demonstrably improving our observational capabilities, scientific understanding, and the ability to forecast. This paper summarizes the accomplishments of the roadmap team in identifying the highest-priority challenges to achieve these goals.

  5. A roadmap towards advanced space weather science to protect society's technological infrastructure: Panel Discussion 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, Carolus; Kauristie, Kirsti

    This single 90minute slot will follow on from the morning plenary presentation of the roadmap, providing an opportunity for further discussion of the panel’s findings with an invited panel of key stakeholders. --- As mankind’s technological capabilities grow, society constructs a rapidly deepening insight into the workings of the universe at large, being guided by exploring space near to our home. But at the same time our societal dependence on technology increases and with that comes a growing appreciation of the challenges presented by the phenomena that occur in that space around our home planet: Magnetic explosions on the Sun and their counterparts in the geomagnetic field can in extreme cases endanger our all-pervasive electrical infrastructure. Powerful space storms occasionally lower the reliability of the globe-spanning satellite navigation systems and interrupt radio communications. Energetic particle storms lead to malfunctions and even failures in satellites that are critical to the flow of information in the globally connected economies. These and other Sun-driven effects on Earth’s environment, collectively known as space weather, resemble some other natural hazards in the sense that they pose a risk for the safe and efficient functioning of society that needs to be understood, quantified, and - ultimately - mitigated against. The complexity of the coupled Sun-Earth system, the sparseness by which it can be covered by remote-sensing and in-situ instrumentation, and the costs of the required observational and computational infrastructure warrant a well-planned and well-coordinated approach with cost-efficient solutions. Our team is tasked with the development of a roadmap with the goal of demonstrably improving our observational capabilities, scientific understanding, and the ability to forecast. This paper summarizes the accomplishments of the roadmap team in identifying the highest-priority challenges to achieve these goals.

  6. GOES weather satellite observations and measurements of the May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holasek, R. E.; Self, S.

    1995-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) images of the May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens volcanic plume in providing details of the dynamics and changing character of this major explosive eruption. Visible and thermal infrared (IR) data from a sequence of images at 30-min intervals from 0850 to 1720 Local Time (LT) give information on dispersal and plume top temperature. Initial visible and IR images at 0850 show the top of a spreading co-ignimbrite-like umbrella plume and an overshooting column emerging from it, both rising off the ground-hugging pyroclastic gravity flow generated by the opening directed blast. The overshooting column had a minimum temperature significantly colder than local ambient atmosphere, indicating substantial undercooling, and a maximum altitude of 31 +/- 2 km at 0920. This large plume system then formed a high-velocity, radially spreading, gravitationally driven current before becoming advected in the wind field at an average downwind velocity of 29 m/s. Reflectance values from visible GOES data change from lower to higher during periods of transition from darker toned Plinian to lighter toned co-ignimbrite plumes indicating that in this case satellite data resolved changes in eruptive style from plumes with a coarser to a finer dominant particle size.

  7. Teachers guide for building and operating weather satellite ground stations for high school science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, R. J.; Gotwald, T.

    1981-01-01

    A number of colleges and universities are operating APT direct readout stations. However, high school science teachers have often failed to realize the potential of meteorological satellites and their products as unique instructional tools. The ability to receive daily pictures from these satellites offers exciting opportunities for secondary school teachers and students to assemble the electronic hardware and to view real time pictures of Earth from outer space. The station and pictures can be used in the classroom to develop an approach to science teaching that could span many scientific disciplines and offer many opportunities for student research and participation in scientific processes. This can be accomplished with relatively small expenditures of funds for equipment. In most schools some of the equipment may already be available. Others can be constructed by teachers and/or students. Yet another source might be the purchase of used equipment from industry or through the government surplus channels. The information necessary for individuals unfamiliar with these systems to construct a direct readout for receiving real time APT photographs on a daily basis in the classroom is presented.

  8. Best Practices in Weathering Climate Risks: Advancing Corporate and Community Resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klima, K.; Winkelman, S.

    2012-12-01

    As the annual costs of severe weather events in the US grow into the billions of dollars, companies and communities are examining how best to plan ahead to protect their assets and bolster their bottom line. The Center for Clean Air Policy's Weathering Climate Risks program aims to help cities and companies enhance resilience to the economic impacts of severe weather and a changing climate. This presentation will highlight three communication techniques aimed at different types of audiences such as businesses, policymakers, the media, and society. First, we find that although planning for natural hazards now saves money later, stakeholders must fi¬nd their own self-interest if they are going to engage in a solution. Thus we research best practices and hold informational, off-the-record interviews to better understand the different stakeholders' perspectives, key concerns, and issues surrounding adaptation, resilience, and/or hazard mitigation. Diverse stakeholders find it attractive when a solution has multiple co-benefits such as climate resilience, greenhouse gas reduction, reduced costs, and social benefits. Second, we use off-the-record dialogues emphasizing candid public-private discussion to promote collaborative problem solving. Our high-level workshops typically consist of 30-40 scientists, companies, communities, and policymakers. We begin with presenting background material, such as geographic information systems (GIS) maps. Then we move to informal conservation. Topics include ideas such as "Ask the Climate Question": How will infrastructure, land development, and investment decisions affect GHG emissions and resilience to climate change impacts? We find these dialogues help stakeholders share their perspectives and advance public-private collaboration on climate resilience to protect critical urban infrastructure, ensure business continuity, and increase extreme weather resilience. Third, we find that communication to the general public must capture

  9. Forecasting distributions of large federal-lands fires utilizing satellite and gridded weather information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Preisler, H.K.; Burgan, R.E.; Eidenshink, J.C.; Klaver, Jacqueline M.; Klaver, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    The current study presents a statistical model for assessing the skill of fire danger indices and for forecasting the distribution of the expected numbers of large fires over a given region and for the upcoming week. The procedure permits development of daily maps that forecast, for the forthcoming week and within federal lands, percentiles of the distributions of (i) number of ignitions; (ii) number of fires above a given size; (iii) conditional probabilities of fires greater than a specified size, given ignition. As an illustration, we used the methods to study the skill of the Fire Potential Index an index that incorporates satellite and surface observations to map fire potential at a national scale in forecasting distributions of large fires. ?? 2009 IAWF.

  10. An advanced mixed user domestic satellite system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, H. G.; Holmes, W. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A domestic satellite system architecture that can efficiently and economically accommodate a wide variety of disparate user classes is described and a baseline system configuration identified. With such a technique, both the efficiency of TDMA operation and the operational terminal flexibility of FDMA can be simultaneously achieved.

  11. Post-Launch Calibration and Testing of Space Weather Instruments on GOES-R Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadikonda, S. K.; Merrow, Cynthia S.; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey A.; Comeyne, Gustave J.; Flanagan, Daniel G.; Todrita, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite - R (GOES-R) is the first of a series of satellites to be launched, with the first launch scheduled for October 2016. The three instruments Solar UltraViolet Imager (SUVI), Extreme ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensor (EXIS), and Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS) provide the data needed as inputs for the product updates National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides to the public. SUVI is a full-disk extreme ultraviolet imager enabling Active Region characterization, filament eruption, and flare detection. EXIS provides inputs to solar back-ground-sevents impacting climate models. SEISS provides particle measurements over a wide energy-and-flux range that varies by several orders of magnitude and these data enable updates to spacecraft charge models for electrostatic discharge. EXIS and SEISS have been tested and calibrated end-to-end in ground test facilities around the United States. Due to the complexity of the SUVI design, data from component tests were used in a model to predict on-orbit performance. The ground tests and model updates provided inputs for designing the on-orbit calibration tests. A series of such tests have been planned for the Post-Launch Testing (PLT) of each of these instruments, and specific parameters have been identified that will be updated in the Ground Processing Algorithms, on-orbit parameter tables, or both. Some of SUVI and EXIS calibrations require slewing them off the Sun, while no such maneuvers are needed for SEISS. After a six-month PLT period the GOES-R is expected to be operational. The calibration details are presented in this paper.

  12. Post-Launch Calibration and Testing of Space Weather Instruments on GOES-R Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadikonda, Sivakumara S. K.; Merrow, Cynthia S.; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey A.; Comeyne, Gustave J.; Flanagan, Daniel G.; Todirita, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite - R (GOES-R) is the first of a series of satellites to be launched, with the first launch scheduled for October 2016. The three instruments - Solar Ultra Violet Imager (SUVI), Extreme ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensor (EXIS), and Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS) provide the data needed as inputs for the product updates National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides to the public. SUVI is a full-disk extreme ultraviolet imager enabling Active Region characterization, filament eruption, and flare detection. EXIS provides inputs to solar backgrounds/events impacting climate models. SEISS provides particle measurements over a wide energy-and-flux range that varies by several orders of magnitude and these data enable updates to spacecraft charge models for electrostatic discharge. EXIS and SEISS have been tested and calibrated end-to-end in ground test facilities around the United States. Due to the complexity of the SUVI design, data from component tests were used in a model to predict on-orbit performance. The ground tests and model updates provided inputs for designing the on-orbit calibration tests. A series of such tests have been planned for the Post-Launch Testing (PLT) of each of these instruments, and specific parameters have been identified that will be updated in the Ground Processing Algorithms, on-orbit parameter tables, or both. Some of SUVI and EXIS calibrations require slewing them off the Sun, while no such maneuvers are needed for SEISS. After a six-month PLT period the GOES-R is expected to be operational. The calibration details are presented in this paper.

  13. Post-launch calibration and testing of space weather instruments on GOES-R satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadikonda, Sivakumara S. K.; Merrow, Cynthia S.; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey A.; Comeyne, Gustave J.; Flanagan, Daniel G.; Todirita, Monica

    2016-05-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite - R (GOES-R) is the first of a series of satellites to be launched, with the first launch scheduled for October 2016. The three instruments -- Solar UltraViolet Imager (SUVI), Extreme ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensor (EXIS), and Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS) provide the data needed as inputs for the product updates National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides to the public. SUVI is a full-disk extreme ultraviolet imager enabling Active Region characterization, filament eruption, and flare detection. EXIS provides inputs to solar backgrounds/events impacting climate models. SEISS provides particle measurements over a wide energy-and-flux range that varies by several orders of magnitude and these data enable updates to spacecraft charge models for electrostatic discharge. EXIS and SEISS have been tested and calibrated end-to-end in ground test facilities around the United States. Due to the complexity of the SUVI design, data from component tests were used in a model to predict on-orbit performance. The ground tests and model updates provided inputs for designing the on-orbit calibration tests. A series of such tests have been planned for the Post-Launch Testing (PLT) of each of these instruments, and specific parameters have been identified that will be updated in the Ground Processing Algorithms, on-orbit parameter tables, or both. Some of SUVI and EXIS calibrations require slewing them off the Sun, while no such maneuvers are needed for SEISS. After a six-month PLT period the GOES-R is expected to be operational. The calibration details are presented in this paper.

  14. In-Orbit Monitoring of Space Weather and Its Effects on Commercial- Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Electronics - A Decade of Research Using Micro-Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Craig I.; Sweeting, Martin, , Sir

    2002-01-01

    Over the past 20 years the University of Surrey has gained significant experience in the use of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) devices operating in low-Earth orbit through the design, manufacture, launch and operation of more than a dozen "UoSAT" micro-satellites. The deleterious effects of the ionising radiation environment is of particular concern when using COTS technologies in space, and over the last decade, particular emphasis has been given to a programme of monitoring "space weather" in terms of the high energy proton and heavy-ion cosmic-ray environment these spacecraft encounter, and to observing and analysing its effects - particularly with regard to single-event effects - upon the COTS devices on-board. The extended period of research has enabled a wide variety of conditions to be observed ranging across an entire solar cycle. This paper reports on the environment and effects observed, and describes the various methodologies that have been used to minimise the risk associated with the use of COTS devices in space. The practical importance of resilient error-detection and correction coding schemes to protect spacecraft data and control software is shown, as is the need for adequate levels of shielding against total ionising radiation dose. The relative effects of Galactic-Cosmic-Rays (GCRs), Solar Proton Events (SPEs) and trapped proton environments in Low-Earth orbit are discussed, and more recent flight data extends these observations out to very high orbit - approx 60,000 km altitude. As well as gaining practical data on space weather and its effects on advanced electronics, the research has resulted in the design and construction of a series of inexpensive, compact, and low- power particle detectors, which are capable of providing routine environmental "health" warnings for future operational spacecraft. Low cost micro-satellites have proven to be ideal vehicles for quick response and cost effective space technology verification missions, where

  15. Proposed advanced satellite applications utilizing space nuclear power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Patrick G.; Isenberg, Lon

    1990-01-01

    A review of the status of space nuclear reactor systems and their possible applications is presented. Such systems have been developed over the past twenty years and are capable of use in various military and civilian applications in the 5-1000-kWe power range. The capabilities and limitations of the currently proposed nuclear reactor systems are summarized. Statements of need are presented from DoD, DOE, and NASA. Safety issues are identified, and if they are properly addressed they should not pose a hindrance. Applications are summarized for the DoD, DOE, NASA, and the civilian community. These applications include both low- and high-altitude satellite surveillance missions, communications satellites, planetary probes, low- and high-power lunar and planetary base power systems, broadband global telecommunications, air traffic control, and high-definition television.

  16. Creating Interactive Graphical Overlays in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System Using Shapefiles and DGM Files

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Lafosse, Richard; Hood, Doris; Hoeth, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Graphical overlays can be created in real-time in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) using shapefiles or Denver AWIPS Risk Reduction and Requirements Evaluation (DARE) Graphics Metafile (DGM) files. This presentation describes how to create graphical overlays on-the-fly for AWIPS, by using two examples of AWIPS applications that were created by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) located at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), Florida. The first example is the Anvil Threat Corridor Forecast Tool, which produces a shapefile that depicts a graphical threat corridor of the forecast movement of thunderstorm anvil clouds, based on the observed or forecast upper-level winds. This tool is used by the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) at Johnson Space Center, Texas and 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) at CCAFS to analyze the threat of natural or space vehicle-triggered lightning over a location. The second example is a launch and landing trajectory tool that produces a DGM file that plots the ground track of space vehicles during launch or landing. The trajectory tool can be used by SMG and the 45 WS forecasters to analyze weather radar imagery along a launch or landing trajectory. The presentation will list the advantages and disadvantages of both file types for creating interactive graphical overlays in future AWIPS applications. Shapefiles are a popular format used extensively in Geographical Information Systems. They are usually used in AWIPS to depict static map backgrounds. A shapefile stores the geometry and attribute information of spatial features in a dataset (ESRI 1998). Shapefiles can contain point, line, and polygon features. Each shapefile contains a main file, index file, and a dBASE table. The main file contains a record for each spatial feature, which describes the feature with a list of its vertices. The index file contains the offset of each record from the beginning of the main file. The dBASE table contains records for each

  17. New advanced netted ground based and topside radio diagnostics for Space Weather Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothkaehl, Hanna; Krankowski, Andrzej; Morawski, Marek; Atamaniuk, Barbara; Zakharenkova, Irina; Cherniak, Iurii

    2014-05-01

    data retrieved from FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC radio occultation measurements. The main purpose of this presentation is to describe new advanced diagnostic techniques of the near-Earth space plasma and point out the scientific challenges of the radio frequency analyser located on board of low orbiting satellites and LOFAR facilities. This research is partly supported by grant O N517 418440

  18. Presentations of the Ninth Advanced Communications Technology Satellite Propagation Studies Workshop (APSW IX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nasser (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite Propagation Studies Workshop (APSW) is convened each year to present the results of the ACTS Propagation Campaign. Representatives from the satellite communications (satcom) industry, academia, and government are invited to APSW for discussions and exchange of information. The ACTS Propagation campaign is completing three years of Ka-Band data collection at seven sites in North America. Through this effort, NASA is making a major contribution to growth of satcom services by providing timely propagation data and models for predicting the performance of Ka-Band satellite communications systems.

  19. Statistical Aspects of North Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclones During the Weather Satellite Era, 1960-2013: Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    A tropical cyclone is described as a warm-core, nonfrontal, synoptic-scale system that originates over tropical or subtropical waters, having organized deep convection and closed surface wind circulation (counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere) about a well defined center. When its sustained wind speed equals 34-63 kt, it is called a tropical (or subtropical) storm and is given a name (i.e., alternating male and female names, beginning in 1979); when its sustained wind speed equals 64-95 kt, it is called a hurricane (at least in the Eastern Pacific and North Atlantic basin); and when its sustained wind speed equals 96 kt or higher, it is called an intense or major hurricane (i.e., categories 3-5 on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale). Although tropical cyclones have been reported and described since the voyages of Columbus, a detailed record of their occurrences extends only from 1851 to the present, with the most reliable portion extending only from about 1945 to the present, owing to the use of near-continuous routine reconnaissance aircraft monitoring flights and the use of satellite imagery (beginning in 1960; see Davis). Even so, the record may still be incomplete, possibly missing at least one tropical cyclone per yearly hurricane season, especially prior to the use of continuous satellite monitoring. In fact, often an unnamed tropical cyclone is included in the year-end listing of events at the conclusion of the season, following post-season analysis (e.g., as happened in 2011 and 2013, each having one unnamed event). In this two-part Technical Publication (TP), statistical aspects of the North Atlantic basin tropical cyclones are examined for the interval 1960-2013, the weather satellite era. Part 1 examines some 25 parameters of tropical cyclones (e.g., frequencies, peak wind speed (PWS), accumulated cyclone energy (ACE), etc.), while part 2 examines the relationship of these parameters against specific climate-related factors. These studies are

  20. Advance Power Technology Experiment for the Starshine 3 Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, David; Wilt, David; Raffaelle, Ryne; Button, Robert; Smith, Mark; Kerslake, Thomas; Miller, Thomas; Bailey, Sheila (Technical Monitor); Hepp, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Starshine 3 satellite will carry several power technology demonstrations. Since Starshine 3 is primarily a passive experiment and does not need electrical power to successfully complete its mission, the requirement for a highly reliable power system is greatly reduced. This creates an excellent opportunity to test new power technologies. Several government and commercial interests have teamed up to provide Starshine 3 with a small power system using state-of-the-art components. Starshine 3 will also fly novel integrated microelectronic power supplies (IWS) for evaluation.

  1. Advancing NASA's Satellite Control Capabilities: More than Just Better Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Danford

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work of the Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) in the development of the NASA's satellite control capabilities. The purpose of the presentation is to provide a quick overview of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and our approach to coordinating the ground system resources and development activities across many different missions. NASA Goddard's work in developing and managing the current and future space exploration missions is highlighted. The GMSEC, was established to to coordinate ground and flight data systems development and services, to create a new standard ground system for many missions and to reflect the reality that business reengineering and mindset were just as important.

  2. Production process for advanced space satellite system cables/interconnects.

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, Luis A.

    2007-12-01

    This production process was generated for the satellite system program cables/interconnects group, which in essences had no well defined production process. The driver for the development of a formalized process was based on the set backs, problem areas, challenges, and need improvements faced from within the program at Sandia National Laboratories. In addition, the formal production process was developed from the Master's program of Engineering Management for New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in Socorro New Mexico and submitted as a thesis to meet the institute's graduating requirements.

  3. Applications technology satellite advanced missions study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Four different spacecraft configurations were developed for geostationary service as a high power communications satellite. The first configuration is a Thor-Delta launch into a low orbit with a spiral ascent to synchronous altitude by ion engine propulsion. The spacecraft is earth oriented with rotating solar arrays. Configuration 2 is a direct injection Atlas/Centaur/Burner II vehicle which when in orbit is sun-oriented with a rotating transponder tower. Configurations 3 and 4 are Titan IIIC launches, and are therefore larger and heavier than Configuration 2. They are both sun-oriented, with rotating transponder towers and are directly injected into orbit. Technology discussed includes high power (up to 2 kW) transmitters with collectors radiating heat directly into space, and contoured antenna patterns designed to illuminate particular earth regions. There is also a review of potential users of the services which can be performed by this type satellite in such areas as information networking, public broadcasting and educational television.

  4. Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) multibeam antenna analysis and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Lagin, Alan R.; Larko, Jeffrey M.; Narvaez, Adabelle

    1992-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of a satellite communication system design is the accurate estimation of antenna performance degradation. Pointing error, end coverage gain, peak gain degradation, etc. are the main concerns. The thermal or dynamic distortions of a reflector antenna structural system can affect the far-field antenna power distribution in a least four ways. (1) The antenna gain is reduced; (2) the main lobe of the antenna can be mispointed thus shifting the destination of the delivered power away from the desired locations; (3) the main lobe of the antenna pattern can be broadened, thus spreading the RF power over a larger area than desired; and (4) the antenna pattern sidelobes can increase, thus increasing the chances of interference among adjacent beams of multiple beam antenna system or with antenna beams of other satellites. The in-house developed NASA Lewis Research Center thermal/structural/RF analysis program was designed to accurately simulate the ACTS in-orbit thermal environment and predict the RF antenna performance. The program combines well establish computer programs (TRASYS, SINDA and NASTAN) with a dual reflector-physical optics RF analysis program. The ACTS multibeam antenna configuration is analyzed and several thermal cases are presented and compared with measurements (pre-flight).

  5. R and D limited partnerships (possible applications in advanced communications satellite technology experiment program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Typical R&D limited partnership arrangements, advantages and disadvantages of R&D limited partnership (RDLPs) and antitrust and tax implications are described. A number of typical forms of RDLPs are described that may be applicable for use in stimulating R&D and experimental programs using the advanced communications technology satellite. The ultimate goal is to increase the rate of market penetration of goods and/or services based upon advanced satellite communications technology. The conditions necessary for these RDLP forms to be advantageous are outlined.

  6. Advanced technology for a satellite multichannel demultiplexer/demodulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramovitz, Irwin J.; Flechsig, Drew E.; Matteis, Richard M., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Satellite on-board processing is needed to efficiently service multiple users while at the same time minimizing earth station complexity. The processing satellite receives a wideband uplink at 30 GHz and down-converts it to a suitable intermediate frequency. A multichannel demultiplexer then separates the composite signal into discrete channels. Each channel is then demodulated by bulk demodulators, with the baseband signals routed to the downlink processor for retransmission to the receiving earth stations. This type of processing circumvents many of the difficulties associated with traditional bent-pipe repeater satellites. Uplink signal distortion and interference are not retransmitted on the downlink. Downlink power can be allocated in accordance with user needs, independent of uplink transmissions. This allows the uplink users to employ different data rates as well as different modulation and coding schemes. In addition, all downlink users have a common frequency standard and symbol clock on the satellite, which is useful for network synchronization in time division multiple access schemes. The purpose of this program is to demonstrate the concept of an optically implemented multichannel demultiplexer (MCD). A proof-of-concept (POC) model has been developed which has the ability to receive a 40 MHz wide composite signal consisting of up to 1000 40 kHz QPSK modulated channels and perform the demultiplexing process. In addition a set of special test equipment (STE) has been configured to evaluate the performance of the POC model. The optical MCD is realized as an acousto-optic spectrum analyzer utilizing the capability of Bragg cells to perform the required channelization. These Bragg cells receive an optical input from a laser source and an RF input (the signal). The Bragg interaction causes optical output diffractions at angles proportional to the RF input frequency. These discrete diffractions are optically detected and output to individual demodulators for

  7. Weathering Patterns of Ignitable Liquids with the Advanced Distillation Curve Method

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Thomas J; Allen, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    One can take advantage of the striking similarity of ignitable liquid vaporization (or weathering) patterns and the separation observed during distillation to predict the composition of residual compounds in fire debris. This is done with the advanced distillation curve (ADC) metrology, which separates a complex fluid by distillation into fractions that are sampled, and for which thermodynamically consistent temperatures are measured at atmospheric pressure. The collected sample fractions can be analyzed by any method that is appropriate. Analytical methods we have applied include gas chromatography (with flame ionization, mass spectrometric and sulfur chemiluminescence detection), thin layer chromatography, FTIR, Karl Fischer coulombic titrimetry, refractometry, corrosivity analysis, neutron activation analysis and cold neutron prompt gamma activation analysis. We have applied this method on product streams such as finished fuels (gasoline, diesel fuels, aviation fuels, rocket propellants), crude oils (including a crude oil made from swine manure) and waste oils streams (used automotive and transformer oils). In this paper, we present results on a variety of ignitable liquids that are not commodity fuels, chosen from the Ignitable Liquids Reference Collection (ILRC). These measurements are assembled into a preliminary database. From this selection, we discuss the significance and forensic application of the temperature data grid and the composition explicit data channel of the ADC. PMID:26401423

  8. Weathering Patterns of Ignitable Liquids with the Advanced Distillation Curve Method.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Thomas J; Allen, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    One can take advantage of the striking similarity of ignitable liquid vaporization (or weathering) patterns and the separation observed during distillation to predict the composition of residual compounds in fire debris. This is done with the advanced distillation curve (ADC) metrology, which separates a complex fluid by distillation into fractions that are sampled, and for which thermodynamically consistent temperatures are measured at atmospheric pressure. The collected sample fractions can be analyzed by any method that is appropriate. Analytical methods we have applied include gas chromatography (with flame ionization, mass spectrometric and sulfur chemiluminescence detection), thin layer chromatography, FTIR, Karl Fischer coulombic titrimetry, refractometry, corrosivity analysis, neutron activation analysis and cold neutron prompt gamma activation analysis. We have applied this method on product streams such as finished fuels (gasoline, diesel fuels, aviation fuels, rocket propellants), crude oils (including a crude oil made from swine manure) and waste oils streams (used automotive and transformer oils). In this paper, we present results on a variety of ignitable liquids that are not commodity fuels, chosen from the Ignitable Liquids Reference Collection (ILRC). These measurements are assembled into a preliminary database. From this selection, we discuss the significance and forensic application of the temperature data grid and the composition explicit data channel of the ADC. PMID:26401423

  9. Advanced Extraction of Spatial Information from High Resolution Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pour, T.; Burian, J.; Miřijovský, J.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper authors processed five satellite image of five different Middle-European cities taken by five different sensors. The aim of the paper was to find methods and approaches leading to evaluation and spatial data extraction from areas of interest. For this reason, data were firstly pre-processed using image fusion, mosaicking and segmentation processes. Results going into the next step were two polygon layers; first one representing single objects and the second one representing city blocks. In the second step, polygon layers were classified and exported into Esri shapefile format. Classification was partly hierarchical expert based and partly based on the tool SEaTH used for separability distinction and thresholding. Final results along with visual previews were attached to the original thesis. Results are evaluated visually and statistically in the last part of the paper. In the discussion author described difficulties of working with data of large size, taken by different sensors and different also thematically.

  10. Baseband processor development for the Advanced Communications Satellite Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moat, D.; Sabourin, D.; Stilwell, J.; Mccallister, R.; Borota, M.

    1982-01-01

    An onboard-baseband-processor concept for a satellite-switched time-division-multiple-access (SS-TDMA) communication system was developed for NASA Lewis Research Center. The baseband processor routes and controls traffic on an individual message basis while providing significant advantages in improved link margins and system flexibility. Key technology developments required to prove the flight readiness of the baseband-processor design are being verified in a baseband-processor proof-of-concept model. These technology developments include serial MSK modems, Clos-type baseband routing switch, a single-chip CMOS maximum-likelihood convolutional decoder, and custom LSL implementation of high-speed, low-power ECL building blocks.

  11. Multidisciplinary studies of the social, economic and political impact resulting from recent advances in satellite meteorology, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The multidisciplinary studies explore and evaluate the impact of the meteorological satellite and the concomitant impact of the data derived from it on various user groups. As expected, the primary impact related to those who would use satellite data for weather prediction and related purposes. A secondary impact was in the area of international concerns where GARP and other international meteorological activities were affected and international law was developed. A tertiary impact was exemplified by satellite photographs utilized in advertisements and related materials. The case studies, supporting studies, and independent studies all emphasize the potential of the meteorological satellite.

  12. Space Weather Impacts on Technological Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtagh, W.; Viereck, R. A.; Rutledge, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), one of the nine National Weather Service (NWS), National Centers for Environmental Prediction, is the nation's official source for space weather alerts and warnings. The rapid advances in the technology sector and our fast growing dependency on space-based systems have resulted in an ever-increasing vulnerability to hazardous space weather. NWS efforts to support aviation, emergency response efforts, and electric power grids, now extend to space and solar storms. Other key sectors impacted by space weather include satellite communications, and GPS applications, which pervade modern society. And the concerns are growing as we approach the next solar maximum, expected to peak in 2013. This presentation will address the different types of space weather events and how they impact our technological infrastructure.

  13. The water balance of Lake Tana and the surrounding catchments using satellite data and routine weather data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zheng; Bastiaanssen, Wim

    2014-05-01

    Lake Tana is the largest lake in Ethiopia. The outflow is the source of the Blue Nile and this water is fundamental for many livelihoods and delivers ecosystem services to downstream - international - stakeholders. It is essential to estimate the major hydrological flow processes of the Lake Tana Basin, including the runoff from ungauged catchments that feed the lake as well as the outflow through weirs and turbines. Flow releases from many lakes and reservoirs in the world are often kept tight by responsible agencies, and this abstract shows how smart hydroinformatics based on freely accessible earth observation data can be explored to inform stakeholders. Routine weather data were added for calibration of rainfall and for the computation of evapotranspiration rates. The monthly inflow from catchments draining into Lake Tana was computed from the difference in rainfall and land evapotranspiration, including a minor correction term for storage changes in the unsaturated/saturated zone. The large majority of the inflow is ungauged, so this provides more information on the total water yield. The rainfall map at 1 km resolution was obtained from Version 7 TRMM 3B43 product using a new published downscaling-calibration procedure with measured rainfall from 20 rain gauges. The 1 km resolution evapotranspiration map was modeled from newly developed ETLook model using data from MODIS, AMSR-E and Meteosat systems. The water balance of the lake area was computed from rainfall, lake evaporation and the changes in water volumes. The rainfall over the lake area was estimated from TRMM 3B43 product with a calibration factor. The De Bruin-Keijman model was used to compute lake evaporation. Monthly heat storage changes were modeled using a newly developed hysteresis model using monthly MODIS surface temperature data. The water volume changes in the lake were estimated using Landsat TM/ETM imagery and satellite altimetry data. The satellite altimetry data were obtained from

  14. A system architecture for an advanced Canadian wideband mobile satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takats, P.; Keelty, M.; Moody, H.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, the system architecture for an advanced Canadian ka-band geostationary mobile satellite system is described, utilizing hopping spot beams to support a 256 kbps wideband service for both N-ISDN and packet-switched interconnectivity to small briefcase-size portable and mobile terminals. An assessment is given of the technical feasibility of the satellite payload and terminal design in the post year 2000 timeframe. The satellite payload includes regeneration and on-board switching to permit single hop interconnectivity between mobile terminals. The mobile terminal requires antenna tracking and platform stabilization to ensure acquisition of the satellite signal. The potential user applications targeted for this wideband service includes: home-office, multimedia, desk-top (PC) videoconferencing, digital audio broadcasting, single and multi-user personal communications.

  15. Satellite Detection in AdvancedCamera for Surveys/Wide Field Channel Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borncamp, D.; Lim, Pey-Lian

    2016-01-01

    This document explains the process by which satellite trails can be found within individual chips of an Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC) image. Since satellites are transient and sporadic events, we used the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) dataset which is manually checked for satellite trails has been used as a truth set to verify that the method in this document does a complete job without a high false positive rate. This document also details the process of producing a mask that will update data quality information to inform users where the trail traverses the image and properly account for the affected pixels. Along with this document, the Python source code used to detect and mask satellite trails will be released to users with as a stand-alone product within the STSDAS acstools package.

  16. Advanced multi-GNSS troposphere modeling for improved monitoring and forecasting of severe weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottiaux, Eric; Berckmans, Julie; Bruyninx, Carine

    2014-05-01

    The Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB) contributes to the EUMETNET EIG GNSS Water Vapour Program (E-GVAP) aiming at the operational exploitation of GNSS signals for improving Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP). Within E-GVAP, ROB provides hourly-updated Zenith Tropospheric Delays (ZTDs) from a network of about 350 GPS stations covering Europe. Over the past years, many GPS station operators have upgraded their equipment to observe simultaneously multiple GNSS (GPS, GLONASS, Galileo). However, these additional observations are presently not exploited for operational meteorology, which still relies on the analysis of GPS-only observations to provide only ZTD (no or few information on spatial heterogeneities is provided). Improving this situation is one of the goals of the new COST Action ES1206: "Advanced GNSS Tropospheric Products for Monitoring Extreme Weather Events and Climate" (GNSS4SWEC) to which ROB participates. In that context, ROB is investigating a new processing strategy using the latest Bernese software version 5.2 to provide new and enhanced tropospheric products, including the estimation of ZTD and horizontal gradients, based on the analysis of multi-GNSS observations. These products will improve the analysis of the behavior of atmospheric water vapor (including its local heterogeneities) and stimulate the use of GNSS for the monitoring and forecasting of severe weather. As a first step, we studied the benefits of including GLONASS observations w.r.t. a GPS-only processing system, focusing particularly on the reliability and stability of the ZTD estimation. We also studied the sensitivity of the new multi-GNSS ZTD estimates with respect to the relative constraints imposed during the parameter estimation. In our setup, relative constraints of 0.007m provide a good balance between reducing the noise and allowing for the natural variability of the ZTD. We also show that the new multi-GNSS ZTD estimates generally agree with the GPS-only estimates at the

  17. Battery Performance of ADEOS (Advanced Earth Observing Satellite) and Ground Simulation Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koga, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Kuwajima, S.; Kusawake, H.

    1997-01-01

    The Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) is developed with the aim of establishment of platform technology for future spacecraft and inter-orbit communication technology for the transmission of earth observation data. ADEOS uses 5 batteries, consists of two packs. This paper describes, using graphs and tables, the ground simulation tests and results that are carried to determine the performance of the ADEOS batteries.

  18. Application of advanced on-board processing concepts to future satellite communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. L.; Hoffman, M.; Kota, S. L.; Ruddy, J. M.; White, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    An initial definition of on-board processing requirements for an advanced satellite communications system to service domestic markets in the 1990's is presented. An exemplar system architecture with both RF on-board switching and demodulation/remodulation baseband processing was used to identify important issues related to system implementation, cost, and technology development.

  19. Statistical Aspects of North Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclones During the Weather Satellite Era, 1960-2013. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    This Technical Publication (TP) is part 2 of a two-part study of the North Atlantic basin tropical cyclones that occurred during the weather satellite era, 1960-2013. In particular, this TP examines the inferred statistical relationships between 25 tropical cyclone parameters and 9 specific climate-related factors, including the (1) Oceanic Niño Index (ONI), (2) Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), (3) Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) index, (4) Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) index, (5) North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index of the Climate Prediction Center (CPC), (6) NAO index of the Climate Research Unit (CRU), (7) Armagh surface air temperature (ASAT), (8) Global Land-Ocean Temperature Index (GLOTI), and (9) Mauna Loa carbon dioxide (CO2) (MLCO2) index. Part 1 of this two-part study examined the statistical aspects of the 25 tropical cyclone parameters (e.g., frequencies, peak wind speed (PWS), accumulated cyclone energy (ACE), etc.) and provided the results of statistical testing (i.e., runs-testing, the t-statistic for independent samples, and Poisson distributions). Also, the study gave predictions for the frequencies of the number of tropical cyclones (NTC), number of hurricanes (NH), number of major hurricanes (NMH), and number of United States land-falling hurricanes (NUSLFH) expected for the 2014 season, based on the statistics of the overall interval 1960-2013, the subinterval 1995-2013, and whether the year 2014 would be either an El Niño year (ENY) or a non-El Niño year (NENY).

  20. Pilot weather advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, W. A.; Seth, S.; Crabill, N. L.; Shipley, S. T.; Graffman, I.; Oneill, J.

    1992-01-01

    The results of the work performed by ViGYAN, Inc., to demonstrate the Pilot Weather Advisor cockpit weather data system using a broadcast satellite communication system are presented. The Pilot Weather Advisor demonstrated that the technical problems involved with transmitting significant amount of weather data to an aircraft in-flight or on-the-ground via satellite are solvable with today's technology. The Pilot Weather Advisor appears to be a viable solution for providing accurate and timely weather information for general aviation aircraft.

  1. Weather in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The ATS-111 weather satellite, launched on November 18, 1967, in a synchronous earth orbit 22,000 miles above the equator, is described in this folder. The description is divided into these topics: the satellite, the camera, the display, the picture information, and the beneficial use of the satellite. Photographs from the satellite are included.…

  2. Advanced Electric Propulsion for Space Solar Power Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steve

    1999-01-01

    The sun tower concept of collecting solar energy in space and beaming it down for commercial use will require very affordable in-space as well as earth-to-orbit transportation. Advanced electric propulsion using a 200 kW power and propulsion system added to the sun tower nodes can provide a factor of two reduction in the required number of launch vehicles when compared to in-space cryogenic chemical systems. In addition, the total time required to launch and deliver the complete sun tower system is of the same order of magnitude using high power electric propulsion or cryogenic chemical propulsion: around one year. Advanced electric propulsion can also be used to minimize the stationkeeping propulsion system mass for this unique space platform. 50 to 100 kW class Hall, ion, magnetoplasmadynamic, and pulsed inductive thrusters are compared. High power Hall thruster technology provides the best mix of launches saved and shortest ground to Geosynchronous Earth Orbital Environment (GEO) delivery time of all the systems, including chemical. More detailed studies comparing launch vehicle costs, transfer operations costs, and propulsion system costs and complexities must be made to down-select a technology. The concept of adding electric propulsion to the sun tower nodes was compared to a concept using re-useable electric propulsion tugs for Low Earth Orbital Environment (LEO) to GEO transfer. While the tug concept would reduce the total number of required propulsion systems, more launchers and notably longer LEO to GEO and complete sun tower ground to GEO times would be required. The tugs would also need more complex, longer life propulsion systems and the ability to dock with sun tower nodes.

  3. Advanced payload concepts and system architecture for emerging services in Indian National Satellite Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, E. P.; Rao, N. Prahlad; Sarkar, S.; Singh, D. K.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past two decades Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) has developed and operationalized satellites to generate a large capacity of transponders for telecommunication service use in INSAT system. More powerful on-board transmitters are built to usher-in direct-to-home broadcast services. These have transformed the Satcom application scenario in the country. With the proliferation of satellite technology, a shift in the Indian market is witnessed today in terms of demand for new services like Broadband Internet, Interactive Multimedia, etc. While it is imperative to pay attention to market trends, ISRO is also committed towards taking the benefits of technological advancement to all round growth of our population, 70% of which dwell in rural areas. The initiatives already taken in space application related to telemedicine, tele-education and Village Resource Centres are required to be taken to a greater height of efficiency. These targets pose technological challenges to build a large capacity and cost-effective satellite system. This paper addresses advanced payload concepts and system architecture along with the trade-off analysis on design parameters in proposing a new generation satellite system capable of extending the reach of the Indian broadband structure to individual users, educational and medical institutions and enterprises for interactive services. This will be a strategic step in the evolution of INSAT system to employ advanced technology to touch every human face of our population.

  4. Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, E. B.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Folmer, M. J.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), 32-km North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) interpolated to a 12-km grid, and 13-km Rapid Refresh analyses.

  5. Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, E. B.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis, and Rapid Refresh analyses.

  6. Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily B.; Zavodsky, Bradley T; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Elmer, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) reanalysis, and Rapid Refresh analyses.

  7. The Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary; Elmer, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis, and Rapid Refresh analyses.

  8. Displaying Composite and Archived Soundings in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Volkmer, Matthew R.; Blottman, Peter F.; Sharp, David W.

    2008-01-01

    In a previous task, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed spatial and temporal climatologies of lightning occurrence based on eight atmospheric flow regimes. The AMU created climatological, or composite, soundings of wind speed and direction, temperature, and dew point temperature at four rawinsonde observation stations at Jacksonville, Tampa, Miami, and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for each of the eight flow regimes. The composite soundings were delivered to the National Weather Service (NWS) Melbourne (MLB) office for display using the National version of the Skew-T Hodograph analysis and Research Program (NSHARP) software program. The NWS MLB requested the AMU make the composite soundings available for display in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS), so they could be overlaid on current observed soundings. This will allow the forecasters to compare the current state of the atmosphere with climatology. This presentation describes how the AMU converted the composite soundings from NSHARP Archive format to Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) format, so that the soundings could be displayed in AWl PS. The NetCDF is a set of data formats, programming interfaces, and software libraries used to read and write scientific data files. In AWIPS, each meteorological data type, such as soundings or surface observations, has a unique NetCDF format. Each format is described by a NetCDF template file. Although NetCDF files are in binary format, they can be converted to a text format called network Common data form Description Language (CDL). A software utility called ncgen is used to create a NetCDF file from a CDL file, while the ncdump utility is used to create a CDL file from a NetCDF file. An AWIPS receives soundings in Binary Universal Form for the Representation of Meteorological data (BUFR) format (http://dss.ucar.edu/docs/formats/bufr/), and then decodes them into NetCDF format. Only two sounding files are generated in AWIPS per day. One

  9. On the Characterization of Rainfall Associated with U.S. Landfalling North Atlantic Tropical Cyclones Based on Satellite Data and Numerical Weather Prediction Outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luitel, B. N.; Villarini, G.; Vecchi, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    When we talk about tropical cyclones (TCs), the first things that come to mind are strong winds and storm surge affecting the coastal areas. However, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) 59% of the deaths caused by TCs since 1970 is due to fresh water flooding. Heavy rainfall associated with TCs accounts for 13% of heavy rainfall events nationwide for the June-October months, with this percentage being much higher if the focus is on the eastern and southern United States. This study focuses on the evaluation of precipitation associated with the North Atlantic TCs that affected the continental United States over the period 2007 - 2012. We evaluate the rainfall associated with these TCs using four satellite based rainfall products: Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission - Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA; both real-time and research version); Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN); Climate Prediction Center (CPC) MORPHing technique (CMORPH). As a reference data we use gridded rainfall provided by CPC (Daily US Unified Gauge-Based Analysis of Precipitation). Rainfall fields from each of these satellite products are compared to the reference data, providing valuable information about the realism of these products in reproducing the rainfall associated with TCs affecting the continental United States. In addition to the satellite products, we evaluate the forecasted rainfall produced by five state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction (NWP) models: European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), UK Met Office (UKMO), National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), China Meteorological Administration (CMA), and Canadian Meteorological Center (CMC). The skill of these models in reproducing TC rainfall is quantified for different lead times, and discussed in light of the performance of the satellite products.

  10. Ranger© - An Affordable, Advanced, Next-Generation, Dual-Pol, X-Band Weather Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stedronsky, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The Enterprise Electronics Corporation (EEC) Ranger© system is a new generation, X-band (3 cm), Adaptive Polarization Doppler Weather Surveillance Radar that fills the gap between high-cost, high-power traditional radar systems and the passive ground station weather sensors. Developed in partnership with the University of Oklahoma Advanced Radar Research Center (ARRC), the system uses relatively low power solid-state transmitters and pulse compression technology to attain nearly the same performance capabilities of much more expensive traditional radar systems. The Ranger© also employs Adaptive Dual Polarization (ADP) techniques to allow Alternating or Simultaneous Dual Polarization capability with total control over the transmission polarization state using dual independent coherent transmitters. Ranger© has been designed using the very latest technology available in the industry and the technical and manufacturing experience gained through over four decades of successful radar system design and production at EEC. The entire Ranger© design concept emphasizes precision, stability, reliability, and value using proven solid state technology combined with the most advanced motion control system ever conceived for weather radar. Key applications include meteorology, hydrology, aviation, offshore oil/gas drilling, wind energy, and outdoor event situational awareness.

  11. Field Test of Advanced Duct-Sealing Technologies Within the Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ternes, MP

    2001-12-05

    A field test of an aerosol-spray duct-sealing technology and a conventional, best-practice approach was performed in 80 homes to determine the efficacy and programmatic needs of the duct-sealing technologies as applied in the U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program. The field test was performed in five states: Iowa, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, and Wyoming. The study found that, compared with the best-practice approach, the aerosol-spray technology is 50% more effective at sealing duct leaks and can potentially reduce labor time and costs for duct sealing by 70%, or almost 4 crew-hours. Further study to encourage and promote use of the aerosol-spray technology within the Weatherization Assistance Program is recommended. A pilot test of full production weatherization programs using the aerosol-spray technology is recommended to develop approaches for integrating this technology with other energy conservation measures and minimizing impacts on weatherization agency logistics. In order to allow or improve adoption of the aerosol spray technology within the Weatherization Assistance Program, issues must be addressed concerning equipment costs, use of the technology under franchise arrangements with Aeroseal, Inc. (the holders of an exclusive license to use this technology), software used to control the equipment, safety, and training. Application testing of the aerosol-spray technology in mobile homes is also recommended.

  12. Design and integration of a solar AMTEC power system with an advanced global positioning satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.; Hunt, M.E.; Determan, W.R.; HoSang, P.A.; Schuller, M.

    1996-12-31

    A 1,200-W solar AMTEC (alkali metal thermal-to-electric conversion) power system concept was developed and integrated with an advanced global positioning system (GPS) satellite. The critical integration issues for the SAMTEC with the GPS subsystems included (1) packaging within the Delta 2 launch vehicle envelope, (2) deployment and start-up operations for the SAMTEC, (3) SAMTEC operation during all mission phases, (4) satellite field of view restrictions with satellite operations, and (5) effect of the SAMTEC requirements on other satellite subsystems. The SAMTEC power system was compared with a conventional planar solar array/battery power system to assess the differences in system weight, size, and operations. Features of the design include the use of an advanced multitube, vapor anode AMTEC cell design with 24% conversion efficiency, and a direct solar insolation receiver design with integral LiF salt canisters for energy storage to generate power during the maximum solar eclipse cycle. The modular generator design consists of an array of multitube AMTEC cells arranged into a parallel/series electrical network with built-in cell redundancy. The preliminary assessment indicates that the solar generator design is scalable over a 500 to 2,500-W range. No battery power is required during the operational phase of the GPS mission. SAMTEC specific power levels greater than 5 We/kg and 160 We/m{sup 2} are anticipated for a mission duration of 10 to 12 yr in orbits with high natural radiation backgrounds.

  13. Satellite soil moisture for advancing our understanding of earth system processes and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorigo, Wouter; de Jeu, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Soil moisture products obtained from active and passive microwave satellites have reached maturity during the last decade (De Jeu and Dorigo, 2016): On the one hand, research algorithms that were initially applied to sensors designed for other purposes, e.g., for measuring wind speed (e.g. the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT)), sea ice, or atmospheric parameters (e.g. the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System AMSR-E), have developed into fully operational products. On the other hand, dedicated soil moisture satellite missions were designed and launched by ESA (the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission) and NASA (the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission).

  14. Real-time compressed video ultrasound using the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Brent K.; Carter, Stephen J.; Cook, Jay F.; Abbe, Brian S.; Pinck, Deborah; Rowberg, Alan H.

    1996-05-01

    The authors have an in-kind grant from NASA to investigate the application of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to teleradiology and telemedicine using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) uplink. We have recently completed three series of experiments with the ACTS/AMT. Although these experiments were multifaceted, the primary objective was the determination and evaluation of transmitting real- time compressed ultrasound video imagery over the ACTS/AMT satellite link, a primary focus of the author's current ARPA Advanced Biomedical Technology contract. These experiments have demonstrated that real-time compressed ultrasound video imagery can be transmitted over multiple ISDN line bandwidth links with sufficient temporal, contrast and spatial resolution for clinical diagnosis of multiple disease and pathology states to provide subspecialty consultation and education at a distance.

  15. S-band multiple-access interference study for advanced tracking and data relay satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Wei-Chung; Yang, Chau-Chin

    1990-01-01

    The results of a study on the effect of mutual interference among S-band multiple access (SMA) system users of advanced tracking and data relay satellite system (ATDRSS) are presented. In the ATDRSS era, the SMA system is required to support data rates ranging from 10 kb/s to 3 Mb/s. The system will consist of four advanced tracking and data relay satellites (ATDRS) each supporting up to five telemetry links. All users have 10 MHz bandwidth with their carrier frequency equal to 2.2875 GHz. A hybrid SDMA/CDMA scheme is used to mitigate the effect of the interference among system users. SMA system interference probability is evaluated with CLASS software. User link margin degradation due to mutual interference between two users is evaluated. System interference probability is evaluated for the projected 1996 mission model, a reference mission model, and a modified reference mission model.

  16. Proceedings of the Eleventh Advanced Communications Technology Satellite Propagation Studies Workshop (APSW 11)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nasser (Editor); Ho, Christian (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite Propagation Studies Workshop (APSW) is convened each year to present the results of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Ka-band propagation campaign. Representatives from the space community including industry, academia, and government who are interested in radiowave propagation at Ka-band are invited to APSW for discussions and exchange of information. The ACTS Propagation campaign will complete five years of Ka-Band data collection at seven sites in North America by December 31, 1998. Through this effort, NASA is making a major contribution to the effective utilization of this band by providing timely propagation data and models for predicting the performance of Ka-band links between space and ground.

  17. The link evaluation terminal for the advanced communications technology satellite experiments program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Brian D.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental NASA satellite, Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), introduces new technology for high throughput 30 to 20 GHz satellite services. Contained in a single communication payload is both a regenerative TDMA system and multiple 800 MHz 'bent pipe' channels routed to spot beams by a switch matrix. While only one mode of operation is typical during any experiment, both modes can operate simultaneously with reduced capability due to sharing of the transponder. NASA-Lewis instituted a ground terminal development program in anticipation of the satellite launch to verify the performance of the switch matrix mode of operations. Specific functions are built into the ground terminal to evaluate rain fade compensation with uplink power control and to monitor satellite transponder performance with bit error rate measurements. These functions were the genesis of the ground terminal's name, Link Evaluation Terminal, often referred to as LET. Connectors are included in LET that allow independent experimenters to run unique modulation or network experiments through ACTS using only the RF transmit and receive portions of LET. Test data indicate that LET will be able to verify important parts of ACTS technology and provide independent experimenters with a useful ground terminal. Lab measurements of major subsystems integrated into LET are presented. Bit error rate is measured with LET in an internal loopback mode.

  18. Investigation of Advanced Radar Techniques for Atmospheric Hazard Detection with Airborne Weather Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pazmany, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    In 2013 ProSensing Inc. conducted a study to investigate the hazard detection potential of aircraft weather radars with new measurement capabilities, such as multi-frequency, polarimetric and radiometric modes. Various radar designs and features were evaluated for sensitivity, measurement range and for detecting and quantifying atmospheric hazards in wide range of weather conditions. Projected size, weight, power consumption and cost of the various designs were also considered. Various cloud and precipitation conditions were modeled and used to conduct an analytic evaluation of the design options. This report provides an overview of the study and summarizes the conclusions and recommendations.

  19. Atmospheric Phenomena Observed Over The South China Sea By The Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Onboard the ENVISAT Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpers, Werner; Huang, Weigen; Chan, Pak Wai; Wong, Wai Kin; Cheng, Cho Ming; Mouche, Alexis

    2010-10-01

    Atmospheric phenomena often leave fingerprints on the sea surface, which are detectable by synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Here we present some representative examples of SAR images acquired by the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) onboard the Envisat satellite over the South China Sea (SCS) which show radar signatures of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) and of coastal wind fields. On SAR images of the SCS also often radar signatures of oceanic internal waves (OIWs) are visible which have similar spatial scales as the ones originating from AGWs. Therefore we first present criteria how to distinguish between them by analyzing the structure of the radar signatures. Then we present two examples of ASAR images which show radar signatures of AGWs over the SCS. Furthermore, we present a SAR image showing radar signatures of a northerly Winter Monsoon surge event over the coastal area south of Hong Kong and compare it with a cloud image and a weather radar image. From the ASAR image we retrieve the near-surface wind field and compare it with the wind field simulated by the AIR model of the Hong Kong Observatory. The comparison shows that the AIR model can simulate quite well the wind speed as well as the position and shape of the frontal line measured by ASAR.

  20. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Cold Weather On-road Testing of the Chevrolet Volt

    SciTech Connect

    Smart, John

    2015-03-01

    This report details cold weather on-road testing of a Chevrolet Volt. It quantifies changes in efficiency and electric range as ambient temperature changes. It will be published to INL's AVTA website as an INL technical report and will be accessible to the general public.

  1. Exploring the Opportunities of a Balloon-Satellite in Bangladesh for Weather Data Collection and Vegetative Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafique, Md. Ishraque Bin; Razzaq Halim, M. A.; Rabbi, Fazle; Khalilur Rhaman, Md.

    2016-07-01

    For a third world country like Bangladesh, satellite and space research is not feasible due to lack of funding. Therefore, in order to imitate the principles of such a satellite Balloon Satellite can easily and inexpensively be setup. Balloon satellites are miniature satellites, which are cheap and easy to construct. This paper discusses a BalloonSat developed using a Raspberry Pi, IMU module, UV sensor, GPS module, Camera and XBee Module. An interactive GUI was designed to display all the data collected after processing. To understand nitrogen concentration of a plant, a leaf color chart is used. This paper attempts to digitalize this process, which is applied on photos taken by the BallonSat.

  2. Distress detection, location, and communications using advanced space technology. [satellite-borne synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces a concept for low-cost, global, day-night, all-weather disaster warning and assistance. Evolving, advanced space technology with passive radio frequency reflectors in conjunction with an imaging synthetic aperture radar is employed to detect, identify, locate, and provide passive communication with earth users in distress. This concept evolved from a broad NASA research on new global search and rescue techniques. Appropriate airborne radar test results from this research are reviewed and related to potential disaster applications. The analysis indicates the approach has promise for disaster communications relative to floods, droughts, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and severe storms.

  3. Creating Interactive Graphical Overlays in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) Using Shapefiles and DGM Files

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Lafosse, Richard; Hood, Doris; Hoeth, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Graphical overlays can be created in real-time in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) using shapefiles or DARE Graphics Metafile (DGM) files. This presentation describes how to create graphical overlays on-the-fly for AWIPS, by using two examples of AWIPS applications that were created by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU). The first example is the Anvil Threat Corridor Forecast Tool, which produces a shapefile that depicts a graphical threat corridor of the forecast movement of thunderstorm anvil clouds, based on the observed or forecast upper-level winds. This tool is used by the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) and 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) to analyze the threat of natural or space vehicle-triggered lightning over a location. The second example is a launch and landing trajectory tool that produces a DGM file that plots the ground track of space vehicles during launch or landing. The trajectory tool can be used by SMG and the 45 WS forecasters to analyze weather radar imagery along a launch or landing trajectory. Advantages of both file types will be listed.

  4. Short-Term Precipitation Occurrence Prediction for Strong Convective Weather Using FY2-G Satellite Data: a Case Study of Shenzhen, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai; Liu, Jun; Guo, Shanxin; Chen, Jinsong; Liu, Ping; Qian, Jing; Chen, Huijuan; Sun, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Short-term precipitation commonly occurs in south part of China, which brings intensive precipitation in local region for very short time. Massive water would cause the intensive flood inside of city when precipitation amount beyond the capacity of city drainage system. Thousands people's life could be influenced by those short-term disasters and the higher city managements are required to facing these challenges. How to predict the occurrence of heavy precipitation accurately is one of the worthwhile scientific questions in meteorology. According to recent studies, the accuracy of short-term precipitation prediction based on numerical simulation model still remains low reliability, in some area where lack of local observations, the accuracy may be as low as 10%. The methodology for short term precipitation occurrence prediction still remains a challenge. In this paper, a machine learning method based on SVM was presented to predict short-term precipitation occurrence by using FY2-G satellite imagery and ground in situ observation data. The results were validated by traditional TS score which commonly used in evaluation of weather prediction. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm can present overall accuracy up to 90% for one-hour to six-hour forecast. The result implies the prediction accuracy could be improved by using machine learning method combining with satellite image. This prediction model can be further used to evaluated to predicted other characteristics of weather in Shenzhen in future.

  5. Anvil Forecast Tool in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System, Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III

    2008-01-01

    Meteorologists from the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) and Spaceflight Meteorology Group have identified anvil forecasting as one of their most challenging tasks when predicting the probability of violations of the Lightning Launch Commit Criteria and Space Light Rules. As a result, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) created a graphical overlay tool for the Meteorological Interactive Data Display Systems (MIDDS) to indicate the threat of thunderstorm anvil clouds, using either observed or model forecast winds as input.

  6. Advanced mobile satellite communications experiment in MM-wave and Ka-band using Japans's COMETS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Shunkichi; Hamamoto, Naokazu; Takeuchi, Makoto; Ohmori, Shingo; Yamamoto, Minoru

    Early in the 21st century, the demand for personal communications using mobile, hand-held and very small aperture terminals (VSAT) will rapidly increase. In a future system, many different types of services should be provided with one-hop connection. The Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) has studied a future advanced mobile satellite communications system using millimeter-wave and Ka-band. In 1990, CRL started the Communications and Broadcasting Engineering Test Satellite (COMETS) project. The satellite has been developed in conjunction with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) and will be launched in 1997. This paper describes the COMETS payload configuration and the experimental system for the advanced mobile communications mission. The 2-m-diameter on-board antenna has three beams, two adjacent Ka-band beams and one millimeter-wave beam. The two Ka-band transponders have high output power SSPAs of 20 W and 10 W. The millimeter-wave transponder consists of a 20 W traveling wave tube amplifier (TWTA) and a high electron mobility transistor/low noise amplifier (HEMT/LNA) with a low noise figure of 3 dB.

  7. Weather service upgrade too costly?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    America needs timely and accurate weather forecasting, said Ernest F. Hollings (D-S.C.), chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation on National Ocean Policy. Calling the existing warning and forecast system dangerously obsolete, Hollings said that new technology “should dramatically improve the accuracy and timeliness of weather predictions,” as we face the new challenge of bringing the National Weather Service into the 21st century. Hollings' committee heard testimony to consider the modernization of the NWS and pending legislation (S98, S916) on June 18.Major components of the Weather Service Modernization program, according to John A. Knauss, administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, are the Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD), a new generation of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES-NEXT), the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS), and the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIA). The best defense against severe weather—early warnings—is probably hampered by outdated equipment, he added.

  8. The Effects of Weather Patterns on the Spatio-Temporal Distribution of SO2 over East Asia as Seen from Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlap, L.; Li, C.; Dickerson, R. R.; Krotkov, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    Weather systems, particularly mid-latitude wave cyclones, have been known to play an important role in the short-term variation of near-surface air pollution. Ground measurements and model simulations have demonstrated that stagnant air and minimal precipitation associated with high pressure systems are conducive to pollutant accumulation. With the passage of a cold front, built up pollution is transported downwind of the emission sources or washed out by precipitation. This concept is important to note when studying long-term changes in spatio-temporal pollution distribution, but has not been studied in detail from space. In this study, we focus on East Asia (especially the industrialized eastern China), where numerous large power plants and other point sources as well as area sources emit large amounts of SO2, an important gaseous pollutant and a precursor of aerosols. Using data from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) we show that such weather driven distribution can indeed be discerned from satellite data by utilizing probability distribution functions (PDFs) of SO2 column content. These PDFs are multimodal and give insight into the background pollution level at a given location and contribution from local and upwind emission sources. From these PDFs it is possible to determine the frequency for a given region to have SO2 loading that exceeds the background amount. By comparing OMI-observed long-term change in the frequency with meteorological data, we can gain insights into the effects of climate change (e.g., the weakening of Asian monsoon) on regional air quality. Such insight allows for better interpretation of satellite measurements as well as better prediction of future pollution distribution as a changing climate gives way to changing weather patterns.

  9. An experiment in remote manufacturing using the advanced communications technology satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsatsoulis, Costas; Frost, Victor

    1991-01-01

    The goal of the completed project was to develop an experiment in remote manufacturing that would use the capabilities of the ACTS satellite. A set of possible experiments that could be performed using the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), and which would perform remote manufacturing using a laser cutter and an integrated circuit testing machine are described in detail. The proposed design is shown to be a feasible solution to the offered problem and it takes into consideration the constraints that were placed on the experiment. In addition, we have developed two more experiments that are included in this report: backup of rural telecommunication networks, and remote use of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data analysis for on-site collection of glacier scattering data in the Antarctic.

  10. Design and Development of a Baseband Processor for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kerry D.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of the operational baseband processor (BBP) subsystem on board the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The BBP supports the network consisting of the NASA ground station (NGS) low burst rate (LBR) terminals, and the T1 very small aperture terminals (VSAT's), to provide flexible, demand assigned satellite switched (SS), baseband processed frequency division modulated (FDM)/time division multiple access (TDMA) operations. This paper presents an overview of the baseband processor and includes a description of the data flow, functional block diagrams, and a discussion of the implementation of BBP. A discussion of the supporting technologies for the BBP is presented. A brief summary of BBP-level performance testing is also presented. Finally, a discussion of the implications of current technology on the BBP design, if it were to be developed today, is presented.

  11. Multidisciplinary studies of the social, economic and political impact resulting from recent advances in satellite meteorology. Volume 6: Executive summary. [technological forecasting spacecraft control/attitude (inclination) -classical mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An assessment of the technological impact of modern satellite weather forecasting for the United States is presented. Topics discussed are: (1) television broadcasting of weather; (2) agriculture (crop production); (3) water resources; (4) urban development; (5) recreation; and (6) transportation.

  12. Satellites in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David

    1988-01-01

    Describes the methods and materials used to obtain satellite pictures from weather satellites. Discusses possible physics lessons which can be done using this equipment including orbital mechanics, and how the satellite works. (CW)

  13. A Mobile Communications Space Link Between the Space Shuttle Orbiter and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick; Arndt, G. D.; Bondyopadhyay, P.; Shaw, Roland

    1994-01-01

    A communications experiment is described as a link between the Space Shuttle Orbiter (SSO) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). Breadboarding for this experiment has led to two items with potential for commercial application: a 1-Watt Ka-band amplifier and a Ka-band, circularly polarized microstrip antenna. Results of the hybrid Ka-band amplifier show gain at 30 dB and a saturated output power of 28.5 dBm. A second version comprised of MMIC amplifiers is discussed. Test results of the microstrip antenna subarray show a gain of approximately 13 dB and excellent circular polarization.

  14. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS): Design and on-orbit performance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gargione, F.; Acosta, R.; Coney, T.; Krawczyk, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), developed and built by Lockheed Martin Astro space for the NASA Lewis Research Center, was launched in September 1993 on the shuttle STS 51 mission. ACTS is a digital experimental communications test bed that incorporates gigahertz bandwidth transponders operating at Ka band, hopping spot beams, on-board storage and switching, and dynamic rain fade compensation. This paper describes the ACTS enabling technologies, the design of the communications payload, the constraints imposed on the spacecraft bus, and the measurements conducted to verify the performance of the system in orbit.

  15. High-speed image transmission via the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzill, Todd M.; Huang, H. K.; Thoma, George R.; Long, L. Rodney; Gill, Michael J.

    1996-05-01

    We are developing a wide area test bed network using the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) from NASA for high speed medical image transmission. The two test sites are the University of California, San Francisco, and the National Library of Medicine. The first phase of the test bed runs over a T1 link (1.544 Mbits/sec) using a Very Small Aperture Terminal. The second phase involves the High Data Rate Terminal via an ATM OC 3C (155 Mbits/sec) connection. This paper describes the experimental set up and some preliminary results from phase 1.

  16. Advancing Heliophysics and Space Weather Research with Student Internships and Faculty Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. P.; Ng, C.; Marchese, P.; Austin, S. A.; Frost, J.; Cheung, T. K.; Tremberger, G.; Robbins, I.; Carlson, B. E.; Paglione, T.; Damas, C.; Steiner, J. C.; Rudolph, E.; Lewis, E.; Ford, K. S.; Cline, T.

    2011-12-01

    Expanding research capability in Heliophysics and Space Weather is the major focus of a collaboration between the City University of New York (CUNY) and NASA Goddard Space Fight Center (GSFC). The Heliophysics Education Consortium has a two-pronged approach centered on undergraduate research and faculty development. Summer 2011 student research projects include: Comparison of Fast Propagating Solar Waves and Slow Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves captured by SDO; Brightness Fluctuation of March 8, 2011 Eruption with Magnetic Rope Structure Measured by SDO; Investigation of Sunspot Regions, Coronal Mass Ejections and Solar Flares; An Integration and Testing Methodology for a Microsatellite; Comparative Analysis of Attitude Control Systems for Microsatellites; Spectral Analysis of Aerosols in Jupiter's Atmosphere Using HST Data; Alternative Sources of 5 GHz and 15 GHz Emissions in Active Galactic Nuclei; Probing Starburst-Driven Superwinds; Asteroid Astrometry; and Optimize an Electrostatic Deflection Element on PIXIES (Plasma Ion Experiment - Ion and Electron Sensor) for a CUNY student at GSFC. Faculty development workshops were conducted by Space Weather Action Center scientists. These workshops included a faculty development session at the CUNY Graduate Center and high school teachers professional development series at Queensborough Community College. The project is supported by NASA award NNX10AE72G.

  17. A COSPAR/ILWS roadmap towards advanced space weather science to protect society's technological infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, K.; Kauristie, K.

    2014-12-01

    With the rapid development of the technological infrastructure upon which modern society depends comes a growing appreciation of the hazards presented by the phenomena around our home planet that we call space weather. The complexity of the coupled Sun-Earth system, the sparseness by which it can be covered by remote-sensing and in-situ instrumentation, and the costs of the required observational and computational infrastructure warrant an international approach with feasible, affordable solutions. COSPAR and the steering committee of the International Living With a Star program tasked a multi-disciplinary, international team with the development of a roadmap with the goal of demonstrably improving our observational capabilities for, scientific understanding of, and ability to forecast the various aspects of space weather. We summarize the roadmap, its top-priority recommendations to achieve its goals, and their underlying rationale. More information on the roadmap, including the team's full membership, can be found at http://www.lmsal.com/~schryver/COSPARrm.

  18. Subjective evaluation of the combined influence of satellite temperature sounding data and increased model resolution on numerical weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R.; Halem, M.; Ghil, M.

    1979-01-01

    The present evaluation is concerned with (1) the significance of prognostic differences resulting from the inclusion of satellite-derived temperature soundings, (2) how specific differences between the SAT and NOSAT prognoses evolve, and (3) comparison of two experiments using the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences general circulation model. The subjective evaluation indicates that the beneficial impact of sounding data is enhanced with increased resolution. It is suggested that satellite sounding data posses valuable information content which at times can correct gross analysis errors in data sparse regions.

  19. Space-Data Routers: Advanced data routing protocols for enhancing data exploitation for space weather applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Balasis, George; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Tsaoussidis, Vassilios; Diamantopoulos, Sotirios

    2014-05-01

    Data sharing and access are major issues in space sciences, as they influence the degree of data exploitation. The availability of multi-spacecraft distributed observation methods and adaptive mission architectures require computationally intensive analysis methods. Moreover, accurate space weather forecasting and future space exploration far from Earth will be in need of real-time data distribution and assimilation technologies. The FP7-Space collaborative research project "Space-Data Routers" (SDR) relies on space internetworking and in particular on Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN), which marks the new era in space communications. SDR unifies space and earth communication infrastructures and delivers a set of tools and protocols for space-data exploitation. The main goal is to allow space agencies, academic institutes and research centers to share space-data generated by single or multiple missions, in an efficient, secure and automated manner. Here we are presenting the architecture and basic functionality of a DTN-based application specifically designed in the framework of the SDR project, for data query, retrieval and administration that will enable addressing outstanding science questions related to space weather, through the provision of simultaneous real-time data sampling at multiple points in space. The work leading to this paper has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SPACE-2010-1) under grant agreement no. 263330 for the SDR (Space-Data Routers for Exploiting Space Data) collaborative research project. This paper reflects only the authors' views and the Union is not liable for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

  20. Advancing the art of satellite communications - Foreign competition spurs NASA Satcom research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulloch, C.

    1985-01-01

    Major advances in satellite communications technology in the US and Japan are detailed. Japan's Ka-band services aboard CS-2a and CS-2b, launched in 1973, are discussed, as well as plans for the ECS-2 and ACTS-E (Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) experimental projects. The ACTS-E would carry both a broadcasting payload operating at 27/22 GHz and a communication payload using the 50/40 GHz band. Japan's fourth generation CS-4, for start-up in the first half of the 1990's, is described as a 2-ton craft carrying 60-70 transponders, and providing capacity for up to 100,000 equivalent two-way voice channels via 10 or 20 scanning spotbeams. NASA's new programs are described as well, including the ACTS program, with a communications payload embodying signal-processing, message-routing, and traffic-management techniques, and the MSAT program, concentrating on narrow-band transmissions. Included are the technical description, operational parameters, and schematic layout of NASA's ACTS, and block diagrams of baseband processor for low burst rate communications switching on the ACTS.

  1. Towards a National Space Weather Predictive Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, N. J.; Ryschkewitsch, M. G.; Merkin, V. G.; Stephens, G. K.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Barnes, R. J.; Anderson, B. J.; Paxton, L. J.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Kelly, M. A.; Berger, T. E.; Bonadonna, L. C. M. F.; Hesse, M.; Sharma, S.

    2015-12-01

    National needs in the area of space weather informational and predictive tools are growing rapidly. Adverse conditions in the space environment can cause disruption of satellite operations, communications, navigation, and electric power distribution grids, leading to a variety of socio-economic losses and impacts on our security. Future space exploration and most modern human endeavors will require major advances in physical understanding and improved transition of space research to operations. At present, only a small fraction of the latest research and development results from NASA, NOAA, NSF and DoD investments are being used to improve space weather forecasting and to develop operational tools. The power of modern research and space weather model development needs to be better utilized to enable comprehensive, timely, and accurate operational space weather tools. The mere production of space weather information is not sufficient to address the needs of those who are affected by space weather. A coordinated effort is required to support research-to-applications transition efforts and to develop the tools required those who rely on this information. In this presentation we will review the space weather system developed for the Van Allen Probes mission, together with other datasets, tools and models that have resulted from research by scientists at JHU/APL. We will look at how these, and results from future missions such as Solar Probe Plus, could be applied to support space weather applications in coordination with other community assets and capabilities.

  2. Increased Surface Albedo in the Northern Hemisphere: Did satellites warn of the weather troubles of 1972 and 1973?

    PubMed

    Kukla, G J; Kukla, H J

    1974-02-22

    Routine mapping of snow and ice fields in the northern hemisphere was started by NOAA in 1967. Large year-to-year variations of the snow and pack-ice covers were observed. The annual mean coverage increased by 12 percent during 1971 and has remained high. The index R, which shows the approximate amount of energy reflected from the surface by snow and ice under the mean cloudiness, increased correspondingly. Thus, if the cloud cover over the snow fields did not increase substantially, the anomalous weather patterns of 1972 and 1973 could have been connected with the deficit in surface heat exchange which originated in the northern hemisphere the year before. During the past 7 years the largest changes occurred in the fall and in the continental interiors of Asia and America (8). Two synoptic parameters which could readily provide information on the development of snow and ice cover in the northern hemisphere are (i) the total area momentarily covered and (ii) the running annual mean of snow and ice coverage for the preceding 1-year period. By 20 September 1973 the annual mean coverage was 37.3 x 10(6) km(2), 11 to 12 percent higher than at the same time during 1968 through 1970. Snow cover-fall, the season when 15 x 10(6) to 55 x 10(6) km(2) of the northern hemisphere is covered with snow and ice, started on 20 September 1973, compared to 17 September 1972 and 5 or 10 October during 1967 through 1970. The links between the atmosphere, the oceans, and the land surfaces must be better understood before the role of snow and ice can be thoroughly explained and exploited for long-range weather forecasting. But it is clear that snow, hitherto almost overlooked in synoptic meteorological reports, must be important in the mechanism of weather changes. PMID:17790616

  3. The evaluation of satellite-borne weather radar system designs using real ground-based radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, E. B.; Kalshoven, J. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents method of evaluating proposed satellite radar systems using real radar data, and discusses methods of displaying the results which will hopefully facilitate easy comparison of systems. A single pencil beam pulsed radar system is considered while the precipitation data base comes from six rain days observed by SPANDAR. The many additional factors that must be considered in the radar equation such as attenuation and scattering (Mie and Rayleigh) are discussed along with some indication where possible errors lie.

  4. Applications of NOAA weather satellite data to the estimates of topographic height and retrieval of soil moisture in Ningxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lianxi; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2003-07-01

    Marked by high efficiency, multiple channels and low cost, meteorological satellites have the applications extending from the use only in a meteorological context to quite a few scopes of research and operation. This paper introduces the establishment of statistical models between altitudes of stations at different latitudes/longitudes and corresponding NOAA/AVHRR remote sensing data to obtain the terrain altitudes in Ningxia and its surroundings whereupon the heights of different parts of Ningxia are found, with the results applied to the retrieval of spring soil moisture, thereby leading to the construction of soil moisture retrieval models from satellite data and altitudes for real-time monitoring soil moisture. Results show that it is successful to make verification of satellite-data calculated altitudes against measurements, which, when introduced into the soil moisture retrieval models, improve the accuracy to greater extent. On this basis we developed the operational models for remote sensing based spring soil moisture monitoring in the target region that are run in an easy, quick and visual way, thus providing an efficient means of farmland soil moisture/dryness distributions monitoring.

  5. ESA successfully conducts experiment in Advanced Space Robotics on Japanese satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-04-01

    ETS-VII is the latest in NASDA's series of engineering test satellites. It is dedicated to the in-orbit assessment and demonstration of novel technologies in rendez-vous / docking and space robotics. ETS-VII is in fact a pair of satellites, a larger chaser and a smaller target satellite which can be released for the rendez-vous and docking experiments. The larger satellite carries a robot arm with a stretched length of about 2 m, and a set of experimentation equipment to test the robot's capabilities : a task board on which typical robot manipulation activities can be performed and measured, an Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) to be removed and reinstalled, a truss structure to be erected, an antenna assembly mechanism to be actuated and an advanced robot hand. The ESA experiments concern advanced schemes for planning, commanding, controlling and monitoring the activities of a space robot arm system. One set of experiments tests an operational mode called "interactive autonomy", whereby the robot motions are split into typical "tasks" of medium complexity. Ground operators can interact with the tasks (parameterising, commanding, rescheduling, monitoring, interrupting them as needed), relying on the fact that each task will be autonomously executed using appropriate sensor-based control loops (it having been programmed and extensively verified in advance by simulation). This significantly reduces the amount of data traffic over the spacelink - in fact, ETS-VII offers only a few short communications windows per day. Data from ESA experiments will be used to assess the performance of tasks executed with "interactive autonomy" compared with the more traditional telemanipulation at lower control levels. The second group of experiments concerns vision-based robot control. Using the Japanese-provided on-board vision system (which includes one hand camera and one scene-overview camera), it has been demonstrated that reliable automatic object localisation and grasping can be

  6. Overview of the Greater Lyon weather radar advances from 90's to 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, F.; Comby, J.

    2010-03-01

    The local weather radar of Lyon, part of the Aramis network of Meteo-France, is currently located 40 km from the urban community. The measurement quality of this tool is subjected to constant improvements from Meteo-France. Indeed, its hydrological measurement quality has steadily evolved from the early 90's until today. This article, therefore, proposes a return on these innovations, assessing measurement quality over the territory of Greater Lyon. This study is based on two successive radar locations, and also on raw reflectivity data and on rain accumulation over the past 15 min (Hydram) or 5 min (Panthere). The measurement performed on the site Satolas was unsatisfactory because of too many ground clutters; and therefore the radar was moved to Saint-Nizier. This new location associated with radar Hydram rain accumulation has reduced the problem of ground clutters. These rain accumulation data have given correct results in comparison with local data of the raingauge network of Greater Lyon, after a global and spatially uniform correction, based on these gauges. The latest generation of radar rain accumulation (Panthere) has, nearly completely, eliminated the problem of ground clutter in the urban area and provides very satisfactory measurements, especially during intense rain events.

  7. Renewable Energy SCADA/Training Using NASA's Advanced Technology Communication Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalu, A.; Emrich, C.; Ventre, G.; Wilson, W.; Acosta, Roberto (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The lack of electrical energy in the rural communities of developing countries is well known, as is the economic unfeasibility of providing much needed energy to these regions via electric grids. Renewable energy (RE) can provide an economic advantage over conventional forms in meeting some of these energy needs. The use of a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) arrangement via satellite could enable experts at remote locations to provide technical assistance to local trainees while they acquire a measure of proficiency with a newly installed RE system through hands-on training programs using the same communications link. Upon full mastery of the technologies, indigenous personnel could also employ similar SCADA arrangements to remotely monitor and control their constellation of RE systems. Two separate ACTS technology verification experiments (TVEs) have demonstrated that the portability of the Ultra Small Aperture Terminal (USAT) and the versatility of NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), as well as the advantages of Ka band satellites, can be invaluable in providing energy training via distance education (DE), and for implementing renewable energy system SCADA. What has not been tested is the capabilities of these technologies for a simultaneous implementation of renewable energy DE and SCADA. Such concurrent implementations will be useful for preparing trainees in developing countries for their eventual SCADA operations. The project described in this correspondence is the first effort, to our knowledge, in this specific TVE. The setup for this experiment consists of a one-Watt USAT located at Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) connected to two satellite modems tuned to different frequencies to establish two duplex ACTS Ka-band communication channels. A short training program on operation and maintenance of the system will be delivered while simultaneously monitoring and controlling the hybrid using the same satellite

  8. The operational user of weather data in the information age

    SciTech Connect

    D`Aleo, J.

    1995-12-31

    We are in the midst of an information explosion in meteorology. The operational user working with computer systems and satellite delivery of weather data today receives as much data in one 8-hour shift as an advanced user in the 1950`s would have received in 40 years (an entire career!). And the changes are accelerating. Spurred on by the National Weather Service`s modernization program, an additional 20 to 50 fold increase in data volumes from today`s levels can be expected by the year 2000. This paper describes the sources of the data, value-added products available, the weather workstation, and how to benefit from the information provided.

  9. Advanced thermal control for french-german direct broadcasting satellites TDF1/TVSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovagnoli, F.

    The joint French-German programme of direct broadcasting is comprised of two distinct phases, i.e. 1. the development of the preoperational spacecraft (D3, F3), with 3 active channels out of 5 installed; 2. the production of operational satellites (D5, F5) with 5 channels active, each of them redundant. Aerospatiale is in charge among others of the Thermal Control of the Spacecraft. This paper deals with: thermal concept, analyses and tests programme. The developed platforms should also permit an easy adaptation to various payloads characterized by higher electrical power levels. The high power levels involved imply advanced thermal control for both Main Body and Antenna Module. The thermal control concept must have the following capabilities: • to transfer the concentrated, high power dissipations involved toward outer space, • to maintain in shadow phase (no emission) the correct temperatures with low or zero heating power, • to ensure, in transfer orbit phase (maximum duration about 300 h), satisfactory temperatures with reduced electrical power (satellite 3-axis stabilized, solar generator partially deployed), • to allow extremely non-symmetrical functionings. To solve these various problems, so far never simultaneously encountered on existing satellites, the following devices are used: • various heat pipe networks (D3/F3; 88 heat pipes, total length approx. 118 m), • large quantity of Optical Solar Reflectors (silica mirror, area approx. 6.3 m 2), • lightweight superinsulations, • various types of heaters, • Thermal Control Electronic (TCE) to switch ON/OFF heaters and monitor thermistors.

  10. Recent Advances in Satellite and Airborne Altimetry over Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, S. L.; Newman, T.; Richter-Menge, J.; Haas, C.; Petty, A.; McAdoo, D. C.; Connor, L. N.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last two decades altimeters on satellite and aircraft platforms have revolutionized our understanding of Arctic sea ice mass balance. Satellite laser and radar altimeters provide unique measurements of sea ice elevation, from which ice thickness may be derived, across basin scales and interdecadal time periods. Meanwhile airborne altimetry, together with high-resolution digital imagery, provides a range of novel observations that describe key features of the ice pack including its snow cover, surface morphology and deformation characteristics. We provide an update on current Arctic sea ice thickness conditions based on IceBridge measurements, discussing these in the context of previously observed decadal change. Fundamental to the goal of understanding interannual variability, and monitoring long-term trends in sea ice volume, is the accurate characterization of measurement uncertainty. This is particularly true when linking observations from different sensors. We discuss recent advances in tracking and quantifying the major components of the altimetric sea ice thickness error budget. We pay particular attention to two major components of the error: freeboard and snow loading uncertainty. We describe novel measurement techniques that are helping to reduce measurement uncertainty and allowing, for the first time, quantification of errors with respect to ice type.

  11. Advanced marine information delivery. [data transmission from oceanic satellites to ships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durstenfeld, R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper examines the information delivery challenges of the follow-on programs to Seasat-1 as they may progress through the next decade. These challenges include coping with the vast amounts of data to be transferred, fulfilling the temporal requirements on data delivery, and the tradeoffs and developments needed to accomplish the various levels of processing required to convert sensor output into useful information. A need for critical development is clearly identifiable in the areas of (1) low cost ground terminals capable of image extraction and image correlation; (2) dynamic data assimilation to accommodate forecasters; (3) low resolution onboard correlators; and (4) low cost user advisory (display) terminals. The system planners for the Ocean Satellite advanced programs are using an end-to-end data systems approach in meeting these challenges.

  12. Enhancing Cloud Radiative Processes and Radiation Efficiency in the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model

    SciTech Connect

    Iacono, Michael J.

    2015-03-09

    The objective of this research has been to evaluate and implement enhancements to the computational performance of the RRTMG radiative transfer option in the Advanced Research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Efficiency is as essential as accuracy for effective numerical weather prediction, and radiative transfer is a relatively time-consuming component of dynamical models, taking up to 30-50 percent of the total model simulation time. To address this concern, this research has implemented and tested a version of RRTMG that utilizes graphics processing unit (GPU) technology (hereinafter RRTMGPU) to greatly improve its computational performance; thereby permitting either more frequent simulation of radiative effects or other model enhancements. During the early stages of this project the development of RRTMGPU was completed at AER under separate NASA funding to accelerate the code for use in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Goddard Earth Observing System GEOS-5 global model. It should be noted that this final report describes results related to the funded portion of the originally proposed work concerning the acceleration of RRTMG with GPUs in WRF. As a k-distribution model, RRTMG is especially well suited to this modification due to its relatively large internal pseudo-spectral (g-point) dimension that, when combined with the horizontal grid vector in the dynamical model, can take great advantage of the GPU capability. Thorough testing under several model configurations has been performed to ensure that RRTMGPU improves WRF model run time while having no significant impact on calculated radiative fluxes and heating rates or on dynamical model fields relative to the RRTMG radiation. The RRTMGPU codes have been provided to NCAR for possible application to the next public release of the WRF forecast model.

  13. Requirements for an Advanced Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Sounder (ALS) for improved regional weather prediction and monitoring of greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Susskind, Joel

    2008-12-01

    Hyperspectral infrared atmospheric sounders (e.g. the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on MetOp) provide highly accurate temperature and water vapor profiles in the lower to upper troposphere. These systems are vital operational components of our National Weather Prediction system and the AIRS has demonstrated over 6 hrs of forecast improvement on the 5 day operational forecast1. Despite the success in the mid troposphere to lower stratosphere, a reduction in sensitivity and accuracy has been seen in these systems in the boundary layer over land. In this paper we demonstrate the potential improvement associated with higher spatial resolution (1km vs currently 13.5 km) on the accuracy of boundary layer products with an added consequence of higher yield of cloud free scenes. This latter feature is related to the number of samples that can be assimilated and has also shown to have a significant impact on improving forecast accuracy. We also present a set of frequencies and resolutions that will improve vertical resolution of temperature and water vapor and trace gas species throughout the atmosphere. Development of an Advanced Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Sounder (ALS) with these improvements will improve weather forecast at the regional scale and of tropical storms and hurricanes. Improvements are also expected in the accuracy of the water vapor and cloud properties products, enhancing process studies and providing a better match to the resolution of future climate models. The improvements of technology required for the ALS are consistent with the current state of technology as demonstrated in NASA Instrument Incubator Program and NOAA's Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) formulation phase development programs.

  14. Requirements for an Advanced Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Sounder (ALS) for Improved Regional Weather Prediction and Monitoring of Greenhouse Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Susskind, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Hyperspectral infrared atmospheric sounders (e.g., the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on Met Op) provide highly accurate temperature and water vapor profiles in the lower to upper troposphere. These systems are vital operational components of our National Weather Prediction system and the AIRS has demonstrated over 6 hrs of forecast improvement on the 5 day operational forecast. Despite the success in the mid troposphere to lower stratosphere, a reduction in sensitivity and accuracy has been seen in these systems in the boundary layer over land. In this paper we demonstrate the potential improvement associated with higher spatial resolution (1 km vs currently 13.5 km) on the accuracy of boundary layer products with an added consequence of higher yield of cloud free scenes. This latter feature is related to the number of samples that can be assimilated and has also shown to have a significant impact on improving forecast accuracy. We also present a set of frequencies and resolutions that will improve vertical resolution of temperature and water vapor and trace gas species throughout the atmosphere. Development of an Advanced Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Sounder (ALS) with these improvements will improve weather forecast at the regional scale and of tropical storms and hurricanes. Improvements are also expected in the accuracy of the water vapor and cloud properties products, enhancing process studies and providing a better match to the resolution of future climate models. The improvements of technology required for the ALS are consistent with the current state of technology as demonstrated in NASA Instrument Incubator Program and NOAA's Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) formulation phase development programs.

  15. Towards a National Space Weather Predictive Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, N. J.; Lindstrom, K. L.; Ryschkewitsch, M. G.; Anderson, B. J.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Merkin, V. G.; Kelly, M. A.; Miller, E. S.; Sitnov, M. I.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Erlandson, R. E.; Barnes, R. J.; Paxton, L. J.; Sotirelis, T.; Stephens, G.; Comberiate, J.

    2014-12-01

    National needs in the area of space weather informational and predictive tools are growing rapidly. Adverse conditions in the space environment can cause disruption of satellite operations, communications, navigation, and electric power distribution grids, leading to a variety of socio-economic losses and impacts on our security. Future space exploration and most modern human endeavors will require major advances in physical understanding and improved transition of space research to operations. At present, only a small fraction of the latest research and development results from NASA, NOAA, NSF and DoD investments are being used to improve space weather forecasting and to develop operational tools. The power of modern research and space weather model development needs to be better utilized to enable comprehensive, timely, and accurate operational space weather tools. The mere production of space weather information is not sufficient to address the needs of those who are affected by space weather. A coordinated effort is required to support research-to-applications transition efforts and to develop the tools required those who rely on this information. In this presentation we will review datasets, tools and models that have resulted from research by scientists at JHU/APL, and examine how they could be applied to support space weather applications in coordination with other community assets and capabilities.

  16. Improved weather information and aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallahan, K.; Zdanys, V.

    1973-01-01

    The major impacts of weather forecasts on aviation are reviewed. Topics discussed include: (1) present and projected structure of American aviation, (2) weather problems considered particularly important for aviation, (3) projected needs for improved weather information by aviators, (4) safety and economics, and (5) future studies utilizing satellite meteorology.

  17. Canadian Advanced Nanospace Experiment 2: Om-Orbit Experience with an Innovative Three-Kilogram Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarda, K.; Grant, C.; Eagleson, S.; Kekez, D. D.; Zee, R. E.

    2008-08-01

    The objective of the Canadian Advanced Nanospace eXperiment (CanX) program is to develop highly capable "nanospacecraft," or spacecraft under 10 kilograms, in short timeframes of 2-3 years. CanX missions offer low- cost and rapid access to space for scientists, technology developers, and operationally responsive missions. The Space Flight Laboratory (SFL) at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS) has developed the Canadian Advanced Nanospace eXperiment 2 (CanX-2) nanosatellite that launched in April 2008. CanX-2, a 3.5-kg, 10 x 10 x 34 cm satellite, features a collection of scientific and engineering payloads that push the envelope of capability for this class of spacecraft. The primary mission of CanX-2 is to test and demonstrate several enabling technologies for precise formation flight. These technologies include a custom cold-gas propulsion system, a 30 mNms nanosatellite reaction wheel as part of a three- axis stabilized momentum-bias attitude control system, and a commercially available GPS receiver. The secondary objective of CanX-2 is to fly a number of university experiments including an atmospheric spectrometer. At the time of writing CanX-2 has been in orbit for three weeks and has performed very well during preliminary commissioning. The mission, the engineering and scientific payloads, and the preliminary on-orbit commissioning experiences of CanX-2 are presented in this paper.

  18. Space Weather Services of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, KiChang; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Young Yun; Kwon, Yongki; Wi, Gwan-sik

    2016-07-01

    The Korean Space Weather Center (KSWC) of the National Radio Research Agency (RRA) is a government agency which is the official source of space weather information for Korean Government and the primary action agency of emergency measure to severe space weather condition. KSWC's main role is providing alerts, watches, and forecasts in order to minimize the space weather impacts on both of public and commercial sectors of satellites, aviation, communications, navigations, power grids, and etc. KSWC is also in charge of monitoring the space weather condition and conducting research and development for its main role of space weather operation in Korea. In this study, we will present KSWC's recent efforts on development of application-oriented space weather research products and services on user needs, and introduce new international collaborative projects, such as IPS-Driven Enlil model, DREAM model estimating electron in satellite orbit, global network of DSCOVR and STEREO satellites tracking, and ARMAS (Automated Radiation Measurement for Aviation Safety).

  19. Meteorological Satellites (METSAT) and Earth Observing System (EOS) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) Stress Analysis Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffner, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Stress analysis of the primary structure of the Meteorological Satellites Project (METSAT) Advanced Microwave Sounding Units-A, A1 Module using static loads is presented. The structural margins of safety and natural frequency predictions for the METSAT design are reported.

  20. Weather assessment and forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Data management program activities centered around the analyses of selected far-term Office of Applications (OA) objectives, with the intent of determining if significant data-related problems would be encountered and if so what alternative solutions would be possible. Three far-term (1985 and beyond) OA objectives selected for analyses as having potential significant data problems were large-scale weather forecasting, local weather and severe storms forecasting, and global marine weather forecasting. An overview of general weather forecasting activities and their implications upon the ground based data system is provided. Selected topics were specifically oriented to the use of satellites.

  1. Pilot Weather Advisor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindamood, Glenn; Martzaklis, Konstantinos Gus; Hoffler, Keith; Hill, Damon; Mehrotra, Sudhir C.; White, E. Richard; Fisher, Bruce D.; Crabill, Norman L.; Tucholski, Allen D.

    2006-01-01

    The Pilot Weather Advisor (PWA) system is an automated satellite radio-broadcasting system that provides nearly real-time weather data to pilots of aircraft in flight anywhere in the continental United States. The system was designed to enhance safety in two distinct ways: First, the automated receipt of information would relieve the pilot of the time-consuming and distracting task of obtaining weather information via voice communication with ground stations. Second, the presentation of the information would be centered around a map format, thereby making the spatial and temporal relationships in the surrounding weather situation much easier to understand

  2. Design and Development of the WVU Advanced Technology Satellite for Optical Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Miranda

    In order to meet the demands of future space missions, it is beneficial for spacecraft to have the capability to support autonomous navigation. This is true for both crewed and uncrewed vehicles. For crewed vehicles, autonomous navigation would allow the crew to safely navigate home in the event of a communication system failure. For uncrewed missions, autonomous navigation reduces the demand on ground-based infrastructure and could allow for more flexible operation. One promising technique for achieving these goals is through optical navigation. To this end, the present work considers how camera images of the Earth's surface could enable autonomous navigation of a satellite in low Earth orbit. Specifically, this study will investigate the use of coastlines and other natural land-water boundaries for navigation. Observed coastlines can be matched to a pre-existing coastline database in order to determine the location of the spacecraft. This paper examines how such measurements may be processed in an on-board extended Kalman filter (EKF) to provide completely autonomous estimates of the spacecraft state throughout the duration of the mission. In addition, future work includes implementing this work on a CubeSat mission within the WVU Applied Space Exploration Lab (ASEL). The mission titled WVU Advanced Technology Satellite for Optical Navigation (WATSON) will provide students with an opportunity to experience the life cycle of a spacecraft from design through operation while hopefully meeting the primary and secondary goals defined for mission success. The spacecraft design process, although simplified by CubeSat standards, will be discussed in this thesis as well as the current results of laboratory testing with the CubeSat model in the ASEL.

  3. Environmental Forensics: Molecular Insight into Oil Spill Weathering Helps Advance High Magnetic Field FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Amy

    2013-03-01

    events in the FT-ICR experiment. For example, the high density of peaks at each nominal mass unit provides unprecedented insight into how excitation conditions affect ion motion during detection. Aggregated oil (i.e., tar balls, tar mats) that reached the surface exhibits a more than two-fold increase in the total number of detected species, with an increased number of oxygenated species. Principal component analysis (PCA) applied to two possible source oils (contained within the same ship) and weathered samples provide the first application of FT-ICR MS for source identification. Molecular formulae from parent and weathered oil indicate that the lightest petroleum fractions (saturated hydrocarbons) are the most readily oxidized components, and can serve as a template to determine chemical transformations that occur throughout the water column. The ability to differentiate and catalogue compositional changes that occur to oil after its release into the environment relies heavily on gains achieved in nearly all steps in the FT-ICR mass spectral experiment required to accommodate larger ion populations inherent to heavily weathered crude oil. Here, we present the requirement for FT-ICR MS for comprehensive oil spill characterization, and highlight advances made to FT-ICR MS experimental conditions developed from petroleum characterization. Work supported by DMR-06-54118, NSF CHE-10-49753 (RAPID), BP/The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative, and the State of Florida

  4. Launch Vehicles Based on Advanced Hybrid Rocket Motors: An Enabling Technology for the Commercial Small and Micro Satellite Planetary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabeyoglu, Arif; Tuncer, Onur; Inalhan, Gokhan

    2016-07-01

    Mankind is relient on chemical propulsion systems for space access. Nevertheless, this has been a stagnant area in terms of technological development and the technology base has not changed much almost for the past forty years. This poses a vicious circle for launch applications such that high launch costs constrain the demand and low launch freqencies drive costs higher. This also has been a key limiting factor for small and micro satellites that are geared towards planetary science. Rather this be because of the launch frequencies or the costs, the access of small and micro satellites to orbit has been limited. With today's technology it is not possible to escape this circle. However the emergence of cost effective and high performance propulsion systems such as advanced hybrid rockets can decrease launch costs by almost an order or magnitude. This paper briefly introduces the timeline and research challenges that were overcome during the development of advanced hybrid LOX/paraffin based rockets. Experimental studies demonstrated effectiveness of these advanced hybrid rockets which incorporate fast burning parafin based fuels, advanced yet simple internal balistic design and carbon composite winding/fuel casting technology that enables the rocket motor to be built from inside out. A feasibility scenario is studied using these rocket motors as building blocks for a modular launch vehicle capable of delivering micro satellites into low earth orbit. In addition, the building block rocket motor can be used further solar system missions providing the ability to do standalone small and micro satellite missions to planets within the solar system. This enabling technology therefore offers a viable alternative in order to escape the viscous that has plagued the space launch industry and that has limited the small and micro satellite delivery for planetary science.

  5. Multivariate assimilation of satellite-derived land remote sensing datasets: Advances, gaps and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Mocko, D. M.; Jasinski, M. F.; Reichle, R. H.; Zaitchik, B. F.; Getirana, A.; Rodell, M.; Xia, Y.; Ek, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing advancements in recent years have enabled monitoring of the Earth's land surface with unprecedented scale and frequency. In the past decade, remote sensing observations of the land surface have become available from a number of satellite instruments and platforms including soil moisture (AMSR-E, ASCAT, AMSR2, SMOS, SMAP), snow depth (AMSR-E, AMSR2), snow cover (MODIS, VIIRS), terrestrial water storage (GRACE) and land surface temperature (MODIS, VIIRS, GOES). To support the effective exploitation of the information content of the remote sensing observations, computational tools such as data assimilation are necessary. In this presentation, I will describe the efforts towards the concurrent use of all available remote sensing observations in a multivariate data assimilation configuration in the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). Though NLDAS has produced over 34 years (Jan 1979 to present) of hourly land-surface meteorology and surface states using the best-available observations and reanalyses for "off-line" land surface model (LSM) simulations, to-date it has not included the assimilation of relevant hydrological remote sensing datasets. The new phase of NLDAS attempts to bridge this gap by assimilating all land relevant datasets in the NLDAS configuration using the NASA Land Information System (LIS). The results from individually assimilating the soil moisture, snow and terrestrial water storage datasets indicate that improvements can be obtained not only in soil moisture and snow states, but also on evapotranspiration and streamflow estimates. The results from the multivariate, multisensor assimilation of the above-mentioned remote sensing datasets in NLDAS and an evaluation of the resulting improvements and trends in soil moisture, snowpack, evapotranspiration and streamflow will also be presented. Through this talk, I will describe the advances made towards the effective utilization of remote sensing data for hydrologic

  6. Dynamic rain fade compensation techniques for the advanced communications technology satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamic and composite nature of propagation impairments that are incurred on earth-space communications links at frequencies in and above the 30/20 GHz Ka band necessitate the use of dynamic statistical identification and prediction processing of the fading signal in order to optimally estimate and predict the levels of each of the deleterious attenuation components. Such requirements are being met in NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) project by the implementation of optimal processing schemes derived through the use of the ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model and nonlinear Markov filtering theory. The ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model discerns climatological variations on the order of 0.5 deg in latitude and longitude in the continental U.S. The time-dependent portion of the model gives precise availability predictions for the 'spot beam' links of ACTS. However, the structure of the dynamic portion of the model, which yields performance parameters such as fade duration probabilities, is isomorphic to the state-variable approach of stochastic control theory and is amenable to the design of such statistical fade processing schemes which can be made specific to the particular climatological location at which they are employed.

  7. Performance experiments with alternative advanced teleoperator control modes for a simulated solar maximum satellite repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, H.; Zak, H.; Kim, W. S.; Bejczy, A. K.; Schenker, P. S.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments are described which were conducted at the JPL Advanced Teleoperator Lab to demonstrate and evaluate the effectiveness of various teleoperator control modes in the performance of a simulated Solar Max Satellite Repair (SMSR) task. THe SMSR was selected as a test because it is very rich in performance capability requirements and it actually has been performed by two EVA astronauts in the Space Shuttle Bay in 1984. The main subtasks are: thermal blanket removal; installation of a hinge attachment for electrical panel opening; opening of electrical panel; removal of electrical connectors; relining of cable bundles; replacement of electrical panel; securing parts and cables; re-mate electrical connectors; closing of electrical panel; and reinstating thermal blanket. The current performance experiments are limited to thermal blanket cutting, electrical panel unbolting and handling electrical bundles and connectors. In one formal experiment even different control modes were applied to the unbolting and reinsertion of electrical panel screws subtasks. The seven control modes are alternative combinations of manual position and rate control with force feedback and remote compliance referenced to force-torque sensor information. Force-torque sensor and end effector position data and task completion times were recorded for analysis and quantification of operator performance.

  8. Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) Network Control Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coney, T. A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the performance of the network control function for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) very small aperture terminal (VSAT) full mesh network. This includes control of all operational activities such as acquisition, synchronization, timing and rain fade compensation as well as control of all communications activities such as on-demand integrated services (voice, video, and date) connects and disconnects Operations control is provided by an in-band orderwire carried in the baseboard processor (BBP) control burst, the orderwire burst, the reference burst, and the uplink traffic burst. Communication services are provided by demand assigned multiple access (DAMA) protocols. The ACTS implementation of DAMA protocols ensures both on-demand and integrated voice, video and data services. Communications services control is also provided by the in-band orderwire but uses only the reference burst and the uplink traffic burst. The performance of the ACTS network control functions have been successfully tested during on-orbit checkout and in various VSAT networks in day to day operations. This paper discusses the network operations and services control performance.

  9. SEASAT economic assessment. Volume 9: Ports and harbors case study and generalization. [economic benefits of SEASAT satellites to harbors and shipping industries through improved weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    This case study and generalization quantify benefits made possible through improved weather forecasting resulting from the integration of SEASAT data into local weather forecasts. The major source of avoidable economic losses to shipping from inadequate weather forecasting data is shown to be dependent on local precipitation forecasting. The ports of Philadelphia and Boston were selected for study.

  10. Weather Forecasting Systems and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecikalski, John (Inventor); MacKenzie, Wayne M., Jr. (Inventor); Walker, John Robert (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A weather forecasting system has weather forecasting logic that receives raw image data from a satellite. The raw image data has values indicative of light and radiance data from the Earth as measured by the satellite, and the weather forecasting logic processes such data to identify cumulus clouds within the satellite images. For each identified cumulus cloud, the weather forecasting logic applies interest field tests to determine a score indicating the likelihood of the cumulus cloud forming precipitation and/or lightning in the future within a certain time period. Based on such scores, the weather forecasting logic predicts in which geographic regions the identified cumulus clouds will produce precipitation and/or lighting within during the time period. Such predictions may then be used to provide a weather map thereby providing users with a graphical illustration of the areas predicted to be affected by precipitation within the time period.

  11. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Fade Compensation Protocol Impact on Very Small-Aperture Terminal Bit Error Rate Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Christina B.; Coney, Thom A.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) communications system operates at Ka band. ACTS uses an adaptive rain fade compensation protocol to reduce the impact of signal attenuation resulting from propagation effects. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of an analysis characterizing the improvement in VSAT performance provided by this protocol. The metric for performance is VSAT bit error rate (BER) availability. The acceptable availability defined by communication system design specifications is 99.5% for a BER of 5E-7 or better. VSAT BER availabilities with and without rain fade compensation are presented. A comparison shows the improvement in BER availability realized with rain fade compensation. Results are presented for an eight-month period and for 24 months spread over a three-year period. The two time periods represent two different configurations of the fade compensation protocol. Index Terms-Adaptive coding, attenuation, propagation, rain, satellite communication, satellites.

  12. GMS-based"Future Time" Rainfall Data Assimilation for Mesoscale Weather Prediction over Korean Peninsula and Future Prospects with GPM Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Ou, Mi-Lim

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the use of satellite-derived nowcasted (short-term forecasted) rainfall over 3-hour time periods to gain an equivalent time increment in initializing a nonhydrostatic mesoscale model used for predicting convective rainfall events over the Korean peninsula. Infrared (IR) window measurements from the Japanese Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS) are used to specify latent heating for a spinup period of the model - but in future time -- thus initializing in advance of actual time in the framework of a prediction scenario. The main scientific objective of the study is to investigate the strengths and weaknesses of this approach insofar as data assimilation, in which the nowcasted assimilation data are derived independently of the prognostic model itself. Although there have been various recent improvements in formulating the dynamics, thermodynamics, and microphysics of mesoscale models, as well as computer advances which allow the use of high resolution cloud-resolving grids and explicit latent heating over regional domains, spinup remains at the forefront of unresolved mesoscale modeling problems. In general, non-realistic spinup limits the skill in predicting the spatial-temporal distribution of convection and precipitation, primarily in the early hours of a. forecast, stemming from standard prognostic variables not representing the initial diabatic heating field produced by the ambient convection and cloud fields. The long-term goal of this research is to improve short-range (12-hour) quantitative precipitation forecasting (QPF) over the Korean peninsula through the use of innovative data assimilation methods based on geosynchronous satellite measurements. As a step in ths direction, a non-standard data assimilation experiment in conjunction with GMS-retrieved nowcasted rainfall information introduced to the mesoscale model is conducted. The 3-hourly precipitation forecast information is assimilated through nudging the associated

  13. A statistical rain attenuation prediction model with application to the advanced communication technology satellite project. 1: Theoretical development and application to yearly predictions for selected cities in the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    A rain attenuation prediction model is described for use in calculating satellite communication link availability for any specific location in the world that is characterized by an extended record of rainfall. Such a formalism is necessary for the accurate assessment of such availability predictions in the case of the small user-terminal concept of the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) Project. The model employs the theory of extreme value statistics to generate the necessary statistical rainrate parameters from rain data in the form compiled by the National Weather Service. These location dependent rain statistics are then applied to a rain attenuation model to obtain a yearly prediction of the occurrence of attenuation on any satellite link at that location. The predictions of this model are compared to those of the Crane Two-Component Rain Model and some empirical data and found to be very good. The model is then used to calculate rain attenuation statistics at 59 locations in the United States (including Alaska and Hawaii) for the 20 GHz downlinks and 30 GHz uplinks of the proposed ACTS system. The flexibility of this modeling formalism is such that it allows a complete and unified treatment of the temporal aspects of rain attenuation that leads to the design of an optimum stochastic power control algorithm, the purpose of which is to efficiently counter such rain fades on a satellite link.

  14. Advances in regional crop yield estimation over the United States using satellite remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D. M.; Dorn, M. F.; Crawford, C.

    2015-12-01

    Since the dawn of earth observation imagery, particularly from systems like Landsat and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer, there has been an overarching desire to regionally estimate crop production remotely. Research efforts integrating space-based imagery into yield models to achieve this need have indeed paralleled these systems through the years, yet development of a truly useful crop production monitoring system has been arguably mediocre in coming. As a result, relatively few organizations have yet to operationalize the concept, and this is most acute in regions of the globe where there are not even alternative sources of crop production data being collected. However, the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) has continued to push for this type of data source as a means to complement its long-standing, traditional crop production survey efforts which are financially costly to the government and create undue respondent burden on farmers. Corn and soybeans, the two largest field crops in the United States, have been the focus of satellite-based production monitoring by NASS for the past decade. Data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has been seen as the most pragmatic input source for modeling yields primarily based on its daily revisit capabilities and reasonable ground sample resolution. The research methods presented here will be broad but provides a summary of what is useful and adoptable with satellite imagery in terms of crop yield estimation. Corn and soybeans will be of particular focus but other major staple crops like wheat and rice will also be presented. NASS will demonstrate that while MODIS provides a slew of vegetation related products, the traditional normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is still ideal. Results using land surface temperature products, also generated from MODIS, will also be shown. Beyond the MODIS data itself, NASS research has also focused efforts on understanding a

  15. Space Weather Services of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, K.; Hong, S.; Park, S.; Kim, Y. Y.; Wi, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Korean Space Weather Center (KSWC) of the National Radio Research Agency (RRA) is a government agency which is the official source of space weather information for Korean Government and the primary action agency of emergency measure to severe space weather condition. KSWC's main role is providing alerts, watches, and forecasts in order to minimize the space weather impacts on both of public and commercial sectors of satellites, aviation, communications, navigations, power grids, and etc. KSWC is also in charge of monitoring the space weather condition and conducting research and development for its main role of space weather operation in Korea. In this study, we will present KSWC's recent efforts on development of application-oriented space weather research products and services on user needs, and introduce new international collaborative projects, such as IPS-Driven Enlil model, global network of DSCOVR and STEREO satellites tracking, and ARMAS (Automated Radiation Measurement for Aviation Safety).

  16. Cockpit weather information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Jeffrey Chen-Yu (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Weather information, periodically collected from throughout a global region, is periodically assimilated and compiled at a central source and sent via a high speed data link to a satellite communication service, such as COMSAT. That communication service converts the compiled weather information to GSDB format, and transmits the GSDB encoded information to an orbiting broadcast satellite, INMARSAT, transmitting the information at a data rate of no less than 10.5 kilobits per second. The INMARSAT satellite receives that data over its P-channel and rebroadcasts the GDSB encoded weather information, in the microwave L-band, throughout the global region at a rate of no less than 10.5 KB/S. The transmission is received aboard an aircraft by means of an onboard SATCOM receiver and the output is furnished to a weather information processor. A touch sensitive liquid crystal panel display allows the pilot to select the weather function by touching a predefined icon overlain on the display's surface and in response a color graphic display of the weather is displayed for the pilot.

  17. Designing a Weather Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The collection and analysis of weather data is crucial to the location of alternate energy systems like solar and wind. This article presents a design challenge that gives students a chance to design a weather station to collect data in advance of a large wind turbine installation. Data analysis is a crucial part of any science or engineering…

  18. Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) Multibeam Antenna On-Orbit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) was launched in September 1993. ACTS introduced several new technologies, including a multibeam antenna (MBA) operating at extremely short wavelengths never before used in communications. This antenna, which has both fixed and rapidly reconfigurable high-energy spot beams (150 miles in diameter), serves users equipped with small antenna terminals. Extensive structural and thermal analyses have been performed for simulating the ACTS MBA on-orbit performance. The results show that the reflector surfaces (mainly the front subreflector), antenna support assembly, and metallic surfaces on the spacecraft body will be distorted because of the thermal effects of varying solar heating, which degrade the ACTS MBA performance. Since ACTS was launched, a number of evaluations have been performed to assess MBA performance in the space environment. For example, the on-orbit performance measurements found systematic environmental disturbances to the MBA beam pointing. These disturbances were found to be imposed by the attitude control system, antenna and spacecraft mechanical alignments, and on-orbit thermal effects. As a result, the MBA may not always exactly cover the intended service area. In addition, the on-orbit measurements showed that antenna pointing accuracy is the performance parameter most sensitive to thermal distortions on the front subreflector surface and antenna support assemblies. Several compensation approaches were tested and evaluated to restore on-orbit pointing stability. A combination of autotrack (75 percent of the time) and Earth sensor control (25 percent of the time) was found to be the best way to compensate for antenna pointing error during orbit. This approach greatly minimizes the effects of thermal distortions on antenna beam pointing.

  19. Advances in Understanding Top-of-Atmosphere Radiation Variability from Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeb, Norman G.; Kato, Seiji; Su, Wenying; Wong, Takmeng; Rose, Fred G.; Doelling, David R.; Norris, Joel R.; Huang, Xianglei

    2012-07-01

    This paper highlights how the emerging record of satellite observations from the Earth Observation System (EOS) and A-Train constellation are advancing our ability to more completely document and understand the underlying processes associated with variations in the Earth's top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiation budget. Large-scale TOA radiation changes during the past decade are observed to be within 0.5 Wm-2 per decade based upon comparisons between Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments aboard Terra and Aqua and other instruments. Tropical variations in emitted outgoing longwave (LW) radiation are found to closely track changes in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). During positive ENSO phase (El Niño), outgoing LW radiation increases, and decreases during the negative ENSO phase (La Niña). The coldest year during the last decade occurred in 2008, during which strong La Nina conditions persisted throughout most of the year. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) observations show that the lower temperatures extended throughout much of the troposphere for several months, resulting in a reduction in outgoing LW radiation and an increase in net incoming radiation. At the global scale, outgoing LW flux anomalies are partially compensated for by decreases in midlatitude cloud fraction and cloud height, as observed by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer, respectively. CERES data show that clouds have a net radiative warming influence during La Niña conditions and a net cooling influence during El Niño, but the magnitude of the anomalies varies greatly from one ENSO event to another. Regional cloud-radiation variations among several Terra and A-Train instruments show consistent patterns and exhibit marked fluctuations at monthly timescales in response to tropical atmosphere-ocean dynamical processes associated with ENSO and Madden-Julian Oscillation.

  20. Survey: National Environmental Satellite Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The national Environmental Satellite Service (NESS) receives data at periodic intervals from satellites of the Synchronous Meteorological Satellite/Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite series and from the Improved TIROS (Television Infrared Observational Satellite) Operational Satellite. Within the conterminous United States, direct readout and processed products are distributed to users over facsimile networks from a central processing and data distribution facility. In addition, the NESS Satellite Field Stations analyze, interpret, and distribute processed geostationary satellite products to regional weather service activities.

  1. Saved By A Weather Satellite

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is a story about an incredibly challenging rescue that took place on Jan. 2, 2010, 250 miles off the shore of North Carolina. Dennis Clements was saved thanks to a distress signal sent from hi...

  2. Weather Watch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratt, Herschell Marvin

    1973-01-01

    Suggests a number of ways in which Federal Aviation Agency weather report printouts can be used in teaching the weather section of meteorology. These weather sequence reports can be obtained free of charge at most major airports. (JR)

  3. Advanced definition study for the determination of atmospheric ozone using the satellite eclipse technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmons, R.; Preski, R. J.; Kierstead, F. H., Jr.; Doll, F. C.; Wight, D. T.; Romick, D. C.

    1973-01-01

    A study was made to evaluate the potential for remote ground-based measurement of upper atmospheric ozone by determining the absorption ratio of selected narrow bands of sunlight as reflected by satellites while passing into eclipse, using the NASA Mobile Satellite Photometric Observatory (MOSPO). Equipment modifications to provide optimum performance were analyzed and recommendations were made for improvements to the system to accomplish this. These included new sensor tubes, pulse counting detection circuitry, filters, beam splitters and associated optical revision, along with an automatic tracking capability plus corresponding operational techniques which should extend the overall measurement capability to include use of satellites down to 5th magnitude.

  4. The solar panels on the GOES-L satellite are deployed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The solar panels on the GOES-L weather satellite are fully deployed. Final testing of the imaging system, instrumentation, communications and power systems also will be performed at the Astrotech facility, Titusville, Fla. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES- L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite.

  5. The solar panels on the GOES-L satellite are deployed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., stand back as they deploy the solar panels of the GOES-L weather satellite. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite.

  6. Advance Technology Satellites in the Commercial Environment. Volume 2: Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A forecast of transponder requirements was obtained. Certain assumptions about system configurations are implicit in this process. The factors included are interpolation of baseline year values to produce yearly figures, estimation of satellite capture, effects of peak-hours and the time-zone staggering of peak hours, circuit requirements for acceptable grade of service capacity of satellite transponders, including various compression methods where applicable, and requirements for spare transponders in orbit. The graphical distribution of traffic requirements was estimated.

  7. Advanced Oil Spill Detection Algorithms For Satellite Based Maritime Environment Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radius, Andrea; Azevedo, Rui; Sapage, Tania; Carmo, Paulo

    2013-12-01

    During the last years, the increasing pollution occurrence and the alarming deterioration of the environmental health conditions of the sea, lead to the need of global monitoring capabilities, namely for marine environment management in terms of oil spill detection and indication of the suspected polluter. The sensitivity of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to the different phenomena on the sea, especially for oil spill and vessel detection, makes it a key instrument for global pollution monitoring. The SAR performances in maritime pollution monitoring are being operationally explored by a set of service providers on behalf of the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA), which has launched in 2007 the CleanSeaNet (CSN) project - a pan-European satellite based oil monitoring service. EDISOFT, which is from the beginning a service provider for CSN, is continuously investing in R&D activities that will ultimately lead to better algorithms and better performance on oil spill detection from SAR imagery. This strategy is being pursued through EDISOFT participation in the FP7 EC Sea-U project and in the Automatic Oil Spill Detection (AOSD) ESA project. The Sea-U project has the aim to improve the current state of oil spill detection algorithms, through the informative content maximization obtained with data fusion, the exploitation of different type of data/ sensors and the development of advanced image processing, segmentation and classification techniques. The AOSD project is closely related to the operational segment, because it is focused on the automation of the oil spill detection processing chain, integrating auxiliary data, like wind information, together with image and geometry analysis techniques. The synergy between these different objectives (R&D versus operational) allowed EDISOFT to develop oil spill detection software, that combines the operational automatic aspect, obtained through dedicated integration of the processing chain in the existing open source NEST

  8. Use of CCSDS and OSI Protocols on the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chirieleison, Don

    1996-01-01

    Although ACTS (Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) provides an almost error-free channel during much of the day and under most conditions, there are times when it is not suitable for reliably error-free data communications when operating in the uncoded mode. Because coded operation is not always available to every earth station, measures must be taken in the end system to maintain adequate throughput when transferring data under adverse conditions. The most effective approach that we tested to improve performance was the addition of an 'outer' Reed-Solomon code through use of CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) GOS 2 (a forward error correcting code). This addition can benefit all users of an ACTS channel including those applications that do not require totally reliable transport, but it is somewhat expensive because additional hardware is needed. Although we could not characterize the link noise statistically (it appeared to resemble uncorrelated white noise, the type that block codes are least effective in correcting), we did find that CCSDS GOS 2 gave an essentially error-free link at BER's (bit error rate) as high as 6x10(exp -4). For users that demand reliable transport, an ARQ (Automatic Repeat Queuing) protocol such as TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) or TP4 (Transport Protocol, Class 4) will probably be used. In this category, it comes as no surprise that the best choice of the protocol suites tested over ACTS was TP4 using CCSDS GOS 2. TP4 behaves very well over an error-free link which GOS 2 provides up to a point. Without forward error correction, however, TP4 service begins to degrade in the 10(exp -7)-10(exp -6) range and by 4x10(exp -6), it barely gives any throughput at all. If Congestion Avoidance is used in TP4, the degradation is even more pronounced. Fortunately, as demonstrated here, this effect can be more than compensated for by choosing the Selective Acknowledgment option. In fact, this option can enable TP4 to

  9. An advanced generation land mobile satellite system and its critical technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naderi, F.

    1982-01-01

    A conceptual design for a Land Mobile Satellite System (LMSS) for the 1990s is presented. LMSS involves small tranceivers accessing satellites directly, with ground reception through small car-top antennas. The satellite would have a large antenna and blanket coverage areas in the UHF. The call may originate from a home, be carried by wire to a gateway, transmitted to satellite on the S-band, converted to UHF on the satellite, and transmitted to the vehicle. The system design is constrained by the number of users in an area during the busiest hours, Shuttle storage, controllability factors, and the total area served. A 55-m antenna has been selected, with 87 spot beams and two 10 MHz UHF bands in the 806-890 MHz band. A 17 dB interbeam isolation level is required, implying that sufficient sub-bands can be generated to assure 8265 total channels. The mobile satellite (MSAT) would have an 83 m mast lower segment, a 34 m upper segment, and a second, 10 m antenna made of a deployable mesh. Various antenna function modes are considered.

  10. Biomass burning observations for near-real-time applications: advances in satellite data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyer, E. J.; Reid, J. S.; Prins, E. M.; Hoffman, J.; Schmidt, C. C.; Giglio, L.; Peterson, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Satellites have been used to provide information on fire activity for wildfire response and air quality applications for many years. While important refinements have been made to algorithmic processing of single satellite scenes for fire detection, most near-real-time (NRT) applications still use fire products in their simplest form-a list of locations and times of fires detected from space. This information can be thought of as the numerator in a fire activity term: it captures relative variations in fire activity, and can be transformed into absolute fire activity only by assuming that the sensitivity of the sensor (the denominator) is consistent and unchanging. This standard for satellite fire products arose from computational necessity, and persists because of simplicity. Using only this limited information restricts development of NRT fire applications in two key ways: first, it does not permit applications to account for variations in detection efficiency by a single sensor, and second, it provides no pathway for quantitative integration of multiple sensors, especially if those sensors have different fire detection properties. We will demonstrate techniques, using current satellite fire products, to improve the fidelity of the description of fire activity from satellite by accounting for variation in detection efficiency, and demonstrate how an absolute metric of fire sensitivity can be used to integrate fire detections from diverse sources, such as polar and geostationary satellite observations, in order to improve NRT description of spatial and temporal patterns of fire activity.

  11. On the Relationship Between the Length of Season and Tropical Cyclone Activity in the North Atlantic Basin During the Weather Satellite Era, 1960-2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    later and with both being related to global warming. In this study, the relationship between the LOS and tropical cyclone activity and climate is examined for the weather satellite era, 1960-2013. Estimates are also given for the LOS and LSD, as well as for the expected number of tropical cyclones (NTC), the total number of storm days (NSD), the total accumulated cyclone energy (ACE), and the net tropical cyclone activity (NTCA) index for the 2014 hurricane season.

  12. Weather and Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, Scott

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews some of the weather hazards involved with flight testing. Some of the hazards reviewed are: turbulence, icing, thunderstorms and winds and windshear. Maps, pictures, satellite pictures of the meteorological phenomena and graphs are included. Also included are pictures of damaged aircraft.

  13. Severe Weather

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forde, Evan B.

    2004-01-01

    Educating the public about safety issues related to severe weather is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) mission. This article deals with a poster entitled, "Severe Weather," that has been created by NOAA to help educate the public about hazardous weather conditions. The four types of severe weather highlighted in…

  14. Severe Weather

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forde, Evan B.

    2004-01-01

    Educating the public about safety issues related to severe weather is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) mission. This month's insert, Severe Weather, has been created by NOAA to help educate the public about hazardous weather conditions. The four types of severe weather highlighted in this poster are hurricanes,…

  15. Advancement of Satellite-based Rainfall Applications for Hydrologic Modeling in Topographically Complex Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Koray; Derin, Yagmur

    2014-05-01

    Accuracy and reliability of hydrological modeling studies heavily depends on quality and availability of precipitation estimates. However hydrological studies in developing countries, especially over complex topography, are limited due to unavailability and scarcity of ground-based networks. In this study we evaluate three different satellite-based rainfall retrieval algorithms namely, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), NOAA/Climate Prediction Center Morphing Method (CMORPH) and EUMETSAT's Multi-Sensor Precipitation Estimate (MPE) over orographically complex Western Black Sea Basin in Turkey, using a relatively dense rain gauge network. Our results indicated that satellite-based products significantly underestimated the rainfall in regions characterized by orographic rainfall and overestimated the rainfall in the drier regions with seasonal dependency. Further, we devised a new bias adjustment algorithm for the satellite-based rainfall products based on the "physiographic similarity" concept. Our results showed that proposed bias adjustment algorithm is better suited to regions with complex topography and provided improved results compared to the baseline "inverse distance weighting" method. To evaluate the utility of satellite-based products in hydrologic modeling studies, we implemented the MIKE SHE-MIKE 11 integrated fully distributed physically based hydrological model in the study region driven by ground-based and satellite-based precipitation estimates. Model parameter estimation was performed using a constrained calibration approach guided by multiple "signature measures" to estimate model parameters in a hydrologically meaningful way rather than using the traditional "statistical" objective functions that largely mask valuable hydrologic information during calibration process. In this presentation we will provide a discussion of evaluation and bias correction of the satellite-based precipitation products and

  16. Study of advanced communications satellite systems based on SS-FDMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiesling, J.

    1980-01-01

    A satellite communication system based on the use of a multiple, contiguous beam satellite antenna and frequency division multiple access (FDMA) is studied. Emphasis is on the evaluation of the feasibility of SS (satellite switching) FDMA technology, particularly the multiple, contiguous beam antenna, the onboard switch and channelization, and on methods to overcome the effects of severe Ka band fading caused by precipitation. This technology is evaluated and plans for technology development and evaluation are given. The application of SS-FDMA to domestic satellite communications is also evaluated. Due to the potentially low cost Earth stations, SS-FDMA is particularly attractive for thin route applications up to several hundred kilobits per second, and offers the potential for competing with terrestrial facilities at low data rates and over short routes. The onboard switch also provides added route flexibility for heavy route systems. The key beneficial SS-FDMA strategy is to simplify and thus reduce the cost of the direct access Earth station at the expense of increased satellite complexity.

  17. The Advanced Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (ATDRSS) - The next generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandel, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) is currently in operation and is providing support to users. This paper describes a candidate satellite configuration which will continue system operation when the current satellite fleet is expended in the 1996 to 1997 time frame. The new system is intended to meet the growth in space network user population and service needs expected through approximately 2010. It is believed that the candidate architecture described will lead to a low-risk evolution from the TDRS architecture used prior to implementation of the ATDRS. NASA is using the architecture described herein as a reference, but has not selected an implementation architecture for the ATDRS system. This selection will be made when an implementing contractor is chosen and will be based on reducing life cycle costs and the ability to meet mission needs.

  18. Proceedings of the Seventeenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 17) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX) is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investors from domestic and international organizations. NAPEX 17 was held on 15 June 1993. The meeting was organized into two technical sessions. The first session was dedicated to slant path propagation studies and experiments. The second session focused on propagation studies for mobile and personal communications. Preceding NAPEX 17, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop was held on 14 June 1993 to review ACTS propagation activities with emphasis on ACTS experiments status and data collection, processing, and exchange.

  19. Weather & Weather Maps. Teacher's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metro, Peter M.; Green, Rachel E.

    This guide is intended to provide an opportunity for students to work with weather symbols used for reporting weather. Also included are exercises in location of United States cities by latitude and longitude, measurement of distances in miles and kilometers, and prediction of weather associated with various types of weather fronts. (RE)

  20. NASA's Advancements in Space-Based Spectrometry Lead to Improvements in Weather Prediction and Understanding of Climate Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel

    2010-01-01

    AIRS is a precision state of the art High Spectral Resolution Multi-detector IR grating array spectrometer that was launched into a polar orbit on EOS Aqua in 2002. AIRS measures most of the infra-red spectrum with very low noise from 650/cm to 2660/cm with a resolving power of 2400 at a spatial resolution of 13 km. The objectives of AIRS were to perform accurate determination of atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles in up to 90% partial cloud cover conditions for the purpose of improving numerical weather prediction and understanding climate processes. AIRS data has also been used to determine accurate trace gas profiles. A brief overview of the retrieval methodology used to analyze AIRS observations under partial cloud cover will be presented and sample results will be shown from the weather and climate perspectives.

  1. Recent advances in understanding stratospheric dynamics and transport processes - Application of satellite data to their interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grose, W. L.

    1984-01-01

    The present paper discusses the use of the transformed Eulerian (or 'residual') mean-flow formulation, the Eliassen-Palm flux, and Ertel's potential vorticity to provide an increased understanding of wave, mean-flow interactions, and constituent transport processes in the stratosphere. Temperature and ozone data retrieved from radiance profiles obtained by the LIMS instrument on the Nimbus 7 satellite are utilized in conjunction with these theoretical concepts for the interpretation of phenomena that occurred during the major and minor warmings of January-February 1979. The results illustrate the insight provided by these concepts and demonstrate that useful diagnostic quantities can be derived from global satellite temperature fields.

  2. Diversity reception for advanced multi-satellite networks: A CDMA approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colzi, E.; Degaudenzi, R.; Elia, C.; Giannetti, F.; Viola, R.

    1993-01-01

    Diversity reception for Synchronous CDMA (S-CDMA) is introduced and analyzed. A Gaussian co-channel synchronous and asynchronous interference approximation is derived to evaluate the effects on the system bit error rate. Numerical results are provided for a simple mobile communication system where the signals transmitted by two distinct satellites in visibility are coherently combined by a three fingers Rake receiver. A second example showing performance of an integrated ground/satellite single frequency network for digital audio broadcasting is presented. Results show the capacity advantage of utilizing S-CDMA in combination with diversity reception.

  3. Study of the integration of advanced communications satellite systems and terrestrial networks, executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-04-01

    Two levels of integration of satellite and terrestrial communication networks were examined: level 1 where 1 earth station is installed at each of the existing or planned 48 international switching centers in Europe; and level 2 where earth stations are installed at the first significant hierarchical level (850 nodes) of the future network of the European countries. Both levels are technically feasible. The main source of economies lies in the ability of the satellite system to derive Erlang advantages by the aggregation of relatively low density international traffic streams, which would otherwise flow via numerous terrestrial routes, through a single transmission facility. An implementation plan based on EUTELSAT 2 and 3 is suggested.

  4. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). Phase 1: Industrial/academic experimenters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maisel, James E.; Nowlin, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the work done at Arizona State University under the ACTS Experimenters Program. The main thrust of the Program was to develop experiments to test, evaluate, and prove the commercial worthiness of the ACTS satellite which is scheduled for launch in 1993. To accomplish this goal, meetings were held with various governmental, industrial, and academic units to discuss the ACTS satellite and its technology and possible experiments that would generate industrial interest and support for ASU's efforts. Several local industries generated several experiments of their own. The investigators submitted several experiments of educational, medical, commercial, and technical value and interest. The disposition of these experimental proposals is discussed in this report.

  5. The Advanced Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (ATDRSS) future service growth (FSG) capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandel, Daniel L.; Gibbons, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Attention is given to the closure of the ATDRSS zone of exclusion (ZOE) utilizing a satellite crosslink whose payload is contained within the FSG. Radio-frequency and optical crosslink approaches are compared in terms of power, volume, and mass. The application considered for the FSG is the ATDRSS ZOE closure utilizing either an optical or an RF crosslink.

  6. Proceedings of the Twentieth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX XX) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nassar (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) Meeting and associated Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop convene yearly to discuss studies supported by the NASA Propagation Program. Representatives from the satellite communications (satcom)industry, academia, and government with an interest in space-ground radio wave propagation have peer discussion of work in progress, disseminate propagation results, and interact with the satcom industry. NAPEX XX, in Fairbanks, Alaska, June 4-5, 1996, had three sessions: (1) "ACTS Propagation Study: Background, Objectives, and Outcomes," covered results from thirteen station-years of Ka-band experiments; (2) "Propagation Studies for Mobile and Personal Satellite Applications," provided the latest developments in measurement, modeling, and dissemination of propagation phenomena of interest to the mobile, personal, and aeronautical satcom industry; and (3)"Propagation Research Topics," covered a range of topics including space/ground optical propagation experiments, propagation databases, the NASA Propagation Web Site, and revision plans for the NASA propagation effects handbooks. The ACTS Miniworkshop, June 6, 1996, covered ACTS status, engineering support for ACTS propagation terminals, and the ACTS Propagation Data Center. A plenary session made specific recommendations for the future direction of the program.

  7. Assessing the Impact of Advanced Satellite Observations in the NASA GEOS-5 Forecast System Using the Adjoint Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelaro, Ron; Liu, Emily; Sienkiewicz, Meta

    2011-01-01

    The adjoint of a data assimilation system provides a flexible and efficient tool for estimating observation impacts on short-range weather forecasts. The impacts of any or all observations can be estimated simultaneously based on a single execution of the adjoint system. The results can be easily aggregated according to data type, location, channel, etc., making this technique especially attractive for examining the impacts of new hyper-spectral satellite instruments and for conducting regular, even near-real time, monitoring of the entire observing system. In this talk, we present results from the adjoint-based observation impact monitoring tool in NASA's GEOS-5 global atmospheric data assimilation and forecast system. The tool has been running in various off-line configurations for some time, and is scheduled to run as a regular part of the real-time forecast suite beginning in autumn 20 I O. We focus on the impacts of the newest components of the satellite observing system, including AIRS, IASI and GPS. For AIRS and IASI, it is shown that the vast majority of the channels assimilated have systematic positive impacts (of varying magnitudes), although some channels degrade the forecast. Of the latter, most are moisture-sensitive or near-surface channels. The impact of GPS observations in the southern hemisphere is found to be a considerable overall benefit to the system. In addition, the spatial variability of observation impacts reveals coherent patterns of positive and negative impacts that may point to deficiencies in the use of certain observations over, for example, specific surface types. When performed in conjunction with selected observing system experiments (OSEs), the adjoint results reveal both redundancies and dependencies between observing system impacts as observations are added or removed from the assimilation system. Understanding these dependencies appears to pose a major challenge for optimizing the use of the current observational network and

  8. Modulation/demodulation techniques for satellite communications. Part 2: Advanced techniques. The linear channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omura, J. K.; Simon, M. K.

    1982-01-01

    A theory is presented for deducing and predicting the performance of transmitter/receivers for bandwidth efficient modulations suitable for use on the linear satellite channel. The underlying principle used is the development of receiver structures based on the maximum-likelihood decision rule. The application of the performance prediction tools, e.g., channel cutoff rate and bit error probability transfer function bounds to these modulation/demodulation techniques.

  9. Advanced architectures and the required technologies for next-generation communications satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Ray; Naderi, F. Michael

    1988-01-01

    The hardware requirements for multibeam operation and onboard data processing and switching on future communication satellites are reviewed. Topics addressed include multiple-beam antennas, frequency-addressable beams, baseband vs IF switching, FDM/TDMA systems, and bulk demodulators. The proposed use of these technologies in the NASA ACTS, Italsat, and the Japanese ETS-VI is discussed in detail and illustrated with extensive diagrams, maps, drawings, and tables of projected performance data.

  10. Advanced snow cover classification by combining terrestrial photography and satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härer, S.; Bernhardt, M.; Schulz, K.

    2013-12-01

    Terrestrial photography combined with the recently presented Photo Rectification And ClassificaTIon SoftwarE (PRACTISE V.1.0) has proven to be a valuable source to derive temporal and spatial high-resolution snow cover maps in mountain regions. However, the integrated automatic snow classification algorithm is restricted to images on equally illuminated terrain and the areal coverage of digital photographs is strongly limited. Here, we present PRACTISE V.1.1 which automatically classifies sunny and shaded areas in the photograph separately, eliminating disturbing shadow effects in the classification. The software also calculates the Normalized-Difference Snow Index (NDSI) for a simultaneously captured satellite image. Until now, it was found to be difficult to set the NDSI threshold for snow accurately even though it is critical for a correct classification. Our new method automatically optimizes the threshold value using the camera-derived snow cover map as a cost-effective technique for in-situ ground-truthing. Eventually, the satellite image is classified. The improved software was successfully tested for photographs of a single lens reflex camera and corresponding satellite images of the Landsat series in the Zugspitze massif (Germany). The results have shown that the combination of terrestrial photography and satellite imagery extends the mapping area enormously, keeping the quality of the snow cover maps high. The enlarged areal coverage enhances the potential use of this technique for validating spatially distributed snow hydrological models, even for larger catchments. The presented approach furthermore indicates that it is largely independent of the used sensor systems as well as the investigated surface variable which allows an application in other research disciplines.

  11. GenSAA: A tool for advancing satellite monitoring with graphical expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Peter M.; Luczak, Edward C.

    1993-01-01

    During numerous contacts with a satellite each day, spacecraft analysts must closely monitor real time data for combinations of telemetry parameter values, trends, and other indications that may signify a problem or failure. As satellites become more complex and the number of data items increases, this task is becoming increasingly difficult for humans to perform at acceptable performance levels. At the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, fault-isolation expert systems have been developed to support data monitoring and fault detection tasks in satellite control centers. Based on the lessons learned during these initial efforts in expert system automation, a new domain-specific expert system development tool named the Generic Spacecraft Analyst Assistant (GenSAA) is being developed to facilitate the rapid development and reuse of real-time expert systems to serve as fault-isolation assistants for spacecraft analysts. Although initially domain-specific in nature, this powerful tool will support the development of highly graphical expert systems for data monitoring purposes throughout the space and commercial industry.

  12. Practical Application of NASA-Langley Advanced Satellite Products to In-Flight Icing Nowcasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Ben C.; Wolff, Cory A.; Minnis, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Experimental satellite-based icing products developed by the NASA Langley Research Center provide new tools to identify the locations of icing and its intensity. Since 1997, research forecasters at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have been helping to guide the NASA Glenn Research Center's Twin Otter aircraft into and out of clouds and precipitation for the purpose of characterizing in-flight icing conditions, including supercooled large drops, the accretions that result from such encounters and their effect on aircraft performance. Since the winter of 2003-04, the NASA Langley satellite products have been evaluated as part of this process, and are being considered as an input to NCAR s automated Current Icing Potential (CIP) products. This has already been accomplished for a relatively straightforward icing event, but many icing events have much more complex characteristics, providing additional challenges to all icing diagnosis tools. In this paper, four icing events with a variety of characteristics will be examined, with a focus on the NASA Langley satellite retrievals that were available in real time and their implications for icing nowcasting and potential applications in CIP.

  13. Advances in Assimilation of Satellite-Based Passive Microwave Observations for Soil-Moisture Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Pauwels, Valentijn; Reichle, Rolf H.; Draper, Clara; Koster, Randy; Liu, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Satellite-based microwave measurements have long shown potential to provide global information about soil moisture. The European Space Agency (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS, [1]) mission as well as the future National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP, [2]) mission measure passive microwave emission at L-band frequencies, at a relatively coarse (40 km) spatial resolution. In addition, SMAP will measure active microwave signals at a higher spatial resolution (3 km). These new L-band missions have a greater sensing depth (of -5cm) compared with past and present C- and X-band microwave sensors. ESA currently also disseminates retrievals of SMOS surface soil moisture that are derived from SMOS brightness temperature observations and ancillary data. In this research, we address two major challenges with the assimilation of recent/future satellite-based microwave measurements: (i) assimilation of soil moisture retrievals versus brightness temperatures for surface and root-zone soil moisture estimation and (ii) scale-mismatches between satellite observations, models and in situ validation data.

  14. An investigation into new advances in geodesy utilizing future satellite constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunter, B.; Teixeira da Encarnacao, J.; Ditmar, P.; Klees, R.

    2011-12-01

    The ability to measure temporal gravity field variations is of great interest to the Earth sciences community. These gravity measurements provide a unique source of information about Earth's mass transport processes, such as ocean currents, sea-level change, atmospheric variations, continental hydrology, movements of the solid earth, and the flux of ice in the cryosphere. Dedicated gravity field missions such as the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) have been collecting valuable global time-variable gravity measurements for nearly a decade now; however, as a single instrument pair, the spatial and temporal resolution of the GRACE mission is inherently limited by its ground track coverage. The information from these dedicated missions could be significantly enhanced if the information from a constellation of (non-dedicated) satellites were available. For example, the precise positions determined from a constellation of satellites equipped with GNSS receivers could be differentiated to reveal the gravitational accelerations acting on each satellite. The measurements from the constellation would not match the accuracy of those collected from GRACE, but would be sufficient to observe the large scale (> 1000 km) gravity variations. More importantly, these variations would be observed at time scales as short as six hours, covering a spectrum of the gravity field not possible from missions such as GRACE. In this context, the gravity data from the constellation would provide new information about Earth's global gravity field that would be fully complementary to data from dedicated gravity missions. In addition, the gravity data from the constellations could serve as an independent source of global time-variable gravity data in the event there is a gap between the end of the current GRACE mission (est. 2015-2016) and the proposed GRACE follow-on mission. Such constellations could soon become a reality, as satellite networks such as Iridium NEXT and others are

  15. Cockpit weather information needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scanlon, Charles H.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective is to develop an advanced pilot weather interface for the flight deck and to measure its utilization and effectiveness in pilot reroute decision processes, weather situation awareness, and weather monitoring. Identical graphical weather displays for the dispatcher, air traffic control (ATC), and pilot crew should also enhance the dialogue capabilities for reroute decisions. By utilizing a broadcast data link for surface observations, forecasts, radar summaries, lightning strikes, and weather alerts, onboard weather computing facilities construct graphical displays, historical weather displays, color textual displays, and other tools to assist the pilot crew. Since the weather data is continually being received and stored by the airborne system, the pilot crew has instantaneous access to the latest information. This information is color coded to distinguish degrees of category for surface observations, ceiling and visibilities, and ground radar summaries. Automatic weather monitoring and pilot crew alerting is accomplished by the airborne computing facilities. When a new weather information is received, the displays are instantaneously changed to reflect the new information. Also, when a new surface or special observation for the intended destination is received, the pilot crew is informed so that information can be studied at the pilot's discretion. The pilot crew is also immediately alerted when a severe weather notice, AIRMET or SIGMET, is received. The cockpit weather display shares a multicolor eight inch cathode ray tube and overlaid touch panel with a pilot crew data link interface. Touch sensitive buttons and areas are used for pilot selection of graphical and data link displays. Time critical ATC messages are presented in a small window that overlays other displays so that immediate pilot alerting and action can be taken. Predeparture and reroute clearances are displayed on the graphical weather system so pilot review of weather along

  16. 15 CFR 950.8 - Satellite Data Services Division (SDSD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...., weather forecasting) have been satisfied. The division also provides photographs collected during NASA's... to: Satellite Data Services Division, World Weather Building, Room 606, Washington, DC 20233,...

  17. 15 CFR 950.8 - Satellite Data Services Division (SDSD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...., weather forecasting) have been satisfied. The division also provides photographs collected during NASA's... to: Satellite Data Services Division, World Weather Building, Room 606, Washington, DC 20233,...

  18. 15 CFR 950.8 - Satellite Data Services Division (SDSD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...., weather forecasting) have been satisfied. The division also provides photographs collected during NASA's... to: Satellite Data Services Division, World Weather Building, Room 606, Washington, DC 20233,...

  19. 15 CFR 950.8 - Satellite Data Services Division (SDSD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...., weather forecasting) have been satisfied. The division also provides photographs collected during NASA's... to: Satellite Data Services Division, World Weather Building, Room 606, Washington, DC 20233,...

  20. 15 CFR 950.8 - Satellite Data Services Division (SDSD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...., weather forecasting) have been satisfied. The division also provides photographs collected during NASA's... to: Satellite Data Services Division, World Weather Building, Room 606, Washington, DC 20233,...

  1. The solar panels on the GOES-L satellite are deployed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., deploy one of the solar panels of the GOES-L weather satellite, to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite.

  2. The solar panels on the GOES-L satellite are deployed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., check out the solar panels of the GOES-L weather satellite, to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite.

  3. COST Action ES1206: Advanced GNSS Tropospheric Products for Monitoring Severe Weather Events and Climate (GNSS4SWEC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jonathan; Guerova, Guergana; Dousa, Jan; Dick, Galina; de Haan, Siebren; Pottiaux, Eric; Bock, Olivier; Pacione, Rosa

    2016-04-01

    GNSS is a well established atmospheric observing system which can accurately sense water vapour, the most abundant greenhouse gas, accounting for 60-70% of atmospheric warming. Water vapour observations are currently under-sampled in operational meteorology and obtaining and exploiting additional high-quality humidity observations is essential to improve severe weather forecasting and climate monitoring. Inconsistencies introduced into long-term time series from improved GNSS processing algorithms make climate trend analysis challenging. Ongoing re-processing efforts using state-of-the-art models are underway which will provide consistent time series' of tropospheric data, using 15+ years of GNSS observations and from over 600 stations worldwide. These datasets will enable validation of systematic biases from a range of instrumentation, improve the knowledge of climatic trends of atmospheric water vapour, and will potentially be of great benefit to global and regional NWP reanalyses and climate model simulations (e.g. IPCC AR5)

  4. Uncertainty Analysis And Synergy Of Aerosol Products From Multiple Satellite Sensors For Advanced Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichoku, C. M.; Petrenko, M.

    2013-05-01

    Aerosols are tiny particles suspended in the air, and can be made up of wind-blown dust, smoke from fires, and particulate emissions from automobiles, industries, and other natural and man-made sources. Aerosols can have significant impacts on the air quality, and can interact with clouds and solar radiation in such a way as to affect the water cycle and climate. However, the extent and scale of these impacts are still poorly understood, and this represents one of the greatest uncertainties in climate research to date. To fill this gap in our knowledge, the global and local properties of atmospheric aerosols are being extensively observed and measured, especially during the last decade, using both satellite and ground-based instruments, including such spaceborne sensors as MODIS on the Terra and Aqua satellites, MISR on Terra, OMI on Aura, POLDER on PARASOL, CALIOP on CALIPSO, SeaWiFS on SeaStar, and the ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) of sunphotometers. The aerosol measurements collected by these instruments over the last decade contribute to an unprecedented availability of the most complete set of complimentary aerosol measurements ever acquired. Still, to be able to utilize these measurements synergistically, they have to be carefully and uniformly analyzed and inter-compared, in order to understand the uncertainties and limitations of the products - a process that is greatly complicated by the diversity of differences that exist among them. In this presentation, we will show results of a coherent comparative uncertainty analysis of aerosol measurements from the above-named satellite sensors relative to AERONET. We use these results to demonstrate how these sensors perform in different parts of the world over different landcover types as well as their performance relative to one another, thereby facilitating product selection and integration for specific research and applications needs.

  5. Review: advances in in situ and satellite phenological observations in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Shin; Nasahara, Kenlo Nishida; Inoue, Tomoharu; Saitoh, Taku M; Suzuki, Rikie

    2016-04-01

    To accurately evaluate the responses of spatial and temporal variation of ecosystem functioning (evapotranspiration and photosynthesis) and services (regulating and cultural services) to the rapid changes caused by global warming, we depend on long-term, continuous, near-surface, and satellite remote sensing of phenology over wide areas. Here, we review such phenological studies in Japan and discuss our current knowledge, problems, and future developments. In contrast with North America and Europe, Japan has been able to evaluate plant phenology along vertical and horizontal gradients within a narrow area because of the country's high topographic relief. Phenological observation networks that support scientific studies and outreach activities have used near-surface tools such as digital cameras and spectral radiometers. Differences in phenology among ecosystems and tree species have been detected by analyzing the seasonal variation of red, green, and blue digital numbers (RGB values) extracted from phenological images, as well as spectral reflectance and vegetation indices. The relationships between seasonal variations in RGB-derived indices or spectral characteristics and the ecological and CO2 flux measurement data have been well validated. In contrast, insufficient satellite remote-sensing observations have been conducted because of the coarse spatial resolution of previous datasets, which could not detect the heterogeneous plant phenology that results from Japan's complex topography and vegetation. To improve Japanese phenological observations, multidisciplinary analysis and evaluation will be needed to link traditional phenological observations with "index trees," near-surface and satellite remote-sensing observations, "citizen science" (observations by citizens), and results published on the Internet. PMID:26307639

  6. Review: advances in in situ and satellite phenological observations in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Shin; Nasahara, Kenlo Nishida; Inoue, Tomoharu; Saitoh, Taku M.; Suzuki, Rikie

    2016-04-01

    To accurately evaluate the responses of spatial and temporal variation of ecosystem functioning (evapotranspiration and photosynthesis) and services (regulating and cultural services) to the rapid changes caused by global warming, we depend on long-term, continuous, near-surface, and satellite remote sensing of phenology over wide areas. Here, we review such phenological studies in Japan and discuss our current knowledge, problems, and future developments. In contrast with North America and Europe, Japan has been able to evaluate plant phenology along vertical and horizontal gradients within a narrow area because of the country's high topographic relief. Phenological observation networks that support scientific studies and outreach activities have used near-surface tools such as digital cameras and spectral radiometers. Differences in phenology among ecosystems and tree species have been detected by analyzing the seasonal variation of red, green, and blue digital numbers (RGB values) extracted from phenological images, as well as spectral reflectance and vegetation indices. The relationships between seasonal variations in RGB-derived indices or spectral characteristics and the ecological and CO2 flux measurement data have been well validated. In contrast, insufficient satellite remote-sensing observations have been conducted because of the coarse spatial resolution of previous datasets, which could not detect the heterogeneous plant phenology that results from Japan's complex topography and vegetation. To improve Japanese phenological observations, multidisciplinary analysis and evaluation will be needed to link traditional phenological observations with "index trees," near-surface and satellite remote-sensing observations, "citizen science" (observations by citizens), and results published on the Internet.

  7. Modulation/demodulation techniques for satellite communications. Part 3: Advanced techniques. The nonlinear channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omura, J. K.; Simon, M. K.

    1982-01-01

    A theory for deducing and predicting the performance of transmitter/receivers for bandwidth efficient modulations suitable for use on the nonlinear satellite channel is presented. The underlying principle used throughout is the development of receiver structures based on the maximum likelihood decision rule and aproximations to it. The bit error probability transfer function bounds developed in great detail in Part 4 is applied to these modulation/demodulation techniques. The effects of the various degrees of receiver mismatch are considered both theoretically and by numerous illustrative examples.

  8. Space based observations for monitoring extreme weather and climate events

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, P.K.

    1996-12-31

    Observations are essential for monitoring, understanding, and predicting the potential for extreme weather and climate events. These events occur on all time and spatial scales. Current NOAA operational satellites have a unique capability of providing many of the observations that are critical for monitoring these events. These observations and derived geophysical quantities can also be used for diagnostics and prediction purposes. Extreme weather conditions such as severe thunderstorms and flash floods, occur very quickly, may last for a short time, and create a considerable amount of damage. Advance warnings of the order of a few minutes are needed to alert the public so they may take adequate precautions. Some extreme weather conditions such as tropical storms (hurricanes) may last for days, and in order to predict the exact track, intensity of the storm and forecast the land fall, frequent observations are critical. Examples of satellite data that are obtained from the NOAA satellites are presented to demonstrate their ability to monitor the extreme weather phenomena. Examples of extreme climate conditions are droughts over continents and the annual depletion of ozone over the Antarctic. Data derived from NOAA satellites were used to monitor the severe drought over Texas and Southwestern U.S.A. in early 1996. Similar data are being used by other countries to monitor the drought in their regions. The development of the ozone hole over the Antarctic during the last fifteen years has been a major scientific and environmental concern. Data from NOAA operational satellites have been extensively used to show the yearly development and dissipation of the ozone hole during the Southern Hemisphere springtime.

  9. Advanced two-way satellite frequency transfer by carrier-phase and carrier-frequency measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujieda, Miho; Gotoh, Tadahiro; Amagai, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Carrier-phase measurement is one of the ways to improve the measurement resolution of two-way satellite frequency transfer. We introduce two possible methods for carrier-phase measurement: direct carrier-phase detection identified by Two-Way Carrier-Phase (TWCP) and the use of carrier-frequency information identified by Two-Way Carrier Frequency (TWCF). We performed the former using an arbitrary waveform generator and an analog-to-digital sampler and the latter using a conventional modem. The TWCF measurement using the modem had a resolution of 10-13 and the result agreed with that obtained by GPS carrier-phase frequency transfer in a 1500 km baseline. The measurement accuracy may have been limited by the poor frequency resolution of the modem; however, the TWCF measurement was able to improve the stability of conventional two-way satellite frequency transfer. Additionally, we show that the TWCP measurement system has the potential to achieve a frequency stability of 10-17.

  10. The Operational Utility of Space Environmental Measurements From Polar-Orbiting, Sun-Synchronous Satellites in AFWA Models and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citrone, P. J.; Bonadonna, M. F.; Cade, T.; Nobis, T. E.; Denig, W. F.

    2005-12-01

    Satellite-based measurements of the space environment provide vital data inputs to advanced space weather models and applications used by the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA) to generate mission-tailored space weather intelligence in support of U.S. military operations. Since the 1970's, the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) has provided in-situ measurements of the topside ionosphere and of the differential energy flux of precipitating electrons and ions into the auroral and polar regions. Recently, DMSP has deployed a new class of ultraviolet remote sensors which offer opportunities for improved space environmental monitoring. The DMSP polar-orbiting, sun-synchronous satellite measurements provide critical data inputs for current and future AFWA space weather models that specify and forecast the global thermosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere. The AFWA Space Weather Technology Branch is pursuing an ongoing effort to transition to operations advanced research technologies associated with space environmental forecasting, to include related software applications used by AFWA to generate mission-tailored visualization products that depict space weather impacts on military systems. The Space Environmental Sensor Suite (SESS) on the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) will offer improved capabilities in terms of characterization and timeliness for space environmental data required by AFWA to meet new and emerging Department of Defense space weather operational requirements.

  11. “You can get there from here”: Advanced low cost propulsion concepts for small satellites beyond LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Adam M.; da Silva Curiel, Alex; Schaffner, Jake; Sweeting, Martin

    2005-07-01

    microsatellite from a typical 700 km sun-synchronous orbit to a lower or higher orbit using a low cost 40 N thrust concentrated hydrogen peroxide/kerosene bipropellant engine. A spin stabilized 'tug' concept capable of providing between 130 and 300 m/s of deltaV to the payload is described. Transfer of an enhanced microsatellite from LEO to lunar orbit using a novel, storable propellant solar thermal propulsion system under development at the Surrey Space Centre. The solar thermal propulsion unit is designed for low cost small satellite support and will be compared with a more traditional approach using and industry standard storable bipropellant chemical engine. Nanosatellite manoeuvring for formation flying using advanced low power electric propulsion. A colloid thruster system concept is planned for development jointly between SSTL, Queen Mary University London and Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK. The colloid thruster system is designed to complement an existing butane resistojet to give full 3-axis manoeuvrability to an upgraded SNAP nanosatellite platform which could be reflown in 2007 alongside ESA's Proba 2 technology demonstrator microsatellite. A comparison between low power resistojets, a colloid thruster system, and pulsed plasma thrusters for orbit manoeuvring of microsatellites will be made. This paper's final section will briefly describe some of the interplanetary missions which have been considered at the Surrey Space Centre, and will highlight the few as yet practical solutions for sending small spacecraft on high deltaV missions without the use of a costly upper stage.

  12. Proceedings of the Eighteenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 18) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX), supported by the NASA Propagation Program, is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investigators from domestic and international organizations. Participants included representatives from Canada, the Netherlands, England, and the United States, including researchers from universities, government agencies, and private industry. The meeting was organized into two technical sessions. The first session was dedicated to slant path propagation studies and experiments. The second session focused on propagation studies for mobile, personal, and sound broadcast systems. In total, 14 technical papers and some informal contributions were presented. Preceding NAPEX_17, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop was held to review ACTS propagation activities.

  13. Proceedings of the Fifteenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 15) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX), supported by the NASA Propagation Program, is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investigators from domestic and international organizations. The meeting was organized into three technical sessions. The first session was dedicated to Olympus and ACTS studies and experiments, the second session was focused on the propagation studies and measurements, and the third session covered computer-based propagation model development. In total, sixteen technical papers and some informal contributions were presented. Following NAPEX 15, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) miniworkshop was held on 29 Jun. 1991, to review ACTS propagation activities, with emphasis on ACTS hardware development and experiment planning. Five papers were presented.

  14. Analysis of leading edge and trailing edge cover glass samples before and after treatment with advanced satellite contamination removal techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hotaling, S. P.

    1993-01-01

    Two samples from Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) experiment M0003-4 were analyzed for molecular and particulate contamination prior to and following treatment with advanced satellite contamination removal techniques (CO2 gas/solid jet spray and oxygen ion beam). The pre- and post-cleaning measurements and analyses are presented. The jet spray removed particulates in seconds. The low energy reactive oxygen ion beam removed 5,000 A of photo polymerized organic hydrocarbon contamination in less than 1 hour. Spectroscopic analytical techniques were applied to the analysis of cleaning efficiency including: Fourier transform infrared, Auger, x ray photoemissions, energy dispersive x ray, and ultraviolet/visible. The results of this work suggest that the contamination studied here was due to spacecraft self-contamination enhanced by atomic oxygen plasma dynamics and solar UV radiation. These results also suggest the efficacy for the jet spray and ion beam contamination control technologies for spacecraft optical surfaces.

  15. Weather Data Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Northern Video Graphics, Inc. developed a low-cost satellite receiving system for users such as independent meteorologists, agribusiness firms, small airports or flying clubs, marine vessels and small TV stations. Called Video Fax, it is designed for use with certain satellites; the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) spacecraft operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the European Space Agency's Meteosat and Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite. By dictum of the World Meteorological Organization, signals from satellites are available to anyone without cost so the Video Fax user can acquire signals directly from the satellite and cut out the middle man, enabling savings. Unit sells for about one-fifth the cost of the equipment used by TV stations. It consists of a two-meter antenna; a receiver; a microprocessor-controlled display computer; and a video monitor. Computer stores data from the satellites and converts it to an image which is displayed on the monitor. Weather map can be preserved as signal data on tape, or it can be stored in a video cassette as a permanent image.

  16. Use of EOS Data in AWIPS for Weather Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Haines, Stephanie L.; Suggs, Ron J.; Bradshaw, Tom; Darden, Chris; Burks, Jason

    2003-01-01

    Operational weather forecasting relies heavily on real time data and modeling products for forecast preparation and dissemination of significant weather information to the public. The synthesis of this information (observations and model products) by the meteorologist is facilitated by a decision support system to display and integrate the information in a useful fashion. For the NWS this system is called Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). Over the last few years NASA has launched a series of new Earth Observation Satellites (EOS) for climate monitoring that include several instruments that provide high-resolution measurements of atmospheric and surface features important for weather forecasting and analysis. The key to the utilization of these unique new measurements by the NWS is the real time integration of the EOS data into the AWIPS system. This is currently being done in the Huntsville and Birmingham NWS Forecast Offices under the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPORT) Program. This paper describes the use of near real time MODIS and AIRS data in AWIPS to improve the detection of clouds, moisture variations, atmospheric stability, and thermal signatures that can lead to significant weather development. The paper and the conference presentation will focus on several examples where MODIS and AIRS data have made a positive impact on forecast accuracy. The results of an assessment of the utility of these products for weather forecast improvement made at the Huntsville NWS Forecast Office will be presented.

  17. The Precipitation Characteristics of ISCCP Tropical Weather States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dongmin; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Huffman, George J.; Rossow, William B.; Kang, In-Sik

    2011-01-01

    We examine the daytime precipitation characteristics of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) weather states in the extended tropics (35 deg S to 35 deg N) for a 10-year period. Our main precipitation data set is the TRMM Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis 3B42 data set, but Global Precipitation Climatology Project daily data are also used for comparison. We find that the most convective weather state (WS1), despite an occurrence frequency below 10%, is the most dominant state with regard to surface precipitation, producing both the largest mean precipitation rates when present and the largest percent contribution to the total precipitation of the tropical zone of our study; yet, even this weather state appears to not precipitate about half the time. WS1 exhibits a modest annual cycle of domain-average precipitation rate, but notable seasonal shifts in its geographic distribution. The precipitation rates of the other weather states tend to be stronger when occurring before or after WS1. The relative contribution of the various weather states to total precipitation is different between ocean and land, with WS1 producing more intense precipitation on average over ocean than land. The results of this study, in addition to advancing our understanding of the current state of tropical precipitation, can serve as a higher order diagnostic test on whether it is distributed realistically among different weather states in atmospheric models.

  18. Advances in the Validation of Satellite-Based Maps of Volcanic Sulfur Dioxide Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Realmuto, V. J.; Berk, A.; Acharya, P. K.; Kennett, R.

    2013-12-01

    The monitoring of volcanic gas emissions with gas cameras, spectrometer arrays, tethersondes, and UAVs presents new opportunities for the validation of satellite-based retrievals of gas concentrations. Gas cameras and spectrometer arrays provide instantaneous observations of the gas burden, or concentration along an optical path, over broad sections of a plume, similar to the observations acquired by nadir-viewing satellites. Tethersondes and UAVs provide us with direct measurements of the vertical profiles of gas concentrations within plumes. This presentation will focus on our current efforts to validate ASTER-based maps of sulfur dioxide plumes at Turrialba and Kilauea Volcanoes (located in Costa Rica and Hawaii, respectively). These volcanoes, which are the subjects of comprehensive monitoring programs, are challenging targets for thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing due the warm and humid atmospheric conditions. The high spatial resolution of ASTER in the TIR (90 meters) allows us to map the plumes back to their source vents, but also requires us to pay close attention to the temperature and emissivity of the surfaces beneath the plumes. Our knowledge of the surface and atmospheric conditions is never perfect, and we employ interactive mapping techniques that allow us to evaluate the impact of these uncertainties on our estimates of plume composition. To accomplish this interactive mapping we have developed the Plume Tracker tool kit, which integrates retrieval procedures, visualization tools, and a customized version of the MODTRAN radiative transfer (RT) model under a single graphics user interface (GUI). We are in the process of porting the RT calculations to graphics processing units (GPUs) with the goal of achieving a 100-fold increase in the speed of computation relative to conventional CPU-based processing. We will report on our progress with this evolution of Plume Tracker. Portions of this research were conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  19. Basalt Weathering Rates Across Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarresitchler, A.; Brantley, S.

    2006-12-01

    Weathering of silicate minerals is a known sink for atmospheric CO2. An estimated 30%-35% of the consumption of CO2 from continental silicate weathering can be attributed to basalt weathering (Dessert et al., 2003). To assess basalt weathering rates we examine weathering advance rates of basalt (w, mm/yr) reported at four scales: denudation rates from basalt watersheds (tens of kilometers), rates of soil formation from soil profiles developed on basaltic parent material of known age (meters), rates of weathering rind formation on basalt clasts (centimeters), and laboratory dissolution rates (millimeters). Basalt weathering advance rates calculated for watersheds range between 0.36 and 9.8x10-3 mm/yr. The weathering advance rate for a basalt soil profile in Hawaii is 8.0x10-3 mm/yr while advance rates for clasts range from 5.6x10-6 to 2.4x10-4 mm/yr. Batch and mixed flow laboratory experiments performed at circum- neutral pH yield advance rates of 2.5x10^{-5} to 3.4x10-7 mm/yr when normalized to BET surface area. These results show increasing advance rates with both increasing scale (from laboratory to watersheds) and increasing temperature. If we assume that basalt weathers at an intrinsic rate that applies to all scales then we conclude that variations in weathering advance rates arise from variations in surface area measurement at different scales (D); therefore, basalt weathering is a fractal system. We measure a fractal dimension (dr) of basalt weathering of 2.2. For Euclidean geometries, measured surface area does not vary with the scale at which it is measured and dr equals 2. For natural surfaces, surface area is related to the scale at which it is measured. As scale increases, the minimum size of the surface irregularities that are measurable also increases. The ratio between BET and geometric normalized laboratory dissolution rates has been defined as a roughness parameter, λ, which ranges from ~10-100. We extend the definition of this roughness parameter

  20. Testing an advanced satellite technique for dust detection as a decision support system for the air quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconieri, Alfredo; Filizzola, Carolina; Femiano, Rossella; Marchese, Francesco; Sannazzaro, Filomena; Pergola, Nicola; Tramutoli, Valerio; Di Muro, Ersilia; Divietri, Mariella; Crisci, Anna Maria; Lovallo, Michele; Mangiamele, Lucia; Vaccaro, Maria Pia; Palma, Achille

    2014-05-01

    In order to correctly apply the European directive for air quality (2008/50/CE), local Authorities are often requested to discriminate the possible origin (natural/anthropic) of anomalous concentration of pollutants in the air (art.20 Directive 2008/50/CE). In this framework, it's been focused on PM10 and PM2,5 concentrations and sources. In fact, depending on their origin, appropriate counter-measures can be taken devoted to prevent their production (e.g. by traffic restriction) or simply to reduce their impact on citizen health (e.g. information campaigns). In this context suitable satellite techniques can be used in order to identify natural sources (particularly Saharan dust, but also volcanic ash or forest fire smoke) that can be responsible of over-threshold concentration of PM10/2,5 in populated areas. In the framework of the NIBS (Networking and Internationalization of Basilicata Space Technologies) project, funded by the Basilicata Region within the ERDF 2007-2013 program, the School of Engineering of University of Basilicata, the Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis of National Research Council (IMAA-CNR) and the Regional Agency for the Protection of the Environment of Basilicata Region (ARPAB) have started a collaboration devoted to assess the potential of the use of advanced satellite techniques for Saharan dust events identification to support ARPAB activities related to the application of the European directive for air quality (2008/50/CE) in Basilicata region. In such a joint activity, the Robust Satellite Technique (RST) approach has been assessed and tested as a decision support system for monitoring and evaluating air quality at local and regional level. In particular, RST-DUST products, derived by processing high temporal resolution data provided by SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) sensor on board Meteosat Second Generation platforms, have been analysed together with PM10 measurements performed by the ground

  1. Advances In Global Aerosol Modeling Applications Through Assimilation of Satellite-Based Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, James; Hyer, Edward; Zhang, Jianglong; Reid, Jeffrey; Westphal, Douglas; Xian, Peng; Vaughan, Mark

    2010-05-01

    Modeling the instantaneous three-dimensional aerosol field and its downwind transport represents an endeavor with many practical benefits foreseeable to air quality, aviation, military and science agencies. The recent proliferation of multi-spectral active and passive satellite-based instruments measuring aerosol physical properties has served as an opportunity to develop and refine the techniques necessary to make such numerical modeling applications possible. Spurred by high-resolution global mapping of aerosol source regions, and combined with novel multivariate data assimilation techniques designed to consider these new data streams, operational forecasts of visibility and aerosol optical depths are now available in near real-time1. Active satellite-based aerosol profiling, accomplished using lidar instruments, represents a critical element for accurate analysis and transport modeling. Aerosol source functions, alone, can be limited in representing the macrophysical structure of injection scenarios within a model. Two-dimensional variational (2D-VAR; x, y) assimilation of aerosol optical depth from passive satellite observations significantly improves the analysis of the initial state. However, this procedure can not fully compensate for any potential vertical redistribution of mass required at the innovation step. The expense of an inaccurate vertical analysis of aerosol structure is corresponding errors downwind, since trajectory paths within successive forecast runs will likely diverge with height. In this paper, the application of a newly-designed system for 3D-VAR (x,y,z) assimilation of vertical aerosol extinction profiles derived from elastic-scattering lidar measurements is described [Campbell et al., 2009]. Performance is evaluated for use with the U. S. Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) by assimilating NASA/CNES satellite-borne Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) 0.532 μm measurements [Winker et al., 2009

  2. Space weather: Challenges and Opportunities (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, T. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) has the following legal mandates to: a) Continuously monitor, measure, and specify the space environment, b) Provide timely and accurate space weather data, operational forecasts, alerts, and warnings of hazardous space weather phenomena, c) Provide scientific stewardship of, and public access to, space weather data and products, d) Understand the processes that influence space weather and develop applications for the user community and e) Develop new and improved products and transition them into operations to meet evolving space weather user needs. This presentation will discuss the challenges and opportunities that NOAA and the SWPC face in addressing these mandates. This includes coordination of space environment activities across federal agencies and the strategic planning for NOAA's space weather services, integration of space weather activities as well as critical dependencies of space weather services on current and future operational environmental satellites.

  3. Unattended network operations technology assessment study. Technical support for defining advanced satellite systems concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Kent M.; Holdridge, Mark; Odubiyi, Jide; Jaworski, Allan; Morgan, Herbert K.

    1991-01-01

    The results are summarized of an unattended network operations technology assessment study for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). The scope of the work included: (1) identified possible enhancements due to the proposed Mars communications network; (2) identified network operations on Mars; (3) performed a technology assessment of possible supporting technologies based on current and future approaches to network operations; and (4) developed a plan for the testing and development of these technologies. The most important results obtained are as follows: (1) addition of a third Mars Relay Satellite (MRS) and MRS cross link capabilities will enhance the network's fault tolerance capabilities through improved connectivity; (2) network functions can be divided into the six basic ISO network functional groups; (3) distributed artificial intelligence technologies will augment more traditional network management technologies to form the technological infrastructure of a virtually unattended network; and (4) a great effort is required to bring the current network technology levels for manned space communications up to the level needed for an automated fault tolerance Mars communications network.

  4. Space Weather and GOCE Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ince, E. S.; Pagiatakis, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    The latest gravity field mission GOCE (Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer) has mapped the Earth's static gravity field with an unrivalled precision. The satellite completed its mission in November 2013 and the most recent gravity field models (e.g., GOCE 5th generation gravity field models) have already been released. However, there are still unanswered questions in the data processing which leak into GOCE Level 1b and 2 products. It is found that there are signals of non-gravitational origin present in the cross-track gravity gradients that are about three to five times larger than the expected noise level of the gravity field components derived from GOCE gradiometer. These disturbances are observed around the magnetic poles during particular time periods that correspond to geomagnetically active days. In this study, we investigate the unexpected disturbances present in GOCE gradiometer gravity tensor's diagonal components along the satellite track and analyze possible causes. External datasets, interplanetary magnetic, and electric field observations from the solar wind monitoring spacecraft ACE- (Advanced Composition Explorer) and WIND, geomagnetic activity observed at CARISMA (Canadian Array for Real-time Investigations of Magnetic Activity) stations and Ionospheric Equivalent Currents (EICS) and Elementary Current Amplitudes (SECS) derived from terrestrial geomagnetic field disturbances observed over North America and Greenland are used to understand the effect of the space weather variations and ionospheric dynamics on the GOCE Gradiometer measurements. We have shown that the variation in the amplitude of the equivalent currents and changes in the current directions show high correlation with the disturbances observed in GOCE measurements along the satellite track which hints the interaction between the two.

  5. Weather Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantley, L. Reed, Sr.; Demanche, Edna L.; Klemm, E. Barbara; Kyselka, Will; Phillips, Edwin A.; Pottenger, Francis M.; Yamamoto, Karen N.; Young, Donald B.

    This booklet presents some activities to measure various weather phenomena. Directions for constructing a weather station are included. Instruments including rain gauges, thermometers, wind vanes, wind speed devices, humidity devices, barometers, atmospheric observations, a dustfall jar, sticky-tape can, detection of gases in the air, and pH of…

  6. Wacky Weather

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabarre, Amy; Gulino, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    What do a leaf blower, water hose, fan, and ice cubes have in common? Ask the students who participated in an integrative science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (I-STEM) education unit, "Wacky Weather," and they will tell say "fun and severe weather"--words one might not have expected! The purpose of the unit…

  7. Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.

    2010-01-01

    This video provides a narrated exploration of the history and affects of space weather. It includes information the earth's magnetic field, solar radiation, magnetic storms, and how solar winds affect electronics on earth, with specific information on how space weather affects space exploration in the future.

  8. Earth Observation Services Weather Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Microprocessor-based systems for processing satellite data offer mariners real-time images of weather systems, day and night, of large areas or allow them to zoom in on a few square miles. Systems West markets these commercial image processing systems, which have significantly decreased the cost of satellite weather stations. The company was assisted by the EOCAP program, which provides government co-funding to encourage private investment in, and to broaden the use of, NASA-developed technology for analyzing information about Earth and ocean resources.

  9. Maximizing the Use of Satellite Thermal Infrared Data for Advancing Land Surface Temperature Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Q.; Fu, P.; Gao, F.

    2014-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a crucial parameter in investigating environmental, ecological processes and climate change at various scales, and is also valuable in the studies of evapotranspiration, soil moisture conditions, surface energy balance, and urban heat islands. These studies require thermal infrared (TIR) images at both high temporal and spatial resolution to retrieve LST. However, currently, no single satellite sensors can deliver TIR data at both high temporal and spatial resolution. Thus, various algorithms/models have been developed to enhance the spatial or the temporal resolution of TIR data, but rare of those can enhance both spatial and temporal details. This paper presents a new data fusion algorithm for producing Landsat-like LST data by blending daily MODIS and periodic Landsat TM datasets. The original Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM) was improved and modified for predicting thermal radiance and LST data by considering annual temperature cycle (ATC) and urban thermal landscape heterogeneity. The technique of linear spectral mixture analysis was employed to relate the Landsat radiance with the MODIS one, so that the temporal changes in radiance can be incorporated in the fusion model. This paper details the theoretical basis and the implementation procedures of the proposed data fusion algorithm, Spatio-temporal Adaptive Data Fusion Algorithm for Temperature mapping (SADFAT). A case study was conducted that predicted LSTs of five dates in 2005 from July to October in Los Angeles County, California. The results indicate that the prediction accuracy for the whole study area ranged from 1.3 K to 2 K. Like existing spatio-temporal data fusion models, the SADFAT method has a limitation in predicting LST changes that were not recorded in the MODIS and/or Landsat pixels due to the model assumption.

  10. Recent Innovations in Deriving Tropospheric Winds from Meteorological Satellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velden, Christopher; Daniels, Jaime; Stettner, David; Santek, David; Key, Jeff; Dunion, Jason; Holmlund, Kenneth; Dengel, Gail; Bresky, Wayne; Menzel, Paul

    2005-02-01

    The evolving constellation of environmental/meteorological satellites and their associated sensor technology is rapidly advancing. This is providing opportunities for creatively improving satellite-derived products used in weather analysis and forecasting. For example, the retrieval methods for deriving atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs) from satellites have been expanding and evolving since the early 1970s. Contemporary AMV processing methods are continuously being updated and advanced through the exploitation of new sensor technologies and innovative new approaches. It is incumbent upon the research community working in AMV extraction techniques to ensure that the quality of the current operational products meets or exceeds the needs of the user community. In particular, the advances in data assimilation and numerical weather prediction in recent years have placed an increasing demand on data quality.To keep pace with these demands, innovative research toward improving methods of deriving winds from satellites has been a focus of the World Meteorological Organization and Coordination Group for Meteorological Satellites (CGMS) cosponsored International Winds Workshops (IWWs). The IWWs are held every 2 yr, and bring together AMV researchers from around the world to present new ideas on AMV extraction techniques, interpretation, and applications. The NWP community is always well represented at these workshops, which provide an important exchange of information on the latest in data assimilation issues. This article draws from recent IWWs, and describes several new advances in satellite-produced wind technologies, derivation methodologies, and products. Examples include AMVs derived from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) rapid scans and the short-wave IR channel, AMVs over the polar regions from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), improved AMV products from the new Meteosat Second Generation satellite, and new processing

  11. A New Burst of Seafloor Mapping and Discovery Driven By Advances in Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, D.; Matthews, K. J.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    Radar altimetry measurements of the ocean surface topography from two satellites have recently been used to construct a new global marine gravity model that is twice as accurate as previous models. The model reveals previously invisible abyssal hill (AH) fabric in many parts of the ocean basins, placing valuable additional constraints on tectonic events reflected in changes in the orientation of linear AHs, and thus in spreading direction. AH fabric, if dated via marine magnetic anomalies, puts much tighter temporal constraints on changes in seafloor spreading directions than fracture zones, which, depending on their offset, often take many millions of years to adjust to major plate motion events. The new data also reveal previously unmapped microplates in the Pacific and Indian oceans. They preferentially form in spreading corridors where spreading rates were very high, reaching plate tectonic speed limits, or in response to plate reorganization stresses. The mapping of previously unknown or poorly mapped ridge propagation events during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (CNS), leading to pseudofaults and extinct ridges, is relevant for interpreting marine magnetic anomaly sequences during the CNS in terms of magnetic field variability. The new grid provides breathtakingly detailed views of individual fault structures, previously only mapped via expensive seismic surveys, in the North Falkland Basin. Here narrow vertical gravity gradient highs and lows can be shown to correspond to seismically imaged horsts and grabens bounded by normal faults. The new gravity field allows us to create a detailed regional fault map outside of existing seismic coverage. The fault network that emerges illustrates that this eastern region of the Falkland Plateau is characterised by broadly distributed faulting, reflecting a wide rift that typically occurs in regions of higher than normal heat flow with relatively thick crust, where local crustal buoyancy effects dominate localising

  12. Smooth Sailing for Weather Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Through a cooperative venture with NASA's Stennis Space Center, WorldWinds, Inc., developed a unique weather and wave vector map using space-based radar satellite information and traditional weather observations. Called WorldWinds, the product provides accurate, near real-time, high-resolution weather forecasts. It was developed for commercial and scientific users. In addition to weather forecasting, the product's applications include maritime and terrestrial transportation, aviation operations, precision farming, offshore oil and gas operations, and coastal hazard response support. Target commercial markets include the operational maritime and aviation communities, oil and gas providers, and recreational yachting interests. Science applications include global long-term prediction and climate change, land-cover and land-use change, and natural hazard issues. Commercial airlines have expressed interest in the product, as it can provide forecasts over remote areas. WorldWinds, Inc., is currently providing its product to commercial weather outlets.

  13. Small Sensors for Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory is actively pursuing enhancing the nation's space weather sensing capability. One aspect of this plan is the concept of flying Space Weather sensor suites on host spacecraft as secondary payloads. The emergence and advancement of the CubeSat spacecraft architecture has produced a viable platform for scientifically and operationally relevant Space Weather sensing. This talk will provide an overview of NRL's low size weight and power sensor technologies targeting Space Weather measurements. A summary of on-orbit results of past and current missions will be presented, as well as an overview of future flights that are manifested and potential constellation missions.

  14. Advances In very high resolution satellite imagery analysis for Monitoring human settlements

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju; Cheriyadat, Anil M; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2014-01-01

    The high rate of urbanization, political conflicts and ensuing internal displacement of population, and increased poverty in the 20th century has resulted in rapid increase of informal settlements. These unplanned, unauthorized, and/or unstructured homes, known as informal settlements, shantytowns, barrios, or slums, pose several challenges to the nations, as these settlements are often located in most hazardous regions and lack basic services. Though several World Bank and United Nations sponsored studies stress the importance of poverty maps in designing better policies and interventions, mapping slums of the world is a daunting and challenging task. In this paper, we summarize our ongoing research on settlement mapping through the utilization of Very high resolution (VHR) remote sensing imagery. Most existing approaches used to classify VHR images are single instance (or pixel-based) learning algorithms, which are inadequate for analyzing VHR imagery, as single pixels do not contain sufficient contextual information (see Figure 1). However, much needed spatial contextual information can be captured via feature extraction and/or through newer machine learning algorithms in order to extract complex spatial patterns that distinguish informal settlements from formal ones. In recent years, we made significant progress in advancing the state of art in both directions. This paper summarizes these results.

  15. Land surface skin temperatures from a combined analysis of microwave and infrared satellite observations for an all-weather evaluation of the differences between air and skin temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigent, Catherine; Aires, Filipe; Rossow, William B.

    2003-05-01

    A neural network inversion scheme including first guess information has been developed to retrieve surface temperature Ts, along with atmospheric water vapor, cloud liquid water, and surface emissivities over land from a combined analysis of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) data. In the absence of routine in situ surface skin measurements, retrieved Ts values are evaluated by comparison to the surface air temperature Tair measured by the meteorological station network. The Ts - Tair difference shows all the expected variations with solar flux, soil characteristics, and cloudiness. During daytime the Ts - Tair difference is driven by the solar insulation, with positive differences that increase with increasing solar flux. With decreasing soil and vegetation moisture the evaporation rate decreases, increasing the sensible heat flux, thus requiring larger Ts - Tair differences. Nighttime Ts - Tair differences are governed by the longwave radiation balance, with Ts usually closer or lower than Tair. The presence of clouds dampens all the difference. After suppression of the variability associated to the diurnal solar flux variations, the Ts and Tair data sets show very good agreement in their synoptic variations, even for cloudy cases, with no bias and a global rms difference of ˜2.9 K. This value is an upper limit of the retrieval rms because it includes errors in the in situ data as well as errors related to imperfect time and space collocations between the satellite and in situ measurements.

  16. Weather information network including graphical display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, Daniel R. (Inventor); Burdon, David (Inventor); Son, Robert S. (Inventor); Martin, Kevin D. (Inventor); Harrison, John (Inventor); Hughes, Keith R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus for providing weather information onboard an aircraft includes a processor unit and a graphical user interface. The processor unit processes weather information after it is received onboard the aircraft from a ground-based source, and the graphical user interface provides a graphical presentation of the weather information to a user onboard the aircraft. Preferably, the graphical user interface includes one or more user-selectable options for graphically displaying at least one of convection information, turbulence information, icing information, weather satellite information, SIGMET information, significant weather prognosis information, and winds aloft information.

  17. Weatherizing America

    ScienceCinema

    Stewart, Zachary; Bergeron, T.J.; Barth, Dale; Qualis, Xavier; Sewall, Travis; Fransen, Richard; Gill, Tony;

    2013-05-29

    As Recovery Act money arrives to expand home weatherization programs across the country, Zachary Stewart of Phoenix, Ariz., and others have found an exciting opportunity not only to start working again, but also to find a calling.

  18. Weatherizing America

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Zachary; Bergeron, T.J.; Barth, Dale; Qualis, Xavier; Sewall, Travis; Fransen, Richard; Gill, Tony

    2009-01-01

    As Recovery Act money arrives to expand home weatherization programs across the country, Zachary Stewart of Phoenix, Ariz., and others have found an exciting opportunity not only to start working again, but also to find a calling.

  19. Weatherization Makes Headlines in Connecticut: Weatherization Assistance Close-Up Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    D&R International

    2001-10-10

    Connecticut demonstrates its commitment to technology and efficiency through the Weatherization Program. Weatherization uses advanced technologies and techniques to reduce energy costs for low-income families by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes.

  20. A Tribute to Weatherization Solutions in South Dakota: Weatherization Assistance Close-Up Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    D&R International

    2001-10-10

    South Dakota demonstrates its commitment to technology and efficiency through the Weatherization Program. Weatherization uses advanced technologies and techniques to reduce energy costs for low-income families by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes.

  1. Space Weather Monitoring and Forecasting Activity in NICT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Watari, Shinichi; T. Murata, Ken

    Disturbances of Space environment around the Earth (geospace) is controlled by the activity of the Sun and the solar wind. Disturbances in geospace sometimes cause serious problems to satellites, astronauts, and telecommunications. To minimize the effect of the problems, space weather forecasting is necessary. In Japan, NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology) is in charge of space weather forecasting services as a regional warning center of International Space Environment Service. With help of geospace environment data exchanging among the international cooperation, NICT operates daily space weather forecast service every day to provide information on nowcasts and forecasts of solar flare, geomagnetic disturbances, solar proton event, and radio-wave propagation conditions in the ionosphere. For prompt reporting of space weather information, we also conduct our original observation networks from the Sun to the upper atmosphere: Hiraiso solar observatory, domestic ionosonde networks, magnetometer & HF radar observations in far-east Siberia and Alaska, and south-east Asia low-latitude ionospheric network (SEALION). ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) and STEREO (Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory) real-time beacon data are received using our antenna facilities to monitor the solar and solar wind conditions in near real-time. Our current activities and future perspective of space weather monitoring and forecasting will be introduced in this report.

  2. Satellite-based land use mapping: comparative analysis of Landsat-8, Advanced Land Imager, and big data Hyperion imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervez, Wasim; Uddin, Vali; Khan, Shoab Ahmad; Khan, Junaid Aziz

    2016-04-01

    Until recently, Landsat technology has suffered from low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and comparatively poor radiometric resolution, which resulted in limited application for inland water and land use/cover mapping. The new generation of Landsat, the Landsat Data Continuity Mission carrying the Operational Land Imager (OLI), has improved SNR and high radiometric resolution. This study evaluated the utility of orthoimagery from OLI in comparison with the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) and hyperspectral Hyperion (after preprocessing) with respect to spectral profiling of classes, land use/cover classification, classification accuracy assessment, classifier selection, study area selection, and other applications. For each data source, the support vector machine (SVM) model outperformed the spectral angle mapper (SAM) classifier in terms of class discrimination accuracy (i.e., water, built-up area, mixed forest, shrub, and bare soil). Using the SVM classifier, Hyperion hyperspectral orthoimagery achieved higher overall accuracy than OLI and ALI. However, OLI outperformed both hyperspectral Hyperion and multispectral ALI using the SAM classifier, and with the SVM classifier outperformed ALI in terms of overall accuracy and individual classes. The results show that the new generation of Landsat achieved higher accuracies in mapping compared with the previous Landsat multispectral satellite series.

  3. Potential of high resolution satellite imagery, remote weather data and 1D hydraulic modeling to evaluate flood areas in Gonaives, Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozza, Andrea; Durand, Arnaud; Allenbach, Bernard; Confortola, Gabriele; Bocchiola, Daniele

    2013-04-01

    We present a feasibility study to explore potential of high-resolution imagery, coupled with hydraulic flood modeling to predict flooding risks, applied to the case study of Gonaives basins (585 km²), Haiti. We propose a methodology working at different scales, providing accurate results and a faster intervention during extreme flood events. The 'Hispaniola' island, in the Caribbean tropical zone, is often affected by extreme floods events. Floods are caused by tropical springs and hurricanes, and may lead to several damages, including cholera epidemics, as recently occurred, in the wake of the earthquake upon January 12th 2010 (magnitude 7.0). Floods studies based upon hydrological and hydraulic modeling are hampered by almost complete lack of ground data. Thenceforth, and given the noticeable cost involved in the organization of field measurement campaigns, the need for exploitation of remote sensing images data. HEC-RAS 1D modeling is carried out under different scenarios of available Digital Elevation Models. The DEMs are generated using optical remote sensing satellite (WorldView-1) and SRTM, combined with information from an open source database (Open Street Map). We study two recent flood episodes, where flood maps from remote sensing were available. Flood extent and land use have been assessed by way of data from SPOT-5 satellite, after hurricane Jeanne in 2004 and hurricane Hanna in 2008. A semi-distributed, DEM based hydrological model is used to simulate flood flows during the hurricanes. Precipitation input is taken from daily rainfall data derived from TRMM satellite, plus proper downscaling. The hydraulic model is calibrated using floodplain friction as tuning parameters against the observed flooded area. We compare different scenarios of flood simulation, and the predictive power of model calibration. The method provide acceptable results in depicting flooded areas, especially considering the tremendous lack of ground data, and show the potential of

  4. Joint Polar Satellite System: The United States next generation civilian polar-orbiting environmental satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Mitchell D.; Kilcoyne, Heather; Cikanek, Harry; Mehta, Ajay

    2013-12-01

    next generation polar-orbiting environmental satellite system, designated as the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS), was proposed in February 2010, as part of the President's Fiscal Year 2011 budget request, to be the Civilian successor to the restructured National Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). Beginning 1 October 2013, the JPSS baseline consists of a suite of five instruments: advanced microwave and infrared sounders critical for short- and medium-range weather forecasting; an advanced visible and infrared imager needed for environmental assessments such as snow/ice cover, droughts, volcanic ash, forest fires and surface temperature; ozone sensor primarily used for global monitoring of ozone and input to weather and climate models; and an Earth radiation budget sensor for monitoring the Earth's energy budget. NASA will fund the Earth radiation budget sensor and the ozone limb sensor for the second JPSS operational satellite--JPSS-2. JPSS is implemented through a partnership between NOAA and the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). NOAA is responsible for overall funding; maintaining the high-level requirements; establishing international and interagency partnerships; developing the science and algorithms, and user engagement; NOAA also provides product data distribution and archiving of JPSS data. NASA's role is to serve as acquisition Center of Excellence, providing acquisition of instruments, spacecraft and the multimission ground system, and early mission implementation through turnover to NOAA for operations.

  5. Proceedings of the 19th NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 19) and the 7th Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Workshop (APSW 7)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX), supported by the NASA Propagation Program, is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investigators from domestic and international organizations. NAPEX 19 was held on 14 Jun. 1995, in Fort Collins, Colorado. Participants included representatives from Canada, Japan, and the United States, including researchers from universities, government agencies, and private industry. The meeting focused on mobile personal satellite systems and the use of 20/30-GHz band for fixed and mobile satellite applications. In total, 18 technical papers were presented. Following NAPEX 19, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Workshop 7 (APSW 7) was held on 15-16 Jun. 1995, to review ACTS propagation activities with emphasis on the experimenters' status reports and dissemination of propagation data to industry.

  6. Concept for an International Standard related to Space Weather Effects on Space Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Tomky, Alyssa

    There is great interest in developing an international standard related to space weather in order to specify the tools and parameters needed for space systems operations. In particular, a standard is important for satellite operators who may not be familiar with space weather. In addition, there are others who participate in space systems operations that would also benefit from such a document. For example, the developers of software systems that provide LEO satellite orbit determination, radio communication availability for scintillation events (GEO-to-ground L and UHF bands), GPS uncertainties, and the radiation environment from ground-to-space for commercial space tourism. These groups require recent historical data, current epoch specification, and forecast of space weather events into their automated or manual systems. Other examples are national government agencies that rely on space weather data provided by their organizations such as those represented in the International Space Environment Service (ISES) group of 14 national agencies. Designers, manufacturers, and launchers of space systems require real-time, operational space weather parameters that can be measured, monitored, or built into automated systems. Thus, a broad scope for the document will provide a useful international standard product to a variety of engineering and science domains. The structure of the document should contain a well-defined scope, consensus space weather terms and definitions, and internationally accepted descriptions of the main elements of space weather, its sources, and its effects upon space systems. Appendices will be useful for describing expanded material such as guidelines on how to use the standard, how to obtain specific space weather parameters, and short but detailed descriptions such as when best to use some parameters and not others; appendices provide a path for easily updating the standard since the domain of space weather is rapidly changing with new advances

  7. Satellite EDR Evaluation with First Suomi NPP Cal/Val Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, D. K.; Liu, X.; Larar, A. M.; Tian, J.; Smith, W. L.; Wu, W.; Kizer, S.; Goldberg, M.; Liu, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite ultraspectral infrared sensors provide key data records essential for weather forecasting and climate change science. The Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite Environmental Data Records (EDRs) are retrieved from calibrated ultraspectral radiance or Sensor Data Records (SDRs). Understand the accuracy of retrieved EDRs is critical. The first Suomi NPP Calibration/Validation Campaign was conducted during May 2013. The NASA high-altitude ER-2 aircraft carrying ultraspectral interferometer sounders such as the National Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I) flew under the Suomi NPP satellite that carries the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS). Here, we inter-compare the EDRs produced with different retrieval algorithms from SDRs measured from satellite and aircraft. The available dropsonde and radiosonde measurements together with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analysis are used to assess the results of this experiment.

  8. Analysis and Comparison of Raw and Weather-corrected July Mean Ozone, Satellite-derived Tropospheric NO2 and Ozone, and Indicator Ratios from Space for the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, P. J.; Tonnesen, G.

    2012-12-01

    In order to evaluate the efficacy of emissions control strategies for reduction of ground-level ozone concentrations, it is important to determine how ozone sensitivity to NOx and VOC varies in space and time across a region. The Denver Non-attainment Area for ozone has several monitoring sites that exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for eight-hour ozone concentrations. Aside from emissions, weather is a major factor that affects year-to-year variations in surface ozone. For Colorado's Front Range region, it has been found that much of the year-to-year variance in the surface ozone concentration data can be explained by the effects of upper-level high pressure strength. Local July mean 500-millibar heights account for more than fifty percent of the year-to-year variation in July mean daily maximum eight-hour ozone concentrations for most sites. We compare tropospheric column ozone data from the NASA OMI/MLS with patterns of 500-millibar heights across the Western U.S. and surface ozone data. This comparison highlights the role of the Four Corners high in years with increased accumulation of local or regional background ozone. We also compare trends in weather-corrected ozone with mean tropospheric NO2 from the OMI and GOME 2 retrievals and explore statistical relationships between ground-level and satellite measurements for the period from 2005 through 2012. These analyses provide clues about the responses of ground-level ozone to meteorology and climate and the significant real-world changes in tropospheric NO2 that occurred during the period. Finally, we analyze ratios of satellite-derived formaldehyde to NO2 and compare these with the results of process analyses of VOC and NOx sensitivity from photochemical modeling of a specific ozone episode in July 2006. Taken together, this work can serve as a weight-of-evidence analysis for State Implementation Plan ozone model attainment demonstrations and help to constrain estimates of ozone responses to

  9. Calibration and Evaluation of a Flood Forecasting System: Utility of Numerical Weather Prediction Model, Data Assimilation and Satellite-based Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucel, Ismail; Onen, Alper; Yilmaz, Koray; Gochis, David

    2015-04-01

    A fully-distributed, multi-physics, multi-scale hydrologic and hydraulic modeling system, WRF-Hydro, is used to assess the potential for skillful flood forecasting based on precipitation inputs derived from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the EUMETSAT Multi-sensor Precipitation Estimates (MPEs). Similar to past studies it was found that WRF model precipitation forecast errors related to model initial conditions are reduced when the three dimensional atmospheric data assimilation (3DVAR) scheme in the WRF model simulations is used. The study then undertook a comparative evaluation of the impact of MPE versus WRF precipitation estimates, both with and without data assimilation, in driving WRF-Hydro simulated streamflow. Several flood events that occurred in the Black Sea region were used for testing and evaluation. Following model calibration, the WRF-Hydro system was capable of skillfully reproducing observed flood hydrographs in terms of the volume of the runoff produced and the overall shape of the hydrograph. Streamflow simulation skill was significantly improved for those WRF model simulations where storm precipitation was accurately depicted with respect to timing, location and amount. Accurate streamflow simulations were more evident in WRF model simulations where the 3DVAR scheme was used compared to when it was not used. Because of substantial dry bias feature of MPE, streamflow derived using this precipitation product is in general very poor. Overall, root mean squared errors for runoff were reduced by 22.2% when hydrological model calibration is performed with WRF precipitation. Errors were reduced by 36.9% (above uncalibrated model performance) when both WRF model data assimilation and hydrological model calibration was utilized. Our results also indicated that when assimilated precipitation and model calibration is performed jointly, the calibrated parameters at the gauged sites could be transferred to ungauged neighboring basins

  10. An atlas of upper tropospheric radiances observed in the 6 to 7-micrometer water vapor band using TOVS data from the NOAA weather satellites during 1979-1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, Dennis; Sharma, OM

    1992-01-01

    This document is a pictorial atlas of the Earth's radiance emitted in the 6 to 7 micro-m water vapor band. At these wavelengths, the infrared brightness temperature corresponds to the layer-average temperature of the top few millimeters of water vapor in the atmosphere. At low altitudes, bright regions are dry slots in the upper troposphere. The satellite observations were obtained from NOAA's cloud and angle corrected measurements made by a series of polar orbiting TOVS (TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder) instruments flown from 1979 to 1991. TOVS 6.7 micro-m and 7.2 micro-m channels were converted to a single brightness temperature that simulates a high altitude channel near '6.5' micro-m. For climatological studies, the daily '6.5' micro-m overpass data were gridded to a cartesian projection with 5 by 5 degree horizontal resolution between 40 degrees N and 40 degrees S latitude. This atlas presents greyscale images of the '6.5' micro-m brightness fields for every day in every month for 13 years. The mean brightness for each of the 12 months for 13 years is presented to display interannual variability, and the annual cycle of 12 monthly means is summarized on a single page. Statistical summaries are presented from other investigations in progress.

  11. Supporting Weather Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Since its founding in 1992, Global Science & Technology, Inc. (GST), of Greenbelt, Maryland, has been developing technologies and providing services in support of NASA scientific research. GST specialties include scientific analysis, science data and information systems, data visualization, communications, networking and Web technologies, computer science, and software system engineering. As a longtime contractor to Goddard Space Flight Center s Earth Science Directorate, GST scientific, engineering, and information technology staff have extensive qualifications with the synthesis of satellite, in situ, and Earth science data for weather- and climate-related projects. GST s experience in this arena is end-to-end, from building satellite ground receiving systems and science data systems, to product generation and research and analysis.

  12. Advanced communications technology satellite high burst rate link evaluation terminal communication protocol software user's guide, version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    The Communication Protocol Software was developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to support the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite High Burst Rate Link Evaluation Terminal (ACTS HBR-LET). The HBR-LET is an experimenters terminal to communicate with the ACTS for various experiments by government, university, and industry agencies. The Communication Protocol Software is one segment of the Control and Performance Monitor (C&PM) Software system of the HBR-LET. The Communication Protocol Software allows users to control and configure the Intermediate Frequency Switch Matrix (IFSM) on board the ACTS to yield a desired path through the spacecraft payload. Besides IFSM control, the C&PM Software System is also responsible for instrument control during HBR-LET experiments, uplink power control of the HBR-LET to demonstrate power augmentation during signal fade events, and data display. The Communication Protocol Software User's Guide, Version 1.0 (NASA CR-189162) outlines the commands and procedures to install and operate the Communication Protocol Software. Configuration files used to control the IFSM, operator commands, and error recovery procedures are discussed. The Communication Protocol Software Maintenance Manual, Version 1.0 (NASA CR-189163, to be published) is a programmer's guide to the Communication Protocol Software. This manual details the current implementation of the software from a technical perspective. Included is an overview of the Communication Protocol Software, computer algorithms, format representations, and computer hardware configuration. The Communication Protocol Software Test Plan (NASA CR-189164, to be published) provides a step-by-step procedure to verify the operation of the software. Included in the Test Plan is command transmission, telemetry reception, error detection, and error recovery procedures.

  13. Calibration and evaluation of a flood forecasting system: Utility of numerical weather prediction model, data assimilation and satellite-based rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucel, I.; Onen, A.; Yilmaz, K. K.; Gochis, D. J.

    2015-04-01

    A fully-distributed, multi-physics, multi-scale hydrologic and hydraulic modeling system, WRF-Hydro, is used to assess the potential for skillful flood forecasting based on precipitation inputs derived from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the EUMETSAT Multi-sensor Precipitation Estimates (MPEs). Similar to past studies it was found that WRF model precipitation forecast errors related to model initial conditions are reduced when the three dimensional atmospheric data assimilation (3DVAR) scheme in the WRF model simulations is used. A comparative evaluation of the impact of MPE versus WRF precipitation estimates, both with and without data assimilation, in driving WRF-Hydro simulated streamflow is then made. The ten rainfall-runoff events that occurred in the Black Sea Region were used for testing and evaluation. With the availability of streamflow data across rainfall-runoff events, the calibration is only performed on the Bartin sub-basin using two events and the calibrated parameters are then transferred to other neighboring three ungauged sub-basins in the study area. The rest of the events from all sub-basins are then used to evaluate the performance of the WRF-Hydro system with the calibrated parameters. Following model calibration, the WRF-Hydro system was capable of skillfully reproducing observed flood hydrographs in terms of the volume of the runoff produced and the overall shape of the hydrograph. Streamflow simulation skill was significantly improved for those WRF model simulations where storm precipitation was accurately depicted with respect to timing, location and amount. Accurate streamflow simulations were more evident in WRF model simulations where the 3DVAR scheme was used compared to when it was not used. Because of substantial dry bias feature of MPE, as compared with surface rain gauges, streamflow derived using this precipitation product is in general very poor. Overall, root mean squared errors for runoff were reduced by

  14. Tropical convective systems life cycle characteristics from geostationary satellite and precipitating estimates derived from TRMM and ground weather radar observations for the West African and South American regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiolleau, T.; Roca, R.; Angelis, F. C.; Viltard, N.

    2012-12-01

    In the tropics most of the rainfall comes in the form of individual storm events embedded in the synoptic circulations (e.g., monsoons). Understanding the rainfall and its variability hence requires to document these highly contributing tropical convective systems (MCS). Our knowledge of the MCS life cycle, from a physical point of view mainly arises from individual observational campaigns heavily based on ground radar observations. While this large part of observations enabled the creation of conceptual models of MCS life cycle, it nevertheless does not reach any statistically significant integrated perspective yet. To overcome this limitation, a composite technique, that will serve as a Day-1 algorithm for the Megha-Tropiques mission, is considered in this study. this method is based on a collocation in space and time of the level-2 rainfall estimates (BRAIN) derived from the TMI radiometer onboard TRMM with the cloud systems identified by a new MCS tracking algorithm called TOOCAN and based on a 3-dimensional segmentation (image + time) of the geostationary IR imagery. To complete this study, a similar method is also developed collocating the cloud systems with the precipitating features derived from the ground weather radar which has been deployed during the CHUVA campaign over several Brazilian regions from 2010 up to now. A comparison of the MCSs life cycle is then performed for the 2010-2012 summer seasons over the West African, and South American regions. On the whole region of study, the results show that the temporal evolution of the cold cloud shield associated to MCSs describes a symmetry between the growth and the decay phases. It is also shown that the parameters of the conceptual model of MCSs are strongly correlated, reducing thereby the problem to a single degree of freedom. At the system scale, over both land and oceanic regions, rainfall is described by an increase at the beginning (the first third) of the life cycle and then smoothly decreases

  15. Satellites You Can See for Homework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broderick, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Artificial satellites are easily observed most nights when the weather is fine. The website called "Heavens Above" at www.heavens-above.com will help locate these satellites flying over one's location. It also includes how bright they will appear. The direction of travel of each satellite in the night sky also indicates the type of satellite. For…

  16. Satellite Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Researchers at the Center for Aerospace Sciences of the University of North Dakota (UND), Grand Forks, used three NASA Computer programs (SANDTRACKS, ODG, NORAD) to develop a Satellite Tracking System for real time utilization of TIROS weather/environment satellite information. SANDTRACKS computes the satellite's position relative to the Earth. ODG allows plotting a view of Earth as seen by the satellite. NORAD computes sight direction, visibility times and maximum elevation angle during each orbit. With the system, UND's Earth System Science Institute will be able to routinely monitor agricultural and environmental conditions of the Northern Plains.

  17. Road Weather and Connected Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisano, P.; Boyce, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    On average, there are over 5.8 M vehicle crashes each year of which 23% are weather-related. Weather-related crashes are defined as those crashes that occur in adverse weather or on slick pavement. The vast majority of weather-related crashes happen on wet pavement (74%) and during rainfall (46%). Connected vehicle technologies hold the promise to transform road-weather management by providing improved road weather data in real time with greater temporal and geographic accuracy. This will dramatically expand the amount of data that can be used to assess, forecast, and address the impacts that weather has on roads, vehicles, and travelers. The use of vehicle-based measurements of the road and surrounding atmosphere with other, more traditional weather data sources, and create road and atmospheric hazard products for a variety of users. The broad availability of road weather data from mobile sources will vastly improve the ability to detect and forecast weather and road conditions, and will provide the capability to manage road-weather response on specific roadway links. The RWMP is currently demonstrating how weather, road conditions, and related vehicle data can be used for decision making through an innovative Integrated Mobile Observations project. FHWA is partnering with 3 DOTs (MN, MI, & NV) to pilot these applications. One is a mobile alerts application called the Motorists Advisories and Warnings (MAW) and a maintenance decision support application. These applications blend traditional weather information (e.g., radar, surface stations) with mobile vehicle data (e.g., temperature, brake status, wiper status) to determine current weather conditions. These weather conditions, and other road-travel-relevant information, are provided to users via web and phone applications. The MAW provides nowcasts and short-term forecasts out to 24 hours while the EMDSS application can provide forecasts up to 72 hours in advance. The three DOTs have placed readers and external

  18. Advancements of in-flight mass moment of inertia and structural deflection algorithms for satellite attitude simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jonathan W.

    Experimental satellite attitude simulators have long been used to test and analyze control algorithms in order to drive down risk before implementation on an operational satellite. Ideally, the dynamic response of a terrestrial-based experimental satellite attitude simulator would be similar to that of an on-orbit satellite. Unfortunately, gravitational disturbance torques and poorly characterized moments of inertia introduce uncertainty into the system dynamics leading to questionable attitude control algorithm experimental results. This research consists of three distinct, but related contributions to the field of developing robust satellite attitude simulators. In the first part of this research, existing approaches to estimate mass moments and products of inertia are evaluated followed by a proposition and evaluation of a new approach that increases both the accuracy and precision of these estimates using typical on-board satellite sensors. Next, in order to better simulate the micro-torque environment of space, a new approach to mass balancing satellite attitude simulator is presented, experimentally evaluated, and verified. Finally, in the third area of research, we capitalize on the platform improvements to analyze a control moment gyroscope (CMG) singularity avoidance steering law. Several successful experiments were conducted with the CMG array at near-singular configurations. An evaluation process was implemented to verify that the platform remained near the desired test momentum, showing that the first two components of this research were effective in allowing us to conduct singularity avoidance experiments in a representative space-like test environment.

  19. International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Davila, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) is an international scientific program to understand the external drivers of space weather. The science and applications of space weather has been brought to prominence because of the rapid development of space based technology that is useful for all human beings. The ISWI program has its roots in the successful International Heliophysical Year (IHY) program that ran during 2007 - 2009. The primary objective of the ISWI program is to advance the space weather science by a combination of instrument deployment, analysis and interpretation of space weather data from the deployed instruments in conjunction with space data, and communicate the results to the public and students. Like the IHY, the ISWI will be a grass roots organization with key participation from national coordinators in cooperation with an international steering committee. This talk outlines the ISWI program including its organization and proposed activities.

  20. Maintaining US Space Weather Capabilities after DMSP: Research to Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machuzak, J. S.; Gentile, L. C.; Burke, W. J.; Holeman, E. G.; Ober, D. M.; Wilson, G. R.

    2012-12-01

    The first Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft was launched in 1972; the last is scheduled to fly in 2020. Presently, there is no replacement for the space-weather monitoring sensors that now fly on DMSP. The present suite has provided comprehensive, long-term records that constitute a critical component of the US space weather corporate memory. Evolving operational needs and research accomplishments justify continued collection of space environmental data. Examples include measurements to: (1) Monitor the Dst index in real time as a driver of next-generation satellite drag models; (2) Quantify electromagnetic energy fluxes from deep space to the ionosphere/ thermosphere that heat neutrals, drive disturbance-dynamo winds and degrade precise orbit determinations; (3) Determine strengths of stormtime electric fields at high and low latitudes that lead to severe blackouts and spacecraft anomalies; (4) Specify variability of plasma density irregularities, equatorial plasma bubbles, and the Appleton anomaly to improve reliability of communication, navigation and surveillance links; (5) Characterize energetic particle fluxes responsible for auroral clutter and radar degradation; (6) Map regions of L-Band scintillation for robust GPS applications; and (7) Update the World Magnetic Field Model needed to maintain guidance system superiority. These examples illustrate the utility of continued space environment awareness. Comprehensive assessments of both operational requirements and research advances are needed to make informed selections of sensors and spacecraft that support future capabilities. A proposed sensor set and satellite constellation to provide the needed measurement capabilities will be presented.

  1. Kazakhstan Space Weather Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryakunova, Olga

    2012-07-01

    Kazakhstan experimental complex is a center of experimental study of space weather. This complex is situated near Almaty, Kazakhstan and includes experimental setup for registration of cosmic ray intensity (neutron monitor) at altitude of 3340 m above sea level, geomagnetic observatory and setup for registration of solar flux density with frequency of 1 and 3 GHz with 1 second time resolution. Results of space environment monitoring in real time are accessible via Internet. This experimental information is used for space weather investigations and different cosmic ray effects. Almaty mountain cosmic ray station is one of the most suitable and sensitive stations for investigation and forecasting of the dangerous situations for satellites; for this reason Almaty cosmic ray station is included in the world-wide neutron monitor network for the real-time monitoring of the space weather conditions and European Database NMDB (www.nmdb.eu). All data are represented on the web-site of the Institute of Ionosphere (www.ionos.kz) in real time. Since July, 2006 the space environment prediction laboratory represents the forecast of geomagnetic activity every day on the same site (www.ionos.kz/?q=en/node/21).

  2. Weather control

    SciTech Connect

    Leepson, M.

    1980-09-05

    Weather modification, the intentional altering of atmospheric conditions to suit the purposes of humankind, has five basic forms: (1) fog dissipation; (2) rain and snow enhancement; (3) hail suppression; (4) lightning suppression; and (5) the abatement of severe storms such as hurricanes and tornadoes. The dissipation of fog and the seeding of clouds with dry ice or silver iodide to produce rain are the most successful weather modification techniques. Both are used extensively and with varying degrees of success in the United States and around the world. Cloud seeding, though, is not effective in easing the harshness of a drought, such as the one that hit the Southwest, Midwest and Great Plains this summer.

  3. The Evolving Space Weather System—Van Allen Probes Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti, L. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Fox, N. J.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Sotirelis, T. S.; Raouafi, N.-E.; Kessel, R. L.; Becker, H. N.

    2014-10-01

    The overarching goal and purpose of the study of space weather is clear—to understand and address the issues caused by solar disturbances on humans and technological systems. Space weather has evolved in the past few decades from a collection of concerned agencies and researchers to a critical function of the National Weather Service of NOAA. The general effects have also evolved from the well-known telegraph disruptions of the mid-1800s to modern day disturbances of the electric power grid, communications and navigation, human spaceflight and spacecraft systems. The last two items in this list, and specifically the effects of penetrating radiation, were the impetus for the space weather broadcast implemented on NASA's Van Allen Probes' twin pair of satellites, launched in August of 2012 and orbiting directly through Earth's severe radiation belts. The Van Allen Probes mission, formerly the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), was renamed soon after launch to honor the discoverer of Earth's radiation belts at the beginning of the space age, the late James Van Allen (the spacecraft themselves are still referred to as RBSP-A and RBSP-B). The Van Allen Probes are one part of NASA's Living With a Star program formulated to advance the scientific understanding of the connection between solar disturbances, the resulting heliospheric conditions, and their effects on the geospace and Earth environment.

  4. Accessing Space Weather Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, D.; Weiss, M.; Immer, E. A.; Patrone, D.; Potter, M.; Barnes, R. J.; Colclough, C.; Holder, R.

    2009-12-01

    To meet the needs of our technology based society, space weather forecasting needs to be advanced and this will entail collaboration amongst research, military and commercial communities to find new ways to understand, characterize, and forecast. In this presentation VITMO, the Virtual Ionosphere-Thermosphere-Mesosphere Observatory will be used as a prototype for a generalized system as a means to bring together a set of tools to access data, models and online collaboration tools to enable rapid progress. VITMO, available at http://vitmo.jhuapl.edu/, currently provides a data access portal for researchers and scientists to enable finding data products as well as access to tools and models. To further the needs of space weather forecasters, the existing VITMO data holdings need to be expanded to provide additional datasets as well as integrating relevant models and model output. VITMO can easily be adapted for the Space Weather domain in its entirety. In this presentation, we will demonstrate how VITMO and the VITMO architecture can be utilized as a prototype in support of integration of Space Weather forecasting tools, models and data.

  5. HIRS-AMTS satellite sounding system test - Theoretical and empirical vertical resolving power. [High resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder - Advanced Moisture and Temperature Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, O. E.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the vertical resolving power of satellite-borne temperature sounding instruments. Information is presented on the capabilities of the High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) and a proposed sounding instrument called the Advanced Moisture and Temperature Sounder (AMTS). Two quite different methods for assessing the vertical resolving power of satellite sounders are discussed. The first is the theoretical method of Conrath (1972) which was patterned after the work of Backus and Gilbert (1968) The Backus-Gilbert-Conrath (BGC) approach includes a formalism for deriving a retrieval algorithm for optimizing the vertical resolving power. However, a retrieval algorithm constructed in the BGC optimal fashion is not necessarily optimal as far as actual temperature retrievals are concerned. Thus, an independent criterion for vertical resolving power is discussed. The criterion is based on actual retrievals of signal structure in the temperature field.

  6. National Weather Service

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lightning Safe Boating Rip Currents Thunderstorms and Tornadoes Space Weather Sun (Ultraviolet Radiation) Safety Campaigns Wind Drought ... Outlook Hurricanes Fire Weather Outlooks UV Alerts Drought Space Weather NOAA Weather Radio NWS CAP Feeds PAST ...

  7. Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array Type L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) mosaic for the Kahiltna terrane, Alaska, 2007-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, Christopher J.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Graham, Garth E.

    2015-01-01

    The USGS has compiled a continuous, cloud-free 12.5-meter resolution radar mosaic of SAR data of approximately 212,000 square kilometers to examine the suitability of this technology for geologic mapping. This mosaic was created from Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) data collected from 2007 to 2010 spanning the Kahiltna terrane and the surrounding area. Interpretation of these data may help geologists understand past geologic processes and identify areas with potential for near-surface mineral resources for further ground-based geological and geochemical investigations.

  8. Proceedings of the 16th NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 16) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX), supported by the NASA Propagation Program, is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investigators from domestic and international organizations. NAPEX 16 was held on May 29, 1992 in Houston, Texas. The meeting was organized into two technical sessions. The first session was dedicated to slant path propagation studies and measurements. The second session focused on Olympus propagation measurements and results. Following NAPEX 16, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Miniworkshop was held to review ACTS propagation activities with emphasis on ACTS hardware development and experiment planning. Eight technical papers were presented by contributors from government agencies, private industry, and university research establishments.

  9. Meteorological Satellites (METSAT) and Earth Observing System (EOS) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) instruments that are being designed and manufactured for the Meteorological Satellites Project (METSAT) and the Earth Observing System (EOS) integrated programs. The FMEA analyzes the design of the METSAT and EOS instruments as they currently exist. This FMEA is intended to identify METSAT and EOS failure modes and their effect on spacecraft-instrument and instrument-component interfaces. The prime objective of this FMEA is to identify potential catastrophic and critical failures so that susceptibility to the failures and their effects can be eliminated from the METSAT/EOS instruments.

  10. Optical terminal definition for the Future Service Growth (FSG) module of the Advanced Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (ATDRSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, Ronald C.; Kalil, Ford

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from preliminary analyses and definition studies for an optical terminal's incorporation into the FSG module of the ATDRS system, which must support crosslinks between selected relay satellites of a modified ATDRS constellation and thereby allow the placement of a relay satellite at an orbital location which eliminates the zone of exclusion. These studies have attempted to identify alternative constellations by means of one or more crosslinks, and to formulate the service-routing requirement for the FSG terminal. Attention is given to an FSG optical terminal that furnishes the functionality and performance required for a crosslink terminal.

  11. The Coming of age of Low-cost Nanosatellites as Enablers for Constellation-class Space Weather Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpar, D. M.

    2006-12-01

    Recent progress in the development of satellite-borne space science instrumentation has focused on increased sophistication resulting in a tremendous increase in understanding of microphysical processes in space. These tremendous advancements, however, have been made without sufficient concomitant experimental characterization of the dynamic behavior of the large-scale geospace system. Global theoretical models of the geospace system need distributed measurements for authentication. Thus there is a need to acquire in-situ space weather data at higher spatio-temporal density than currently planned. Nanosatellites (i.e. 1-10 kg spacecraft) have emerged as technically capable carriers for a variety of on-orbit missions. Advances in electronic miniaturization, reductions in power consumption, increased communications capabilities and miniaturized propulsion systems for station-keeping have enabled development of highly capable miniature satellite buses. Led primarily by universities, kg-class satellites have been developed and launched for a variety of purposes. As recently as July 2006, 18 satellites were lost in a launch booster failure in what was billed as the single largest cluster launch of satellites to date. Thirteen of the 14 one kg-class satellites in this cluster launch were designed, developed, and built in university laboratories. They were built at a fraction of the cost of typical satellites. While, in this instance, these 14 satellites had, for the most part, unrelated mission goals it is perfectly reasonable to envision that a launch of several dozen related satellites is technically feasible at a cost much lower than studies based on traditional methods have shown. This paper will review current nanosatellite capabilities and explore the application of constellations of nanosatellies as carriers of relatively unsophisticated space weather instruments where the value lies in the ability to make a network of measurements that provide unprecedented

  12. Space Weather Observations by GNSS Radio Occultation: From FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC to FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Xinan; Schreiner, William S; Pedatella, Nicholas; Anthes, Richard A; Mannucci, Anthony J; Straus, Paul R; Liu, Jann-Yenq

    2014-01-01

    The joint Taiwan-United States FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate) mission, hereafter called COSMIC, is the first satellite constellation dedicated to remotely sense Earth's atmosphere and ionosphere using a technique called Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO). The occultations yield abundant information about neutral atmospheric temperature and moisture as well as space weather estimates of slant total electron content, electron density profiles, and an amplitude scintillation index, S4. With the success of COSMIC, the United States and Taiwan are moving forward with a follow-on RO mission named FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 (COSMIC-2), which will ultimately place 12 satellites in orbit with two launches in 2016 and 2019. COSMIC-2 satellites will carry an advanced Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) RO receiver that will track both GPS and Russian Global Navigation Satellite System signals, with capability for eventually tracking other GNSS signals from the Chinese BeiDou and European Galileo system, as well as secondary space weather payloads to measure low-latitude plasma drifts and scintillation at multiple frequencies. COSMIC-2 will provide 4–6 times (10–15X in the low latitudes) the number of atmospheric and ionospheric observations that were tracked with COSMIC and will also improve the quality of the observations. In this article we focus on COSMIC/COSMIC-2 measurements of key ionospheric parameters. PMID:26213514

  13. Characterizing Space Weather Effects in the Post-DMSP Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather generally refers to heliophysical phenomena or events that produce a negative impact on manmade systems. While many space weather events originate with impulsive disturbances on the sun, others result from complex internal interactions in the ionosphere-thermosphere system. The reliance of mankind on satellite-based services continues to increase rapidly, yet the global capacity for sensing space weather in the ionosphere seems headed towards decline. A number of recent ionospheric-focused space-based missions are either presently, or soon-to-be, no longer available, and the end of the multi-decade Defense Meteorological Satellite Program is now in sight. The challenge facing the space weather community is how to maintain or increase sensing capabilities in an operational environment constrained by a decreasing numbers of sensors. The upcoming launch of COSMIC-2 in 2016/2018 represents the most significant new capability planned for the future. GNSS RO data has some benefit for background ionospheric models, particularly over regions where ground-based GNSS TEC measurements are unavailable, but the space weather community has a dire need to leverage such missions for far more knowledge of the ionosphere, and specifically for information related to space weather impacts. Meanwhile, the number of ground-based GNSS sensors worldwide has increased substantially, yet progress instrumenting some vastly undersampled regions, such as Africa, remains slow. In fact, the recent loss of support for many existing ground stations in such areas under the former Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) program may actually result in a decrease in such sensing sites over the next 1-2 years, abruptly reversing a positive trend established over the last decade. Here we present potential solutions to the challenges these developments pose to the space weather enterprise. Specific topics include modeling advances required to detect and accurately characterize

  14. The GOES-L satellite is prepped at Astrotech for media showing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Workers at Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., prepare the GOES-L satellite for a media showing. The GOES-L is due to be launched May 15 from Launch Pad 36B aboard an Atlas IIA rocket. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites.

  15. The GOES-L satellite is prepped at Astrotech for media showing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., the GOES-L satellite sits ready for a media showing. The GOES-L is due to be launched May 15 from Launch Pad 36B aboard an Atlas IIA rocket. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites.

  16. The GOES-L satellite is prepped at Astrotech for media showing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., GOES-L Program Manager Gerald Dittberner, with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) talks with a journalist during a media showing of the GOES-L satellite in the background. The GOES-L is due to be launched May 15 from Launch Pad 36B aboard an Atlas IIA rocket. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three- axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites.

  17. Lightning: Nature's Probe of Severe Weather for Research and Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Lightning, the energetic and broadband electrical discharge produced by thunderstorms, provides a natural remote sensing signal for the study of severe storms and related phenomena on global, regional and local scales. Using this strong signal- one of nature's own probes of severe weather -lightning measurements prove to be straightforward and take advantage of a variety of measurement techniques that have advanced considerably in recent years. We briefly review some of the leading lightning detection systems including satellite-based optical detectors such as the Lightning Imaging Sensor, and ground-based radio frequency systems such as Vaisala's National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), long range lightning detection systems, and the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) networks. In addition, we examine some of the exciting new research results and operational capabilities (e.g., shortened tornado warning lead times) derived from these observations. Finally we look forward to the next measurement advance - lightning observations from geostationary orbit.

  18. Advances in large-scale ocean dynamics from a decade of satellite altimetric measurement of ocean surface topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. L.; Menard, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The past decade has seen the most intensive observations of the global ocean surface topography from satellite altimeters. The Joint U.S./France TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) Mission has become the longest radar mission ever flown in space, providing the most accurate measurements for the study of ocean dynamics since October 1992.

  19. Cosmic Rays and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, Lev

    In this review-paper we consider following problems. 1. Cosmic rays (CR) as element of space weather 1.1. Influence of CR on the Earth's atmosphere and global climate change 1.2. Radia-tion hazard from galactic CR 1.3. Radiation hazard from solar CR 1.4. Radiation hazard from energetic particle precipitation from radiation belts 2. CR as tool for space weather forecasting 2.1. Forecasting of the part of global climate change caused by CR intensity variations 2.2. Forecasting of radiation hazard for aircrafts and spacecrafts caused by variations of galactic CR intensity 2.3. Forecasting of the radiation hazard from solar CR events by using on-line one-min ground neutron monitors network and satellite data 2.4. Forecasting of great magnetic storms hazard by using on-line one hour CR intensity data from ground based world-wide network of neutron monitors and muon telescopes 3. CR, space weather, and satellite anomalies 4. CR, space weather, and people health

  20. Research from an Operatonal Space Weather Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Koning, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    STEREO real-time white-light images, or beacon images, are heavily compressed, 256x256 pixel images. And yet, they show the same transient features that are in the STEREO science images, which are up to 2048x2048 pixels. Based on our experience with STEREO beacon images, we demonstrate that operational images can be used to do good quality science. We also discuss the limitations of operational data for scientific research. Finally, we discuss ways in which a predominantly operational mission could be combined with science mission, to further enhance research.

  1. The International Space Weather Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nat, Gopalswamy; Joseph, Davila; Barbara, Thompson

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) is a program of international cooperation aimed at understanding the external drivers of space weather. The ISWI program has its roots in the successful International Heliophysical Year (IHY) program that ran during 2007 - 2009 and will continue with those aspects that directly affect life on Earth. The primary objective of the ISWI program is to advance the space weather science by a combination of instrument deployment, analysis and interpretation of space weather data from the deployed instruments in conjunction with space data, and communicate the results to the public and students. Like the IHY, the ISWI will be a grass roots organization with key participation from national coordinators in cooperation with an international steering committee. This presentation outlines the ISWI program including its organizational aspects and proposed activities. The ISWI observatory deployment and outreach activities are highly complementary to the CAWSES II activities of SCOSTEP.

  2. Impact of Tactical and Strategic Weather Avoidance on Separation Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refai, Mohamad S.; Windhorst, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The ability to keep flights away from weather hazards while maintaining aircraft-to-aircraft separation is critically important. The Advanced Airspace Concept is an automation concept that implements a ground-based strategic conflict resolution algorithm for management of aircraft separation. The impact of dynamic and uncertain weather avoidance on this concept is investigated. A strategic weather rerouting system is integrated with the Advanced Airspace Concept, which also provides a tactical weather avoidance algorithm, in a fast time simulation of the Air Transportation System. Strategic weather rerouting is used to plan routes around weather in the 20 minute to two-hour time horizon. To address forecast uncertainty, flight routes are revised at 15 minute intervals. Tactical weather avoidance is used for short term trajectory adjustments (30 minute planning horizon) that are updated every minute to address any weather conflicts (instances where aircraft are predicted to pass through weather cells) that are left unresolved by strategic weather rerouting. The fast time simulation is used to assess the impact of tactical weather avoidance on the performance of automated conflict resolution as well as the impact of strategic weather rerouting on both conflict resolution and tactical weather avoidance. The results demonstrate that both tactical weather avoidance and strategic weather rerouting increase the algorithm complexity required to find aircraft conflict resolutions. Results also demonstrate that tactical weather avoidance is prone to higher airborne delay than strategic weather rerouting. Adding strategic weather rerouting to tactical weather avoidance reduces total airborne delays for the reported scenario by 18% and reduces the number of remaining weather violations by 13%. Finally, two features are identified that have proven important for strategic weather rerouting to realize these benefits; namely, the ability to revise reroutes and the use of maneuvers

  3. Satellites save lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulloch, Chris

    The use of satellites, in particular weather satellites, to detect emergency transmitter signals for search and rescue (SAR) operations is studied. The benefits provided to SAR operations by the Doppler processing of signals and the assignment of the 100-kHz band, 406.0-406.1 MHz in UHF region for satellite SAR services are discussed. The capabilities of Argos, a data collection system, and its function in SAR operations are described. Future developments for the COSPAS-SARSAT system are considered.

  4. Joint Polar Satellite System's Operational and Research Applications from Suomi NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Joint Polar Satellite System is NOAA's new operational satellite program and includes the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) as a bridge between NOAA's operational Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES) series, which began in 1978, and the first JPSS operational satellite scheduled for launch in 2017. JPSS provides critical data for key operational and research applications, and includes: 1) Weather forecasting - data from the JPSS Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) are needed to forecast weather events out to 7 days. Nearly 85% of all data used in weather forecasting are from polar orbiting satellites. 2) Environmental monitoring - data from the JPSS Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) are used to monitor the environment including the health of coastal ecosystems, drought conditions, fire, smoke, dust, snow and ice, and the state of oceans, including sea surface temperature and ocean color. 3) Climate monitoring - data from JPSS instruments, including OMPS and CERES will provide continuity to climate data records established using NOAA POES and NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite observations. These data records provide a unified and coherent long-term observation of the environment; the records and products are critical to climate modelers, scientists, and decision makers concerned with advancing climate change understanding, prediction, mitigation and adaptation strategies, and policies. To bridge the gap between products and applications, the JPSS Program has established a proving ground program to optimize the use of JPSS data with other data sources to improve key products and services. A number of operational and research applications will be discussed, including the use of CrIS and ATMS for improved weather forecasting, the use of VIIRS for environmental monitoring of sea ice, smoke, fire, floods, droughts, coastal water quality (e.g. harmful algal blooms

  5. S`COOL: Leveraging Information Technology Advances to Present K-12 Students with Specifically Relevant Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. H.; Rogerson, T. M.; Fischer, J. D.; Moore, S. W.

    2007-12-01

    The Students` Cloud Observations On-Line (S`COOL) Project began in 1997 as a way to connect K-12 classrooms directly with ongoing NASA Earth Science research. Through the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project, students as young as kindergarten have been involved for more than 10 years in providing ground truth observations of cloud cover and type. NASA scientists use these observations as part of the validation effort for understanding cloud effects on the Earth's energy budget. In addition, since the beginning, the project has also focused on students doing their own data analysis. However, not very many S`COOL participants actually performed much data analysis in the first years of the project. Over the last year and a half, the S`COOL team has worked to provide additional scaffolding for student data analysis, by leveraging emerging information technology developments to select and present specifically relevant satellite data to the students. In addition to the simple, standard visualization of the ground and satellite cloud information, we have provided a direct link to the specific 5-minute MODIS image, through the MODIS Rapid Response website. Over the summer, we added tutorials explaining how students can also bring in the atmospheric profiles from CALIPSO and/or CloudSat, when there is a near overhead pass of these satellites. In addition to the direct links to satellite imagery and data, we have also implemented a web-based classification and comment system. S`COOL participants can provide additional comments on the ground to satellite correspondence, after the satellite data are processed by FLASHFlux about a week after the student ground observation. Comments are emailed to the S`COOL team and enable additional interaction with the participants. Finally, new data analysis tools focusing on commonly-used spreadsheet software were developed over the summer by a team of college student interns. The addition of all these new resources

  6. A statistical rain attenuation prediction model with application to the advanced communication technology satellite project. 3: A stochastic rain fade control algorithm for satellite link power via non linear Markow filtering theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic and composite nature of propagation impairments that are incurred on Earth-space communications links at frequencies in and above 30/20 GHz Ka band, i.e., rain attenuation, cloud and/or clear air scintillation, etc., combined with the need to counter such degradations after the small link margins have been exceeded, necessitate the use of dynamic statistical identification and prediction processing of the fading signal in order to optimally estimate and predict the levels of each of the deleterious attenuation components. Such requirements are being met in NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Project by the implementation of optimal processing schemes derived through the use of the Rain Attenuation Prediction Model and nonlinear Markov filtering theory.

  7. NASA's Sentinels Monitoring Weather and Climate: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Herring, David; Gutro, Rob; Huffman, George; Halverson, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    Weatherwise is probably the most popular newstand magazine focusing on the subject of weather. It is published six times per year and includes features on weather, climate, and technology. This article (to appear in the January/February Issue) provides a comprehensive review of NASA s past, present, and future contributions in satellite remote sensing for weather and climate processes. The article spans the historical strides of the TIROS program through the scientific and technological innovation of Earth Observer-3 and Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM). It is one of the most thorough reviews of NASA s weather and climate satellite efforts to appear in the popular literature.

  8. Proceedings of the Fourteenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 14) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX), supported by the NASA Propagation Program, is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investigators from domestic and international organizations. NAPEX XIV was held on May 11, 1990, at the Balcones Research Centers, University of Texas, Austin, Texas. The meeting was organized into two technical sessions: Satellite (ACTS) and the Olympus Spacecraft, while the second focused on the fixed and mobile satellite propagation studies and experiments. Following NAPEX XIV, the ACTS Miniworkshop was held at the Hotel Driskill, Austin, Texas, on May 12, 1990, to review ACTS propagation activities since the First ACTS Propagation Studies Workshop was held in Santa Monica, California, on November 28 and 29, 1989.

  9. Vodcasting Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins Petersen, Carolyn; Erickson, P. J.; Needles, M.

    2009-01-01

    The topic of space weather is the subject of a series of vodcasts (video podcasts) produced by MIT Haystack Observatory (Westford, MA) and Loch Ness Productions (Groton, MA). This paper discusses the production and distribution of the series via Webcast, Youtube, and other avenues. It also presents preliminary evaluation of the effectiveness and outreach of the project through feedback from both formal and information education venues. The vodcast series is linked to the NASA Living With a Star Targeted Research and Technology project award "Multi-Instrument Investigation of Inner-Magnetospheric/Ionosphere Disturbances.” It is being carried out by Principal Investigator Dr. John Foster, under the auspices of NASA Grant # NNX06AB86G. The research involves using ionospheric total electron content (TEC) observations to study the location, extent, and duration of perturbations within stormtime ionospheric electric fields at mid- to low latitudes. It combines ground-based global positioning system (GPS) TEC data, incoherent scatter radar measurements of the mid-latitude ionospheric state, and DMSP satellite observations to characterize conditions which lead to severe low-latitude ionospheric perturbations. Each vodcast episode covers a certain aspect of space weather and the research program.

  10. Operational Applications from the Suomi Npp and Jpss Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, M.; Furgerson, J.; Sjoberg, W.; Weng, F.; Csiszar, I. A.; Kilcoyne, H.; Gleason, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    The Joint Polar Satellite System is NOAA's new operational satellite program and includes the SUOMI National Polar Partnership (NPP) as a bridge between NOAA's operational Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES) series, which began in 1978, and the first JPSS operational satellite scheduled for launch in 2017. JPSS provides critical data for key NOAA product and services, which the Nation depends on. These products and services include: Weather forecasting - data from the JPSS Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) are needed to forecast weather events out to 7 days. Nearly 85% of all data used in weather forecasting are from polar orbiting satellites. Environmental monitoring - data from the JPSS Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) are used to monitor the environment including the health of coastal ecosystems, drought conditions, fire, smoke, dust, snow and ice, and the state of oceans, including sea surface temperature and ocean color. Climate monitoring - data from JPSS instruments, including OMPS, CERES and TSIS will provide continuity to climate data records established using NOAA POES and NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite observations. These data records provide a unified and coherent long-term observation of the environment; the records and products are critical to climate modelers, scientists, and decision makers concerned with advancing climate change understanding, prediction, mitigation and adaptation strategies, and policies. Data collection - JPSS satellites continue the POES data collection instruments that relay in situ data and observations from remote transmitters. These instruments relay data from remote, unmanned stations including wind, temperature and salinity readings from ocean buoys, which allow for the monitoring of the ocean. These instruments are also used to track wildlife. Search and rescue - JPSS will continue the search and rescue instruments on POES that

  11. Investigation of AIRS and AMSU sounding products in regional numerical weather simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shen-Cha; Liu, Chian-Yi; Kuo, Szu-Chen

    2016-05-01

    The initial and boundary conditions are critical to the numerical weather prediction (NWP) model. It is known that satellite observations can overcome the limitations of the terrain, especially over the oceans where conventional observations are difficult to obtain. Therefore, the use of satellite data will expect to improve those regions where lack of traditional observation. The Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) onboard NASA's EOS Aqua satellite, represent microwave and hyperspectral infrared observations, respectively. Both of them may provide atmospheric temperature and moisture soundings with complementary characteristics. For example, AMSU has the advantage to give cloudy retrievals while AIRS may retain the atmospheric gradient due to its finer high spatial resolution. Both data could estimate atmospheric thermodynamic state with substantial accuracy to improve high impact weather forecast In this study, we adopt the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system to evaluate the use of AMSU/AIRS retrievals for severe precipitation at Taiwan. The front, UTC 2016/01/05 22Z, is selected to demonstrate the benefit of using sounding data. The preliminary results shows a positive impact on total precipitable water while the time slope may need further investigation.

  12. Asteroids: Does Space Weathering Matter?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffey, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    The interpretive calibrations and methodologies used to extract mineralogy from asteroidal spectra appear to remain valid until the space weathering process is advanced to a degree which appears to be rare or absent on asteroid surfaces. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Solar variability, weather, and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Advances in the understanding of possible effects of solar variations on weather and climate are most likely to emerge by addressing the subject in terms of fundamental physical principles of atmospheric sciences and solar-terrestrial physis. The limits of variability of solar inputs to the atmosphere and the depth in the atmosphere to which these variations have significant effects are determined.

  14. Weather Information Communications (WINCOMM) Overview and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martzaklis, K.

    2003-01-01

    The second annual project review of Weather Information Communications (WINCOMM) is presented. The topics of discussion include: 1) In-Flight Weather Information; 2) System Elements; 3) Technology Investment Areas; 4) NAS Information Exchange; 5) FIS Datalink Architecture Analyses; 6) Hybrid FIS Datalink Architecture; 7) FIS Datalink Architecture Analyses; 8) Air Transport: Ground and Satellite-based Datalinks; 9) General Aviation: Ground and Satellite-based Datalinks; 10) Low Altitude AutoMET Reporting; 11) AutoMET: Airborne-based Datalinks; 12) Network Protocols Development; and 13) FAA/NASA Collaboration. A summary of WINCOMM is also included. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  15. The Contribution of Operational and Research Applications from the Joint Polar Satellite System to Societal Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, M.

    2015-12-01

    Applications of satellite data are paramount to transform science and technology to product and services which are used in critical decision making. For the satellite community, good representations of technology are the satellite sensors, while science provides the instrument calibration and derived geophysical parameters. Weather forecasting is an application of the science and technology provided by remote sensing satellites. The Joint Polar Satellite System, which includes the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) provides formidable science and technology to support many applications and includes support to 1) weather forecasting - data from the JPSS Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) are used to forecast weather events out to 7 days - nearly 85% of all data used in weather forecasting are from polar orbiting satellites; 2) environmental monitoring -data from the JPSS Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) are used to monitor the environment including the health of coastal ecosystems, drought conditions, fire, smoke, dust, snow and ice, and the state of oceans, including sea surface temperature and ocean color; and 3) climate monitoring - data from JPSS instruments, including OMPS and CERES will provide continuity to climate data records established using NOAA POES and NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite observations. To bridge the gap between products and applications, the JPSS Program has established a proving ground program to optimize the use of JPSS data with other data sources to improve key products and services. A number of operational and research applications will be presented along with how the data and applications support a large number of societal benefit areas of the Global Earth Observation Systems of Systems (GEOSS).

  16. Comparison of Weather Shows in Eastern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najman, M.

    2009-09-01

    Comparison of Weather Shows in Eastern Europe Television weather shows in Eastern Europe have in most cases in the high graphical standard. There is though a wast difference in duration and information content in the weather shows. There are few signs and regularities by which we can see the character of the weather show. The main differences are mainly caused by the income structure of the TV station. Either it is a fully privately funded TV relying on the TV commercials income. Or it is a public service TV station funded mainly by the national budget or fixed fee structure/tax. There are wast differences in duration and even a graphical presentation of the weather. Next important aspect is a supplier of the weather information and /or the processor. Shortly we can say, that when the TV show is produced by the national met office, the TV show consists of more scientific terms, synoptic maps, satellite imagery, etc. If the supplier is the private meteorological company, the weather show is more user-friendly, laical with less scientific terms. We are experiencing a massive shift in public weather knowledge and demand for information. In the past, weather shows consisted only of maps with weather icons. In todaýs world, even the laic weather shows consist partly of numerical weather model outputs - they are of course designed to be understandable and graphically attractive. Outputs of the numerical weather models used to be only a part of daily life of a professional meteorologist, today they are common part of life of regular people. Video samples are a part of this presentation.

  17. Graphical tools for TV weather presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najman, M.

    2010-09-01

    Contemporary meteorology and its media presentation faces in my opinion following key tasks: - Delivering the meteorological information to the end user/spectator in understandable and modern fashion, which follows industry standard of video output (HD, 16:9) - Besides weather icons show also the outputs of numerical weather prediction models, climatological data, satellite and radar images, observed weather as actual as possible. - Does not compromise the accuracy of presented data. - Ability to prepare and adjust the weather show according to actual synoptic situtation. - Ability to refocus and completely adjust the weather show to actual extreme weather events. - Ground map resolution weather data presentation need to be at least 20 m/pixel to be able to follow the numerical weather prediction model resolution. - Ability to switch between different numerical weather prediction models each day, each show or even in the middle of one weather show. - The graphical weather software need to be flexible and fast. The graphical changes nee to be implementable and airable within minutes before the show or even live. These tasks are so demanding and the usual original approach of custom graphics could not deal with it. It was not able to change the show every day, the shows were static and identical day after day. To change the content of the weather show daily was costly and most of the time impossible with the usual approach. The development in this area is fast though and there are several different options for weather predicting organisations such as national meteorological offices and private meteorological companies to solve this problem. What are the ways to solve it? What are the limitations and advantages of contemporary graphical tools for meteorologists? All these questions will be answered.

  18. Report on the First International Symposium on Operational Weather Forecasting in Antarctica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, John; Pendlebury, Stephen; Cowled, Lance; Jacka, Kieran; Jones, Marjorie; Targett, Philip

    2000-01-01

    The First International Symposium on Operational Weather Forecasting in Antarctica was held in Hobart, Australia, from 31 August to 3 September 1998. There were 40 attendees at the meeting from Australia, Belgium, Brazil, China, France, Italy, Russia, and the United Kingdom. In recent years there has been considerable growth in the requirement for weather forecasts for the Antarctic because of the increases in complex scientific research activities and the rapid growth of tourism to the continent. At many of the research stations there are now sophisticated forecasting operations that make use of the data available from drifting buoys and automatic weather stations, the output from numerical weather prediction systems, and high resolution satellite imagery. The models have considerable success at predicting the synoptic-scale depressions that occur over the ocean and in the coastal region. However, the many mesoscale systems that occur, which are very important for forecasting local conditions, are not well represented in the model fields and their movement is mainly predicted via the satellite data. In the future it is anticipated that high resolution, limited-area models will be run for selected parts of the continent. The symposium showed that great advances had been made during recent years in forecasting for the Antarctic as a result of our better understanding of atmospheric processes at high latitudes, along with the availability of high resolution satellite imagery and the output of numerical models. Outstanding problems include the difficulty of getting all of the observations to the main analysis centers outside the Antarctic in a timely fashion, the lack of upper air data from the Antarctic Peninsula and the interior of the continent, and the poor representation of the Antarctic orography and high latitude processes in numerical models. An outcome of the symposium will be a weather forecasting handbook dealing with the entire continent.

  19. The Sun and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2002-06-01

    What are the terrestrial effects of solar activity and the solar activity cycle? The modern term used for solar terrestrial relations is `Space Weather'. This term describes all external effects on the space environment of the Earth and the Earth's atmosphere. The main driver for space weather is our Sun. Explosive events on the Sun that are modulated by the solar activity cycle lead to enhanced particle emission and short wavelength radiation. This affects satellites: for example surface charging and enhanced drag forces on satellites in low Earth orbit can cause satellite crashes etc. Enhanced radiation also poses a problem for astronauts, especially for extravehicular activities. Another source of space weather effects is space debris and micrometeoroids. Since the Sun is the main source of space weather effects, the first part of the book is devoted to a general introduction to the physics of the Sun. A better understanding of the phenomena underlying solar activity is also important for prediction of solar outbursts and thus for establishing alert systems for space missions and telecommunication systems. The book contains the following topics: * possible influence of the Sun on the Earth's climate; * the effects of radiation on humans in space and the expected radiation dose from various solar events; * disturbances of the Earth's ionosphere and the implications of radio communication at different wavelength ranges; * possible hazardous asteroids and meteoroids and their detection; and * space debris and special shielding of spacecraft. In the cited literature the reader can find more detailed information about the topics. This book provides an introduction and overview of modern solar-terrestrial physics for students as well as for researchers in the field of astrophysics, solar physics, geophysics, and climate research. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-0684-5

  20. The Future of Satellite Communications Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowland, Wayne

    1985-01-01

    Discusses technical advances in satellite technology since the 1960s, and the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization's role in these developments; describes how AUSSAT, Australia's domestic satellite system, exemplifies the latest developments in satellite technology; and reviews satellite system features, possible future…