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Sample records for advanced wide field

  1. SSC Geopositional Assessment of the Advanced Wide Field Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Kenton

    2006-01-01

    The geopositional accuracy of the standard geocorrected product from the Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) was evaluated using digital orthophoto quarter quadrangles and other reference sources of similar accuracy. Images were analyzed from summer 2004 through spring 2005. Forty to fifty check points were collected manually per scene and analyzed to determine overall circular error, estimates of horizontal bias, and other systematic errors. Measured errors were somewhat higher than the specifications for the data, but they were consistent with the analysis of the distributing vendor.

  2. Estimating crop production in Iowa from Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Indian National Remote Sensing Agency ResourceSat-1 Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) data for the USA is being provided online by the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) and Arctic Slope Regional Corporation – Management Services (ASRC-MS). Because of the frequent revisit time and pixel sizes...

  3. Satellite Detection in Advanced Camera for Surveys/Wide Field Channel Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borncamp, D.; Lim, Pey Lian

    2016-01-01

    This document explains the process by which satellite trails can be found within individual chips of an Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC) image. Since satellites are transient and sporadic events, we used the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) dataset which is manually checked for satellite trails has been used as a truth set to verify that the method in this document does a complete job without a high false positive rate. This document also details the process of producing a mask that will update data quality information to inform users where the trail traverses the image and properly account for the affected pixels. Along with this document, the Python source code used to detect and mask satellite trails will be released to users with as a stand-alone product within the STSDAS acstools package.

  4. Advanced wide-field broad-passband refracting field correctors for large telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epps, H. W.; Angel, J. R. P.; Anderson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Design objectives, constraints, and optical data are presented for specific corrector designs under consideration for several large telescope projects. These include a preliminary 30-arcmin prime focus (f/2.0) refracting field corrector system for the University of California Ten-Meter Telescope (UC TMT); a compact 40-arcmin internal Cassegrain (f/1.75 hyperbola to f/5.0) broad-passband (3300 A to 1.0 micron) corrector suitable for imaging and multi-object spectroscopy at the UC TMT; three 60-arcmin Cassegrain correctors for 300-inch f/1.8 and f/2.0 parabolic primary mirrors suitable for a Fifteen-Meter NNTT/MMT; and a 300-inch 40-arcmin external Cassegrain (f/1.0 parabola to f/4.0) broad-passband (3300 A to 1.0 micron) corrector with ADC.

  5. Wide field imager instrument for the Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Nandra, Kirpal; Plattner, Markus; Porro, Matteo; Rau, Arne; Santangelo, Andrea; Tenzer, Chris; Wilms, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics (Athena) has been selected for ESA's L2 mission, scheduled for launch in 2028. It will provide the necessary capabilities to achieve the ambitious goals of the science theme "The Hot and Energetic Universe." Athena's x-ray mirrors will be based on silicon pore optics technology with a 12-m focal length. Two complementary focal plane camera systems are foreseen, which can be moved interchangeably to the focus of the mirror system: the actively shielded micro-calorimeter spectrometer X-IFU and the wide field imager (WFI). The WFI camera will provide an unprecedented survey power through its large field of view of 40 arc min with a high count-rate capability (˜1 Crab). It permits a state-of-the-art energy resolution in the energy band of 0.1 to 15 keV during the entire mission lifetime (e.g., full width at half maximum ≤150 eV at 6 keV). This performance is accomplished by a set of depleted P-channel field effect transistor (DEPFET) active pixel sensor matrices with a pixel size well suited to the angular resolution of 5 arc sec (on-axis) of the mirror system. Each DEPFET pixel is a combined detector-amplifier structure with a MOSFET integrated onto a fully depleted 450-μm-thick silicon bulk. This manuscript will summarize the current instrument concept and design, the status of the technology development, and the envisaged baseline performance.

  6. ProtoEXIST2: Advanced Wide-field Imaging CZT Detector Development For The HET On The Proposed EXIST Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub; Allen, B.; Grindlay, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Baker, R.; Gehrels, N.; Cook, W.; Kaye, S.; Harrison, F.

    2010-03-01

    We describe our development of ProtoEXIST2, the advanced CZT imaging detector and wide field telescope prototype for the High Energy Telescope (HET) on the proposed Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) mission. EXIST is a multi-wavelength Medium class mission which would explore the early Universe using high redshift Gamma-ray Bursts and survey black holes on all scales. ProtoEXIST2 will demonstrate the feasibility of a large scale imaging module (256 cm2) with a close-tiled array of fine pixel (0.6 mm) CZT with a balloon flight test in 2010 or 2011. This second generation close-tiled CZT imager follows ProtoEXIST1, which had a recent successful balloon flight (see Allen et al in this meeting) using the same area CZT detector module (256 cm2) but with larger pixel size (2.5mm). For signal readout and event processing, we use the Direct-Bond (DB) ASIC, developed for the NuSTAR mission to be used in a close-tiled 2 x 2 array of 2x2 cm2 CZT detectors, each with 32x32 pixels. The DB-ASIC is attractive for a large scale implementation of tiled imaging CZT detectors given its low noise and power consumption (70uW/pixel). We are developing readout for the DB-ASIC that incorporates our back-end FPGA readout architecture developed for ProtoEXIST1 in order to accomplish the 256 cm2 detector module area with totally vertical integration (i.e. no auxialliary boards to the sides of the module. This is required to tile large numbers of modules into the very large total area (4.5m^2) proposed for the HET on EXIST. We review the design of the EXIST/HET and its optimum shielding in light of our ProtoEXIST1 balloon flight and our plan for future development of ProtoEXIST3, a final EXIST/HET detector module that would incorporate a still lower power version of the DB ASIC.

  7. ProtoEXIST: The Development of Advanced Tiled CZT Detector Planes for Wide Field Hard X-Ray Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Branden; Hong, J.; Grindlay, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Baker, R.

    2011-05-01

    ProtoEXIST is a technology development program for a coded aperture hard X-ray telescope with a large area (1-5 m^2) CZT detector plane for use in a future hard X-ray wide field sky monitor and survey telescope. The successful flight of the ProtoEXIST1 (P1) coded-aperture telescope concluded the first phase of the program on October 9, 2009. The black hole binary Cyg X-1 was imaged and its spectrum measured at the end of the (6h) flight. The P1 detector plane is comprised of a 8x8 array of detector crystal units (DCUs); each made up of a single 20 mm x 20 mm, 5 mm thick Redlen CZT crystal with a 8x8 pixilated anode (pixel pitch of 2.5 mm) bonded to an interposer board connecting each of the individual 64 anode pixels to a single input channel on a RadNET ASIC, forming a 256 cm^2 contiguous CZT imaging array with 4096 individual pixels. P1 was successfully recovered and has undergone further characterization in the interim. The program continues with the ongoing development ProtoEXIST2 (P2) utilizing a closely tiled 8x8 array of DCUs now with a reduced anode pixel pitch of 0.6 mm. Each DCU in P2 will consist of a CZT crystal, identical to that utilized in P1 now with a 32x32 pixelated anode, directly bonded to a single NuSTAR ASIC (Nu-ASIC). The fully assembled P2 imaging detector will be comprised of a semi-contiguous 256x256 array of pixels on 256 cm^2 of CZT. With its finer pixelation the P2 detector plane will enable 5' (FWHM) imaging with a 70 cm focal length and will be flown side-by-side with P1 from Ft. Sumner in the Spring of 2012. Results from the characterization of the P1 detector are discussed as well as current progress in the development of the P2 detector plane.

  8. LED characterization for development of on-board calibration unit of CCD-based advanced wide-field sensor camera of Resourcesat-2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Verma, Anurag

    2016-05-01

    The Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) camera caters to high temporal resolution requirement of Resourcesat-2A mission with repeativity of 5 days. The AWiFS camera consists of four spectral bands, three in the visible and near IR and one in the short wave infrared. The imaging concept in VNIR bands is based on push broom scanning that uses linear array silicon charge coupled device (CCD) based Focal Plane Array (FPA). On-Board Calibration unit for these CCD based FPAs is used to monitor any degradation in FPA during entire mission life. Four LEDs are operated in constant current mode and 16 different light intensity levels are generated by electronically changing exposure of CCD throughout the calibration cycle. This paper describes experimental setup and characterization results of various flight model visible LEDs (λP=650nm) for development of On-Board Calibration unit of Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) camera of RESOURCESAT-2A. Various LED configurations have been studied to meet dynamic range coverage of 6000 pixels silicon CCD based focal plane array from 20% to 60% of saturation during night pass of the satellite to identify degradation of detector elements. The paper also explains comparison of simulation and experimental results of CCD output profile at different LED combinations in constant current mode.

  9. Wide-Field Plate Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, M. K.; Stavrev, K. Y.; Tsvetkova, K. P.; Semkov, E. H.; Mutatov, A. S.

    The Wide-Field Plate Database (WFPDB) and the possibilities for its application as a research tool in observational astronomy are presented. Currently the WFPDB comprises the descriptive data for 400 000 archival wide field photographic plates obtained with 77 instruments, from a total of 1 850 000 photographs stored in 269 astronomical archives all over the world since the end of last century. The WFPDB is already accessible for the astronomical community, now only in batch mode through user requests sent by e-mail. We are working on on-line interactive access to the data via INTERNET from Sofia and parallel from the Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg. (Initial information can be found on World Wide Web homepage URL http://www.wfpa.acad.bg.) The WFPDB may be useful in studies of a variety of astronomical objects and phenomena, andespecially for long-term investigations of variable objects and for multi-wavelength research. We have analysed the data in the WFPDB in order to derive the overall characteristics of the totality of wide-field observations, such as the sky coverage, the distributions by observation time and date, by spectral band, and by object type. We have also examined the totality of wide-field observations from point of view of their quality, availability and digitisation. The usefulness of the WFPDB is demonstrated by the results of identification and investigation of the photometrical behaviour of optical analogues of gamma-ray bursts.

  10. Wide field of view telescope

    DOEpatents

    Ackermann, Mark R.; McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.

    2008-01-15

    A wide field of view telescope having two concave and two convex reflective surfaces, each with an aspheric surface contour, has a flat focal plane array. Each of the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary reflective surfaces are rotationally symmetric about the optical axis. The combination of the reflective surfaces results in a wide field of view in the range of approximately 3.8.degree. to approximately 6.5.degree.. The length of the telescope along the optical axis is approximately equal to or less than the diameter of the largest of the reflective surfaces.

  11. Wide field imaging problems in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwell, T. J.; Golap, K.; Bhatnagar, S.

    2005-03-01

    The new generation of synthesis radio telescopes now being proposed, designed, and constructed face substantial problems in making images over wide fields of view. Such observations are required either to achieve the full sensitivity limit in crowded fields or for surveys. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA Consortium, Tech. Rep., 2004), now being developed by an international consortium of 15 countries, will require advances well beyond the current state of the art. We review the theory of synthesis radio telescopes for large fields of view. We describe a new algorithm, W projection, for correcting the non-coplanar baselines aberration. This algorithm has improved performance over those previously used (typically an order of magnitude in speed). Despite the advent of W projection, the computing hardware required for SKA wide field imaging is estimated to cost up to $500M (2015 dollars). This is about half the target cost of the SKA. Reconfigurable computing is one way in which the costs can be decreased dramatically.

  12. Wide Field Instrument Adjutant Scientist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spergel, David

    As Wide Field Instrument Adjutant Scientist, my goal will be to maximize the science capability of the mission in a cost-contained environment. I hope to work with the HQ, project and the FSWG to assure mission success. I plan to play a leadership role in communicating the WFIRST science capabilities to the astronomy community , obtain input from both science teams and the broader community that help derive performance requirements and calibration metrics. I plan to focus on developing the observing program for the deep fields and focus on using them to calibrate instrument performance and capabilities. I plan to organize workshops that will bring together WFIRST team members with astronomers working on LSST, Euclid, JWST, and the ELTs to maximize combined science return. I am also eager to explore the astrometric and stellar seismology capabilities of the instrument with a goal of maximizing science return without affecting science requirements.

  13. The LOFT wide field monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, S.; Hernanz, M.; Alvarez, L.; Azzarello, P.; Barret, D.; Bozzo, E.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Campana, R.; del Monte, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangalista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Galvez Sanchez, J. L.; Götz, D.; Hansen, F.; den Herder, J. W.; Hudec, R.; Huovelin, J.; Karelin, D.; Korpela, S.; Lund, N.; Orleanski, P.; Pohl, M.; Rashevski, A.; Santangelo, A.; Schanne, S.; Schmid, C.; Suchy, S.; Tenzer, C.; Vacchi, A.; Wilms, J.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; in't Zand, J.; Zdziarski, A.

    2012-09-01

    LOFT (Large Observatory For x-ray Timing) is one of the four missions selected in 2011 for assessment study for the ESA M3 mission in the Cosmic Vision program, expected to be launched in 2024. The LOFT mission will carry two instruments with their prime sensitivity in the 2-30 keV range: a 10 m2 class large area detector (LAD) with a <1° collimated field of view and a wide field monitor (WFM) instrument based on the coded mask principle, providing coverage of more than 1/3 of the sky. The LAD will provide an effective area ~20 times larger than any previous mission and will by timing studies be able to address fundamental questions about strong gravity in the vicinity of black holes and the equation of state of nuclear matter in neutron stars. The prime goal of the WFM will be to detect transient sources to be observed by the LAD. However, with its wide field of view and good energy resolution of <300 eV, the WFM will be an excellent monitoring instrument to study long term variability of many classes of X-ray sources. The sensitivity of the WFM will be 2.1 mCrab in a one day observation, and 270 mCrab in 3s in observations of in the crowded field of the Galactic Center. The high duty cycle of the instrument will make it an ideal detector of fast transient phenomena, like X-ray bursters, soft gamma repeaters, terrestrial gamma flashes, and not least provide unique capabilities in the study of gamma ray bursts. A dedicated burst alert system will enable the distribution to the community of ~100 gamma ray burst positions per year with a ~1 arcmin location accuracy within 30 s of the burst. This paper provides an overview of the design, configuration, and capabilities of the LOFT WFM instrument.

  14. The Ooty Wide Field Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanya, C. R.; Manoharan, P. K.; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

    2017-03-01

    We describe here an ongoing upgrade to the legacy Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). The ORT is a cylindrical parabolic cylinder 530 m × 30 m in size operating at a frequency of 326.5 (or z˜3.35 for the HI 21-cm line). The telescope has been constructed on a North-South hill slope whose gradient is equal to the latitude of the hill, making it effectively equatorially mounted. The feed consists of an array of 1056 dipoles. The key feature of this upgrade is the digitization and cross-correlation of the signals of every set of 4-dipoles. This converts the ORT into a 264 element interferometer with a field-of-view of 2∘×27.4∘cos( δ). This upgraded instrument is called the Ooty Wide Field Array (OWFA). This paper briefly describes the salient features of the upgrade, as well as its main science drivers. There are three main science drivers viz. (1) observations of the large scale distribution of HI in the post-reionization era, (2) studies of the propagation of plasma irregularities through the inner heliosphere and (3) blind surveys for transient sources. More details on the upgrade, as well as on the expected science uses can be found in other papers in this special issue.

  15. Flight performance of an advanced CZT imaging detector in a balloon-borne wide-field hard X-ray telescope—ProtoEXIST1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Allen, B.; Grindlay, J.; Barthelemy, S.; Baker, R.; Garson, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Apple, J.; Cleveland, W. H.

    2011-10-01

    We successfully carried out the first high-altitude balloon flight of a wide-field hard X-ray coded-aperture telescope ProtoEXIST1, which was launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility at Ft. Sumner, New Mexico on October 9, 2009. ProtoEXIST1 is the first implementation of an advanced CdZnTe (CZT) imaging detector in our ongoing program to establish the technology required for next generation wide-field hard X-ray telescopes such as the High Energy Telescope (HET) in the Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST). The CZT detector plane in ProtoEXIST1 consists of an 8×8 array of closely tiled 2 cm×2 cm×0.5 cm thick pixellated CZT crystals, each with 8×8 pixels, mounted on a set of readout electronics boards and covering a 256 cm2 active area with 2.5 mm pixels. A tungsten mask, mounted at 90 cm above the detector provides shadowgrams of X-ray sources in the 30-600 keV band for imaging, allowing a fully coded field of view of 9°×9° (and 19°×19° for 50% coding fraction) with an angular resolution of 20‧. In order to reduce the background radiation, the detector is surrounded by semi-graded (Pb/Sn/Cu) passive shields on the four sides all the way to the mask. On the back side, a 26 cm×26 cm×2 cm CsI(Na) active shield provides signals to tag charged particle induced events as well as ≳100keV background photons from below. The flight duration was only about 7.5 h due to strong winds (60 knots) at float altitude (38-39 km). Throughout the flight, the CZT detector performed excellently. The telescope observed Cyg X-1, a bright black hole binary system, for ˜1h at the end of the flight. Despite a few problems with the pointing and aspect systems that caused the telescope to track about 6.4° off the target, the analysis of the Cyg X-1 data revealed an X-ray source at 7.2σ in the 30-100 keV energy band at the expected location from the optical images taken by the onboard daytime star camera. The success of this first flight is very

  16. ROSAT wide field camera mirrors.

    PubMed

    Willingale, R

    1988-04-15

    The ROSAT wide field camera (WFC) is an XUV telescope operating in the 12-250-eV energy band. The mirror system utilizes Wolter-Schwarzschild type I (WS I) grazing incidence optics with a focal length of 525 mm, comprised of three nested aluminum shells with an outermost diameter of 576 mm providing a geometric aperture area of 456 cm(2). The reflecting surfaces are electroless nickel plated and coated with gold to enhance their reflectivity in the XUV. The mirrors have undergone full aperture optical testing, narrow beam XUV testing, and full aperture XUV testing. Measurements of the reflectivity are compared to theoretical values derived from the optical constants of gold in the XUV range. Analysis of the focused distribution is used to estimate the surface roughness and figuring errors of the polished surfaces. The results are compared to the mechanical metrology data collected during manufacture of the shells and the power spectral density of the reflecting surfaces is found to have a power-law form.

  17. ROSAT Wide Field Camera Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willingale, R.

    1988-08-01

    The ROSAT wide field camera (WFC) is an XUV telescope operating in the 12-250-eV energy band. The mirror system utilizes Wolter-Schwarzschild type I (WSI) grazing incidence optics with a focal length of 525 mm, comprised of three nested aluminum shells with an outermost diameter of 576 mm providing a geometric aperture area of 456 cm2. The reflecting surfaces are electroless nickel plated and coated with gold to enhance their reflectivity in the XUV. The mirrors have undergone full aperture optical testing, narrow beam XUV testing, and full aperture XUV testing. Measurements of the reflectivity are compared to theoretical values derived from the optical constants of gold in the XUV range. Analysis of the focused distribution is used to estimate the surface roughness and figuring errors of the polished surfaces. The results are compared to the mechanical metrology data collected during manufacture of the shells and the power spectral density of the reflecting surfaces is found to have a power-law form.

  18. The wide field/planetary camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, J. A.; Baum, W. A.; Code, A. D.; Currie, D. G.; Danielson, G. E.; Gunn, J. E.; Kelsall, T. F.; Kristian, J. A.; Lynds, C. R.; Seidelmann, P. K.

    1982-01-01

    A wide site of potential astronomical and solar system scientific studies using the wide field planetary camera on space telescope are described. The expected performance of the camera as it approaches final assembly and testing is also detailed.

  19. Stereoscopic wide field of view imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prechtl, Eric F. (Inventor); Sedwick, Raymond J. (Inventor); Jonas, Eric M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A stereoscopic imaging system incorporates a plurality of imaging devices or cameras to generate a high resolution, wide field of view image database from which images can be combined in real time to provide wide field of view or panoramic or omni-directional still or video images.

  20. Wide-field TCSPC: methods and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Suhling, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) is a widely used, robust and mature technique to measure the photon arrival time in applications such as fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy, LIDAR and optical tomography. In the past few years there have been significant developments with wide-field TCSPC detectors, which can record the position as well as the arrival time of the photon simultaneously. In this review, we summarise different approaches used in wide-field TCSPC detection, and discuss their merits for different applications, with emphasis on fluorescence lifetime imaging.

  1. Recent Advances in Wide-Bandgap Photovoltaic Polymers.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yunhao; Huo, Lijun; Sun, Yanming

    2017-03-29

    The past decade has witnessed significant advances in the field of organic solar cells (OSCs). Ongoing improvements in the power conversion efficiency of OSCs have been achieved, which were mainly attributed to the design and synthesis of novel conjugated polymers with different architectures and functional moieties. Among various conjugated polymers, the development of wide-bandgap (WBG) polymers has received less attention than that of low-bandgap and medium-bandgap polymers. Here, we briefly summarize recent advances in WBG polymers and their applications in organic photovoltaic (PV) devices, such as tandem, ternary, and non-fullerene solar cells. Addtionally, we also dissuss the application of high open-circuit voltage tandem solar cells in PV-driven electrochemical water dissociation. We mainly focus on the molecular design strategies, the structure-property correlations, and the photovoltaic performance of these WBG polymers. Finally, we extract empirical regularities and provide invigorating perspectives on the future development of WBG photovoltaic materials.

  2. WIDE-FIELD ASTRONOMICAL MULTISCALE CAMERAS

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, Daniel L.; Brady, David J.

    2013-05-15

    In order to produce sufficiently low aberrations with a large aperture, telescopes have a limited field of view. Because of this narrow field, large areas of the sky at a given time are unobserved. We propose several telescopes based on monocentric reflective, catadioptric, and refractive objectives that may be scaled to wide fields of view and achieve 1.''1 resolution, which in most locations is the practical seeing limit of the atmosphere. The reflective and Schmidt catadioptric objectives have relatively simple configurations and enable large fields to be captured at the expense of the obscuration of the mirror by secondary optics, a defect that may be managed by image plane design. The refractive telescope design does not have an obscuration but the objective has substantial bulk. The refractive design is a 38 gigapixel camera which consists of a single monocentric objective and 4272 microcameras. Monocentric multiscale telescopes, with their wide fields of view, may observe phenomena that might otherwise be unnoticed, such as supernovae, glint from orbital space debris, and near-earth objects.

  3. Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padgett, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    We present WISE (Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer) mid-infrared photometry of young stellar object candidates in the Canis Majoris clouds at a distance of 1 kpc. WISE has identified 682 objects with apparent 12 and 22 micron excess emission in a 7 deg x 10 deg field around the CMa Rl cloud . While a substantial fraction of these candidates are likely galaxies, AGB stars, and artifacts from confusion along the galactic plane, others are part of a spectacular cluster of YSOs imaged by WISE along a dark filament in the R1 cloud. Palomar Double Spectrograph observations of several sources in this cluster confirm their identity as young A and B stars with strong emission lines. In this contribution, we plot the optical -mid-infrared spectral energy distribution for the WISE YSO candidates and discuss potential contaminants to the sample . The data demonstrate the utility of WISE in performing wide-area surveys for young stellar objects.

  4. The Wide-Field Infrared Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schember, Helene; Hacking, Perry

    1993-01-01

    More than 30% of current star formation is taking place ingalaxies known as starburst galaxies. Do starburst galaxies play a central role in the evolution of all galaxies, and can they lead us to the birth of galaxies and the source of quasars? We have proposed to build the Wide Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE), capable of detecting typical starburst galaxies at a redshift of 0.5, ultraluminous infrared galaxies behond a redshift of 2, and luminous protogalaxies beyond a redshift of 5.

  5. The DESI Wide Field Corrector Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Doel, Peter; Sholl, Michael J.; Liang, Ming; Brooks, David; Flaugher, Brenna; Gutierrez, Gaston; Kent, Stephen; Lampton, Michael; Miller, Timothy; Sprayberry, David

    2014-01-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic instrument (DESI) is a 5000 fiber multi-object spectrometer system under development for installation on the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) Kitt Peak 4m telescope (the Mayall telescope). DESI is designated to perform a 14,000° (square) galaxy and Quasi-Stellar Object (QSO) redshift survey to improve estimates of the dark energy equation of state. The survey design imposes numerous constraints on a prime focus corrector design, including field of view, geometrical blur, stability, fiber injection efficiency, zenith angle, mass and coast. The DESI baseline wide-field optical design described herein provides a 3.2 diameter field of view with six 0.8-1.14m diameter lenses and an integral atmospheric dispersion compensator.

  6. Collimation of Fast Wide-Field Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Brian A.

    1996-02-01

    In this paper, I present a simple technique for collimating the secondary mirror of fast focal ratio wide-field Cassegrain telescopes. This technique minimizes both coma and astigmatism across the field. Because astigmatism is nearly zero on-axis even in a misaligned system, it is necessary to make measurements off-axis. This technique is useful on telescopes corrected for off-axis coma such as Ritchey-Cretien designs and classical Cassegrains with refractive correctors. Proper alignment for astigmatism is especially important in the latter type of telescope where there is no astigmatism across the field in a properly aligned system. The tools required for collimation are a camera that can examine images at several locations at the edge of the field and a secondary mirror that can be controlled in five axes. Also presented are analytic expressions for the amount of field-dependent astigmatism due to miscollimation. The technique is robust enough to collimate telescopes with fixed astigmatism in the telescope primary. (SECTION: Astronomical Instrumentation)

  7. Imaging spectrometer wide field catadioptric design

    DOEpatents

    Chrisp; Michael P.

    2008-08-19

    A wide field catadioptric imaging spectrometer with an immersive diffraction grating that compensates optical distortions. The catadioptric design has zero Petzval field curvature. The imaging spectrometer comprises an entrance slit for transmitting light, a system with a catadioptric lens and a dioptric lens for receiving the light and directing the light, an immersion grating, and a detector array. The entrance slit, the system for receiving the light, the immersion grating, and the detector array are positioned wherein the entrance slit transmits light to the system for receiving the light and the system for receiving the light directs the light to the immersion grating and the immersion grating receives the light and directs the light through the system for receiving the light to the detector array.

  8. The IXO wide-field imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Peter; Aschauer, Florian; Bombelli, Luca; Fiorini, Carlo; Herrmann, Sven; Lauf, Thomas; Lutz, Gerhard; Majewski, Petra; Meuris, Aline; Porro, Matteo; Reiffers, Jonas; Richter, Rainer; Stefanescu, Alexander; Strüder, Lothar; Treis, Johannes; De Vita, Giulio

    2010-07-01

    The Wide Field Imager (WFI) of the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) is an X-ray imaging spectrometer based on a large monolithic DePFET (Depleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor) Active Pixel Sensor. Filling an area of 10 × 10 cm² with a format of 1024 × 1024 pixels it will cover a field of view of 18 arcmin. The pixel size of 100 × 100 μm² corresponds to a fivefold oversampling of the telescope's expected 5 arcsec point spread function. The WFI's basic DePFET structure combines the functionalities of sensor and integrated amplifier with nearly Fano-limited energy resolution and high efficiency from 100 eV to 15 keV. The development of dedicated control and amplifier ASICs allows for high frame rates up to 1 kHz and flexible readout modes. Results obtained with representative prototypes with a format of 256 × 256 pixels are presented.

  9. Wide field-of-view bifocal eyeglasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Sergio; Rubinstein, Jacob

    2015-09-01

    When vision is affected simultaneously by presbyopia and myopia or hyperopia, a solution based on eyeglasses implies a surface with either segmented focal regions (e.g. bifocal lenses) or a progressive addition profile (PALs). However, both options have the drawback of reducing the field-of-view for each power position, which restricts the natural eye-head movements of the wearer. To avoid this serious limitation we propose a new solution which is essentially a bifocal power-adjustable optical design ensuring a wide field-of-view for every viewing distance. The optical system is based on the Alvarez principle. Spherical refraction correction is considered for different eccentric gaze directions covering a field-of-view range up to 45degrees. Eye movements during convergence for near objects are included. We designed three bifocal systems. The first one provides 3 D for far vision (myopic eye) and -1 D for near vision (+2 D Addition). The second one provides a +3 D addition with 3 D for far vision. Finally the last system is an example of reading glasses with +1 D power Addition.

  10. A Wide Field of View Plasma Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Skoug, Ruth M.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Moebius, Eberhard; Harper, Ron W.; Kihara, Keith H.; Bower, Jonathan S.

    2016-07-01

    Here we present a fundamentally new type of space plasma spectrometer, the wide field of view plasma spectrometer, whose field of view is >1.25π ster using fewer resources than traditional methods. The enabling component is analogous to a pinhole camera with an electrostatic energy-angle filter at the image plane. Particle energy-per-charge is selected with a tunable bias voltage applied to the filter plate relative to the pinhole aperture plate. For a given bias voltage, charged particles from different directions are focused by different angles to different locations. Particles with appropriate locations and angles can transit the filter plate and are measured using a microchannel plate detector with a position-sensitive anode. Full energy and angle coverage are obtained using a single high-voltage power supply, resulting in considerable resource savings and allowing measurements at fast timescales. Lastly, we present laboratory prototype measurements and simulations demonstrating the instrument concept and discuss optimizations of the instrument design for application to space measurements.

  11. A wide field of view plasma spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Möbius, E.; Harper, R. W.; Kihara, K. H.; Bower, J. S.

    2016-07-01

    We present a fundamentally new type of space plasma spectrometer, the wide field of view plasma spectrometer, whose field of view is > 1.25π ster using fewer resources than traditional methods. The enabling component is analogous to a pinhole camera with an electrostatic energy-angle filter at the image plane. Particle energy-per-charge is selected with a tunable bias voltage applied to the filter plate relative to the pinhole aperture plate. For a given bias voltage, charged particles from different directions are focused by different angles to different locations. Particles with appropriate locations and angles can transit the filter plate and are measured using a microchannel plate detector with a position-sensitive anode. Full energy and angle coverage are obtained using a single high-voltage power supply, resulting in considerable resource savings and allowing measurements at fast timescales. We present laboratory prototype measurements and simulations demonstrating the instrument concept and discuss optimizations of the instrument design for application to space measurements.

  12. A Wide Field of View Plasma Spectrometer

    DOE PAGES

    Skoug, Ruth M.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Moebius, Eberhard; ...

    2016-07-01

    Here we present a fundamentally new type of space plasma spectrometer, the wide field of view plasma spectrometer, whose field of view is >1.25π ster using fewer resources than traditional methods. The enabling component is analogous to a pinhole camera with an electrostatic energy-angle filter at the image plane. Particle energy-per-charge is selected with a tunable bias voltage applied to the filter plate relative to the pinhole aperture plate. For a given bias voltage, charged particles from different directions are focused by different angles to different locations. Particles with appropriate locations and angles can transit the filter plate and aremore » measured using a microchannel plate detector with a position-sensitive anode. Full energy and angle coverage are obtained using a single high-voltage power supply, resulting in considerable resource savings and allowing measurements at fast timescales. Lastly, we present laboratory prototype measurements and simulations demonstrating the instrument concept and discuss optimizations of the instrument design for application to space measurements.« less

  13. Filters for HST Wide Field Camera 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, S.; Brown, T.; Boucarut, R.; Figer, D.; Hartig, G.; Kimble, R.; MacKenty, J.; Robberto, M.; Telfer, R.; Kim-Quijano, J.; Quijada, M.; Allen, G.; Arsenovic, P.; Hilbert, B.; Lupie, O.; Townsend, J.

    2006-06-01

    Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3) has been built for installation on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during the next servicing mission. The WFC3 instrument consists of both a UVIS and an IR channel, each with its own complement of filters. On the UVIS side, a selectable optical filter assembly (SOFA) contains a set of 12 wheels that house 48 elements (42 full-frame filters, 5 quadrant filters, and 1 UV grism). The IR channel has one filter wheel which houses 17 elements (15 filters and 2 grisms). While the majority of UVIS filters exhibited excellent performance during ground testing, a subset of filters showed filter ghosting; improved replacements for these filters have been procured and installed. No filter ghosting was found in any of the IR filters; however, the new IR detector for WFC3 will have significantly more response blueward of 800 nm than the original detector, requiring that two filters originally constructed on a fused silica substrate be remade to block any visible light transmission. This paper summarizes the characterization of the final complement of the WFC3 UVIS and IR filters, highlighting improvements in the replacement filters and the projected benefit to science observations.

  14. Wide-angle flat field telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallam, K. L.; Howell, B. J.; Wilson, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    Described is an unobscured three mirror wide angle telescopic imaging system comprised of an input baffle which provides a 20 deg (Y axis) x 30 deg (X axis) field of view, a primary mirror having a convex spherical surface, a secondary mirror having a concave ellipsoidal reflecting surface, a tertiary mirror having a concave spherical reflecting surface. The mirrors comprise mirror elements which are offset segments of parent mirrors whose axes and vertices commonly lie on the system's optical axis. An iris diaphragm forming an aperture stop is located between the secondary and tertiary mirror with its center also being coincident with the optical axis and being further located at the beam waist of input light beams reflected from the primary and secondary mirror surfaces. At the system focus following the tertiary mirror is located a flat detector which may be, for example, a TV imaging tube or a photographic film. When desirable, a spectral transmission filter is placed in front of the detector in close proximity thereto.

  15. Adaptive wide-field optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Vivek; Intes, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    We describe a wide-field optical tomography technique, which allows the measurement-guided optimization of illumination patterns for enhanced reconstruction performances. The iterative optimization of the excitation pattern aims at reducing the dynamic range in photons transmitted through biological tissue. It increases the number of measurements collected with high photon counts resulting in a dataset with improved tomographic information. Herein, this imaging technique is applied to time-resolved fluorescence molecular tomography for preclinical studies. First, the merit of this approach is tested by in silico studies in a synthetic small animal model for typical illumination patterns. Second, the applicability of this approach in tomographic imaging is validated in vitro using a small animal phantom with two fluorescent capillaries occluded by a highly absorbing inclusion. The simulation study demonstrates an improvement of signal transmitted (˜2 orders of magnitude) through the central portion of the small animal model for all patterns considered. A corresponding improvement in the signal at the emission wavelength by 1.6 orders of magnitude demonstrates the applicability of this technique for fluorescence molecular tomography. The successful discrimination and localization (˜1 mm error) of the two objects with higher resolution using the optimized patterns compared with nonoptimized illumination establishes the improvement in reconstruction performance when using this technique.

  16. Aquila field: Advanced contracting strategies

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Aquila oil field, in 2,800 ft of water, is in the middle of the Otranto Channel in the Mediterranean Sea, approximately 28 miles offshore southern Italy, and is subject to difficult sea and weather conditions. The many difficulties, caused mainly by water depth, requires the use of advanced technology that can be obtained only through the direct association with contractor companies. This solution safeguards the technological reliability and allows for maximum control of time and cost. The selection of a floating production, storage, and offloading (FPSO) system resulted from a feasibility study that indicated this solution was the only method that would provide economical exploitation of the Aquila field. The system includes flowlines and control lines. The ship, FPSO Agip Firenze, has been specially redesigned to manage the field development. Agip will provide the subsea production system, the Christmas tree, control system, and artificial lift.

  17. The wide field imager instrument for Athena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Nandra, Kirpal; Plattner, Markus; Porro, Matteo; Rau, Arne; Santangelo, Andrea E.; Tenzer, Chris; Wilms, Jörn

    2014-07-01

    The "Hot and Energetic Universe" has been selected as the science theme for ESA's L2 mission, scheduled for launch in 2028. The proposed Athena X-ray observatory provides the necessary capabilities to achieve the ambitious goals of the science theme. The X-ray mirrors are based on silicon pore optics technology and will have a 12 m focal length. Two complementary camera systems are foreseen which can be moved in and out of the focal plane by an interchange mechanism. These instruments are the actively shielded micro-calorimeter spectrometer X-IFU and the Wide Field Imager (WFI). The WFI will combine an unprecedented survey power through its large field of view of 40 arcmin with a high countrate capability (approx. 1 Crab). It permits a state-of-the-art energy resolution in the energy band of 0.1 keV to 15 keV during the entire mission lifetime (e.g. FWHM <= 150 eV at 6 keV). This performance is accomplished by a set of DEPFET active pixel sensor matrices with a pixel size matching the angular resolution of 5 arcsec (on-axis) of the mirror system. Each DEPFET pixel is a combined detector-amplifier structure with a MOSFET integrated onto a fully depleted 450 micron thick silicon bulk. The signal electrons generated by an X-ray photon are collected in a so-called internal gate below the transistor channel. The resulting change of the conductivity of the transistor channel is proportional to the number of electrons and thus a measure for the photon energy. DEPFETs have already been developed for the "Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer" on-board of ESA's BepiColombo mission. For Athena we develop enhanced sensors with integrated electronic shutter and an additional analog storage area in each pixel. These features improve the peak-to-background ratio of the spectra and minimize dead time. The sensor will be read out with a new, fast, low-noise multi-channel analog signal processor with integrated sequencer and serial analog output. The architecture of sensor and readout

  18. The wide field imager instrument for Athena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Eder, Josef; Eraerds, Tanja; Nandra, Kirpal; Pietschner, Daniel; Plattner, Markus; Rau, Arne; Strecker, Rafael

    2016-07-01

    The WFI (Wide Field Imager) instrument is planned to be one of two complementary focal plane cameras on ESA's next X-ray observatory Athena. It combines unprecedented survey power through its large field of view of 40 amin x 40 amin together with excellent count rate capability (>= 1 Crab). The energy resolution of the silicon sensor is state-of-the-art in the energy band of interest from 0.2 keV to 15 keV, e.g. the full width at half maximum of a line at 7 keV will be <= 170 eV until the end of the nominal mission phase. This performance is accomplished by using DEPFET active pixel sensors with a pixel size of 130 μm x 130 μm well suited to the on-axis angular resolution of 5 arcsec half energy width (HEW) of the mirror system. Each DEPFET pixel is a combined sensor-amplifier structure with a MOSFET integrated onto a fully depleted 450 μm thick silicon bulk. Two detectors are planned for the WFI instrument: A large-area detector comprising four sensors with a total of 1024 x 1024 pixels and a fast detector optimized for high count rate observations. This high count rate capable detector permits for bright point sources with an intensity of 1 Crab a throughput of more than 80% and a pile-up of less than 1%. The fast readout of the DEPFET pixel matrices is facilitated by an ASIC development, called VERITAS-2. Together with the Switcher-A, a control ASIC that allows for operation of the DEPFET in rolling shutter mode, these elements form the key components of the WFI detectors. The detectors are surrounded by a graded-Z shield, which has in particular the purpose to avoid fluorescence lines that would contribute to the instrument background. Together with ultra-thin coating of the sensor and particle identification by the detector itself, the particle induced background shall be minimized in order to achieve the scientific requirement of a total instrumental background value smaller than 5 x 10-3 cts/cm2/s/keV. Each detector has its dedicated detector electronics

  19. Wide Area Wind Field Monitoring Status & Results

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Marchant; Jed Simmons

    2011-09-30

    Volume-scanning elastic has been investigated as a means to derive 3D dynamic wind fields for characterization and monitoring of wind energy sites. An eye-safe volume-scanning lidar system was adapted for volume imaging of aerosol concentrations out to a range of 300m. Reformatting of the lidar data as dynamic volume images was successfully demonstrated. A practical method for deriving 3D wind fields from dynamic volume imagery was identified and demonstrated. However, the natural phenomenology was found to provide insufficient aerosol features for reliable wind sensing. The results of this study may be applicable to wind field measurement using injected aerosol tracers.

  20. Wide field strip-imaging optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Arthur H. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A strip imaging wide angle optical system is provided. The optical system is provided with a 'virtual' material stop to avoid aberrational effects inherent in wide angle optical systems. The optical system includes a spherical mirror section for receiving light from a 180-degree strip or arc of a target image. Light received by the spherical mirror section is reflected to a frusto-conical mirror section for subsequent rereflection to a row of optical fibers. Each optical fiber transmits a portion of the received light to a detector. The optical system exploits the narrow cone of acceptance associated with optical fibers to substantially eliminate vignetting effects inherent in wide-angle systems. Further, the optical system exploits the narrow cone of acceptance of the optical fibers to substantially limit spherical aberration. The optical system is ideally suited for any application wherein a 180-degree strip image need be detected, and is particularly well adapted for use in hostile environments such as in planetary exploration.

  1. Wide Field X-Ray Telescope Mission Concept Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. C.; Thomas, H. D.; Fabisinski, L. L.; Baysinger, M.; Hornsby, L. S.; Maples, C. D.; Purlee, T. E.; Capizzo, P. D.; Percy, T. K.

    2014-01-01

    The Wide Field X-Ray Telescope (WFXT) is an astrophysics mission concept for detecting and studying extra-galactic x-ray sources, including active galactic nuclei and clusters of galaxies, in an effort to further understand cosmic evolution and structure. This Technical Memorandum details the results of a mission concept study completed by the Advanced Concepts Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in 2012. The design team analyzed the mission and instrument requirements, and designed a spacecraft that enables the WFXT mission while using high heritage components. Design work included selecting components and sizing subsystems for power, avionics, guidance, navigation and control, propulsion, structures, command and data handling, communications, and thermal control.

  2. Optical design study of the Wide Field Survey Telescope (WFST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Zheng; Liang, Ming; Yao, Dazhi; Zheng, Xianzhong; Cheng, Jingquan; Wang, Hairen; Liu, Wei; Qian, Yuan; Zhao, Haibin; Yang, Ji

    2016-10-01

    WFST is a proposed 2.5m wide field survey telescope intended for dedicated wide field sciences. The telescope is to operate at six wavelength bands (u, g, r, i, z, and w), spanning from 320 to 1028 nm. Designed with a field of view diameter of 3 degree and an effective aperture diameter of 2.29 m, the WFST acquires a total optical throughput over 29.3 m2deg2. With such a large throughput, WFST will survey up to 6000deg2 of the northern sky in multiple colors each night, reaching 23th magnitude for high-precision photometry and astrometry. The optical design is based on an advanced primary-focus system made up of a 2.5 m f/2.48 concave primary mirror and a primary-focus assembly (PFA) consisting of five corrector lenses, atmospheric dispersion corrector (ADC), filters, and the focal-plane instrument. For zenith angles from 0 to 60 degrees, 80% of the polychromatic diffracted energy falls within a 0.35 arcsec diameter. The optical design also highlights an enhanced transmission in the UV bands. The total optical transmission reaches 23.5% at 320 nm, allowing unique science goals in the U band. Other features include low distortion and ease of baffling against stray lights, etc. The focal-plane instrument is a 0.9 gigapixel mosaic CCD camera comprising 9 pieces of 10K×10K CCD chips. An active optics system (AOS) is used to maintain runtime image quality. Various design aspects of the WFST including the optical design, active optics, mirror supports, and the focal-plane instrument are discussed in detail.

  3. Wide-Field Detected Fourier Transform CARS Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Alex Soares; Schnedermann, Christoph; Kukura, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    We present a wide-field imaging implementation of Fourier transform coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (wide-field detected FT-CARS) microscopy capable of acquiring high-contrast label-free but chemically specific images over the full vibrational ‘fingerprint’ region, suitable for a large field of view. Rapid resonant mechanical scanning of the illumination beam coupled with highly sensitive, camera-based detection of the CARS signal allows for fast and direct hyperspectral wide-field image acquisition, while minimizing sample damage. Intrinsic to FT-CARS microscopy, the ability to control the range of time-delays between pump and probe pulses allows for fine tuning of spectral resolution, bandwidth and imaging speed while maintaining full duty cycle. We outline the basic principles of wide-field detected FT-CARS microscopy and demonstrate how it can be used as a sensitive optical probe for chemically specific Raman imaging. PMID:27881844

  4. Wide-Field Detected Fourier Transform CARS Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Alex Soares; Schnedermann, Christoph; Kukura, Philipp

    2016-11-01

    We present a wide-field imaging implementation of Fourier transform coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (wide-field detected FT-CARS) microscopy capable of acquiring high-contrast label-free but chemically specific images over the full vibrational ‘fingerprint’ region, suitable for a large field of view. Rapid resonant mechanical scanning of the illumination beam coupled with highly sensitive, camera-based detection of the CARS signal allows for fast and direct hyperspectral wide-field image acquisition, while minimizing sample damage. Intrinsic to FT-CARS microscopy, the ability to control the range of time-delays between pump and probe pulses allows for fine tuning of spectral resolution, bandwidth and imaging speed while maintaining full duty cycle. We outline the basic principles of wide-field detected FT-CARS microscopy and demonstrate how it can be used as a sensitive optical probe for chemically specific Raman imaging.

  5. CCD photometry using a wide-field Newtonian telescope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menako, C. R.; Henson, G. D.; Castelaz, M. A.; Powell, H. D.

    1996-01-01

    The paper demonstrates the utility of a CCD electronic-imaging camera at the focus of a wide-field Newtonian telescope as an efficient system for astronomical photometry. The CCD camera coupled to the wide-field telescope images one square degree of the sky, allowing for simultaneous light flux measurement of multiple stars without instrument repositioning. Photometric data acquired from the variable star W UMa using this system is compared to published values.

  6. Optical Design of WFIRST-AFTA Wide-Field Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasquale, Bert; Content, Dave; Kruk, Jeffrey; Vaughn, David; Gong, Qian; Howard, Joseph; Jurling, Alden; Mentzell, Eric; Armani, Nerses; Kuan, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The WFIRSTAFTA Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope TMA optical design provides 0.28-sq FOV at 0.11 pixel scale, operating between 0.6 2.4m, including a spectrograph mode (1.3-1.95m.) An IFU provides a discrete 3x3.15 field at 0.15 sampling.

  7. Ultra-Wide-Field Fluorescein Angiography in Microscopic Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Philander, Shannon A.; Ter-Zakarian, Anna; Rao, Narsing A.; Rodger, Damien C.

    2016-01-01

    A 25-year-old Hispanic female presented with 5 months of dry eyes and 2 months of bilateral photophobia and decreased vision. On examination, she had bilateral anterior uveitis and mild disc edema of the left eye. A complete infectious and inflammatory work-up was positive for elevated antinuclear antibodies and p-ANCA, leading to a diagnosis of microscopic polyangiitis. One year after initial treatment and steroid taper, an ultra-wide-field fluorescein angiography revealed peripheral vasculitis, outside of the standard traditional field of view, leading to an increase in immunomodulatory therapy and illustrating the utility of wide-field angiography for managing patients with uveitis. PMID:27872779

  8. Depth-resolved incoherent and coherent wide-field high-content imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Peter T.

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in depth-resolved wide-field imaging technique has enabled many high throughput applications in biology and medicine. Depth resolved imaging of incoherent signals can be readily accomplished with structured light illumination or nonlinear temporal focusing. The integration of these high throughput systems with novel spectroscopic resolving elements further enable high-content information extraction. We will introduce a novel near common-path interferometer and demonstrate its uses in toxicology and cancer biology applications. The extension of incoherent depth-resolved wide-field imaging to coherent modality is non-trivial. Here, we will cover recent advances in wide-field 3D resolved mapping of refractive index, absorbance, and vibronic components in biological specimens.

  9. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Interim Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J.; Schechter, P.; Baltay, C.; Bean, R.; Bennett, D.; Brown, R.; Conselice, C.; Donahue, M.; Gaudi, S.; Lauer, T.; Perlmutter, S.; Rauscher, B.; Rhodes, J.; Roellig, T.; Stern, D.; Sumi, T.; Gerhels, N.; Sambruna, R.; Barry, R. K.; Content, D.; Grady, K; Jackson, C.; Kruk, J.; Melton, M.; Rioux, N.

    2011-01-01

    measurements. The Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), Herschel, Spitzer, and Wide-field Infrared Sur-vey Explorer (WISE) are all space missions that have produced stunning new scientific advances by going to space to observe in the infrared. This interim report describes progress as of June 2011 on developing a requirements flowdown and an evaluation of scientific performance. An Interim Design Reference Mission (IDRM) configuration is presented that is based on the specifications of NWNH with some refinements to optimize the design in accordance with the new scientific requirements. Analysis of this WFIRST IDRM concept is in progress to ensure the capability of the observatory is compatible with the science requirements. The SDT and Project will continue to refine the mission concept over the coming year as design, analysis and simulation work are completed, resulting in the SDT s WFIRST Design Reference Mission (DRM) by the end of 2012.

  10. Experience with wavefront sensor and deformable mirror interfaces for wide-field adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, A. G.; Atkinson, D.; Bharmal, N. A.; Bitenc, U.; Brangier, M.; Buey, T.; Butterley, T.; Cano, D.; Chemla, F.; Clark, P.; Cohen, M.; Conan, J.-M.; de Cos, F. J.; Dickson, C.; Dipper, N. A.; Dunlop, C. N.; Feautrier, P.; Fusco, T.; Gach, J. L.; Gendron, E.; Geng, D.; Goodsell, S. J.; Gratadour, D.; Greenaway, A. H.; Guesalaga, A.; Guzman, C. D.; Henry, D.; Holck, D.; Hubert, Z.; Huet, J. M.; Kellerer, A.; Kulcsar, C.; Laporte, P.; Le Roux, B.; Looker, N.; Longmore, A. J.; Marteaud, M.; Martin, O.; Meimon, S.; Morel, C.; Morris, T. J.; Myers, R. M.; Osborn, J.; Perret, D.; Petit, C.; Raynaud, H.; Reeves, A. P.; Rousset, G.; Sanchez Lasheras, F.; Sanchez Rodriguez, M.; Santos, J. D.; Sevin, A.; Sivo, G.; Stadler, E.; Stobie, B.; Talbot, G.; Todd, S.; Vidal, F.; Younger, E. J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in adaptive optics (AO) have led to the implementation of wide field-of-view AO systems. A number of wide-field AO systems are also planned for the forthcoming Extremely Large Telescopes. Such systems have multiple wavefront sensors of different types, and usually multiple deformable mirrors (DMs). Here, we report on our experience integrating cameras and DMs with the real-time control systems of two wide-field AO systems. These are CANARY, which has been operating on-sky since 2010, and DRAGON, which is a laboratory AO real-time demonstrator instrument. We detail the issues and difficulties that arose, along with the solutions we developed. We also provide recommendations for consideration when developing future wide-field AO systems.

  11. The Astronomical Potential of Wide-field Imaging from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, S.

    2001-12-01

    Wide-field imaging is best done from space. Unrestricted by seeing and the limitations of an isoplanatic patch, it should be possible to construct space telescopes delivering very wide fields of diffraction-limited images with enormous information content per image. Among the science programs that will benefit are complete sky surveys to look for rare objects, staring observations to look for microlensing events, monitoring of star clusters to look for eclipses by extra-solar planets, regular surveys of large regions to search for time-variable phenomena, especially supernovae, and repeated observations of the ecliptic to identify ``killer asteroids" and other interlopers. This talk will discuss some of the science that could be enabled by wide-field imaging telescopes in space such as the SNAP satellite.

  12. IAU Working Group on Wide-Field Imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGillivray, H. T.

    1991-01-01

    Contents: 1. Introduction - The IAU Working Group on Wide-Field Imaging (R. M. West). 2. Reports from the Sub-Sections of the Working Group - a. Sky surveys and patrols (R. M. West). b. Photographic techniques (D. F. Malin). c. Digitization techniques (H. T. MacGillivray). d. Archival and retrieval of wide-field data (B. Lasker). 3. Meeting of the Organising Committee (R. M. West). 4. Wide-field plate archives (M. Tsvetkov). 5. Reproduction of the Palomar Observatory Sky Surveys (R. J. Brucato). 6. Status of the St ScI scan-distribution program (B. Lasker). 7. Pixel addition - pushing Schmidt plates to B = 25 (M. R. S. Hawkins). 8. Photometry from Estar film (S. Phillipps, Q. Parker). 9. ASCHOT - Astrophysical Schmidt Orbital Telescope (H. Lorenz). 10. The Hitchhiker parallel CCD camera (J. Davies, M. Disney, S. Driver, I. Morgan, S. Phillipps).

  13. Foregrounds in Wide-field Redshifted 21 cm Power Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Bowman, Judd D.; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Bernardi, G.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Carroll, P.; Corey, B. E.; de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Dillon, Joshua S.; Emrich, D.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kim, Han-Seek; Kittiwisit, P.; Kratzenberg, E.; Lenc, E.; Line, J.; Loeb, A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Neben, A. R.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A. R.; Ord, S. M.; Paul, Sourabh; Pindor, B.; Pober, J. C.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Sethi, Shiv K.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Sullivan, I. S.; Tegmark, M.; Tingay, S. J.; Trott, C. M.; Waterson, M.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2015-05-01

    Detection of 21 cm emission of H i from the epoch of reionization, at redshifts z\\gt 6, is limited primarily by foreground emission. We investigate the signatures of wide-field measurements and an all-sky foreground model using the delay spectrum technique that maps the measurements to foreground object locations through signal delays between antenna pairs. We demonstrate interferometric measurements are inherently sensitive to all scales, including the largest angular scales, owing to the nature of wide-field measurements. These wide-field effects are generic to all observations but antenna shapes impact their amplitudes substantially. A dish-shaped antenna yields the most desirable features from a foreground contamination viewpoint, relative to a dipole or a phased array. Comparing data from recent Murchison Widefield Array observations, we demonstrate that the foreground signatures that have the largest impact on the H i signal arise from power received far away from the primary field of view. We identify diffuse emission near the horizon as a significant contributing factor, even on wide antenna spacings that usually represent structures on small scales. For signals entering through the primary field of view, compact emission dominates the foreground contamination. These two mechanisms imprint a characteristic pitchfork signature on the “foreground wedge” in Fourier delay space. Based on these results, we propose that selective down-weighting of data based on antenna spacing and time can mitigate foreground contamination substantially by a factor of ∼100 with negligible loss of sensitivity.

  14. Wide-field lensfree imaging of tissue slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, Sophie Nhu An; Delon, Antoine; Blandin, Pierre; Bordy, Thomas; Cioni, Olivier; Hervé, Lionel; Fromentin, Catherine; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Allier, Cédric

    2015-07-01

    We developed a new imaging tool that can help pathologists in recording wide-field images of tissue slides. We present a simple cost-effective lens-free imaging method to record 2-4μm resolution wide-field (10 mm2 - 6 cm2) images of stained and unstained tissue slides. To our knowledge, our method is the first technique that enables fast (less than 5 minutes) wide-field lens-free imaging of such dense samples. Multiple holograms are recorded with different wavelength illumination, and a multispectral algorithm is used to retrieve both amplitude and phase. Our method can be used to retrieve images of stained tissue slides. For such absorbing object, the useful information is included in the modulus of the reconstructed complex field. Our method can also be applied to retrieve images of unstained tissue slides, where the useful information is in the retrieved phase. This technique is much cheaper and compact than a conventional microscope and could be made portable. Moreover, it enables wide field unstained tissue slides imaging, which could quickly provide useful information, for example on frozen section biopsies, when a rapid diagnosis is needed during surgery.

  15. Wide-Field Raman Imaging of Dental Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shan; Li, Bolan; Akkus, Anna; Akkus, Ozan; Lang, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Detection of dental caries at the onset remains as a great challenge in dentistry. Raman spectroscopy could be successfully applied towards detecting caries since it is sensitive to the amount of the Raman active mineral crystals, the most abundant component of enamel. Effective diagnosis requires full examination of a tooth surface via a Raman mapping. Point-scan Raman mapping is not clinically relevant (feasible) due to lengthy data acquisition time. In this work, a wide-field Raman imaging system was assembled based on a high-sensitivity 2D CCD camera for imaging the mineralization status of teeth with lesions. Wide-field images indicated some lesions to be hypomineralized and others to be hypermineralized. The observations of wide-field Raman imaging were in agreement with point-scan Raman mapping. Therefore, sound enamel and lesions can be discriminated by Raman imaging of the mineral content. In conclusion, wide-field Raman imaging is a potentially useful tool for visualization of dental lesions in the clinic. PMID:24781363

  16. Sensitivity analysis of a wide-field telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Juhee; Lee, Sangon; Moon, Il Kweon; Yang, Ho-Soon; Lee, Jong Ung; Choi, Young-Jun; Park, Jang-Hyun; Jin, Ho

    2013-07-01

    We are developing three ground-based wide-field telescopes. A wide-field Cassegrain telescope consists of two hyperbolic mirrors, aberration correctors and a field flattener for a 2-degree field of view. The diameters of the primary mirror and the secondary mirror are 500 mm and 200 mm, respectively. Corrective optics combined with four lenses, a filter and a window are also considered. For the imaging detection device, we use a charge coupled device (CCD) which has a 4096 × 4096 array with a 9-µm2 pixel size. One of the requirements is that the image motion limit of the opto-mechanical structure be less than 1 pixel size of the CCD on the image plane. To meet this requirement, we carried out an optical design evaluation and a misalignment analysis. Line-of-sight sensitivity equations are obtained from the rigid-body rotation in three directions and the rigid-body translation in three directions. These equations express the image motions at the image plane in terms of the independent motions of the optical components. We conducted a response simulation to evaluate the finite element method models under static load conditions, and the result is represented by the static response function. We show that the wide-field telescope system is stiff and stable enough to be supported and operated during its operating time.

  17. Wide-field in vivo oral OCT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anthony M. D.; Cahill, Lucas; Liu, Kelly; MacAulay, Calum; Poh, Catherine; Lane, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We have built a polarization-sensitive swept source Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) instrument capable of wide-field in vivo imaging in the oral cavity. This instrument uses a hand-held side-looking fiber-optic rotary pullback catheter that can cover two dimensional tissue imaging fields approximately 2.5 mm wide by up to 90 mm length in a single image acquisition. The catheter spins at 100 Hz with pullback speeds up to 15 mm/s allowing imaging of areas up to 225 mm2 field-of-view in seconds. A catheter sheath and two optional catheter sheath holders have been designed to allow imaging at all locations within the oral cavity. Image quality of 2-dimensional image slices through the data can be greatly enhanced by averaging over the orthogonal dimension to reduce speckle. Initial in vivo imaging results reveal a wide-field view of features such as epithelial thickness and continuity of the basement membrane that may be useful in clinic for chair-side management of oral lesions. PMID:26203389

  18. Wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging of cancer

    PubMed Central

    McGinty, James; Galletly, Neil P.; Dunsby, Chris; Munro, Ian; Elson, Daniel S.; Requejo-Isidro, Jose; Cohen, Patrizia; Ahmad, Raida; Forsyth, Amanda; Thillainayagam, Andrew V.; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Stamp, Gordon W

    2010-01-01

    Optical imaging of tissue autofluorescence has the potential to provide rapid label-free screening and detection of surface tumors for clinical applications, including when combined with endoscopy. Quantitative imaging of intensity-based contrast is notoriously difficult and spectrally resolved imaging does not always provide sufficient contrast. We demonstrate that fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) applied to intrinsic tissue autofluorescence can directly contrast a range of surface tissue tumors, including in gastrointestinal tissues, using compact, clinically deployable instrumentation achieving wide-field fluorescence lifetime images of unprecedented clarity. Statistically significant contrast is observed between cancerous and healthy colon tissue for FLIM with excitation at 355 nm. To illustrate the clinical potential, wide-field fluorescence lifetime images of unstained ex vivo tissue have been acquired at near video rate, which is an important step towards real-time FLIM for diagnostic and interoperative imaging, including for screening and image-guided biopsy applications. PMID:21258496

  19. Wide-field turbulence imaging with beam emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, G. R.; Fonck, R. J.; Uzun-Kaymak, I. U.; Yan, Z.; Shafer, M. W.

    2010-10-15

    Imaging of the size, shape, time-averaged, and time-resolved dynamics of long-wavelength density turbulence structures is accomplished with an expanded, high-sensitivity, wide-field beam emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic on DIII-D. A 64-channel BES system is configured with an 8x8 grid of discrete channels that image an approximately 7x9 cm region at the outboard midplane. The grid covers multiple correlation lengths and each channel shape matches the measured radial-poloidal correlation length asymmetry of turbulent eddies. The wide field 8x8 imaging capability allows for sampling of essentially the full two-dimensional spatial correlation function for typical plasma conditions. The sampled area can be radially scanned over 0.4

  20. In-Flight Performance of Wide Field Camera 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy

    2010-01-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a powerful new UVNisible/IR imager, was installed into HST during Servicing Mission 4. After a successful commissioning in the Servicing Mission Orbital Verification program, WFC3 has been engaged in an exciting program of scientific observations. I review here the in-flight scientific performance of the instrument, addressing such topics as image quality, sensitivity, detector performance, and stability.

  1. Quantitative phase imaging by wide field lensless digital holographic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adinda-Ougba, A.; Koukourakis, N.; Essaidi, A.; Ger­hardt, N. C.; Hofmann, M. R.

    2015-05-01

    Wide field, lensless microscopes have been developed for telemedicine and for resource limited setting [1]. They are based on in-line digital holography which is capable to provide amplitude and phase information resulting from numerical reconstruction. The phase information enables achieving axial resolution in the nanometer range. Hence, such microscopes provide a powerful tool to determine three-dimensional topologies of microstructures. In this contribution, a compact, low-cost, wide field, lensless microscope is presented, which is capable of providing topological profiles of microstructures in transparent material. Our setup consist only of two main components: a CMOSsensor chip and a laser diode without any need of a pinhole. We use this very simple setup to record holograms of microobjects. A wide field of view of ~24 mm², and a lateral resolution of ~2 μm are achieved. Moreover, amplitude and phase information are obtained from the numerical reconstruction of the holograms using a phase retrieval algorithm together with the angular spectrum propagation method. Topographic information of highly transparent micro-objects is obtained from the phase data. We evaluate our system by recording holograms of lines with different depths written by a focused laser beam. A reliable characterization of laser written microstructures is crucial for their functionality. Our results show that this system is valuable for determination of topological profiles of microstructures in transparent material.

  2. Development of the Wide Field Grism Spectrograph 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Mariko; Nagashima, Chie; Sugitani, Koji; Watanabe, Makoto; Sato, Shuji; Nagata, Tetsuya; Tamura, Motohide; Ebizuka, Noboru; Pickles, Andrew J.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Itoh, Yoichi; Nakano, Makoto; Ogura, Katsuo

    2004-09-01

    We have developed the Wide Field Grism Spectrograph 2 (WFGS2) for the f/10 focus of the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope (UH88). This instrument provides slit-less, wide-field spectroscopy as well as imaging and long-slit spectroscopy. Two CCD cameras of UH88, Tektronix 2k x 2k and OPTIC 4k x 4k, can be used as a detector. The spectral coverage is 380 - 970 nm, and the field of view is 11'.5 x 11'.5 with a pixel scale of 0".34 (Tektronix) or 0".21 pixel-1 (OPTIC) in the imaging mode. WFGS2 has two replica grisms (R = 620 at 650 nm and R = 730 at 400 nm) and a Volume-Phase Holographic (VPH) grism (R = 2500 at 664 nm). The VPH grism enables intermediate-dispersion spectroscopy with this transmission system. Two long-slits with widths of 0".6 and 0".9 can be used. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (g', r', i', z') and narrow-band (wide Hα, Hα, and [SII]+Li) filters are equipped. The first light observation was done in November 2003. We present the details of WFGS2, including the results of the first light observation.

  3. Wide Field Camera 3 Accommodations for HST Robotics Servicing Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginyard, Amani

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation discusses the objectives of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Robotics Servicing and Deorbit Mission (HRSDM), reviews the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), and also reviews the contamination accomodations for the WFC3. The objectives of the HRSDM are (1) to provide a disposal capability at the end of HST's useful life, (2) to upgrade the hardware by installing two new scientific instruments: replace the Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement (COSTAR) with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS), and to replace the Wide Field/Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC2) with Wide Field Camera-3, and (3) Extend the Scientific life of HST for a minimum of 5 years after servicing. Included are slides showing the Hubble Robotic Vehicle (HRV) and slides describing what the HRV contains. There are also slides describing the WFC3. One of the mechanisms of the WFC3 is to serve partially as replacement gyroscopes for HST. There are also slides that discuss the contamination requirements for the Rate Sensor Units (RSUs), that are part of the Rate Gyroscope Assembly on the WFC3.

  4. The development of WIFIS: a wide integral field infrared spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivanandam, Suresh; Chou, Richard C. Y.; Moon, Dae-Sik; Ma, Ke; Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Chun, Moo-Young; Kim, Sang Chul; Raines, Steven N.; Eisner, Joshua

    2012-09-01

    We present the current results from the development of a wide integral field infrared spectrograph (WIFIS). WIFIS offers an unprecedented combination of etendue and spectral resolving power for seeing-limited, integral field observations in the 0.9 - 1.8 μm range and is most sensitive in the 0.9 - 1.35 μ,m range. Its optical design consists of front-end re-imaging optics, an all-reflective image slicer-type, integral field unit (IFU) called FISICA, and a long-slit grating spectrograph back-end that is coupled with a HAWAII 2RG focal plane array. The full wavelength range is achieved by selecting between two different gratings. By virtue of its re-imaging optics, the spectrograph is quite versatile and can be used at multiple telescopes. The size of its field-of-view is unrivalled by other similar spectrographs, offering a 4.511x 1211 integral field at a 10-meter class telescope (or 2011 x 5011 at a 2.3-meter telescope). The use of WIFIS will be crucial in astronomical problems which require wide-field, two-dimensional spectroscopy such as the study of merging galaxies at moderate redshift and nearby star/planet-forming regions and supernova remnants. We discuss the final optical design of WIFIS, and its predicted on-sky performance on two reference telescope platforms: the 2.3-m Steward Bok telescope and the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias. We also present the results from our laboratory characterization of FISICA. IFU properties such as magnification, field-mapping, and slit width along the entire slit length were measured by our tests. The construction and testing of WIFIS is expected to be completed by early 2013. We plan to commission the instrument at the 2.3-m Steward Bok telescope at Kitt Peak, USA in Spring 2013.

  5. The Wide-Field Imager for Solar Probe Plus (WISPR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell A.; Plunkett, Simon P.; Korendyke, Clarence M.; Thernisien, Arnaud F. R.; Wang, Dennis; Rich, Nathan; Carter, Michael T.; Chua, Damien H.; Socker, Dennis G.; Linton, Mark G.; Morrill, Jeff S.; Lynch, Sean; Thurn, Adam; Van Duyne, Peter; Hagood, Robert; Clifford, Greg; Grey, Phares J.; Velli, Marco; Liewer, Paulett C.; Hall, Jeffrey R.; DeJong, Eric M.; Mikic, Zoran; Rochus, Pierre; Mazy, Emanuel; Bothmer, Volker; Rodmann, Jens

    2016-12-01

    The Wide-field Imager for Solar PRobe Plus (WISPR) is the sole imager aboard the Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission scheduled for launch in 2018. SPP will be a unique mission designed to orbit as close as 7 million km (9.86 solar radii) from Sun center. WISPR employs a 95∘ radial by 58∘ transverse field of view to image the fine-scale structure of the solar corona, derive the 3D structure of the large-scale corona, and determine whether a dust-free zone exists near the Sun. WISPR is the smallest heliospheric imager to date yet it comprises two nested wide-field telescopes with large-format (2 K × 2 K) APS CMOS detectors to optimize the performance for their respective fields of view and to minimize the risk of dust damage, which may be considerable close to the Sun. The WISPR electronics are very flexible allowing the collection of individual images at cadences up to 1 second at perihelion or the summing of multiple images to increase the signal-to-noise when the spacecraft is further from the Sun. The dependency of the Thomson scattering emission of the corona on the imaging geometry dictates that WISPR will be very sensitive to the emission from plasma close to the spacecraft in contrast to the situation for imaging from Earth orbit. WISPR will be the first `local' imager providing a crucial link between the large-scale corona and the in-situ measurements.

  6. Wide-field surveys from the SNAP mission

    SciTech Connect

    agkim@lbl.gov

    2002-07-23

    The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-borne observatory that will survey the sky with a wide-field optical/NIR imager. The images produced by SNAP will have an unprecedented combination of depth, solid-angle, angular resolution, and temporal sampling. Two 7.5 square-degree fields will be observed every four days over 16 months to a magnitude depth of AB = 27.7 in each of nine filters. Co-adding images over all epochs will give an AB = 30.3 per filter. A 300 square-degree field will be surveyed with no repeat visits to AB = 28 per filter. The nine filters span 3500-17000 {angstrom}. Although the survey strategy is tailored for supernova and weak gravitational lensing observations, the resulting data supports a broad range of auxiliary science programs.

  7. Deployment of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope wide field upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Gary J.; Drory, Niv; Good, John; Lee, Hanshin; Vattiat, Brian; Kriel, Herman; Bryant, Randy; Elliot, Linda; Landriau, Martin; Leck, Ron; Perry, David; Ramsey, Jason; Savage, Richard; Allen, Richard D.; Damm, George; DePoy, D. L.; Fowler, Jim; Gebhardt, Karl; Haeuser, Marco; MacQueen, Phillip; Marshall, J. L.; Martin, Jerry; Prochaska, Travis; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Rheault, Jean-Philippe; Shetrone, Matthew; Schroeder Mrozinski, Emily; Tuttle, Sarah E.; Cornell, Mark E.; Booth, John; Moreira, Walter

    2014-07-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) is an innovative large telescope located in West Texas at the McDonald Observatory. The HET operates with a fixed segmented primary and has a tracker, which moves the four-mirror optical corrector and prime focus instrument package to track the sidereal and non-sidereal motions of objects. A major upgrade of the HET is in progress that will substantially increase the pupil size to 10 meters (from 9.2 m) and the field of view to 22 arcminutes (from 4 arcminutes) by replacing the corrector, tracker, and prime focus instrument package. In addition to supporting existing instruments, and a new low resolution spectrograph, this wide field upgrade will feed a revolutionary new integral field spectrograph called VIRUS, in support of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX§). The upgrade is being installed and this paper discusses the current status.

  8. The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed: Progress and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, S. A.; Leisawitz, D.; Leviton, D.; Martino, A.; Maynard, W.; Mundy, L. G.; Zhang, X.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the technique of wide field mosaic imaging for optical/IR interferometers and present early experimental results from a laboratory instrument designed to validate, experiment with, and refine the technique. A conventional single-detector stellar interferometer operating with narrow bandwidth at center wavelength lambda is limited in its field of view to the primary beam of the individual telescope apertures, or approx. lambda/D(sub tel) radians, where is the telescope diameter. Such a field is too small for many applications; often one wishes to image extended sources. We are developing and testing a technique analogous to the mosaic method employed in millimeter and radio astronomy, but applicable to optical/IR Michelson interferometers, in which beam combination is done in the pupil plane. An N(sub pix) x N(sub pix) detector array placed in the image plane of the interferometer is used to record simultaneously the fringe patterns from many contiguous telescope fields, effectively multiplying the field size by N(sub pix)/2, where the factor 2 allows for Nyquist sampling. This mosaic imaging technique will be especially valuable for far IR and submillimeter interferometric space observatories such as the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) and the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS). SPIRIT and SPECS will be designed to provide sensitive, high angular resolution observations of fields several arcminutes in diameter, and views of the universe complementary to those provided by HST, NGST, and ALMA.

  9. The Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopita, Michael; Hart, John; McGregor, Peter; Oates, Patrick; Bloxham, Gabe; Jones, Damien

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) under construction at the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics (RSAA) of the Australian National University (ANU) for the ANU 2.3 m telescope at the Siding Spring Observatory. WiFeS is a powerful integral field, double-beam, concentric, image-slicing spectrograph designed to deliver excellent throughput, wavelength stability, spectrophotometric performance and superb image quality along with wide spectral coverage throughout the 320 950 nm wavelength region. It provides a 25×38 arcsec field with 0.5 arcsec sampling along each of twenty five 38×1 arcsec slitlets. The output format is optimized to match the 4096×4096 pixel CCD detectors in each of two cameras individually optimized for the blue and the red ends of the spectrum, respectively. A process of “interleaved nod-and-shuffle” will be applied to permit quantum noise-limited sky subtraction. Using VPH gratings, spectral resolutions of 3000 and 7000 are provided. The full spectral range is covered in a single exposure at R=3000, and in two exposures in the R=7000 mode. The use of transmissive coated optics, VPH gratings and optimized mirror coatings ensures a throughput (including telescope atmosphere and detector) >30% over a wide spectral range. The concentric image-slicer design ensures an excellent and uniform image quality across the full field. To maximize scientific return, the whole instrument is configured for remote observing, pipeline data reduction, and the accumulation of calibration image libraries.

  10. Scalable wide-field optical coherence tomography-based angiography for in vivo imaging applications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingjiang; Wei, Wei; Song, Shaozhen; Qi, Xiaoli; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based angiography have demonstrated a variety of biomedical applications in the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of diseases with vascular involvement. While promising, its imaging field of view (FOV) is however still limited (typically less than 9 mm2), which somehow slows down its clinical acceptance. In this paper, we report a high-speed spectral-domain OCT operating at 1310 nm to enable wide FOV up to 750 mm2. Using optical microangiography (OMAG) algorithm, we are able to map vascular networks within living biological tissues. Thanks to 2,048 pixel-array line scan InGaAs camera operating at 147 kHz scan rate, the system delivers a ranging depth of ~7.5 mm and provides wide-field OCT-based angiography at a single data acquisition. We implement two imaging modes (i.e., wide-field mode and high-resolution mode) in the OCT system, which gives highly scalable FOV with flexible lateral resolution. We demonstrate scalable wide-field vascular imaging for multiple finger nail beds in human and whole brain in mice with skull left intact at a single 3D scan, promising new opportunities for wide-field OCT-based angiography for many clinical applications. PMID:27231630

  11. Science with a wide-field UV transient explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Sagiv, I.; Gal-Yam, A.; Ofek, E. O.; Waxman, E.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Topaz, J.; Aharonson, O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Phinney, E. S.; Nakar, E.; Maoz, D.; Beichman, C.; Murthy, J.; Worden, S. P.

    2014-04-01

    The time-variable electromagnetic sky has been well-explored at a wide range of wavelengths. In contrast, the ultra-violet (UV) variable sky is relatively poorly explored, even though it offers exciting scientific prospects. Here, we review the potential scientific impact of a wide-field UV survey on the study of explosive and other transient events, as well as known classes of variable objects, such as active galactic nuclei and variable stars. We quantify our predictions using a fiducial set of observational parameters which are similar to those envisaged for the proposed ULTRASAT mission. We show that such a mission would be able to revolutionize our knowledge about massive star explosions by measuring the early UV emission from hundreds of events, revealing key physical parameters of the exploding progenitor stars. Such a mission would also detect the UV emission from many tens of tidal-disruption events of stars by supermassive black holes at galactic nuclei and enable a measurement of the rate of such events. The overlap of such a wide-field UV mission with existing and planned gravitational-wave and high-energy neutrino telescopes makes it especially timely.

  12. Wide-field wide-band Interferometric Imaging: The WB A-Projection and Hybrid Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, S.; Rau, U.; Golap, K.

    2013-06-01

    Variations of the antenna primary beam (PB) pattern as a function of time, frequency, and polarization form one of the dominant direction-dependent effects at most radio frequency bands. These gains may also vary from antenna to antenna. The A-Projection algorithm, published earlier, accounts for the effects of the narrow-band antenna PB in full polarization. In this paper, we present the wide-band A-Projection algorithm (WB A-Projection) to include the effects of wide bandwidth in the A-term itself and show that the resulting algorithm simultaneously corrects for the time, frequency, and polarization dependence of the PB. We discuss the combination of the WB A-Projection and the multi-term multi-frequency synthesis (MT-MFS) algorithm for simultaneous mapping of the sky brightness distribution and the spectral index distribution across a wide field of view. We also discuss the use of the narrow-band A-Projection algorithm in hybrid imaging schemes that account for the frequency dependence of the PB in the image domain.

  13. WIDE-FIELD WIDE-BAND INTERFEROMETRIC IMAGING: THE WB A-PROJECTION AND HYBRID ALGORITHMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, S.; Rau, U.; Golap, K. E-mail: rurvashi@nrao.edu

    2013-06-20

    Variations of the antenna primary beam (PB) pattern as a function of time, frequency, and polarization form one of the dominant direction-dependent effects at most radio frequency bands. These gains may also vary from antenna to antenna. The A-Projection algorithm, published earlier, accounts for the effects of the narrow-band antenna PB in full polarization. In this paper, we present the wide-band A-Projection algorithm (WB A-Projection) to include the effects of wide bandwidth in the A-term itself and show that the resulting algorithm simultaneously corrects for the time, frequency, and polarization dependence of the PB. We discuss the combination of the WB A-Projection and the multi-term multi-frequency synthesis (MT-MFS) algorithm for simultaneous mapping of the sky brightness distribution and the spectral index distribution across a wide field of view. We also discuss the use of the narrow-band A-Projection algorithm in hybrid imaging schemes that account for the frequency dependence of the PB in the image domain.

  14. Facility calibration unit of Hobby Eberly Telescope wide field upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hanshin; Hill, Gary J.; Vattiat, Brian L.; Smith, Michael P.; Haeuser, Marco

    2012-09-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) Wide-Field Upgrade (WFU) will be equipped with new Facility Calibration Unit (FCU). The FCU is in support of VIRUS and the facility instruments and consists of the head and source box. The FCU head, connected to the source box through two liquid light guides, is attached to the bottom of the WFU Wide-Field Corrector (WFC) and can be deployed into the beam to inject calibration light through the WFC whenever calibration is needed. A set of Fresnel lenses is used in the FCU head to mimic the caustics of M1 as much as possible to re-produce the telescope’s focal plane illumination pattern. Various imaging/non-imaging optical components (e.g. Compound Parabolic Concentrators, cone reflectors, condenser lenses) are used for efficient coupling between different types of calibration lamps and light guides, covering wavelengths from 350nm to 1800nm. In addition, we developed an efficient and tunable Light-Emitting Diode (LED) based source and coupler for UV and Visible spectral flat field calibration. This paper presents the designs, prototypes, and as-built components / subsystems of the FCU.

  15. Wide-field aberration corrector for spherical gossamer primary mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, David A.

    2000-10-01

    If gossamer primary mirrors were to be constructed in a spherical form, it would be possible to arrange a simple null- test in situ. However, spherical mirrors would require correction of the large amount of spherical aberration created in pupils that generally will be greater than 2 m diameter. The design requirement is for diffraction-limited performance over a useful angular field. The otherwise excellent wide- field design solutions of the classical Schmidt and Maksutov are inapplicable in gossamer structures because of the mass and size penalty of large refractive components. However, it is possible for this mode of correction to be achieved near the prime focus by means of pupil transfer optics that minify the large entrance pupil down to more acceptable dimensions. A problem with these solutions is constraint of field coverage due to pupil aberrations created by the large spherical aberration of the primary mirror. This leads the designer towards slower primaries and the penalty of larger, heavier structures. A solution is presented here for spherical primaries with speeds up to f/4. This is based on the 'KiwiStar' principle presented here in 1997, in which a large spherical catoptric is combined by pupil-transfer with a smaller spherical catadioptric to give well corrected wide field images of high speed. This system is well suited to correction at the prime focus of large spherical mirrors, and has only one relatively small weak aspheric surface to provide zonal correction, all other surfaces being spherical. An example is presented of a 4 m diameter, f/2.5 system that is diffraction-limited over the whole of a 0.25 degree field (43 mm diameter), for a bandpass of 486 - 850 nm.

  16. Non-mydriatic, wide field, fundus video camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeher, Bernhard; Voigtmann, Peter; Michelson, Georg; Schmauss, Bernhard

    2014-02-01

    We describe a method we call "stripe field imaging" that is capable of capturing wide field color fundus videos and images of the human eye at pupil sizes of 2mm. This means that it can be used with a non-dilated pupil even with bright ambient light. We realized a mobile demonstrator to prove the method and we could acquire color fundus videos of subjects successfully. We designed the demonstrator as a low-cost device consisting of mass market components to show that there is no major additional technical outlay to realize the improvements we propose. The technical core idea of our method is breaking the rotational symmetry in the optical design that is given in many conventional fundus cameras. By this measure we could extend the possible field of view (FOV) at a pupil size of 2mm from a circular field with 20° in diameter to a square field with 68° by 18° in size. We acquired a fundus video while the subject was slightly touching and releasing the lid. The resulting video showed changes at vessels in the region of the papilla and a change of the paleness of the papilla.

  17. PSF modelling for very wide-field CCD astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, L. W.; Batsch, T.; Czyrkowski, H.; Cwiok, M.; Dabrowski, R.; Kasprowicz, G.; Majcher, A.; Majczyna, A.; Malek, K.; Mankiewicz, L.; Nawrocki, K.; Opiela, R.; Siudek, M.; Sokolowski, M.; Wawrzaszek, R.; Wrochna, G.; Zaremba, M.; Żarnecki, A. F.

    2013-03-01

    Context. One of the possible approaches to detecting optical counterparts of GRBs requires monitoring large parts of the sky. This idea has gained some instrumental support in recent years, such as with the "Pi of the Sky" project. The broad sky coverage of the "Pi of the Sky" apparatus results from using cameras with wide-angle lenses (20° × 20° field of view). Optics of this kind introduce significant deformations of the point spread function (PSF), increasing with the distance from the frame centre. A deformed PSF results in additional uncertainties in data analysis. Aims: Our aim was to create a model describing highly deformed PSF in optical astronomy, allowing uncertainties caused by image deformations to be reduced. Methods: Detailed laboratory measurements of PSF, pixel sensitivity, and pixel response functions were performed. These data were used to create an effective high quality polynomial model of the PSF. Finally, tuning the model and tests in applications to the real sky data were performed. Results: We have developed a PSF model that accurately describes even very deformed stars in our wide-field experiment. The model is suitable for use in any other experiment with similar image deformation, with a simple tuning of its parameters. Applying this model to astrometric procedures results in a significant improvement over standard methods, while basic photometry precision performed with the model is comparable to the results of an optimised aperture algorithm. Additionally, the model was used to search for a weak signal - namely a possible gamma ray burst optical precursor - showing very promising results. Conclusions: Precise modelling of the PSF function significantly improves the astrometric precision and enhances the discovery potential of a wide-field system with lens optics.

  18. Science Archives at the Wide Field Astronomy Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, R.; Read, M.; Sutorius, E.; Hambly, N.; Cross, N.; Collins, R.; Holliman, M.; Mann, B.

    The Wide Field Astronomy Unit (WFAU) at the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (ROE) has been producing archives of astronomy data for more than a decade. It houses a collection of over 80 billion individual detections spread across five major astronomical surveys dating back over 60 years. As well as these surveys, we also host copies of external surveys to allow the cross-referencing of sources in our surveys with those detected with other instruments. This article details the data held by WFAU and the services we provide to our users.

  19. A ROSAT Wide Field Camera search for XUV bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Alan; Page, Clive G.; Sembay, S.; Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1993-02-01

    We have searched the ROSAT Wide Field Camera all-sky survey for short time-scale (less than 50 s) XUV bursts down to a limiting count of 5 x 10 exp -3 count/sq arcmin, corresponding to an incident flux of about 3 x 10 exp -10 erg/sq cm. In a total observation period of 171 d covering the entire sky, we found no evidence for such events. The present results are used to place limits on the log N-log S relation for gamma-ray bursts and constraints on the spectral shape of the previously reported ultrasoft X-ray transients.

  20. Light concentrator of the wide field of view Cherenkov telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rui; Sheng, Xi Yi; Liao, Bo Lin

    2016-10-01

    The Wide Field of View Cherenkov Telescope (WFCT) is mainly constituted by optical reflector and focal-plane photomultiplier (PMT) array camera. In order to avoid loss of Cherenkov signal resulting from the dead area between circular PMT tubes and invalid fringe of each PMT, the light concentrator used as front window of PMT is considered to improve detective efficiency. Basing on the edge-ray principle and features of WFCT, several light concentrators are designed and simulated with ZEMAX. The result shows that the hollow hexahedral compound parabolic concentrator (hex-CPC) has good performance in collecting light. Moreover, the samples of the hollow hexahedral CPC have been manufactured and tested.

  1. High accuracy magnetic field sensors with wide operation temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'evskii, I. S.; Vinichenko, A. N.; Rubakin, D. I.; Bolshakova, I. A.; Kargin, N. I.

    2016-10-01

    n+InAs(Si) epitaxial thin films heavily doped by silicon and Hall effect magnetic field sensors based on this structures have been fabricated and studied. We have demonstrated the successful formation of highly doped InAs thin films (∼100 nm) with the different intermediate layer arrangement and appropriate electron mobility values. Hall sensors performance parameters have been measured in wide temperature range. Obtained sensitivity varied from 1 to 40 Ω/T, while the best linearity and lower temperature coefficient have been found in the higher doped samples with lower electron mobility. We attribute this to the electron system degeneracy and decreased phonon contribution to electron mobility and resistance.

  2. A Parallel Imaging Approach to Wide-field MR Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Mary Preston; Wright, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM), suggested in the earliest papers on MRI, has always been limited by the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) resulting from the small voxel size. MRM has largely been enabled by the use of microcoils which provide the SNR improvement required to overcome this limitation. Concomitant with the small coils is a small field-of-view, which limits the use of MRM as a histological tool or for imaging large regions in general. This paper describes initial results in wide field-of-view MR microscopy using a large array of narrow, parallel coils, which provides an SNR enhancement as well as the ability to use parallel imaging techniques. Comparison images made between a volume coil and the proposed technique demonstrate reductions in imaging time of over 100 with no loss in SNR or resolution. PMID:22139858

  3. Development of stable monolithic wide-field Michelson interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Chen, Zhiping

    2011-07-01

    Bulk wide-field Michelson interferometers are very useful for high precision applications in remote sensing and astronomy. A stable monolithic Michelson interferometer is a key element in high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies. Thermal stress analysis shows that matching coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) is a critical requirement for ensuring interferometer stability. This requirement leads to a novel design using BK7 and LAK7 materials, such that the monolithic interferometer is free from thermal distortion. The processes of design, fabrication, and testing of interferometers are described in detail. In performance evaluations, the field angle is typically 23.8° and thermal sensitivity is typically -2.6×10-6/° C near 550nm, which corresponds to ˜800m/s/°C in the RV scale. Low-cost interferometer products have been commissioned in multiple RV instruments, and they are producing high stability performance over long term operations.

  4. Development of stable monolithic wide-field Michelson interferometers.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Chen, Zhiping

    2011-07-20

    Bulk wide-field Michelson interferometers are very useful for high precision applications in remote sensing and astronomy. A stable monolithic Michelson interferometer is a key element in high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies. Thermal stress analysis shows that matching coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) is a critical requirement for ensuring interferometer stability. This requirement leads to a novel design using BK7 and LAK7 materials, such that the monolithic interferometer is free from thermal distortion. The processes of design, fabrication, and testing of interferometers are described in detail. In performance evaluations, the field angle is typically 23.8° and thermal sensitivity is typically -2.6×10(-6)/°C near 550 nm, which corresponds to ∼800 m/s/°C in the RV scale. Low-cost interferometer products have been commissioned in multiple RV instruments, and they are producing high stability performance over long term operations.

  5. Wide field of view infrared imaging system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogala, Eric W.

    2004-08-01

    In the design of optical systems, simple straightforward requirements are often complicated by unusual and unique constraints. In this particular case a design mapping a 20° square field of view onto a CCD sensor is complicated by the requirement that the wide field of view must not vignette through a narrow-diameter, finite-length cylindrical aperture. Furthermore, the design must use off-the-shelf optics available from any major vendor. The imaging system is designed to operate in the near IR. The 20° square field of view must pass through a 20.32mm diameter, 40mm long cylindrical tube without vignetting. This constraint prohibits the use of a simple achromat whose back focal length would place the image within the cylindrical tube. Two design approaches are discussed, a Keplerian telescope with a field lens, and a reverse telephoto system. Matlab programs have been written that evaluate the first-order optical principles to arrive at a design solution space. Representative solutions are then evaluated in Zemax using the built-in lens catalog to select appropriate lenses. The results show the advantages and limitations of each particular design approach.

  6. Design of wide-field imaging shack Hartmann testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatz, Lauren H.; Scott, R. Phillip; Bronson, Ryan S.; Sanchez, Lucas R. W.; Hart, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Standard adaptive optics systems measure the aberrations in the wavefronts of a beacon guide star caused by atmospheric turbulence, which limits the corrected field of view to the isoplanatic patch, the solid angle over which the optical aberration is roughly constant. For imaging systems that require a corrected field of view larger than the isoplanatic angle, a three-dimensional estimate of the aberration is required. We are developing a wide-field imaging Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (WFS) that will characterize turbulence over a large field of view tens of times the size of the isoplanatic angle. The technique will find application in horizontal and downward looking remote sensing scenarios where high resolution imaging through extended atmospheric turbulence is required. The laboratory prototype system consists of a scene generator, turbulence simulator, a Shack Hartman WFS arm, and an imaging arm. The system has a high intrinsic Strehl ratio, is telecentric, and diffraction limited. We present preliminary data and analysis from the system.

  7. A wide bandwidth electrostatic field sensor for lightning research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaepfel, K. P.

    1986-01-01

    Data obtained from UHF Radar observation of direct-lightning strikes to the NASA F-106B airplane have indicated that most of the 690 strikes acquired during direct-strike lightning tests were triggered by the aircraft. As an aid in understanding the triggered lightning process, a wide bandwidth electric field measuring system was designed for the F-106B by implementing a clamped-detection signal processing concept originated at the Air Force Cambridge Research Lab in 1953. The detection scheme combines the signals from complementary stator pairs clamped to zero volts at the exact moment when each stator pair is maximally shielded by the rotor, a process that restores the dc level lost by the charge amplifier. The new system was implemented with four shutter-type field mills located at strategic points on the airplane. The bandwidth of the new system was determined in the laboratory to be from dc to over 100 Hz, whereas past designs had upper limits of 10 Hz to 100 Hz. To obtain the undisturbed electric field vector and total aircraft charge, the airborne field mill system is calibrated by using techniques involving results from ground and flight calibrations of the F-106B, laboratory tests of a metallized model, and a finite-difference time-domain electromagnetic computer code.

  8. A wide bandwidth electrostatic field sensor for lightning research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaepfel, Klaus P.

    1989-01-01

    Data obtained from UHF radar observation of direct-lightning strikes to the NASA F-106B aircraft have indicated that most of the 690 strikes acquired during direct-strike lightning tests were triggered by the aircraft. As an aid in understanding the triggered lightning process, a wide bandwidth electric field measuring system was designed for the F-106B by implementing a clamped-detection signal processing concept originated at the Air Force Cambridge Research Lab in 1953. The detection scheme combines the signals from complementary stator pairs clamped to zero bolts at the exact moment when each stator pair is maximally shielded by the rotor, a process that restores the dc level lost by the charge amplifier. The system was implemented with four shutter-type field mills located at strategic points on the aircraft. The bandwidth of the system was determined in the laboratory to be from dc to over 100 Hz, whereas past designs had upper limits of 10 to 100 Hz. To obtain the undisturbed electric field vector and total aircraft charge, the airborne field mill system is calibrated by using techniques involving results from ground and flight calibrations of the F-106B, laboratory tests of a metallized model, and a finite difference time-domain electromagnetic computer code.

  9. Mitigating fluorescence spectral overlap in wide-field endoscopic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Vivian; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The number of molecular species suitable for multispectral fluorescence imaging is limited due to the overlap of the emission spectra of indicator fluorophores, e.g., dyes and nanoparticles. To remove fluorophore emission cross-talk in wide-field multispectral fluorescence molecular imaging, we evaluate three different solutions: (1) image stitching, (2) concurrent imaging with cross-talk ratio subtraction algorithm, and (3) frame-sequential imaging. A phantom with fluorophore emission cross-talk is fabricated, and a 1.2-mm ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) is used to test and compare these approaches. Results show that fluorophore emission cross-talk could be successfully avoided or significantly reduced. Near term, the concurrent imaging method of wide-field multispectral fluorescence SFE is viable for early stage cancer detection and localization in vivo. Furthermore, a means to enhance exogenous fluorescence target-to-background ratio by the reduction of tissue autofluorescence background is demonstrated. PMID:23966226

  10. Frequency modulation technique for wide-field imaging of magnetic field with nitrogen-vacancy ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yukihiro; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Nomura, Shintaro

    2017-04-01

    We report on the application of a frequency modulation technique to wide-field magnetic field imaging of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond at room temperature. We use a scientific CMOS (sCMOS) camera to collect photoluminescence images from a large number of nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles in parallel. This technique allows a significant reduction in the measurement time required to obtain a magnetic field image compared with a scanning probe approach at a comparable magnetic field sensitivity.

  11. Wide-Field-of-View, High-Resolution, Stereoscopic Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prechtl, Eric F.; Sedwick, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    A device combines video feeds from multiple cameras to provide wide-field-of-view, high-resolution, stereoscopic video to the user. The prototype under development consists of two camera assemblies, one for each eye. One of these assemblies incorporates a mounting structure with multiple cameras attached at offset angles. The video signals from the cameras are fed to a central processing platform where each frame is color processed and mapped into a single contiguous wide-field-of-view image. Because the resolution of most display devices is typically smaller than the processed map, a cropped portion of the video feed is output to the display device. The positioning of the cropped window will likely be controlled through the use of a head tracking device, allowing the user to turn his or her head side-to-side or up and down to view different portions of the captured image. There are multiple options for the display of the stereoscopic image. The use of head mounted displays is one likely implementation. However, the use of 3D projection technologies is another potential technology under consideration, The technology can be adapted in a multitude of ways. The computing platform is scalable, such that the number, resolution, and sensitivity of the cameras can be leveraged to improve image resolution and field of view. Miniaturization efforts can be pursued to shrink the package down for better mobility. Power savings studies can be performed to enable unattended, remote sensing packages. Image compression and transmission technologies can be incorporated to enable an improved telepresence experience.

  12. Wide-field-of-view (WFOV) night vision goggle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isbell, Wayne; Estrera, Joseph P.

    2003-09-01

    The United States' armed forces continue to be presented with increased challenges in adverse operational environments with increasing risk and complexity - especially at night. To ensure continued operational success and battlefield superiority during darkness, our armed forces must be equipped with night vision (NV) systems providing increased situational awareness. Doing so will significantly enhance threat detection and engagement, as well as survivability, thus ensuring greater mission success. Northrop Grumman Electro-Optical Systems (EOS) continues to develop its Wide Field of View (WFOV) image intensification (I2) night vision system for ground forces. This system will provide a significant increase in visual coverage enabling US forces to continue "to own the night". Until now, NV systems have typically been limited to a 40-degree field of view (FOV), vertically and horizontally. This limited FOV reduces off-axis detection, restricts an individual soldier's recognition and engagement capabilities and hinders added peripheral vision. To counter this operational deficiency, EOS proposes the Wide Field of View (WFOV) night vision binocular. The WFOV system will have a 70-degree horizontal FOV, with a 55-degree vertical FOV. The increased FOV will result in increased situational awareness of soldiers' surrounding environment (including terrain, hazards, threat, etc) during normal night operations. It will also allow for rapid and safer movement, especially in MOUT operations. Additionally, the increased visual coverage of large areas will enable soldiers to detect and engage targets faster and with greater reliability. The WFOV binocular will significantly enhance survivability, threat detection and engagement, and hence, greater mission success rate.

  13. DMD-based programmable wide field spectrograph for Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamkotsian, Frédéric; Lanzoni, Patrick; Liotard, Arnaud; Viard, Thierry; Costes, Vincent; Hébert, Philippe-Jean

    2015-03-01

    In Earth Observation, Universe Observation and Planet Exploration, scientific return could be optimized in future missions using MOEMS devices. In Earth Observation, we propose an innovative reconfigurable instrument, a programmable wide-field spectrograph where both the FOV and the spectrum could be tailored thanks to a 2D micromirror array (MMA). For a linear 1D field of view (FOV), the principle is to use a MMA to select the wavelengths by acting on intensity. This component is placed in the focal plane of a first grating. On the MMA surface, the spatial dimension is along one side of the device and for each spatial point, its spectrum is displayed along the perpendicular direction: each spatial and spectral feature of the 1D FOV is then fully adjustable dynamically and/or programmable. A second stage with an identical grating recomposes the beam after wavelengths selection, leading to an output tailored 1D image. A mock-up has been designed, fabricated and tested. The micromirror array is the largest DMD in 2048 x 1080 mirrors format, with a pitch of 13.68μm. A synthetic linear FOV is generated and typical images have been recorded o at the output focal plane of the instrument. By tailoring the DMD, we could modify successfully each pixel of the input image: for example, it is possible to remove bright objects or, for each spatial pixel, modify the spectral signature. The very promising results obtained on the mock-up of the programmable wide-field spectrograph reveal the efficiency of this new instrument concept for Earth Observation.

  14. Design of wide field and high resolution video lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ze-xin; Zhan, Binzhou; Han, Haimei

    2009-11-01

    Online detecting is increasingly used in industrial process for the requirement of product quality improving. It is a trend that the "machine detecting" with "machine version + computer intelligence" as new method replaces traditional manual "eye observation". The essential of "machine detecting" is that image of object being collected with high resolution video lens on sensor panel of photoelectric (CCD ,CMOS) and detecting result being automatically gained by computer after the image saved and processed. "Machine detecting" is developing rapidly with the universal reception by enterprises because of its fine accurateness, high efficiency and the real time. Video lens is one of the important components of machine version system. Requirements of wide field and high resolution enlarged the complexity of video lens design. In this paper a design case used in visible light with field diameter Φ32mm, β=-0.25× and NA'=0.15. We give design parameters of the video lens which obtained with theoretically calculating and Oslo software optimization: MTF>0.3 in full field and 215lp/mm, distortion <0.05%.This lens has an excellent optic performance to match with 1.3 million pixels 1/2"CCD, and a high performance price ratio for being consist of only 7 single lens in the way of 5 units.

  15. Deepest Wide-Field Colour Image in the Southern Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    LA SILLA CAMERA OBSERVES CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH ESO PR Photo 02a/03 ESO PR Photo 02a/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 437 pix - 95k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 873 pix - 904k] [HiRes - JPEG: 4000 x 4366 pix - 23.1M] Caption : PR Photo 02a/03 shows a three-colour composite image of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) , obtained with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) camera on the 2.2-m MPG/ESO telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile). It was produced by the combination of about 450 images with a total exposure time of nearly 50 hours. The field measures 36 x 34 arcmin 2 ; North is up and East is left. Technical information is available below. The combined efforts of three European teams of astronomers, targeting the same sky field in the southern constellation Fornax (The Oven) have enabled them to construct a very deep, true-colour image - opening an exceptionally clear view towards the distant universe . The image ( PR Photo 02a/03 ) covers an area somewhat larger than the full moon. It displays more than 100,000 galaxies, several thousand stars and hundreds of quasars. It is based on images with a total exposure time of nearly 50 hours, collected under good observing conditions with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) on the MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile) - many of them extracted from the ESO Science Data Archive . The position of this southern sky field was chosen by Riccardo Giacconi (Nobel Laureate in Physics 2002) at a time when he was Director General of ESO, together with Piero Rosati (ESO). It was selected as a sky region towards which the NASA Chandra X-ray satellite observatory , launched in July 1999, would be pointed while carrying out a very long exposure (lasting a total of 1 million seconds, or 278 hours) in order to detect the faintest possible X-ray sources. The field is now known as the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) . The new WFI photo of CDF-S does not reach quite as deep as the available images of the "Hubble Deep Fields

  16. Clinical Trial Results Vary Widely, But Always Advance Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials Clinical Trial Results Vary Widely, But Always Advance Research ... very emotional." Should You Be Interested in a Clinical Trial People volunteer to take part in clinical ...

  17. Data Reduction Algorithm for Optical Wide Field Patrol (OWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Park, Y.; Yim, H.; Jo, J.; Moon, H.; Bae, Y.; Lim, Y.; Choi, J.; Choi, Y.; Park, J.; Son, J.

    2014-09-01

    OWL (Optical Wide-field Patrol) has a detector system which has the chopper which consists of 4 blades in front of the CCD camera to acquire efficiently the position and time information of moving objects such as artificial satellites. Using this system, it is possible to get more position data by splitting the streaks of the moving object into many pieces with fast rotating blades during tracking. At the same time, the time data of the rotating chopper can be acquired by the time tagger connected to the photo diode. In order to derive the orbits of the targets, we need a sequential data reduction procedure including the calculation of WCS (World Coordinate System) solution to transform the positions into equatorial coordinate systems, and the combination of the time data from the time tagger and the position data. We present such a data reduction procedure and the preliminary results after applying this procedure to the observation images.

  18. Wide-Field Astronomical Surveys in the Next Decade

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Michael A.; Tyson, J.Anthony; Anderson, Scott F.; Axelrod, T.S.; Becker, Andrew C.; Bickerton, Steven J.; Blanton, Michael R.; Burke, David L.; Condon, J.J.; Connolly, A.J.; Cooray, Asantha R.; Covey, Kevin R.; Csabai, Istvan; Ferguson, Henry C.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kantor, Jeffrey; Kent, Stephen M.; Knapp, G.R.; Myers, Steven T.; Neilsen, Eric H., Jr.; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U., ICG /Harish-Chandra Res. Inst. /Caltech, IPAC /Potsdam, Max Planck Inst. /Harvard U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /NOAO, Tucson /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.

    2011-11-14

    Wide-angle surveys have been an engine for new discoveries throughout the modern history of astronomy, and have been among the most highly cited and scientifically productive observing facilities in recent years. This trend is likely to continue over the next decade, as many of the most important questions in astrophysics are best tackled with massive surveys, often in synergy with each other and in tandem with the more traditional observatories. We argue that these surveys are most productive and have the greatest impact when the data from the surveys are made public in a timely manner. The rise of the 'survey astronomer' is a substantial change in the demographics of our field; one of the most important challenges of the next decade is to find ways to recognize the intellectual contributions of those who work on the infrastructure of surveys (hardware, software, survey planning and operations, and databases/data distribution), and to make career paths to allow them to thrive.

  19. Wide-Field Astronomical Surveys in the Next Decade

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Michael A.; Tyson, J.Anthony; Anderson, Scott F.; Axelrod, T.S.; Becker, Andrew C.; Bickerton, Steven J.; Blanton, Michael R.; Burke, David L.; Condon, J.J.; Connolly, A.J.

    2009-03-01

    Wide-angle surveys have been an engine for new discoveries throughout the modern history of astronomy, and have been among the most highly cited and scientifically productive observing facilities in recent years. This trend is likely to continue over the next decade, as many of the most important questions in astrophysics are best tackled with massive surveys, often in synergy with each other and in tandem with the more traditional observatories. We argue that these surveys are most productive and have the greatest impact when the data from the surveys are made public in a timely manner. The rise of the 'survey astronomer' is a substantial change in the demographics of our field; one of the most important challenges of the next decade is to find ways to recognize the intellectual contributions of those who work on the infrastructure of surveys (hardware, software, survey planning and operations, and databases/data distribution), and to make career paths to allow them to thrive.

  20. On illumination schemes for wide-field CARS microscopy.

    PubMed

    Toytman, I; Simanovskii, D; Palanker, D

    2009-04-27

    New system for a wide-field CARS microscopy is demonstrated, including two schemes of non-phase-matching illumination. Several advantages including high Stokes pulse energy, pulse-to-pulse stability and inherent synchronization between pump and Stokes pulses were brought by use of methane-filled Raman converter. Spatial resolution of the system with axially symmetric illumination, 0.5 microm, was found to correspond to diffraction limit of the imaging objective. Selective sensitivity to lipid-rich myelin sheaths in the nerve tissue has been demonstrated and confirmed by comparison with histological samples stained with myelin-specific dye. Single-shot imaging capability of the system has been demonstrated with a speckling-free illumination on a monolayer of 3 microm polystyrene beads.

  1. Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope WFIRST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J.; Schechter, P.; Baltay, C.; Bean, R.; Bennett, D.; Brown, R.; Conselice, C.; Donahue, M.; Fan, X.; Rauscher, B.; Rhodes, J.; Roellig, T.; Stern, D.; Gehrels, N.; Sambruna, R.; Traub, W.; Barry, R. K.; Content, D.; Goullioud, R.; Grady, K.; Kruk, J.; Melton, M.; Peddie, C.; Rioux, N.; Seiffert, M.

    2012-01-01

    In December 2010, NASA created a Science Definition Team (SDT) for WFIRST, the Wide Field Infra-Red Survey Telescope, recommended by the Astro 2010 Decadal Survey as the highest priority for a large space mission. The SDT was chartered to work with the WFIRST Project Office at GSFC and the Program Office at JPL to produce a Design Reference Mission (DRM) for WFIRST. Part of the original charge was to produce an interim design reference mission by mid-2011. That document was delivered to NASA and widely circulated within the astronomical community. In late 2011 the Astrophysics Division augmented its original charge, asking for two design reference missions. The first of these, DRM1, was to be a finalized version of the interim DRM, reducing overall mission costs where possible. The second of these, DRM2, was to identify and eliminate capabilities that overlapped with those of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (henceforth JWST), ESA's Euclid mission, and the NSF's ground-based Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (henceforth LSST), and again to reduce overall mission cost, while staying faithful to NWNH. This report presents both DRM1 and DRM2.

  2. Wide field-of-view target tracking sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daqun; Yang, Jame J.; Wang, Michael R.

    2009-05-01

    Surveillance and tracking of targets such as sensor fused warheads (SFWs) and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has been a challenging task, especially in the presence of multiple targets moving at a relatively fast speed. Due to the insufficient wavelength resolution, conventional radar technology may fail to resolve closely located targets or lack spatial resolution for specific target identification. There is a need for the development of an innovative sensor that is able to recognize and track closely related targets. To address this need, we have developed a target sensor that combines vision and laser ranging technologies for the detection and tracking of multiple targets with wide viewing angle and high spatial resolution. Using this sensor, regions-of-interest (ROIs) in the global scene are first selected, and then each ROI is subsequently zoomed with vision technique to provide high spatial resolution for target recognition or identification. Moreover, vision technique provides the azimuth and elevation angles of targets to a laser range finder for target distance determination. As a result, continuous three-dimensional target tracking can be potentially achieved with the proposed sensor. The developed sensor can be suitable for a wide variety of military and defense related applications. The design and construction of a proof-of-concept target tracking sensor is described. Basic performance of the constructed target tracking sensor including field-of-view, resolution, and target distance are presented. The potential military and defense related applications of this technology are highlighted.

  3. Portable wide-field hand-held NIR scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Young-Jin; Roman, Manuela; Carrasquilla, Jennifer; Erickson, Sarah J.; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2013-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging modality is one of the widely used medical imaging techniques for breast cancer imaging, functional brain mapping, and many other applications. However, conventional NIR imaging systems are bulky and expensive, thereby limiting their accelerated clinical translation. Herein a new compact (6 × 7 × 12 cm3), cost-effective, and wide-field NIR scanner has been developed towards contact as well as no-contact based real-time imaging in both reflectance and transmission mode. The scanner mainly consists of an NIR source light (between 700- 900 nm), an NIR sensitive CCD camera, and a custom-developed image acquisition and processing software to image an area of 12 cm2. Phantom experiments have been conducted to estimate the feasibility of diffuse optical imaging by using Indian-Ink as absorption-based contrast agents. As a result, the developed NIR system measured the light intensity change in absorption-contrasted target up to 4 cm depth under transillumination mode. Preliminary in-vivo studies demonstrated the feasibility of real-time monitoring of blood flow changes. Currently, extensive in-vivo studies are carried out using the ultra-portable NIR scanner in order to assess the potential of the imager towards breast imaging..

  4. SSC Geopositional Assessment of the Advanced Wide Field Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Kenton

    2007-01-01

    The objective is to provide independent verification of IRS geopositional accuracy claims and of the internal geopositional characterization provided by Lutes (2005). Six sub-scenes (quads) were assessed; Three from each AWiFS camera. Check points were manually matched to digital orthophoto quarter quadrangle (DOQQ) reference (assumed accuracy approx. 5 m, RMSE) Check points were selected to meet or exceed Federal Geographic Data Committee's guidelines. Used ESRI ArcGIS for data collection and SSC-written MATLAB scripts for data analysis.

  5. Wide Field-of-View Fluorescence Imaging of Coral Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Treibitz, Tali; Neal, Benjamin P.; Kline, David I.; Beijbom, Oscar; Roberts, Paul L. D.; Mitchell, B. Greg; Kriegman, David

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs globally are declining rapidly because of both local and global stressors. Improved monitoring tools are urgently needed to understand the changes that are occurring at appropriate temporal and spatial scales. Coral fluorescence imaging tools have the potential to improve both ecological and physiological assessments. Although fluorescence imaging is regularly used for laboratory studies of corals, it has not yet been used for large-scale in situ assessments. Current obstacles to effective underwater fluorescence surveying include limited field-of-view due to low camera sensitivity, the need for nighttime deployment because of ambient light contamination, and the need for custom multispectral narrow band imaging systems to separate the signal into meaningful fluorescence bands. Here we describe the Fluorescence Imaging System (FluorIS), based on a consumer camera modified for greatly increased sensitivity to chlorophyll-a fluorescence, and we show high spectral correlation between acquired images and in situ spectrometer measurements. This system greatly facilitates underwater wide field-of-view fluorophore surveying during both night and day, and potentially enables improvements in semi-automated segmentation of live corals in coral reef photographs and juvenile coral surveys. PMID:25582836

  6. Wide-field, high-resolution Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoan; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we report an imaging method, termed Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM), which iteratively stitches together a number of variably illuminated, low-resolution intensity images in Fourier space to produce a wide-field, high-resolution complex sample image. By adopting a wavefront correction strategy, the FPM method can also correct for aberrations and digitally extend a microscope’s depth-of-focus beyond the physical limitations of its optics. As a demonstration, we built a microscope prototype with a resolution of 0.78 μm, a field-of-view of ~120 mm2, and a resolution-invariant depth-of-focus of 0.3 mm (characterized at 632 nm). Gigapixel colour images of histology slides verify FPM’s successful operation. The reported imaging procedure transforms the general challenge of high-throughput, high-resolution microscopy from one that is coupled to the physical limitations of the system’s optics to one that is solvable through computation. PMID:25243016

  7. The Receiver System for the Ooty Wide Field Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanya, C. R.; Prasad, P.; Girish, B. S.; Somashekar, R.; Manoharan, P. K.; Mittal, A. K.

    2017-03-01

    The legacy Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) is being reconfigured as a 264-element synthesis telescope, called the Ooty Wide Field Array (OWFA). Its antenna elements are the contiguous 1.92 m sections of the parabolic cylinder. It will operate in a 38-MHz frequency band centred at 326.5 MHz and will be equipped with a digital receiver including a 264-element spectral correlator with a spectral resolution of 48 kHz. OWFA is designed to retain the benefits of equatorial mount, continuous 9-hour tracking ability and large collecting area of the legacy telescope and use of modern digital techniques to enhance the instantaneous field-of-view by more than an order of magnitude. OWFA has unique advantages for contemporary investigations related to large scale structure, transient events and space weather watch. In this paper, we describe the RF subsystems, digitizers and fibre optic communication of OWFA and highlight some specific aspects of the system relevant for the observations planned during the initial operation.

  8. Wide field-of-view fluorescence imaging of coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Treibitz, Tali; Neal, Benjamin P; Kline, David I; Beijbom, Oscar; Roberts, Paul L D; Mitchell, B Greg; Kriegman, David

    2015-01-13

    Coral reefs globally are declining rapidly because of both local and global stressors. Improved monitoring tools are urgently needed to understand the changes that are occurring at appropriate temporal and spatial scales. Coral fluorescence imaging tools have the potential to improve both ecological and physiological assessments. Although fluorescence imaging is regularly used for laboratory studies of corals, it has not yet been used for large-scale in situ assessments. Current obstacles to effective underwater fluorescence surveying include limited field-of-view due to low camera sensitivity, the need for nighttime deployment because of ambient light contamination, and the need for custom multispectral narrow band imaging systems to separate the signal into meaningful fluorescence bands. Here we describe the Fluorescence Imaging System (FluorIS), based on a consumer camera modified for greatly increased sensitivity to chlorophyll-a fluorescence, and we show high spectral correlation between acquired images and in situ spectrometer measurements. This system greatly facilitates underwater wide field-of-view fluorophore surveying during both night and day, and potentially enables improvements in semi-automated segmentation of live corals in coral reef photographs and juvenile coral surveys.

  9. WiFeS: the wide field spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Waldron, Liam E.; McGregor, Peter; Conroy, Peter; Doolan, Matthew C.; Zhelem, Ross; Bloxham, Gabe; Saunders, Will; Jones, Damien; Pfitzner, Lee

    2004-09-01

    WiFeS is a powerful integral field, double-beam, concentric, image-slicing spectrograph designed to deliver excellent thoughput, precision spectrophotometric performance and superb image quality along with wide spectral coverage throughout the 320-1000 nm wavelength region. It is currently under construction at the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics of the Australian National University (ANU), and will be mounted on the ANU 2.3m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory. It will provide a 25x31 arc sec field with 0.5 arc sec sampling along each of twenty five 31x1.0 arc sec slitlets. The output format is arranged to match the 4096x4096 pixel CCD detectors in each of two cameras individually optimized for the blue and the red ends of the spectrum, respectively. A process of "interleaved nod-and-shuffle" will be applied to permit quantum noise-limited sky subtraction. Using VPH gratings, spectral resolutions modes of 3000 and 7000 will be provided. The full spectral range is covered in a single exposure in the R=3000 mode, and in two exposures in the R=7000 mode. The use of transmissive coated optics, VPH gratings and optimized mirror coatings ensures a throughput (including telescope and atmosphere) that peaks above 30%. The concentric image-slicer design ensures an excellent and uniform image quality across the full field. To maximize the scientific return, the whole instrument is configured for remote observing, pipeline data reduction, and the accumulation of calibration image libraries.

  10. Texas Supernova Search: A Wide Field Search for Nearby SNe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quimby, R. M.; Castro, F.; Gerardy, C. L.; Hoeflich, P.; Kannappan, S. J.; Mondol, P.; Sellers, M.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2005-12-01

    ROTSE-IIIb is one four robotic telescopes built by the University of Michigan to observe the prompt optical afterglows associated with gamma-ray bursts. At just 0.45m in diameter, it is the smallest research telescope at McDonald, but its 1.85 x 1.85 deg field of view and autonomous operation make it an excellent survey instrument for rare transient phenomena. We have been using ROTSE-IIIb for the past year to search for supernovae in nearby galaxy clusters such as the Virgo, Coma, and Ursa Major clusters. ROTSE-IIIb's wide field of view allows us to search the thousands of galaxies in these clusters, which cover hundreds of square degrees on the sky, in just a few tens of exposures. We can therefore observe all of these fields in a single night, and repeat the search every night. When we identify a new supernova candidate, we invoke our target of opportunity time on the neighboring 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) the following night to obtain a spectrum. Because of the rolling search and the quick spectral turn-around possible with the HET, we are able to capture spectra of the earliest phases of the explosion. By combining this information with spectra taken at later epochs, we can construct a complete description of the explosion. Through this work we aim to better understand the physical conditions of supernova explosions, identify any systematic effects that may affect how Type Ia supernovae are calibrated as standard candles and used to probe cosmology, and also to better calibrate Type II supernovae as standard candles.

  11. An all-reflective wide-angle flat-field telescope for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallam, K. L.; Howell, B. J.; Wilson, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    An all-reflective wide-angle flat-field telescope (WAFFT) designed and built at Goddard Space Flight Center demonstrates the markedly improved wide-angle imaging capability which can be achieved with a design based on a recently announced class of unobscured 3-mirror optical systems. Astronomy and earth observation missions in space dictate the necessity or preference for wide-angle all-reflective systems which can provide UV through IR wavelength coverage and tolerate the space environment. An initial prototype unit has been designed to meet imaging requirements suitable for monitoring the ultraviolet sky from space. The unobscured f/4, 36 mm efl system achieves a full 20 x 30 deg field of view with resolution over a flat focal surface that is well matched for use with advanced ultraviolet image array detectors. Aspects of the design and fabrication approach, which have especially important bearing on the system solution, are reviewed; and test results are compared with the analytic performance predictions. Other possible applications of the WAFFT class of imaging system are briefly discussed. The exceptional wide-angle, high quality resolution, and very wide spectral coverage of the WAFFT-type optical system could make it a very important tool for future space research.

  12. Fluorescent Nanowire Ring Illumination for Wide-Field Far-Field Subdiffraction Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaowei; Kuang, Cuifang; Hao, Xiang; Pang, Chenlei; Xu, Pengfei; Li, Haifeng; Liu, Ying; Yu, Chao; Xu, Yingke; Nan, Di; Shen, Weidong; Fang, Yue; He, Lenian; Liu, Xu; Yang, Qing

    2017-02-01

    Here we demonstrate an active method which pioneers in utilizing a combination of a spatial frequency shift and a Stokes frequency shift to enable wide-field far-field subdiffraction imaging. A fluorescent nanowire ring acts as a localized source and is combined with a film waveguide to produce omnidirectional illuminating evanescent waves. Benefitting from the high wave vector of illumination, the high spatial frequencies of an object can be shifted to the passband of a conventional imaging system, contributing subwavelength spatial information to the far-field image. A structure featuring 70-nm-wide slots spaced 70 nm apart has been resolved at a wavelength of 520 nm with a 0.85 numerical aperture standard objective based on this method. The versatility of this approach has been demonstrated by imaging integrated chips, Blu-ray DVDs, biological cells, and various subwavelength 2D patterns, with a viewing area of up to 1 0 0 0 μ m2 , which is one order of magnitude larger than the previous far-field and full-field nanoscopy methods. This new resolving technique is label-free, is conveniently integrated with conventional microscopes, and can potentially become an important tool in cellular biology, the on-chip industry, as well as other fields requiring wide-field nanoscale visualization.

  13. Update on the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mainzer, Amanda K.; Eisenhardt, Peter; Wright, Edward L.; Liu, Feng-Chuan; Irace, William; Heinrichsen, Ingolf; Cutri, Roc; Duval, Valerie

    2006-01-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a NASA MIDEX mission, will survey the entire sky in four bands from 3.3 to 23 microns with a sensitivity 1000 times greater than the IRAS survey. The WISE survey will extend the Two Micron All Sky Survey into the thermal infrared and will provide an important catalog for the James Webb Space Telescope. Using 1024(sup 2) HgCdTe and Si:As arrays at 3.3, 4.7, 12 and 23 microns, WISE will find the most luminous galaxies in the universe, the closest stars to the Sun, and it will detect most of the main belt asteroids larger than 3 km. The single WISE instrument consists of a 40 cm diamond-turned aluminum afocal telescope, a two-stage solid hydrogen cryostat, a scan mirror mechanism, and reimaging optics giving 5 resolution (full-width-half-maximum). The use of dichroics and beamsplitters allows four color images of a 47' x47' field of view to be taken every 8.8 seconds, synchronized with the orbital motion to provide total sky coverage with overlap between revolutions. WISE will be placed into a Sun-synchronous polar orbit on a Delta 7320-10 launch vehicle. The WISE survey approach is simple and efficient. The three-axis-stabilized spacecraft rotates at a constant rate while the scan mirror freezes the telescope line of sight during each exposure. WISE has completed its mission Preliminary Design Review and its NASA Confirmation Review, and the project is awaiting confirmation from NASA to proceed to the Critical Design phase. Much of the payload hardware is now complete, and assembly of the payload will occur over the next year. WISE is scheduled to launch in late 2009; the project web site can be found at www.wise.ssl.berkeley.edu.

  14. PSF reconstruction for MUSE in wide field mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villecroze, R.; Fusco, Thierry; Bacon, Roland; Madec, Pierre-Yves

    2012-07-01

    The resolution of ground-based telescopes is dramatically limited by the atmospheric turbulence.. Adaptative optics (AO) is a real-time opto-mechanical approach which allows to correct for the turbulence effect and to reach the ultimate diffraction limit astronomical telescopes and their associated instrumentation. Nevertheless, the AO correction is never perfect especially when it has to deal with large Field of View (FoV). Hence, a posteriori image processing really improves the final estimation of astrophysical data. Such techniques require an accurate knowledge of the system response at any position in the FoV The purpose of this work is then the estimation of the AO response in the particular case of the MUSE [1] /GALACSI [2] instrument (a 3D mult-object spectrograph combined with a Laser-assisted wide field AO system which will be installed at the VLT in 2013). Using telemetry data coming from both AO Laser and natural guide stars, a Point Spread Function (PSF) is derived at any location of the FoV and for every wavelength of the MUSE spectrograph. This document presents the preliminary design of the MUSE WFM PSF reconstruction process. The various hypothesis and approximations are detailed and justified. A first description of the overall process is proposed. Some alternative strategies to improve the performance (in terms of computation time and storage) are described and have been implemented. Finally, after a validation of the proposed algorithm using end-to-end models, a performance analysis is conducted (with the help of a full end-to-end model). This performance analysis will help us to populate an exhaustive error budget table.

  15. Metrology of confined flows using wide field nanoparticle velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Ranchon, Hubert; Picot, Vincent; Bancaud, Aurélien

    2015-01-01

    The manipulation of fluids in micro/nanofabricated systems opens new avenues to engineer the transport of matter at the molecular level. Yet the number of methods for the in situ characterization of fluid flows in shallow channels is limited. Here we establish a simple method called nanoparticle velocimetry distribution analysis (NVDA) that relies on wide field microscopy to measure the flow rate and channel height based on the fitting of particle velocity distributions along and across the flow direction. NVDA is validated by simulations, showing errors in velocity and height determination of less than 1% and 8% respectively, as well as with experiments, in which we monitor the behavior of 200 nm nanoparticles conveyed in channels of ~1.8 μm in height. We then show the relevance of this assay for the characterization of flows in bulging channels, and prove its suitability to characterize the concentration of particles across the channel height in the context of visco-elastic focusing. Our method for rapid and quantitative flow characterization has therefore a broad spectrum of applications in micro/nanofluidics, and a strong potential for the optimization of Lab-on-Chips modules in which engineering of confined transport is necessary. PMID:25974654

  16. PANGU: a wide field gamma-ray imager and polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Walter, R.; Su, M.; Ambrosi, G.; Azzarello, P.; Böttcher, M.; Chang, J.; Chernyakova, M.; Fan, Y.; Farnier, C.; Gargano, F.; Grenier, I.; Hajdas, W.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Pearce, M.; Pohl, M.; Zdziarski, A.

    2016-07-01

    PANGU (the PAir-productioN Gamma-ray Unit) is a gamma-ray telescope with a wide field of view optimized for spectro-imaging, timing and polarization studies. It will map the gamma-ray sky from 10 MeV to a few GeV with unprecedented spatial resolution. This window on the Universe is unique to detect photons produced directly by relativistic particles, via the decay of neutral pions, or the annihilation or decay light from anti-matter and the putative light dark matter candidates. A wealth of questions can be probed among the most important themes of modern physics and astrophysics. The PANGU instrument is a pair-conversion gamma-ray telescope based on an innovative design of a silicon strip tracker. It is light, compact and accurate. It consists of 100 layers of silicon micro-strip detector of 80 x 80 cm2 in area, stacked to height of about 90 cm, and covered by an anticoincidence detector. PANGU relies on multiple scattering effects for energy measurement, reaching an energy resolution between 30-50% for 10 MeV - 1 GeV. The novel tracker will allow the first polarization measurement and provide the best angular resolution ever obtained in the soft gamma ray and GeV band.

  17. Rotation Periods of Wide Binaries in the Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janes, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    In a search of proper motion catalogs for common proper motion stars in the field of the Kepler spacecraft I identified 93 likely binary systems. A comparison of their rotation periods is a test of the gyrochronology concept. To find their periods I calculated the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the Kepler mission photometry for each star. In most systems for which good periods can be found, the cooler star has a longer period than the hotter component, in general agreement with models. However, there is a wide range in the gradients of lines connecting binary pairs in a period–color diagram. Furthermore, near the solar color, only a few stars have longer periods than the Sun, suggesting that they, and their cooler companions, are not much older than the Sun. In addition, there is an apparent gap at intermediate periods in the period distribution of the late K and early M stars. Either star formation in this direction has been variable, or stars evolve in period at a non-uniform rate, or some stars evolve more rapidly than others at the same mass. Finally, using the ACF as a measure of the activity level, I found that while the F, G, and early K stars become less active as their periods increase, there is no correlation between period and activity for the mid K to early M stars.

  18. Focus Validation of the Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tansock, J.; Larsen, M.; Shumway, A.; Hacking, P.

    1998-09-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) is a small cryogenic spaceborne infrared telescope being readied for launch in September 1998 as the fifth of NASA's Small Explorers. WIRE illuminates two 128 x 128 Si:As Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) produced by Boeing North American with a 30 cm diameter Ritchey Cretien diamond turned mirror system. A dichroic beam splitter and band-pass filter define two broad pass bands for a deep pointed survey to search for protogalaxies and to study the evolution of starburst galaxies. The Space Dynamics Laboratory at Utah State University (SDL/USU) developed and instrumented ground-based procedures to validate the focus of the WIRE Instrument. The procedures used point source data acquired during ground measurements obtained with a calibration source consisting of an illuminated pinhole near the focus of a cryogenically cooled collimator. Simulated point source measurements were obtained at multiple focus positions by translating the pinhole along the optical axis inside and outside the optimum focus of the collimator. The detector FPAs were moved to positions indicated by the test results. These focus positions were verified by subsequent cold tests using an independent cold collimator. The method and hardware used to obtain focus validation are described and results presented.

  19. Wide field of view multifocal scanning microscopy with sparse sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Wu, Jigang

    2016-02-01

    We propose to use sparsely sampled line scans with a sparsity-based reconstruction method to obtain images in a wide field of view (WFOV) multifocal scanning microscope. In the WFOV microscope, we used a holographically generated irregular focus grid to scan the sample in one dimension and then reconstructed the sample image from line scans by measuring the transmission of the foci through the sample during scanning. The line scans were randomly spaced with average spacing larger than the Nyquist sampling requirement, and the image was recovered with sparsity-based reconstruction techniques. With this scheme, the acquisition data can be significantly reduced and the restriction for equally spaced foci positions can be removed, indicating simpler experimental requirement. We built a prototype system and demonstrated the effectiveness of the reconstruction by recovering microscopic images of a U.S. Air Force target and an onion skin cell microscope slide with 40, 60, and 80% missing data with respect to the Nyquist sampling requirement.

  20. Prowess - A Software Model for the Ooty Wide Field Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marthi, Visweshwar Ram

    2017-03-01

    One of the scientific objectives of the Ooty Wide Field Array (OWFA) is to observe the redshifted H i emission from z ˜ 3.35. Although predictions spell out optimistic outcomes in reasonable integration times, these studies were based purely on analytical assumptions, without accounting for limiting systematics. A software model for OWFA has been developed with a view to understanding the instrument-induced systematics, by describing a complete software model for the instrument. This model has been implemented through a suite of programs, together called Prowess, which has been conceived with the dual role of an emulator as well as observatory data analysis software. The programming philosophy followed in building Prowess enables a general user to define an own set of functions and add new functionality. This paper describes a co-ordinate system suitable for OWFA in which the baselines are defined. The foregrounds are simulated from their angular power spectra. The visibilities are then computed from the foregrounds. These visibilities are then used for further processing, such as calibration and power spectrum estimation. The package allows for rich visualization features in multiple output formats in an interactive fashion, giving the user an intuitive feel for the data. Prowess has been extensively used for numerical predictions of the foregrounds for the OWFA H i experiment.

  1. FRB Event Rate Predictions for the Ooty Wide Field Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Siddhartha; Bera, Apurba; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Ramesh Bhat, N. D.; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

    2017-03-01

    We developed a generic formalism to estimate the event rate and the redshift distribution of Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) in our previous publication (Bera et al. 2016), considering FRBs are of an extragalactic origin. In this paper, we present (a) the predicted pulse widths of FRBs by considering two different scattering models, (b) the minimum total energy required to detect events, (c) the redshift distribution and (d) the detection rates of FRBs for the Ooty Wide Field Array (OWFA). The energy spectrum of FRBs is modelled as a power law with an exponent - α and our analysis spans a range -3≤ α≤5. We find that OWFA will be capable of detecting FRBs with α≥0. The redshift distribution and the event rates of FRBs are estimated by assuming two different energy distribution functions; a Delta function and a Schechter luminosity function with an exponent -2≤ γ≤2. We consider an empirical scattering model based on pulsar observations (model I) as well as a theoretical model (model II) expected for the intergalactic medium. The redshift distributions peak at a particular redshift z p for a fixed value of α, which lie in the range 0.3≤ z p ≤1 for the scattering model I and remain flat and extend up to high redshifts ( z≲5) for the scattering model II.

  2. Wide-Field Optic for Autonomous Acquisition of Laser Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Norman A.; Charles, Jeffrey R.; Biswas, Abhijit

    2011-01-01

    An innovation reported in Two-Camera Acquisition and Tracking of a Flying Target, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 8 (August 2008), p. 20, used a commercial fish-eye lens and an electronic imaging camera for initially locating objects with subsequent handover to an actuated narrow-field camera. But this operated against a dark-sky background. An improved solution involves an optical design based on custom optical components for the wide-field optical system that directly addresses the key limitations in acquiring a laser signal from a moving source such as an aircraft or a spacecraft. The first challenge was to increase the light collection entrance aperture diameter, which was approximately 1 mm in the first prototype. The new design presented here increases this entrance aperture diameter to 4.2 mm, which is equivalent to a more than 16 times larger collection area. One of the trades made in realizing this improvement was to restrict the field-of-view to +80 deg. elevation and 360 azimuth. This trade stems from practical considerations where laser beam propagation over the excessively high air mass, which is in the line of sight (LOS) at low elevation angles, results in vulnerability to severe atmospheric turbulence and attenuation. An additional benefit of the new design is that the large entrance aperture is maintained even at large off-axis angles when the optic is pointed at zenith. The second critical limitation for implementing spectral filtering in the design was tackled by collimating the light prior to focusing it onto the focal plane. This allows the placement of the narrow spectral filter in the collimated portion of the beam. For the narrow band spectral filter to function properly, it is necessary to adequately control the range of incident angles at which received light intercepts the filter. When this angle is restricted via collimation, narrower spectral filtering can be implemented. The collimated beam (and the filter) must be relatively large to

  3. Wide-field optical coherence micro-elastography for intraoperative assessment of human breast cancer margins

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Wes M.; Chin, Lixin; Wijesinghe, Philip; Kirk, Rodney W.; Latham, Bruce; Sampson, David D.; Saunders, Christobel M.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2016-01-01

    Incomplete excision of malignant tissue is a major issue in breast-conserving surgery, with typically 20 - 30% of cases requiring a second surgical procedure arising from postoperative detection of an involved margin. We report advances in the development of a new intraoperative tool, optical coherence micro-elastography, for the assessment of tumor margins on the micro-scale. We demonstrate an important step by conducting whole specimen imaging in intraoperative time frames with a wide-field scanning system acquiring mosaicked elastograms with overall dimensions of ~50 × 50 mm, large enough to image an entire face of most lumpectomy specimens. This capability is enabled by a wide-aperture annular actuator with an internal diameter of 65 mm. We demonstrate feasibility by presenting elastograms recorded from freshly excised human breast tissue, including from a mastectomy, lumpectomies and a cavity shaving. PMID:27867721

  4. Composite Tissue Transplantation: A Rapidly Advancing Field

    PubMed Central

    Ravindra, K.V.; Wu, S.; Bozulic, L.; Xu, H.; Breidenbach, W.C.; Ildstad, S.T.

    2008-01-01

    Composite tissue allotransplantation (CTA) is emerging as a potential treatment for complex tissue defects. It is currently being performed with increasing frequency in the clinic. The feasibility of the procedure has been confirmed through 30 hand transplantation, 3 facial reconstructions, and vascularized knee, esophageal, and tracheal allografts. A major drawback for CTA is the requirement for lifelong immunosuppression. The toxicity of these agents has limited the widespread application of CTA. Methods to reduce or eliminate the requirement for immunosuppression and promote CTA acceptance would represent a significant step forward in the field. Multiple studies suggest that mixed chimerism established by bone marrow transplantation promotes tolerance resulting in allograft acceptance. This overview focuses on the history and the exponentially expanding applications of the new frontier in CTA transplantation: immunology associated with CTA; preclinical animal models of CTA; clinical experience with CTA; and advances in mixed chimerism–induced tolerance in CTA. Additionally, some important hurdles that must be overcome in using bone marrow chimerism to induce tolerance to CTA are also discussed. PMID:18589081

  5. SHELS: Complete Redshift Surveys of Two Widely Separated Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.; Zahid, Harus Jabran; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.

    2016-05-01

    The Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS) is a complete redshift survey covering two well-separated fields (F1 and F2) of the Deep Lens Survey (DLS). Both fields are more than 94% complete to a Galactic extinction corrected R 0 = 20.2. Here, we describe the redshift survey of the F1 field centered at R.A.2000 = 00h53m25.ˢ3 and decl.2000 = 12°33‧55″ like F2, the F1 field covers ˜4 deg2. The redshift survey of the F1 field includes 9426 new galaxy redshifts measured with Hectospec on the MMT (published here). As a guide to future uses of the combined survey, we compare the mass metallicity relation and the distributions of D n 4000 as a function of stellar mass and redshift for the two fields. The mass-metallicity relations differ by an insignificant 1.6σ. For galaxies in the stellar mass range 1010-1011 M ⊙, the increase in the star-forming fraction with redshift is remarkably similar in the two fields. The seemingly surprising 31%-38% difference in the overall galaxy counts in F1 and F2 is probably consistent with the expected cosmic variance given the subtleties of the relative systematics in the two surveys. We also review the DLS cluster detections in the two fields: poorer photometric data for F1 precluded secure detection of the single massive cluster at z = 0.35 that we find in SHELS. Taken together, the two fields include 16,055 redshifts for galaxies with {R}0≤slant 20.2 and 20,754 redshifts for galaxies with R ≤ 20.6. These dense surveys in two well-separated fields provide a basis for future investigations of galaxy properties and large-scale structure.

  6. A fast, wide field of view, catadioptric telescope for Whipple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, James P.

    2014-12-01

    We describe the optical design of a spaceborne f/1.3 catadioptric telescope with a 9 degree field and 77 cm aperture that is being proposed to study objects in the Kuiper belt, Sedna Region, and Oort cloud.

  7. All-spherical telescope with extremely wide field of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terebizh, V. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    An all-spherical catadioptic telescope with the angular field of view of several tens of degrees in diameter and spherical focal surface is proposed for the monitoring of large sky areas. We provide a few examples of such a system with the apertures up to 800 mm and the field of view 30° and 40° in diameter. The curvature of the focal surface is repaid by high performance of the telescope. In particular, the diameter of a circle that includes 80 % of energy in the polychromatic image of a star is in the range 1.4 arcsec - 1.9 arcsec across the field of 30° size and 2.2 arcsec - 2.9 arcsec for the field of 40° size. Some ways of working with curved focal surfaces are discussed.

  8. Fundamental study of flow field generated by rotorcraft blades using wide-field shadowgraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    The vortex trajectory and vortex wake generated by helicopter rotors are visualized using a wide-field shadowgraph technique. Use of a retro-reflective Scotchlite screen makes it possible to investigate the flow field generated by full-scale rotors. Tip vortex trajectories are visible in shadowgraphs for a range of tip Mach number of 0.38 to 0.60. The effect of the angle of attack is substantial. At an angle of attack greater than 8 degrees, the visibility of the vortex core is significant even at relatively low tip Mach numbers. The theoretical analysis of the sensitivity is carried out for a rotating blade. This analysis demonstrates that the sensitivity decreases with increasing dimensionless core radius and increases with increasing tip Mach number. The threshold value of the sensitivity is found to be 0.0015, below which the vortex core is not visible and above which it is visible. The effect of the optical path length is also discussed. Based on this investigation, it is concluded that the application of this wide-field shadowgraph technique to a large wind tunnel test should be feasible. In addition, two simultaneous shadowgraph views would allow three-dimensional reconstruction of vortex trajectories.

  9. Fast and compact wide-field Gregorian telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, Mehdi; Goncharov, Alexander V.

    2012-09-01

    A traditional Gregorian telescope features an intermediate focus, which makes the system longer than an equivalent fnumber Cassegrain design. One could shorten the Gregorian system by inserting a flat mirror before the secondary mirror. We explore the potential of this compact configuration for sky survey imaging with relaxed requirements for angular resolution. A 0.5 m f/1.4 telescope with 4 deg full field is presented. The modified design consists of two elliptical mirrors and a folding flat in between. A plano-convex field flattener is used near the focal plane. The telescope optical performance is analyzed and possible improvements are discussed based on aberration balancing. A special emphasis is given to stay light analysis and baffle designs are considered.

  10. Wide Field Imaging of the Hubble Deep Field-South Region III: Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palunas, Povilas; Collins, Nicholas R.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Hill, Robert S.; Malumuth, Eliot M.; Rhodes, Jason; Teplitz, Harry I.; Woodgate, Bruce E.

    2002-01-01

    We present 1/2 square degree uBVRI imaging around the Hubble Deep Field - South. These data have been used in earlier papers to examine the QSO population and the evolution of the correlation function in the region around the HDF-S. The images were obtained with the Big Throughput Camera at CTIO in September 1998. The images reach 5 sigma limits of u approx. 24.4, B approx. 25.6, V approx. 25.3, R approx. 24.9 and I approx. 23.9. We present a catalog of approx. 22,000 galaxies. We also present number-magnitude counts and a comparison with other observations of the same field. The data presented here are available over the world wide web.

  11. Microcalorimetry: Wide Temperature Range, High Field, Small Sample Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellman, Frances

    2000-03-01

    We have used Si micromachining techniques to fabricate devices for measuring specific heat or other calorimetric signals from microgram-quantity samples over a temperature range from 1 to 900K in magnetic fields to date up to 8T. The devices are based on a relatively robust silicon nitride membrane with thin film heaters and thermometers. Different types of thermometers are used for different purposes and in different temperature ranges. These devices are particularly useful for thin film samples (typically 200-400 nm thick at present) deposited directly onto the membrane through a Si micromachined evaporation mask. They have also been used for small single crystal samples attached by conducting grease or solder, and for powder samples dissolved in a solvent and dropped onto devices. The measurement technique used (relaxation method) is particularly suited to high field measurements because the thermal conductance can be measured once in zero field and is field independent, while the time constant of the relaxation does not depend on thermometer calibration. Present development efforts include designs which show promise for time-resolved calorimetry measurements of biological samples in small amounts of water. Samples measured to date include amorphous magnetic thin films (a-TbFe2 and giant negative magnetoresistance a-Gd-Si alloys), empty and filled fullerenes (C_60, K_3C_60, C_82, La@C_82, C_84, and Sc_2@C_84), single crystal manganites (La_1-xSr_xMnO_3), antiferromagnetic multilayers (NiO/CoO, NiO/MgO, and CoO/MgO), and nanoparticle magnetic materials (CoO in a Ag matrix).

  12. A purely reflective large wide-field telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terebizh, V. Yu.

    2008-06-01

    Two versions of a fast, purely reflective Paul-Baker-type telescope are discussed, each with an 8.4-m aperture, 3° diameter flat field and f/1.25 focal ratio. The first version is based on a common, even asphere type of surface with zero conic constant. The primary and tertiary mirrors are 6th order aspheres, while the secondary mirror is an 8th order asphere (referred to here for brevity, as the 6/8/6 configuration). The D 80 diameter of a star image varies from 0″.18 on the optical axis up to 0″.27 at the edge of the field (9.3-13.5 μm). The second version of the telescope is based on a polysag surface type, which uses a polynomial expansion in the sag z, r^2 = 2R_0 z - left( {1 + b} right)z^2 + a_3 z^3 + a_4 z^3 + a_4 z^4 + ldots + a_N z^N instead of the common form of aspheric surface. This approach results in somewhat better images, with D 80 ranging from 0″.16 to 0″.23, using a lower-order 3/4/3 combination of powers for the mirror surfaces. An additional example with 3.5-m aperture, 3°.5 diameter flat field, and f/1.25 focal ratio featuring near-diffraction-limited image quality is also presented.

  13. Science yield estimate with the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traub, Wesley A.; Breckinridge, James; Greene, Thomas P.; Guyon, Olivier; Jeremy Kasdin, N.; Macintosh, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    The coronagraph instrument (CGI) on the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope will directly image and spectrally characterize planets and circumstellar disks around nearby stars. Here we estimate the expected science yield of the CGI for known radial-velocity (RV) planets and potential circumstellar disks. The science return is estimated for three types of coronagraphs: the hybrid Lyot and shaped pupil are the currently planned designs, and the phase-induced amplitude apodizing complex mask coronagraph is the backup design. We compare the potential performance of each type for imaging as well as spectroscopy. We find that the RV targets can be imaged in sufficient numbers to produce substantial advances in the science of nearby exoplanets. To illustrate the potential for circumstellar disk detections, we estimate the brightness of zodiacal-type disks, which could be detected simultaneously during RV planet observations.

  14. Affordable Wide-field Optical Space Surveillance using sCMOS and GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, P.; McGraw, J.; Ackermann, M.

    2016-09-01

    Recent improvements in sCMOS technology allow for affordable, wide-field, and rapid cadence surveillance from LEO to out past GEO using largely off-the-shelf hardware. sCMOS sensors, until very recently, suffered from several shortcomings when compared to CCD sensors - lower sensitivity, smaller physical size and less predictable noise characteristics. Sensors that overcome the first two of these are now available commercially and the principals at J.T. McGraw and Associates (JTMA) have developed observing strategies that minimize the impact of the third, while leveraging the key features of sCMOS, fast readout and low average readout noise. JTMA has integrated a new generation sCMOS sensor into an existing COTS telescope system in order to develop and test new detection techniques designed for uncued optical surveillance across a wide range of apparent object angular rates - from degree per second scale of LEO objects to a few arcseconds per second for objects out past GEO. One further complication arises from this: increased useful frame rate means increased data volume. Fortunately, GPU technology continues to advance at a breakneck pace and we report on the results and performance of our new detection techniques implemented on new generation GPUs. Early results show significance within 20% of the expected theoretical limiting signal-to-noise using commodity GPUs in near real time across a wide range of object parameters, closing the gap in detectivity between moving objects and tracked objects.

  15. Large filters for wide-field survey telescope LSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent; Sassolas, Benoit; Flaminio, Raffaele; Forest, Daniéle; Lagrange, Bernard; Michel, Christophe; Antilogus, Pierre

    2012-09-01

    The LSST design foresees the use of six wide-band large optical filters that can alternatively be moved in front of the CCD camera. Each of the six filters has a different band-pass covering all the wavelengths from 300 nm to 1200 nm. The way to achieve this is to coat an optimized optical thin films stack on a filter substrate. Each filter requires a specific design using specific appropriate materials. The main characteristics of these filters, that constitute a real technological challenge, are: their relatively large size - their radii of curvature (about 5.6 m) that represent a sagitta of 12,5 mm that increases the uniformity complexity, the large rejection band requirements with transmission lower than 0.01 % out of the band and a transmission of 95 % over the band-pass. This paper proposes to show the problematic and the results obtained at LMA (Laboratoire des Matériaux Avancés-FRANCE) to the purpose of realizing these filters using the IBS (Ion Beam Sputtering) deposition technique. The results obtained with High-Pass/Low-Pass structures will be presented. Experimental results will be shown concerning the R-band filter (552-691 nm). An overview of the work to be done to realize transmittance map over large filters will be given.

  16. Assessment Practices of Advanced Field Ecology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lei, Simon A.

    2010-01-01

    Learning is an active process, best facilitated by involving the learning in cognitive engagement with the information to be learned. Most college ecology instructors consist of lecture and exams, but also include active components of laboratories and field trips (campus and off-campus). Field trips can be subdivided into three major phases:…

  17. Wide field of view spectroscopy using Fabry-Perot Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikoleyczik, Jonathan

    We present a high resolution spectrometer consisting of dual solid Fabry-Perot Interferometers (FPIs). This work is intended to be an all inclusive documentation of the instrument including discussion of the design of this instrument, the methods used in data reduction, and the analysis of these data. Each FPI is made of a single piece of L-BBH2 glass which has a high index of refraction n 2.07 with a thickness on the order of 100 mum. Each is then coated with partially reflective mirrors to create a resonant cavity and thus achieve a spectral resolution of R 30,000. Running the FPIs in tandem reduces the overlapping orders and allows for a much wider free spectral range and higher contrast. We will also discuss the properties of the FPIs which we have measured. This includes the tuning of the FPIs which is achieved by adjusting the temperature and thus changing the FPI gap and the refractive index of the material. The spectrometer then moves spatially in order to get spectral information at every point in the field of view. We select spectral lines for further analysis and create maps of the line depths across the field. Using this technique we are able to measure the fluorescence of chlorophyll in plants and attempt to observe zodiacal light. In the chlorophyll analysis we are able to detect chlorophyll fluorescence using the line depth in a plant using the sky as a reference solar spectrum. This instrument has possible applications in either a cubesat or aerial observations to measure bulk plant activity over large areas.

  18. Advanced Interconnect and Device-Field Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-15

    Essaaidi NATO Advanced Research Workshop : Bianisotropics 2002, 99th Conference on Electromagnetics of Complex Media 8-11May, 2002, Marrakech , Morocco...Bianisotropics 2002, 99th Conference on Electromagnetics of Complex Media 8-11May, 2002, Marrakech , Morocco. Study of Substrates Bi-anisotropy Effects on...Conference on Electromagnetics of Complex Media 8-11May, 2002, Marrakech , Morocco. Dielectric Substrates Anisotropic Effects on The Characteristics of

  19. Wide-field Fourier ptychographic microscopy using laser illumination source

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jaebum; Lu, Hangwen; Ou, Xiaoze; Zhou, Haojiang; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-01-01

    Fourier ptychographic (FP) microscopy is a coherent imaging method that can synthesize an image with a higher bandwidth using multiple low-bandwidth images captured at different spatial frequency regions. The method’s demand for multiple images drives the need for a brighter illumination scheme and a high-frame-rate camera for a faster acquisition. We report the use of a guided laser beam as an illumination source for an FP microscope. It uses a mirror array and a 2-dimensional scanning Galvo mirror system to provide a sample with plane-wave illuminations at diverse incidence angles. The use of a laser presents speckles in the image capturing process due to reflections between glass surfaces in the system. They appear as slowly varying background fluctuations in the final reconstructed image. We are able to mitigate these artifacts by including a phase image obtained by differential phase contrast (DPC) deconvolution in the FP algorithm. We use a 1-Watt laser configured to provide a collimated beam with 150 mW of power and beam diameter of 1 cm to allow for the total capturing time of 0.96 seconds for 96 raw FPM input images in our system, with the camera sensor’s frame rate being the bottleneck for speed. We demonstrate a factor of 4 resolution improvement using a 0.1 NA objective lens over the full camera field-of-view of 2.7 mm by 1.5 mm. PMID:27896016

  20. Wide-field Raman imaging for bone detection in tissue

    PubMed Central

    Papour, Asael; Kwak, Jin Hee; Taylor, Zach; Wu, Benjamin; Stafsudd, Oscar; Grundfest, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate bone growth in soft tissue can occur after trauma to a limb and can cause a disruption to the healing process. This is known as Heterotopic Ossification (HO) in which regions in the tissue start to mineralize and form microscopic bone-like structures. These structures continue to calcify and develop into large, non-functional bony masses that cause pain, limit limb movement, and expose the tissue to reoccurring infections; in the case of open wounds this can lead to amputation as a result of a failed wound. Both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and X-ray imaging have poor sensitivity and specificity for the detection of HO, thus delaying therapy and leading to poor patient outcomes. We present a low-power, fast (1 frame per second) optical Raman imaging system with a large field of view (1 cm2) that can differentiate bone tissue from soft tissue without spectroscopy, this in contrast to conventional Raman microscopy systems. This capability may allow for the development of instrumentation which permits bedside diagnosis of HO. PMID:26504639

  1. Wide-field Raman imaging for bone detection in tissue.

    PubMed

    Papour, Asael; Kwak, Jin Hee; Taylor, Zach; Wu, Benjamin; Stafsudd, Oscar; Grundfest, Warren

    2015-10-01

    Inappropriate bone growth in soft tissue can occur after trauma to a limb and can cause a disruption to the healing process. This is known as Heterotopic Ossification (HO) in which regions in the tissue start to mineralize and form microscopic bone-like structures. These structures continue to calcify and develop into large, non-functional bony masses that cause pain, limit limb movement, and expose the tissue to reoccurring infections; in the case of open wounds this can lead to amputation as a result of a failed wound. Both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and X-ray imaging have poor sensitivity and specificity for the detection of HO, thus delaying therapy and leading to poor patient outcomes. We present a low-power, fast (1 frame per second) optical Raman imaging system with a large field of view (1 cm(2)) that can differentiate bone tissue from soft tissue without spectroscopy, this in contrast to conventional Raman microscopy systems. This capability may allow for the development of instrumentation which permits bedside diagnosis of HO.

  2. Fibre assignment in next-generation wide-field spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Isaac; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Azzaro, Marco; Prada, Francisco; Sánchez, Justo; Becerril, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    We present an optimized algorithm for assigning fibres to targets in next-generation fibre-fed multi-object spectrographs. The method, which we have called the draining algorithm, ensures that the maximum number of targets in a given target field is observed in the first few tiles. Using randomly distributed targets and mock galaxy catalogues, we have estimated that the gain provided by the draining algorithm, compared to a random assignment, can be as much as 2 per cent for the first tiles. For a survey such as the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BigBOSS), this would imply saving for observation several hundred thousand objects or, alternatively, reducing the covered area in ˜350 deg2. An important advantage of this method is that the fibre collision problem can be solved easily and in an optimal way. We also discuss the additional optimizations of the fibre-positioning process. In particular, we show that if we allow for the rotation of the focal plane, we can improve the efficiency of the process by ˜3.5-4.5 per cent, even if only small adjustments are permitted (up to 2°). For instruments that allow large rotations of the focal plane, the expected gain increases to ˜5-6 per cent. Therefore, these results strongly support the use of focal plane rotation in future spectrographs, as far as the efficiency of the fibre-positioning process is concerned. Finally, we discuss the implications of our optimizations and provide some basic hints for an optimal survey strategy, based on the number of targets per positioner.

  3. Geometry of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field/Planetary Camera field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Andrew; Yanny, Brian

    1994-01-01

    We present a solution for the relative positions and orientations of the four charge coupled device (CCD) chips on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Planetary Camera (PC). An accurate solution is required when matching HST images with ground-based images or with one another. The solution is accurate to about 2/3 PC pixel or about .03 sec, a tenfold improvement over the best previous solution. The CCDs are rotated relative to one another by up to 1 deg. The solution is based on images taken between December 1990 and June 1992 and is stable over that entire period. We also present a solution for the relative positions and orientations of the four CCD chips on the HST Wide Field Camera (WFC). This solution is accurate to about 1/2 WFC pixel or about .05 sec.

  4. Advanced Fuzzy Potential Field Method for Mobile Robot Obstacle Avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Wook; Kwak, Hwan-Joo; Kang, Young-Chang; Kim, Dong W.

    2016-01-01

    An advanced fuzzy potential field method for mobile robot obstacle avoidance is proposed. The potential field method primarily deals with the repulsive forces surrounding obstacles, while fuzzy control logic focuses on fuzzy rules that handle linguistic variables and describe the knowledge of experts. The design of a fuzzy controller—advanced fuzzy potential field method (AFPFM)—that models and enhances the conventional potential field method is proposed and discussed. This study also examines the rule-explosion problem of conventional fuzzy logic and assesses the performance of our proposed AFPFM through simulations carried out using a mobile robot. PMID:27123001

  5. Advanced Fuzzy Potential Field Method for Mobile Robot Obstacle Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Wook; Kwak, Hwan-Joo; Kang, Young-Chang; Kim, Dong W

    2016-01-01

    An advanced fuzzy potential field method for mobile robot obstacle avoidance is proposed. The potential field method primarily deals with the repulsive forces surrounding obstacles, while fuzzy control logic focuses on fuzzy rules that handle linguistic variables and describe the knowledge of experts. The design of a fuzzy controller--advanced fuzzy potential field method (AFPFM)--that models and enhances the conventional potential field method is proposed and discussed. This study also examines the rule-explosion problem of conventional fuzzy logic and assesses the performance of our proposed AFPFM through simulations carried out using a mobile robot.

  6. World History as an Advanced Academic Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vadney, T. E.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses world history as an academic field at the University of Manitoba (Canada). Advocates developing programs with a specifically global approach. Argues research and publishing are necessary to win academic recognition and funding. Suggests faculty recruitment remain politically sensitive and proceed gradually. (CH)

  7. Field development projects advance in Norwegian Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Vielvoye, R.

    1992-03-30

    This paper reports on the Norwegian Sea, lying between the Norwegian North Sea and the western flank of the Barents Sea, which is set to become Norway's second oil and gas producing province. Oil is scheduled to start to flow near the end of next year when AS Norske Shell places on production 428 million bbl Draugen field in Block 6407/9, about 60 miles off the coast of mid-Norway in the frontier sea area known as Haltenbanken. Two years later, in 1995, Norske Conoco AS will add to the 95,000 b/d from Draugen when it commissions the world's first concrete hull tension leg platform (TLP) in Heidrun field. The TLP is expected to produce 200,000 b/d of oil and move associated gas by pipeline to the Norwegian mainland to feed a worldscale methanol plant planned for construction at Tjeldbergodden. The Norwegian government also has been asked to approve a gas pipeline link between Haltenbanken and the gas export infrastructure in the North Sea.

  8. Recent advancements of wide-angle polarization analysis with 3He neutron spin filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. C.; Gentile, T. R.; Ye, Q.; Kirchhoff, A.; Watson, S. M.; Rodriguez-Rivera, J. A.; Qiu, Y.; Broholm, C.

    2016-09-01

    Wide-angle polarization analysis with polarized 3He based neutron spin filters (NSFs) has recently been employed on the Multi-Axis Crystal Spectrometer (MACS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). Over the past several years, the apparatus has undergone many upgrades to address the fundamental requirements for wide angle polarization analysis using spin exchange optical pumping based 3He NSFs. In this paper, we report substantial improvements in the on-beam-line performance of the apparatus and progress toward routine user capability. We discuss new standard samples used for 3He NSF characterization and the flipping ratio measurement on MACS. We further discuss the management of stray magnetic fields produced by operation of superconducting magnets on the MACS instrument, which can significantly reduce the 3He polarization relaxation time. Finally, we present the results of recent development of horseshoe-shaped wide angle cells.

  9. UVUDF: Ultraviolet imaging of the Hubble ultra deep field with wide-field camera 3

    SciTech Connect

    Teplitz, Harry I.; Rafelski, Marc; Colbert, James W.; Hanish, Daniel J.; Kurczynski, Peter; Gawiser, Eric; Bond, Nicholas A.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; De Mello, Duilia F.; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Brown, Thomas M.; Coe, Dan; Ferguson, Henry C.; Atek, Hakim; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Gronwall, Caryl; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Ravindranath, Swara; and others

    2013-12-01

    We present an overview of a 90 orbit Hubble Space Telescope treasury program to obtain near-ultraviolet imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field using the Wide Field Camera 3 UVIS detector with the F225W, F275W, and F336W filters. This survey is designed to: (1) investigate the episode of peak star formation activity in galaxies at 1 < z < 2.5; (2) probe the evolution of massive galaxies by resolving sub-galactic units (clumps); (3) examine the escape fraction of ionizing radiation from galaxies at z ∼ 2-3; (4) greatly improve the reliability of photometric redshift estimates; and (5) measure the star formation rate efficiency of neutral atomic-dominated hydrogen gas at z ∼ 1-3. In this overview paper, we describe the survey details and data reduction challenges, including both the necessity of specialized calibrations and the effects of charge transfer inefficiency. We provide a stark demonstration of the effects of charge transfer inefficiency on resultant data products, which when uncorrected, result in uncertain photometry, elongation of morphology in the readout direction, and loss of faint sources far from the readout. We agree with the STScI recommendation that future UVIS observations that require very sensitive measurements use the instrument's capability to add background light through a 'post-flash'. Preliminary results on number counts of UV-selected galaxies and morphology of galaxies at z ∼ 1 are presented. We find that the number density of UV dropouts at redshifts 1.7, 2.1, and 2.7 is largely consistent with the number predicted by published luminosity functions. We also confirm that the image mosaics have sufficient sensitivity and resolution to support the analysis of the evolution of star-forming clumps, reaching 28-29th magnitude depth at 5σ in a 0.''2 radius aperture depending on filter and observing epoch.

  10. CREST Research: Advancing the Field for Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Mosqueda, Laura; Brandl, Bonnie; Otto, Joanne; Stiegel, Lori; Thomas, Randolph; Heisler, Candace

    2008-01-01

    An external advisory board consisting of members from the fields of geriatric internal medicine, family practice geriatrics, criminal prosecution, civil law, police force, adult protective services and victims advocacy was created to advise and guide the research conducted by the Consortium for Research in Elder Self-neglect of Texas (CREST). This panel of experts performed site visits and facilitated the research through responses to biweekly facts sheets and quarterly conference calls. This paper provides the perspective of five of the board members regarding the research findings that were presented at the CREST National Conference in 2006. The discussions outline the successes of the CREST research, describe obstacles and the necessary next steps for continuance of the scientific exploration of this syndrome, and highlight the practice implications of the current and proposed research. PMID:19016972

  11. World-wide association of timberline forest advance with microsite type along a precipitation gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A. C.; Yeakley, A.

    2009-12-01

    Timberline forest advance associated with global climate change is occurring worldwide and is often associated with microsites. Microsites, controlled by topography, substrates, and plant cover, are localized regions dictating temperature, moisture, and solar radiation. These abiotic factors are integral to seedling survival. From a compilation of world-wide information on seedling regeneration on microsites at timberline, including our on-going research in the Pacific Northwest, we classified available literature into four microsite categories, related microsite category to annual precipitation, and used analysis of variance to detect statistical differences in microsite type and associated precipitation. We found statistical differences (p = 0.022) indicating the usefulness of understanding microsite/precipitation associations in detecting world-wide trends in timberline expansion. For example, wetter timberlines with downed wood, had regeneration associated with nurse logs, whereas on windy, drier landscapes, regeneration was typically associated with either leeward sides of tree clumps or on microsites protected from frost by overstory canopy. In our study of timberline expansion in the Pacific Northwest, we expect that such knowledge of microsite types associated with forest expansion will reveal a better understanding of mechanisms and rates of timberline forest advance during global warming.

  12. Large-field-of-view wide-spectrum artificial reflecting superposition compound eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chi-Chieh

    The study of the imaging principles of natural compound eyes has become an active area of research and has fueled the advancement of modern optics with many attractive design features beyond those available with conventional technologies. Most prominent among all compound eyes is the reflecting superposition compound eyes (RSCEs) found in some decapods. They are extraordinary imaging systems with numerous optical features such as minimum chromatic aberration, wide-angle field of view (FOV), high sensitivity to light and superb acuity to motion. Inspired by their remarkable visual system, we were able to implement the unique lens-free, reflection-based imaging mechanisms into a miniaturized, large-FOV optical imaging device operating at the wide visible spectrum to minimize chromatic aberration without any additional post-image processing. First, two micro-transfer printing methods, a multiple and a shear-assisted transfer printing technique, were studied and discussed to realize life-sized artificial RSCEs. The processes exploited the differential adhesive tendencies of the microstructures formed between a donor and a transfer substrate to accomplish an efficient release and transfer process. These techniques enabled conformal wrapping of three-dimensional (3-D) microstructures, initially fabricated in two-dimensional (2-D) layouts with standard fabrication technology onto a wide range of surfaces with complex and curvilinear shapes. Final part of this dissertation was focused on implementing the key operational features of the natural RSCEs into large-FOV, wide-spectrum artificial RSCEs as an optical imaging device suitable for the wide visible spectrum. Our devices can form real, clear images based on reflection rather than refraction, hence avoiding chromatic aberration due to dispersion by the optical materials. Compared to the performance of conventional refractive lenses of comparable size, our devices demonstrated minimum chromatic aberration, exceptional

  13. Perihelion advance of a test particle in the Kerr field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Enamul

    2017-01-01

    Here I represent a Perihelion advance of a test particle in the Kerr field. I assume that the spin of the central body to be very small and planar motion occurs only in the equatorial plane. I find some physical picture which is different from the case of Schwarzschild field and can recover the picture for Schwarzschild field. We use perturbation method to solve the equation of motion.

  14. Automatic Processing of Chinese GF-1 Wide Field of View Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Wan, Y.; Wang, B.; Kang, Y.; Xiong, J.

    2015-04-01

    The wide field of view (WFV) imaging instrument carried on the Chinese GF-1 satellite includes four cameras. Each camera has 200km swath-width that can acquire earth image at the same time and the observation can be repeated within only 4 days. This enables the applications of remote sensing imagery to advance from non-scheduled land-observation to periodically land-monitoring in the areas that use the images in such resolutions. This paper introduces an automatic data analysing and processing technique for the wide-swath images acquired by GF-1 satellite. Firstly, the images are validated by a self-adaptive Gaussian mixture model based cloud detection method to confirm whether they are qualified and suitable to be involved into the automatic processing workflow. Then the ground control points (GCPs) are quickly and automatically matched from the public geo-information products such as the rectified panchromatic images of Landsat-8. Before the geometric correction, the cloud detection results are also used to eliminate the invalid GCPs distributed in the cloud covered areas, which obviously reduces the ratio of blunders of GCPs. The geometric correction module not only rectifies the rational function models (RFMs), but also provides the self-calibration model and parameters for the non-linear distortion, and it is iteratively processed to detect blunders. The maximum geometric distortion in WFV image decreases from about 10-15 pixels to 1-2 pixels when compensated by self-calibration model. The processing experiments involve hundreds of WFV images of GF-1 satellite acquired from June to September 2013, which covers the whole mainland of China. All the processing work can be finished by one operator within 2 days on a desktop computer made up by a second-generation Intel Core-i7 CPU and a 4-solid-State-Disk array. The digital ortho maps (DOM) are automatically generated with 3 arc second Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The geometric accuracies of the

  15. Laser Light-field Fusion for Wide-field Lensfree On-chip Phase Contrast Microscopy of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Wide-field lensfree on-chip microscopy, which leverages holography principles to capture interferometric light-field encodings without lenses, is an emerging imaging modality with widespread interest given the large field-of-view compared to lens-based techniques. In this study, we introduce the idea of laser light-field fusion for lensfree on-chip phase contrast microscopy for detecting nanoparticles, where interferometric laser light-field encodings acquired using a lensfree, on-chip setup with laser pulsations at different wavelengths are fused to produce marker-free phase contrast images of particles at the nanometer scale. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate, for the first time, a wide-field lensfree on-chip instrument successfully detecting 300 nm particles across a large field-of-view of ~30 mm2 without any specialized or intricate sample preparation, or the use of synthetic aperture- or shift-based techniques. PMID:27958348

  16. Laser Light-field Fusion for Wide-field Lensfree On-chip Phase Contrast Microscopy of Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Wide-field lensfree on-chip microscopy, which leverages holography principles to capture interferometric light-field encodings without lenses, is an emerging imaging modality with widespread interest given the large field-of-view compared to lens-based techniques. In this study, we introduce the idea of laser light-field fusion for lensfree on-chip phase contrast microscopy for detecting nanoparticles, where interferometric laser light-field encodings acquired using a lensfree, on-chip setup with laser pulsations at different wavelengths are fused to produce marker-free phase contrast images of particles at the nanometer scale. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate, for the first time, a wide-field lensfree on-chip instrument successfully detecting 300 nm particles across a large field-of-view of ~30 mm2 without any specialized or intricate sample preparation, or the use of synthetic aperture- or shift-based techniques.

  17. Laser Light-field Fusion for Wide-field Lensfree On-chip Phase Contrast Microscopy of Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander

    2016-12-13

    Wide-field lensfree on-chip microscopy, which leverages holography principles to capture interferometric light-field encodings without lenses, is an emerging imaging modality with widespread interest given the large field-of-view compared to lens-based techniques. In this study, we introduce the idea of laser light-field fusion for lensfree on-chip phase contrast microscopy for detecting nanoparticles, where interferometric laser light-field encodings acquired using a lensfree, on-chip setup with laser pulsations at different wavelengths are fused to produce marker-free phase contrast images of particles at the nanometer scale. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate, for the first time, a wide-field lensfree on-chip instrument successfully detecting 300 nm particles across a large field-of-view of ~30 mm(2) without any specialized or intricate sample preparation, or the use of synthetic aperture- or shift-based techniques.

  18. Brief wide-field photostimuli evoke and modulate oscillatory reverberating activity in cortical networks

    PubMed Central

    Pulizzi, Rocco; Musumeci, Gabriele; Van den Haute, Chris; Van De Vijver, Sebastiaan; Baekelandt, Veerle; Giugliano, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Cell assemblies manipulation by optogenetics is pivotal to advance neuroscience and neuroengineering. In in vivo applications, photostimulation often broadly addresses a population of cells simultaneously, leading to feed-forward and to reverberating responses in recurrent microcircuits. The former arise from direct activation of targets downstream, and are straightforward to interpret. The latter are consequence of feedback connectivity and may reflect a variety of time-scales and complex dynamical properties. We investigated wide-field photostimulation in cortical networks in vitro, employing substrate-integrated microelectrode arrays and long-term cultured neuronal networks. We characterized the effect of brief light pulses, while restricting the expression of channelrhodopsin to principal neurons. We evoked robust reverberating responses, oscillating in the physiological gamma frequency range, and found that such a frequency could be reliably manipulated varying the light pulse duration, not its intensity. By pharmacology, mathematical modelling, and intracellular recordings, we conclude that gamma oscillations likely emerge as in vivo from the excitatory-inhibitory interplay and that, unexpectedly, the light stimuli transiently facilitate excitatory synaptic transmission. Of relevance for in vitro models of (dys)functional cortical microcircuitry and in vivo manipulations of cell assemblies, we give for the first time evidence of network-level consequences of the alteration of synaptic physiology by optogenetics. PMID:27099182

  19. Ground characterization of the Wide-field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, John C.; Larsen, Mark F.; Peterson, James Q.; Sargent, Steven D.

    1998-11-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) is a small cryogenic spaceborne infrared telescope being readied for launch in September 1998 as the fifth of NASA's Small Explorers. WIRE utilizes two 128 X 128 Si:As Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) produced by Boeing North American with a 30 cm diameter Ritchey Cretien diamond turned mirror system. This mission takes advantage of recent advances in infrared array detector technology to provide a large sensitivity gain over previously flown missions. Two broad pass bands are defined for a deep pointed survey to search for protogalaxies and to study the evolution of starburst galaxies. The Space Dynamics Laboratory at Utah State University (SDL/USU) used the multifunction infrared calibrator and other special purpose cryogenic equipment to perform a ground characterization of the WIRE instrument. The focus was verified cold with two independent measurements. Both in-band and out-of-band Relative Spectral Response measurements were made; some sensitivity to temperature, bias voltage, and location on the long wavelength focal plane array were found. Dark current and dark noise measurements are also reported.

  20. Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer cryogenic support system lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Brett; Thompson, Brian; Schick, Scott

    2010-08-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) is a JPL-managed MIDEX mission to perform an infrared all-sky survey. The WISE instrument, developed by the Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL), is a 40-cm cryogenically-cooled telescope which includes a cryogenic scan mirror and four infrared focal planes (2-HgCdTe, 2-Si:As). Cooling the instrument to the desired temperatures is accomplished by a two-stage, solid hydrogen cryostat, provided by Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center (LMATC). Required temperatures for the instrument optics and Si:As focal planes are <13 K and <7.6 K respectively. To reduce heat loads, the vacuum shell is isolated from the spacecraft bus via composite struts and radiatively cooled to <200 K. The telescope aperture is protected from on-orbit environmental loads via a two-stage radiatively cooled aperture shade. WISE was successfully launched into a 530 km, polar orbit on December 14, 2009, beginning a 10-month mission to survey the entire sky in the infrared.

  1. GravityCam: wide-field, high-resolution imaging and high-speed photometry instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKay, Craig; Dominik, Martin; Steele, Iain

    2016-08-01

    The limits to the angular resolution achievable with conventional ground-based telescopes are unchanged over 70 years. Atmospheric turbulence limits image quality to typically 1 arcsec in practice. We have developed a new concept of ground-based imaging instrument called GravityCam capable of delivering significantly sharper images from the ground than is normally possible without adaptive optics. The acquisition of visible images at high speed without significant noise penalty has been made possible by advances in optical and near IR imaging technologies. Images are recorded at high speed and then aligned before combination and can yield a 3-5 fold improvement in image resolution. Very wide survey fields are possible with widefield telescope optics. We describe GravityCam and detail its application to accelerate greatly the rate of detection of Earth size planets by gravitational microlensing. GravityCam will also improve substantially the quality of weak shear studies of dark matter distribution in distant clusters of galaxies. The microlensing survey will also provide a vast dataset for asteroseismology studies. In addition, GravityCam promises to generate a unique data set that will help us understand of the population of the Kuiper belt and possibly the Oort cloud.

  2. A testbed for wide-field, high-resolution, gigapixel-class cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittle, David S.; Marks, Daniel L.; Son, Hui S.; Kim, Jungsang; Brady, David J.

    2013-05-01

    The high resolution and wide field of view (FOV) of the AWARE (Advanced Wide FOV Architectures for Image Reconstruction and Exploitation) gigapixel class cameras present new challenges in calibration, mechanical testing, and optical performance evaluation. The AWARE system integrates an array of micro-cameras in a multiscale design to achieve gigapixel sampling at video rates. Alignment and optical testing of the micro-cameras is vital in compositing engines, which require pixel-level accurate mappings over the entire array of cameras. A testbed has been developed to automatically calibrate and measure the optical performance of the entire camera array. This testbed utilizes translation and rotation stages to project a ray into any micro-camera of the AWARE system. A spatial light modulator is projected through a telescope to form an arbitrary object space pattern at infinity. This collimated source is then reflected by an elevation stage mirror for pointing through the aperture of the objective into the micro-optics and eventually the detector of the micro-camera. Different targets can be projected with the spatial light modulator for measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the system, fiducials in the overlap regions for registration and compositing, distortion mapping, illumination profiles, thermal stability, and focus calibration. The mathematics of the testbed mechanics are derived for finding the positions of the stages to achieve a particular incident angle into the camera, along with calibration steps for alignment of the camera and testbed coordinate axes. Measurement results for the AWARE-2 gigapixel camera are presented for MTF, focus calibration, illumination profile, fiducial mapping across the micro-camera for registration and distortion correction, thermal stability, and alignment of the camera on the testbed.

  3. A testbed for wide-field, high-resolution, gigapixel-class cameras.

    PubMed

    Kittle, David S; Marks, Daniel L; Son, Hui S; Kim, Jungsang; Brady, David J

    2013-05-01

    The high resolution and wide field of view (FOV) of the AWARE (Advanced Wide FOV Architectures for Image Reconstruction and Exploitation) gigapixel class cameras present new challenges in calibration, mechanical testing, and optical performance evaluation. The AWARE system integrates an array of micro-cameras in a multiscale design to achieve gigapixel sampling at video rates. Alignment and optical testing of the micro-cameras is vital in compositing engines, which require pixel-level accurate mappings over the entire array of cameras. A testbed has been developed to automatically calibrate and measure the optical performance of the entire camera array. This testbed utilizes translation and rotation stages to project a ray into any micro-camera of the AWARE system. A spatial light modulator is projected through a telescope to form an arbitrary object space pattern at infinity. This collimated source is then reflected by an elevation stage mirror for pointing through the aperture of the objective into the micro-optics and eventually the detector of the micro-camera. Different targets can be projected with the spatial light modulator for measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the system, fiducials in the overlap regions for registration and compositing, distortion mapping, illumination profiles, thermal stability, and focus calibration. The mathematics of the testbed mechanics are derived for finding the positions of the stages to achieve a particular incident angle into the camera, along with calibration steps for alignment of the camera and testbed coordinate axes. Measurement results for the AWARE-2 gigapixel camera are presented for MTF, focus calibration, illumination profile, fiducial mapping across the micro-camera for registration and distortion correction, thermal stability, and alignment of the camera on the testbed.

  4. Wide field/planetary camera optics study. [for the large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Design feasibility of the baseline optical design concept was established for the wide field/planetary camera (WF/PC) and will be used with the space telescope (ST) to obtain high angular resolution astronomical information over a wide field. The design concept employs internal optics to relay the ST image to a CCD detector system. Optical design performance predictions, sensitivity and tolerance analyses, manufacturability of the optical components, and acceptance testing of the two mirror Cassegrain relays are discussed.

  5. Wide-field monitoring strategy for the study of fast optical transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, Grigory; Bondar, Sergey; Karpov, Sergey; Guarnieri, Adriano; Bartolini, Corrado; Greco, Giuseppe; Piccioni, Adalberto

    2010-10-01

    We discuss the strategy of search for fast optical transients accompanying gamma-ray bursts by means of continuous monitoring of wide sky fields with high temporal resolution. We describe the design, performance and results of our cameras, FAVOR and TORTORA. Also we discuss the perspectives of this strategy and possible design of next-generation equipment for wide-field monitoring which will be able to detect optical transients and to study their color and polarization properties with high time resolution.

  6. Advanced Materials for High Temperature, High Performance, Wide Bandgap Power Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neal, Chad B.; McGee, Brad; McPherson, Brice; Stabach, Jennifer; Lollar, Richard; Liederbach, Ross; Passmore, Brandon

    2016-01-01

    Advanced packaging materials must be utilized to take full advantage of the benefits of the superior electrical and thermal properties of wide bandgap power devices in the development of next generation power electronics systems. In this manuscript, the use of advanced materials for key packaging processes and components in multi-chip power modules will be discussed. For example, to date, there has been significant development in silver sintering paste as a high temperature die attach material replacement for conventional solder-based attach due to the improved thermal and mechanical characteristics as well as lower processing temperatures. In order to evaluate the bond quality and performance of this material, shear strength, thermal characteristics, and void quality for a number of silver sintering paste materials were analyzed as a die attach alternative to solder. In addition, as high voltage wide bandgap devices shift from engineering samples to commercial components, passivation materials become key in preventing premature breakdown in power modules. High temperature, high dielectric strength potting materials were investigated to be used to encapsulate and passivate components internal to a power module. The breakdown voltage up to 30 kV and corresponding leakage current for these materials as a function of temperature is also presented. Lastly, high temperature plastic housing materials are important for not only discrete devices but also for power modules. As the operational temperature of the device and/or ambient temperature increases, the mechanical strength and dielectric properties are dramatically reduced. Therefore, the electrical characteristics such as breakdown voltage and leakage current as a function of temperature for housing materials are presented.

  7. Plant Aquaporins: Genome-Wide Identification, Transcriptomics, Proteomics, and Advanced Analytical Tools

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Rupesh K.; Sonah, Humira; Bélanger, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are channel-forming integral membrane proteins that facilitate the movement of water and many other small molecules. Compared to animals, plants contain a much higher number of AQPs in their genome. Homology-based identification of AQPs in sequenced species is feasible because of the high level of conservation of protein sequences across plant species. Genome-wide characterization of AQPs has highlighted several important aspects such as distribution, genetic organization, evolution and conserved features governing solute specificity. From a functional point of view, the understanding of AQP transport system has expanded rapidly with the help of transcriptomics and proteomics data. The efficient analysis of enormous amounts of data generated through omic scale studies has been facilitated through computational advancements. Prediction of protein tertiary structures, pore architecture, cavities, phosphorylation sites, heterodimerization, and co-expression networks has become more sophisticated and accurate with increasing computational tools and pipelines. However, the effectiveness of computational approaches is based on the understanding of physiological and biochemical properties, transport kinetics, solute specificity, molecular interactions, sequence variations, phylogeny and evolution of aquaporins. For this purpose, tools like Xenopus oocyte assays, yeast expression systems, artificial proteoliposomes, and lipid membranes have been efficiently exploited to study the many facets that influence solute transport by AQPs. In the present review, we discuss genome-wide identification of AQPs in plants in relation with recent advancements in analytical tools, and their availability and technological challenges as they apply to AQPs. An exhaustive review of omics resources available for AQP research is also provided in order to optimize their efficient utilization. Finally, a detailed catalog of computational tools and analytical pipelines is

  8. Development of an advanced pitch active control system for a wide body jet aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinn, Wiley A.; Rising, Jerry J.; Davis, Walt J.

    1984-01-01

    An advanced PACS control law was developed for a commercial wide-body transport (Lockheed L-1011) by using modern control theory. Validity of the control law was demonstrated by piloted flight simulation tests on the NASA Langley visual motion simulator. The PACS design objective was to develop a PACS that would provide good flying qualities to negative 10 percent static stability margins that were equivalent to those of the baseline aircraft at a 15 percent static stability margin which is normal for the L-1011. Also, the PACS was to compensate for high-Mach/high-g instabilities that degrade flying qualities during upset recoveries and maneuvers. The piloted flight simulation tests showed that the PACS met the design objectives. The simulation demonstrated good flying qualities to negative 20 percent static stability margins for hold, cruise and high-speed flight conditions. Analysis and wind tunnel tests performed on other Lockheed programs indicate that the PACS could be used on an advanced transport configuration to provide a 4 percent fuel savings which results from reduced trim drag by flying at negative static stability margins.

  9. Epidermal electronics with advanced capabilities in near-field communication.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeonghyun; Banks, Anthony; Cheng, Huanyu; Xie, Zhaoqian; Xu, Sheng; Jang, Kyung-In; Lee, Jung Woo; Liu, Zhuangjian; Gutruf, Philipp; Huang, Xian; Wei, Pinghung; Liu, Fei; Li, Kan; Dalal, Mitul; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Feng, Xue; Huang, Yonggang; Gupta, Sanjay; Paik, Ungyu; Rogers, John A

    2015-02-25

    Epidermal electronics with advanced capabilities in near field communications (NFC) are presented. The systems include stretchable coils and thinned NFC chips on thin, low modulus stretchable adhesives, to allow seamless, conformal contact with the skin and simultaneous capabilities for wireless interfaces to any standard, NFC-enabled smartphone, even under extreme deformation and after/during normal daily activities.

  10. Spectral wide-field microscopic fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging in live cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Qin, Guiqi; Chai, Liuying; Zhang, Jiang; Yang, Fangfang; Yang, Hongqin; Xie, Shusen; Chen, Tongsheng

    2015-08-01

    With its precise, sensitive, and nondestructive features, spectral unmixing-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy has been widely applied to visualize intracellular biological events. In this report, we set up a spectral wide-field microscopic FRET imaging system by integrating a varispec liquid crystal tunable filter into a wide-field microscope for quantitative FRET measurement in living cells. We implemented a representative emission-spectral unmixing-based FRET measurement method on this platform to simultaneously acquire pixel-to-pixel images of both FRET efficiency (E ) and acceptor-to-donor concentration ratio (R C ) in living HepG2 cells expressing fusion proteins in the presence or absence of free donors and acceptors and obtained consistent results with other instruments and methods. This stable and low-cost spectral wide-field microscopic FRET imaging system provides a new toolbox for imaging molecular events with high spatial resolution in living cells.

  11. Development of high-speed and wide-angle visible observation diagnostics on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak using catadioptric optics.

    PubMed

    Yang, J H; Yang, X F; Hu, L Q; Zang, Q; Han, X F; Shao, C Q; Sun, T F; Chen, H; Wang, T F; Li, F J; Hu, A L

    2013-08-01

    A new wide-angle endoscope for visible light observation on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) has been recently developed. The head section of the optical system is based on a mirror reflection design that is similar to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-like wide-angle observation diagnostic on the Joint European Torus. However, the optical system design has been simplified and improved. As a result, the global transmittance of the system is as high as 79.6% in the wavelength range from 380 to 780 nm, and the spatial resolution is <5 mm for the full depth of field (4000 mm). The optical system also has a large relative aperture (1:2.4) and can be applied in high-speed camera diagnostics. As an important diagnostic tool, the optical system has been installed on the HT-7 (Hefei Tokamak-7) for its final experimental campaign, and the experiments confirmed that it can be applied to the investigation of transient processes in plasma, such as ELMy eruptions in H-mode, on EAST.

  12. Wide field of view adaptive optical system for lightweight deployable telescope technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComas, Brian K.; Cermak, Michael A.; Friedman, Edward J.

    2003-02-01

    A NASA research contract (NAS1-00116) was awarded to Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in January 2000 to study wide field-of-view adaptive optical systems. These systems will be required on future high resolution Earth remote sensing systems that employ large, flexible, lightweight, deployed primary mirrors. The deformations from these primary mirrors will introduce aberrations into the optical system, which must be removed by corrective optics. For economic reasons, these remote sensing systems must have a large field-of-view (a few degrees). Unlike ground-based adaptive optical systems, which have a negligible field-of-view, the adaptive optics on these space-based remote sensing systems will be required to correct for the deformations in the primary mirror over the entire field-of-view. A new error function, which is an enhancement to conventional adaptive optics, for wide field-of-view optical systems will be introduced. This paper will present the goals of the NASA research project and its progress. The initial phase of this research project is a demonstration of the wide field-of-view adaptive optics theory. A breadboard has been designed and built for this purpose. The design and assembly of the breadboard will be presented, along with the final results for this phase of the research project. Finally, this paper will show the applicability of wide field-of-view adaptive optics to space-based astronomical systems.

  13. SuperBIT: Wide-field, Sub-arcsecond Imaging from the Super Pressure Balloon Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Jason; Fraisse, Aurélien A.; Jones, William C.; Netterfield, Calvin Barth; Massey, Richard

    2014-06-01

    The scientific potential of near-diffraction-limited imaging from mid-latitude ultra-long duration balloon payloads is well known. The combination of diffraction-limited angular resolution, extreme stability, space-like backgrounds, and long integrations enables transformative opportunities in studies ranging from the weak lensing of galaxy clusters and cosmic shear to the search for exoplanets. Collaborators at the University of Toronto have recently integrated a half-meter class telescope with a prototype subarcsecond pointing system. SuperBIT will adapt the existing system to the requirements of the mid-latitude super-pressure balloon (SPB) payload, and demonstrate its imaging capability during an ultra-long duration balloon flight that will take off from Wanaka, New Zealand, in the 2016-17 Austral summer. The demonstration instrument will provide imaging with a half-degree field of view and 0.3-arcsecond resolution in five bands between 300 and1000 nm, with sensitivities in the shape-band exceeding 24th magnitude(>5 sigma) in 300 seconds of integration. Our observing schedule will be split between a performance verification sample, a photometric and spectroscopic calibration set, a deep field, and a science catalog. The performance verification set prioritizes a sample of thirty clusters that have been previously well studied with the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys, the Chandra X-ray observatory, and for which there are Compton-Y parameter data from millimeter-wavelengths. The photometric calibration set will be selected from the COSMOS field. The science catalog will draw from a set of more than 150 Sunyaev-Zel’dovich, X-ray, and optically selected clusters spanning a wide range of cluster masses and morphologies. Aside from demonstrating the technical approach, these data will enable a systematic program to constrain the mass-observable relations over an unprecedented scale. A successful demonstration of the technical approach and the scientific potential

  14. Recent advances in liquid mixtures in electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsir, Yael; Tsori, Yoav

    2017-02-01

    When immiscible liquids are subject to electric fields interfacial forces arise due to a difference in the permittivity or the conductance of the liquids, and these forces lead to shape change in droplets or to interfacial instabilities. In this topical review we discuss recent advances in the theory and experiments of liquids in electric fields with an emphasis on liquids which are initially miscible and demix under the influence of an external field. In purely dielectric liquids demixing occurs if the electrode geometry leads to sufficiently large field gradients. In polar liquids field gradients are prevalent due to screening by dissociated ions irrespective of the electrode geometry. We examine the conditions for these ‘electro prewetting’ transitions and highlight few possible systems where they might be important, such as in stabilization of colloids and in gating of pores in membranes.

  15. Direct design of two freeform optical surfaces for wide field of view line imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yunfeng; Thienpont, Hugo; Duerr, Fabian

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-fields direct design method aiming to calculate two freeform surfaces with an entrance pupil incorporated for wide field of view on-axis line imaging applications. Both infinite and finite conjugate objectives can be designed with this approach. Since a wide angle imaging system requires more than few discrete perfect imaging points, the multi-fields design approach is based on partial coupling of multiple fields, which guarantees a much more balanced imaging performance over the full field of view. The optical path lengths (OPLs) and image points of numerous off-axis fields are calculated during the procedure, thus very few initial parameters are needed. The procedure to calculate such a freeform lens is explained in detail. We have designed an exemplary monochromatic single lens to demonstrate the functionality of the design method. A rotationally symmetric counterpart following the same specifications is compared in terms of RMS spot radius to demonstrate the clear benefit that freeform lens brings to on-axis line imaging systems. In addition, a practical achromatic wide angle objective is designed by combining our multi-fields design method with classic optical design strategies, serving as a very good starting point for further optimization in a commercial optical design program. The results from the perspective of aberrations plots and MTF values show a very good and well balanced performance over the full field of view.

  16. A 4-meter wide field coronagraph space telescope for general astrophysics and exoplanet observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenerelli, Domenick; Angel, Roger; Burge, Jim; Guyon, Olivier; Zabludoff, Ann; Belikov, Ruslan; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Egerman, Robert

    2010-07-01

    The Wide Field Coronagraph Telescope (WFCT) is a 4-meter space telescope for general astrophysics and exoplanet observations that meets the 2000 Decadal Committee requirements. This paper presents a design for a 4-m diameter, off-axis space telescope that offers high performance in both wide field and coronagraphic imaging modes. A 3.8 x 3.3-m unobstructed elliptical pupil is provided for direct coronagraphic imaging of exoplanets and a 4-m diameter pupil for wide-field imaging from far-ultraviolet (UV) to near-infrared (IR). The off-axis wide-field optics are all reflective and designed to deliver an average of 12 nm wavefront aberrations over a 6 x 24 arcminute field of view (FOV), therefore providing diffraction-limited images down to 300 nm wavelength and 15 mas images down to a wavelength limit set only by the mirror coatings. The coronagraph with phase-induced amplitude apodization (PIAA) provides diffraction suppression around a 360-degree field with high Strehl and sensitivity at the 1e-10 level to an inner working angle of 2 λ/D (or 50 mas at 500 nm wavelength). This paper focuses on the optical design that allows the above imaging features to be combined in single telescope, and gives a preliminary spacecraft design and costing, assuming a distant trailing orbit.

  17. DICOM index tracker enterprise: advanced system for enterprise-wide quality assurance and patient safety monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Pavlicek, William; Panda, Anshuman; Langer, Steve G.; Morin, Richard; Fetterly, Kenneth A.; Paden, Robert; Hanson, James; Wu, Lin-Wei; Wu, Teresa

    2015-03-01

    DICOM Index Tracker (DIT) is an integrated platform to harvest rich information available from Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) to improve quality assurance in radiology practices. It is designed to capture and maintain longitudinal patient-specific exam indices of interests for all diagnostic and procedural uses of imaging modalities. Thus, it effectively serves as a quality assurance and patient safety monitoring tool. The foundation of DIT is an intelligent database system which stores the information accepted and parsed via a DICOM receiver and parser. The database system enables the basic dosimetry analysis. The success of DIT implementation at Mayo Clinic Arizona calls for the DIT deployment at the enterprise level which requires significant improvements. First, for geographically distributed multi-site implementation, the first bottleneck is the communication (network) delay; the second is the scalability of the DICOM parser to handle the large volume of exams from different sites. To address this issue, DICOM receiver and parser are separated and decentralized by site. To facilitate the enterprise wide Quality Assurance (QA), a notable challenge is the great diversities of manufacturers, modalities and software versions, as the solution DIT Enterprise provides the standardization tool for device naming, protocol naming, physician naming across sites. Thirdly, advanced analytic engines are implemented online which support the proactive QA in DIT Enterprise.

  18. Genome-wide association for fear conditioning in an advanced intercross mouse line.

    PubMed

    Parker, Clarissa C; Sokoloff, Greta; Cheng, Riyan; Palmer, Abraham A

    2012-05-01

    Fear conditioning (FC) may provide a useful model for some components of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We used a C57BL/6J × DBA/2J F(2) intercross (n = 620) and a C57BL/6J × DBA/2J F(8) advanced intercross line (n = 567) to fine-map quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with FC. We conducted an integrated genome-wide association analysis in QTLRel and identified five highly significant QTL affecting freezing to context as well as four highly significant QTL associated with freezing to cue. The average percent decrease in QTL width between the F(2) and the integrated analysis was 59.2%. Next, we exploited bioinformatic sequence and expression data to identify candidate genes based on the existence of non-synonymous coding polymorphisms and/or expression QTLs. We identified numerous candidate genes that have been previously implicated in either fear learning in animal models (Bcl2, Btg2, Dbi, Gabr1b, Lypd1, Pam and Rgs14) or PTSD in humans (Gabra2, Oprm1 and Trkb); other identified genes may represent novel findings. The integration of F(2) and AIL data maintains the advantages of studying FC in model organisms while significantly improving resolution over previous approaches.

  19. Upconverting nanoparticles: a versatile platform for wide-field two-photon microscopy and multi-modal in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Il; Lee, Kang Taek; Suh, Yung Doug; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2015-03-21

    Lanthanide-doped upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) have recently attracted enormous attention in the field of biological imaging owing to their unique optical properties: (1) efficient upconversion photoluminescence, which is intense enough to be detected at the single-particle level with a (nonscanning) wide-field microscope setup equipped with a continuous wave (CW) near-infrared (NIR) laser (980 nm), and (2) resistance to photoblinking and photobleaching. Moreover, the use of NIR excitation minimizes adverse photoinduced effects such as cellular photodamage and the autofluorescence background. Finally, the cytotoxicity of UCNPs is much lower than that of other nanoparticle systems. All these advantages can be exploited simultaneously without any conflicts, which enables the establishment of a novel UCNP-based platform for wide-field two-photon microscopy. UCNPs are also useful for multimodal in vivo imaging because simple variations in the composition of the lattice atoms and dopant ions integrated into the particles can be easily implemented, yielding various distinct biomedical activities relevant to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography (PET). These multiple functions embedded in a single type of UCNPs play a crucial role in precise disease diagnosis. The application of UCNPs is extended to therapeutic fields such as photodynamic and photothermal cancer therapies through advanced surface conjugation schemes.

  20. Three dimensional image reconstruction based on a wide-field optical coherence tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yinqi; Feng, Shengtong; Zhang, Min; Hao, Junjun

    2014-07-01

    Wide-field optical coherence tomography has a promising application for its high scanning rate and resolution. The principle of a wide-field optical coherence tomography system is described, and 2D images of glass slides are reconstructed using eight-stepped phase-shifting method in the system. Using VC6.0 and OpenGL programming, 3D images are reconstructed based on the Marching Cube algorithm with 2D image sequences. The experimental results show that the depth detection and three-dimensional tomography for translucent materials could be implemented efficiently in the WFOCT system.

  1. Wide-field strain imaging with preferentially aligned nitrogen-vacancy centers in polycrystalline diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusheim, Matthew E.; Englund, Dirk

    2016-12-01

    We report on wide-field optically detected magnetic resonance imaging of nitrogen-vacancy centers (NVs) in type IIa polycrystalline diamond. These studies reveal a heterogeneous crystalline environment that produces a varied density of NV centers, including preferential orientation within some individual crystal grains, but preserves long spin coherence times. Using the native NVs as nanoscale sensors, we introduce a three-dimensional strain imaging technique with high sensitivity (< {10}-5 Hz-1/2) and diffraction-limited resolution across a wide field of view.

  2. A Method for Measuring Distortion in Wide-Field Imaging with High Order Polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, N.; Okura, Y.; Takata, T.; Furusawa, H.

    2011-07-01

    In analyzing wide-field images, for example those from the Hyper Suprime-Cam on the Subaru telescope, determining World Coordinate System (WCS) information (for example position and angle) of each CCD is very important. In this paper, we show a method for determining the distortion with high-order polynomials using the TAN-SIP convention, utilizing all of the CCDs in a field of view (FOV) at once.

  3. An EUV Wide-Field Imager and Spectrometer for the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon; Savage, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The Coronal Spectrographic Imager in the EUV, COSIE, combines a wide-field solar coronal EUV imager (EUVC) and an on-disk EUV imaging spectrometer (EUVS). Located on the International Space Station (ISS), the goal of the mission is to enhance our understanding of the dynamics of the Transition Corona (the region in which the coronal magnetic field transitions from closed to open), and to provide improved detection and tracking of solar eruptive events for space weather research.

  4. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with integrated wide-field retinal imaging and tracking.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, R Daniel; Zhong, Zhangyi; Hammer, Daniel X; Mujat, Mircea; Patel, Ankit H; Deng, Cong; Zou, Weiyao; Burns, Stephen A

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a new, unified implementation of the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) incorporating a wide-field line-scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) and a closed-loop optical retinal tracker. AOSLO raster scans are deflected by the integrated tracking mirrors so that direct AOSLO stabilization is automatic during tracking. The wide-field imager and large-spherical-mirror optical interface design, as well as a large-stroke deformable mirror (DM), enable the AOSLO image field to be corrected at any retinal coordinates of interest in a field of >25 deg. AO performance was assessed by imaging individuals with a range of refractive errors. In most subjects, image contrast was measurable at spatial frequencies close to the diffraction limit. Closed-loop optical (hardware) tracking performance was assessed by comparing sequential image series with and without stabilization. Though usually better than 10 μm rms, or 0.03 deg, tracking does not yet stabilize to single cone precision but significantly improves average image quality and increases the number of frames that can be successfully aligned by software-based post-processing methods. The new optical interface allows the high-resolution imaging field to be placed anywhere within the wide field without requiring the subject to re-fixate, enabling easier retinal navigation and faster, more efficient AOSLO montage capture and stitching.

  5. Application of Advanced Wide Area Early Warning Systems with Adaptive Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Blumstein, Carl; Cibulka, Lloyd; Thorp, James; Centeno, Virgilio; King, Roger; Reeves, Kari; Ashrafi, Frank; Madani, Vahid

    2014-09-30

    Recent blackouts of power systems in North America and throughout the world have shown how critical a reliable power system is to modern societies, and the enormous economic and societal damage a blackout can cause. It has been noted that unanticipated operation of protection systems can contribute to cascading phenomena and, ultimately, blackouts. This project developed and field-tested two methods of Adaptive Protection systems utilizing synchrophasor data. One method detects conditions of system stress that can lead to unintended relay operation, and initiates a supervisory signal to modify relay response in real time to avoid false trips. The second method detects the possibility of false trips of impedance relays as stable system swings “encroach” on the relays’ impedance zones, and produces an early warning so that relay engineers can re-evaluate relay settings. In addition, real-time synchrophasor data produced by this project was used to develop advanced visualization techniques for display of synchrophasor data to utility operators and engineers.

  6. Infrared Testing of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Telescope Grism Using Computer Generated Holograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominguez, Margaret Z.; Content, David A.; Gong, Qian; Griesmann, Ulf; Hagopian, John G.; Marx, Catherine T; Whipple, Arthur L.

    2017-01-01

    Infrared Computer Generated Holograms (CGHs) were designed, manufactured and used to measure the performance of the grism (grating prism) prototype which includes testing Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE). The grism in the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) will allow the surveying of a large section of the sky to find bright galaxies.

  7. Conceptual design of wide-field focal plane with InGaAs image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiyama, Y.; Nakaya, H.; Kashikawa, N.; Uchida, T.

    2016-08-01

    We present a conceptual design to implement wide-field focal plane assembly with InGaAs image sensors which are being tested intensively and reveled to be promising for astronomical use. InGaAs image sensors are sensitive up to 1.7 microns and would open a new window for the wide-field near-infrared (NIR) imaging survey once large format sensors are developed. The sensors are not necessarily cooled down to below 100 K, which is the case for prevailing NIR image sensors such as HgCdTe, enabling us to develop the NIR camera based on the technique developed for the CCD camera in optical wavelength. The major technical challenges to employ InGaAS image sensors for wide-field NIR camera are implementation of focal plane assembly and thermal design. In this article, we discuss these difficulties and show how we can conquer based on our experience to build Hyper Suprime-Cam, which is a wide-field imager with 116 2k4k CCDs attached to Subaru Telescope.

  8. Astronaut Jeffrey Hoffman with Wide Field/Planetary Camera during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut Jeffrey A. Hoffman with Wide Field/Planetary Camera (WF/PC 1) in payload bay during changeout operations. Hoffman is standing on a foot restraint attached to the robot arm of the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) in order to remove the old WF/PC. The new WF/PC has already been installed in cavity (out of frame).

  9. The Status of NASA's Wide-Field Meteor Camera Network and Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaauw, R.; Cooke, W.; Kingery, A.; Suggs, R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) recently established two wide-field cameras to detect meteors in the millimeter-size-range. This paper outlines the concepts of the system, the hardware and software, and results of 3,440 orbits seen from December 13, 2012 until May 14, 2014.

  10. The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed: Enabling Techniques for High Angular Resolution Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, S. A.; Armstrong, T.; Frey, Bradley J.; Jung, J.; Kirk, J.; Leisawitz, David T.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Lyon, R.; Maher, Stephen; Martino, Anthony J.; Pauls, T.

    2007-01-01

    The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) was designed to develop techniques for wide-field of view imaging interferometry, using "double-Fourier" methods. These techniques will be important for a wide range of future spacebased interferometry missions. We have provided simple demonstrations of the methodology already, and continuing development of the testbed will lead to higher data rates, improved data quality, and refined algorithms for image reconstruction. At present, the testbed effort includes five lines of development; automation of the testbed, operation in an improved environment, acquisition of large high-quality datasets, development of image reconstruction algorithms, and analytical modeling of the testbed. We discuss the progress made towards the first four of these goals; the analytical modeling is discussed in a separate paper within this conference.

  11. Design of four-mirror afocal principal system for wide field multichannel infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin; Huang, Ying; Li, Yan

    2015-08-01

    The image space scanning system is widely used for multichannel infrared imaging to overcome the absence of large infrared focal plane array. The field of view of afocal system directly influences the time resolution of the image space scanning system. The field of view of afocal system is generally less than 7°. Therefore, it is significant to design larger field of view of afocal system for increasing time resolution. The method of four-mirror afocal system design based on primary aberration is explored. The structural parameters are calculated according to magnification and obscuration ratio of each mirror. The conic parameters are calculated according to primary aberration coefficients. The procedure for calculating initial structural parameters is programmed. Then a four-mirror afocal system is designed with an entrance pupil diameter of 200mm, a field of view of 20°×1°, the operating wave band of 3~12μm, compression ratio of 2.5 times and the distance of exit pupil of 620mm. The results indicate that the maximum root mean square (RMS) wavefront error is less than 0.042λ(λ=7.5μm), the maximum optical path difference(OPD) is less than λ/4(λ=3~12μm). It has high imaging quality and the modulation transfer function (MTF) is approached to the diffraction limit. The method of afocal system design can be widely used for wide field multichannel infrared imaging.

  12. Prime focus wide-field corrector designs with lossless atmospheric dispersion correction

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Will; Gillingham, Peter; Smith, Greg; Kent, Steve; Doel, Peter

    2014-07-18

    Wide-Field Corrector designs are presented for the Blanco and Mayall telescopes, the CFHT and the AAT. The designs are Terezibh-style, with 5 or 6 lenses, and modest negative optical power. They have 2.2-3 degree fields of view, with curved and telecentric focal surfaces suitable for fiber spectroscopy. Some variants also allow wide-field imaging, by changing the last WFC element. Apart from the adaptation of the Terebizh design for spectroscopy, the key feature is a new concept for a 'Compensating Lateral Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector', with two of the lenses being movable laterally by small amounts. This provides excellent atmospheric dispersion correction, without any additional surfaces or absorption. A novel and simple mechanism for providing the required lens motions is proposed, which requires just 3 linear actuators for each of the two moving lenses.

  13. Nonmydriatic ultra-wide-field scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (Optomap) versus two-field fundus photography in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Liegl, Raffael; Liegl, Kristine; Ceklic, Lala; Haritoglou, Christos; Kampik, Anselm; Ulbig, Michael W; Kernt, Marcus; Neubauer, Aljoscha S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic properties of a 2-laser wavelength nonmydriatic 200° ultra-wide-field scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) versus mydriatic 2-field 45° color fundus photography (EURODIAB standard) for assessing diabetic retinopathy (DR). A total of 143 consecutive eyes of patients with different levels of DR were graded regarding DR level and macular edema based on 2-field color photographs or 1 Optomap Panoramic 200 SLO image. All SLO images were nonmydriatic and all photographs mydriatic. Grading was performed masked to patient and clinical data. Based on photography, 20 eyes had no DR, 44 had mild, 18 moderate and 42 severe nonproliferative DR, and 19 eyes had proliferative DR. Overall correlation for grading DR level compared to Optomap SLO was moderate with kappa 0.54 (p < 0.001), fair-to-moderate in macular edema grading with kappa 0.39 (p < 0.001), and substantial for grading clinically significant macular edema (kappa 0.77). The wide-field SLO offers a wider field of view and can potentially better differentiate lesions by applying the 2 laser wavelengths. However, these advantages over 2-field fundus photography need to be confirmed in further studies.

  14. Recent advances in globin research using genome-wide association studies and gene editing

    PubMed Central

    Orkin, Stuart H.

    2015-01-01

    A long-sought goal in the hemoglobin field has been an improved understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the switch from fetal (HbF) to adult (HbA) hemoglobin during development. With such knowledge, the hope is that strategies for directed reactivation of HbF in adults could be devised as an approach to therapy for the β-hemoglobinopathies thalassemia and sickle cell disease. Recent genome-wide association studies led to identification of three loci (BCL11A, HBS1L-Myb, and the β-globin cluster itself) in which natural genetic variation is correlated with different HbF levels in populations. Here, the central role of BCL11A in control of HbF is reviewed from the perspective of how findings may be translated to gene therapy in the not-too-distant future. This summary traces the evolution of recent studies from the initial recognition of BCL11A through GWAS to identification of critical sequences in an enhancer required for its erythroid-specific expression, thereby highlighting an Achilles heel for genome editing. PMID:26866328

  15. Recent advances in globin research using genome-wide association studies and gene editing.

    PubMed

    Orkin, Stuart H

    2016-03-01

    A long-sought goal in the hemoglobin field has been an improved understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the switch from fetal (HbF) to adult (HbA) hemoglobin during development. With such knowledge, the hope is that strategies for directed reactivation of HbF in adults could be devised as an approach to therapy for the β-hemoglobinopathies thalassemia and sickle cell disease. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) led to identification of three loci (BCL11A, HBS1L-MYB, and the β-globin cluster itself) in which natural genetic variation is correlated with different HbF levels in populations. Here, the central role of BCL11A in control of HbF is reviewed from the perspective of how findings may be translated to gene therapy in the not-too-distant future. This summary traces the evolution of recent studies from the initial recognition of BCL11A through GWAS to identification of critical sequences in an enhancer required for its erythroid-specific expression, thereby highlighting an Achilles heel for genome editing.

  16. Concerning the Development of the Wide-Field Optics for WFXT Including Methods of Optimizing X-Ray Optical Prescriptions for Wide-Field Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; Elsner, R. F.; O'Dell, S. L.; Ramsey, B. D.

    2010-01-01

    We present a progress report on the various endeavors we are undertaking at MSFC in support of the Wide Field X-Ray Telescope development. In particular we discuss assembly and alignment techniques, in-situ polishing corrections, and the results of our efforts to optimize mirror prescriptions including polynomial coefficients, relative shell displacements, detector placements and tilts. This optimization does not require a blind search through the multi-dimensional parameter space. Under the assumption that the parameters are small enough so that second order expansions are valid, we show that the performance at the detector can be expressed as a quadratic function with numerical coefficients derived from a ray trace through the underlying Wolter I optic. The optimal values for the parameters are found by solving the linear system of equations creating by setting derivatives of this function with respect to each parameter to zero.

  17. Field-balanced adaptive optics error function for wide field-of-view space-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComas, Brian K.; Friedman, Edward J.

    2002-03-01

    Adaptive optics are regularly used in ground-based astronomical telescopes. These applications are characterized by a very narrow (approximately 1 arcmin) field of view. For economic reasons, commercial space-based earth-observing optical systems must have a field of view as large as possible. We develop a new error function that is an extension of conventional adaptive optics for wide field-of-view optical systems and show that this new error function enables diffraction-limited performance across a large field of view with only one deformable mirror. This new error function allows for reprogramming of aberration control algorithms for particular applications by the use of an addressable weighting function.

  18. Wide-field optical mapping of neural activity and brain haemodynamics: considerations and novel approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying; Shaik, Mohammed A.; Kozberg, Mariel G.; Thibodeaux, David N.; Zhao, Hanzhi T.; Yu, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Although modern techniques such as two-photon microscopy can now provide cellular-level three-dimensional imaging of the intact living brain, the speed and fields of view of these techniques remain limited. Conversely, two-dimensional wide-field optical mapping (WFOM), a simpler technique that uses a camera to observe large areas of the exposed cortex under visible light, can detect changes in both neural activity and haemodynamics at very high speeds. Although WFOM may not provide single-neuron or capillary-level resolution, it is an attractive and accessible approach to imaging large areas of the brain in awake, behaving mammals at speeds fast enough to observe widespread neural firing events, as well as their dynamic coupling to haemodynamics. Although such wide-field optical imaging techniques have a long history, the advent of genetically encoded fluorophores that can report neural activity with high sensitivity, as well as modern technologies such as light emitting diodes and sensitive and high-speed digital cameras have driven renewed interest in WFOM. To facilitate the wider adoption and standardization of WFOM approaches for neuroscience and neurovascular coupling research, we provide here an overview of the basic principles of WFOM, considerations for implementation of wide-field fluorescence imaging of neural activity, spectroscopic analysis and interpretation of results. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience’. PMID:27574312

  19. Application of a wide-field phantom eye for optical coherence tomography and reflectance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Anthony; Muyo, Gonzalo; van Hemert, Jano; Gorman, Alistair; Harvey, Andrew R.

    2015-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectance imaging are used in clinical practice to measure the thickness and transverse dimensions of retinal features. The recent trend towards increasing the field of view (FOV) of these devices has led to an increasing significance of the optical aberrations of both the human eye and the device. We report the design, manufacture and application of the first phantom eye that reproduces the off-axis optical characteristics of the human eye, and allows the performance assessment of wide-field ophthalmic devices. We base our design and manufacture on the wide-field schematic eye, [Navarro, R. J. Opt. Soc. Am. A, 1985, 2.] as an accurate proxy to the human eye and enable assessment of ophthalmic imaging performance for a ? external FOV. We used multi-material 3D-printed retinal targets to assess imaging performance of the following ophthalmic instruments: the Optos 200Tx, Heidelberg Spectralis, Zeiss FF4 fundus camera and Optos OCT SLO and use the phantom to provide an insight into some of the challenges of wide-field OCT.

  20. Miniature wide field-of-view star trackers for spacecraft attitude sensing and navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, William; Curtis, Eric; Hull, Anthony; Morgan, William

    1993-01-01

    Introducing a family of miniature, wide field-of-view star trackers for low cost, high performance spacecraft attitude determination and navigation applications. These devices, derivative of the WFOV Star Tracker Camera developed cooperatively by OCA Applied Optics and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the Brilliant Pebbles program, offer a suite of options addressing a wide range of spacecraft attitude measurement and control requirements. These sensors employ much wider fields than are customary (ranging between 20 and 60 degrees) to assure enough bright stars for quick and accurate attitude determinations without long integration intervals. The key benefit of this approach are light weight, low power, reduced data processing loads and high information carrier rates for wide ACS bandwidths. Devices described range from the proven OCA/LLNL WFOV Star Tracker Camera (a low-cost, space-qualified star-field imager utilizing the spacecraft's own computer and centroiding and position-finding), to a new autonomous subsystem design featuring dual-redundant cameras and completely self-contained star-field data processing with output quaternion solutions accurate to 100 micro-rad, 3 sigma, for stand-alone applications.

  1. Application of a wide-field phantom eye for optical coherence tomography and reflectance imaging.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Anthony; Muyo, Gonzalo; van Hemert, Jano; Gorman, Alistair; Harvey, Andrew R

    2015-12-15

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectance imaging are used in clinical practice to measure the thickness and transverse dimensions of retinal features. The recent trend towards increasing the field of view (FOV) of these devices has led to an increasing significance of the optical aberrations of both the human eye and the device. We report the design, manufacture and application of the first phantom eye that reproduces the off-axis optical characteristics of the human eye, and allows the performance assessment of wide-field ophthalmic devices. We base our design and manufacture on the wide-field schematic eye, [Navarro, R. J. Opt. Soc. Am. A, 1985,2.] as an accurate proxy to the human eye and enable assessment of ophthalmic imaging performance for a [Formula: see text] external FOV. We used multi-material 3D-printed retinal targets to assess imaging performance of the following ophthalmic instruments: the Optos 200Tx, Heidelberg Spectralis, Zeiss FF4 fundus camera and Optos OCT SLO and use the phantom to provide an insight into some of the challenges of wide-field OCT.

  2. Advanced mean-field theory of the restricted Boltzmann machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haiping; Toyoizumi, Taro

    2015-05-01

    Learning in restricted Boltzmann machine is typically hard due to the computation of gradients of log-likelihood function. To describe the network state statistics of the restricted Boltzmann machine, we develop an advanced mean-field theory based on the Bethe approximation. Our theory provides an efficient message-passing-based method that evaluates not only the partition function (free energy) but also its gradients without requiring statistical sampling. The results are compared with those obtained by the computationally expensive sampling-based method.

  3. Methods to Determine Recommended Feeder-Wide Advanced Inverter Settings for Improving Distribution System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Rylander, Matthew; Reno, Matthew J.; Quiroz, Jimmy E.; Ding, Fei; Li, Huijuan; Broderick, Robert J.; Mather, Barry; Smith, Jeff

    2016-11-21

    This paper describes methods that a distribution engineer could use to determine advanced inverter settings to improve distribution system performance. These settings are for fixed power factor, volt-var, and volt-watt functionality. Depending on the level of detail that is desired, different methods are proposed to determine single settings applicable for all advanced inverters on a feeder or unique settings for each individual inverter. Seven distinctly different utility distribution feeders are analyzed to simulate the potential benefit in terms of hosting capacity, system losses, and reactive power attained with each method to determine the advanced inverter settings.

  4. The Wide Integral Field Infrared Spectrograph (WIFIS): optomechanical design and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, R. Elliot; Moon, Dae-Sik; Sivanandam, Suresh; Ma, Ke; Henderson, Chuck; Blank, Basil; Chou, Chueh-Yi; Jarvis, Miranda; Eikenberry, Stephen S.

    2016-08-01

    We present the optomechanical design and development of the Wide Integral Field Infrared Spectrograph (WIFIS). WIFIS will provide an unrivalled integral field size of 20"×50" for a near-infrared (0.9-1.7 μm) integral-field spectrograph at the 2.3-meter Steward Bok telescope. Its main optomechanical system consists of two assemblies: a room-temperature bench housing the majority of the optical components and a cryostat for a field-flattening lens, thermal blocking filter, and detector. Two additional optical subsystems will provide calibration functionality, telescope guiding, and off-axis optical imaging. WIFIS will be a highly competitive instrument for seeing-limited astronomical investigations of the dynamics and chemistry of extended objects in the near-infrared wavebands. WIFIS is expected to be commissioned during the end of 2016 with scientific operations beginning in 2017.

  5. Deep wide-field near-infrared survey of the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preibisch, T.; Ratzka, T.; Kuderna, B.; Ohlendorf, H.; King, R. R.; Hodgkin, S.; Irwin, M.; Lewis, J. R.; McCaughrean, M. J.; Zinnecker, H.

    2011-06-01

    Context. The Great Nebula in Carina is a giant H ii region and a superb location in which to study the physics of violent massive star formation, but the population of the young low-mass stars remained very poorly studied until recently. Aims: Our aim was to produce a near-infrared survey that is deep enough to detect the full low-mass stellar population (i.e. down to ≈0.1 M⊙ and for extinctions up to AV ≈ 15 mag) and wide enough to cover all important parts of the Carina Nebula complex (CNC), including the clusters Tr 14, 15, and 16 as well as the South Pillars region. Methods: We used HAWK-I at the ESO VLT to survey the central ≈0.36 deg2 area of the Carina Nebula. These data reveal more than 600 000 individual infrared sources down to magnitudes as faint as J ≈ 23, H ≈ 22, and Ks ≈ 21. The results of a recent deep X-ray survey (which is complete down to stellar masses of ~0.5-1 M⊙) are used to distinguish between young stars in Carina and background contaminants. We analyze color - magnitude diagrams (CMDs) to derive information about the ages and masses of the low-mass stars. Results: The ages of the low-mass stars agree with previous age estimates for the massive stars. The CMD suggests that ≈3200 of the X-ray selected stars have masses of M∗ ≥ 1 M⊙; this number is in good agreement with extrapolations of the field IMF based on the number of high-mass (M∗ ≥ 20 M⊙) stars and shows that there is no deficit of low-mass stars in the CNC. The HAWK-I images confirm that about 50% of all young stars in Carina are in a widely distributed, non-clustered spatial configuration. Narrow-band images reveal six molecular hydrogen emission objects (MHOs) that trace jets from embedded protostars. However, none of the optical HH objects shows molecular hydrogen emission, suggesting that the jet-driving protostars are located very close to the edges of the globules in which they are embedded. Conclusions: The near-infrared excess fractions for the

  6. Delivery, installation, on-sky verification of the Hobby Eberly Telescope wide field corrector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hanshin; Hill, Gary J.; Good, John M.; Vattiat, Brian L.; Shetrone, Matthew; Kriel, Herman; Martin, Jerry; Schroeder, Emily; Oh, Chang Jin; Frater, Eric; Smith, Bryan; Burge, James H.

    2016-08-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET)†, located in West Texas at the McDonald Observatory, operates with a fixed segmented primary (M1) and has a tracker, which moves the prime-focus corrector and instrument package to track the sidereal and non-sidereal motions of objects. We have completed a major multi-year upgrade of the HET that has substantially increased the pupil size to 10 meters and the field of view to 22 arcminutes by deploying the new Wide Field Corrector (WFC), new tracker system, and new Prime Focus Instrument Package (PFIP). The focus of this paper is on the delivery, installation, and on-sky verification of the WFC. We summarize the technical challenges encountered and resolutions to overcome such challenges during the construction of the system. We then detail the transportation from Tucson to the HET, on-site ground verification test results, post-installation static alignment among the WFC, PFIP, and M1, and on-sky verification of alignment and image quality via deploying multiple wavefront sensors across 22 arcminutes field of view. The new wide field HET will feed the revolutionary new integral field spectrograph called VIRUS, in support of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX), a new low resolution spectrograph (LRS2), an upgraded high resolution spectrograph (HRS2), and later the Habitable Zone Planet Finder (HPF).

  7. Electrowetting liquid lens array on curved substrates for wide field of view image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Yousung; Lee, Muyoung; Won, Yong Hyub

    2016-03-01

    In this research, electrowetting liquid lens array on curved substrates is developed for wide field of view image sensor. In the conventional image sensing system, this lens array is usually in the form of solid state. However, in this state, the lens array which is similar to insect-like compound eyes in nature has several limitations such as degradation of image quality and narrow field of view because it cannot adjust focal length of lens. For implementation of the more enhanced system, the curved array of lenses based on electrowetting effect is developed in this paper, which can adjust focal length of lens. The fabrication of curved lens array is conducted upon the several steps, including chamber fabrication, electrode & dielectric layer deposition, liquid injection, and encapsulation. As constituent materials, IZO coated convex glass, UV epoxy (NOA 68), DI water, and dodecane are used. The number of lenses on the fabricated panel is 23 by 23 and each lens has 1mm aperture with 1.6mm pitch between adjacent lenses. When the voltage is applied on the device, it is observed that each lens is changed from concave state to convex state. From the unique optical characteristics of curved array of liquid lenses such as controllable focal length and wide field of view, we can expect that it has potential applications in various fields such as medical diagnostics, surveillance systems, and light field photography.

  8. Gyrochronology of Stars in Wide Binaries in the Kepler K2 Cycle 5 Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswalt, Terry D.; Buzasi, Derek L.; Otani, Tomomi

    2017-01-01

    We are determining rotation periods for an ensemble of over 100 wide non-interacting binary stars in the K2 Cycle 5 field that contain two main sequence dwarfs, as well as a smaller sample containing at least one white dwarf component. Observations of such coeval pairs provide the basis for our new investigation of rotation-based age determinations. Such “gyrochronology” ages can achieve a precision that exceeds most other current methods of stellar age determination. A status report on our analysis of the light curves extracted from the K2 Cycle 5 field will be presented.

  9. CPAPIR: a wide-field infrared camera for the Observatoire du Mont Megantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artigau, Etienne; Doyon, Rene; Vallee, Philippe; Riopel, Martin; Nadeau, Daniel

    2004-09-01

    CPAPIR is a wide-field infrared camera for use at the Observatoire du mont Megantic and CTIO 1.5 m telescopes. The camera will be primarily a survey instrument with a half-degree field of view, making it one of the most efficient of its kind. CPAPIR will provide broad and narrow band filters within its 0.8 to 2.5 μm bandpass. The camera is based on a Hawaii-2 2048x2048 HgCdTe detector.

  10. Hybrid wide-field and scanning microscopy for high-speed 3D imaging.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yubo; Chen, Nanguang

    2015-11-15

    Wide-field optical microscopy is efficient and robust in biological imaging, but it lacks depth sectioning. In contrast, scanning microscopic techniques, such as confocal microscopy and multiphoton microscopy, have been successfully used for three-dimensional (3D) imaging with optical sectioning capability. However, these microscopic techniques are not very suitable for dynamic real-time imaging because they usually take a long time for temporal and spatial scanning. Here, a hybrid imaging technique combining wide-field microscopy and scanning microscopy is proposed to accelerate the image acquisition process while maintaining the 3D optical sectioning capability. The performance was demonstrated by proof-of-concept imaging experiments with fluorescent beads and zebrafish liver.

  11. Recent experiments conducted with the Wide-field imaging interferometry testbed (WIIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisawitz, David T.; Juanola-Parramon, Roser; Bolcar, Matthew; Fienup, James R.; Iacchetta, Alexander S.; Maher, Stephen F.; Rinehart, Stephen A.

    2016-08-01

    The Wide-field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) was developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center to demonstrate and explore the practical limitations inherent in wide field-of-view "double Fourier" (spatio-spectral) interferometry. The testbed delivers high-quality interferometric data and is capable of observing spatially and spectrally complex hyperspectral test scenes. Although WIIT operates at visible wavelengths, by design the data are representative of those from a space-based far-infrared observatory. We used WIIT to observe a calibrated, independently characterized test scene of modest spatial and spectral complexity, and an astronomically realistic test scene of much greater spatial and spectral complexity. This paper describes the experimental setup, summarizes the performance of the testbed, and presents representative data.

  12. Wide Field-of-View Soft X-Ray Imaging for Solar Wind-Magnetosphere Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, B. M.; Collier, M. R.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. S.; Sibeck, D. G.; Snowden, S. L.; Carter, J. A.; Collado-Vega, Y.; Connor, H. K.; Cravens, T. E.; Read, A. M.; Sembay, S.; Thomas, N. E.

    2016-01-01

    Soft X-ray imagers can be used to study the mesoscale and macroscale density structures that occur whenever and wherever the solar wind encounters neutral atoms at comets, the Moon, and both magnetized and unmagnetized planets. Charge exchange between high charge state solar wind ions and exospheric neutrals results in the isotropic emission of soft X-ray photons with energies from 0.1 to 2.0 keV. At Earth, this process occurs primarily within the magnetosheath and cusps. Through providing a global view, wide field-of-view imaging can determine the significance of the various proposed solar wind-magnetosphere interaction mechanisms by evaluating their global extent and occurrence patterns. A summary of wide field-of-view (several to tens of degrees) soft X-ray imaging is provided including slumped micropore microchannel reflectors, simulated images, and recent flight results.

  13. Wide-field optical coherence tomography based microangiography for retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinqin; Lee, Cecilia S.; Chao, Jennifer; Chen, Chieh-Li; Zhang, Thomas; Sharma, Utkarsh; Zhang, Anqi; Liu, Jin; Rezaei, Kasra; Pepple, Kathryn L.; Munsen, Richard; Kinyoun, James; Johnstone, Murray; Van Gelder, Russell N.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) allows for the evaluation of functional retinal vascular networks without a need for contrast dyes. For sophisticated monitoring and diagnosis of retinal diseases, OCTA capable of providing wide-field and high definition images of retinal vasculature in a single image is desirable. We report OCTA with motion tracking through an auxiliary real-time line scan ophthalmoscope that is clinically feasible to image functional retinal vasculature in patients, with a coverage of more than 60 degrees of retina while still maintaining high definition and resolution. We demonstrate six illustrative cases with unprecedented details of vascular involvement in retinal diseases. In each case, OCTA yields images of the normal and diseased microvasculature at all levels of the retina, with higher resolution than observed with fluorescein angiography. Wide-field OCTA technology will be an important next step in augmenting the utility of OCT technology in clinical practice. PMID:26912261

  14. Supernova and optical transient observations using the three wide-field telescope array of the KMTNet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Dae-Sik; Kim, Sang Chul; Lee, Jae-Joon; Pak, Mina; Park, Hong Soo; He, Matthias Y.; Antoniadis, John; Ni, Yuan Qi; Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Seung-Lee; Park, Byeong-Gon; Kim, Dong-Jin; Cha, Sang-Mok; Lee, Yongseok; Gonzalez, Santiago

    2016-08-01

    The Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) is a network of three new 1.6-m, wide-field telescopes spread over three different sites in Chile, South Africa and Australia. Each telescope is equipped with a four square degree wide-field CCD camera, making the KMTNet an ideal facility for discovering and monitoring early supernovae and other rapidly evolving optical transients by providing 24-hour continuous sky coverage. We describe our inaugurating program of observing supernovae and optical transients using about 20% of the KMTNet time in 2015-2019. Our early results include detection of infant supernovae, novae and peculiar transients as well as numerous variable stars and low surface brightness objects such as dwarf galaxies.

  15. Improved sensitivity to fluorescence for cancer detection in wide-field image-guided neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Jermyn, Michael; Gosselin, Yoann; Valdes, Pablo A.; Sibai, Mira; Kolste, Kolbein; Mercier, Jeanne; Angulo, Leticia; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Petrecca, Kevin; Daigle, Olivier; Wilson, Brian C.; Leblond, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    In glioma surgery, Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence may identify residual tumor that could be resected while minimizing damage to normal brain. We demonstrate that improved sensitivity for wide-field spectroscopic fluorescence imaging is achieved with minimal disruption to the neurosurgical workflow using an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) relative to a state-of-the-art CMOS system. In phantom experiments the EMCCD system can detect at least two orders-of-magnitude lower PpIX. Ex vivo tissue imaging on a rat glioma model demonstrates improved fluorescence contrast compared with neurosurgical fluorescence microscope technology, and the fluorescence detection is confirmed with measurements from a clinically-validated spectroscopic probe. Greater PpIX sensitivity in wide-field fluorescence imaging may improve the residual tumor detection during surgery with consequent impact on survival. PMID:26713218

  16. Ground-based complex for detection and investigation of fast optical transients in wide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Emilio; Beskin, Grigory; Bondar, Sergey; Karpov, Sergey; Plokhotnichenko, Vladimir; de-Bur, Vjacheslav; Greco, Guiseppe; Bartolini, Corrado; Guarnieri, Adriano; Piccioni, Adalberto

    2008-07-01

    To study short stochastic optical flares of different objects (GRBs, SNs, etc) of unknown localizations as well as NEOs it is necessary to monitor large regions of sky with high time resolution. We developed a system which consists of wide-field camera (FOW is 400-600 sq.deg.) using TV-CCD with time resolution of 0.13 s to record and classify optical transients, and a fast robotic telescope aimed to perform their spectroscopic and photometric investigation just after detection. Such two telescope complex TORTOREM combining wide-field camera TORTORA and robotic telescope REM operated from May 2006 at La Silla ESO observatory. Some results of its operation, including first fast time resolution study of optical transient accompanying GRB and discovery of its fine time structure, are presented. Prospects for improving the complex efficiency are given.

  17. Wide-field corrector for 4MOST: design details and MAIV processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azais, Nicolas; Barden, Samuel C.; Smith, Greg; Jones, Damien; Delabre, Bernard; Egron, Sylvain

    2016-08-01

    The 4-meter Multi-Object Spectroscopic Telescope (4MOST) is a wide-field, high-multiplex spectroscopic survey facility under development for the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO). The primary and secondary mirrors (M1 and M2) together with the Wide Field Corrector (WFC) system provide a pupil-centric and aberration corrected focal surface. The WFC is also an integral part of the metrology system. At the focal surface, we meet two wave front sensing (WFS) systems, a deployable camera at commissioning, an acquisition and guiding (A and G) unit and a secondary guiding unit. This paper provides an overview of design details and Manufacture, Assembly, Integration and Verification (MAIV) processes for the 4MOST WFC system.

  18. About using wide field lens optics for Space Surveillance Systems in Odessa Astronomical observatory (Ukraine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, P. P.; Volkoff, S. K.; Karpenko, G. F.; Titenko, V. V.; Yamnitsky, V. A.; Tkachenko, A. A.

    2007-08-01

    On base results of the observations in Odessa astronomical observatory, is shown obvious fact. The possibility of the using domestic wide field lens optics for monitoring high orbital artificial Earth satellite objects for the calculations elements of orbits. With wide field lens optics "Tair-19 5003", limited magnitude consist 15m.5 per 10 seconds of the accumulation, average square-error (ASE) of the measurements of the coordinates slowly move GSS consist not more than 2 arcsec. Beside 90% measurements has ASE not more 1 arcsec. At surveillance of the area of the equator by width 5° areas 500 deg2 are discovered all 40 active "standing" GSS, 12 passive GSS and 2 high elliptical orbital satellites (HEO). Is shown perspective possibility of the use WFO for monitoring LEO height before of 2 000 km. 90% of 39 object LEO fixed in mode "beam-park" (the still telescope) in current 1 hour, surelay are identified using catalog NORAD.

  19. Differential speckle and wide-field imaging for the Gemini-North and WIYN telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Nicholas J.; Howell, Steve B.; Horch, Elliott P.

    2016-07-01

    Two new instruments are currently being built for the Gemini-North and WIYN telescopes. They are based on the existing DSSI (Differential Speckle Survey Instrument), but the new dual-channel instruments will have both speckle and "wide-field" imaging capabilities. Nearly identical copies of the instrument will be installed as a public access permanent loan at the Gemini-N and WIYN telescopes. Many exoplanet targets will come from the NASA K2 and TESS missions. The faint limiting magnitude, for speckle observations, will remain around 16 to 17th magnitude depending on observing conditions, while wide-field, high speed imaging should be able to go to 21+. For Gemini, the instrument will be remotely operable from either the mid-level facility at Hale Pohaku or the remote operations base in Hilo.

  20. Improved sensitivity to fluorescence for cancer detection in wide-field image-guided neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Jermyn, Michael; Gosselin, Yoann; Valdes, Pablo A; Sibai, Mira; Kolste, Kolbein; Mercier, Jeanne; Angulo, Leticia; Roberts, David W; Paulsen, Keith D; Petrecca, Kevin; Daigle, Olivier; Wilson, Brian C; Leblond, Frederic

    2015-12-01

    In glioma surgery, Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence may identify residual tumor that could be resected while minimizing damage to normal brain. We demonstrate that improved sensitivity for wide-field spectroscopic fluorescence imaging is achieved with minimal disruption to the neurosurgical workflow using an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) relative to a state-of-the-art CMOS system. In phantom experiments the EMCCD system can detect at least two orders-of-magnitude lower PpIX. Ex vivo tissue imaging on a rat glioma model demonstrates improved fluorescence contrast compared with neurosurgical fluorescence microscope technology, and the fluorescence detection is confirmed with measurements from a clinically-validated spectroscopic probe. Greater PpIX sensitivity in wide-field fluorescence imaging may improve the residual tumor detection during surgery with consequent impact on survival.

  1. Wide Field Infra-Red Survey Telescope (WFIRST) 2.4-Meter Mission Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Content, D.; Aaron, K.; Alplanalp, L.; Anderson, K.; Capps, R.; Chang, Z.; Dooley, J.; Egerman, R.; Goullioud, R.; Klein, D.; Kruk, J.; Kuan, G.; Melton, M.; Ruffa, J.; Underhill, M.; Buren, D. Van

    2013-01-01

    The most recent study of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission is based on reuse of an existing 2.4m telescope. This study was commissioned by NASA to examine the potential science return and cost effectiveness of WFIRST by using this significantly larger aperture telescope. We review the science program envisioned by the WFIRST 2012-2013 Science Definition Team (SDT), an overview of the mission concept, and the telescope design and status. Comparisons against the previous 1.3m and reduced cost 1.1m WFIRST design concepts are discussed. A significant departure from past point designs is the option for serviceability and the geostationary orbit location which enables servicing and replacement instrument insertion later during mission life. Other papers at this conference provide more in depth discussion of the wide field instrument and the optional exoplanet imaging coronagraph instrument.

  2. SpIOMM and SITELLE: Wide-field Imaging FTS for the Study of Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drissen, Laurent; Bernier, Anne-Pier; Robert, Carmelle; Robert

    2011-12-01

    SpIOMM, a wide-field Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer attached to the Mont Mégantic 1.6-m telescope, is capable of obtaining the visible spectrum of every source of light in a 12 arcminute field of view, with a spectral resolution ranging from R = 1 (wide-band image) to R = 25 000, resulting in 1.7 million spectra with a spatial resolution of one arcsecond. SITELLE will be a similar instrument attached to the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope, and will be in operation in early 2013. We present a short description of these instruments and illustrate their capabilities to study nearby galaxies with the results of a data cube of M51.

  3. In-vivo performance comparison study of wide-field oxygenation imaging methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Giessen, Martijn; Angelo, Joseph; Vargas, Christina; Gioux, Sylvain

    2015-03-01

    Wide-field oxygenation saturation (StO2) estimates can be clinically very advantageous. Particularly when implemented in a non-contact manner, applications such as intra-operative assessment of tissue perfusion are very promising. Nevertheless, wide-field optical oxygenation imaging did not yet successfully translate to the clinic. In this work we compare four proposed methods for wide-field imaging that are based on different photon propagation models and that depend on different sets of assumed parameters such as absorption and reduced scattering coefficients. We investigated these for methods, with particular attention to sensitivities to errors in assumed parameters of calibration estimates. To this end we acquired an in vivo time series of a pig skin flap with a venous occlusion. StO2 estimates of all methods were compared to estimates from spatial frequency domain imaging of the same time series. Correct assumptions on scatter power and accurate calibration were found to be the most important prerequisites for accurate StO2 estimates. Although all models were able to measure relative changes in StO2 when the occlusion was applied and released, only the models that incorporated assumed reduced scattering coefficients estimated StO2 values within 5% of the expected values (estimated using SFDI). An important aspect of the compared methods is their ability to be used for real-time imaging. With the addition of real-time calibration and robust tissue scattering estimates, real-time wide-field imaging of oxygenation saturation can prove to provide important added value in the clinic.

  4. Hubble Space Telescope: Wide field and planetary camera instrument handbook. Version 2.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffiths, Richard (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    An overview is presented of the development and construction of the Wide Field and Planetary Camera (WF/PC). The WF/PC is a duel two dimensional spectrophotometer with rudimentary polarimetric and transmission grating capabilities. The instrument operates from 1150 to 11000 A with a resolution of 0.1 arcsec per pixel or 0.043 arcsec per pixel. Data products and standard calibration methods are briefly summarized.

  5. HST Wide Field Camera 3: Instrument Status and Advice for Cycle 25 Proposers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momcheva, Ivelina G.; WFC3 Instrument Team

    2017-01-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 on-board of the Hubble Space Telescope provides astronomers with powerful imaging and slitless spectroscopic capabilities from the near-ultraviolet (200 nm) to the near-infrared (1700 nm). We summarize the basic characteristics and performances of WFC3, highlight changes in the calibration pipeline, summarize the calibration program for Cycle 24, and provide new information useful for observers planning to apply for future science investigations.

  6. The second generation Wide-Field/Planetary Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leschly, Kim; Allestad, David; Herrell, Linda

    1991-01-01

    The general design and principal features of the second generation Wide-Field/Planetary Camera (WFPC-2) for the Hubble Space Telescope are reviewed. The discussion covers the background of WFPC-2 development, science capabilities, key performance parameters, optical and electronic equipment, mechanisms, thermal control, and contamination control. Attention is also given to on-orbit operations, including commanding and telemetry and on-orbit servicing.

  7. Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope [WFIRST]: Telescope Design and Simulated Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goullioud, R.; Content, D. A.; Kuan, G. M.; Moore, J. D.; Chang, Z.; Sunada, E. T.; Villalvazo, J.; Hawk, J. P.; Armani, N. V.; Johnson, E. L.; Powell, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    The ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey proposed multiple missions with NIR focal planes and 3 mirror wide field telescopes in the 1.5m aperture range. None of them would have won as standalone missions WFIRST is a combination of these missions, created by Astro 2010 committee. WFIRST Science Definition Team (SDT) tasked to examine the design. Project team is a GSFC-JPL-Caltech collaboration. This interim mission design is a result of combined work by the project team with the SDT.

  8. An Overview of Wide-Field-Of-View Optical Designs for Survey Telescopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    exist with each having its own strengths and limitations. 1. Introduction Wide-field astronomical sky survey work dates back to the mid 1840s...shortly after the invention of photography [1]. Early survey instruments were nothing more than cameras and the optics were early camera lenses...Some of the better known optics were made by Voigtlander and Petzval [2]. As the technical characteristics of photography improved, larger

  9. Highly sensitive and wide-band tunable terahertz response of plasma waves based on graphene field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Yu, Anqi; Zhang, Yang; Ding, Jiayi; Lu, Wei

    2014-06-27

    Terahertz (THz) technology is becoming a spotlight of scientific interest due to its promising myriad applications including imaging, spectroscopy, industry control and communication. However, one of the major bottlenecks for advancing this field is due to lack of well-developed solid-state sources and detectors operating at THz gap which serves to mark the boundary between electronics and photonics. Here, we demonstrate exceptionally wide tunable terahertz plasma-wave excitation can be realized in the channel of micrometer-level graphene field effect transistors (FET). Owing to the intrinsic high propagation velocity of plasma waves (>~10(8) cm/s) and Dirac band structure, the plasma-wave graphene-FETs yield promising prospects for fast sensing, THz detection, etc. The results indicate that the multiple guide-wave resonances in the graphene sheets can lead to the deep sub-wavelength confinement of terahertz wave and with Q-factor orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional 2DEG system at room temperature. Rooted in this understanding, the performance trade-off among signal attenuation, broadband operation, on-chip integrability can be avoided in future THz smart photonic network system by merging photonics and electronics. The unique properties presented can open up the exciting routes to compact solid state tunable THz detectors, filters, and wide band subwavelength imaging based on the graphene-FETs.

  10. Highly Sensitive and Wide-Band Tunable Terahertz Response of Plasma Waves Based on Graphene Field Effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Yu, Anqi; Zhang, Yang; Ding, Jiayi; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology is becoming a spotlight of scientific interest due to its promising myriad applications including imaging, spectroscopy, industry control and communication. However, one of the major bottlenecks for advancing this field is due to lack of well-developed solid-state sources and detectors operating at THz gap which serves to mark the boundary between electronics and photonics. Here, we demonstrate exceptionally wide tunable terahertz plasma-wave excitation can be realized in the channel of micrometer-level graphene field effect transistors (FET). Owing to the intrinsic high propagation velocity of plasma waves (>~108 cm/s) and Dirac band structure, the plasma-wave graphene-FETs yield promising prospects for fast sensing, THz detection, etc. The results indicate that the multiple guide-wave resonances in the graphene sheets can lead to the deep sub-wavelength confinement of terahertz wave and with Q-factor orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional 2DEG system at room temperature. Rooted in this understanding, the performance trade-off among signal attenuation, broadband operation, on-chip integrability can be avoided in future THz smart photonic network system by merging photonics and electronics. The unique properties presented can open up the exciting routes to compact solid state tunable THz detectors, filters, and wide band subwavelength imaging based on the graphene-FETs. PMID:24969065

  11. Highly Sensitive and Wide-Band Tunable Terahertz Response of Plasma Waves Based on Graphene Field Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Yu, Anqi; Zhang, Yang; Ding, Jiayi; Lu, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology is becoming a spotlight of scientific interest due to its promising myriad applications including imaging, spectroscopy, industry control and communication. However, one of the major bottlenecks for advancing this field is due to lack of well-developed solid-state sources and detectors operating at THz gap which serves to mark the boundary between electronics and photonics. Here, we demonstrate exceptionally wide tunable terahertz plasma-wave excitation can be realized in the channel of micrometer-level graphene field effect transistors (FET). Owing to the intrinsic high propagation velocity of plasma waves (>~108 cm/s) and Dirac band structure, the plasma-wave graphene-FETs yield promising prospects for fast sensing, THz detection, etc. The results indicate that the multiple guide-wave resonances in the graphene sheets can lead to the deep sub-wavelength confinement of terahertz wave and with Q-factor orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional 2DEG system at room temperature. Rooted in this understanding, the performance trade-off among signal attenuation, broadband operation, on-chip integrability can be avoided in future THz smart photonic network system by merging photonics and electronics. The unique properties presented can open up the exciting routes to compact solid state tunable THz detectors, filters, and wide band subwavelength imaging based on the graphene-FETs.

  12. Wide field fluorescence imaging in narrow passageways using scanning fiber endoscope technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cameron M.; Chandler, John E.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2010-02-01

    An ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) has been developed for high resolution imaging of regions in the body that are commonly inaccessible. The SFE produces 500 line color images at 30 Hz frame rate while maintaining a 1.2-1.7 mm outer diameter. The distal tip of the SFE houses a 9 mm rigid scan engine attached to a highly flexible tether (minimum bend radius < 8 mm) comprised of optical fibers and electrical wires within a protective sheath. Unlike other ultrathin technologies, the unique characteristics of this system have allowed the SFE to navigate narrow passages without sacrificing image quality. To date, the SFE has been used for in vivo imaging of the bile duct, esophagus and peripheral airways. In this study, the standard SFE operation was tailored to capture wide field fluorescence images and spectra. Green (523 nm) and blue (440 nm) lasers were used as illumination sources, while the white balance gain values were adjusted to accentuate red fluorescence signal. To demonstrate wide field fluorescence imaging of small lumens, the SFE was inserted into a phantom model of a human pancreatobiliary tract and navigated to a custom fluorescent target. Both wide field fluorescence and standard color images of the target were captured to demonstrate multimodal imaging.

  13. Wide-field four-channel fluorescence imager for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Madhuri; Melnik, Dmitry; Barnett, Heather; Daly, Kevin; Moran, Christine H.; Chang, Wei-Shun; Link, Stephan; Bucher, Christopher Theodore; Kittrell, Carter; Curl, Robert

    2010-03-01

    A wide-field four-channel fluorescence imager has been developed. The instrument uses four expanded laser beams to image a large section (6 mm×9 mm). An object can be sequentially illuminated with any combination of 408-, 532-, 658-, and 784-nm lasers for arbitrary (down to 1 ms) exposure times for each laser. Just two notch filters block scattered light from all four lasers. The design approach described here offers great flexibility in treatment of objects, very good sensitivity, and a wide field of view at low cost. There appears to be no commercial instrument capable of simultaneous fluorescence imaging of a wide field of view with four-laser excitation. Some possible applications are following events such as flow and mixing in microchannel systems, the transmission of biological signals across a culture, and following simulations of biological membrane diffusion. It can also be used in DNA sequencing by synthesis to follow the progress of the photolytic removal of dye and terminator. Without utilizing its time resolution, it can be used to obtain four independent images of a single tissue section stained with four targeting agents, with each coupled to a different dye matching one of the lasers.

  14. Intra-familial Similarity of Wide-Field Fundus Autofluorescence in Inherited Retinal Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Yuka; Ogino, Ken; Oishi, Akio; Gotoh, Norimoto; Makiyama, Yukiko; Oishi, Maho; Kurimoto, Masafumi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    To examine the similarity of wide-field fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging in inherited retinal dystrophy between siblings and between parents and their children. The subjects included 17 siblings (12 with retinitis pigmentosa and 5 with cone rod dystrophy) and 10 parent-child pairs (8 with retinitis pigmentosa and 2 with cone rod dystrophy). We quantified the similarity of wide-field FAF using image processing techniques of cropping, binarization, superimposition, and subtraction. The estimated similarity of the siblings was compared with that of the parent-child pairs and that of the age-matched unrelated patients. The similarity between siblings was significantly higher that of parent-child pairs or that of age-matched unrelated patients (P = 0.004 and P = 0.049, respectively). Wide-field FAF images were similar between siblings with inherited retinal dystrophy but different between parent-child pairs. This suggests that aging is a confounding factor in genotype-phenotype correlation studies.

  15. Monitoring with high temporal resolution to search for optical transients in the wide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, Grigory; Bondar, Sergey; Ivanov, Evgeny; Karpov, Sergey; Katkova, Elena; Pozanenko, Alexei; Guarnieri, Adriano; Bartolini, Corrado; Piccioni, Adalberto; Greco, Giuseppe; Molinari, Emilio; Covino, Stefano

    2008-02-01

    In order to detect and investigate short stochastic optical flares from a number of variable astrophysical objects (GRBs, SNs, flare stars, CVs, X-Ray binaries) of unknown localizations as well as near-earth objects (NEOs), both natural and artificial, it is necessary to perform the systematic monitoring of large regions of the sky with high temporal resolution. Here we describe the design of a system able to perform such a task, which consists of a wide-field camera with high time resolution able to detect and classify the transient events on a subsecond time scale, and a fast robotic telescope aimed to perform their detailed investigation. In a last few years we've created the prototype FAVOR wide-field camera, placed at North Caucasus near Russian 6-m telescope, and a complete two-telescope complex TORTOREM, combining TORTORA wide-field camera with REM robotic telescope and placed at La Silla ESO observatory. Its technical parameters and first results of operation are described.

  16. Wide Field Of View Varifocal Near-Eye Display Using See-Through Deformable Membrane Mirrors.

    PubMed

    Dunn, David; Tippets, Cary; Torell, Kent; Kellnhofer, Petr; Aksit, Kaan; Didyk, Piotr; Myszkowski, Karol; Luebke, David; Fuchs, Henry

    2017-04-01

    Accommodative depth cues, a wide field of view, and ever-higher resolutions all present major hardware design challenges for near-eye displays. Optimizing a design to overcome one of these challenges typically leads to a trade-off in the others. We tackle this problem by introducing an all-in-one solution - a new wide field of view, gaze-tracked near-eye display for augmented reality applications. The key component of our solution is the use of a single see-through, varifocal deformable membrane mirror for each eye reflecting a display. They are controlled by airtight cavities and change the effective focal power to present a virtual image at a target depth plane which is determined by the gaze tracker. The benefits of using the membranes include wide field of view (100° diagonal) and fast depth switching (from 20 cm to infinity within 300 ms). Our subjective experiment verifies the prototype and demonstrates its potential benefits for near-eye see-through displays.

  17. Wide-field quantitative imaging of tissue microstructure using sub-diffuse spatial frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    McClatchy, David M; Rizzo, Elizabeth J; Wells, Wendy A; Cheney, Philip P; Hwang, Jeeseong C; Paulsen, Keith D; Pogue, Brian W; Kanick, Stephen C

    2016-06-20

    Localized measurements of scattering in biological tissue provide sensitivity to microstructural morphology but have limited utility to wide-field applications, such as surgical guidance. This study introduces sub-diffusive spatial frequency domain imaging (sd-SFDI), which uses high spatial frequency illumination to achieve wide-field sampling of localized reflectances. Model-based inversion recovers macroscopic variations in the reduced scattering coefficient [Formula: see text] and the phase function backscatter parameter (γ). Measurements in optical phantoms show quantitative imaging of user-tuned phase-function-based contrast with accurate decoupling of parameters that define both the density and the size-scale distribution of scatterers. Measurements of fresh ex vivo breast tissue samples revealed, for the first time, unique clustering of sub-diffusive scattering properties for different tissue types. The results support that sd-SFDI provides maps of microscopic structural biomarkers that cannot be obtained with diffuse wide-field imaging and characterizes spatial variations not resolved by point-based optical sampling.

  18. Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

    2013-07-31

    The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

  19. KOALA: a wide-field 1000 element integral-field unit for the Anglo-Australian Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, S. C.; Ireland, M.; Lawrence, J. S.; Tims, J.; Staszak, N.; Brzeski, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Sharp, R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Case, S.; Colless, M.; Croom, S.; Couch, W.; De Marco, O.; Glazebrook, K.; Saunders, W.; Webster, R.; Zucker, D. B.

    2012-09-01

    KOALA, the Kilofibre Optimised Astronomical Lenslet Array, is a wide-field, high efficiency integral field unit being designed for use with the bench mounted AAOmega spectrograph on the AAT. KOALA will have 1000 fibres in a rectangular array with a selectable field of view of either 1390 or 430 sq. arcseconds with a spatial sampling of 1.25" or 0.7" respectively. To achieve this KOALA will use a telecentric double lenslet array with interchangeable fore-optics. The IFU will feed AAOmega via a 31m fibre run. The efficiency of KOALA is expected to be ≍ 52% at 3700A and ≍ 66% at 6563°Å with a throughput of > 52% over the entire wavelength range.

  20. TMT-AGE: wide field of regard multi-object adaptive optics for TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Masayuki; Oya, Shin; Ono, Yoshito H.; Takami, Hideki; Ozaki, Shinobu; Hayano, Yutaka; Iwata, Ikuru; Hane, Kazuhiro; Wu, Tong; Yamamuro, Tomoyasu; Ikeda, Yuji

    2014-07-01

    We introduce current status of the feasibility study on a wide field of regard (FoR) Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO) system for TMT (TMT-AGE: TMT-Analyzer for Galaxies in the Early universe). MOAO is a system which realize high spatial-resolution observations of multiple objects scattered in a wide FoR. In this study, we put emphasise on the FoR as wide as 10' diameter. The wide FoR is crucial to effectively observe very high-redshift galaxies, which have low surface number density. Simulations of an MOAO system with 8 LGSs show close-to-diffraction-limited correction can be achieved within 5' diameter FoR and moderate AO correction can be achieved within 10' diameter FoR. We discuss overall system design of the wide FoR MOAO system considering the constraint from the stroke of small-size deformable mirror (DM). We also introduce current status of developments of key components of an MOAO system; high-dynamic range wavefront sensor (WFS) and large-stroke small-size DM, and real time computer (RTC) with fast tomographic reconstruction.

  1. Preliminary core design studies for the advanced burner reactor over a wide range of conversion ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E. A.; Yang, W. S.; Hill, R. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-05-05

    A consistent set of designs for 1000 MWt commercial-scale sodium-cooled Advance Burner Reactors (ABR) have been developed for both metal and oxide-fueled cores with conversion ratios from breakeven (CR=1.0) to fertile-free (CR=0.0). These designs are expected to satisfy thermal and irradiation damage limits based on the currently available data. The very low conversion ratio designs require fuel that is beyond the current fuel database, which is anticipated to be qualified by and for the Advanced Burned Test Reactor. Safety and kinetic parameters were calculated, but a safety analysis was not performed. Development of these designs was required to achieve the primary goal of this study, which was to generate representative fuel cycle mass flows for system studies of ABRs as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). There are slight variations with conversion ratio but the basic ABR configuration consists of 144 fuel assemblies and between 9 and 22 primary control assemblies for both the metal and oxide-fueled cores. Preliminary design studies indicated that it is feasible to design the ABR to accommodate a wide range of conversion ratio by employing different assembly designs and including sufficient control assemblies to accommodate the large reactivity swing at low conversion ratios. The assemblies are designed to fit within the same geometry, but the size and number of fuel pins within each assembly are significantly different in order to achieve the target conversion ratio while still satisfying thermal limits. Current irradiation experience would allow for a conversion ratio of somewhat below 0.75. The fuel qualification for the first ABR should expand this experience to allow for much lower conversion ratios and higher bunrups. The current designs were based on assumptions about the performance of high and very high enrichment fuel, which results in significant uncertainty about the details of the designs. However, the basic fuel cycle performance

  2. Prototyping results for a wide-field fiber positioner for the Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Anna M.; McGrath, Andrew J.

    2004-07-01

    Given the physical size of the GSMT prime focus field is approximately equivalent to that of the Subaru telescope it is possible to directly apply current technology developed for the Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph instrument (FMOS, to be commissioned in 2005) and substantially reduce the risk associated with developing a new solution for wide-field multi-object spectroscopy on an ELT. The Anglo-Australian Observatory has recently completed a design study for an ~1000 fiber, Echidna-style positioner for the prime focus of the Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope (GSMT). The positioner forms part of the wide-field Multi-Object Multi-Fiber Optical Spectrograph (MOMFOS), an ELT prime focus instrument offering a minimum of 800 fibers patrolling the corrected 20 arcmin field. The design study identified 2 components of an equivalent MOMFOS positioner design that required prototyping. Firstly, a higher spine packing density is required to satisfy the proposed scientific program. Secondly, the fiber position measurement system adopted for FMOS cannot be simply scaled and applied to MOMFOS given space constraints in the top end unit. As such a new and, if possible, simpler system was required. Prototyping results for both components are presented.

  3. Lensless wide-field fluorescent imaging on a chip using compressive decoding of sparse objects.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Ahmet F; Sencan, Ikbal; Su, Ting-Wei; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-05-10

    We demonstrate the use of a compressive sampling algorithm for on-chip fluorescent imaging of sparse objects over an ultra-large field-of-view (>8 cm(2)) without the need for any lenses or mechanical scanning. In this lensfree imaging technique, fluorescent samples placed on a chip are excited through a prism interface, where the pump light is filtered out by total internal reflection after exciting the entire sample volume. The emitted fluorescent light from the specimen is collected through an on-chip fiber-optic faceplate and is delivered to a wide field-of-view opto-electronic sensor array for lensless recording of fluorescent spots corresponding to the samples. A compressive sampling based optimization algorithm is then used to rapidly reconstruct the sparse distribution of fluorescent sources to achieve approximately 10 microm spatial resolution over the entire active region of the sensor-array, i.e., over an imaging field-of-view of >8 cm(2). Such a wide-field lensless fluorescent imaging platform could especially be significant for high-throughput imaging cytometry, rare cell analysis, as well as for micro-array research.

  4. Electron field emission from wide bandgap semiconductors under intervalley carrier redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litovchenko, V.; Grygoriev, A.; Evtukh, A.; Yilmazoglu, O.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Pavlidis, D.

    2009-11-01

    Electron field emission phenomena from semiconductors (and, in particular, wide band gap materials) are analyzed theoretically for the general case, i.e., by taking into consideration aspects that have not been considered earlier such as two (or more) valleys of the energy band structure, nondegenerated statistics for the free electrons, heating of conduction band electrons, intervalley carrier redistribution under applied electrical fields, size quantization of electron band spectra, and change in the field emission characteristics. Comparisons with experiments performed on the highly structured (micro- and nano) surfaces of the GaN wide bandgap semiconductor have been made. The influence of the above factors on the current-voltage Fowler-Nordheim characteristics was demonstrated by theory and experiment. From theoretical and experimental results the intervalley energy difference (ΔE) for GaN quantum-sized cathodes was estimated to be 0.8 eV, which is considerably less than that predicted for bulk semiconductor (ΔE =1.2-1.5 eV). Furthermore the field emission currents were several orders higher than for bulk material. This is in good agreement with the prediction of the proposed theoretical model.

  5. Simulation studies of wide and medium field of view earth radiation data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. N.

    1978-01-01

    A parameter estimation technique is presented to estimate the radiative flux distribution over the earth from radiometer measurements at satellite altitude. The technique analyzes measurements from a wide field of view (WFOV), horizon to horizon, nadir pointing sensor with a mathematical technique to derive the radiative flux estimates at the top of the atmosphere for resolution elements smaller than the sensor field of view. A computer simulation of the data analysis technique is presented for both earth-emitted and reflected radiation. Zonal resolutions are considered as well as the global integration of plane flux. An estimate of the equator-to-pole gradient is obtained from the zonal estimates. Sensitivity studies of the derived flux distribution to directional model errors are also presented. In addition to the WFOV results, medium field of view results are presented.

  6. Wide field x-ray telescopes: Detecting x-ray transients/afterglows related to GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Hudec, Rene; Pina, Ladislav; Inneman, Adolf; Gorenstein, Paul

    1998-05-16

    The recent discovery of X-ray afterglows of GRBs opens the possibility of analyses of GRBs by their X-ray detections. However, imaging X-ray telescopes in current use mostly have limited fields of view. Alternative X-ray optics geometries achieving very large fields of view have been theoretically suggested in the 70's but not constructed and used so far. We review the geometries and basic properties of the wide-field X-ray optical systems based on one- and two-dimensional lobster-eye geometry and suggest technologies for their development and construction. First results of the development of double replicated X-ray reflecting flats for use in one-dimensional X-ray optics of lobster-eye type are presented and discussed. The optimum strategy for locating GRBs upon their X-ray counterparts is also presented and discussed.

  7. The wide-field imager for IXO: status and future activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strüder, Lothar; Aschauer, Florian; Bautz, Mark; Bombelli, Luca; Burrows, David; Fiorini, Carlo; Fraser, George; Herrmann, Sven; Kendziorra, Eckhard; Kuster, Markus; Lauf, Thomas; Lechner, Peter; Lutz, Gerhard; Majewski, Petra; Meuris, Aline; Porro, Matteo; Reiffers, Jonas; Richter, Rainer; Santangelo, Andrea; Soltau, Heike; Stefanescu, Alexander; Tenzer, Chris; Treis, Johannes; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; de Vita, Giulio; Wilms, Jörn

    2010-07-01

    The Wide Field Imager (WFI) of the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) is an X-ray imaging spectrometer based on a large monolithic DePFET (Depleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor) Active Pixel Sensor. Filling an area of 10 x 10 cm2 with a format of 1024 x 1024 pixels it will cover a field of view of 18 arcmin. The pixel size of 100 x 100 μm2 corresponds to a fivefold oversampling of the telescope's expected 5 arcsec point spread function. The WFI's basic DePFET structure combines the functionalities of sensor and integrated amplifier with nearly Fano-limited energy resolution and high efficiency from 100 eV to 15 keV. The development of dedicated control and amplifier ASICs allows for high frame rates up to 1 kHz and flexible readout modes. Results obtained with representative prototypes with a format of 256 x 256 pixels are presented.

  8. Optical wide field monitor AROMA-W using multiple digital single-lens reflex cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ichiro; Tsunashima, Kosuke; Tatsuhito, Takeda; Saori, Ono; Kazutaka, Yamaoka; Yoshida, Atsumasa

    2010-12-01

    We have developed and operated the automatic optical observation device Aoyama Gakuin University Robotic Optical Monitor for Astrophysical objects - Wide field (AROMA-W). It covers a large field of view of about 45 degrees W 30 degrees at a time by the multiple digital single-lens reflex cameras, and provides photometric data in four bands with a limiting V magnitude of about 12-13 magnitude (20 seconds, 3 sigma level). The automatic analysis pipeline which can analyze in parallel with observation has been constructed so far. It can draw the light curves of all stars in the field of view of AROMA-W. We are aiming at the simultaneous observation of the transients (e.g., X-ray nova, Supernova, GRB) that MAXI discovered by using the AROMA-W. We report the developmental status, the observational results of AROMA-W and a possibility of the simultaneous observation to the X-ray transients discovered with MAXI.

  9. Ultra-wide field retinal imaging in detection, classification, and management of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ahmed Z; Silva, Paolo S; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Sun, Jennifer K

    2012-01-01

    Current ultra-wide field (UWF) retinal imaging systems utilize scanning laser ophthalmoscope technology combined with an ellipsoidal mirror to capture up to 200 degrees of the retina in a single image. When compared with mydriatic ETDRS-protocol, 7 standard field photographs and clinical examination, nonmydriatic UWF images appear to have excellent agreement in allowing the detection and classification of diabetic retinopathy (DR), although larger, definitive validation studies are still forthcoming. UWF imaging and angiography allow visualization of peripheral retinal nonperfusion, vascular leakage and neovascularization in patients with DR that may not be captured on 7 standard fields. Prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate whether modified laser treatment algorithms based on improved visualization of the retinal periphery might improve patient outcomes. Nonmydriatic UWF imaging has potential applications for ocular diabetic telehealth programs, but validation of newer, more portable, and more affordable UWF imaging models is needed.

  10. Design of wide-field Nasmyth optical system for a submillimeter camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuzuki, Toshihiro; Nitta, Tom; Imada, Hiroaki; Seta, Masumichi; Nakai, Naomasa; Sekiguchi, Shigeyuki; Sekimoto, Yutaro

    2015-04-01

    A wide-field Nasmyth optical system that connects a planned 10-m Ritchey-Chrétien telescope to a submillimeter camera is reported. This diffraction-limited system has a 1-deg field of view at 850 GHz, filled with a more than 20,000-pixel camera. The system enables us to carry out large field surveys of distant galaxies within reasonable time scales. The size of the Nasmyth optics is reasonably compact and its cryogenic part including the vacuum window, cryogenic lens, and IR block filters can be built using existing technologies at a reasonable cost. This type of optical system can be applied for the optical design of millimeter, terahertz, and other submillimeter instruments.

  11. WISPIR: A Wide-Field Imaging SPectrograph for the InfraRed for the SPICA Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Mundy, Lee G.

    2010-01-01

    We have undertaken a study of a far infrared imaging spectrometer based on a Fourier transform spectrometer that uses well-understood, high maturity optics, cryogenics, and detectors to further our knowledge of the chemical and astrophysical evolution of the Universe as it formed planets, stars, and the variety of galaxy morphologies that we observe today. The instrument, Wide-field Imaging Spectrometer for the InfraRed (WISPIR), would operate on the SPICA observatory, and will feature a spectral range from 35 - 210 microns and a spectral resolving power of R=1,000 to 6,000, depending on wavelength. WISPIR provides a choice of full-field spectral imaging over a 2'x2' field or long-slit spectral imaging along a 2' slit for studies of astrophysical structures in the local and high-redshift Universe. WISPIR in long-slit mode will attain a sensitivity two orders of magnitude better than what is currently available.

  12. Current status of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope wide field upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Gary J.; Booth, John A.; Cornell, Mark E.; Good, John M.; Gebhardt, Karl; Kriel, Herman J.; Lee, Hanshin; Leck, Ron; Moreira, Walter; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Perry, Dave M.; Rafal, Marc D.; Rafferty, Tom H.; Ramiller, Chuck; Savage, Richard D.; Taylor, Charles A.; Vattiat, Brian L.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Beno, Joseph H.; Beets, Timothy A.; Esguerra, Jorge D.; Häuser, Marco; Hayes, Richard J.; Heisler, James T.; Soukup, Ian M.; Zierer, Joseph J.; Worthington, Michael S.; Mollison, Nicholas T.; Wardell, Douglas R.; Wedeking, Gregory A.

    2012-09-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) is an innovative large telescope of 9.2 meter aperture, located in West Texas at the McDonald Observatory (MDO). The HET operates with a fixed segmented primary and has a tracker which moves the four-mirror corrector and prime focus instrument package to track the sidereal and non-sidereal motions of objects. A major upgrade of the HET is in progress that will increase the pupil size to 10 meters and the field of view to 22' by replacing the corrector, tracker and prime focus instrument package. In addition to supporting the existing suite of instruments, this wide field upgrade will feed a revolutionary new integral field spectrograph called VIRUS, in support of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEXχ). This paper discusses the current status of this upgrade.

  13. The Wide-Field Nearby Galaxy-Cluster Survey (WINGS) and Its Extension OMEGAWINGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggianti, B. M.; Fasano, G.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; Couch, W.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dressler, A.; Fritz, J.; Kjaergaard, P.; Gullieuszik, M.; Moles, M.; Moretti, A.; Omizzolo, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Varela, J.; Vulcani, B.

    WINGS is a wide-field multi-wavelength survey of 76 X-ray selected clusters at low redshift. The WINGS database has been used for a variety of cluster and cluster galaxy studies, investigating galaxy star formation, morphologies, structure, stellar mass functions and other properties. We present the recent wider-field extension of WINGS, OMEGAWINGS, conducted with OmegaCAM@VST and AAOmega@AAT. We show two of our latest results regarding jellyfish galaxies and galaxy sizes. OMEGAWINGS has allowed the first systematic search of galaxies with signs of ongoing ram pressure stripping (jellyfishes), yielding a catalog of ˜ 240 galaxies in 41 clusters. We discuss the first results obtained from this sample and the prospects for integral field data. Finally, we summarize our results regarding the discovery of compact massive galaxies at low redshift, their properties, dependence on environment and the implications for the evolution of galaxy sizes from high- to low-z.

  14. Design of a wide field far-UV spectrometer for a mission to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wishnow, Edward; Miller, Tim; Fillingim, Matthew; Edelstein, Jerry; Lillis, Robert; Korpela, Eric; England, Scott; Shourt, William Van; Siegmund, Oswald; McPhate, Jason; Courtade, Sasha; Curtis, David; Deighan, Justin; Chaffin, Michael; Harmoul, Abdullah S.; Al Matroushi, Hessa R.

    2016-07-01

    An imaging spectrometer for observations of the Martian corona and the Martian thermosphere is presented. The corona extends over 10 Martian radii and its measurement requires observations over a very wide field. The spectrometer covers the wavelength region 120-170 nm where this band includes coronal spectral lines of hydrogen Lyman alpha and oxygen, and thermospheric spectral lines from atomic oxygen and carbon and the 4th positive band of CO. Stellar occultation observations will provide atmospheric density measurements. These scientific requirements are fulfilled by an Offner-type spectrometer with a 110 degree instantaneous field of view and no moving mechanisms. Both the spectral and imaging resolution vary across the field, from higher resolution across the planet body, to lower resolution required at the diffuse outer parts of the corona. This Offner-type design has not been previously used in the FUV.

  15. Advanced Use of Wolrd-Wide Web in the Online System of Delphi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DöNszelmann, M.; Carvalho, D.; Mundim, L. M.; Du, S.; Rodden, K.; TennebØ, F.

    The World-Wide Web technology is used by the DELPHI experiment at CERN to provide easy access to information of the `On-line System'. WWW technology on both client and server side is used in five different projects. The World-Wide Web has its advantages concerning the network technology, the practical user interface and its scalability. It however also demands a stateless protocol and format negotiation.

  16. Fractionated Wide-Field Radiation Therapy Followed by Fractionated Local-Field Irradiation for Treating Widespread Painful Bone Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Wontaek; Nam, Jiho; Kim, Donghyun; Jeon, Hosang; Park, Dahl; Kim, Dongwon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Wide-field radiation therapy (WFRT) is an effective treatment for widespread bone metastasis. We evaluated local-field irradiation (LFI) after fractionated WFRT (f-WFRT) for treating the patients with multiple painful bone lesions. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2007, 32 patients with multiple bone metastases were treated with fractionated LFI (f-LFI) after f-WFRT. All patients initially received 15 Gy in 5 fractions to a wide field, followed by LFI (9-15 Gy in 3 Gy fractions). Response was assessed by evaluating the degree of pain relief using a visual analog scale before radiotherapy, after f-WFRT, and after f-LFI. Results: Fractionated LFI following f-WFRT yielded an overall relief rate of 93.8% and a complete relief rate of 43.8%. The rate of the appearance of new disease was 6.3% for the patients with complete relief, 20.5% for the patients with a partial relief, and 50% for the patients with no relief. Conclusion: Fractionated LFI after f-WFRT is a well-tolerated and effective treatment for multiple metastatic bone disease.

  17. A New Method for Wide-field Near-IR Imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momcheva, Ivelina G.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; van der Wel, Arjen; Brammer, Gabriel B.; MacKenty, John; Nelson, Erica J.; Leja, Joel; Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn

    2017-01-01

    We present a new technique for wide and shallow observations using the near-infrared channel of Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Wide-field near-IR surveys with HST are generally inefficient, as guide star acquisitions make it impractical to observe more than one pointing per orbit. This limitation can be circumvented by guiding with gyros alone, which is possible as long as the telescope has three functional gyros. The method presented here allows us to observe mosaics of eight independent WFC3-IR pointings in a single orbit by utilizing the fact that HST drifts by only a very small amount in the 25 s between non-destructive reads of unguided exposures. By shifting the reads and treating them as independent exposures the full resolution of WFC3 can be restored. We use this “drift and shift” (DASH) method in the Cycle 23 COSMOS-DASH program, which will obtain 456 WFC3 H 160 pointings in 57 orbits, covering an area of 0.6 degree in the COSMOS field down to H 160 = 25. When completed, the program will more than triple the area of extra-galactic survey fields covered by near-IR imaging at HST resolution. We demonstrate the viability of the method with the first four orbits (32 pointings) of this program. We show that the resolution of the WFC3 camera is preserved, and that structural parameters of galaxies are consistent with those measured in guided observations.

  18. A wide field-of-view microscope based on holographic focus grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jigang; Cui, Xiquan; Zheng, Guoan; Lee, Lap Man; Yang, Changhuei

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a novel microscope technique that can achieve wide field-of-view (FOV) imaging and yet possess resolution that is comparable to conventional microscope. The principle of wide FOV microscope system breaks the link between resolution and FOV magnitude of traditional microscopes. Furthermore, by eliminating bulky optical elements from its design and utilizing holographic optical elements, the wide FOV microscope system is more cost-effective. In our system, a hologram was made to focus incoming collimated beam into a focus grid. The sample is put in the focal plane and the transmissions of the focuses are detected by an imaging sensor. By scanning the incident angle of the incoming beam, the focus grid will scan across the sample and the time-varying transmission can be detected. We can then reconstruct the transmission image of the sample. The resolution of microscopic image is limited by the size of the focus formed by the hologram. The scanning area of each focus spot is determined by the separation of the focus spots and can be made small for fast imaging speed. We have fabricated a prototype system with a 2.4-mm FOV and 1-μm resolution. The prototype system was used to image onion skin cells for a demonstration. The preliminary experiments prove the feasibility of the wide FOV microscope technique, and the possibility of a wider FOV system with better resolution.

  19. Segmentation guided registration of wide field-of-view retinal optical coherence tomography volumes

    PubMed Central

    Lezama, José; Mukherjee, Dibyendu; McNabb, Ryan P.; Sapiro, Guillermo; Kuo, Anthony N.; Farsiu, Sina

    2016-01-01

    Patient motion artifacts are often visible in densely sampled or large wide field-of-view (FOV) retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) volumes. A popular strategy for reducing motion artifacts is to capture two orthogonally oriented volumetric scans. However, due to larger volume sizes, longer acquisition times, and corresponding larger motion artifacts, the registration of wide FOV scans remains a challenging problem. In particular, gaps in data acquisition due to eye motion, such as saccades, can be significant and their modeling becomes critical for successful registration. In this article, we develop a complete computational pipeline for the automatic motion correction and accurate registration of wide FOV orthogonally scanned OCT images of the human retina. The proposed framework utilizes the retinal boundary segmentation as a guide for registration and requires only a minimal transformation of the acquired data to produce a successful registration. It includes saccade detection and correction, a custom version of the optical flow algorithm for dense lateral registration and a linear optimization approach for axial registration. Utilizing a wide FOV swept source OCT system, we acquired retinal volumes of 12 subjects and we provide qualitative and quantitative experimental results to validate the state-of-the-art effectiveness of the proposed technique. The source code corresponding to the proposed algorithm is available online. PMID:28018709

  20. Advancing the field of health systems research synthesis.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Etienne V; Ranson, Michael K; Bärnighausen, Till; Bosch-Capblanch, Xavier; Daniels, Karen; El-Jardali, Fadi; Ghaffar, Abdul; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Haines, Andy; Lavis, John N; Lewin, Simon; Meng, Qingyue; Oliver, Sandy; Pantoja, Tomás; Straus, Sharon; Shemilt, Ian; Tovey, David; Tugwell, Peter; Waddington, Hugh; Wilson, Mark; Yuan, Beibei; Røttingen, John-Arne

    2015-07-10

    Those planning, managing and working in health systems worldwide routinely need to make decisions regarding strategies to improve health care and promote equity. Systematic reviews of different kinds can be of great help to these decision-makers, providing actionable evidence at every step in the decision-making process. Although there is growing recognition of the importance of systematic reviews to inform both policy decisions and produce guidance for health systems, a number of important methodological and evidence uptake challenges remain and better coordination of existing initiatives is needed. The Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research, housed within the World Health Organization, convened an Advisory Group on Health Systems Research (HSR) Synthesis to bring together different stakeholders interested in HSR synthesis and its use in decision-making processes. We describe the rationale of the Advisory Group and the six areas of its work and reflects on its role in advancing the field of HSR synthesis. We argue in favour of greater cross-institutional collaborations, as well as capacity strengthening in low- and middle-income countries, to advance the science and practice of health systems research synthesis. We advocate for the integration of quasi-experimental study designs in reviews of effectiveness of health systems intervention and reforms. The Advisory Group also recommends adopting priority-setting approaches for HSR synthesis and increasing the use of findings from systematic reviews in health policy and decision-making.

  1. Advancing the field of 3D biomaterial printing.

    PubMed

    Jakus, Adam E; Rutz, Alexandra L; Shah, Ramille N

    2016-01-11

    3D biomaterial printing has emerged as a potentially revolutionary technology, promising to transform both research and medical therapeutics. Although there has been recent progress in the field, on-demand fabrication of functional and transplantable tissues and organs is still a distant reality. To advance to this point, there are two major technical challenges that must be overcome. The first is expanding upon the limited variety of available 3D printable biomaterials (biomaterial inks), which currently do not adequately represent the physical, chemical, and biological complexity and diversity of tissues and organs within the human body. Newly developed biomaterial inks and the resulting 3D printed constructs must meet numerous interdependent requirements, including those that lead to optimal printing, structural, and biological outcomes. The second challenge is developing and implementing comprehensive biomaterial ink and printed structure characterization combined with in vitro and in vivo tissue- and organ-specific evaluation. This perspective outlines considerations for addressing these technical hurdles that, once overcome, will facilitate rapid advancement of 3D biomaterial printing as an indispensable tool for both investigating complex tissue and organ morphogenesis and for developing functional devices for a variety of diagnostic and regenerative medicine applications.

  2. New wide field camera for Subaru Telescope: Hyper Suprime-Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) is a new wide field optical imaging camera built for 8.2 m Subaru telescope. The field of view is 1.5 degree in diameter and the nearly 50 cm image circle was paved by 116 fully depleted CCDs (2k x 4k 15 micron square pixels). To realize a seeing limit imaging at Mauna Kea, the specification on the overall instrument PSF is set as 0.32 arc-second (FWHM). This is crucial for our primary scientific objectives: weak gravitational lensing survey to probe dark matter distribution. We started building the camera in 2006 and had a first light in 2012. The delivered image quality turned out to be mostly seeing limited as designed. We once observed the seeing size of 0.43 arc-second (median value over the field of view) in Y-band with 300 seconds exposure. Our 300 nights observing proposal has been accepted. The program started in March 2014 and continues over 5 years. The wide survey plans to cover 1,400 square degree with the limiting magnitude of i_AB = 26 (5 sigma, 2 arcsec aperture). General observer programs are carried out in parallel. In this talk, we will present the design and the actual performance of the camera as well as how we implement the massive (1.6 GByte/exposure) data management system.

  3. Narrow and wide field amacrine cells fire action potentials in response to depolarization and light stimulation.

    PubMed

    Heflin, Stephanie J; Cook, Paul B

    2007-01-01

    Action potentials in amacrine cells are important for lateral propagation of signals across the inner retina, but it is unclear how many subclasses of amacrine cells contain voltage-gated sodium channels or can fire action potentials. This study investigated the ability of amacrine cells with narrow ( <200 microm) and wide (>200 microm) dendritic fields to fire action potentials in response to depolarizing current injections and light stimulation. The pattern of action potentials evoked by current injections revealed two distinct classes of amacrine cells; those that responded with a single action potential (single-spiking cells) and those that responded with repetitive action potentials (repetitive-spiking cells). Repetitive-spiking cells differed from single-spiking cells in several regards: Repetitive-spiking cells were more often wide field cells, while single-spiking cells were more often narrow field cells. Repetitive-spiking cells had larger action potential amplitudes, larger peak voltage-gated NaV currents lower action potential thresholds, and needed less current to induce action potentials. However, there was no difference in the input resistance, holding current or time constant of these two classes of cells. The intrinsic capacity to fire action potentials was mirrored in responses to light stimulation; single-spiking amacrine cells infrequently fired action potentials to light steps, while repetitive-spiking amacrine cells frequently fired numerous action potentials. These results indicate that there are two physiologically distinct classes of amacrine cells based on the intrinsic capacity to fire action potentials.

  4. Wide field nulling imager for TPF: the Boeing-SVS hypertelescope concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Olivier

    2003-02-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission is aimed at providing direct images of Earth-like planets orbiting nearby stars and characterizing their atmospheres (low resolution spectroscopy). The BOEING/SVS hypertelescope concept, NRLA (Non-Redundant Linear Array), uses a 35m baseline interferometric rotating array of six 2.3-meter telescopes operating in the infrared (7 to 12 microns) to produce wide field images of exoplanetary systems. The full (u,v) plane coverage of the array offers very good imaging capabilities, which is essential to unambiguously confirm the detection of planets, and also provides an outstanding capability for high resolution/high dynamic range imaging for general astrophysics. Thanks to a novel approach combining pupil densification, phase mask coronagraphy and pupil redilution, this concept combines wide field of view imaging and interferometric nulling of the central star. We first briefly present the techniques used by this concept (phase mask coronagraphy, pupil densification and redilution, aperture synthesis imaging) and demonstrate how they can be used to overcome the limitations commonly encountered by interferometers (low (u,v) plane coverage, small field of view, low dynamical range). A complete computer simulation of the concept has been written and is used to study the performance of the array for exoplanet imaging and spectroscopy. We show that with this concept, detection (S/N=5) of Earth-like planets at 10pc with a 5 microns spectral bandwidth can be achieved in less than an hour (for a 100% quantum efficiency).

  5. Enola Gay: an integrated modelling optical toolbox applied to a wide-field telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipani, P.; Perrotta, F.

    2008-07-01

    The integrated modelling approach is fundamental in telescopes design where it is necessary to merge different disciplines together. This paper describes the integration of optical ray-tracing capabilities within the Matlab computational environment. This approach allows to write automatic procedures to implement a huge number of computations, that are very unpractical to perform in interactive mode by ray tracing software packages. Data produced by computations are stored and automatically analyzed. One of the main benefits from this approach comes from the traceability of the work, that is intrinsically impossible when the optical designer works in interactive mode. The right procedure is built and tuned just the first time and the computation software is available for inspection and check. Furthermore computations and results are easily reproducible simply re-running Matlab scripts. An automatic approach is especially helpful in wide-field telescope projects where the optical quality has to be studied over a wide field of view. This leads to repeat the same computations many times in a number of fields. In interactive mode this would cause a significant waste of optical designer time to repeat many times the same manual procedures. The solution proposed here allows to save time and prevent occasional mistakes.

  6. An integrated image processing platform designed for Chinese GF-1 wide field view data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhishan; Shi, Runhe; Liu, Chaoshun; Chen, Maosi

    2016-09-01

    The Wide Field View (WFV), a space borne multi-spectral sensor onboard the Chinese GaoFen-1 (GF-1) satellite from the China High-resolution Earth Observation System, is operating in orbit dedicating to providing Earth observation with decametric spatial resolution, high temporal resolution and wide coverage for environment monitoring purpose. The objective of this study is to present an integrated image processing and environment monitoring platform specifically for GF-1 WFV data. The platform is developed with a multi-layer architecture and C/S structure, which primarily consists of image pre-processing, environment monitoring, data visualization, and results output modules. The client application was created by using C# whereas IDL was used to develop image processing and other relevant algorithms. This paper focuses mainly on the overall design of the platform and related key techniques. The platform has been implemented as a stand-alone application, and successfully implemented in real world environment monitoring studies.

  7. Readout electronics for the Wide Field of view Cherenkov/Fluorescence Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, R.; Bai, L.; Zhang, J.; Huang, J.; Yang, C.; Cao, Z.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), supported by IHEP of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is a multipurpose project with a complex detectors array for high energy gamma ray and cosmic ray detection. The Wide Field of view Cherenkov Telescope Array (WFCTA), as one of the components of the LHAASO project, aim to tag each primary particle that causes an air shower. The WFCTA is a portable telescope array used to detect cosmic ray spectra. The design of the readout electronics of the WFCTA is described in this paper Sixteen photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), together with their readout electronics are integrated into a single sub-cluster. To maintain good resolution and linearity over a wide dynamic range, a dual-gain amplification configuration on an analog board is used The digital board contains two 16channel 14-bit, 50 Msps analog-to-digital converters (ADC) and its power consumption, noise level, and relative deviation are all tested.

  8. Wide field of view laser beacon system for three-dimensional aircraft position measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, L. M.; Miles, R. B.; Webb, S. G.; Wong, E. Y.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a new wide field of view laser beacon system for measurement, in three dimensions, of aircraft or other remote objects. The system is developed for aircraft collision hazard warning independent of ground-based hardware, as well as for flight research, helicopter-assisted construction and rescue, and robotic manipulation applications. Accurate information describing the relative range, elevation, and azimuth of the aircraft are generated by the sweep of a low-power fan-shaped rotating laser beacon past an array of optical detectors. The system achieves a wide angle of acceptance of laser beacon light through use of compound parabolic concentrators, which collimate the light for spectral filtering to minimize solar interference. An on-board microprocessor system converts the pulse sequence to aircraft position in real time. System reliability and performance are enhanced through narrow pass filtering of the pulse signals, digital logic design to mask spurious signals, and adaptive modulation of trigger threshold levels.

  9. Plastic optical fiber for wide field-of-view optical wireless receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah, Hoorieh; Sterckx, Karel; Saengudomlert, Poompat; Mohammed, Waleed S.

    2016-10-01

    This paper demonstrates a working indoor optical wireless link for smart environment applications. The system utilizes a wide field-of-view (FOV) optical wireless receiver through cleaving the tip of large core plastic optical fibers (POFs) attached to the detector. The quality of the optical link is quantified through bit error rate (BER) measurements. The experimental results show a wide FOV with the uncoded BER in the order of 10-3 for transmission distances up to 35 cm when using two POFs for signal collection. The distance can be improved further by increasing the number of fibers. The transmitted signal format and how the BER measurement is achieved are discussed at length. In addition, details are provided for the design of the electronics to establish the optical wireless link.

  10. Optical/NIR Imaging of AKARI NEP-Wide Survey Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Y.; Im, M.; Kang, E.; Lee, I.; Ibrahimov, M.

    2009-12-01

    We describe the characteristics of optical and NIR imaging data of the NEP-Wide field in B, R, I, J and H band filters. The NEP-Wide is an AKARI survey of the North Ecliptic Pole covering 5.8 deg2 area. Our optical/NIR imaging observation supports the AKARI’s IR imaging data by providing a crucial coverage in optical/NIR. The optical data were obtained at Maidanak Observatory in Uzbekistan using the 1.5m telescope and the Seoul National University’s 4k×4k CCD. The NIR data were obtained using FLAMINGOS on KPNO 2.1m telescope. We present the astrometric accuracy, galaxy number counts and completeness. The photometric data will be used for identifying optical counterparts of the IR data provided by AKARI, studying their SEDs and the selection of interesting objects for spectroscopic follow-up studies.

  11. Wide-field optical sectioning for live-tissue imaging by plane-projection multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiun-Yann; Kuo, Chun-Hung; Holland, Daniel B.; Chen, Yenyu; Ouyang, Mingxing; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Zadoyan, Ruben; Guo, Chin-Lin

    2011-11-01

    Optical sectioning provides three-dimensional (3D) information in biological tissues. However, most imaging techniques implemented with optical sectioning are either slow or deleterious to live tissues. Here, we present a simple design for wide-field multiphoton microscopy, which provides optical sectioning at a reasonable frame rate and with a biocompatible laser dosage. The underlying mechanism of optical sectioning is diffuser-based temporal focusing. Axial resolution comparable to confocal microscopy is theoretically derived and experimentally demonstrated. To achieve a reasonable frame rate without increasing the laser power, a low-repetition-rate ultrafast laser amplifier was used in our setup. A frame rate comparable to that of epifluorescence microscopy was demonstrated in the 3D imaging of fluorescent protein expressed in live epithelial cell clusters. In this report, our design displays the potential to be widely used for video-rate live-tissue and embryo imaging with axial resolution comparable to laser scanning microscopy.

  12. Palm-size wide-field Fourier spectroscopic imager with uncooled infrared microbolometer arrays for smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Natsumi; Suzuki, Yo; Qi, Wei; Hosono, Satsuki; Saito, Tsubasa; Ogawa, Satoshi; Sato, Shun; Fujiwara, Masaru; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Tanaka, Naotaka; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    We proposed the imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy that is a near-common-path interferometer with strong robustness against mechanical vibrations. We introduced the miniature uncooled infrared microbolometer arrays for smartphone (e.g. product name: FILR ONE price: around 400USD). And we constructed the phase-shifter with the piezo impact drive mechanism (maker: Technohands.co.Ltd., stroke: 4.5mm, resolution: 0.01μm, size: 20mm, price: around 800USD). Thus, we realized the palm-size mid-infrared spectroscopic imager [size: L56mm×W69mm×H43mm weight: 500g]. And by using wide-angle lens as objective lens, the proposed method can obtain the wide-field 2- dimensional middle-infrared (wavelength: 7.5-13.5[μm]) spectroscopic imaging of radiation lights emitted from human bodies itself

  13. An integrative approach for analyzing hundreds of neurons in task performing mice using wide-field calcium imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Ali I.; Gritton, Howard J.; Tseng, Hua-an; Bucklin, Mark E.; Yao, Zhaojie; Han, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Advances in neurotechnology have been integral to the investigation of neural circuit function in systems neuroscience. Recent improvements in high performance fluorescent sensors and scientific CMOS cameras enables optical imaging of neural networks at a much larger scale. While exciting technical advances demonstrate the potential of this technique, further improvement in data acquisition and analysis, especially those that allow effective processing of increasingly larger datasets, would greatly promote the application of optical imaging in systems neuroscience. Here we demonstrate the ability of wide-field imaging to capture the concurrent dynamic activity from hundreds to thousands of neurons over millimeters of brain tissue in behaving mice. This system allows the visualization of morphological details at a higher spatial resolution than has been previously achieved using similar functional imaging modalities. To analyze the expansive data sets, we developed software to facilitate rapid downstream data processing. Using this system, we show that a large fraction of anatomically distinct hippocampal neurons respond to discrete environmental stimuli associated with classical conditioning, and that the observed temporal dynamics of transient calcium signals are sufficient for exploring certain spatiotemporal features of large neural networks. PMID:26854041

  14. An integrative approach for analyzing hundreds of neurons in task performing mice using wide-field calcium imaging.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ali I; Gritton, Howard J; Tseng, Hua-an; Bucklin, Mark E; Yao, Zhaojie; Han, Xue

    2016-02-08

    Advances in neurotechnology have been integral to the investigation of neural circuit function in systems neuroscience. Recent improvements in high performance fluorescent sensors and scientific CMOS cameras enables optical imaging of neural networks at a much larger scale. While exciting technical advances demonstrate the potential of this technique, further improvement in data acquisition and analysis, especially those that allow effective processing of increasingly larger datasets, would greatly promote the application of optical imaging in systems neuroscience. Here we demonstrate the ability of wide-field imaging to capture the concurrent dynamic activity from hundreds to thousands of neurons over millimeters of brain tissue in behaving mice. This system allows the visualization of morphological details at a higher spatial resolution than has been previously achieved using similar functional imaging modalities. To analyze the expansive data sets, we developed software to facilitate rapid downstream data processing. Using this system, we show that a large fraction of anatomically distinct hippocampal neurons respond to discrete environmental stimuli associated with classical conditioning, and that the observed temporal dynamics of transient calcium signals are sufficient for exploring certain spatiotemporal features of large neural networks.

  15. The SLUGGS survey: the globular cluster systems of three early-type galaxies using wide-field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartha, Sreeja S.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Spitler, Lee R.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Brodie, Jean P.

    2014-01-01

    We present the results from a wide-field imaging study of globular cluster (GC) systems in three early-type galaxies. Combinations of Subaru/Suprime-Cam, Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/MegaCam and Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2/Advanced Camera for Surveys data were used to determine the GC system properties of three highly flattened galaxies NGC 720, NGC 1023 and NGC 2768. This work is the first investigation of the GC system in NGC 720 and NGC 2768 to very large galactocentric radius (˜100 kpc). The three galaxies have clear blue and red GC subpopulations. The radial surface densities of the GC systems are fitted with Sérsic profiles, and detected out to 15, 8 and 10 galaxy effective radii, respectively. The total number of GCs and specific frequency are determined for each GC system. The ellipticity of the red subpopulation is in better agreement with the host galaxy properties than is the blue subpopulation, supporting the traditional view that metal-rich GCs are closely associated with the bulk of their host galaxies' field stars, while metal-poor GCs reflect a distinct stellar halo. With the addition of another 37 literature studied galaxies, we present a new correlation of GC system extent with host galaxy effective radius. We find a dependence of the relative fraction of blue to red GCs on host galaxy environmental density for lenticular galaxies (but not for elliptical or spiral galaxies). We propose that tidal interactions between galaxies in cluster environments might be the reason behind the observed trend for lenticular galaxies.

  16. WIDE-FIELD INFRARED POLARIMETRY OF THE ρ OPHIUCHI CLOUD CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hough, James H.; Nakajima, Yasushi; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Kandori, Ryo

    2015-09-15

    We conducted wide and deep simultaneous JHK{sub s}-band imaging polarimetry of the ρ Ophiuchi cloud complex. Aperture polarimetry in the JHK{sub s} band was conducted for 2136 sources in all three bands, of which 322 sources have significant polarizations in all the JHK{sub s} bands and have been used for a discussion of the core magnetic fields. There is a positive correlation between degrees of polarization and H − K{sub s} color up to H − K{sub s} ≈ 3.5. The magnetic field structures in the core region are revealed up to at least A{sub V} ≈ 47 mag and are unambiguously defined in each sub-region (core) of Oph-A, Oph-B, Oph-C, Oph-E, Oph-F, and Oph-AC. Their directions, degrees of polarization, and polarization efficiencies differ but their changes are gradual; thus, the magnetic fields appear to be connected from core to core, rather than as a simple overlap of the different cloud core components. Comparing our results with the large-scale field structures obtained from previous optical polarimetric studies, we suggest that the magnetic field structures in the core were distorted by the cluster formation in this region, which may have been induced by shock compression due to wind/radiation from the Scorpius–Centaurus association.

  17. SIMULTANEOUS EXOPLANET CHARACTERIZATION AND DEEP WIDE-FIELD IMAGING WITH A DIFFRACTIVE PUPIL TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Guyon, Olivier; Eisner, Josh A.; Angel, Roger; Woolf, Neville J.; Bendek, Eduardo A.; Milster, Thomas D.; Ammons, S. Mark; Shao, Michael; Shaklan, Stuart; Levine, Marie; Nemati, Bijan; Martinache, Frantz; Pitman, Joe; Woodruff, Robert A.; Belikov, Ruslan

    2013-04-10

    High-precision astrometry can identify exoplanets and measure their orbits and masses while coronagraphic imaging enables detailed characterization of their physical properties and atmospheric compositions through spectroscopy. In a previous paper, we showed that a diffractive pupil telescope (DPT) in space can enable sub-{mu}as accuracy astrometric measurements from wide-field images by creating faint but sharp diffraction spikes around the bright target star. The DPT allows simultaneous astrometric measurement and coronagraphic imaging, and we discuss and quantify in this paper the scientific benefits of this combination for exoplanet science investigations: identification of exoplanets with increased sensitivity and robustness, and ability to measure planetary masses to high accuracy. We show how using both measurements to identify planets and measure their masses offers greater sensitivity and provides more reliable measurements than possible with separate missions, and therefore results in a large gain in mission efficiency. The combined measurements reliably identify potentially habitable planets in multiple systems with a few observations, while astrometry or imaging alone would require many measurements over a long time baseline. In addition, the combined measurement allows direct determination of stellar masses to percent-level accuracy, using planets as test particles. We also show that the DPT maintains the full sensitivity of the telescope for deep wide-field imaging, and is therefore compatible with simultaneous scientific observations unrelated to exoplanets. We conclude that astrometry, coronagraphy, and deep wide-field imaging can be performed simultaneously on a single telescope without significant negative impact on the performance of any of the three techniques.

  18. The development of a wide-field, high-resolution UV Raman hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomer, Nathaniel R.; Nelson, Matthew P.; Angel, S. M.

    2015-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a valuable tool for the investigation and analysis of explosive and biological analytes because it provides a unique molecular fingerprint that allows for unambiguous target identification. Raman can be advantageous when utilized with deep UV excitation, but typical deep UV Raman systems have numerous limitations that hinder their performance and make their potential integration onto a field portable platform difficult. These systems typically offer very low throughput, are physically large and heavy, and can only probe an area the size of a tightly focused laser, severely diminishing the ability of the system to investigate large areas efficiently. The majority of these limitations are directly related to a system's spectrometer, which is typically dispersive grating based and requires a very narrow slit width and long focal length optics to achieve high spectral resolution. To address these shortcomings, ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS), teaming with the University of South Carolina, are developing a revolutionary wide-field Raman hyperspectral imaging system capable of providing wide-area, high resolution measurements with greatly increased throughput in a small form factor, which would revolutionize the way Raman is conducted and applied. The innovation couples a spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS), a novel slit-less spectrometer that operates similar to Michelson interferometer, with a fiber array spectral translator (FAST) fiber array, a two-dimensional imaging fiber for hyperspectral imagery. This combination of technologies creates a novel wide-field, high throughput Raman hyperspectral imager capable of yielding very high spectral resolution measurements using defocused excitation, giving the system a greater area coverage and faster search rate than traditional Raman systems. This paper will focus on the need for an innovative UV Raman system, provide an overview of spatial heterodyne Raman spectroscopy, and discuss the development

  19. A Modified Johnson-Cook Model for Advanced High-Strength Steels Over a Wide Range of Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingdong, Zhang; Qiang, Cao; Xiaofeng, Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) is widely used in automotive industry. In order to investigate the mechanical behaviors of AHSS over a wide range of temperatures, quasi-static tensile experiments were conducted at the temperatures from 298 to 1073 K on a Gleeble-3500 thermo-simulation machine. The results show that flow behaviors are affected by testing temperature significantly. In order to describe the flow features of AHSS, the Johnson-Cook (JC) model is employed. By introducing polynomial functions to consider the effects of temperature on hardening behavior, the JC model is modified and used to predict flow behavior of AHSS at different experimental conditions. The accuracy of the modified JC model is verified and the predicted flow stress is in good agreement with experimental results, which confirms that the modified JC model can give an accurate and precise estimate over a wide range of temperatures.

  20. Using Hypermedia Research To Advance the Study of Learning on the World Wide Web. Research Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eveland, William P.; Dunwoody, Sharon

    In this monograph we begin by situating the technological and historical origins of the World Wide Web in hypermedia systems that were conceptualized during the World War II era and first developed decades before the Web. We then review the cross-disciplinary theoretical and empirical literature on the uses and effects of educational hypermedia.…

  1. Far ultraviolet wide field imaging with a SPARTAN /Experiment of Opportunity/ Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, G. R.; Heckathorn, H. M.; Opal, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    A wide-field electrographic Schmidt camera, sensitive in the far UV (1230-2000 A), has been developed and utilized in three sounding rocket flights. It is now being prepared for Shuttle flight as an Experiment of Opportunity Payload (EOP) (recently renamed as the SPARTAN program). In this paper, we discuss (1) design of the instrument and payload, particularly as influenced by our experience in rocket flights; (2) special problems of EOP in comparison to sounding rocket missions; (3) relationship of this experiment to, and special capabilities in comparison to, other space astronomy instruments such as Space Telescope; and (4) a tentative observing plan for an EOP mission.

  2. Far ultraviolet wide field imaging and photometry - Spartan-202 Mark II Far Ultraviolet Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.; Heckathorn, Harry M.; Opal, Chet B.; Witt, Adolf N.; Henize, Karl G.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory' Mark II Far Ultraviolet Camera, which is expected to be a primary scientific instrument aboard the Spartan-202 Space Shuttle mission, is described. This camera is intended to obtain FUV wide-field imagery of stars and extended celestial objects, including diffuse nebulae and nearby galaxies. The observations will support the HST by providing FUV photometry of calibration objects. The Mark II camera is an electrographic Schmidt camera with an aperture of 15 cm, a focal length of 30.5 cm, and sensitivity in the 1230-1600 A wavelength range.

  3. Wide-field compact catadioptric telescope spanning 0.7-14 μm wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Marks, Daniel L; Hagen, Nathan; Durham, Mark; Brady, David J

    2013-06-20

    We present a wide-field compact f-1.2, f-1.6 effective illumination catadioptric telescope that spans the wavelengths 0.7-14.0 μm. Such a telescope replaces several telescopes designed for different infrared bands, while having a track length shorter than most single-band telescopes. Incorporated with a suitable multiband focal plane array, many wavelength bands may be imaged simultaneously in the same instrument. We have constructed and tested prototypes of the telescopes and found the performance is near the predicted values.

  4. Modified Savart polariscope with wide field of view and achromatic lateral displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Naicheng; Zhang, Chunmin; Mu, Tingkui

    2017-01-01

    A modified Savart polariscope with wide field of view and achromatic lateral displacement is presented. The modified Savart polariscope can be made from two different birefringent crystal materials. The principle of the element is described and the impacts of systematic errors are analyzed. The achievement and performance of the modified Savart polariscope is demonstrated with numerical simulations. The maximum acceptable angle of incidence can be increased by an order of magnitude and the chromatic variations in lateral displacement are inhibited obviously across the specified spectral range 0.4 μm to 0.9 μm.

  5. DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY LEO A: SUPRIME-CAM WIDE-FIELD STELLAR PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Stonkutė, Rima; Narbutis, Donatas; Vansevičius, Vladas; Arimoto, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Takashi; Tamura, Naoyuki

    2014-10-01

    We have surveyed a complete extent of Leo A—an apparently isolated gas-rich low-mass dwarf irregular galaxy in the Local Group. The B, V, and I passband CCD images (typical seeing ∼0.''8) were obtained with the Subaru Telescope equipped with the Suprime-Cam mosaic camera. The wide-field (20' × 24') photometry catalog of 38,856 objects (V ∼ 16-26 mag) is presented. This survey is also intended to serve as ''a finding chart'' for future imaging and spectroscopic observation programs of Leo A.

  6. The High-Speed and Wide-Field TORTORA Camera: description & results .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, G.; Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.; Bondar, S.; Piccioni, A.; Molinari, E.

    We present the description and the most significant results of the wide-field and ultra-fast TORTORA camera devoted to the investigation of rapid changes in light intensity in a phenomenon occurring within an extremely short period of time and randomly distributed over the sky. In particular, the ground-based TORTORA observations synchronized with the gamma -ray BAT telescope on board of the Swift satellite has permitted to trace the optical burst time-structure of the Naked-Eye GRB 080319B with an unprecedented level of accuracy.

  7. The First Hundred Brown Dwarfs Discovered by the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cushing, Michael C.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Griffith, Roger L.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Wright, Edward L.; Mainzer, Amanda K.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; McLean, Ian S.; Bauer, James M.; Benford, Dominic J.; Lake, Sean E.; Petty, Sara M.; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Beichman, Charles; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Stern, Daniel; Vacca, William D.

    2011-01-01

    We present ground-based spectroscopic verification of six Y dwarfs also Cushing et al.), eighty-nine T dwarfs, eight L dwarfs, and one M dwarf identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Eighty of these are cold brown dwarfs with spectral types > or =T6, six of which have been announced earlier in Mainzer et al. and I3urgasser et al. We present color-color and colortype diagrams showing the locus of M, L, T, and Y dwarfs in WISE color space. "

  8. On the Design of Wide-Field X-ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, Ronald F.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Weiskopf, Martin C.

    2009-01-01

    X-ray telescopes having a relatively wide field-of-view and spatial resolution vs. polar off-axis angle curves much flatter than the parabolic dependence characteristic of Wolter I designs are of great interest for surveys of the X-ray sky and potentially for study of the Sun s X-ray emission. We discuss the various considerations affecting the design of such telescopes, including the possible use of polynomial mirror surface prescriptions, a method of optimizing the polynomial coefficients, scaling laws for mirror segment length vs. intersection radius, the loss of on-axis spatial resolution, and the positioning of focal plane detectors.

  9. Deriving comprehensive error breakdown for wide field adaptive optics systems using end-to-end simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, F.; Gendron, E.; Rousset, G.; Gratadour, D.

    2016-07-01

    The future European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) adaptive optics (AO) systems will aim at wide field correction and large sky coverage. Their performance will be improved by using post processing techniques, such as point spread function (PSF) deconvolution. The PSF estimation involves characterization of the different error sources in the AO system. Such error contributors are difficult to estimate: simulation tools are a good way to do that. We have developed in COMPASS (COMputing Platform for Adaptive opticS Systems), an end-to-end simulation tool using GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) acceleration, an estimation tool that provides a comprehensive error budget by the outputs of a single simulation run.

  10. Real-time monitoring of graphene patterning with wide-field four-wave mixing microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivistoinen, Juha; Aumanen, Jukka; Hiltunen, Vesa-Matti; Myllyperkiö, Pasi; Johansson, Andreas; Pettersson, Mika

    2016-04-01

    The single atom thick two-dimensional graphene is a promising material for various applications due to its extraordinary electronic, optical, optoelectronic, and mechanical properties. The demand for developing graphene based applications has entailed a requirement for development of methods for fast imaging techniques for graphene. Here, we demonstrate imaging of graphene with femtosecond wide-field four-wave mixing microscopy. The method provides a sensitive, non-destructive approach for rapid large area characterization of graphene. We show that the method is suitable for online following of a laser patterning process of microscale structures on single-layer graphene.

  11. Range performance of the DARPA AWARE wide field-of-view visible imager.

    PubMed

    Nichols, J M; Judd, K P; Olson, C C; Novak, K; Waterman, J R; Feller, S; McCain, S; Anderson, J; Brady, D

    2016-06-01

    In a prior paper, we described a new imaging architecture that addresses the need for wide field-of-view imaging combined with the resolution required to identify targets at long range. Over the last two years substantive improvements have been made to the system, both in terms of the size, weight, and power of the camera as well as to the optics and data management software. The result is an overall improvement in system performance, which we demonstrate via a maritime target identification experiment.

  12. Wide-range Vacuum Measurements from MWNT Field Emitters Grown Directly on Stainless Steel Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Detian; Zhao, Yangyang; Cheng, Yongjun; Dong, Changkun

    2016-01-01

    The field emission properties and the vacuum measurement application are investigated from the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) grown directly on catalytic stainless steel substrates. The MWNT emitters present excellent emission properties after the acid treatment of the substrate. The MWNT gauge is able to work down to the extreme-high vacuum (XHV) range with linear measurement performance in wide range from 10-11 to 10-6 Torr. A modulating grid is attempted with improved gauge sensitivity. The extension of the lower pressure limit is attributed largely to low outgassing effect due to direct growth of MWNTs and justified design of the electron source.

  13. Wide-range Vacuum Measurements from MWNT Field Emitters Grown Directly on Stainless Steel Substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Detian; Zhao, Yangyang; Cheng, Yongjun; Dong, Changkun

    2016-12-01

    The field emission properties and the vacuum measurement application are investigated from the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) grown directly on catalytic stainless steel substrates. The MWNT emitters present excellent emission properties after the acid treatment of the substrate. The MWNT gauge is able to work down to the extreme-high vacuum (XHV) range with linear measurement performance in wide range from 10(-11) to 10(-6) Torr. A modulating grid is attempted with improved gauge sensitivity. The extension of the lower pressure limit is attributed largely to low outgassing effect due to direct growth of MWNTs and justified design of the electron source.

  14. Micrometeoroid Impacts on the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Larger Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G. W.; Webb, R. P.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V.; Colaux, J. L.; Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J. C.; Opiela, J.; Griffin, G. T.; Gerlach, L.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) was returned from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) by shuttle mission STS-125 in 2009. In space for 16 years, the surface accumulated hundreds of impact features on the zinc orthotitanate paint, some penetrating through into underlying metal. Larger impacts were seen in photographs taken from within the shuttle orbiter during service missions, with spallation of paint in areas reaching 1.6 cm across, exposing alloy beneath. Here we describe larger impact shapes, the analysis of impactor composition, and the micrometeoroid (MM) types responsible.

  15. Three-dimensional imaging and image analysis of hippocampal neurons: confocal and digitally enhanced wide field microscopy.

    PubMed

    Turner, J N; Szarowski, D H; Turner, T J; Ancin, H; Lin, W C; Roysam, B; Holmes, T J

    1994-11-01

    The microscopy of biological specimens has traditionally been a two-dimensional imaging method for analyzing what are in reality three-dimensional (3-D) objects. This has been a major limitation of the application of one of science's most widely used tools. Nowhere has this limitation been more acute than in neurobiology, which is dominated by the necessity of understanding both large- and small-scale 3-D anatomy. Fortunately, recent advances in optical instrumentation and computational methods have provided the means for retrieving the third dimension, making full 3-D microscopic imaging possible. Optical designs have concentrated on the confocal imaging mode while computational methods have made 3-D imaging possible with wide field microscopes using deconvolution methods. This work presents a brief review of these methods, especially as applied to neurobiology, and data using both approaches. Specimens several hundred micrometers thick can be sampled allowing essentially intact neurons to be imaged. These neurons or selected components can be contrasted with either fluorescent, absorption, or reflection stains. Image analysis in 3-D is as important as visualization in 3-D. Automated methods of cell counting and analysis by nuclear detection as well as tracing of individual neurons are presented.

  16. Wide-field optical coherence tomography angiography enabled by two repeated measurements of B-scans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruikang K; Zhang, Anqi; Choi, Woo June; Zhang, Qinqin; Chen, Chieh-Li; Miller, Andrew; Gregori, Giovanni; Rosenfeld, Philip J

    2016-05-15

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) has increasingly become clinically important, particularly in ophthalmology. However, the field of view (FOV) for current OCTA imaging is severely limited due to A-scan rates that can be afforded by current clinical systems and, more importantly, the requirement of a repeated scanning protocol. This Letter evaluates the possibility of using only two repeated B-scans for OCTA for the purpose of an increased FOV. The effect of repeated numbers on the OCTA result is discussed through experiments on an animal model in vivo and evaluated using quantitative metrics for image quality. Demonstrated through in vivo imaging of a pathological human eye, we show that optical microangiography-based OCTA with two repeated B-scans can provide wide-field angiography up to 12×12  mm with clinically acceptable image quality.

  17. Studies on wide-field-of-view multiphoton imaging using the flexible clinical multiphoton tomograph MPTflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton imaging systems are capable of high-resolution 3-D image acquisition of deep tissue. A first commercially available CE-certified biomedical system for subcelluar resolution of human skin has been launched by JenLab company with the DermaInspectR in 2002. The demand for more flexibility caused the development of the MPTflexR, which provides an increased flexibility and accessibility especially for clinical and cosmetic examinations. However the high resolution of clinical multiphoton tomographs are adherent with a small field-of-view (FOV) of about 360×360μm2. Especially time-consuming is the relocation of areas of interest (AOI) like lesions, sweat glands or hair shafts during a multiphoton examination. This limitation can be be overcome by macroscopic large-area (wide-field-ofview) multiphoton tomography, which is tested first within this work.

  18. Developing Wide-Field Spatio-Spectral Interferometry for Far-Infrared Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leisawitz, David; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Lyon, Richard G.; Maher, Stephen F.; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Sinukoff, Evan J.

    2012-01-01

    Interferometry is an affordable way to bring the benefits of high resolution to space far-IR astrophysics. We summarize an ongoing effort to develop and learn the practical limitations of an interferometric technique that will enable the acquisition of high-resolution far-IR integral field spectroscopic data with a single instrument in a future space-based interferometer. This technique was central to the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) and Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS) space mission design concepts, and it will first be used on the Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII). Our experimental approach combines data from a laboratory optical interferometer (the Wide-field Imaging Interferometry Testbed, WIIT), computational optical system modeling, and spatio-spectral synthesis algorithm development. We summarize recent experimental results and future plans.

  19. Australian SKA Pathfinder: A High-Dynamic Range Wide-Field of View Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBoer, D. R.; Gough, R. G.; Bunton, J. D.; Cornwell, T. J.; Beresford, R. J.; Johnston, S.; Feain, I. J.; Schinckel, A. E.; Jackson, C. A.; Kesteven, M. J.; Chippendale, A.; Hampson, G. A.; O'Sullivan, J. D.; Hay, S. G.; Jacka, C. E.; Sweetnam, T. W.; Storey, M. C.; Ball, L.; Boyle, B. J.

    2009-08-01

    The Australia SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) is a new telescope under development as a world-class high-dynamic-range wide-field-of-view survey instrument. It will utilize focal plane phased array feeds on the 36 12-m antennas that will compose the array. The large amounts of data present a huge computing challenge, and ASKAP will store data products in an archive after near real-time pipeline processing. This powerful instrument will be deployed at a new radio-quiet observatory, the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in the midwest region of Western Australia, to enable sensitive surveys of the entire sky to address some of the big questions in contemporary physics. As a pathfinder for the SKA, ASKAP will demonstrate field of view enhancement and computing/processing technology as well as the operation of a large-scale radio array in a remote and radio-quiet region of Australia.

  20. Alternate optical designs for head-mounted displays with a wide field of view.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Herkommer, Alois M

    2017-02-01

    The most widely applied design form for mixed reality head-mounted display (HMD) systems is generally a prism with one surface in total internal reflection (TIR). This, however, limits the angle of the incident rays, and thus decreases the design freedom and affects the performance. To obtain better performance of the HMD optics, in this paper two seldom used design forms of HMD systems are presented and compared to the standard TIR HMD optics. One of them is a catadioptric HMD system, consisting of one lens and two mirrors; the other is a prism HMD with a different folding geometry. The designs are compared for a field of view of 40°×30°; however, they are also investigated for an increased field of view of 50°×30°. The evaluation indicates good performance of our systems. In particular, the prism with an alternate folding geometry has advantages in both performance and size.

  1. A wide-field infrared camera for the Observatoire du mont Mégantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artigau, Etienne; Doyon, Rene; Nadeau, Daniel; Vallee, Philippe; Thibault, Simon

    2003-03-01

    A wide-field near-infrared (0.8 2.4 μm) camera for the 1.6 m telescope of the Observatoire du mont Mégantic (OMM), is currently under construction at the Université de Montréal. The field of view is 30' × 30' and will have very little distortion. The optics comprise 8 spherical cryogenic lenses. The instrument features two filter wheels with provision for 10 filters including broad band I, z, J, H, K and other narrow-band filters. The camera is based on a 2048 × 2048 HgCdTe Hawaii-2 detector driven by a 32-output SDSU-II controller operating at ~250 kHz.

  2. Wide-field endoscopic fluorescence imaging for gastrointestinal tumor detection with glucose analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yun; Qu, Yawei; Bai, Jing; Liu, Haifeng

    2014-05-01

    The lack of functional information and targeted imaging in conventional white-light endoscopy leads to a high miss-rate of gastrointestinal tumor. The combination of near-infrared fluorescence imaging and endoscopy presents a promising approach. Here we introduce a new endoscopy method employing a home-made flexible wide-field epi-fluorescence endoscope, that can be inserted through the biopsy channel of a gastrointestinal endoscope, with the glucose analogue 2- DeoxyGlucosone as the near-infrared fluorescent probe. System characterization indicates a good sensitivity and linearity over a large field of view. Its capability of tumor identification and location is demonstrated with in-vivo imaging of xenografted tumor model.

  3. Advances toward field application of 3D hydraulic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardiff, M. A.; Barrash, W.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    Hydraulic tomography (HT) is a technique that shows great potential for aquifer characterization and one that holds the promise of producing 3D hydraulic property distributions, given suitable equipment. First suggested over 15 years ago, HT assimilates distributed aquifer pressure (head) response data collected during a series of multiple pumping tests to produce estimates of aquifer property variability. Unlike traditional curve-matching analyses, which assume homogeneity or "effective" parameters within the radius of influence of a hydrologic test, HT analysis relies on numerical models with detailed heterogeneity in order to invert for the highly resolved 3D parameter distribution that jointly fits all data. Several numerical and laboratory investigations of characterization using HT have shown that property distributions can be accurately estimated between observation locations when experiments are correctly designed - a property not always shared by other, simpler 1D characterization approaches such as partially-penetrating slug tests. HT may represent one of the best methods available for obtaining detailed 3D aquifer property descriptions, especially in deep or "hard" aquifer materials, where direct-push methods may not be feasible. However, to date HT has not yet been widely adopted at contaminated field sites. We believe that current perceived impediments to HT adoption center around four key issues: 1) A paucity in the scientific literature of proven, cross-validated 3D field applications 2) A lack of guidelines and best practices for performing field 3D HT experiments; 3) Practical difficulty and time commitment associated with the installation of a large number of high-accuracy sampling locations, and the running of a large number of pumping tests; and 4) Computational difficulty associated with solving large-scale inverse problems for parameter identification. In this talk, we present current results in 3D HT research that addresses these four issues

  4. OP09O-OP404-9 Wide Field Camera 3 CCD Quantum Efficiency Hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Nick

    2009-01-01

    The HST/Wide Field Camera (WFC) 3 UV/visible channel CCD detectors have exhibited an unanticipated quantum efficiency hysteresis (QEH) behavior. At the nominal operating temperature of -83C, the QEH feature contrast was typically 0.1-0.2% or less. The behavior was replicated using flight spare detectors. A visible light flat-field (540nm) with a several times full-well signal level can pin the detectors at both optical (600nm) and near-UV (230nm) wavelengths, suppressing the QEH behavior. We are characterizing the timescale for the detectors to become unpinned and developing a protocol for flashing the WFC3 CCDs with the instrument's internal calibration system in flight. The HST/Wide Field Camera 3 UV/visible channel CCD detectors have exhibited an unanticipated quantum efficiency hysteresis (QEH) behavior. The first observed manifestation of QEH was the presence in a small percentage of flat-field images of a bowtie-shaped contrast that spanned the width of each chip. At the nominal operating temperature of -83C, the contrast observed for this feature was typically 0.1-0.2% or less, though at warmer temperatures contrasts up to 5% (at -50C) have been observed. The bowtie morphology was replicated using flight spare detectors in tests at the GSFC Detector Characterization Laboratory by power cycling the detector while cold. Continued investigation revealed that a clearly-related global QE suppression at the approximately 5% level can be produced by cooling the detector in the dark; subsequent flat-field exposures at a constant illumination show asymptotically increasing response. This QE "pinning" can be achieved with a single high signal flat-field or a series of lower signal flats; a visible light (500-580nm) flat-field with a signal level of several hundred thousand electrons per pixel is sufficient for QE pinning at both optical (600nm) and near-UV (230nm) wavelengths. We are characterizing the timescale for the detectors to become unpinned and developing a

  5. Deep wide-field imaging of main belt comets and asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Jayadev; Jewitt, David; Ridgway, Susan

    2014-02-01

    We propose to continue a deep imaging study, using the pODI optical imager on the WIYN telescope, of selected regions of the main asteroid belt that contain a known main-belt comet (MBC). An MBC is an asteroid that shows evidence of significant mass loss, seen as transient, comet- like tails and comae. In 2013, we were awarded 4 nights over the two semesters and obtained high-impact wide-field, deep images of two new MBCs, P/2010 A2 and P/2013 P5, to study their origins. In addition, we use the considerable pODI field-of-view to search for direct evidence of very low-level mass-loss activity in the sample of main belt asteroids that will also be detected. Asteroids could be repositories of primordial water and a supply for volatiles on earth. In order to test this possibility (suggested by the recent TALCS asteroid survey at CFHT) and further characterize the mass-loss in known MBC activity, we will observe ~ 25- arcminute fields around ~ 3 known MBCs to significantly deeper levels than TALCS with better resolution. More than half of the 2013A allocation was lost to weather. We request 4 nights in 2014A. With this additional time we are confident of reaching publishable results on low level mass-loss and on the evolution of the activity in known MBCs. We will follow the secular evolution of P/2010 A2. And, as in the previous two semesters, we hope to add a spectacular wide-field deep image of a new MBC.

  6. Cryogenic Telescope, Scanner, and Imaging Optics for the Wide-field Imaging Survey Explorer (WISE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalm, Mark; Akerstrom, A.; Barry, M.; Guregian, J.; LaMalva, F.; Laquidara, P.; Perron, G.; Sampath, D.; Ugolini, V.

    2006-12-01

    NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) instrument includes a cryogenic telescope, scanner, and imaging optics module. Component fabrication, mirror polishing, and prototype scanner cryogenic testing are complete for these subassemblies, and assembly is in process. The telescope is a 40 cm aperture reflecting five-mirror imager/collimator relay that provides 8X demagnification, a 47 x 86 arcminute field of regard, and a real exit pupil for scanning. It also provides distortion control to better than one part in a thousand to prevent image blur during internal scanning. A single-axis scan mirror at the exit pupil scans the detectors' field of view across the telescope field of regard, countering the orbital motion and freezing the line of sight during the multi-second exposure period. The imaging optics module is a five-mirror re-imager with dichroic beamsplitters that separate the energy into four infrared channels between 2.8 and 26 microns. All modules operate below 17 Kelvin. The all-reflective system uses aluminum mirrors and metering structures. L-3 Communications SSG-Tinsley is designing and building the telescope, scanner, and imaging optics module under contract to the Space Dynamics Laboratory. WISE is a MIDEX mission within NASA's Explorers Program.

  7. Wide Field Collimator 2 (WFC2) for GOES Imager and Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etemad, Shahriar; Bremer, James C.; Zukowski, Barbara J.; Pasquale, Bert A.; zukowski, Tmitri J.; Prince, Robert E.; O'Neill, Patrick A.; Ross, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    Two of the GOES instruments, the Imager and the Sounder, perform scans of the Earth to provide a full disc picture of the Earth. To verify the entire scan process, an image of a target that covers an 18 deg. circular field-of-view is collimated and projected into the field of regard of each instrument. The Wide Field Collimator 2 (WFC2) has many advantages over its predecessor, WFC1, including lower thermal dissipation higher fir field MTF, smaller package, and a more intuitive (faster) focusing process. The illumination source is an LED array that emits in a narrow spectral band centered at 689 nm, within the visible spectral bands of the Imager and Sounder. The illumination level can be continuously adjusted electronically. Lower thermal dissipation eliminates the need for forced convection cooling and minimizes time to reach thermal stability. The lens system has been optimized for the illumination source spectral output and athernalized to remain in focus during bulk temperature changes within the laboratory environment. The MTF of the lens is higher than that of the WFC1 at the edge of FOV. The target is focused in three orthogonal motions, controlled by an ergonomic system that saves substantial time and produces a sharper focus. Key words: Collimator, GOES, Imager, Sounder, Projector

  8. Cone of Darkness: Finding Blank-sky Positions for Multi-object Wide-field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, N. P. F.

    2014-05-01

    We present the Cone of Darkness, an application to automatically configure blank-sky positions for a series of stacked, wide-field observations, such as those carried out by the SAMI instrument on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT). The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) uses a plug-plate to mount its 13×61 core imaging fibre bundles (hexabundles) in the optical plane at the telescope's prime focus. To make the most efficient use of each plug-plate, several observing fields are typically stacked to produce a single plate. When choosing blank-sky positions for the observations it is most effective to select these such that one set of 26 holes gives valid sky positions for all fields on the plate. However, when carried out manually this selection process is tedious and includes a significant risk of error. The Cone of Darkness software aims to provide uniform blank-sky position coverage over the field of observation, within the limits set by the distribution of target positions and the chosen input catalogs. This will then facilitate the production of the best representative median sky spectrum for use in sky subtraction. The application, written in C++, is configurable, making it usable for a range of instruments. Given the plate characteristics and the positions of target holes, the software segments the unallocated space on the plate and determines the position which best fits the uniform distribution requirement. This position is checked, for each field, against the selected catalog using a TAP ADQL search. The process is then repeated until the desired number of sky positions is attained.

  9. Wide-field computational color imaging using pixel super-resolved on-chip microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Greenbaum, Alon; Feizi, Alborz; Akbari, Najva; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    Lens-free holographic on-chip imaging is an emerging approach that offers both wide field-of-view (FOV) and high spatial resolution in a cost-effective and compact design using source shifting based pixel super-resolution. However, color imaging has remained relatively immature for lens-free on-chip imaging, since a ‘rainbow’ like color artifact appears in reconstructed holographic images. To provide a solution for pixel super-resolved color imaging on a chip, here we introduce and compare the performances of two computational methods based on (1) YUV color space averaging, and (2) Dijkstra’s shortest path, both of which eliminate color artifacts in reconstructed images, without compromising the spatial resolution or the wide FOV of lens-free on-chip microscopes. To demonstrate the potential of this lens-free color microscope we imaged stained Papanicolaou (Pap) smears over a wide FOV of ~14 mm2 with sub-micron spatial resolution. PMID:23736466

  10. Large-field-of-view wide-spectrum artificial reflecting superposition compound eyes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Chieh; Wu, Xiudong; Liu, Hewei; Aldalali, Bader; Rogers, John A; Jiang, Hongrui

    2014-08-13

    In nature, reflecting superposition compound eyes (RSCEs) found in shrimps, lobsters and some other decapods are extraordinary imaging systems with numerous optical features such as minimum chromatic aberration, wide-angle field of view (FOV), high sensitivity to light and superb acuity to motion. Here, we present life-sized, large-FOV, wide-spectrum artificial RSCEs as optical imaging devices inspired by the unique designs of their natural counterparts. Our devices can form real, clear images based on reflection rather than refraction, hence avoiding chromatic aberration due to dispersion by the optical materials. Compared to imaging at visible wavelengths using conventional refractive lenses of comparable size, our artificial RSCEs demonstrate minimum chromatic aberration, exceptional FOV up to 165° without distortion, modest aberrations and comparable imaging quality without any post-image processing. Together with an augmenting cruciform pattern surrounding each focused image, our large-FOV, wide-spectrum artificial RSCEs possess enhanced motion-tracking capability ideal for diverse applications in military, security, medical imaging and astronomy.

  11. Three-Dimensional Resolution Doubling in Wide-Field Fluorescence Microscopy by Structured Illumination

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Mats G. L.; Shao, Lin; Carlton, Peter M.; Wang, C. J. Rachel; Golubovskaya, Inna N.; Cande, W. Zacheus; Agard, David A.; Sedat, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Structured illumination microscopy is a method that can increase the spatial resolution of wide-field fluorescence microscopy beyond its classical limit by using spatially structured illumination light. Here we describe how this method can be applied in three dimensions to double the axial as well as the lateral resolution, with true optical sectioning. A grating is used to generate three mutually coherent light beams, which interfere in the specimen to form an illumination pattern that varies both laterally and axially. The spatially structured excitation intensity causes normally unreachable high-resolution information to become encoded into the observed images through spatial frequency mixing. This new information is computationally extracted and used to generate a three-dimensional reconstruction with twice as high resolution, in all three dimensions, as is possible in a conventional wide-field microscope. The method has been demonstrated on both test objects and biological specimens, and has produced the first light microscopy images of the synaptonemal complex in which the lateral elements are clearly resolved. PMID:18326650

  12. High sensitive/wide dynamic range, field emission pressure sensor based on fully embedded CNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taak, S.; Rajabali, S.; Darbari, S.; Mohajerzadeh, S.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of high sensitivity-wide dynamic range field emission pressure sensors based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is reported. In this work, CNTs are grown inside an array of micromachined holes in order to ensure a high sensitivity and a wide dynamic range by allowing anode-cathode proximity while preventing anode-cathode direct contact simultaneously. External pressure is applied to a Si-based flexible anode, which results in consequent variations in emission current, due to electric field changes. Microcavities in this structure have been formed by a Si deep vertical etching process, while the CNTs have been grown by direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. Also, it is demonstrated that a similar fabrication process can be applied to implement a device with an electrically controllable emission current. A high sensitivity of 1.5-13.7 µA kPa-1 (with Vanode/cathode < 100 V) within a dynamic range from around 0.1 to 1 GPa, is measured in this experiment.

  13. Exoplanets from the Arctic: The First Wide-field Survey at 80°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Nicholas M.; Carlberg, Raymond; Salbi, Pegah; Ngan, Wai-Hin Wayne; Ahmadi, Aida; Steinbring, Eric; Murowinski, Richard; Sivanandam, Suresh; Kerzendorf, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    Located within 10° of the North Pole, northern Ellesmere Island offers continuous darkness in the winter months. This capability can greatly enhance the detection efficiency of planetary transit surveys and other time domain astronomy programs. We deployed two wide-field cameras at 80°N, near Eureka, Nunavut, for a 152 hr observing campaign in 2012 February. The 16 megapixel camera systems were based on commercial f/1.2 lenses with 70 mm and 42 mm apertures, and they continuously imaged 504 and 1295 deg2, respectively. In total, the cameras took over 44,000 images and produced better than 1% precision light curves for approximately 10,000 stars. We describe a new high-speed astrometric and photometric data reduction pipeline designed for the systems, test several methods for the precision flat fielding of images from very-wide-angle cameras, and evaluate the cameras' image qualities. We achieved a scintillation-limited photometric precision of 1%-2% in each 10 s exposure. Binning the short exposures into 10 minute chunks provided a photometric stability of 2-3 mmag, sufficient for the detection of transiting exoplanets around the bright stars targeted by our survey. We estimate that the cameras, when operated over the full Arctic winter, will be capable of discovering several transiting exoplanets around bright (mV < 9.5) stars.

  14. Improved wide-field collimator for dynamic testing of the GOES imager and sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, James C.; Etemad, Shahriar; Zukowski, Barbara J.; Pasquale, Bert A.; Zukowski, Tmitri J.; Prince, Robert E.; Holmes, Vincent; Ryskewich, John A.; O'Neill, Patrick; Murphy-Morris, Jeanine E.

    2002-09-01

    The GOES Imager and Sounder instruments each observe the full Earth disk, 17.4° in diameter, from geostationary orbit. Pre-launch, each instrument's dynamic scanning performance is tested using the projection of a test pattern from a wide-field collimator. We are fabricating a second wide-field collimator (WFC2) to augment this test program. The WFC2 has several significant advantages over the existing WFC1. The WFC2 target illumination system uses an array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) radiating at 680nm, which is within the visible bands of both the Imager and Sounder. The light from the LEDs is projected through a non-Lambertian diffuser plate and the target plate to the pupil of the projection lens. The WFC2's power dissipation is much lower than that of WFC1, decreasing stabilization time and eliminating the need for cooling fans. The WFC2's custom-designed 5-element projection lens has the same effective focal length (EFL) as the WFC1 projection lens. The WFC2 lens is optimized for the LED's narrow spectral band simplifying the design and improving image quality. The target plate is mounted in a frame with a mechanized micro-positioner system that controls three degrees of freedom: tip, tilt, and focus. The tip and tilt axes intersect in the WFC's image plane, and all adjustments are controlled remotely by the operator observing the target plate through an auto-collimating telescope.

  15. Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Slitless Spectrometer: Design, Prototype, and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Qian; Content, David; Dominguez, Margaret; Emmett, Thomas; Griesmann, Ulf; Hagopian, John; Kruk, Jeffrey; Marx, Catherine; Pasquale, Bert; Wallace, Thomas; Whipple, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    The slitless spectrometer plays an important role in the Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission for the survey of emission-line galaxies. This will be an unprecedented very wide field, HST quality 3D survey of emission line galaxies. The concept of the compound grism as a slitless spectrometer has been presented previously. The presentation briefly discusses the challenges and solutions of the optical design, and recent specification updates, as well as a brief comparison between the prototype and the latest design. However, the emphasis of this paper is the progress of the grism prototype: the fabrication and test of the complicated diffractive optical elements and powered prism, as well as grism assembly alignment and testing. Especially how to use different tools and methods, such as IR phase shift and wavelength shift interferometry, to complete the element and assembly tests. The paper also presents very encouraging results from recent element tests to assembly tests. Finally we briefly touch the path forward plan to test the spectral characteristic, such as spectral resolution and response.

  16. Wide-field and high-resolution optical imaging for early detection of oral neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Mark C.; Schwarz, Richard A.; Rosbach, Kelsey; Roblyer, Darren; Muldoon, Tim; Williams, Michelle D.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2010-02-01

    Current procedures for oral cancer screening typically involve visual inspection of the entire tissue surface at risk under white light illumination. However, pre-cancerous lesions can be difficult to distinguish from many benign conditions when viewed under these conditions. We have developed wide-field (macroscopic) imaging system which additionally images in cross-polarized white light, narrowband reflectance, and fluorescence imaging modes to reduce specular glare, enhance vascular contrast, and detect disease-related alterations in tissue autofluorescence. We have also developed a portable system to enable high-resolution (microscopic) evaluation of cellular features within the oral mucosa in situ. This system is a wide-field epi-fluorescence microscope coupled to a 1 mm diameter, flexible fiber-optic imaging bundle. Proflavine solution was used to specifically label cell nuclei, enabling the characteristic differences in N/C ratio and nuclear distribution between normal, dysplastic, and cancerous oral mucosa to be quantified. This paper discusses the technical design and performance characteristics of these complementary imaging systems. We will also present data from ongoing clinical studies aimed at evaluating diagnostic performance of these systems for detection of oral neoplasia.

  17. Optically sectioned wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging endoscopy enabled by structured illumination (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinsdale, Taylor; Malik, Bilal H.; Rico-Jimenez, Jose J.; Jo, Javier A.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2016-03-01

    We present a wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) system with optical sectioning by structured illumination microscopy (SIM). FLIM measurements were made using a time gated ICCD camera in conjunction with a pulsed nitrogen dye laser operating at 450 nm. Intensity images were acquired at multiple time delays from a trigger initiated by a laser pulse to create a wide-field FLIM image, which was then combined with three phase SIM to provide optical sectioning. Such a mechanism has the potential to increase the reliability and accuracy of the FLIM measurements by rejecting background intensity. SIM also provides the opportunity to create volumetric FLIM images with the incorporation of scanning mechanisms for the sample plane. We present multiple embodiments of such a system: one as a free space endoscope and the other as a fiber microendoscope enabled by the introduction of a fiber bundle. Finally, we demonstrate the efficacy of such an imaging system by imaging dyes embedded in a tissue phantom.

  18. EXOPLANETS FROM THE ARCTIC: THE FIRST WIDE-FIELD SURVEY AT 80 Degree-Sign N

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Nicholas M.; Sivanandam, Suresh; Carlberg, Raymond; Salbi, Pegah; Ngan, Wai-Hin Wayne; Kerzendorf, Wolfgang; Ahmadi, Aida; Steinbring, Eric; Murowinski, Richard

    2013-03-15

    Located within 10 Degree-Sign of the North Pole, northern Ellesmere Island offers continuous darkness in the winter months. This capability can greatly enhance the detection efficiency of planetary transit surveys and other time domain astronomy programs. We deployed two wide-field cameras at 80 Degree-Sign N, near Eureka, Nunavut, for a 152 hr observing campaign in 2012 February. The 16 megapixel camera systems were based on commercial f/1.2 lenses with 70 mm and 42 mm apertures, and they continuously imaged 504 and 1295 deg{sup 2}, respectively. In total, the cameras took over 44,000 images and produced better than 1% precision light curves for approximately 10,000 stars. We describe a new high-speed astrometric and photometric data reduction pipeline designed for the systems, test several methods for the precision flat fielding of images from very-wide-angle cameras, and evaluate the cameras' image qualities. We achieved a scintillation-limited photometric precision of 1%-2% in each 10 s exposure. Binning the short exposures into 10 minute chunks provided a photometric stability of 2-3 mmag, sufficient for the detection of transiting exoplanets around the bright stars targeted by our survey. We estimate that the cameras, when operated over the full Arctic winter, will be capable of discovering several transiting exoplanets around bright (m{sub V} < 9.5) stars.

  19. Wide dynamic range enrichment method of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes with weak field centrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Wieland G.; Tomović, Željko; Weitz, R. Thomas; Krupke, Ralph; Mikhael, Jules

    2017-01-01

    The potential of single–walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to outperform silicon in electronic application was finally enabled through selective separation of semiconducting nanotubes from the as-synthesized statistical mix with polymeric dispersants. Such separation methods provide typically high semiconducting purity samples with narrow diameter distribution, i.e. almost single chiralities. But for a wide range of applications high purity mixtures of small and large diameters are sufficient or even required. Here we proof that weak field centrifugation is a diameter independent method for enrichment of semiconducting nanotubes. We show that the non-selective and strong adsorption of polyarylether dispersants on nanostructured carbon surfaces enables simple separation of diverse raw materials with different SWCNT diameter. In addition and for the first time, we demonstrate that increased temperature enables higher purity separation. Furthermore we show that the mode of action behind this electronic enrichment is strongly connected to both colloidal stability and protonation. By giving simple access to electronically sorted SWCNTs of any diameter, the wide dynamic range of weak field centrifugation can provide economical relevance to SWCNTs. PMID:28317942

  20. Generalized mesh-based Monte Carlo for wide-field illumination and detection via mesh retessellation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ruoyang; Intes, Xavier; Fang, Qianqian

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods are commonly used as the gold standard in modeling photon transport through turbid media. With the rapid development of structured light applications, an accurate and efficient method capable of simulating arbitrary illumination patterns and complex detection schemes over large surface area is in great need. Here we report a generalized mesh-based Monte Carlo algorithm to support a variety of wide-field illumination methods, including spatial-frequency-domain imaging (SFDI) patterns and arbitrary 2-D patterns. The extended algorithm can also model wide-field detectors such as a free-space CCD camera. The significantly enhanced flexibility of source and detector modeling is achieved via a fast mesh retessellation process that combines the target domain and the source/detector space in a single tetrahedral mesh. Both simulations of complex domains and comparisons with phantom measurements are included to demonstrate the flexibility, efficiency and accuracy of the extended algorithm. Our updated open-source software is provided at http://mcx.space/mmc. PMID:26819826

  1. Chronic wide-field imaging of brain hemodynamics in behaving animals

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Peng; Zhang, Lingke; Li, Miao; Zhang, Yiguang; Feng, Shihan; Wang, Qihong; Thakor, Nitish V.

    2016-01-01

    Chronically monitoring cerebral activities in awake and freely moving status is very important in physiological and pathological studies. We present a novel standalone micro-imager for monitoring the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and total hemoglobin (HbT) activities in freely moving animals using the laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) and optical intrinsic signal (OIS) methods. A new cranial window method, using contact lens and wide field optics, is also proposed to achieve the chronic and wide-field imaging of rat’s cerebral cortex. The hemodynamic activities of rats’ cortex were measured for the first time without restriction of cables or fibers in awake and behaving animals. Chronic imaging showed the increase of CBF and HbT in motor cortex when the rats were climbing on the cage wall. Interestingly, the CBF activation of supplying vessel was smaller than that of parenchyma. Furthermore, after the climbing, CBF demonstrated fully return to the baseline while HbT showed a delayed recovery. The standalone micro-imager technology provides new possibilities of brain imaging in cognitive neuroscience studies. PMID:28101429

  2. Confirmation of Wide-field Signatures in Redshifted 21 cm Power Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Bowman, Judd D.; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Bernardi, G.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Carroll, P.; Deshpande, A. A.; de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Dillon, Joshua S.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hernquist, L.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kim, Han-Seek; Kittiwisit, P.; Lenc, E.; Line, J.; Loeb, A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Neben, A. R.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A. R.; Ord, S. M.; Paul, Sourabh; Pindor, B.; Pober, J. C.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Sethi, Shiv K.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Sullivan, I. S.; Tegmark, M.; Tingay, S. J.; Trott, C. M.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2015-07-01

    We confirm our recent prediction of the “pitchfork” foreground signature in power spectra of high-redshift 21 cm measurements where the interferometer is sensitive to large-scale structure on all baselines. This is due to the inherent response of a wide-field instrument and is characterized by enhanced power from foreground emission in Fourier modes adjacent to those considered to be the most sensitive to the cosmological H i signal. In our recent paper, many signatures from the simulation that predicted this feature were validated against Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) data, but this key pitchfork signature was close to the noise level. In this paper, we improve the data sensitivity through the coherent averaging of 12 independent snapshots with identical instrument settings and provide the first confirmation of the prediction with a signal-to-noise ratio \\gt 10. This wide-field effect can be mitigated by careful antenna designs that suppress sensitivity near the horizon. Simple models for antenna apertures that have been proposed for future instruments such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array and the Square Kilometre Array indicate they should suppress foreground leakage from the pitchfork by ∼40 dB relative to the MWA and significantly increase the likelihood of cosmological signal detection in these critical Fourier modes in the three-dimensional power spectrum.

  3. Wide field and highly sensitive angiography based on optical coherence tomography with akinetic swept source

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingjiang; Song, Shaozhen; Wei, Wei; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-01-01

    Wide-field vascular visualization in bulk tissue that is of uneven surface is challenging due to the relatively short ranging distance and significant sensitivity fall-off for most current optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) systems. We report a long ranging and ultra-wide-field OCTA (UW-OCTA) system based on an akinetic swept laser. The narrow instantaneous linewidth of the swept source with its high phase stability, combined with high-speed detection in the system enable us to achieve long ranging (up to 46 mm) and almost negligible system sensitivity fall-off. To illustrate these advantages, we compare the basic system performances between conventional spectral domain OCTA and UW-OCTA systems and their functional imaging of microvascular networks in living tissues. In addition, we show that the UW-OCTA is capable of different depth-ranging of cerebral blood flow within entire brain in mice, and providing unprecedented blood perfusion map of human finger in vivo. We believe that the UW-OCTA system has promises to augment the existing clinical practice and explore new biomedical applications for OCT imaging. PMID:28101428

  4. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SPECTROSCOPY OF BROWN DWARFS DISCOVERED WITH THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Adam C.; Cushing, Michael C.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Gelino, Christopher R.; Mace, Gregory N.; Wright, Edward L.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Griffith, Roger L.; Marsh, Kenneth A.

    2015-05-10

    We present a sample of brown dwarfs identified with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) for which we have obtained Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) near-infrared grism spectroscopy. The sample (22 in total) was observed with the G141 grism covering 1.10–1.70 μm, while 15 were also observed with the G102 grism, which covers 0.90–1.10 μm. The additional wavelength coverage provided by the G102 grism allows us to (1) search for spectroscopic features predicted to emerge at low effective temperatures (e.g.,ammonia bands) and (2) construct a smooth spectral sequence across the T/Y boundary. We find no evidence of absorption due to ammonia in the G102 spectra. Six of these brown dwarfs are new discoveries, three of which are found to have spectral types of T8 or T9. The remaining three, WISE J082507.35+280548.5 (Y0.5), WISE J120604.38+840110.6 (Y0), and WISE J235402.77+024015.0 (Y1), are the 19th, 20th, and 21st spectroscopically confirmed Y dwarfs to date. We also present HST grism spectroscopy and reevaluate the spectral types of five brown dwarfs for which spectral types have been determined previously using other instruments.

  5. Wide dynamic range enrichment method of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes with weak field centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Wieland G.; Tomović, Željko; Weitz, R. Thomas; Krupke, Ralph; Mikhael, Jules

    2017-03-01

    The potential of single–walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to outperform silicon in electronic application was finally enabled through selective separation of semiconducting nanotubes from the as-synthesized statistical mix with polymeric dispersants. Such separation methods provide typically high semiconducting purity samples with narrow diameter distribution, i.e. almost single chiralities. But for a wide range of applications high purity mixtures of small and large diameters are sufficient or even required. Here we proof that weak field centrifugation is a diameter independent method for enrichment of semiconducting nanotubes. We show that the non-selective and strong adsorption of polyarylether dispersants on nanostructured carbon surfaces enables simple separation of diverse raw materials with different SWCNT diameter. In addition and for the first time, we demonstrate that increased temperature enables higher purity separation. Furthermore we show that the mode of action behind this electronic enrichment is strongly connected to both colloidal stability and protonation. By giving simple access to electronically sorted SWCNTs of any diameter, the wide dynamic range of weak field centrifugation can provide economical relevance to SWCNTs.

  6. Using Wide-Field Meteor Cameras to Actively Engage Students in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, D. M.; Scales, J. N.

    2012-08-01

    Astronomy has always afforded teachers an excellent topic to develop students' interest in science. New technology allows the opportunity to inexpensively outfit local school districts with sensitive, wide-field video cameras that can detect and track brighter meteors and other objects. While the data-collection and analysis process can be mostly automated by software, there is substantial human involvement that is necessary in the rejection of spurious detections, in performing dynamics and orbital calculations, and the rare recovery and analysis of fallen meteorites. The continuous monitoring allowed by dedicated wide-field surveillance cameras can provide students with a better understanding of the behavior of the night sky including meteors and meteor showers, stellar motion, the motion of the Sun, Moon, and planets, phases of the Moon, meteorological phenomena, etc. Additionally, some students intrigued by the possibility of UFOs and "alien visitors" may find that actual monitoring data can help them develop methods for identifying "unknown" objects. We currently have two ultra-low light-level surveillance cameras coupled to fish-eye lenses that are actively obtaining data. We have developed curricula suitable for middle or high school students in astronomy and earth science courses and are in the process of testing and revising our materials.

  7. WPOL: a DSSD-based hard x-ray wide field imager and polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, P.; Bertoli, W.; Breelle, E.; Dolgorouky, Y.; Gouiffès, C.; Khalil, M.; Limousin, O.; Lebrun, F.; Rodriguez, J.

    2014-07-01

    WPOL (Wide field camera with POLarimetry) is a wide field camera which aims to monitor the X-ray/low gamma-ray sources and measures their polarimetric properties. This camera will be operated in space to trigger a main instrument in case of transient events (gamma-ray bursts, black hole binaries state transition, supernovae, …) and to map the Xray/ gamma-ray polarized sources of the Galaxy, which has never been done up to now. It will be proposed, as an accompanying instrument, in the context of the next medium mission ESA call (M4). The concept of the instrument is based upon a coded mask imaging with a detector unit composed of two planes of Silicon double sided stripped detectors (DSSD), a passive collimator and a tungsten mask. Mapping is done on the first plane through mask imaging and polarization is measured by studying Compton scattering events between the two planes. The source direction in the sky being known through the mask pattern projected on the detector plane, and the scattered photon direction being measured between the two planes, only the determination of the first energy deposit is needed to compute the whole Compton scattering kinetics and in particular, to determine the source photon energy

  8. Space infrared telescope facility wide field and diffraction limited array camera (IRAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.

    1988-01-01

    The wide-field and diffraction limited array camera (IRAC) is capable of two-dimensional photometry in either a wide-field or diffraction-limited mode over the wavelength range from 2 to 30 microns with a possible extension to 120 microns. A low-doped indium antimonide detector was developed for 1.8 to 5.0 microns, detectors were tested and optimized for the entire 1.8 to 30 micron range, beamsplitters were developed and tested for the 1.8 to 30 micron range, and tradeoff studies of the camera's optical system performed. Data are presented on the performance of InSb, Si:In, Si:Ga, and Si:Sb array detectors bumpbonded to a multiplexed CMOS readout chip of the source-follower type at SIRTF operating backgrounds (equal to or less than 1 x 10 to the 8th ph/sq cm/sec) and temperature (4 to 12 K). Some results at higher temperatures are also presented for comparison to SIRTF temperature results. Data are also presented on the performance of IRAC beamsplitters at room temperature at both 0 and 45 deg angle of incidence and on the performance of the all-reflecting optical system baselined for the camera.

  9. Wide field OCT based microangiography in living human eye (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qinqin; Chen, Chieh-Li; Chu, Zhongdi; Zhang, Anqi; An, Lin; Durbin, Mary; Sharma, Utkarsh; Rosenfeld, Philip J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the application of optical microangiography (OMAG) in living human eye. Patients with different macular diseases were recruited, including diabetic retinopathy (DR), geographic atrophy (GA), retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and venous occlusion, et al. Wide field OCT angiography images can be generated by montage scanning protocol based on the tracking system. OMAG algorithm based on complex differentiation was used to extract the blood flow and removed the bulk motion by 2D cross-correlation method. The 3D angiography was segmented into 3 layers in the retina and 2 layers in the choroid. The en-face maximum projection was used to obtain 2-dimensional angiograms of different layers coded with different colors. Flow and structure images were combined for cross-sectional view. En face OMAG images of different macular diseases showed a great agreement with FA. Meanwhile, OMAG gave more distinct vascular network visions that were less affected by hemorrhage and leakage. The MAs were observed in both superficial and middle retinal layers based on OMAG angiograms in different layers of DR patients. The contour line of FAZ was extracted as well, which can be quantitative the retinal diseases. For GA patient, the damage of RPE layer enhanced the penetration of light and enabled the acquisition of choriocapillaries and choroidal vessels. The wide field OMAG angiogram enabled the capability of capturing the entire geographic atrophy. OMAG provides depth-resolved information and detailed vascular images of DR and GA patients, providing a better visualization of vascular network compared to FA.

  10. Fabrication of a wide-field NIR integral field unit for SWIMS using ultra-precision cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Yutaro; Yamagata, Yutaka; Morita, Shin-ya; Motohara, Kentaro; Ozaki, Shinobu; Takahashi, Hidenori; Konishi, Masahiro; Kato, Natsuko M.; Kobayakawa, Yutaka; Terao, Yasunori; Ohashi, Hirofumi

    2016-07-01

    We describe overview of fabrication methods and measurement results of test fabrications of optical surfaces for an integral field unit (IFU) for Simultaneous color Wide-field Infrared Multi-object Spectrograph, SWIMS, which is a first-generation instrument for the University of Tokyo Atacama Observatory 6.5-m telescope. SWIMS-IFU provides entire near-infrared spectrum from 0.9 to 2.5 μm simultaneously covering wider field of view of 17" × 13" compared with current near-infrared IFUs. We investigate an ultra-precision cutting technique to monolithically fabricate optical surfaces of IFU optics such as an image slicer. Using 4- or 5-axis ultra precision machine we compare the milling process and shaper cutting process to find the best way of fabrication of image slicers. The measurement results show that the surface roughness almost satisfies our requirement in both of two methods. Moreover, we also obtain ideal surface form in the shaper cutting process. This method will be adopted to other mirror arrays (i.e. pupil mirror and slit mirror, and such monolithic fabrications will also help us to considerably reduce alignment procedure of each optical elements.

  11. Optical And Near-infrared Variability Among Distant Galactic Nuclei Of The CANDELS/Wide Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grogin, Norman A.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Donley, Jennifer; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lucas, Ray; McGrath, Elizabeth; Rajan, Abhijit; Rosario, David; Salvato, Mara; Villforth, Carolin

    2015-08-01

    Three of the five fields surveyed during 2010-2013 by the CANDELS HST Multi-cycle Treasury Program were so-called "Wide" fields: CANDELS/UDS; CANDELS/COSMOS; and CANDELS/EGS. The area covered by CANDELS/Wide comprises WFC3/IR exposures in J-band and H-band across a total of 585 square arcminutes, and coordinated parallel ACS/WFC exposures in V-band and I-band across a total of 750 square arcminutes that largely overlaps the WFC3/IR coverage. In each field, these observations were split between two epochs with 52-day spacing for the primary purpose of high-redshift SNe detection and follow-up. However, the CANDELS combination of sensitivity, high resolution, and time spacing is also well-suited to detect optical and near-infrared variability ("ONIV") among moderate- to high-redshift galaxy nuclei (H<25AB mag; I<26AB mag).These data are sensitive to rest-frame variability time-scales of up to several weeks, and prior ACS/WFC imaging in CANDELS/COSMOS and CANDELS/EGS extends variability sensitivity to several years in the V- and I-bands. The overwhelming majority of these variable galaxy nuclei will be AGN; the small fraction arising from SNe have already been meticulously culled by the CANDELS high-redshift SNe search effort. These ONIV galaxy nuclei potentially represent a significant addition to the census of distant lower-luminosity AGN subject to multi-wavelength scrutiny with CANDELS.We present the combined results of our variability analyses, leading to the discovery of 133 I-band and 132 H-band ONIVs in CANDELS/Wide. We compare these HST-detected ONIVs with the known AGN candidates in the fields from deep Spitzer and Chandra imaging, and from extensive ground-based optical spectroscopy as well as HST IR-grism spectroscopy. We also assess the redshift distribution of the ONIVs from both spectroscopy and from robust SED-fitting incorporating ancillary deep ground-based imaging along with the CANDELS VIJH photometry. The I-band and H-band ONIVs are largely non

  12. Cost-effective and compact wide-field fluorescent imaging on a cell-phone.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Su, Ting-Wei; Tseng, Derek; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2011-01-21

    We demonstrate wide-field fluorescent and darkfield imaging on a cell-phone with compact, light-weight and cost-effective optical components that are mechanically attached to the existing camera unit of the cell-phone. For this purpose, we used battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to pump the sample of interest from the side using butt-coupling, where the pump light was guided within the sample cuvette to uniformly excite the specimen. The fluorescent emission from the sample was then imaged using an additional lens that was positioned right in front of the existing lens of the cell-phone camera. Because the excitation occurs through guided waves that propagate perpendicular to our detection path, an inexpensive plastic colour filter was sufficient to create the dark-field background required for fluorescent imaging, without the need for a thin-film interference filter. We validate the performance of this platform by imaging various fluorescent micro-objects in 2 colours (i.e., red and green) over a large field-of-view (FOV) of ∼81 mm(2) with a raw spatial resolution of ∼20 μm. With additional digital processing of the captured cell-phone images, through the use of compressive sampling theory, we demonstrate ∼2 fold improvement in our resolving power, achieving ∼10 μm resolution without a trade-off in our FOV. Further, we also demonstrate darkfield imaging of non-fluorescent specimen using the same interface, where this time the scattered light from the objects is detected without the use of any filters. The capability of imaging a wide FOV would be exceedingly important to probe large sample volumes (e.g., >0.1 mL) of e.g., blood, urine, sputum or water, and for this end we also demonstrate fluorescent imaging of labeled white-blood cells from whole blood samples, as well as water-borne pathogenic protozoan parasites such as Giardia Lamblia cysts. Weighing only ∼28 g (∼1 ounce), this compact and cost-effective fluorescent imaging platform

  13. Mimir: A Near-Infrared Wide-Field Imager, Spectrometer and Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, D. P.; Sarcia, D.; Grabau, A.; Tollestrup, E. V.; Buie, M. W.; Dunham, E.; Taylor, B.

    2007-12-01

    Mimir, a new facility-class near-infrared instrument for the 1.8 m Perkins telescope on Anderson Mesa outside Flagstaff, Arizona, was commissioned and has been operating for three years. Mimir is multifunction, performing wide-field (F/5) and narrow-field (F/17) imaging, long-slit spectroscopy, and imaging polarimetry. The F/5 mode images at 0.59" per pixel onto the 1024 × 1024 pixel ALADDIN III InSb array detector, giving a 10' × 10' field of view. In the F/17 mode, the plate scale is 0.18" per pixel. Optically, Mimir is a refractive reimager for the F/17.5 Perkins beam. A six-lens collimator produces an achromatic 25 mm pupil, which is imaged by a five-lens camera (F/5), a four-lens camera (F/17), or a two-lens pupil viewer onto the detector. Three filter wheels precede the pupil, one follows the pupil. The wheels contain a rotating half-wave plate, broadband filters, narrowband filters, grisms, long-pass filters, a wire grid, and thermal IR blockers. The first telescope focus is within Mimir, where a slit and decker unit, consisting of two linear motion cars, selects one of 13 slit scenes. The slit and decker cars, the four filter wheels, the half-wave plate rotation, and the camera selector are all driven by stepper motors within the cold vacuum space. Cooling is provided by a CTI 1050 two-stage, closed-cycle helium refrigerator, keeping the optics, filters, and internal surfaces between 65 and 75 K and the detector at 33.5 K. Switching between Mimir's different modes takes only a few seconds, making it a versatile tool for conducting a wide range of investigations and for quickly reacting to changing observing conditions. Mimir on the Perkins telescope achieves imaging sensitivities 2-4 mag deeper than 2MASS, moderate resolution (R ˜ 700) JHK spectra of virtually any 2MASS source, high-precision wide-field imaging polarimetry, and L' and M' band imaging and spectroscopy.

  14. Automated Astrometric Analysis of Satellite Observations using Wide-field Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuljan, J.; Kay, J.

    2016-09-01

    An observational trial was conducted in the South Island of New Zealand from 24 to 28 February 2015, as a collaborative effort between the United Kingdom and New Zealand in the area of space situational awareness. The aim of the trial was to observe a number of satellites in low Earth orbit using wide-field imaging from two separate locations, in order to determine the space trajectory and compare the measurements with the predictions based on the standard two-line elements. This activity was an initial step in building a space situational awareness capability at the Defence Technology Agency of the New Zealand Defence Force. New Zealand has an important strategic position as the last land mass that many satellites selected for deorbiting pass before entering the Earth's atmosphere over the dedicated disposal area in the South Pacific. A preliminary analysis of the trial data has demonstrated that relatively inexpensive equipment can be used to successfully detect satellites at moderate altitudes. A total of 60 satellite passes were observed over the five nights of observation and about 2600 images were collected. A combination of cooled CCD and standard DSLR cameras were used, with a selection of lenses between 17 mm and 50 mm in focal length, covering a relatively wide field of view of 25 to 60 degrees. The CCD cameras were equipped with custom-made GPS modules to record the time of exposure with a high accuracy of one millisecond, or better. Specialised software has been developed for automated astrometric analysis of the trial data. The astrometric solution is obtained as a two-dimensional least-squares polynomial fit to the measured pixel positions of a large number of stars (typically 1000) detected across the image. The star identification is fully automated and works well for all camera-lens combinations used in the trial. A moderate polynomial degree of 3 to 5 is selected to take into account any image distortions introduced by the lens. A typical RMS

  15. WINGS: a WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey. I. Optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, G.; Marmo, C.; Varela, J.; D'Onofrio, M.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moles, M.; Pignatelli, E.; Bettoni, D.; Kjærgaard, P.; Rizzi, L.; Couch, W. J.; Dressler, A.

    2006-01-01

    This is the first paper of a series that will present data and scientific results from the WINGS project, a wide-field, multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopic survey of galaxies in 77 nearby clusters. The sample was extracted from the ROSAT catalogs of X-Ray emitting clusters, with constraints on the redshift (0.04< z<0.07) and distance from the galactic plane ({\\vert}b{\\vert}≥ 20 deg). The global goal of the WINGS project is the systematic study of the local cosmic variance of the cluster population and of the properties of cluster galaxies as a function of cluster properties and local environment. This data collection will allow the definition of a local, "zero-point" reference against which to gauge the cosmic evolution when compared to more distant clusters. The core of the project consists of wide-field optical imaging of the selected clusters in the B and V bands. We have also completed a multi-fiber, medium-resolution spectroscopic survey for 51 of the clusters in the master sample. The imaging and spectroscopy data were collected using, respectively, the WFC@INT and WYFFOS@WHT in the northern hemisphere, and the WFI@MPG and 2dF@AAT in the southern hemisphere. In addition, a NIR (J, K) survey of ˜50 clusters and an Hα+U survey of some 10 clusters are presently ongoing with the WFCAM@UKIRT and WFC@INT, respectively, while a very-wide-field optical survey has also been programmed with OmegaCam@VST. In this paper we briefly outline the global objectives and the main characteristics of the WINGS project. Moreover, the observing strategy and the data reduction of the optical imaging survey (WINGS-OPT) are presented. We have achieved a photometric accuracy of ˜0.025 mag, reaching completeness to V˜ 23.5. Field size and resolution (FWHM) span the absolute intervals (1.6-2.7) Mpc and (0.7-1.7) kpc, respectively, depending on the redshift and on the seeing. This allows the planned studies to obtain a valuable description of the local properties of clusters

  16. Field testing advanced geothermal turbodrill (AGT). Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, W.C.; Cohen, J.H.

    1999-06-01

    Maurer Engineering developed special high-temperature geothermal turbodrills for LANL in the 1970s to overcome motor temperature limitations. These turbodrills were used to drill the directional portions of LANL`s Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Wells at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The Hot Dry Rock concept is to drill parallel inclined wells (35-degree inclination), hydraulically fracture between these wells, and then circulate cold water down one well and through the fractures and produce hot water out of the second well. At the time LANL drilled the Fenton Hill wells, the LANL turbodrill was the only motor in the world that would drill at the high temperatures encountered in these wells. It was difficult to operate the turbodrills continuously at low speed due to the low torque output of the LANL turbodrills. The turbodrills would stall frequently and could only be restarted by lifting the bit off bottom. This allowed the bit to rotate at very high speeds, and as a result, there was excessive wear in the bearings and on the gauge of insert roller bits due to these high rotary speeds. In 1998, Maurer Engineering developed an Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) for the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technology (NADET) at MIT by adding a planetary speed reducer to the LANL turbodrill to increase its torque and reduce its rotary speed. Drilling tests were conducted with the AGT using 12 1/2-inch insert roller bits in Texas Pink Granite. The drilling tests were very successful, with the AGT drilling 94 ft/hr in Texas Pink Granite compared to 45 ft/hr with the LANL turbodrill and 42 ft/hr with a rotary drill. Field tests are currently being planned in Mexico and in geothermal wells in California to demonstrate the ability of the AGT to increase drilling rates and reduce drilling costs.

  17. Proto-Type Development of Optical Wide-field Patrol Network and Test Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Choi, Y.; Jo, J.; Moon, H.; Yim, H.; Park, Y.; Hae, Y.; Park, S.; Choi, J.; Son, J.

    2014-09-01

    We present a prototype system developed for optical satellite tracking and its early test observation results. The main objective of the OWL (Optical Wide-field patroL) network is to get orbital information for Korean domestic satellites using optical means only and to maintain their orbital elements. The network is composed of 5 small wide-field telescopes deployed over the world. Each observing station is operated in fully robotic manner from receiving observation schedule to reporting the result, and controlled by the headquarter located in Daejeon, Korea, where orbit calculation and observation strategy will be determined. We developed a compact telescope system for robotic observation and easy maintenance. The telescope is 0.5m of aperture diameter with Rechey-Cretian configuration and its field of view is 1.1 deg. It is equipped with 4K CCD with 9um pixel size, and its pixel scale is 1.2 arcsec/pixel. A chopper wheel with variable speed is adopted to get more points in a single shot. The CCD camera and all the rotating parts (chopper wheel, de-rotator, and filter wheel) are integrated into one compact component called a wheel station. Each observing station is equipped with a fully automatic dome and heavy duty environment monitoring system. We could get an image every 20 seconds and up to ~100 trail points in a single exposure. Each point is time-tagged by ~1/1000 second precision. For one of best cases, we could estimate satellite position with RMS ~ 0.5km accuracy in the along-track with only 4 exposures (~100 points). The first system was installed at the Mongolian site after completing verification test at the testbed site in Daejeon, Korea. The second and third system will be installed in the end of this year.

  18. Preliminary optical design of PANIC, a wide-field infrared camera for CAHA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas, M. C.; Rodríguez Gómez, J.; Lenzen, R.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, we present the preliminary optical design of PANIC (PAnoramic Near Infrared camera for Calar Alto), a wide-field infrared imager for the Calar Alto 2.2 m telescope. The camera optical design is a folded single optical train that images the sky onto the focal plane with a plate scale of 0.45 arcsec per 18 μm pixel. A mosaic of four Hawaii 2RG of 2k x 2k made by Teledyne is used as detector and will give a field of view of 31.9 arcmin x 31.9 arcmin. This cryogenic instrument has been optimized for the Y, J, H and K bands. Special care has been taken in the selection of the standard IR materials used for the optics in order to maximize the instrument throughput and to include the z band. The main challenges of this design are: to produce a well defined internal pupil which allows reducing the thermal background by a cryogenic pupil stop; the correction of off-axis aberrations due to the large field available; the correction of chromatic aberration because of the wide spectral coverage; and the capability of introduction of narrow band filters (~1%) in the system minimizing the degradation in the filter passband without a collimated stage in the camera. We show the optomechanical error budget and compensation strategy that allows our as built design to met the performances from an optical point of view. Finally, we demonstrate the flexibility of the design showing the performances of PANIC at the CAHA 3.5m telescope.

  19. Speckle correlation resolution enhancement of wide-field fluorescence imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Hasan

    2016-03-01

    Structured illumination enables high-resolution fluorescence imaging of nanostructures [1]. We demonstrate a new high-resolution fluorescence imaging method that uses a scattering layer with a high-index substrate as a solid immersion lens [2]. Random scattering of coherent light enables a speckle pattern with a very fine structure that illuminates the fluorescent nanospheres on the back surface of the high-index substrate. The speckle pattern is raster-scanned over the fluorescent nanospheres using a speckle correlation effect known as the optical memory effect. A series of standard-resolution fluorescence images per each speckle pattern displacement are recorded by an electron-multiplying CCD camera using a commercial microscope objective. We have developed a new phase-retrieval algorithm to reconstruct a high-resolution, wide-field image from several standard-resolution wide-field images. We have introduced phase information of Fourier components of standard-resolution images as a new constraint in our algorithm which discards ambiguities therefore ensures convergence to a unique solution. We demonstrate two-dimensional fluorescence images of a collection of nanospheres with a deconvolved Abbe resolution of 116 nm and a field of view of 10 µm × 10 µm. Our method is robust against optical aberrations and stage drifts, therefore excellent for imaging nanostructures under ambient conditions. [1] M. G. L. Gustafsson, J. Microsc. 198, 82-87 (2000). [2] H. Yilmaz, E. G. van Putten, J. Bertolotti, A. Lagendijk, W. L. Vos, and A. P. Mosk, Optica 2, 424-429 (2015).

  20. Cosmology with wide-field SZ cluster surveys: selection and systematic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juin, J. B.; Yvon, D.; Réfrégier, A.; Yèche, C.

    2007-04-01

    The cosmological potential of large-scale structure observations for cosmology have been extensively discussed in the litterature. In particular, it has recently been shown how Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) cluster surveys can be used to constrain dark energy parameters. In this paper, we study whether selection and systematics effects will limit future wide-field SZ surveys from achieving their cosmological potential. For this purpose, we use a sky simulation and an SZ-cluster detection software presented in Pires et al. (2006, A&A, 455, 741), using the future Olimpo survey as a concrete example. We show that the SZ-cluster selection function and contamination of SZ-cluster catalogues are more complex than is usually assumed. In particular, the simulated field-to-field detected cluster counts variance can be a factor 3 larger than the expected Poisson fluctuations. We also study the impact of missing redshift information and of the uncertainty of the scaling relations for low mass clusters. We quantify, through hypothesis tests, how near-future SZ experiments can be used to discriminate between different structure formation models. Using a maximum likelihood approach, we then study the impact of these systematics on the joint measurement of cosmological models and of cluster scaling relations.

  1. A 64 Mpixel camera for the Wendelstein Fraunhofer Telescope Nasmyth wide-field port: WWFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gössl, Claus; Bender, Ralf; Grupp, Frank; Hopp, Ulrich; Lang-Bardl, Florian; Mitsch, Wolfgang; Altmann, Werner; Ayres, Ann; Clark, Scott; Hartl, Michael; Kampf, Dirk; Sims, Gary; Thiele, Hans; Toerne, Kevin

    2010-07-01

    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München operates an astrophysical observatory on the summit of Mt. Wendelstein1 which will be equipped with a modern 2m-class, robotic telescope.2 One Nasmyth port of the new Fraunhofer telescope is designed to sustain the excellent (< 0.8" median) seeing of the site [1, Fig. 1] over a FOV of 0.2 deg2 utilizing three-element transmissive field corrector optics for optical wavebands. It will be equipped with a camera built around a customized 64 MPixel Mosaic (Spectral Instruments, 4 × (4k)2 15μm e2v CCDs). TheWendelsteinWide Field Imager has two filter wheels with eight slots each (SDSS3 [ugriz] + eight still free) as well as two off-axis guiding units (two FLI Microline with 2k Fairchild CCDs on differential focus stages). A Bonn Shutter4 ensures high precision photometric exposures. An option to either insert a low dispersion grating (for field spectroscopy) or support a wave front sensor probe allows for further expansion of the camera. EMI-safe housing has to overcome the emission of a close by 0.5MW radio station. Special care has been taken to design a very low ghost budget of the overall system to allow for low-surface brightness applications (e.g. weak lensing surveys).

  2. Intact skull chronic windows for mesoscopic wide-field imaging in awake mice

    PubMed Central

    Silasi, Gergely; Xiao, Dongsheng; Vanni, Matthieu P.; Chen, Andrew C. N.; Murphy, Timothy H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Craniotomy-based window implants are commonly used for microscopic imaging, in head-fixed rodents, however their field of view is typically small and incompatible with mesoscopic functional mapping of cortex. New Method We describe a reproducible and simple procedure for chronic through-bone wide-field imaging in awake head-fixed mice providing stable optical access for chronic imaging over large areas of the cortex for months. Results The preparation is produced by applying clear-drying dental cement to the intact mouse skull, followed by a glass coverslip to create a partially transparent imaging surface. Surgery time takes about 30 minutes. A single set-screw provides a stable means of attachment for mesoscale assessment without obscuring the cortical field of view. Comparison with Existing Methods We demonstrate the utility of this method by showing seed-pixel functional connectivity maps generated from spontaneous cortical activity of GCAMP6 signals in both awake and anesthetized mice. Conclusions We propose that the intact skull preparation described here may be used for most longitudinal studies that do not require micron scale resolution and where cortical neural or vascular signals are recorded with intrinsic sensors. PMID:27102043

  3. Deployment of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope wide-field upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Gary J.; Drory, Niv; Good, John M.; Lee, Hanshin; Vattiat, Brian L.; Kriel, Herman; Ramsey, Jason; Bryant, Randy; Elliot, Linda; Fowler, Jim; Häuser, Marco; Landiau, Martin; Leck, Ron; Odewahn, Stephen; Perry, Dave; Savage, Richard; Schroeder Mrozinski, Emily; Shetrone, Matthew; DePoy, D. L.; Prochaska, Travis; Marshall, J. L.; Damm, George; Gebhardt, Karl; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Martin, Jerry; Armandroff, Taft; Ramsey, Lawrence W.

    2016-07-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) is an innovative large telescope, located in West Texas at the McDonald Observatory. The HET operates with a fixed segmented primary and has a tracker, which moves the four-mirror corrector and prime focus instrument package to track the sidereal and non-sidereal motions of objects. We have completed a major multi-year upgrade of the HET that has substantially increased the pupil size to 10 meters and the field of view to 22 arcminutes by replacing the corrector, tracker, and prime focus instrument package. The new wide field HET will feed the revolutionary integral field spectrograph called VIRUS, in support of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX§), a new low resolution spectrograph (LRS2), an upgraded high resolution spectrograph (HRS2), and later the Habitable Zone Planet Finder (HPF). The upgrade is being commissioned and this paper discusses the completion of the installation, the commissioning process and the performance of the new HET.

  4. Advancement of the Emerging Field of RNA Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Jasinski, Daniel; Haque, Farzin; Binzel, Daniel W; Guo, Peixuan

    2017-02-28

    The field of RNA nanotechnology has advanced rapidly during the past decade. A variety of programmable RNA nanoparticles with defined shape, size, and stoichiometry have been developed for diverse applications in nanobiotechnology. The rising popularity of RNA nanoparticles is due to a number of factors: (1) removing the concern of RNA degradation in vitro and in vivo by introducing chemical modification into nucleotides without significant alteration of the RNA property in folding and self-assembly; (2) confirming the concept that RNA displays very high thermodynamic stability and is suitable for in vivo trafficking and other applications; (3) obtaining the knowledge to tune the immunogenic properties of synthetic RNA constructs for in vivo applications; (4) increased understanding of the 4D structure and intermolecular interaction of RNA molecules; (5) developing methods to control shape, size, and stoichiometry of RNA nanoparticles; (6) increasing knowledge of regulation and processing functions of RNA in cells; (7) decreasing cost of RNA production by biological and chemical synthesis; and (8) proving the concept that RNA is a safe and specific therapeutic modality for cancer and other diseases with little or no accumulation in vital organs. Other applications of RNA nanotechnology, such as adapting them to construct 2D, 3D, and 4D structures for use in tissue engineering, biosensing, resistive biomemory, and potential computer logic gate modules, have stimulated the interest of the scientific community. This review aims to outline the current state of the art of RNA nanoparticles as programmable smart complexes and offers perspectives on the promising avenues of research in this fast-growing field.

  5. Advancement of the Emerging Field of RNA Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The field of RNA nanotechnology has advanced rapidly during the past decade. A variety of programmable RNA nanoparticles with defined shape, size, and stoichiometry have been developed for diverse applications in nanobiotechnology. The rising popularity of RNA nanoparticles is due to a number of factors: (1) removing the concern of RNA degradation in vitro and in vivo by introducing chemical modification into nucleotides without significant alteration of the RNA property in folding and self-assembly; (2) confirming the concept that RNA displays very high thermodynamic stability and is suitable for in vivo trafficking and other applications; (3) obtaining the knowledge to tune the immunogenic properties of synthetic RNA constructs for in vivo applications; (4) increased understanding of the 4D structure and intermolecular interaction of RNA molecules; (5) developing methods to control shape, size, and stoichiometry of RNA nanoparticles; (6) increasing knowledge of regulation and processing functions of RNA in cells; (7) decreasing cost of RNA production by biological and chemical synthesis; and (8) proving the concept that RNA is a safe and specific therapeutic modality for cancer and other diseases with little or no accumulation in vital organs. Other applications of RNA nanotechnology, such as adapting them to construct 2D, 3D, and 4D structures for use in tissue engineering, biosensing, resistive biomemory, and potential computer logic gate modules, have stimulated the interest of the scientific community. This review aims to outline the current state of the art of RNA nanoparticles as programmable smart complexes and offers perspectives on the promising avenues of research in this fast-growing field. PMID:28045501

  6. Innovation on Energy Power Technology (15)Great Advances in Power System Stabilizing Technology triggered by the Wide-area Outage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egawa, Masanao

    On July 23, 1987, a very hot day, the largest wide-area power outage occurred in Kanto-Area, Japan. The cause was a voltage collapse on the bulk power network of Tokyo Electric Power Company, due to the abnormal rate of demand rising following resume after lunch break. Aggressive studies on voltage collapse throughout industry and university have led to great advances in power system stability. This essay describes the detail record of the outage, the applied countermeasures, and the inside story when the multiple voltage solutions of power flow on actual power system were found out for the first time.

  7. Advancement of the Wide-angle JEM-EUSO Optical System with Holographic and Fresnel Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takizawa, Y.; Adams, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    JEM-EUSO is a space mission to observe extremely high-energy cosmic rays, evolved from the previous design studies of EUSO. It is adjusted for the Japan Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS). JEM-EUSO uses a wide-angle refractive telescope in near-ultraviolet wavelength region to observe from ISS the time-and-space-resolved atmospheric fluorescence images of the extensive air showers. The JEM-EUSO optics is re-designed after the ESA-Phase A studies to upgrade the light-collecting-power by using a new material CYTOP, and its overall light-collecting power is about 1.5 times higher than the ESA-Phase A baseline optics. We describe in this paper an optimized optics design that maximizes the sensitivity of JEM-EUSO, and the results of the optics manufacturing tests.

  8. Recent advances on the anti-cancer properties of Nigella sativa, a widely used food additive.

    PubMed

    Majdalawieh, Amin F; Fayyad, Muneera W

    The use of naturally-occurring agents to regulate tumorigenesis is on the rise. Several herbal extracts, pure plant-derived active constituents, and food additives have been reported to possess potent anti-cancer properties and cancer-ameliorating effects. The wide-range anti-cancer effects of Nigella sativa, also known as black seed or black cumin, have been extensively studied using different in vitro and in vivo models. Here, we provide a comprehensive, analytical review of the reported anti-cancer properties of N. sativa seed extracts. This review focuses on analyzing experimental findings related to the ability of N. sativa to exert anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-oxidant, cytotoxic, anti-mutagenic, anti-metastatic, and NK cytotoxic activity enhancing effects against various primary cancer cells and cancer cell lines. Moreover, we underline the molecular mechanisms of action and the signal transduction pathways implicated in the suppression of tumorigenesis by N. sativa. The major signaling pathway utilized by N. sativa to manifest its anti-cancer activity is the iNOS signaling pathway. This review underscores the recent developments that highlight an effective therapeutic potential of N. sativa to suppress tumor development, reduce tumor incidence, and ameliorate carcinogenesis. In sum, experimental findings reported in the last two decades strongly suggest that N. sativa fractions could serve, alone or in combination with known chemotherapeutic drugs, as effective agents to control tumor initiation, growth, and metastasis, and hence, treatment of a wide range of cancers.

  9. Wide-field X-ray afterglow searches for gravitational wave events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawhan, Peter; Tervala, Justin

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave (GW) detectors are on track to begin collecting science data soon and to reach full sensitivity by 2019. Low-latency analysis of the GW data will provide triggers for astronomers to seek electromagnetic transient counterparts. Many instruments will contribute to that effort, but instruments with very large fields of view will have a natural advantage for following up the typically large GW error regions. In particular, we consider ISS-Lobster, a proposed NASA mission to be deployed on the International Space Station, which features a focusing imager for soft X-rays with a field of view of over 800 square degrees. Our study using binary neutron star coalescence simulations from Singer et al. shows that a single ISS-Lobster pointing will, on average, cover over 95% of a LIGO-Virgo 3-detector sky map, while even a 2-detector sky map can be over 85% covered (on average) by a sequence of four pointings. We gratefully acknowledge the support of NSF Grants PHY-1068549 and PHY-1404121.

  10. A Wide-angle Multi-Octave Broadband Waveplate Based on Field Transformation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junming; Zhang, Lianhong; Li, Jensen; Feng, Yijun; Dyke, Amy; Haq, Sajad; Hao, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Transformation optics (TO) offers a geometrical approach in designing optical components of any shapes. Although it has been proven to be a versatile and robust mathematical tool, TO has, however, limited control over electromagnetic (EM) field polarization in the process of coordinate transformation. Such a technique can be extended to a so-called “Field transformation (FT)” which provides direct control over the impedance and polarization signature of an arbitrary object. In this work, we demonstrate a FT application by designing and manufacturing a novel waveplate, which defies the fundamental limit of bandwidth and incident angles and has the ability of converting between TE (transverse electric) and TM (transverse magnetic) as well as LCP (left-handed circular polarization) and RCP (right-handed circular polarization). Such a waveplate can also be applied to different operating modes for both transmitted and reflected waves by adjusting its thickness and adding an optional metallic ground plane. The proposed design approach presents a remarkable degree of advance for designing future devices with arbitrary polarization controls, artificial waveguides or antenna substrates and polarization-enabled resonators with angle-insensitive functionalities. Our approach has far reaching implications applicable from radio to optical frequencies.

  11. A Wide-angle Multi-Octave Broadband Waveplate Based on Field Transformation Approach.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junming; Zhang, Lianhong; Li, Jensen; Feng, Yijun; Dyke, Amy; Haq, Sajad; Hao, Yang

    2015-12-07

    Transformation optics (TO) offers a geometrical approach in designing optical components of any shapes. Although it has been proven to be a versatile and robust mathematical tool, TO has, however, limited control over electromagnetic (EM) field polarization in the process of coordinate transformation. Such a technique can be extended to a so-called "Field transformation (FT)" which provides direct control over the impedance and polarization signature of an arbitrary object. In this work, we demonstrate a FT application by designing and manufacturing a novel waveplate, which defies the fundamental limit of bandwidth and incident angles and has the ability of converting between TE (transverse electric) and TM (transverse magnetic) as well as LCP (left-handed circular polarization) and RCP (right-handed circular polarization). Such a waveplate can also be applied to different operating modes for both transmitted and reflected waves by adjusting its thickness and adding an optional metallic ground plane. The proposed design approach presents a remarkable degree of advance for designing future devices with arbitrary polarization controls, artificial waveguides or antenna substrates and polarization-enabled resonators with angle-insensitive functionalities. Our approach has far reaching implications applicable from radio to optical frequencies.

  12. Studies of prototype DEPFET sensors for the wide field imager of Athena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Andritschke, Robert; Bähr, Alexander; Bianchi, Davide; Koch, Anna; Meidinger, Norbert; Müller-Seidlitz, Johannes; Ott, Sabine; Porro, Matteo

    2016-07-01

    The Wide Field Imager of the Athena telescope will combine an excellent spectroscopic performance and high count rate capability with a large field of view. For these purposes, its focal plane consists of two complementary detectors, using DEPFET active pixel sensors. One is the high count rate detector with a small field of view, which has to be operated with a readout speed of 80 μs per frame. In contrast, the large area detector will cover a large field of view and has to be read out with a frame rate <= 5 ms. Its sensitive area is covered by four identical active pixel arrays, consisting of 512 x 512 pixels, each. Since a column parallel readout will be used, 512 pixels are connected to one single channel of a readout ASIC. The readout will be accomplished by either sensing a voltage step on the source node or a change of the transistor drain current. The former so-called source follower mode requires long settling times - proportional to the load capacitances - but can cope with local inhomogeneities. Alternatively, the latter so-called drain current mode provides a fast readout - independent to the load capacitance - but implicates a higher sensitivity on local variations of the DEPFETs bias currents. Both modes are implemented in the VERITAS 2.1 readout ASIC and were studied with 64 x 64 pixels arrays. Drain current devices could be operated with significantly smaller settling times but suffer from a slightly increased noise at similar shaping times in comparison to the source follower ones. By using an optimized timing with dedicated settling and shaping times, the devices of both modes feature a comparable spectral performance.

  13. Mid-infrared Variability from the Spitzer Deep Wide-field Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozłowski, Szymon; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Stern, Daniel; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Assef, Roberto J.; Bock, J. J.; Borys, C.; Brand, K.; Brodwin, M.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cool, R.; Cooray, A.; Croft, S.; Dey, Arjun; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Gonzalez, A.; Gorjian, V.; Griffith, R.; Grogin, N.; Ivison, R.; Jacob, J.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Mainzer, A.; Moustakas, L.; Röttgering, H.; Seymour, N.; Smith, H. A.; Stanford, S. A.; Stauffer, J. R.; Sullivan, I. S.; van Breugel, W.; Willner, S. P.; Wright, E. L.

    2010-06-01

    We use the multi-epoch, mid-infrared Spitzer Deep Wide-Field Survey to investigate the variability of objects in 8.1 deg2 of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey Boötes field. We perform a Difference Image Analysis of the four available epochs between 2004 and 2008, focusing on the deeper 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands. Out of 474, 179 analyzed sources, 1.1% meet our standard variability selection criteria that the two light curves are strongly correlated (r>0.8) and that their joint variance (σ12) exceeds that for all sources with the same magnitude by 2σ. We then examine the mid-IR colors of the variable sources and match them with X-ray sources from the XBoötes survey, radio catalogs, 24 μm selected active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates, and spectroscopically identified AGNs from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES). Based on their mid-IR colors, most of the variable sources are AGNs (76%), with smaller contributions from stars (11%), galaxies (6%), and unclassified objects, although most of the stellar, galaxy, and unclassified sources are false positives. For our standard selection criteria, 11%-12% of the mid-IR counterparts to X-ray sources, 24 μm AGN candidates, and spectroscopically identified AGNs show variability. The exact fractions depend on both the search depth and the selection criteria. For example, 12% of the 1131 known z>1 AGNs in the field and 14%-17% of the known AGNs with well-measured fluxes in all four Infrared Array Camera bands meet our standard selection criteria. The mid-IR AGN variability can be well described by a single power-law structure function with an index of γ ≈ 0.5 at both 3.6 and 4.5 μm, and an amplitude of S 0 ~= 0.1 mag on rest-frame timescales of 2 yr. The variability amplitude is higher for shorter rest-frame wavelengths and lower luminosities.

  14. Wide field array calibration dependence on the stability of measured dose distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Thomas A.; Simon, William E.; Kahler, Darren; Li, Jonathan; Liu, Chihray

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to simulate the effect of dose distribution changes on detector array calibrations and to explore compensatory methods that are used during calibration measurements. Methods: The array calibration technique that was investigated is known as wide field (WF) calibration. Using this method, a linear array [y-axis (65 detectors) of the IC PROFILER (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL)] is calibrated with three measurements ({alpha}, {theta}, and {lambda}); each measurement uses the same radiation field, which is larger than the array. For measurement configuration {theta}, the array is rotated by 180 deg. from its position in {alpha}; for {lambda}, the array is shifted by one detector from its position in {theta}. The relative detector sensitivities are then determined through ratios of detector readings at the same field locations (using {theta} and {lambda}). This method results in error propagation that is proportional to the number of detectors in the array. During the procedure, the calibration protocol operates under three postulates, which state that (a) the beam shape does not change between measurements; (b) the relative sensitivities of the detectors do not change; and (c) the scatter to the array does not change as the array is moved. The WF calibration's sensitivity to a postulate (a) violation was quantified by applying a sine shaped perturbation (of up to 0.1%) to {alpha}, {theta}, or {lambda}, and then determining the change relative to a baseline calibration. Postulate (a) violations were minimized by using a continuous beam and mechanized array movement during {theta} and {lambda}. A continuously on beam demonstrated more stable beam symmetry as compared to cycling the beam on and off between measurements. Additional side-scatter was also used to satisfy postulate (c). Results: Simulated symmetry perturbations of 0.1% to {theta} or {lambda} resulted in calibration errors of up to 2%; {alpha} was relatively immune to

  15. Automated algorithm for actinic cheilitis diagnosis by wide-field fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Cosci, Alessandro; Takahama, Ademar; Correr, Wagner Rafael; Azevedo, Rebeca Souza; Fontes, Karla Bianca Fernandes da Costa; Kurachi, Cristina

    2016-10-01

    Actinic cheilitis (AC) is a disease caused by prolonged and cumulative sun exposure that mostly affects the lower lip, which can progress to a lip squamous cell carcinoma. Routine diagnosis relies on clinician experience and training. We investigated the diagnostic efficacy of wide-field fluorescence imaging coupled to an automated algorithm for AC recognition. Fluorescence images were acquired from 57 patients with confirmed AC and 46 normal volunteers. Three different algorithms were employed: two based on the emission characteristics of local heterogeneity, entropy and intensity range, and one based on the number of objects after K-mean clustering. A classification model was obtained using a fivefold cross correlation algorithm. Sensitivity and specificity rates were 86% and 89.1%, respectively.

  16. Nonlinear structured-illumination microscopy: Wide-field fluorescence imaging with theoretically unlimited resolution

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Mats G. L.

    2005-01-01

    Contrary to the well known diffraction limit, the fluorescence microscope is in principle capable of unlimited resolution. The necessary elements are spatially structured illumination light and a nonlinear dependence of the fluorescence emission rate on the illumination intensity. As an example of this concept, this article experimentally demonstrates saturated structured-illumination microscopy, a recently proposed method in which the nonlinearity arises from saturation of the excited state. This method can be used in a simple, wide-field (nonscanning) microscope, uses only a single, inexpensive laser, and requires no unusual photophysical properties of the fluorophore. The practical resolving power is determined by the signal-to-noise ratio, which in turn is limited by photobleaching. Experimental results show that a 2D point resolution of <50 nm is possible on sufficiently bright and photostable samples. PMID:16141335

  17. Hydrogenated monolayer graphene with reversible and tunable wide band gap and its field-effect transistor

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jangyup; Lee, Soogil; Kim, Sang Jin; Park, Byung Cheol; Lee, Han-Koo; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, Jae Hoon; Hong, Byung Hee; Hong, Jongill

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is currently at the forefront of cutting-edge science and technology due to exceptional electronic, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties. However, the absence of a sizeable band gap in graphene has been a major obstacle for application. To open and control a band gap in functionalized graphene, several gapping strategies have been developed. In particular, hydrogen plasma treatment has triggered a great scientific interest, because it has been known to be an efficient way to modify the surface of single-layered graphene and to apply for standard wafer-scale fabrication. Here we show a monolayer chemical-vapour-deposited graphene hydrogenated by indirect hydrogen plasma without structural defect and we demonstrate that a band gap can be tuned as wide as 3.9 eV by varying hydrogen coverage. We also show a hydrogenated graphene field-effect transistor, showing that on/off ratio changes over three orders of magnitude at room temperature. PMID:27830748

  18. Lessons Learned from the Wide Field Camera 3 TV1 Test Campaign and Correlation Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peabody, Hume; Stavley, Richard; Bast, William

    2007-01-01

    In January 2004, shortly after the Columbia accident, future servicing missions to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were cancelled. In response to this, further work on the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument was ceased. Given the maturity level of the design, a characterization thermal test (TV1) was completed in case the mission was re-instated or an alternate mission found on which to fly the instrument. This thermal test yielded some valuable lessons learned with respect to testing configurations and modeling/correlation practices, including: 1. Ensure that the thermal design can be tested 2. Ensure that the model has sufficient detail for accurate predictions 3. Ensure that the power associated with all active control devices is predicted 4. Avoid unit changes for existing models. This paper documents the difficulties presented when these recommendations were not followed.

  19. Performance analysis of a filtered wide field-of-view radiometer for earth radiation budget measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. E.; Luther, M. R.

    1978-01-01

    The proposed Earth Radiation Budget Satellite System (ERBSS) of the 1980's will include a wide field-of-view (WFOV) fixed axes earth radiator discriminator consisting of a shortwave channel and a total (unfiltered) channel. The broadband spectral isolation required for the shortwave channel is achieved by use of a hemispherical fused silica (Suprasil W) dome filter placed in front of a wire wound thermopile radiation detector. A description is presented of the thermal response of the single-fused silica dome filter in the ERBSS WFOV shortwave channel conceptual design and the impact of that response on the channel measurement. Results from design definition and performance analysis studies are included. Problems associated with achieving the desired levels of confidence in a high accuracy filtered, WFOV radiometer are discussed. Design approaches, ground calibration, and data reduction techniques which minimize measurement uncertainties are explained.

  20. The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) molecular adsorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barengoltz, Jack; Moore, Sonya; Soules, David; Voecks, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    A device has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, for the adsorption of contaminants inside a space instrument during flight. The molecular adsorber was developed for use on the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, and it has been shown to perform at its design specifications in the WFPC-2. The basic principle of the molecular adsorber is a zeolite-coated ceramic honeycomb. The arrangement is efficient for adsorption and also provides the needed rigidity to retain the special zeolite coating during the launch vibrational environment. The adsorber, on other forms, is expected to be useful for all flight instruments sensitive to internal sources of contamination. Typically, some internal contamination is unavoidable. A common design solution is to increase the venting to the exterior. However, for truly sensitive instruments, the external contamination environment is more severe. The molecular adsorber acts as a one-way vent to solve this problem. Continued development is planned for this device.

  1. Hydrogenated monolayer graphene with reversible and tunable wide band gap and its field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Jangyup; Lee, Soogil; Kim, Sang Jin; Park, Byung Cheol; Lee, Han-Koo; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, Jae Hoon; Hong, Byung Hee; Hong, Jongill

    2016-11-01

    Graphene is currently at the forefront of cutting-edge science and technology due to exceptional electronic, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties. However, the absence of a sizeable band gap in graphene has been a major obstacle for application. To open and control a band gap in functionalized graphene, several gapping strategies have been developed. In particular, hydrogen plasma treatment has triggered a great scientific interest, because it has been known to be an efficient way to modify the surface of single-layered graphene and to apply for standard wafer-scale fabrication. Here we show a monolayer chemical-vapour-deposited graphene hydrogenated by indirect hydrogen plasma without structural defect and we demonstrate that a band gap can be tuned as wide as 3.9 eV by varying hydrogen coverage. We also show a hydrogenated graphene field-effect transistor, showing that on/off ratio changes over three orders of magnitude at room temperature.

  2. Multi-modal digital holographic microscopy for wide-field fluorescence and 3D phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Xiangyu; Xia, Peng; Matoba, Osamu; Nitta, Koichi; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Multi-modal digital holographic microscopy is a combination of epifluorescence microscopy and digital holographic microscopy, the main function of which is to obtain images from fluorescence intensity and quantified phase contrasts, simultaneously. The proposed system is mostly beneficial to biological studies, with the reason that often the studies are depending on fluorescent labeling techniques to detect certain intracellular molecules, while phase information reflecting properties of unstained transparent elements. This paper is presenting our latest researches on applications such as randomly moving micro-fluorescent beads and living cells of Physcomitrella patens. The experiments are succeeded on obtaining a succession of wide-field fluorescent images and holograms from micro-beads, and different depths focusing is realized via numerical reconstruction. Living cells of Physcomitrella patens are recorded in the static manner, the reconstruction distance indicates thickness of cellular structure. These results are implementing practical applications toward many biomedical science researches.

  3. Morphological analysis of Bacillux polymyxa colonies: digital image analysis in wide-field microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Lina M.; Plata G., Arturo; Rincón C., Giovanna; Gutiérrez A., Henry; Plata, Alexandra

    2013-11-01

    In the last twenty years the growth of bacterial colonies has been studied experimentally using images with different growth patterns, but the resolution of those images is in areas of tenths of microns without range information. On the other hand, theoretical studies considering the bacteria as systems with collective behavior controlled by a reduced number of parameters have been developed. The present work aims to study morphological and dynamic growth of Bacillus polymyxa colonies by the technique of digital image analysis in wide-field microscopy, which provides high resolution, both in texture and topography. Getting a three-dimensional behavior of dynamic biological systems is useful to create structures and materials with different physical and biological properties for industrial applications.

  4. Sampling and Analysis of Impact Crater Residues Found on the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G. W.; Colaux, J. L.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V. V.; Webb, R, P.; Griffin, T. J.; Reed, B. B.; Anz-Meador, P. D.; Kou, J.-C.; Robinson, G. A.; Opiela, J. N.; Gerlach, L.

    2013-01-01

    After nearly 16 years in low Earth orbit (LEO), the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC2) was recovered from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009, during the 12 day shuttle mission designated STS-125. The WFPC-2 radiator had been struck by approximately 700 impactors producing crater features 300 microns and larger in size. Following optical inspection in 2009, agreement was reached for joint NASA-ESA study of crater residues, in 2011. Over 480 impact features were extracted at NASA Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Space Exposed Hardware clean-room and curation facility during 2012, and were shared between NASA and ESA. We describe analyses conducted using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) - energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX): by NASA at JSC's Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Division; and for ESA at the Natural History Museum (NHM), with Ion beam analysis (IBA) using a scanned proton microbeam at the University of Surrey Ion Beam Centre (IBC).

  5. Design and characterization of a combined OCT and wide field imaging falloposcope for ovarian cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Molly; Tate, Tyler H.; Kieu, Khanh; Black, John F.; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of ovarian cancer is only achieved in around 20% of women due to lack of effective screening. We propose a method for surveillance of high risk women based on a microendoscope introduced transvaginally to image the fallopian tubes and ovaries. This requires extreme miniaturization of the optics and catheter sheath. We describe the design of a falloposcope that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and wide field imaging into a sub-1 mm diameter package. We characterize the systems and show that they provide contrast on ex-vivo samples of ovary and fallopian tube. In addition, we show the mechanical performance of the endoscope in an anatomically correct model of the female reproductive tract. PMID:28101406

  6. Meteor observations with Mini-Mega-TORTORA wide-field monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, S.; Orekhova, N.; Beskin, G.; Biryukov, A.; Bondar, S.; Ivanov, E.; Katkova, E.; Perkov, A.; Sasyuk, V.

    2016-12-01

    Here we report on the results of meteor observations with 9-channel Mini-Mega-TORTORA (MMT-9) optical monitoring system with the wide field and high temporal resolution. During the first 1.5 years of operation more than 90 thousands of meteors have been detected, at a rate of 300-350 per night, with durations from 0.1 to 2.5 seconds and angular velocities up to 38 degrees per second. The faintest detected meteors have peak brightnesses about 10 mag, while the majority have them ranging from 4 to 8 mag. Some of the meteors have been observed in BVR filters simultaneously. Color variations along the trail for them have been determined. The parameters of the detected meteors have been published online. The database also includes data from 10 thousands of meteors detected by our previous FAVOR camera during 2006-2009.

  7. Near infrared FRET using wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging in live animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lingling; Abe, Ken; Barroso, Margarida; Intes, Xavier

    2013-06-01

    One of the challenges in anti-cancer drug delivery systems is to quantitatively discriminate non-specific receptorindependent tumor accumulation from receptor-mediated uptake into the tumor cells. To overcome this challenge, we develop a new near infrared fluorescence resonance energy transfer fluorescence lifetime imaging (NIR FRET FLIM) technique with wide-field illumination strategies to validate and characterize cellular uptake in both cancer cells and normal cells with different donor-acceptor ratios in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrate that NIR FRET FLIM can quantitatively distinguish receptor-bound from unbound donor in live animals with high sensitivity and high accuracy. Thus, it has a great potential for the quantitative detection of targeted delivery systems for diagnostic and therapeutic use.

  8. Stellar photometry with the Wide Field/Planetary Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, J.A. )

    1990-07-01

    Simulations of Wide Field/Planetary Camera (WF/PC) images are analyzed in order to discover the most effective techniques for stellar photometry and to evaluate the accuracy and limitations of these techniques. The capabilities and operation of the WF/PC and the simulations employed in the study are described. The basic techniques of stellar photometry and methods to improve these techniques for the WF/PC are discussed. The correct parameters for star detection, aperture photometry, and point-spread function (PSF) fitting with the DAOPHOT software of Stetson (1987) are determined. Consideration is given to undersampling of the stellar images by the detector; variations in the PSF; and the crowding of the stellar images. It is noted that, with some changes DAOPHOT, is able to generate photometry almost to the level of photon statistics. 10 refs.

  9. Optical Design Trade Study for the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope [WFIRST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Content, David A.; Goullioud, R.; Lehan, John P.; Mentzell, John E.

    2011-01-01

    The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission concept was ranked first in new space astrophysics mission by the Astro2010 Decadal Survey incorporating the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM)-Omega payload concept and multiple science white papers. This mission is based on a space telescope at L2 studying exoplanets [via gravitational microlensing], probing dark energy, and surveying the near infrared sky. Since the release of NWNH, the WFIRST project has been working with the WFIRST science definition team (SDT) to refine mission and payload concepts. We present the driving requirements. The current interim reference mission point design, based on the use of a 1.3m unobscured aperture three mirror anastigmat form, with focal imaging and slitless spectroscopy science channels, is consistent with the requirements, requires no technology development, and out performs the JDEM-Omega design.

  10. Quantitative microscopy and nanoscopy of sickle red blood cells performed by wide field digital interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaked, Natan T.; Satterwhite, Lisa L.; Telen, Marilyn J.; Truskey, George A.; Wax, Adam

    2011-03-01

    We have applied wide-field digital interferometry (WFDI) to examine the morphology and dynamics of live red blood cells (RBCs) from individuals who suffer from sickle cell anemia (SCA), a genetic disorder that affects the structure and mechanical properties of RBCs. WFDI is a noncontact, label-free optical microscopy approach that can yield quantitative thickness profiles of RBCs and measurements of their membrane fluctuations at the nanometer scale reflecting their stiffness. We find that RBCs from individuals with SCA are significantly stiffer than those from a healthy control. Moreover, we show that the technique is sensitive enough to distinguish classes of RBCs in SCA, including sickle RBCs with apparently normal morphology, compared to the stiffer crescent-shaped sickle RBCs. We expect that this approach will be useful for diagnosis of SCA and for determining efficacy of therapeutic agents.

  11. Wide-field FTIR microscopy using mid-IR pulse shaping

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Arnaldo L.; Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Ostrander, Joshua S.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new table-top technique for collecting wide-field Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscopic images by combining a femtosecond pulse shaper with a mid-IR focal plane array. The pulse shaper scans the delay between a pulse pair extremely rapidly for high signal-to-noise, while also enabling phase control of the individual pulses to under-sample the interferograms and subtract background. Infrared absorption images were collected for a mixture of W(CO)6 or Mn2(CO)10 absorbed polystyrene beads, demonstrating that this technique can spatially resolve chemically distinct species. The images are sub-diffraction limited, as measured with a USAF test target patterned on CaF2 and verified with scalar wave simulations. We also find that refractive, rather than reflective, objectives are preferable for imaging with coherent radiation. We discuss this method with respect to conventional FTIR microscopes. PMID:26191843

  12. Progress Report on Optimizing X-ray Optical Prescriptions for Wide-Field Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; O'Dell, S. L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the present status of our continuing efforts to develop a method for optimizing wide-field nested x-ray telescope mirror prescriptions. Utilizing extensive Monte-Carlo ray trace simulations, we find an analytic form for the root-mean-square dispersion of rays from a Wolter I optic on the surface of a flat focal plane detector as a function of detector tilt away from the nominal focal plane and detector displacement along the optical axis. The configuration minimizing the ray dispersion from a nested array of Wolter I telescopes is found by solving a linear system of equations for tilt and individual mirror pair displacement. Finally we outline our initial efforts at expanding this method to include higher order polynomial terms in the mirror prescriptions.

  13. Methods of Optimizing X-Ray Optical Prescriptions for Wide-Field Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; O'Dell, S. L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2010-01-01

    We are working on the development of a method for optimizing wide-field x-ray telescope mirror prescriptions, including polynomial coefficients, mirror shell relative displacements, and (assuming 4 focal plane detectors) detector placement and tilt that does not require a search through the multi-dimensional parameter space. Under the assumption that the parameters are small enough that second order expansions are valid, we show that the performance at the detector surface can be expressed as a quadratic function of the parameters with numerical coefficients derived from a ray trace through the underlying Wolter I optic. The best values for the parameters are found by solving the linear system of equations creating by setting derivatives of this function with respect to each parameter to zero. We describe the present status of this development effort.

  14. Sampling and Analysis of Impact Crater Residues Found on the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 Radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anz-Meador, P. D.; Liou, J.-C.; Ross, D.; Robinson, G. A.; Opiela, J. N.; Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G. W.; Colaux, J. L.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V. V.; Webb, R. P.; Griffin, T. J.; Reed, B. B.; Gerlach, L.

    2013-08-01

    After nearly 16 years in low Earth orbit (LEO), the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC2) was recovered from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009, during the 12 day shuttle mission designated STS-125. The WFPC-2 radiator had been struck by approximately 700 impactors producing crater features 300 μ m and larger in size. Following optical inspection in 2009, agreement was reached for joint NASA-ESA study of crater residues, in 2011. Over 480 impact features were extracted at NASA Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Space Exposed Hardware clean-room and curation facility during 2012, and were shared between NASA and ESA. We describe analyses conducted using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) - energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX): by NASA at JSC's Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Division; and for ESA at the Natural History Museum (NHM), with Ion beam analysis (IBA) using a scanned proton microbeam at the University of Surrey Ion Beam Centre (IBC).

  15. Commissioning of a medical accelerator photon beam Monte Carlo simulation using wide-field profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, J.; Franco, L.; Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Lobato, R.; Mosquera, J.; Pazos, A.; Pardo, J.; Pombar, M.; Rodríguez, A.; Sendón, J.

    2004-11-01

    A method for commissioning an EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation of medical linac photon beams through wide-field lateral profiles at moderate depth in a water phantom is presented. Although depth-dose profiles are commonly used for nominal energy determination, our study shows that they are quite insensitive to energy changes below 0.3 MeV (0.6 MeV) for a 6 MV (15 MV) photon beam. Also, the depth-dose profile dependence on beam radius adds an additional uncertainty in their use for tuning nominal energy. Simulated 40 cm × 40 cm lateral profiles at 5 cm depth in a water phantom show greater sensitivity to both nominal energy and radius. Beam parameters could be determined by comparing only these curves with measured data.

  16. The filter and calibration wheel for the ATHENA wide field imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rataj, M.; Polak, S.; Palgan, T.; Kamisiński, T.; Pilch, A.; Eder, J.; Meidinger, N.; Plattner, M.; Barbera, M.; Parodi, G.; D'Anca, Fabio

    2016-07-01

    The planned filter and calibration wheel for the Wide Field Imager (WFI) instrument on Athena is presented. With four selectable positions it provides the necessary functions, in particular an UV/VIS blocking filter for the WFI detectors and a calibration source. Challenges for the filter wheel design are the large volume and mass of the subsystem, the implementation of a robust mechanism and the protection of the ultra-thin filter with an area of 160 mm square. This paper describes performed trade-offs based on simulation results and describes the baseline design in detail. Reliable solutions are envisaged for the conceptual design of the filter and calibration wheel. Four different variant with different position of the filter are presented. Risk mitigation and the compliance to design requirements are demonstrated.

  17. Micrometeoroid Impacts on the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Smaller Particle Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J.C.; Opiela, J.; Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G.; Webb, R.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V.; Colaux, J.; Griffin, T.; Gerlach, L.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    The radiator shield on the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) was subject to optical inspection following return from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2009. The survey revealed over 600 impact features of > 300 micrometers diameter, from exposure in space for 16 years. Subsequently, an international collaborative programme of analysis was organized to determine the origin of hypervelocity particles responsible for the damage. Here we describe examples of the numerous smaller micrometeoroid (MM) impact features (< 700 micrometers diameter) which excavated zinc orthotitanate (ZOT) paint from the radiator surface, but did not incorporate material from underlying Al alloy; larger impacts are described by [3]. We discuss recognition and interpretation of impactor remains, and MM compositions found on WFPC2.

  18. Utility of galaxy catalogs for following up gravitational waves from binary neutron star mergers with wide-field telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, Chad; Mandel, Ilya; Vousden, Will E-mail: imandel@star.sr.bham.ac.uk

    2014-03-20

    The first detections of gravitational waves from binary neutron star mergers with advanced LIGO and Virgo observatories are anticipated in the next five years. These detections could pave the way for multi-messenger gravitational-wave (GW) and electromagnetic (EM) astronomy if GW triggers are successfully followed up with targeted EM observations. However, GW sky localization is relatively poor, with expected localization areas of ∼10-100 deg{sup 2}; this presents a challenge for following up GW signals from compact binary mergers. Even for wide-field instruments, tens or hundreds of pointings may be required. Prioritizing pointings based on the relative probability of successful imaging is important since it may not be possible to tile the entire gravitational-wave localization region in a timely fashion. Galaxy catalogs were effective at narrowing down regions of the sky to search in initial attempts at joint GW/EM observations. The relatively limited range of initial GW instruments meant that few galaxies were present per pointing and galaxy catalogs were complete within the search volume. The next generation of GW detectors will have a 10-fold increase in range thereby increasing the expected number of galaxies per unit solid angle by a factor of ∼1000. As an additional complication, catalogs will be highly incomplete. Nevertheless, galaxy catalogs can still play an important role in prioritizing pointings for the next era of GW searches. We show how to quantify the advantages of using galaxy catalogs to prioritize wide-field follow-ups as a function of only two parameters: the three-dimensional volume within the field of view of a telescope after accounting for the GW distance measurement uncertainty, and the fraction of the GW sky localization uncertainty region that can be covered with telescope pointings. We find that the use of galaxy catalogs can improve the probability of successful imaging by ∼10% to ∼300% relative to follow-up strategies that

  19. SuperBIT: Wide-field, Sub-arcsecond Imaging from the Super-Pressure Balloon Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, William

    The scientific potential of diffraction-limited imaging from mid-latitude ultra-long duration balloon payloads is immense. The combination of diffraction-limited angular resolution, extreme stability, space-like backgrounds, and long integrations enables transformative opportunities in studies ranging from the weak lensing of galaxy clusters and cosmic shear, to the search for exoplanets. Pioneering research, spear-headed by the co-investigators of this proposal, has led to the development of the precision tip/tilt and de-rotation systems that are required to realize the potential of the super-pressure balloon (SPB) platform for deep, wide-field imaging. Under a separately funded Canadian Space Agency program, a half-meter class telescope has been integrated with a prototype sub-arcsecond pointing system. We propose a highly focused five-year program to develop and fly a comparable instrument on the mid-latitude SPB platform, demonstrating the imaging capability during an ultra-long duration balloon flight while providing space-quality weak lensing measurements for a large catalog of galaxy clusters. This instrument will provide imaging with a half-degree field of view and 0.3-arcsecond resolution in five bands between 300 and 1000 nm, with sensitivities in the shape-band exceeding 24th magnitude (> 5 sigma) in 300 seconds of integration. We propose an observing schedule that is split between a performance verification sample, a photometric and spectroscopic calibration set, a deep field, and a science catalog. The performance verification set prioritizes a sample of thirty clusters that have been previously well studied with the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys, the Chandra X-ray observatory, and for which there are Compton-Y parameter data from millimeter wavelengths. The photometric calibration set will be selected from the COSMOS field. The science catalog will draw from a set of more than 150 Sunyaev-Zel'dovich, X-ray, and optically-selected clusters spanning a

  20. Utility of Galaxy Catalogs for Following up Gravitational Waves from Binary Neutron Star Mergers with Wide-field Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Chad; Mandel, Ilya; Vousden, Will

    2014-03-01

    The first detections of gravitational waves from binary neutron star mergers with advanced LIGO and Virgo observatories are anticipated in the next five years. These detections could pave the way for multi-messenger gravitational-wave (GW) and electromagnetic (EM) astronomy if GW triggers are successfully followed up with targeted EM observations. However, GW sky localization is relatively poor, with expected localization areas of ~10-100 deg2; this presents a challenge for following up GW signals from compact binary mergers. Even for wide-field instruments, tens or hundreds of pointings may be required. Prioritizing pointings based on the relative probability of successful imaging is important since it may not be possible to tile the entire gravitational-wave localization region in a timely fashion. Galaxy catalogs were effective at narrowing down regions of the sky to search in initial attempts at joint GW/EM observations. The relatively limited range of initial GW instruments meant that few galaxies were present per pointing and galaxy catalogs were complete within the search volume. The next generation of GW detectors will have a 10-fold increase in range thereby increasing the expected number of galaxies per unit solid angle by a factor of ~1000. As an additional complication, catalogs will be highly incomplete. Nevertheless, galaxy catalogs can still play an important role in prioritizing pointings for the next era of GW searches. We show how to quantify the advantages of using galaxy catalogs to prioritize wide-field follow-ups as a function of only two parameters: the three-dimensional volume within the field of view of a telescope after accounting for the GW distance measurement uncertainty, and the fraction of the GW sky localization uncertainty region that can be covered with telescope pointings. We find that the use of galaxy catalogs can improve the probability of successful imaging by ~10% to ~300% relative to follow-up strategies that do not utilize

  1. Precision Pointing for the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoneking, Eric; Hsu, Oscar; Welter, Gary

    2017-01-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission, scheduled for a mid-2020's launch, is currently in its definition phase. The mission is designed to investigate essential questions in the areas of dark energy, exoplanets, and infrared astrophysics. WFIRST will use a 2.4-meter primary telescope (same size as the Hubble Space Telescope's primary mirror) and two instruments: the Wide Field Instrument (WFI) and the Coronagraph Instrument (CGI). In order to ad-dress the critical science requirements, the WFIRST mission will conduct large-scale surveys of the infrared sky, requiring both agility and precision pointing (11.6 milli-arcsec stability, 14 milli-arcsec jitter). This paper describes some of the challenges this mission profile presents to the GNC subsystem, and some of the design elements chosen to accommodate those challenges. The high-galactic-latitude survey is characterized by 3-minute observations separated by slews ranging from 0.025 deg to 0.8 deg. The need for observation efficiency drives the slew and settle process to be as rapid as possible. A description of the shaped slew profile chosen to minimize excitation of structural oscillation, and the handoff from star tracker-gyro control to fine guidance sensor control is detailed. Also presented is the fine guidance sensor (FGS), which is integral with the primary instrument (WFI). The FGS is capable of tracking up to 18 guide stars, enabling robust FGS acquisition and precision pointing. To avoid excitation of observatory structural jitter, reaction wheel speeds are operationally maintained within set limits. In addition, the wheel balance law is designed to maintain 1-Hz separation between the wheel speeds to avoid reinforcing jitter excitation at any particular frequency. The wheel balance law and operational implications are described. Finally, the candidate GNC hardware suite needed to meet the requirements of the mission is presented.

  2. Precision Pointing for the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope(WFIRST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoneking, Eric T.; Hsu, Oscar C.; Welter, Gary

    2017-01-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission, scheduled for a mid-2020's launch, is currently in its definition phase. The mission is designed to investigate essential questions in the areas of dark energy, exoplanets, and infrared astrophysics. WFIRST will use a 2.4-meter primary telescope (same size as the Hubble Space Telescope's primary mirror) and two instruments: the Wide Field Instrument (WFI) and the Coronagraph Instrument (CGI). In order to address the critical science requirements, the WFIRST mission will conduct large-scale surveys of the infrared sky, requiring both agility and precision pointing (11.6 milli-arcsec stability, 14 milli-arcsec jitter). This paper describes some of the challenges this mission profile presents to the Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) subsystem, and some of the design elements chosen to accommodate those challenges. The high-galactic-latitude survey is characterized by 3-minute observations separated by slews ranging from 0.025 deg to 0.8 deg. The need for observation efficiency drives the slew and settle process to be as rapid as possible. A description of the shaped slew profile chosen to minimize excitation of structural oscillation, and the handoff from star tracker-gyro control to fine guidance sensor control is detailed. Also presented is the fine guidance sensor (FGS), which is integral with the primary instrument (WFI). The FGS is capable of tracking up to 18 guide stars, enabling robust FGS acquisition and precision pointing. To avoid excitation of observatory structural jitter, reaction wheel speeds are operationally maintained within set limits. In addition, the wheel balance law is designed to maintain 1-Hz separation between the wheel speeds to avoid reinforcing jitter excitation at any particular frequency. The wheel balance law and operational implications are described. Finally, the candidate GNC hardware suite needed to meet the requirements of the mission is presented.

  3. Reaching the Diffraction Limit - Differential Speckle and Wide-Field Imaging for the WIYN Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Nic J.; Howell, Steve; Horch, Elliott

    2016-01-01

    Speckle imaging allows telescopes to achieve diffraction limited imaging performance. The technique requires cameras capable of reading out frames at a very fast rate, effectively 'freezing out' atmospheric seeing. The resulting speckles can be correlated and images reconstructed that are at the diffraction limit of the telescope. These new instruments are based on the successful performance and design of the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument (DSSI).The instruments are being built for the Gemini-N and WIYN telescopes and will be made available to the community via the peer review proposal process. We envision their primary use to be validation and characterization of exoplanet targets from the NASA, K2 and TESS missions and RV discovered exoplanets. Such targets will provide excellent follow-up candidates for both the WIYN and Gemini telescopes. We expect similar data quality in speckle imaging mode with the new instruments. Additionally, both cameras will have a wide-field mode and standard SDSS filters. They will be highly versatile instruments and it is that likely many other science programs will request time on the cameras. The limiting magnitude for speckle observations will remain around 13-14th at WIYN and 16-17th at Gemini, while wide-field, normal CCD imaging operation should be able to go to much fainter, providing usual CCD imaging and photometric capabilities. The instruments will also have high utility as scoring cameras for telescope engineering purposes, or other applications where high time resolution is needed. Instrument support will be provided, including a software pipeline that takes raw speckle data to fully reconstructed images.

  4. Wide-field fluorescent microscopy and fluorescent imaging flow cytometry on a cell-phone.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-04-11

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. However these devices are in general relatively bulky and costly, making them less effective in the resource limited settings. To potentially address these limitations, we have recently demonstrated the integration of wide-field fluorescent microscopy and imaging flow cytometry tools on cell-phones using compact, light-weight, and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments. In our flow cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are flushed through a microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing cell-phone camera unit. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the side of this microfluidic chip, which effectively acts as a multi-mode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to uniformly excite the fluorescent targets. The cell-phone camera records a time lapse movie of the fluorescent cells flowing through the microfluidic channel, where the digital frames of this movie are processed to count the number of the labeled cells within the target solution of interest. Using a similar opto-fluidic design, we can also image these fluorescently labeled cells in static mode by e.g. sandwiching the fluorescent particles between two glass slides and capturing their fluorescent images using the cell-phone camera, which can achieve a spatial resolution of e.g. - 10 μm over a very large field-of-view of - 81 mm(2). This cell-phone based fluorescent imaging flow cytometry and microscopy platform might be useful especially in resource limited settings, for e.g. counting of CD4+ T cells toward monitoring of HIV+ patients or for detection of water-borne parasites in drinking water.

  5. Improved iris localization by using wide and narrow field of view cameras for iris recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeong Gon; Shin, Kwang Yong; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2013-10-01

    Biometrics is a method of identifying individuals by their physiological or behavioral characteristics. Among other biometric identifiers, iris recognition has been widely used for various applications that require a high level of security. When a conventional iris recognition camera is used, the size and position of the iris region in a captured image vary according to the X, Y positions of a user's eye and the Z distance between a user and the camera. Therefore, the searching area of the iris detection algorithm is increased, which can inevitably decrease both the detection speed and accuracy. To solve these problems, we propose a new method of iris localization that uses wide field of view (WFOV) and narrow field of view (NFOV) cameras. Our study is new as compared to previous studies in the following four ways. First, the device used in our research acquires three images, one each of the face and both irises, using one WFOV and two NFOV cameras simultaneously. The relation between the WFOV and NFOV cameras is determined by simple geometric transformation without complex calibration. Second, the Z distance (between a user's eye and the iris camera) is estimated based on the iris size in the WFOV image and anthropometric data of the size of the human iris. Third, the accuracy of the geometric transformation between the WFOV and NFOV cameras is enhanced by using multiple matrices of the transformation according to the Z distance. Fourth, the searching region for iris localization in the NFOV image is significantly reduced based on the detected iris region in the WFOV image and the matrix of geometric transformation corresponding to the estimated Z distance. Experimental results showed that the performance of the proposed iris localization method is better than that of conventional methods in terms of accuracy and processing time.

  6. Automatic vessel segmentation in wide-field retina images of infants with retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Enea; Fiorin, Diego; Grisan, Enrico; Ruggeri, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    The earliest signs of Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) are tortuosity and dilation of retinal vessels. Such vascular changes are considered of primary importance for the diagnosis and the follow-up of the disease. However, a widely accepted computerized system for their quantitative measurement is still missing. Images taken from a preterm baby's eye are often low-contrast, noisy, and blurred. Algorithms that have been successfully applied to analyze adult retinal images do not work well in ROP images. We propose here a novel method for the automatic extraction of vessel centerline in wide-field ROP retinal images, based on a sparse tracking scheme. After a set of seed points is identified all over the image, vessels are traced by connecting those seeds by means of minimum cost paths, whose weights depend on similarity features and alignment evaluated by a custom line operator. The performance of the method was assessed on a dataset of 20 images acquired with the RetCam fundus camera. A sensitivity of 0.78 and a false detection rate of 0.15 were obtained with respect to manual ground truth reference.

  7. Preliminary Results from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer's NEOWISE Search for Minor Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainzer, A.; Bauer, J. M.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; McMillan, R. S.; Walker, R.; Tholen, D. J.; Wright, E.; Eisenhardt, P.; Cutri, R.; Neowise Team

    2011-12-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) imaged the entire sky twice between January, 2010 and January, 2011 at four wavelengths spanning the near through mid-IR at sensitivities hundreds of times greater than previous surveys [1]. The WISE band-passes (3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22mm) sample the flux from most inner-solar-system bodies near the peak of their thermal emission. Overlapping sky regions were sampled repeatedly at 3 hour intervals. The same region of sky was observed a minimum of 8 times. While the primary WISE science objectives focus on ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and brown dwarfs, additions to the baseline WISE pipeline (collectively known as "NEOWISE") have enabled the detection of undiscovered moving objects, as well as previously known bodies [2]. NEOWISE has detected more than 155,000 minor planets, including more than 500 near-Earth objects (NEOs), ~2000 Jupiter Trojans, ~120 comets, and ~20 outer Solar System objects such as Centaurs. The survey has discovered ~34,000 new minor planets, including 130 new NEOs and 20 new comets. The NEOWISE data will drive a wide range of new Solar System investigations. NEOWISE allows precise determination of IR-derived diameters and albedos for minor planets throughout the Solar System [3],[4]. We will summarize the latest results from the project, including studies of the statistical properties of asteroid populations such as the NEOs, and comparisons between albedo and asteroid taxonomic classification.

  8. Optical multi-frequency swept sensing for wide-field vibration measurement of interior surfaces in biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Nin, F.; Hibino, H.; Suzuki, T.

    2015-12-01

    Multifrequency sensing technique adopting the wide field heterodyne detection technique is demonstrated for interior surface vibration measurements in thick biological tissue. These arrangements allow obtaining not only 3D tomographic images but also various vibration parameters such as spatial amplitude, phase, and frequency, with high temporal and transverse resolutions over a wide field. The axial resolution and the accuracy of vibration amplitude measurement were estimated to be 2.5 μm and 3 nm, respectively. This wide-field tomographic sensing method can be applied for measuring microdynamics of a variety of biological samples, thus contributing to the progress in life sciences research.

  9. Advancement in genetic variants conferring obesity susceptibility from genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Jia, Weiping; Hu, Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Obesity prevalence has increased in recent years. Lifestyle change fuels obesity, but genetic factors cause more than 50% of average variations in obesity. The advent of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has hastened the progress of polygenic obesity research. As of this writing, more than 73 obesity susceptibility loci have been identified in ethnic groups through GWAS. The identified loci explain only 2% to 4% of obesity heritability, thereby indicating that a large proportion of loci remain undiscovered. Thus, the next step is to identify and confirm novel loci, which may exhibit smaller effects and lower allele frequencies than established loci. However, achieving these tasks has been difficult for researchers. GWAS help researchers discover the causal loci. Moreover, numerous biological studies have been performed on the polygenic effects on obesity, such as studies on fat mass- and obesity-associated gene (FTO), but the role of these polygenic effects in the mechanism of obesity remains unclear. Thus, obesity-causing variations should be identified, and insights into the biology of polygenic effects on obesity are needed.

  10. Wide-field spectral domain-optical coherence tomography in central serous chorioretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Carrai, Paola; Pichi, Francesco; Bonsignore, Francesco; Ciardella, Antonio P; Nucci, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    The aim the study was to describe wide-field spectral-domain optical coherence tomography morphologic relationships of the vitreous, retina, and choroid in central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) eyes. Standardized horizontal, vertical, and two oblique (supertemporal to inferonasal and supranasal to inferotemporal) SD-OCT sections were collected for 40 patient with CSCR. For extramacular imaging, images were obtained from eight locations: (1) nasal to the optic disk, (2) extreme nasal periphery, (3) superior to the superotemporal vascular arcade, (4) extreme superior periphery, (5) inferior to the inferotemporal vascular arcade, (6) extreme inferior periphery, (7) temporal to the macula, and (8) extreme temporal periphery. Wide-angle montage images of OCT from equator to equator were composed with a montaging software. Average subfoveal choroidal thickness was 478 ± 114 µm (range 232-695 µm) at the macular level, 367 ± 94 µm in the superior periphery, 257 ± 103 µm in the inferior periphery, 431 ± 121 and 280 ± 88 µm in the nasal and in the temporal periphery, respectively. Wide-field EDI-OCT revealed a relative thinning of the inner choroidal layer in the periphery, including the small and medium large vessels, which ranged from 86 µm nasally to 120.1 µm superiorly, with a mean of 98.8 ± 13.6 µm. Beneath the thinned inner choroidal layer, hyporeflective lumina, corresponding to the outer choroidal layer, were identified in the periphery of all eyes. The outer choroidal layer thickness ranged from 175.5 µm temporally to 235.5 µm superiorly, with a mean of 217.8 ± 41.4 µm. The novel approach of montaging SD-OCT images to examine relationships between the choroid, retina, and associated structures adjacent to and outside of the macula may have a number of relevant applications in the study of pathologic features of central serous chorioretinopathy.

  11. Broadband and Wide Field-of-view Plasmonic Metasurface-enabled Waveplates

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi Hao; Lin, Lan; Ma, Ding; Yun, Seokho; Werner, Douglas H.; Liu, Zhiwen; Mayer, Theresa S.

    2014-01-01

    Quasi two-dimensional metasurfaces composed of subwavelength nanoresonator arrays can dramatically alter the properties of light in an ultra-thin planar geometry, enabling new optical functions such as anomalous reflection and refraction, polarization filtering, and wavefront modulation. However, previous metasurface-based nanostructures suffer from low efficiency, narrow bandwidth and/or limited field-of-view due to their operation near the plasmonic resonance. Here we demonstrate plasmonic metasurface-based nanostructures for high-efficiency, angle-insensitive polarization transformation over a broad octave-spanning bandwidth. The structures are realized by optimizing the anisotropic response of an array of strongly coupled nanorod resonators to tailor the interference of light at the subwavelength scale. Nanofabricated reflective half-wave and quarter-wave plates designed using this approach have measured polarization conversion ratios and reflection magnitudes greater than 92% over a broad wavelength range from 640 to 1290 nm and a wide field-of-view up to ±40°. This work outlines a versatile strategy to create metasurface-based photonics with diverse optical functionalities. PMID:25524830

  12. Wide-field holography of Compact Array antennae at 1.4 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, E.; Voronkov, M.; Kesteven, M.; Cornwell, T.; Graves, G.

    2006-08-01

    It is not trivial to produce high-SNR images from radio interferometer data. In very deep integrations at low frequencies, strong radio sources well outside the primary beams cause sidelobes in the synthesized image, and limit its dynamic range. These sidelobes cannot be removed with cleaning and self-calibration techniques, and it becomes necessary to predict the effects of strong sources and to remove them from the data before an image is formed. We present results from recent holographic measurements of a subset of the antennae of the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at 1.4 GHz. We have mapped in detail the far-field reception pattern of ATCA antennae to sources as far as 20 degrees away from the optical axis, using beacons of a geostationary satellite. We report the results from these observations and the improvements they yield for wide-field, deep radio interferometer observations. Future sensitive, low-frequency radio interferometers such as the xNTD and the SKA will need similar calibration techniques to reach their full potential.

  13. THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

    2010-08-31

    This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

  14. Development of a prototype of the Tomo-e Gozen wide-field CMOS camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sako, Shigeyuki; Osawa, Ryou; Takahashi, Hidenori; Kikuchi, Yuki; Doi, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Naoto; Aoki, Tsutomu; Arimatsu, Ko; Ichiki, Makoto; Ikeda, Shiro; Ita, Yoshifusa; Kasuga, Toshihiro; Kawakita, Hideyo; Kokubo, Mitsuru; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Mito, Hiroyuki; Mitsuda, Kazuma; Miyata, Takashi; Mori, Kiyoshi; Mori, Yuki; Morii, Mikio; Morokuma, Tomoki; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Osawa, Kentaro; Okumura, Shin-ichiro; Onozato, Hiroki; Sarugaku, Yuki; Sato, Mikiya; Shigeyama, Toshikazu; Soyano, Takao; Tanaka, Masaomi; Taniguchi, Yuki; Tanikawa, Ataru; Tarusawa, Ken'ichi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Totani, Tomonori; Urakawa, Seitaro; Usui, Fumihiko; Watanabe, Junichi; Yamaguchi, Jumpei; Yoshikawa, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    The Tomo-e Gozen is an extremely wide-field optical camera for the Kiso 1.0-m Schmidt telescope. It is capable of taking consecutive frames with a field-of-view of 20 deg2 and a sub-second time-resolution, which are achieved by 84 chips of 2k×1k CMOS sensor. This camera adopts unconventional designs including a lightweight structure, a nonvacuumed and naturally-air cooled system, front-side-illuminated CMOS sensors with microlens arrays, a sensor alignment along a spherical focal plane of the telescope, and massive readout electronics. To develop technical components necessary for the Tomo-e Gozen and confirm a feasibility of its basic design, we have developed a prototype-model (PM) of the Tomo-e Gozen prior to the final-model (FM). The Tomo-e PM is equipped with eight chips of the CMOS sensor arranged in a line along the RA direction, covering a sky area of 2.0 deg2. The maximum frame rate is 2 fps. The total data production rate is 80 MByte sec-1 at 2 fps, corresponding to approximately 3 TByte night-1. After laboratory testing, we have successfully obtained consecutive movie data at 2 fps with the Tomo-e PM in the first commissioning run conducted in the end of 2015.

  15. The Kepler Mission: A wide-field transit search for terrestrial planets [review article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basri, Gibor; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David

    2005-11-01

    The Kepler Mission is a NASA Discovery mission which will continuously monitor the brightness of at least 100,000 main sequence stars, to detect the transits of terrestrial and larger planets. It is scheduled to be launched in 2007 into an Earth-trailing heliocentric orbit. It is a wide-field photometer with a Schmidt-type telescope and array of 42 CCDs covering the 100 square degree field-of-view. It has a 1-m aperture which enables a differential photometric precision of 2 parts in 100,000 for 12th magnitude solar-like stars over a 6.5-hour transit duration. It will continuously observe dwarf stars from 8th to 15th magnitude in the Cygnus constellation, for a period of four years, with a cadence of 4 measurements per hour. Hundreds of terrestrial planets should be detected if they are common around solar-type stars. Ground-based spectrometry of stars with planetary candidates will help eliminate false-positives, and determine stellar characteristics such as mass and metallicity. A null result would imply that terrestrial planets are rare.

  16. Wide-field lensless fluorescent microscopy using a tapered fiber-optic faceplate on a chip.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Ahmet F; Sencan, Ikbal; Su, Ting-Wei; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2011-09-07

    We demonstrate lensless fluorescent microscopy over a large field-of-view of ~60 mm(2) with a spatial resolution of <4 µm. In this on-chip fluorescent imaging modality, the samples are placed on a fiber-optic faceplate that is tapered such that the density of the fiber-optic waveguides on the top facet is >5 fold larger than the bottom one. Placed on this tapered faceplate, the fluorescent samples are pumped from the side through a glass hemisphere interface. After excitation of the samples, the pump light is rejected through total internal reflection that occurs at the bottom facet of the sample substrate. The fluorescent emission from the sample is then collected by the smaller end of the tapered faceplate and is delivered to an opto-electronic sensor-array to be digitally sampled. Using a compressive sampling algorithm, we decode these raw lensfree images to validate the resolution (<4 µm) of this on-chip fluorescent imaging platform using microparticles as well as labeled Giardia muris cysts. This wide-field lensfree fluorescent microscopy platform, being compact and high-throughput, might provide a valuable tool especially for cytometry, rare cell analysis (involving large area microfluidic systems) as well as for microarray imaging applications.

  17. Demonstration of the Wide-Field Imaging Interferometer Testbed Using a Calibrated Hyperspectral Image Projector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Leisawitz, David; Maher, Steve; Rinehart, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Wide-field Imaging Interferometer testbed (WIIT) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center uses a dual-Michelson interferometric technique. The WIIT combines stellar interferometry with Fourier-transform interferometry to produce high-resolution spatial-spectral data over a large field-of-view. This combined technique could be employed on future NASA missions such as the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) and the Sub-millimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS). While both SPIRIT and SPECS would operate at far-infrared wavelengths, the WIIT demonstrates the dual-interferometry technique at visible wavelengths. The WIIT will produce hyperspectral image data, so a true hyperspectral object is necessary. A calibrated hyperspectral image projector (CHIP) has been constructed to provide such an object. The CHIP uses Digital Light Processing (DLP) technology to produce customized, spectrally-diverse scenes. CHIP scenes will have approximately 1.6-micron spatial resolution and the capability of . producing arbitrary spectra in the band between 380 nm and 1.6 microns, with approximately 5-nm spectral resolution. Each pixel in the scene can take on a unique spectrum. Spectral calibration is achieved with an onboard fiber-coupled spectrometer. In this paper we describe the operation of the CHIP. Results from the WIIT observations of CHIP scenes will also be presented.

  18. Water-Immersible MEMS scanning mirror designed for wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Martel, Catherine; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lidai; Yang, Joon-Mo; Gao, Liang; Randolph, Gwendalyn; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    By offering images with high spatial resolution and unique optical absorption contrast, optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has gained increasing attention in biomedical research. Recent developments in OR-PAM have improved its imaging speed, but have sacrificed either the detection sensitivity or field of view or both. We have developed a wide-field fast-scanning OR-PAM by using a water-immersible MEMS scanning mirror (MEMS-ORPAM). Made of silicon with a gold coating, the MEMS mirror plate can reflect both optical and acoustic beams. Because it uses an electromagnetic driving force, the whole MEMS scanning system can be submerged in water. In MEMS-ORPAM, the optical and acoustic beams are confocally configured and simultaneously steered, which ensures uniform detection sensitivity. A B-scan imaging speed as high as 400 Hz can be achieved over a 3 mm scanning range. A diffraction-limited lateral resolution of 2.4 μm in water and a maximum imaging depth of 1.1 mm in soft tissue have been experimentally determined. Using the system, we imaged the flow dynamics of both red blood cells and carbon particles in a mouse ear in vivo. By using Evans blue dye as the contrast agent, we also imaged the flow dynamics of lymphatic vessels in a mouse tail in vivo. The results show that MEMS-OR-PAM could be a powerful tool for studying highly dynamic and time-sensitive biological phenomena.

  19. Polarization mosaicing: high dynamic range and polarization imaging in a wide field of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schechner, Yoav Y.; Nayar, Shree K.

    2003-12-01

    We present an approach for imaging the polarization state of scene points in a wide field of view, while enhancing the radiometric dynamic range of imaging systems. This is achieved by a simple modification of image mosaicking, which is a common technique in remote sensing. In traditional image mosaics, images taken in varying directions or positions are stitched to obtain a larger image. Yet, as the camera moves, it senses each scene point multiple times in overlapping regions of the raw frames. We rigidly attach to the camera a fixed, spatially varying polarization and attenuation filter. This way, the camera motion-induced multiple measurements per scene point are taken under different optical settings. This is in contrast to the redundant measurements of traditional mosaics. Computational algorithms then analyze the data to extract polarization imaging with high dynamic range across the mosaic field of view. We developed a Maximum Likelihood method to automatically register the images, in spite of the challenging spatially varying effects. Then, we use Maximum Likelihood to handle, in a single framework, variable exposures (due to transmittance variations), saturation, and partial polarization filtering. As a by product, these results enable polarization settings of cameras to change while the camera moves, alleviating the need for camera stability. This work demonstrates the modularity of the Generalized Mosaicing approach, which we recently introduced for multispectral image mosaics. The results are useful for the wealth of polarization imaging applications, in addition to mosaicking applications, particularly remote sensing. We demonstrate experimental results obtained using a system we built.

  20. Calibration of HST wide field camera for quantitative analysis of faint galaxy images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnatunga, Kavan U.; Griffiths, Richard E.; Casertano, Stefano; Neuschaefer, Lyman W.; Wyckoff, Eric W.

    1994-01-01

    We present the methods adopted to optimize the calibration of images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera (WFC) (1991-1993). Our main goal is to improve quantitative measurement of faint images, with special emphasis on the faint (I approximately 20-24 mag) stars and galaxies observed as a part of the Medium-Deep Survey. Several modifications to the standard calibration procedures have been introduced, including improved bias and dark images, and a new supersky flatfield obtained by combining a large number of relatively object-free Medium-Deep Survey exposures of random fields. The supersky flat has a pixel-to-pixel rms error of about 2.0% in F555W and of 2.4% in F785LP; large-scale variations are smaller than 1% rms. Overall, our modifications improve the quality of faint images with respect to the standard calibration by about a factor of five in photometric accuracy and about 0.3 mag in sensitivity, corresponding to about a factor of two in observing time. The relevant calibration images have been made available to the scientific community.

  1. The Wide-Area X-ray Survey in the Legacy Stripe 82 Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMassa, S.; Urry, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Comastri, A.; Glikman, E.; Richards, G.; B"ohringer, H.

    2016-06-01

    We are carrying out a wide-area X-ray survey in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 field to uncover how luminous, obscured AGN evolve over cosmic time and the role they play in galaxy evolution. Stripe 82 is a legacy field with a high level of spectroscopic completeness and rich multi-wavelength coverage from the ultraviolet to far-infrared, including Spitzer and Herschel imaging. Our Stripe 82X survey currently reaches 31 deg^{2}, with ˜6200 X-ray point sources detected at ≥5σ level. I will review the characteristics of this survey, on-going programs to target obscured AGN candidates, and how we can use the lessons learned from the synergistic multi-wavelength coverage to develop strategic plans for future surveys and missions. Finally, I will comment on how extending the Stripe 82X survey area to 100 deg^{2} will provide unprecedented insight into the high-L (Lx > 10^{45} erg/s), high-z (z > 2) AGN population.

  2. SAAO's new robotic telescope and WiNCam (Wide-field Nasmyth Camera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worters, Hannah L.; O'Connor, James E.; Carter, David B.; Loubser, Egan; Fourie, Pieter A.; Sickafoose, Amanda; Swanevelder, Pieter

    2016-08-01

    The South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) is designing and manufacturing a wide-field camera for use on two of its telescopes. The initial concept was of a Prime focus camera for the 74" telescope, an equatorial design made by Grubb Parsons, where it would employ a 61mmx61mm detector to cover a 23 arcmin diameter field of view. However, while in the design phase, SAAO embarked on the process of acquiring a bespoke 1-metre robotic alt-az telescope with a 43 arcmin field of view, which needs a homegrown instrument suite. The Prime focus camera design was thus adapted for use on either telescope, increasing the detector size to 92mmx92mm. Since the camera will be mounted on the Nasmyth port of the new telescope, it was dubbed WiNCam (Wide-field Nasmyth Camera). This paper describes both WiNCam and the new telescope. Producing an instrument that can be swapped between two very different telescopes poses some unique challenges. At the Nasmyth port of the alt-az telescope there is ample circumferential space, while on the 74 inch the available envelope is constrained by the optical footprint of the secondary, if further obscuration is to be avoided. This forces the design into a cylindrical volume of 600mm diameter x 250mm height. The back focal distance is tightly constrained on the new telescope, shoehorning the shutter, filter unit, guider mechanism, a 10mm thick window and a tip/tilt mechanism for the detector into 100mm depth. The iris shutter and filter wheel planned for prime focus could no longer be accommodated. Instead, a compact shutter with a thickness of less than 20mm has been designed in-house, using a sliding curtain mechanism to cover an aperture of 125mmx125mm, while the filter wheel has been replaced with 2 peripheral filter cartridges (6 filters each) and a gripper to move a filter into the beam. We intend using through-vacuum wall PCB technology across the cryostat vacuum interface, instead of traditional hermetic connector-based wiring. This

  3. Advanced regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control strategies for IGCC targeted towards improving power ramp-rates

    SciTech Connect

    Mahapatra, P.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    As part of ongoing R&D activities at the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training & Research (AVESTAR™) Center, this paper highlights strategies for enhancing low-level regulatory control and system-wide coordinated control strategies implemented in a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon capture. The underlying IGCC plant dynamic model contains 20 major process areas, each of which is tightly integrated with the rest of the power plant, making individual functionally-independent processes prone to routine disturbances. Single-loop feedback control although adequate to meet the primary control objective for most processes, does not take into account in advance the effect of these disturbances, making the entire power plant undergo large offshoots and/or oscillations before the feedback action has an opportunity to impact control performance. In this paper, controller enhancements ranging from retuning feedback control loops, multiplicative feed-forward control and other control techniques such as split-range control, feedback trim and dynamic compensation, applicable on various subsections of the integrated IGCC plant, have been highlighted and improvements in control responses have been given. Compared to using classical feedback-based control structure, the enhanced IGCC regulatory control architecture reduces plant settling time and peak offshoots, achieves faster disturbance rejection, and promotes higher power ramp-rates. In addition, improvements in IGCC coordinated plant-wide control strategies for “Gasifier-Lead”, “GT-Lead” and “Plantwide” operation modes have been proposed and their responses compared. The paper is concluded with a brief discussion on the potential IGCC controller improvements resulting from using advanced process control, including model predictive control (MPC), as a supervisory control layer.

  4. Advanced materials characterization based on full field deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpentier, A. Paige

    Accurate stress-strain constitutive properties are essential for understanding the complex deformation and failure mechanisms for materials with highly anisotropic mechanical properties. Among such materials, glass-fiber- and carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer--matrix composites play a critical role in advanced structural designs. The large number of different methods and specimen types currently required to generate three-dimensional allowables for structural design slows down the material characterization. Also, some of the material constitutive properties are never measured due to the prohibitive cost of the specimens needed. This work shows that simple short-beam shear (SBS) specimens are well-suited for measurement of multiple constitutive properties for composite materials and that can enable a major shift toward accurate material characterization. The material characterization is based on the digital image correlation (DIC) full-field deformation measurement. The full-field-deformation measurement enables additional flexibility for assessment of stress--strain relations, compared to the conventional strain gages. Complex strain distributions, including strong gradients, can be captured. Such flexibility enables simpler test-specimen design and reduces the number of different specimen types required for assessment of stress--strain constitutive behavior. Two key elements show advantage of using DIC in the SBS tests. First, tensile, compressive, and shear stress--strain relations are measured in a single experiment. Second, a counter-intuitive feasibility of closed-form stress and modulus models, normally applicable to long beams, is demonstrated for short-beam specimens. The modulus and stress--strain data are presented for glass/epoxy and carbon/epoxy material systems. The applicability of the developed method to static, fatigue, and impact load rates is also demonstrated. In a practical method to determine stress-strain constitutive relations, the stress

  5. A Wide-field Camera and Fully Remote Operations at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findlay, Joseph R.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Weger, James S.; Bucher, Gerald A.; Perry, Marvin C.; Myers, Adam D.; Pierce, Michael J.; Vogel, Conrad

    2016-11-01

    Upgrades at the 2.3 meter Wyoming Infrared Observatory telescope have provided the capability for fully remote operations by a single operator from the University of Wyoming campus. A line-of-sight 300 Megabit s-1 11 GHz radio link provides high-speed internet for data transfer and remote operations that include several realtime video feeds. Uninterruptable power is ensured by a 10 kVA battery supply for critical systems and a 55 kW autostart diesel generator capable of running the entire observatory for up to a week. The construction of a new four-element prime-focus corrector with fused-silica elements allows imaging over a 40‧ field of view with a new 40962 UV-sensitive prime-focus camera and filter wheel. A new telescope control system facilitates the remote operations model and provides 20″ rms pointing over the usable sky. Taken together, these improvements pave the way for a new generation of sky surveys supporting space-based missions and flexible-cadence observations advancing emerging astrophysical priorities such as planet detection, quasar variability, and long-term time-domain campaigns.

  6. Wide-field multispectral super-resolution imaging using spin-dependent fluorescence in nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Edward H; Gaathon, Ophir; Trusheim, Matthew E; Englund, Dirk

    2013-05-08

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy have enabled spatial resolution below the diffraction limit by localizing multiple temporally or spectrally distinguishable fluorophores. Here, we introduce a super-resolution technique that deterministically controls the brightness of uniquely addressable, photostable emitters. We modulate the fluorescence brightness of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-)) centers in nanodiamonds through magnetic resonance techniques. Using a CCD camera, this "deterministic emitter switch microscopy" (DESM) technique enables super-resolution imaging with localization down to 12 nm across a 35 × 35 μm(2) area. DESM is particularly well suited for biological applications such as multispectral particle tracking since fluorescent nanodiamonds are not only cytocompatible but also nonbleaching and bright. We observe fluorescence count rates exceeding 1.5 × 10(6) photons per second from single NV(-) centers at saturation. When combined with emerging NV(-)-based techniques for sensing magnetic and electric fields, DESM opens the door to rapid, super-resolution imaging for tracking and sensing applications in the life and physical sciences.

  7. Searching for fast optical transients by means of a wide-field monitoring observations with high temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Plokhotnichenko, V.; Bondar, S.; Ivanov, E.; Perkov, A.; Greco, G.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.

    We discuss the strategy of search for fast optical transients accompanying gamma-ray bursts by means of continuous monitoring of wide sky fields with high temporal resolution. We describe the design, performance and results of our cameras, FAVOR and TORTORA. Also we discuss the perspectives of this strategy and possible design of next-generation equipment for wide-field monitoring which will be able to detect optical transients and to study their color and polarization properties with high time resolution.

  8. A small animal time-resolved optical tomography platform using wide-field excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Vivek

    Small animal imaging plays a critical role in present day biomedical research by filling an important gap in the translation of research from the bench to the bedside. Optical techniques constitute an emerging imaging modality which have tremendous potential in preclinical applications. Optical imaging methods are capable of non-invasive assessment of the functional and molecular characteristics of biological tissue. The three-dimensional optical imaging technique, referred to as diffuse optical tomography, provides an approach for the whole-body imaging of small animal models and can provide volumetric maps of tissue functional parameters (e.g. blood volume, oxygen saturation etc.) and/or provide 3D localization and quantification of fluorescence-based molecular markers in vivo. However, the complex mathematical reconstruction problem associated with optical tomography and the cumbersome instrumental designs limits its adoption as a high-throughput quantitative whole-body imaging modality in current biomedical research. The development of new optical imaging paradigms is thus necessary for a wide-acceptance of this new technology. In this thesis, the design, development, characterization and optimization of a small animal optical tomography system is discussed. Specifically, the platform combines a highly sensitive time-resolved imaging paradigm with multi-spectral excitation capability and CCD-based detection to provide a system capable of generating spatially, spectrally and temporally dense measurement datasets. The acquisition of such data sets however can take long and translate to often unrealistic acquisition times when using the classical point source based excitation scheme. The novel approach in the design of this platform is the adoption of a wide-field excitation scheme which employs extended excitation sources and in the process allows an estimated ten-fold reduction in the acquisition time. The work described herein details the design of the imaging

  9. A Comprehensive Study of ULIRGs in the Herschel Very Wide Field Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haojing

    Extreme starbursting galaxies exist at all redshifts, and most of them are so heavily obscured by dust that they are Ultra-Luminous InfraRed Galaxies (ULIRGs) while being faint in optical to near-IR. The latest example is at record-high z=6.337, approaching the end of the reionization. There have been numerous suggestions that understanding ULIRG is critical in constructing a comprehensive picture of galaxy formation history. These range from the hypothesis three decades ago that the ULIRG phase is the prelude to QSO and large ellipticals, to the recent tentative evidence that ULIRG could make a large (if not dominant) contribution to the global star formation rate density (GSFRD) at z>1. However, the exact nature of ULIRG and their role in galaxy assembly still remain illusive, largely due to the limited sample size and the severe source confusion problem in the far-IR (FIR). The very wide field surveys by Herschel have provided the best opportunity to date to systematically study ULIRG beyond the local universe, most importantly because of their wide coverage and high sensitivity to probe large volumes to high redshifts and the multiple FIR bands that allow for direct measurement of the IR luminosities. We propose to construct the largest possible ULIRG sample in these fields at all redshifts, and to study the evolution of ULIRGs. We will concentrate on the HerMES, the H-ATLAS and the HerS programs whose data are already public. While the confusion problem still persists in these Herschel data, we have demonstrated that it is possible to directly use the position priors from optical images to decompose the candidate contributors to a given Herschel source if its S/N suffices (Yan et al. 2014). This is a significant improvement over previous studies where higher-resolution mid-IR (mostly Spitzer MIPS 24-micron) data had to be used as the proxies to the FIR source locations, because (1) such proxy images also suffer from the blending problem in the first place and

  10. WIDE-FIELD PRECISION KINEMATICS OF THE M87 GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Strader, Jay; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Beasley, Michael A.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Tamura, Naoyuki; Sharples, Ray M.; Arimoto, Nobuo

    2011-12-01

    We present the most extensive combined photometric and spectroscopic study to date of the enormous globular cluster (GC) system around M87, the central giant elliptical galaxy in the nearby Virgo Cluster. Using observations from DEIMOS and the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer at Keck, and Hectospec on the Multiple Mirror Telescope, we derive new, precise radial velocities for 451 GCs around M87, with projected radii from {approx}5 to 185 kpc. We combine these measurements with literature data for a total sample of 737 objects, which we use for a re-examination of the kinematics of the GC system of M87. The velocities are analyzed in the context of archival wide-field photometry and a novel Hubble Space Telescope catalog of half-light radii, which includes sizes for 344 spectroscopically confirmed clusters. We use this unique catalog to identify 18 new candidate ultracompact dwarfs and to help clarify the relationship between these objects and true GCs. We find much lower values for the outer velocity dispersion and rotation of the GC system than in earlier papers and also differ from previous work in seeing no evidence for a transition in the inner halo to a potential dominated by the Virgo Cluster, nor for a truncation of the stellar halo. We find little kinematical evidence for an intergalactic GC population. Aided by the precision of the new velocity measurements, we see significant evidence for kinematical substructure over a wide range of radii, indicating that M87 is in active assembly. A simple, scale-free analysis finds less dark matter within {approx}85 kpc than in other recent work, reducing the tension between X-ray and optical results. In general, out to a projected radius of {approx}150 kpc, our data are consistent with the notion that M87 is not dynamically coupled to the Virgo Cluster; the core of Virgo may be in the earliest stages of assembly.

  11. Design of wide-field submillimeter-wave camera using SIS photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Hiroshi; Ariyoshi, Seiichiro; Otani, Chiko; Ezawa, Hajime; Kobayashi, Jun; Mori, Yuko; Nagata, Hirohisa; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.; Fujiwara, Mikio; Akiba, Makoto; Hosako, Iwao

    2004-10-01

    SIS photon detectors are niobium-based superconducting direct detectors for submillimeter-wave that show superior performance when compared with bolometric detectors for ground-based observations. We present the design and development of the SIS photon detectors together with optical and cryogenic components for wide field continuum observation system on Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). Using antenna coupled distributed junctions, SIS photon detectors give wide band response in a 650-GHz atmospheric window as well as high current sensitivity, shot noise limited operation, fast response and high dynamic range. Optical noise equivalent power (NEP) was measured to be 1.6x10-16 W/Hz0.5 that is less than the background photon fluctuation limit for ground based submillimeter-wave observations. Fabrication of focal plane array with 9 detector pixels is underway to install in ASTE. Readout electronics with Si-JFETs operating at about 100 K will be used for this array. Development of readout electronics for larger array is based on GaAs-JFETs operating at 0.3 K. For the purpose of installing 100 element array of SIS photon detectors, we have developed remotely operable low-vibration cryostat, which now cools bolometers for 350, 450, 850-µm observations down to 0.34 K. GM-type 4-K cooler and He3/He4 sorption cooler is used, which can be remotely recycled to keep detectors at 0.34 K. Since we have large optical window for this cryostat, sapphire cryogenic window is used to block infrared radiation. The sapphire window is ante-reflection coated with SiO2 by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The transmittance of the cryogenic window at 650 GHz is more than 95%.

  12. Afar-wide Crustal Strain Field from Multiple InSAR Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagli, C.; Wright, T. J.; Wang, H.; Calais, E.; Bennati Rassion, L. S.; Ebinger, C. J.; Lewi, E.

    2010-12-01

    Onset of a rifting episode in the Dabbahu volcanic segment, Afar (Ethiopia), in 2005 renewed interest in crustal deformation studies in the area. As a consequence, an extensive geodetic data set, including InSAR and GPS measurements have been acquired over Afar and hold great potential towards improving our understanding of the extensional processes that operate during the final stages of continental rupture. The current geodetic observational and modelling strategy has focused on detailed, localised studies of dyke intrusions and eruptions mainly in the Dabbahu segment. However, an eruption in the Erta ‘Ale volcanic segment in 2008, and cluster of earthquakes observed in the Tat Ale segment, are testament to activity elsewhere in Afar. Here we make use of the vast geodetic dataset available to obtain strain information over the whole Afar depression. A systematic analysis of all the volcanic segments, including Dabbahu, Manda-Hararo, Alayta, Tat ‘Ale Erta Ale and the Djibouti deformation zone, is undertaken. We use InSAR data from multiple tracks together with available GPS measurements to obtain a velocity field model for Afar. We use over 300 radar images acquired by the Envisat satellite in both descending and ascending orbits, from 12 distinct tracks in image and wide swath modes, spanning the time period from October 2005 to present time. We obtain the line-of-sight deformation rates from each InSAR track using a network approach and then combine the InSAR velocities with the GPS observations, as suggested by Wright and Wang (2010) following the method of England and Molnar (1997). A mesh is constructed over the Afar area and then we solve for the horizontal and vertical velocities on each node. The resultant full 3D Afar-wide velocity field shows where current strains are being accumulated within the various volcanic segments of Afar, the width of the plate boundary deformation zone and possible connections between distinct volcanic segments on a

  13. Systems, computer-implemented methods, and tangible computer-readable storage media for wide-field interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G. (Inventor); Leisawitz, David T. (Inventor); Rinehart, Stephen A. (Inventor); Memarsadeghi, Nargess (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Disclosed herein are systems, computer-implemented methods, and tangible computer-readable storage media for wide field imaging interferometry. The method includes for each point in a two dimensional detector array over a field of view of an image: gathering a first interferogram from a first detector and a second interferogram from a second detector, modulating a path-length for a signal from an image associated with the first interferogram in the first detector, overlaying first data from the modulated first detector and second data from the second detector, and tracking the modulating at every point in a two dimensional detector array comprising the first detector and the second detector over a field of view for the image. The method then generates a wide-field data cube based on the overlaid first data and second data for each point. The method can generate an image from the wide-field data cube.

  14. KMTNet: a network of 1.6-m wide field optical telescopes installed at three southern observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Seung-Lee; Cha, Sang-Mok; Lee, Yongseok; Kim, Dong-Jin; Park, Byeong-Gon; Lee, Dong-Joo; Koo, Jae-Rim; Hong, Kyeongsoo; Lee, Jae Woo; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun; Lim, Beomdu; Lim, Jin-Sun; Gho, Seung-Won; Kim, Min-Jun

    2015-08-01

    Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) have installed three identical 1.6-m telescopes, called Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet), which cover 2 x 2 degree field of view with the plate scale of 0.4 arcsec/pixel at three observatories - CTIO, SSO and SAAO in southern hemisphere. The uniqueness of the system is the uninterupted 24-hour monitoring with a wide field optics in southern hemisphere. The telescope adopts prime focus using a parabolic mirror and four spherical flattening lenses. The structural design and driving systems are modified from the degin of 2MASS telescope. The one piece filter-shutter assembly has a sliding shutter and four 310-mm square filters. Each observation system produces a 680MB size image file at site and the images are transfered to KASI data center using the Global Ring Network for Advanced Application Development (GLORIAD) network with the band width of 50Mbps in average. The main science goal of the KMTNet is to discover Earth like extra solar planet using the microlensing technique during bulge season, and 50% of the total observation time is allocated for the science program solely. The other telescope times are allocated for pre-selected seven science programs during non-bulge season. From the test observation, we verify that the most important two requirements are satisfied: 10 arcsec in RMS for the pointing accuracy and 1 arcsec of delivered image quality in I-band. In this presentation, we introduce finally installed system at each observatory and its observational performance obtained from the test observation.

  15. Evaluation of illumination system uniformity for wide-field biomedical hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Travis W.; Siri Luthman, A.; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2017-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) systems collect both spatial (morphological) and spectral (chemical) information from a sample. HSI can provide sensitive analysis for biological and medical applications, for example, simultaneously measuring reflectance and fluorescence properties of a tissue, which together with structural information could improve early cancer detection and tumour characterisation. Illumination uniformity is a critical pre-condition for quantitative data extraction from an HSI system. Non-uniformity can cause glare, specular reflection and unwanted shading, which negatively impact statistical analysis procedures used to extract abundance of different chemical species. Here, we model and evaluate several illumination systems frequently used in wide-field biomedical imaging to test their potential for HSI. We use the software LightTools and FRED. The analysed systems include: a fibre ring light; a light emitting diode (LED) ring; and a diffuse scattering dome. Each system is characterised for spectral, spatial, and angular uniformity, as well as transfer efficiency. Furthermore, an approach to measure uniformity using the Kullback–Leibler divergence (KLD) is introduced. The KLD is generalisable to arbitrary illumination shapes, making it an attractive approach for characterising illumination distributions. Although the systems are quite comparable in their spatial and spectral uniformity, the most uniform angular distribution is achieved using a diffuse scattering dome, yielding a contrast of 0.503 and average deviation of 0.303 over a ±60° field of view with a 3.9% model error in the angular domain. Our results suggest that conventional illumination sources can be applied in HSI, but in the case of low light levels, bespoke illumination sources may offer improved performance.

  16. Dual-Conjugate Adaptive Optics Instrument for Wide-Field Retinal Imaging - Oral Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaung, Jörgen; Owner-Petersen, Mette; Popovic, Zoran

    2008-01-01

    To date only conventional single-conjugate adaptive optics (SCAO) systems are used to correct ocular aberrations. A major shortcoming of SCAO is the severely restricted corrected field of view. This can be solved with multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO), a solution that is costly and gives bulky instruments. Another problem, especially in the study of the human eye, is unwanted light from parasitic source reflections and light from unwanted object regions. We present a dual-conjugate adaptive optics (DCAO) demonstrator that will enable wide field high resolution imaging of the human retina in vivo, implementing five retinal guide stars, two OKO micromachined membrane deformable mirrors; a 15 mm 37 channel pupil conjugate mirror, and a 40 mm 79 channel mirror conjugated to a plane in the vitreous body approximately 3 mm in front of the retina. The AO system runs with a closed-loop measurement wavelength of 835 nm. It incorporates an array of collimator lenses to spatially filter the light from all guide stars using only one adjustable iris, and a single camera to image the Hartmann patterns of multiple reference sources. Optical simulations in Zemax indicate an increase of the retinal isoplanatic patch from a radius of 0.5 degrees using SCAO to approximately 3.5 degrees or more using DCAO. The advantage of this is a clinically useful imaging area that is approximately 50 times the size of an SCAO system. This is corroborated by measurements on a model eye while performing SCAO, ground layer adaptive optics (GLAO), and DCAO correction.

  17. Optimizing X-Ray Optical Prescriptions for Wide-Field Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; O'Dell, S. L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray telescopes with spatial resolution optimized over the field of view (FOV) are of special interest for missions, such as WFXT, focused on moderately deep and deep surveys of the x-ray sky, and for solar x-ray observations. Here we report on the present status of an on-going study of the properties of Wolter I and polynominal grazing incidence designs with a view to gain a deeper insight into their properties and simply the design process. With these goals in mind, we present some results in the complementary topics of (1) properties of Wolter I x-ray optics and polynominal x-ray optic ray tracing. Of crucial importance for the design of wide-field x-ray optics is the optimization criteria. Here we have adopted the minimization of a merit function, M, which measures the spatial resolution averaged over the FOV: M= ((integral of d phi) between the limits of 0 and 2 pi) (integral of d theta theta w(theta) sigma square (theta,phi) between the limits of 0 and theta(sub FOV)) (integral of d phi between the limits of 0 and phi/4) (Integral of d theta theta w(theta) between the limits of 0 and theta(sub FOV) where w(theta(sub 1) is a weighting function and Merit function: sigma-square (theta, phi) = summation of (x,y,z) [-<(x,y,z)> (exp 2)] is the spatial variance for a point source on the sky at polar and azimuthal off-axis angles (theta,phi).

  18. Wide-field hard x-ray survey telescope: ProtoEXIST1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Grindlay, J. E.; Chammas, N.; Allen, B.; Copete, A.; Said, B.; Burke, M.; Howell, J.; Gauron, T.; Baker, R. G.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Sheikh, S.; Gehrels, N.; Cook, W. R.; Burnham, J. A.; Harrison, F. A.; Collins, J.; Labov, S.; Garson, A., III; Krawczynski, H.

    2007-09-01

    We report our progress on the development of pixellated imaging CZT detector arrays for our first-generation balloon-borne wide-field hard X-ray (20 - 600 keV) telescope, ProtoEXIST1. Our ProtoEXIST program is a pathfinder for the High Energy Telescope (HET) on the Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey telescope (EXIST), a proposed implementation of the Black Hole Finder Probe. ProtoEXIST1 consists of four independent coded-aperture telescopes with close-tiled (~0.4 mm gaps) CZT detectors that preserve their 2.5mm pixel pitch. Multiple shielding/field-of-view configurations are planned to identify optimal geometry for the HET in EXIST. The primary technical challenge in ProtoEXIST is the development of large area, close-tiled modules of imaging CZT detectors (1000 cm2 for ProtoEXIST1), with all readout and control systems for the ASIC readout vertically stacked. We describe the overall telescope configuration of ProtoEXIST1 and review the current development status of the CZT detectors, from individual detector crystal units (DCUs) to a full detector module (DM). We have built the first units of each component for the detector plane and have completed a few Rev2 DCUs (2x2 cm2), which are under a series of tests. Bare DCUs (pre-crystal bonding) show high, uniform ASIC yield (~70%) and ~30% reduction in electronics noise compared to the Rev1 equivalent. A Rev1 DCU already achieved ~1.2% FWHM at 662 keV, and preliminary analysis of the initial radiation tests on a Rev2 DCU shows ~ 4 keV FWHM at 60 keV (vs. 4.7 keV for Rev1). We therefore expect about <=1% FWHM at 662 keV with the Rev2 detectors.

  19. Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Landreth

    2007-12-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was

  20. The on-chip guiding system of the wide-field infrared camera at CFHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Loic; Riopel, Martin; Teeple, Douglas; Ward, Jeff; Barrick, Greg

    2005-08-01

    The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) is commissioning a new Wide field Infrared Camera (WIRCam) that uses a mosaic of 4 HAWAII-2RG near-infrared detectors manufactured by Rockwell. At the heart of the instrument is an On-Chip Guiding System (OCGS) that exploits the unique parallel science/guide frame readout capability of the HAWAII-2RG detectors. A small subsample of each array is continuously read at a rate of 50 Hz while the integration of the science image is ongoing with the full arrays. Each of these guiding windows is centered on a star to provide an error signal for the telescope guiding. An Image Stabilizer Unit (ISU) (i.e. a tip-tilt silica plate), provides the corrections. A Proportional Integral Differential (PID) closed loop controls the ISU such that telescope tracking is corrected at a rate of 5 Hz. The guide window size and readout rate are adjustable but typical numbers are 8×8-16×16 boxes read at 50 or 1.5 Hz. This paper presents the technical architecture of the guiding system and performance measurements on the sky with WIRCam.

  1. Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) slitless spectrometer: design, prototype, and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Qian; Content, David A.; Dominguez, Margaret; Emmett, Thomas; Griesmann, Ulf; Hagopian, John; Kruk, Jeffrey; Marx, Catherine; Pasquale, Bert; Wallace, Thomas; Whipple, Arthur

    2016-07-01

    The slitless spectrometer plays an important role in the WFIRST mission for the survey of emission-line galaxies. This will be an unprecedented very wide field, HST quality 3D survey of emission line galaxies1. The concept of the compound grism as a slitless spectrometer has been presented previously. The presentation briefly discusses the challenges and solutions of the optical design, and recent specification updates, as well as a brief comparison between the prototype and the latest design. However, the emphasis of this paper is the progress of the grism prototype: the fabrication and test of the complicated diffractive optical elements and powered prism, as well as grism assembly alignment and testing. Especially how to use different tools and methods, such as IR phase shift and wavelength shift interferometry, to complete the element and assembly tests. The paper also presents very encouraging results from recent element tests to assembly tests. Finally we briefly touch the path forward plan to test the spectral characteristic, such as spectral resolution and response.

  2. Managing the Development of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irace, William; Cutri, Roc; Duval, Valerie; Eisenhardt, Peter; Elwell, John; Greanias, George; Heinrichsen, Ingolf; Howard, Joan; Liu, Feng-Chuan; Royer, Donald; Wright, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a NASA Medium-Class Explorer (MIDEX) mission, is surveying the entire sky in four bands from 3.4 to 22 microns with a sensitivity hundreds to hundreds of thousands times better than previous all-sky surveys at these wavelengths. The single WISE instrument consists of a 40 cm three-mirror anastigmatic telescope, a two-stage solid hydrogen cryostat, a scan mirror mechanism, and reimaging optics giving 6" resolution (full-width-half-maximum). WISE was placed into a Sun-synchronous polar orbit on a Delta II 7320 launch vehicle on December 14, 2009. NASA selected WISE as a MIDEX in 2002 following a rigorous competitive selection process. To gain further confidence in WISE, NASA extended the development period one year with an option to cancel the mission if certain criteria were not met. MIDEX missions are led by the principal investigator who in this case delegated day-to-day management to the project manager. With a cost cap and relatively short development schedule, it was essential for all WISE partners to work seamlessly together. This was accomplished with an integrated management team representing all key partners and disciplines. The project was developed on budget and on schedule in spite of the need to surmount significant technical challenges. This paper describes our management approach, key challenges and critical decisions made. Results are described from a programmatic, technical and scientific point of view. Lessons learned are offered for projects of this type.

  3. Clinically compatible flexible wide-field multi-color fluorescence endoscopy with a porcine colon model

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gyugnseok; Park, Youngrong; Yoo, Su Woong; Hwang, Soonjoo; Chin-Yu, Alexey V. Dan; Ryu, Yeon-Mi; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Do, Eun-Ju; Kim, Ki Hean; Kim, Sungjee; Myung, Seung-Jae; Chung, Euiheon

    2017-01-01

    Early detection of structural or molecular changes in dysplastic epithelial tissues is crucial for cancer screening and surveillance. Multi-targeting molecular endoscopic fluorescence imaging may improve noninvasive detection of precancerous lesions in the colon. Here, we report the first clinically compatible, wide-field-of-view, multi-color fluorescence endoscopy with a leached fiber bundle scope using a porcine model. A porcine colon model that resembles the human colon is used for the detection of surrogate tumors composed of multiple biocompatible fluorophores (FITC, ICG, and heavy metal-free quantum dots (hfQDs)). With an ex vivo porcine colon tumor model, molecular imaging with hfQDs conjugated with MMP14 antibody was achieved by spraying molecular probes on a mucosa layer that contains xenograft tumors. With an in vivo porcine colon embedded with surrogate tumors, target-to-background ratios of 3.36 ± 0.43, 2.70 ± 0.72, and 2.10 ± 0.13 were achieved for FITC, ICG, and hfQD probes, respectively. This promising endoscopic technology with molecular contrast shows the capacity to reveal hidden tumors and guide treatment strategy decisions. PMID:28270983

  4. (Sn)DICE: A Calibration System Designed for Wide Field Imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnault, N.; Barrelet, E.; Guyonnet, A.; Juramy, C.; Rocci, P.-F.; Le Guillou, L.; Schahmanèche, K.; Villa, F.

    2016-05-01

    Dark Energy studies with type Ia supernovae set very tight constraints on the photometric calibration of the imagers used to detect the supernovae and follow up their flux variations. Among the key challenges is the measurement of the shape and normalization of the instrumental throughput. The DICE system was developed by members of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) , building upon the lessons learnt working with the MegaCam imager. It consists in a very stable light source, placed in the telescope enclosure, and generating compact, conical beams, yielding an almost flat illumination of the imager focal plane. The calibration light is generated by narrow spectrum LEDs selected to cover the entire wavelength range of the imager. It is monitored in real time using control photodiodes. A first DICE demonstrator, SnDICE has been installed at CFHT. A second generation instrument (SkyDICE) has been installed in the enclosure of the SkyMapper telescope. We present the main goals of the project. We discuss the main difficulties encoutered when trying to calibrate a wide field imager, such as MegaCam (or SkyMapper) using such a calibrated light source.

  5. The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE): Mission Description and Initial On-Orbit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Edward L.; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Mainzer, Amy; Ressler, Michael E.; Cutri, Roc M.; Jarrett, Thomas; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Padgett, Deborah; McMillan, Robert S.; Skrutskie,Michael; Stanford, S. A.; Cohen, Martin; Walker, Russell G.; Mather, John C.; Leisawitz, David; Gautier, Thomas N., III; McLean, Ian; Benford, Dominic; Lonsdale,Carol J.; Blain, Andrew; Mendez,Bryan; Irace, William R.; Duval, Valerie; Liu, Fengchuan; Royer, Don

    2010-01-01

    The all sky surveys done by the Palomar Observatory Schmidt, the European Southern Observatory Schmidt, and the United Kingdom Schmidt, the InfraRed Astronomical Satellite and the 2 Micron All Sky Survey have proven to be extremely useful tools for astronomy with value that lasts for decades. The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer is mapping the whole sky following its launch on 14 December 2009. WISE began surveying the sky on 14 Jan 2010 and completed its first full coverage of the sky on July 17. The survey will continue to cover the sky a second time until the cryogen is exhausted (anticipated in November 2010). WISE is achieving 5 sigma point source sensitivities better than 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6 mJy in unconfused regions on the ecliptic in bands centered at wavelengths of 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 micrometers. Sensitivity improves toward the ecliptic poles due to denser coverage and lower zodiacal background. The angular resolution is 6.1", 6.4", 6.5" and 12.0" at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 micrometers, and the astrometric precision for high SNR sources is better than 0.15".

  6. Automated segmentation of oral mucosa from wide-field OCT images (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldan, Ryan N.; Lee, Anthony M. D.; Cahill, Lucas; Liu, Kelly; MacAulay, Calum; Poh, Catherine F.; Lane, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) can discriminate morphological tissue features important for oral cancer detection such as the presence or absence of basement membrane and epithelial thickness. We previously reported an OCT system employing a rotary-pullback catheter capable of in vivo, rapid, wide-field (up to 90 x 2.5mm2) imaging in the oral cavity. Due to the size and complexity of these OCT data sets, rapid automated image processing software that immediately displays important tissue features is required to facilitate prompt bed-side clinical decisions. We present an automated segmentation algorithm capable of detecting the epithelial surface and basement membrane in 3D OCT images of the oral cavity. The algorithm was trained using volumetric OCT data acquired in vivo from a variety of tissue types and histology-confirmed pathologies spanning normal through cancer (8 sites, 21 patients). The algorithm was validated using a second dataset of similar size and tissue diversity. We demonstrate application of the algorithm to an entire OCT volume to map epithelial thickness, and detection of the basement membrane, over the tissue surface. These maps may be clinically useful for delineating pre-surgical tumor margins, or for biopsy site guidance.

  7. Telescope Fabra ROA Montsec: A New Robotic Wide Field Baker–Nunn Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fors, Octavi; Núñez, Jorge; Muiños, José Luis; Montojo, Francisco Javier; Baena-Gallé, Roberto; Boloix, Jaime; Morcillo, Ricardo; Merino, María Teresa; Downey, Elwood C.; Mazur, Michael J.

    2013-05-01

    A Baker–Nunn Camera (BNC), originally installed at the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada (ROA) in 1958, was refurbished and robotized. The new facility, called Telescope Fabra ROA Montsec (TFRM), was installed at the Observatori Astronòmic del Montsec (OAdM). The process of refurbishment is described in detail. Most of the steps of the refurbishment project were accomplished by purchasing commercial components, which involve little posterior engineering assembling work. The TFRM is a 0.5 m aperture f/0.96 optically modified BNC, which offers a unique combination of instrumental specifications: fully robotic and remote operation, wide field of view (4°.4 × 4°.4), moderate limiting magnitude (V ∼ 19.5 mag), ability of tracking at arbitrary right ascension (α) and declination (δ) rates, as well as opening and closing CCD shutter at will during an exposure. Nearly all kinds of image survey programs can benefit from those specifications. Apart from other less time-consuming programs, since the beginning of science TFRM operations we have been conducting two specific and distinct surveys: super-Earths transiting around M-type dwarfs stars, and geostationary debris in the context of Space Situational Awareness/Space Surveillance and Tracking (SSA/SST) programs. Preliminary results for both cases will be shown.

  8. WIDE-FIELD MULTIBAND PHOTOMETRY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS IN THE FORNAX GALAXY CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hak-Sub; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Chung, Chul; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Lee, Young-Wook; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Kim, Sang Chul; Kim, Eunhyeuk

    2013-01-20

    We present wide-field multiband photometry of globular cluster (GC) systems in NGC 1399, NGC 1404, and NGC 1387 located in the central region of the Fornax galaxy cluster. Observation was carried out through U, B, V, and I bands, which marks one of the widest and deepest U-band studies on extragalactic GC systems. The present U-band photometry enables us to significantly reduce the contamination by a factor of two for faint sources (V {sub 0} {approx} 23.5). The main results based on some 2000 GC candidates around NGC 1399, NGC 1404, and NGC 1387 are as follows: (1) the GC system in each galaxy exhibits bimodal color distributions in all colors examined, but the shape of color histograms varies systematically depending on colors; (2) NGC 1399 shows that the mean colors of both blue and red GCs become bluer with increasing galactocentric radius; (3) NGC 1399 shows overabundance of GCs in the directions of NGC 1404 and NGC 1387, indicating their ongoing interactions; and (4) NGC 1399 also exhibits a {approx}0.'5 offset between the center of the inner GC distribution and the galaxy's optical center, suggesting that NGC 1399 is not yet dynamically relaxed and may be undergoing merger events.

  9. Intraoperative detection and removal of microscopic residual sarcoma using wide-field imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mito, Jeffrey K; Ferrer, Jorge M; Brigman, Brian E; Lee, Chang-Lung; Dodd, Rebecca D; Eward, William C; Marshall, Lisa F; Cuneo, Kyle C; Carter, Jessica E; Ramasunder, Shalini; Kim, Yongbaek; Lee, W David; Griffith, Linda G; Bawendi, Moungi G; Kirsch, David G

    2012-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND: The goal of limb-sparing surgery for a soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity is to remove all malignant cells while preserving limb function. After initial surgery, microscopic residual disease in the tumor bed will cause a local recurrence in approximately 33% of patients with sarcoma. To help identify these patients, the authors developed an in vivo imaging system to investigate the suitability of molecular imaging for intraoperative visualization. METHODS: A primary mouse model of soft tissue sarcoma and a wide field-of-view imaging device were used to investigate a series of exogenously administered, near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes activated by cathepsin proteases for real-time intraoperative imaging. RESULTS: The authors demonstrated that exogenously administered cathepsin-activated probes can be used for image-guided surgery to identify microscopic residual NIR fluorescence in the tumor beds of mice. The presence of residual NIR fluorescence was correlated with microscopic residual sarcoma and local recurrence. The removal of residual NIR fluorescence improved local control. CONCLUSIONS: The authors concluded that their technique has the potential to be used for intraoperative image-guided surgery to identify microscopic residual disease in patients with cancer. Cancer 2012. © 2012 American Cancer Society. PMID:22437667

  10. Wide-band acousto-optic deflectors for large field of view two-photon microscope.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Runhua; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2012-04-01

    Acousto-optic deflector (AOD) is an attractive scanner for two-photon microscopy because it can provide fast and versatile laser scanning and does not involve any mechanical movements. However, due to the small scan range of available AOD, the field of view (FOV) of the AOD-based microscope is typically smaller than that of the conventional galvanometer-based microscope. Here, we developed a novel wide-band AOD to enlarge the scan angle. Considering the maximum acceptable acoustic attenuation in the acousto-optic crystal, relatively lower operating frequencies and moderate aperture were adopted. The custom AOD was able to provide 60 MHz 3-dB bandwidth and 80% peak diffraction efficiency at 840 nm wavelength. Based on a pair of such AOD, a large FOV two-photon microscope was built with a FOV up to 418.5 μm (40× objective). The spatiotemporal dispersion was compensated simultaneously with a single custom-made prism. By means of dynamic power modulation, the variation of laser intensity within the FOV was reduced below 5%. The lateral and axial resolution of the system were 0.58-2.12 μm and 2.17-3.07 μm, respectively. Pollen grain images acquired by this system were presented to demonstrate the imaging capability at different positions across the entire FOV.

  11. Wide-field SCUBA-2 observations of NGC 2264: submillimetre clumps and filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckle, J. V.; Richer, J. S.

    2015-10-01

    We present wide-field observations of the NGC 2264 molecular cloud in the dust continuum at 850 and 450 μm using SCUBA-2 on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Using 12CO 3 → 2 molecular line data, we determine that emission from CO contaminates the 850 μm emission at levels ˜30 per cent in localized regions associated with high-velocity molecular outflows. Much higher contamination levels of 60 per cent are seen in shocked regions near the massive star S Mon. If not removed, the levels of CO contamination would contribute an extra 13 per cent to the dust mass in NGC 2264. We use the FELLWALKER routine to decompose the dust into clumpy structures, and a Hessian-based routine to decompose the dust into filamentary structures. The filaments can be described as a hub-filament structure, with lower column density filaments radiating from the NGC 2264 C protocluster hub. Above mean filament column densities of 2.4 × 1022 cm-2, star formation proceeds with the formation of two or more protostars. Below these column densities, filaments are starless, or contain only a single protostar.

  12. Wide-Field Emission-Line Imaging of Galactic Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. Frank; Smith, R. Chris

    2001-02-01

    We propose to complete narrow-band emission-line imaging of all the southern supernova remnants (SNRs) for which optical emission has been reported. The great majority of these have never been systematically studied using CCDs. Images in Hα, S II, and O III will enable us to distinguish shock-heated SNR filaments from photo-ionized nebulosity and to search for rare, ejecta-dominated filaments. With matched continuum images we will subtract the stars to give pure emission-line images and reveal faint diffuse features. The results will be used in conjunction with X-ray and radio images for multi-wavelength studies of SNRs and the ISM. We plan to assemble an emission-line atlas of SNRs, to be available in both published form and on-line as digital images. This study requires the unique wide field and fast beam of the Schmidt, so we request sufficient time to complete it in the last semester of this instrument's availability. In addition, we plan deep, broad-band imaging of the SN 1006 remnant in attempt at the first measurement of optical synchrotron emission behind an SNR shock. Detection at the level expected from extrapolation of radio and X-ray power-law spectra would support the picture that Fermi acceleration of electrons to TeV energies produces both X-ray emission and cosmic rays, while significant upper limits would raise questions about this picture.

  13. Spectro-spatial reconstruction of Wide Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanola-Parramon, Roser; Leisawitz, David; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Iacchetta, Alexander; Maher, Stephen F.; Rinehart, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The Wide-field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) is a double Fourier interferometer (DF) operating at optical wavelengths, and provides data that are highly representative of those from a space-based far-infrared interferometer like SPIRIT. Developed at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, this testbed produces high-quality interferometric data and is capable of observing spatially and spectrally complex hyperspectral test scenes, from geometrically simple to astronomically representative test scenes. Here we present the reconstruction of WIIT data via spectro-spatial Fourier transformation, where the spectral domain and the spatial domain are synthesized independently, offering the opportunity to apply algorithms classically used in spectroscopy and radio interferometry. For this current study, the test scene under consideration spatially consists of four reference point sources intended for spectral and spatial calibration, and six science sources, comprised of binary systems. Each binary pair member has a unique spectrum. Our results demonstrate the synthesis of real double Fourier interferometry data, and we compare them with synthesized datacubes reconstructed from simulated data generated by the Far-infrared Interferometer Instrument Simulator (FIInS).

  14. Tomographic control for wide field AO systems on extremely large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, C.; Conan, J.-M.; Fusco, T.; Neichel, B.

    2010-07-01

    We investigate in this article tomographic control using both Laser and Natural Guide Stars (LGS and NGS) in the particular framework of the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) Wide Field Adaptive Optics (WFAO) modules design. A similar global control strategy has been indeed derived for both the Laser Tomographic Adaptive Optics (LTAO) and Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) modules of the E-ELT, due to similar constraints. This control strategy leads in both cases to a split control of low order modes measured thanks to NGS and high order modes measured thanks to LGS. We investigate here this split tomographic control, compared to an optimal coupled solution. To support our analysis, a dedicated simulation code has been developed. Indeed, due to the huge complexity of the EELT, fast simulation tools must be considered to explore quickly the tomographic issues. We describe our control strategy which has lead to considering split tomographic control. First results on Tomography for E-ELT WFAO systems are then presented and discussed.

  15. Pulsed light imaging for wide-field dosimetry of photodynamic therapy in the skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Scott C.; Sexton, Kristian; Chapman, Michael Shane; Maytin, Edward; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy using aminoluvelinic acid (ALA) is an FDA-approved treatment for actinic keratoses, pre-cancerous skin lesions which pose a significant risk for immunocompromised individuals, such as organ transplant recipients. While PDT is generally effective, response rates vary, largely due to variations in the accumulation of the photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) after ALA application. The ability to quantify PpIX production before treatment could facilitate the use of additional interventions to improve outcomes. While many groups have demonstrated the ability to image PpIX in the clinic, these systems generally require darkening the room lights during imaging, which is unpopular with clinicians. We have developed a novel wide-field imaging system based on pulsed excitation and gated acquisition to image photosensitizer activity in the skin. The tissue is illuminated using four pulsed LED's to excite PpIX, and the remitted light acquired with a synchronized ICCD. This approach facilitates real-time background subtraction of ambient light, precluding the need to darken the exam room. Delivering light in short bursts also allows the use of elevated excitation intensity while remaining under the maximum permissible exposure limits, making the modality more sensitive to photosensitizer fluorescence than standard approaches. Images of tissue phantoms indicate system sensitivity down to 250nM PpIX and images of animals demonstrate detection of PpIX fluorescence in vivo under normal room light conditions.

  16. Flatfielding and photometric accuracy of the first Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Andrew C.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Koo, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Long exposures with the original Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera (WFC) through the F555W and F785LP filters show gradients in the background following standard pipeline calibration. We show that these gradients also appear in stellar photometry, and thus must be predominantly the result of inaccurate flatfielding at a level of 10 to 20%. Color errors may be even larger. Applying corrections to the flatfield frames based on the background structure leads to an improved accuracy of approximately 4% for single-measurement photometry within a single CCD chip, compared to the approximately 10% accuracy suggested by previous studies. We have reanalyzed the F555W and F785LP calibration photometry to derive zero points appropriate for corrected data; these new zero points have internal consistency at a level of approximately 1.2%, based on comparison between the chip-to-chip offsets and the sky levels observed in corrected images. This indicates that relative photometry approaching 1 to 2% is achievable with the WFC. The new zero point values for corrected data are 22.90, 23.04, 23.04, and 22.96 (F555W), and 21.56, 21.64, 21.44, and 21.47 (F785LP) for chips WF1-WF4, respectively. Comparison is made with other zero points, and the applicability of 'delta flats' is briefly discussed.

  17. High-resolution Imaging Through Strong Atmospheric Turbulence and Over Wide Fields of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferies, S.; Hope, D.; Hart, M.; Nagy, J.

    2013-09-01

    We discuss how high-resolution imaging through strong atmospheric turbulence requires both maximizing the transmission of information through the optical system and accurate estimation of the observed wave front over a wide range of spatial frequencies. We show that both requirements can be met by observing with a dual channel system where one channel employs aperture diversity and the other an imaging Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor. The imagery from this setup is processed using a blind restoration algorithm that combines the strengths of the multi-aperture phase retrieval and multi-telescope, multi-frame blind deconvolution techniques: it also captures the inherent temporal correlations in the observed phases. This approach, which strengthens the synergy between image acquisition and post-processing, provides near-diffraction-limited imagery at unprecedented levels of atmospheric turbulence. The approach also allows for the separation of the phase perturbations from different layers of the atmosphere. This characteristic offers potential for a beaconless wave-front sensor and for the accurate restoration of images with fields of view substantially larger than the isoplanatic angle. The proposed approach also has application for high-dynamic range imaging.

  18. Characterization of high proper motion objects from the wide-field infrared survey explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Luhman, K. L.; Sheppard, Scott S.

    2014-06-01

    We present an analysis of high proper motion objects that we have found in a recent study and in this work with multi-epoch astrometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using photometry and proper motions from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey and WISE, we have identified the members of this sample that are likely to be late-type, nearby, or metal-poor. We have performed optical and near-infrared spectroscopy on 41 objects, from which we measure spectral types that range from M4-T2.5. This sample includes 11 blue L dwarfs and 5 subdwarfs; the latter were also classified as such in the recent study by Kirkpatrick and coworkers. Based on their spectral types and photometry, several of our spectroscopic targets may have distances of <20 pc with the closest at ∼12 pc. The tangential velocities implied by the spectrophotometric distances and proper motions indicate that four of the five subdwarfs are probably members of the Galactic halo while several other objects, including the early-T dwarf WISE J210529.08–623558.7, may belong to the thick disk.

  19. Wide Field Camera 3 Instrument Handbook for Cycle 21 v. 5.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressel, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a fourth-generation imaging instrument. It was installed in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) in May 2009. WFC3 saw first light on June 24, 2009, following the cooling of its detectors. Servicing Mission 4 Observatory Verification (SMOV) activities were completed in late August 2009, and were followed by the Cycle 17 calibration and science programs. This WFC3 Instrument Handbook has been prepared by the WFC3 team at STScI. It is the basic technical reference manual for WFC3 observers. The information in this Handbook is intended to be useful for Cycle 21 Phase I proposers, for the subsequently selected General Observers (GOs) as they prepare their Phase II specifications, and for those analyzing WFC3 data. The HST Primer and the HST Call for Proposals also contain valuable information for proposers, and the Call for Proposals is the final authority on HST policy. This edition of the WFC3 Instrument Handbook (Version 5.0) was written near the end of the execution of the Cycle 19 calibration plan. It supersedes Version 4.0, and includes results from analysis of the first three cycles of on-orbit performance.

  20. WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF THE EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Padgett, D. L.; Rebull, L. M.

    2012-01-10

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the 'fireworks hypothesis' since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  1. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Asslef, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of II outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  2. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Assef, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars.We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks.We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  3. Progression of gyrate atrophy measured with ultra-wide-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Villanueva, Guillermo; Paciuc-Beja, Miguel; Villanueva-Mendoza, Cristina; Harasawa, Mariana; Smith, Jesse M; Velez-Montoya, Raul; Olson, Jeffrey L; Oliver, Scott C; Mandava, Naresh; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo

    2016-02-01

    The study aims to determine the progression of gyrate atrophy by measuring the area growth of chorioretinal atrophic lesions using ultra-wide-field images (UWFI). A retrospective, observational, and comparative study was conducted and UWFI (200°) were obtained from two patients with gyrate atrophy at baseline and follow-up. Measurements of atrophy were obtained for three types of lesions: Solitary atrophic lesions (SAL), De novo solitary lesions (DNSL), and peripapillary atrophy (PPA). Comparison of baseline and follow-up was done using t tests. Two patients with gyrate atrophy were included. Patient 1 presented 16 SAL, 5 DNSL, and PPA measured for both eyes (BE). Overall area growth (OAG) for SAL (expressed in decimals) presented a mean of 3.41, σ 3.07. DNSL area for BE presented a mean of 1586.08 P (2), σ 1069.55. OAG for PPA presented a mean of 1.21, σ 0.17. Patient 2 presented 5 SAL, no DNSL, and PPA was measured for BE. OAG for SAL presented a mean of 1.58, σ 1.05 (range 1.02-3.47). OAG for PPA presented a mean of 1.05, σ 0.001. Gyrate atrophy progression can be determined by measuring the changes in area using UWFI.

  4. A TECHNIQUE FOR PRIMARY BEAM CALIBRATION OF DRIFT-SCANNING, WIDE-FIELD ANTENNA ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Pober, Jonathan C.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Aguirre, James E.; Moore, David F.; Bradley, Richard F.; Parashare, Chaitali R.; Carilli, Chris L.; Gugliucci, Nicole E.

    2012-02-15

    We present a new technique for calibrating the primary beam of a wide-field, drift-scanning antenna element. Drift-scan observing is not compatible with standard beam calibration routines, and the situation is further complicated by difficult-to-parameterize beam shapes and, at low frequencies, the sparsity of accurate source spectra to use as calibrators. We overcome these challenges by building up an interrelated network of source 'crossing points'-locations where the primary beam is sampled by multiple sources. Using the single assumption that a beam has 180 Degree-Sign rotational symmetry, we can achieve significant beam coverage with only a few tens of sources. The resulting network of crossing points allows us to solve for both a beam model and source flux densities referenced to a single calibrator source, circumventing the need for a large sample of well-characterized calibrators. We illustrate the method with actual and simulated observations from the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization.

  5. Development of a Data Reduction algorithm for Optical Wide Field Patrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sun-youp; Keum, Kang-Hoon; Lee, Seong-Whan; Jin, Ho; Park, Yung-Sik; Hong-Suh; Jo, Jung Hyun; Moon, Hong-Kyu; Bae, Young-Ho; Choi, Jin; Choi, Young-Jun; Park, Jang-Hyun; Lee, Jung-Ho

    2013-09-01

    The detector subsystem of the Optical Wide-field Patrol (OWL) network efficiently acquires the position and time information of moving objects such as artificial satellites through its chopper system, which consists of 4 blades in front of the CCD camera. Using this system, it is possible to get more position data with the same exposure time by changing the streaks of the moving objects into many pieces with the fast rotating blades during sidereal tracking. At the same time, the time data from the rotating chopper can be acquired by the time tagger connected to the photo diode. To analyze the orbits of the targets detected in the image data of such a system, a sequential procedure of determining the positions of separated streak lines was developed that involved calculating the World Coordinate System (WCS) solution to transform the positions into equatorial coordinate systems, and finally combining the time log records from the time tagger with the transformed position data. We introduce this procedure and the preliminary results of the application of this procedure to the test observation images.

  6. Ultraviolet Raman Wide-Field Hyperspectral Imaging Spectrometer for Standoff Trace Explosive Detection.

    PubMed

    Hufziger, Kyle T; Bykov, Sergei V; Asher, Sanford A

    2017-02-01

    We constructed the first deep ultraviolet (UV) Raman standoff wide-field imaging spectrometer. Our novel deep UV imaging spectrometer utilizes a photonic crystal to select Raman spectral regions for detection. The photonic crystal is composed of highly charged, monodisperse 35.5 ± 2.9 nm silica nanoparticles that self-assemble in solution to produce a face centered cubic crystalline colloidal array that Bragg diffracts a narrow ∼1.0 nm full width at half-maximum (FWHM) UV spectral region. We utilize this photonic crystal to select and image two different spectral regions containing resonance Raman bands of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and NH4NO3 (AN). These two deep UV Raman spectral regions diffracted were selected by angle tuning the photonic crystal. We utilized this imaging spectrometer to measure 229 nm excited UV Raman images containing ∼10-1000 µg/cm(2) samples of solid PETN and AN on aluminum surfaces at 2.3 m standoff distances. We estimate detection limits of ∼1 µg/cm(2) for PETN and AN films under these experimental conditions.

  7. Wide-field laser ophthalmoscopy for imaging of gas-filled eyes after macular hole surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Shintaro; Arita, Ryoichi; Sato, Yuki; Enaida, Hiroshi; Ueno, Akifumi; Matsui, Takaaki; Salehi-Had, Hani; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Sonoda, Koh-hei

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Existing ophthalmoscopy methods are unable to obtain clear fundus autofluorescence (FAF) images in gas-filled eyes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capability of wide-field laser ophthalmoscopy (Optos) in obtaining FAF images in gas-filled eyes for the assessment of macular hole (MH) closure after surgery. Methods This was an interventional case series. Eighteen consecutive patients with unilateral MH underwent vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling and 20% sulfur hexafluoride gas tamponade. FAF images using Optos were recorded preoperatively and postoperatively (days 1, 2, and 7). Results On postoperative days 1, 2, and 7, FAF images were obtained from 11/18 (61.1%), 9/18 (50.0%), and 17/18 eyes (94.4%), respectively, using Optos. The quality of FAF images using Optos was sufficient to determine MH closure in 9/18 (50.0%) of gas-filled eyes postoperatively. Quantitative analysis of FAF images was helpful in determining complete or partial closure of the MH. Conclusion FAF imaging using Optos might be a useful adjunct to optical coherence tomography as a supportive method to guide the release from facedown posturing in some cases of MH. PMID:27601877

  8. A DEEP, WIDE-FIELD H{alpha} SURVEY OF NEARBY CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES: DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Shoko; Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr.; Moss, Chris

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of a wide-field H{alpha} imaging survey of eight nearby (z = 0.02-0.03) Abell clusters. We have measured H{alpha} fluxes and equivalent widths for 465 galaxies, of which 360 are new detections. The survey was designed to obtain complete emission-line-selected inventories of star-forming galaxies in the inner regions of these clusters, extending to star formation rates below 0.1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. This paper describes the observations, data processing, and source identification procedures, and presents an H{alpha} and R-band catalog of detected cluster members and other candidates. Future papers in the series will use these data to study the completeness of spectroscopically based star formation surveys, and to quantify the effects of cluster environment on the present-day populations of star-forming galaxies. The data will also provide a valuable foundation for imaging surveys of redshifted H{alpha} emission in more distant clusters.

  9. Automated classification of periodic variable stars detected by the wide-field infrared survey explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Masci, Frank J.; Grillmair, Carl J.; Cutri, Roc M.; Hoffman, Douglas I.

    2014-07-01

    We describe a methodology to classify periodic variable stars identified using photometric time-series measurements constructed from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) full-mission single-exposure Source Databases. This will assist in the future construction of a WISE Variable Source Database that assigns variables to specific science classes as constrained by the WISE observing cadence with statistically meaningful classification probabilities. We have analyzed the WISE light curves of 8273 variable stars identified in previous optical variability surveys (MACHO, GCVS, and ASAS) and show that Fourier decomposition techniques can be extended into the mid-IR to assist with their classification. Combined with other periodic light-curve features, this sample is then used to train a machine-learned classifier based on the random forest (RF) method. Consistent with previous classification studies of variable stars in general, the RF machine-learned classifier is superior to other methods in terms of accuracy, robustness against outliers, and relative immunity to features that carry little or redundant class information. For the three most common classes identified by WISE: Algols, RR Lyrae, and W Ursae Majoris type variables, we obtain classification efficiencies of 80.7%, 82.7%, and 84.5% respectively using cross-validation analyses, with 95% confidence intervals of approximately ±2%. These accuracies are achieved at purity (or reliability) levels of 88.5%, 96.2%, and 87.8% respectively, similar to that achieved in previous automated classification studies of periodic variable stars.

  10. THE FIRST ULTRA-COOL BROWN DWARF DISCOVERED BY THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER

    SciTech Connect

    Mainzer, A.; Cushing, Michael C.; Eisenhardt, P.; Skrutskie, M.; Beaton, R.; Gelino, C. R.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Jarrett, T.; Masci, F.; Marsh, K.; Padgett, D.; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, D.; Wright, E.; McLean, I.; Dietrich, M.; Garnavich, P.; Rueff, K.; Kuhn, O.; Leisawitz, D.

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of the first new ultra-cool brown dwarf (BDs) found with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The object's preliminary designation is WISEPC J045853.90+643451.9. Follow-up spectroscopy with the LUCIFER instrument on the Large Binocular Telescope indicates that it is a very late-type T dwarf with a spectral type approximately equal to T9. Fits to an IRTF/SpeX 0.8-2.5 {mu}m spectrum to the model atmospheres of Marley and Saumon indicate an effective temperature of approximately 600 K as well as the presence of vertical mixing in its atmosphere. The new BD is easily detected by WISE, with a signal-to-noise ratio of {approx}36 at 4.6 {mu}m. Current estimates place it at a distance of 6-10 pc. This object represents the first in what will likely be hundreds of nearby BDs found by WISE that will be suitable for follow-up observations, including those with the James Webb Space Telescope. One of the two primary scientific goals of the WISE mission is to find the coolest, closest stars to our Sun; the discovery of this new BD proves that WISE is capable of fulfilling this objective.

  11. Dome Degradation Characterization of Wide-Field-of-View Nonscanner Aboard ERBE and Its Reprocessing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrestha, Alok K.; Kato, Seiji; Wong, Takmeng; Su, Wenying; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; Rose, Fred; Miller, Walter F.; Bush, Kathryn; Rutan, David A.; Minnis, Patrick; Doelling, David R.; Smith, George L.

    2015-01-01

    Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) wide-field-of-view (WFOV) nonscanners aboard ERBS and NOAA- 9/NOAA-10 provided broadband shortwave and longwave irradiances from 1985 to 1999. The previous analysis showed dome degradation in the shortwave nonscanner instruments. The correction was performed with a constant spectral (gray assumption) degradation. We suspect that the gray assumption affected daytime longwave irradiance and led to a day-minus-night longwave flux differences (little change in night time longwave) increase over time. Based on knowledge from the CERES process, we will reprocess entire ERBE nonscanner radiation dataset by characterizing shortwave dome transmissivity with spectral dependent degradation using the solar data observed by these instruments. Once spectral dependent degradation is derived, imager derived cloud fraction and the cloud phase as well as surface type over the FOV of nonscanner instruments will be used to model unfiltering coefficients. This poster primarily explains the reprocessing techniques and includes initial comparison of several months of data processed with existing and our recent methods.

  12. Color and monochrome lensless on-chip imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans over a wide field-of-view.

    PubMed

    Isikman, Serhan O; Sencan, Ikbal; Mudanyali, Onur; Bishara, Waheb; Oztoprak, Cetin; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-05-07

    We demonstrate color and monochrome on-chip imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans samples over a wide field-of-view using incoherent lensless in-line holography. Digital reconstruction of the recorded lensless holograms rapidly creates the C. elegans images within <1 s over a field-of-view of >24 mm2. By digitally combining the reconstructed images at three different wavelengths (red, green and blue), color images of dyed samples are also acquired. This wide field-of-view and compact on-chip imaging modality also permits straightforward integration with microfluidic systems.

  13. Hubble Space Telescope Medium Deep Survey. 2: Deconvolution of Wide Field Camera field galaxy images in the 13 hour + 43 deg field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windhorst, R. A.; Schmidtke, P. C.; Pascarelle, S. M.; Gordon, J. M.; Griffiths, R. E.; Ratnatunga, K. U.; Neuschaefer, L. W.; Ellis, R. S.; Gilmore, G.; Glazebrook, K.

    1994-01-01

    We present isophotal profiles of six faint field galaxies from some of the first deep images taken for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Medium Deep Survey (MDS). These have redshifts in the range z = 0.126 to 0.402. The images were taken with the Wide Field Camera (WFC) in `parallel mode' and deconvolved with the Lucy method using as the point-spread function nearby stars in the image stack. The WFC deconvolutions have a dynamic range of 16 to 20 dB (4 to 5 mag) and an effective resolution approximately less than 0.2 sec (FWHM). The multiorbit HST images allow us to trace the morphology, light profiles, and color gradients of faint field galaxies down to V approximately equal to 22 to 23 mag at sub-kpc resolution, since the redshift range covered is z = 0.1 to 0.4. The goals of the MDS are to study the sub-kpc scale morphology, light profiles, and color gradients for a large samole of faint field galaxies down to V approximately equal to 23 mag, and to trace the fraction of early to late-type galaxies as function of cosmic time. In this paper we study the brighter MDS galaxies in the 13 hour + 43 deg MDS field in detail, and investigate to what extent model fits with pure exponential disks or a(exp 1/4) bulges are justified at V approximately less than 22 mag. Four of the six field galaxies have light profiles that indicate (small) inner bulges following r(exp 1/4) laws down to 0.2 sec resolution, plus a dominant surrounding exponential disk with little or no color gradients. Two occur in a group at z = 0.401, two are barred spiral galaxies at z = 0.179 and z = 0.302, and two are rather subluminous (and edge-on) disk galaxies at z = 0.126 and z = 0.179. Our deep MDS images can detect galaxies down to V, I approximately less than 25 to 26 mag, and demonstrate the impressive potential of HST--even with its pre-refurbished optics--to resolve morphological details in galaxies at cosmologically significant distances (v approximately less than 23 mag). Since the median

  14. Advanced beamed-energy and field propulsion concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrabo, L. N.

    1983-01-01

    Specific phenomena which might lead to major advances in payload, range and terminal velocity of very advanced vehicle propulsion are studied. The effort focuses heavily on advanced propulsion spinoffs enabled by current government-funded investigations in directed-energy technology: i.e., laser, microwave, and relativistic charged particle beams. Futuristic (post-year 2000) beamed-energy propulsion concepts which indicate exceptional promise are identified and analytically investigated. The concepts must be sufficiently developed to permit technical understanding of the physical processes involved, assessment of the enabling technologies, and evaluation of their merits over conventional systems. Propulsion concepts that can be used for manned and/or unmanned missions for purposes of solar system exploration, planetary landing, suborbital flight, transport to orbit, and escape are presented. Speculations are made on the chronology of milestones in beamed-energy propulsion development, such as in systems applications of defense, satellite orbit-raising, global aerospace transportation, and manned interplanetary carriers.

  15. DEEP, WIDE-FIELD CCD PHOTOMETRY FOR THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 3532

    SciTech Connect

    Clem, James L.; Landolt, Arlo U.; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie E-mail: landolt@phys.lsu.edu E-mail: wachter@ipac.caltech.edu

    2011-04-15

    We present the results of a deep, wide-field CCD survey for the open cluster NGC 3532. Our new BV(RI){sub c} photometry effectively covers a one square degree area and reaches an unprecedented depth of V {approx} 21 to reveal that NGC 3532 is a rich open cluster that harbors a large number of faint, low-mass stars. We employ a number of methods to reduce the impact of field star contamination in the cluster color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), including supplementing our photometry with JHK{sub s} data from the 2MASS catalog. These efforts allow us to define a robust sample of candidate main-sequence stars suitable for a purely empirical determination of the cluster's parameters by comparing them to the well-established Hyades main sequence. Our results confirm previous findings that NGC 3532 lies fairly near to the Sun [(m - M){sub 0} = 8.46 {+-} 0.05; 492{sup +12}{sub -11} pc] and has an extremely low reddening for its location near the Galactic plane [E(B - V) = 0.028 {+-} 0.006]. Moreover, an age of {approx}300 Myr has been derived for the cluster by fitting a set of overshooting isochrones to the well-populated upper main sequence. This new photometry also extends faint enough to reach the cluster white dwarf sequence, as confirmed by our photometric recovery of eight spectroscopically identified members of the cluster. Using the location of these eight members, along with the latest theoretical cooling tracks, we have identified {approx}30 additional white dwarf stars in the [V, (B - V)] CMD that have a high probability of belonging to NGC 3532. Reassuringly, the age we derive from fitting white dwarf isochrones to the locus of these stars, 300 {+-} 100 Myr, is consistent with the age derived from the turnoff. Our analysis of the photometry also includes an estimation of the binary star fraction as well as a determination of the cluster's luminosity and mass functions.

  16. THERMAL MODEL CALIBRATION FOR MINOR PLANETS OBSERVED WITH WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER/NEOWISE

    SciTech Connect

    Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Ressler, M.; Eisenhardt, P.; Grav, T.; Wright, E.; Cutri, R. M.; McMillan, R. S.; Cohen, M.

    2011-08-01

    With the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we have observed over 157,000 minor planets. Included in these are a number of near-Earth objects, main-belt asteroids, and irregular satellites which have well measured physical properties (via radar studies and in situ imaging) such as diameters. We have used these objects to validate models of thermal emission and reflected sunlight using the WISE measurements, as well as the color corrections derived in Wright et al. for the four WISE bandpasses as a function of effective temperature. We have used 50 objects with diameters measured by radar or in situ imaging to characterize the systematic errors implicit in using the WISE data with a faceted spherical near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM) to compute diameters and albedos. By using the previously measured diameters and H magnitudes with a spherical NEATM model, we compute the predicted fluxes (after applying the color corrections given in Wright et al.) in each of the four WISE bands and compare them to the measured magnitudes. We find minimum systematic flux errors of 5%-10%, and hence minimum relative diameter and albedo errors of {approx}10% and {approx}20%, respectively. Additionally, visible albedos for the objects are computed and compared to the albedos at 3.4 {mu}m and 4.6 {mu}m, which contain a combination of reflected sunlight and thermal emission for most minor planets observed by WISE. Finally, we derive a linear relationship between subsolar temperature and effective temperature, which allows the color corrections given in Wright et al. to be used for minor planets by computing only subsolar temperature instead of a faceted thermophysical model. The thermal models derived in this paper are not intended to supplant previous measurements made using radar or spacecraft imaging; rather, we have used them to characterize the errors that should be expected when computing diameters and albedos of minor planets observed by WISE using a spherical

  17. THE DISCOVERY OF Y DWARFS USING DATA FROM THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER (WISE)

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, Michael C.; Mainzer, A.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Gelino, Christopher R.; Griffith, Roger L.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Beichman, Charles A.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Prato, Lisa A.; Simcoe, Robert A.; Marley, Mark S.; Freedman, Richard S.; Saumon, D.; Wright, Edward L.

    2011-12-10

    We present the discovery of seven ultracool brown dwarfs identified with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Near-infrared spectroscopy reveals deep absorption bands of H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} that indicate all seven of the brown dwarfs have spectral types later than UGPS J072227.51-054031.2, the latest-type T dwarf currently known. The spectrum of WISEP J182831.08+265037.8 is distinct in that the heights of the J- and H-band peaks are approximately equal in units of f{sub {lambda}}, so we identify it as the archetypal member of the Y spectral class. The spectra of at least two of the other brown dwarfs exhibit absorption on the blue wing of the H-band peak that we tentatively ascribe to NH{sub 3}. These spectral morphological changes provide a clear transition between the T dwarfs and the Y dwarfs. In order to produce a smooth near-infrared spectral sequence across the T/Y dwarf transition, we have reclassified UGPS 0722-05 as the T9 spectral standard and tentatively assign WISEP J173835.52+273258.9 as the Y0 spectral standard. In total, six of the seven new brown dwarfs are classified as Y dwarfs: four are classified as Y0, one is classified as Y0 (pec?), and WISEP J1828+2650 is classified as >Y0. We have also compared the spectra to the model atmospheres of Marley and Saumon and infer that the brown dwarfs have effective temperatures ranging from 300 K to 500 K, making them the coldest spectroscopically confirmed brown dwarfs known to date.

  18. Multiple Observing Modes for Wide-field Optical Surveillance of GEO Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, J.; Zimmer, P.; Ackermann, M.

    2016-09-01

    Very wide field of view optical sensors with silicon detectors are being used in multiple survey modes by J. T. McGraw and Associates to provide persistent, affordable surveillance of GEO space to faint limiting magnitudes. Examples include:

  19. classical staring mode with typical integration times of seconds provided by multiple co-directed sensors to provide a deep mosaic of tens of square degrees per exposure to faint limiting magnitude
  20. b) step-and-stare observations of several second integration time from which a continuous, overlapped, mosaicked image of GEO space can be provided
  21. time-delay and integrate (TDI) imagery obtained by driving the telescope in declination and stepping the telescope in the E-W direction, which produces repeated, overlapping (if desired), synoptic images of GEO space.
  22. With current 350 mm diameter optics, detection limits for concentrated observations (e.g. "neighborhood watch") detection limits of magnitude 18 are achieved, and for uncued survey the detection limits are fainter than magnitude 16. Each of these techniques can employ multiple telescopes to obtain search rates in excess of 1000 square degrees per hour, allowing complete uncued CONUS GEO surveillance to +/- 15 degrees latitude every two nighttime hours. With appropriate placement, sensors could provide complete coverage of GEO to these limiting magnitudes at the same survey rate. At each step of the development of this unique capability we discuss the fundamental underlying physical principals of optics, detectors, search modes and siting that enable this survey, a valuable adjunct to RF, radar, GEODSS and other optical surveys of GEO space.

  23. Real-time control for the high order, wide field DRAGON AO test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, Alastair; Bharmal, Nazim A.; Bitenc, Urban; Dipper, Nigel; Morris, Tim; Myers, Richard; Reeves, Andrew; Younger, Eddy

    2014-07-01

    DRAGON is a high order, wide field AO test-bench at Durham. A key feature of DRAGON is the ability to be operated at real-time rates, i.e. frame rates of up to 1kHz, with low latency to maintain AO performance. Here, we will present the real-time control architecture for DRAGON, which includes two deformable mirrors, eight wavefront sensors and thousands of Shack-Hartmann sub-apertures. A novel approach has been taken to allow access to the wavefront sensor pixel stream, reducing latency and peak computational load, and this technique can be implemented for other similar wavefront sensor cameras with no hardware costs. We report on experience with an ELT-suitable wavefront sensor camera. DRAGON will form the basis for investigations into hardware acceleration architectures for AO real-time control, and recent work on GPU and many-core systems (including the Xeon Phi) will be reported. Additionally, the modular structure of DRAGON, its remote control capabilities, distribution of AO telemetry data, and the software concepts and architecture will be reported. Techniques used in DRAGON for pixel processing, slope calculation and wavefront reconstruction will be presented. This will include methods to handle changes in CN2 profile and sodium layer profile, both of which can be modelled in DRAGON. DRAGON software simulation techniques linking hardware-in-the-loop computer models to the DRAGON real-time system and control software will also be discussed. This tool allows testing of the DRAGON system without requiring physical hardware and serves as a test-bed for ELT integration and verification techniques.

  24. Tracker controls development and control architecture for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Wide Field Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mock, Jason R.; Beno, Joe; Rafferty, Tom H.; Cornell, Mark E.

    2010-07-01

    To enable the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Wide Field Upgrade, the University of Texas Center for Electromechanics and McDonald Observatory are developing a precision tracker system - a 15,000 kg robot to position a 3,100 kg payload within 10 microns of a desired dynamic track. Performance requirements to meet science needs and safety requirements that emerged from detailed Failure Modes and Effects Analysis resulted in a system of 14 precision controlled actuators and 100 additional analog and digital devices (primarily sensors and safety limit switches). This level of system complexity and emphasis on fail-safe operation is typical of large modern telescopes and numerous industrial applications. Due to this complexity, demanding accuracy requirements, and stringent safety requirements, a highly versatile and easily configurable centralized control system that easily links with modeling and simulation tools during the hardware and software design process was deemed essential. The Matlab/Simulink simulation environment, coupled with dSPACE controller hardware, was selected for controls development and realization. The dSPACE real-time operating system collects sensor information; motor commands are transmitted over a PROFIBUS network to servo amplifiers and drive motor status is received over the same network. Custom designed position feedback loops, supplemented by feed forward force commands for enhanced performance, and algorithms to accommodate self-locking gearboxes (for safety), reside in dSPACE. To interface the dSPACE controller directly to absolute Heidenhain sensors with EnDat 2.2 protocol, a custom communication board was developed. This paper covers details of software and hardware, design choices and analysis, and supporting simulations (primarily Simulink).

  1. Dual-modality wide-field photothermal quantitative phase microscopy and depletion of cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turko, Nir A.; Barnea, Itay; Blum, Omry; Korenstein, Rafi; Shaked, Natan T.

    2015-03-01

    We review our dual-modality technique for quantitative imaging and selective depletion of populations of cells based on wide-field photothermal (PT) quantitative phase imaging and simultaneous PT cell extermination. The cells are first labeled by plasmonic gold nanoparticles, which evoke local plasmonic resonance when illuminated by light in a wavelength corresponding to their specific plasmonic resonance peak. This reaction creates changes of temperature, resulting in changes of phase. This phase changes are recorded by a quantitative phase microscope (QPM), producing specific imaging contrast, and enabling bio-labeling in phase microscopy. Using this technique, we have shown discrimination of EGFR over-expressing (EGFR+) cancer cells from EGFR under-expressing (EGFR-) cancer cells. Then, we have increased the excitation power in order to evoke greater temperatures, which caused specific cell death, all under real-time phase acquisition using QPM. Close to 100% of all EGFR+ cells were immediately exterminated when illuminated with the strong excitation beam, while all EGFR- cells survived. For the second experiment, in order to simulate a condition where circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are present in blood, we have mixed the EGFR+ cancer cells with white blood cells (WBCs) from a healthy donor. Here too, we have used QPM to observe and record the phase of the cells as they were excited for selective visualization and then exterminated. The WBCs survival rate was over 95%, while the EGFR+ survival rate was under 5%. The technique may be the basis for real-time detection and controlled treatment of CTCs.

  2. Peripheral Reticular Pigmentary Degeneration and Choroidal Vascular Insufficiency, Studied by Ultra Wide-Field Fluorescein Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kunho; Cho, Kyuyeon; Kang, Se Woong; Kim, Sang Jin; Kim, Jong Min

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To explore the pathogenesis of peripheral reticular pigmentary degeneration (PRPD) and its clinical significance. Methods This cross-sectional, observational study (conducted between January 2010 and May 2015) enrolled 441 eyes of 229 subjects, including 35 eyes with PRPD and 406 eyes without PRPD, which was identified by ultra-wide-field fluorescein angiography (UWFA). The distribution and angiographic circulation time of PRPD were assessed by UWFA. The frequencies of systemic and ophthalmologic comorbidities were compared between groups. Univariate and multivariate generalized estimation equation methods were used to determine the risk factors for PRPD. Results The patients with PRPD had a mean age of 75.7 ± 8.5 years (range, 59–93 years), whereas the patients without PRPD had a mean age of 60.1 ± 14.9 years (range, 9–92 years). All eyes with PRPD manifested the lesion in the superior nasal periphery with or without circumferential extension. Among those, only 16 eyes (45.7%) in the PRPD group showed distinctive features in the same location on fundus photographs. There was significant choroidal filling delay in the PRPD group when compared with the control group (1.42±1.22 vs. -0.02±1.05 seconds, P < 0.001). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that older age (P < 0.001), stroke (P = 0.018), ischemic optic neuropathy (P < 0.001), and age-related macular degeneration (P = 0.022) were significantly associated with PRPD. Conclusions UWFA may enhance the diagnostic sensitivity of PRPD. Choroidal vascular insufficiency with compromised systemic circulation in the elderly was related to the manifestation of PRPD. These results help to better understand the pathophysiology of PRPD. Co-existence of systemic and ophthalmic circulatory disorders should be considered in patients with PRPD. PMID:28114409

  3. A wide-field near- and mid-infrared Census of young stars in NGC 6334

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, S.; Marengo, M.; Allen, L.; Fazio, G. G.; Smith, H. A.; Carey, S.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a study of the rate and efficiency of star formation in the NGC 6334 star-forming region. We obtained observations at J, H, and K{sub s} taken with the NOAO Extremely Wide-Field Infrared Imager and combined them with observations taken with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope at wavelengths = 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm. We also analyzed previous observations taken at 24 μm using the Spitzer MIPS camera as part of the MIPSGAL survey. We have produced a point source catalog with >700, 000 entries. We have identified 2283 young stellar object (YSO) candidates, 375 Class I YSOs, and 1908 Class II YSOs using a combination of existing IRAC-based color classification schemes that we have extended and validated to the near-IR for use with warm Spitzer data. We have identified multiple new sites of ongoing star formation activity along filamentary structures extending tens of parsecs beyond the central molecular ridge of NGC 6334. By mapping the extinction, we derived an estimate for the gas mass, 2.2 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}. The heavy concentration of protostars along the dense filamentary structures indicates that NGC 6334 may be undergoing a 'mini-starburst' event with Σ{sub SFR} > 8.2 M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1} pc{sup –2} and SFE > 0.10. We have used these estimates to place NGC 6334 in the Kennicutt-Schmidt diagram to help bridge the gap between observations of local low-mass star-forming regions and star formation in other galaxies.

  4. Ionic mechanisms mediating oscillatory membrane potentials in wide-field retinal amacrine cells.

    PubMed

    Vigh, Jozsef; Solessio, Eduardo; Morgans, Catherine W; Lasater, Eric M

    2003-07-01

    Particular types of amacrine cells of the vertebrate retina show oscillatory membrane potentials (OMPs) in response to light stimulation. Historically it has been thought the oscillations arose as a result of circuit properties. In a previous study we found that in some amacrine cells, the ability to oscillate was an intrinsic property of the cell. Here we characterized the ionic mechanisms responsible for the oscillations in wide-field amacrine cells (WFACs) in an effort to better understand the functional properties of the cell. The OMPs were found to be calcium (Ca2+) dependent; blocking voltage-gated Ca2+ channels eliminated the oscillations, whereas elevating extracellular Ca2+ enhanced them. Strong intracellular Ca2+ buffering (10 mM EGTA or bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid) eliminated any attenuation in the OMPs as well as a Ca2+-dependent inactivation of the voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Pharmacological and immunohistochemical characterization revealed that WFACs express L- and N-type voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels. Block of the L-type channels eliminated the OMPs, but omega-conotoxin GVIA did not, suggesting a different function for the N-type channels. The L-type channels in WFACs are functionally coupled to a set of calcium-dependent potassium (K(Ca)) channels to mediate OMPs. The initiation of OMPs depended on penitrem-A-sensitive (BK) K(Ca) channels, whereas their duration is under apamin-sensitive (SK) K(Ca) channel control. The Ca2+ current is essential to evoke the OMPs and triggering the K(Ca) currents, which here act as resonant currents, enhances the resonance as an amplifying current, influences the filtering characteristics of the cell membrane, and attenuates the OMPs via CDI of the L-type Ca2+ channel.

  5. Advanced Waste Treatment. A Field Study Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    This operations manual represents a continuation of operator training manuals developed for the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in response to the technological advancements of wastewater treatment and the changing needs of the operations profession. It is intended to be used as a home-study course manual (using the concepts…

  6. ERBE Wide-Field-of-View Nonscanner Data Reprocessing and revisiting its Radiation dataset from 1985 to 199

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, A. K.; Kato, S.; Wong, T.; Stackhouse, P. W.; Rose, F. G.; Miller, W. F.; Bush, K.; Rutan, D. A.; Minnis, P.; Doelling, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's radiation budget is a fundamental component of the climate system and should reflect the variation in climate. As such, it is critical to know how it has varied over past decades to ensure that climate models are properly representing climate. Broadband shortwave and longwave irradiances were measured by the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) wide-field-of-view (WFOV) nonscanner instrument from 1985 to 1998. These WFOV nonscanner instruments were onboard NASA's Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and two NOAA's satellites (NOAA-9 and NOAA-10). However, earlier studies showed that the transmissivity of the dome for the WFOV shortwave (SW) nonscanner instrument degraded over time. To account for the degradation, WFOV instruments were calibrated assuming constant spectral degradation (gray assumption). Recent developments from analysis of data from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System project (CERES), which has been measuring the radiation budget since 2000, suggest that transmissivity of shorter wavelength degrades faster. Therefore, a spectrally dependent degradation correction is needed for a better calibration. In addition, accounting for the spectrally dependent degradation may eliminate an additional correction applied to irradiances using a time series of daytime and nighttime longwave irradiance differences. Therefore, we have reprocessed WFOV nonscanner data by characterizing the spectrally dependent degradation of the SW dome transmissivity. Time and spectral dependent degradation of the shortwave filter function is estimated using solar data observed by these instruments during calibration days. Because the spectrum of reflected irradiance depends on scene type, we use Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer AVHRR-derived cloud properties and surface type over the WFOV footprints in addition to time dependent filter function for the unfiltering process. This poster explains the reprocessing approach and discusses the

  7. Predicting Performance in an Advanced Undergraduate Geological Field Camp Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykas, Matthew J.; Valentino, David W.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the factors that contribute to students' success in conducting geological field work. Undergraduate students (n = 49; 51% female; mean age = 22 y) who were enrolled in the 5-wk State University of New York at Oswego (SUNY Oswego) geology field program volunteered to participate in this study. At the beginning of the field…

  8. Advances in genome-wide RNAi cellular screens: a case study using the Drosophila JAK/STAT pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genome-scale RNA-interference (RNAi) screens are becoming ever more common gene discovery tools. However, whilst every screen identifies interacting genes, less attention has been given to how factors such as library design and post-screening bioinformatics may be effecting the data generated. Results Here we present a new genome-wide RNAi screen of the Drosophila JAK/STAT signalling pathway undertaken in the Sheffield RNAi Screening Facility (SRSF). This screen was carried out using a second-generation, computationally optimised dsRNA library and analysed using current methods and bioinformatic tools. To examine advances in RNAi screening technology, we compare this screen to a biologically very similar screen undertaken in 2005 with a first-generation library. Both screens used the same cell line, reporters and experimental design, with the SRSF screen identifying 42 putative regulators of JAK/STAT signalling, 22 of which verified in a secondary screen and 16 verified with an independent probe design. Following reanalysis of the original screen data, comparisons of the two gene lists allows us to make estimates of false discovery rates in the SRSF data and to conduct an assessment of off-target effects (OTEs) associated with both libraries. We discuss the differences and similarities between the resulting data sets and examine the relative improvements in gene discovery protocols. Conclusions Our work represents one of the first direct comparisons between first- and second-generation libraries and shows that modern library designs together with methodological advances have had a significant influence on genome-scale RNAi screens. PMID:23006893

  9. Measuring metallicities with Hubble space telescope/wide-field camera 3 photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Teresa L.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.; Twarog, Bruce; Bond, Howard E.; Saha, Abhijit; Walker, Alistair E-mail: holtz@nmsu.edu E-mail: btwarog@ku.edu E-mail: awalker@ctio.noao.edu

    2014-01-01

    We quantified and calibrated the metallicity and temperature sensitivities of colors derived from nine Wide-Field Camera 3 filters on board the Hubble Space Telescope using Dartmouth isochrones and Kurucz atmosphere models. The theoretical isochrone colors were tested and calibrated against observations of five well studied galactic clusters, M92, NGC 6752, NGC 104, NGC 5927, and NGC 6791, all of which have spectroscopically determined metallicities spanning –2.30 < [Fe/H] <+0.4. We found empirical corrections to the Dartmouth isochrone grid for each of the following color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs): (F555W-F814W, F814W), (F336W-F555W, F814W), (F390M-F555W, F814W), and (F390W-F555W, F814W). Using empirical corrections, we tested the accuracy and spread of the photometric metallicities assigned from CMDs and color-color diagrams (which are necessary to break the age-metallicity degeneracy). Testing three color-color diagrams [(F336W-F555W),(F390M-F555W),(F390W-F555W), versus (F555W-F814W)], we found the colors (F390M-F555W) and (F390W-F555W) to be the best suited to measure photometric metallicities. The color (F390W-F555W) requires much less integration time, but generally produces wider metallicity distributions and, at very low metallicity, the metallicity distribution function (MDF) from (F390W-F555W) is ∼60% wider than that from (F390M-F555W). Using the calibrated isochrones, we recovered the overall cluster metallicity to within ∼0.1 dex in [Fe/H] when using CMDs (i.e., when the distance, reddening, and ages are approximately known). The measured MDF from color-color diagrams shows that this method measures metallicities of stellar clusters of unknown age and metallicity with an accuracy of ∼0.2-0.5 dex using F336W-F555W, ∼0.15-0.25 dex using F390M-F555W, and ∼0.2-0.4 dex with F390W-F555W, with the larger uncertainty pertaining to the lowest metallicity range.

  10. Automatic detection of asteroids and meteoroids --- a wide-field survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereš, P.; Tóth, J.; Jedicke, R.; Tonry, J.; Denneau, L.; Wainscoat, R.; Kornoš, L.; Šilha, J.

    2014-07-01

    The small Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) represent a potential risk but also an easily accessible space resource for future robotic or human in-situ space exploration or commercial activities. However, the population of 1--300 m NEAs is not well understood in terms of size- frequency and orbital distribution. NEAs with diameters below 200 m tend to have much faster spin rates than large objects and they are believed to be monolithic and not rubble-pile like their large counterparts. Moreover, the current surveys do not systematically search for the small NEAs that are mostly overlooked. We propose a low- cost robotic optical survey (ADAM-WFS) aimed at small NEAs based on four state-of-the-art telescopes having extremely wide fields of view. The four Houghton-Terebizh 30-cm astrographs (Fig. left) with 4096×4096 -pixel CCD cameras will acquire 96 square degrees in one exposure with the plate scale of 4.4 arcsec/pixel. In 30 seconds, the system will be able to reach +17.5 mag in unfiltered mode. The survey will be operated on semi-automatic basis, covering the entire night sky three times per night and optimized toward fast moving targets recognition. The advantage of the proposed system is the usage of existing of-the-shelf components and software for the image processing and object identification and linking (Denneau et al., 2013). The one-year simulation of the survey (Fig. right) at the testing location at AGO Modra observatory in Slovakia revealed that we will detect 60--240 NEAs between 1--300 m that get closer than 10 lunar distances from the Earth. The number of detections will rise by a factor of 1.5--2 in case the survey is placed at a superb observing location such as Canary Islands. The survey will also serve as an impact warning system for imminent impactors. Our simulation showed that we have a 20 % chance of finding a 50-m NEA on a direct impact orbit. The survey will provide multiple byproducts from the all-sky scans, such as comet discoveries, sparse

  11. A Review of Asteroid Rotation Statistics with and without the Results from Wide-field Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Stephens, Robert D.

    2015-11-01

    Several recent wide-field surveys, e.g., Waszczak et al. (2015) and Chang et al. (2015), have added more than 10,000 asteroid rotation rates to the asteroid lightcurve database (LCDB), Warner et al. (2009). In previous works, Harris et al. (2012), Warner et al. (2011), we explored the possible effects on asteroid rotational statistics with the large infusion of results from such surveys, especially if using “sparse” data sets, e.g., those with fewer than 60 data points from a short span of 2-4 nights.Now that such data sets exist, we examine asteroid rotation statistics with and without the results from the surveys, looking at two specific points: 1) the possible biases introduced when using survey data and 2) assuming that the stated results are statistically useful, what the larger data set now tells us about asteroid rotation rates.For point #1, there appears to be the expected substantial biases against low amplitude and very short or long period lightcurves with the period problems stemming from the observing cadence and limited number of observations. Furthermore, the two latest surveys found periods for only about 20% of all observed objects, meaning that only the “easier” results were found. While the two surveys tended to go deeper and, therefore, work smaller objects, that raises yet another bias: success in finding a period depends on brightness. As a result, we would urge caution when interpreting spin properties versus size.For point #2, we first note that the vast majority of objects observed by the two surveys were in the broad regions of the inner or outer main-belt. Significantly, less than 10 NEAs were observed. For this reason, it makes it difficult to compare the effects of YORP, as seen by rotation rate distribution, on small asteroids at different distances. When considering main-belt objects with 10 < D < 40 km, the difference between plots with and without survey data show essentially the same Mawellian-like distribution.

  12. Sampling and Analysis of Impact Crater Residues found on the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G. W.; Colaux, J. L.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V. V.; Webb, R. P.; Griffin, T. J.; Reed, B. B.; Anz-Meador, P. D.; Kou, J.-C.; Robinson, G. A.; Opiela, J. N.; Gerlach, L.

    2013-01-01

    After nearly 16 years on orbit, the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC-2) was recovered from the Hubble Space Telescope in May 2009 during the 12 day shuttle mission designated STS-125. During that exposure to the low Earth orbit environment, the WFPC-2 radiator was struck by approximately 700 impactors producing crater features 300 micrometers and larger in size. Following an optical inspection of these features in 2009, an agreement was reached for the joint NASA-ESA examination and characterization of crater residues, the remnants of the projectile, in 2011. Active examination began in 2012, with 486 of the impact features being cored at NASA Johnson Space Center fs (JSC) Space Exposed Hardware cleanroom and curation facility. The core samples were subsequently divided between NASA and ESA. NASA's analysis was conducted at JSC fs Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Division, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/ energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) methods, and ESA's analysis was conducted at the Natural History Museum (NHM) again using SEM/EDS, and at the University of Surrey Ion Beam Centre (IBC) using ion beam analysis (IBA) with a scanned proton microbeam. As detailed discussion of the joint findings remains premature at this point, this paper reports on the coring technique developed; the practical taxonomy developed to classify residues as belonging either to anthropogenic "orbital debris" or micrometeoroids; and the protocols for examination of crater residues. Challenges addressed in coring were the relative thickness of the surface to be cut, protection of the impact feature from contamination while coring, and the need to preserve the cleanroom environment so as to preclude or minimize cross-contamination. Classification criteria are summarized, including the assessment of surface contamination and surface cleaning. Finally, we discuss the analytical techniques used to examine the crater residues. We employed EDS from

  13. Measuring Metallicities with Hubble Space Telescope/Wide-Field Camera 3 Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Teresa L.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.; Bond, Howard E.; Twarog, Bruce; Saha, Abhijit; Walker, Alistair

    2014-01-01

    We quantified and calibrated the metallicity and temperature sensitivities of colors derived from nine Wide-Field Camera 3 filters on board the Hubble Space Telescope using Dartmouth isochrones and Kurucz atmosphere models. The theoretical isochrone colors were tested and calibrated against observations of five well studied galactic clusters, M92, NGC 6752, NGC 104, NGC 5927, and NGC 6791, all of which have spectroscopically determined metallicities spanning -2.30 < [Fe/H] <+0.4. We found empirical corrections to the Dartmouth isochrone grid for each of the following color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs): (F555W-F814W, F814W), (F336W-F555W, F814W), (F390M-F555W, F814W), and (F390W-F555W, F814W). Using empirical corrections, we tested the accuracy and spread of the photometric metallicities assigned from CMDs and color-color diagrams (which are necessary to break the age-metallicity degeneracy). Testing three color-color diagrams [(F336W-F555W),(F390M-F555W),(F390W-F555W), versus (F555W-F814W)], we found the colors (F390M-F555W) and (F390W-F555W) to be the best suited to measure photometric metallicities. The color (F390W-F555W) requires much less integration time, but generally produces wider metallicity distributions and, at very low metallicity, the metallicity distribution function (MDF) from (F390W-F555W) is ~60% wider than that from (F390M-F555W). Using the calibrated isochrones, we recovered the overall cluster metallicity to within ~0.1 dex in [Fe/H] when using CMDs (i.e., when the distance, reddening, and ages are approximately known). The measured MDF from color-color diagrams shows that this method measures metallicities of stellar clusters of unknown age and metallicity with an accuracy of ~0.2-0.5 dex using F336W-F555W, ~0.15-0.25 dex using F390M-F555W, and ~0.2-0.4 dex with F390W-F555W, with the larger uncertainty pertaining to the lowest metallicity range. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope

  14. THE FIRST HUNDRED BROWN DWARFS DISCOVERED BY THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER (WISE)

    SciTech Connect

    Davy Kirkpatrick, J.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Griffith, Roger L.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Beichman, Charles A.; Cushing, Michael C.; Mainzer, A.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Bauer, James M.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Wright, Edward L.; McLean, Ian S.; Lake, Sean E.; Petty, Sara M.; Thompson, Maggie A.; Benford, Dominic J.; Bridge, Carrie R.; Stanford, S. A.; Bailey, Vanessa; and others

    2011-12-01

    We present ground-based spectroscopic verification of 6 Y dwarfs (see also Cushing et al.), 89 T dwarfs, 8 L dwarfs, and 1 M dwarf identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Eighty of these are cold brown dwarfs with spectral types {>=}T6, six of which have been announced earlier by Mainzer et al. and Burgasser et al. We present color-color and color-type diagrams showing the locus of M, L, T, and Y dwarfs in WISE color space. Near-infrared and, in a few cases, optical spectra are presented for these discoveries. Near-infrared classifications as late as early Y are presented and objects with peculiar spectra are discussed. Using these new discoveries, we are also able to extend the optical T dwarf classification scheme from T8 to T9. After deriving an absolute WISE 4.6 {mu}m (W2) magnitude versus spectral type relation, we estimate spectrophotometric distances to our discoveries. We also use available astrometric measurements to provide preliminary trigonometric parallaxes to four of our discoveries, which have types of L9 pec (red), T8, T9, and Y0; all of these lie within 10 pc of the Sun. The Y0 dwarf, WISE 1541-2250, is the closest at 2.8{sup +1.3}{sub -0.6} pc; if this 2.8 pc value persists after continued monitoring, WISE 1541-2250 will become the seventh closest stellar system to the Sun. Another 10 objects, with types between T6 and >Y0, have spectrophotometric distance estimates also placing them within 10 pc. The closest of these, the T6 dwarf WISE 1506+7027, is believed to fall at a distance of {approx}4.9 pc. WISE multi-epoch positions supplemented with positional info primarily from the Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera allow us to calculate proper motions and tangential velocities for roughly one-half of the new discoveries. This work represents the first step by WISE to complete a full-sky, volume-limited census of late-T and Y dwarfs. Using early results from this census, we present preliminary, lower limits to the space density of

  15. The Software Design for the Wide-Field Infrared Explorer Attitude Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark O.; Barnes, Kenneth C.; Melhorn, Charles M.; Phillips, Tom

    1998-01-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE), currently scheduled for launch in September 1998, is the fifth of five spacecraft in the NASA/Goddard Small Explorer (SMEX) series. This paper presents the design of WIRE's Attitude Control System flight software (ACS FSW). WIRE is a momentum-biased, three-axis stabilized stellar pointer which provides high-accuracy pointing and autonomous acquisition for eight to ten stellar targets per orbit. WIRE's short mission life and limited cryogen supply motivate requirements for Sun and Earth avoidance constraints which are designed to prevent catastrophic instrument damage and to minimize the heat load on the cryostat. The FSW implements autonomous fault detection and handling (FDH) to enforce these instrument constraints and to perform several other checks which insure the safety of the spacecraft. The ACS FSW implements modules for sensor data processing, attitude determination, attitude control, guide star acquisition, actuator command generation, command/telemetry processing, and FDH. These software components are integrated with a hierarchical control mode managing module that dictates which software components are currently active. The lowest mode in the hierarchy is the 'safest' one, in the sense that it utilizes a minimal complement of sensors and actuators to keep the spacecraft in a stable configuration (power and pointing constraints are maintained). As higher modes in the hierarchy are achieved, the various software functions are activated by the mode manager, and an increasing level of attitude control accuracy is provided. If FDH detects a constraint violation or other anomaly, it triggers a safing transition to a lower control mode. The WIRE ACS FSW satisfies all target acquisition and pointing accuracy requirements, enforces all pointing constraints, provides the ground with a simple means for reconfiguring the system via table load, and meets all the demands of its real-time embedded environment (16 MHz Intel

  16. The WSRT wide-field H I survey. I. The background galaxy sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, R.; Thilker, D.; Walterbos, R. A. M.

    2003-08-01

    We have used the Westerbork array to carry out an unbiased wide-field survey for H I emission features, achieving an RMS sensitivity of about 18 mJy/Beam at a velocity resolution of 17 km s-1 over 1800 deg2 and between -1000 < VHel <+6500 km s-1. The primary data consists of auto-correlation spectra with an effective angular resolution of 49' FWHM, although cross-correlation data were also acquired. The survey region is centered approximately on the position of Messier 31 and is Nyquist-sampled over 60x 30o in RA x Dec. More than 100 distinct features are detected at high significance in each of the two velocity regimes (negative and positive LGSR velocities). In this paper we present the results for our H I detections of external galaxies at positive LGSR velocity. We detect 155 external galaxies in excess of 8sigma in integrated H I flux density. Plausible optical associations are found within a 30' search radius for all but one of our H I detections in DSS images, although several are not previously cataloged or do not have published red-shift determinations. Our detection without a DSS association is at low galactic latitude. Twenty-three of our objects are detected in H I for the first time. We classify almost half of our detections as ``confused'', since one or more companions is cataloged within a radius of 30' and a velocity interval of 400 km s-1. We identify a handful of instances of significant positional offsets exceeding 10 kpc of unconfused optical galaxies with the associated H I centroid, possibly indicative of severe tidal distortions or uncataloged gas-rich companions. A possible trend is found for an excess of detected H I flux in unconfused galaxies within our large survey beam relative to that detected previously in smaller telescope beams, both as function of increasing distance and increasing gas mass. This may be an indication for a diffuse gaseous component on 100 kpc scales in the environment of massive galaxies or a population of

  17. Removing cosmic-ray hits from multiorbit HST Wide Field Camera images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windhorst, Rogier A.; Franklin, Barbara E.; Neuschaefer, Lyman W.

    1994-01-01

    We present an optimized algorithm that removes cosmic rays ('CRs') from multiorbit Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field/Planetary Camera ('WF/PC') images. It computes the image noise in every iteration from the WF/PC CCD equation. This includes all known sources of random and systematic calibration errors. We test this algorithm on WF/PC stacks of 2-12 orbits as a function of the number of available orbits and the formal Poissonian sigma-clipping level. We find that the algorithm needs greater than or equal 4 WF/PC exposures to locate the minimal sky signal (which is noticeably affected by CRs), with an optimal clipping level at 2-2.5 x sigma(sub Poisson). We analyze the CR flux detected on multiorbit 'CR stacks,' which are constructed by subtracting the best CR filtered images from the unfiltered 8-12 orbit average. We use an automated object finder to determine the surface density of CRS as a function of the apparent magnitude (or ADU flux) they would have generated in the images had they not been removed. The power law slope of the CR 'counts' (gamma approximately = 0.6 for N(m) m(exp gamma)) is steeper than that of the faint galaxy counts down to V approximately = 28 mag. The CR counts show a drop off between 28 less than or approximately V less than or approximately 30 mag (the latter is our formal 2 sigma point source sensitivity without spherical aberration). This prevents the CR sky integral from diverging, and is likely due to a real cutoff in the CR energy distribution below approximately 11 ADU per orbit. The integral CR surface density is less than or approximately 10(exp 8)/sq. deg, and their sky signal is V approximately = 25.5-27.0 mag/sq. arcsec, or 3%-13% of our NEP sky background (V = 23.3 mag/sq. arcsec), and well above the EBL integral of the deepest galaxy counts (B(sub J) approximately = 28.0 mag/sq. arcsec). We conclude that faint CRs will always contribute to the sky signal in the deepest WF/PC images. Since WFPC2 has approximately 2.7x

  18. A PANCHROMATIC CATALOG OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES AT INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT IN THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, M. J.; Cohen, S. H.; Windhorst, R. A.; Kaviraj, S.; Crockett, R. M.; Silk, J.; O'Connell, R. W.; Hathi, N. P.; McCarthy, P. J.; Ryan, R. E. Jr.; Koekemoer, A.; Bond, H. E.; Yan, H.; Kimble, R. A.; Balick, B.; Calzetti, D.; Disney, M. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, J. A.; Hall, D. N. B.; and others

    2012-03-01

    In the first of a series of forthcoming publications, we present a panchromatic catalog of 102 visually selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) from observations in the Early Release Science (ERS) program with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) field. Our ETGs span a large redshift range, 0.35 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.5, with each redshift spectroscopically confirmed by previous published surveys of the ERS field. We combine our measured WFC3 ERS and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) GOODS-S photometry to gain continuous sensitivity from the rest-frame far-UV to near-IR emission for each ETG. The superior spatial resolution of the HST over this panchromatic baseline allows us to classify the ETGs by their small-scale internal structures, as well as their local environment. By fitting stellar population spectral templates to the broadband photometry of the ETGs, we determine that the average masses of the ETGs are comparable to the characteristic stellar mass of massive galaxies, 10{sup 11} < M{sub *}[M{sub Sun }]<10{sup 12}. By transforming the observed photometry into the Galaxy Evolution Explorer FUV and NUV, Johnson V, and Sloan Digital Sky Survey g' and r' bandpasses we identify a noteworthy diversity in the rest-frame UV-optical colors and find the mean rest-frame (FUV-V) = 3.5 and (NUV-V) = 3.3, with 1{sigma} standard deviations {approx_equal}1.0. The blue rest-frame UV-optical colors observed for most of the ETGs are evidence for star formation during the preceding gigayear, but no systems exhibit UV-optical photometry consistent with major recent ({approx}<50 Myr) starbursts. Future publications which address the diversity of stellar populations likely to be present in these ETGs, and the potential mechanisms by which recent star formation episodes are activated, are discussed.

  19. High spatial and temporal resolution wide-field imaging of neuron activity using quantum NV-diamond.

    PubMed

    Hall, L T; Beart, G C G; Thomas, E A; Simpson, D A; McGuinness, L P; Cole, J H; Manton, J H; Scholten, R E; Jelezko, F; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Petrou, S; Hollenberg, L C L

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative understanding of the dynamics of biological neural networks is fundamental to gaining insight into information processing in the brain. While techniques exist to measure spatial or temporal properties of these networks, it remains a significant challenge to resolve the neural dynamics with subcellular spatial resolution. In this work we consider a fundamentally new form of wide-field imaging for neuronal networks based on the nanoscale magnetic field sensing properties of optically active spins in a diamond substrate. We analyse the sensitivity of the system to the magnetic field generated by an axon transmembrane potential and confirm these predictions experimentally using electronically-generated neuron signals. By numerical simulation of the time dependent transmembrane potential of a morphologically reconstructed hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron, we show that the imaging system is capable of imaging planar neuron activity non-invasively at millisecond temporal resolution and micron spatial resolution over wide-fields.

  20. Construction Productivity Advancement Research (CPAR) Program: Improved Materials and Processes for Sealing and Resealing Joints in Portland Cement Concrete Pavements - Field Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    compositions of material- are currently used for scaling portland cement concrete (PCC) joints . These materials vary widely in chemi- cal complexity...PRODUCTIVITY ADVANCEMENT RESEARCH (CPAR) PROGRAM Improved Materials and Processes for Sealing and Resealing Joints in Portland Cement Concrete Pavements...Processes for Sealing and Resealing Joints in Portland Cement Concrete Pavements-Field Evaluation by Larry N. Lynch, Dewey W. White Accesion

  1. Genome-Wide Association Mapping for Intelligence in Military Working Dogs: Development of Advanced Classification Algorithm for Genome-Wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    distribution unlimited. QC – quality control QTL – quantitative trait loci SNP – single nucleotide polymorphism TE – Tris + EDTA TBE – Tris + Boric Acid + EDTA WGSA – whole genome sampling assay ...canine intelligence testing protocol EDTA – ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid GWAS – genome-wide association study LD – linkage disequilibrium MWD

  2. Recent advances in the field of anti-cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Henrique; Kwok, Hang Fai

    2015-01-01

    Background The main goal of anti-cancer therapy is to specifically inhibit the malignant activity of cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unaffected. As such, for every proposed therapy, it is important to keep in mind the therapeutic index — the ratio of the toxic dose over the therapeutic dose. The use of immunotherapy has allowed a means to both specifically block protein–protein interaction and deliver cytotoxic events to a tumor-specific antigen. Review scope It is the objective of this review to give an overview on current immunotherapy treatment for cancers using monoclonal antibodies. We demonstrate three exciting targets for immunotherapy, TNF-α Converting Enzyme (TACE), Cathepsin S and Urokinase Plasmogen Activator and go over the advances made with one of the most used monoclonal antibodies in cancer therapy, Rituximab; as well as Herceptin, which is used for breast cancer therapy. Furthermore, we touch on other venues of immunotherapy, such as adaptive cell transfer, the use of nucleic acids and the use of dendritic cells. Finally, we summarize some ongoing studies that spell tentative advancements for anti-cancer immunotherapy. General significance Immunotherapy is at the forefront of anti-cancer therapies, allying both a high degree of specificity to general high effectiveness and fewer side-effects. PMID:26673349

  3. Development of an optical imaging platform for functional imaging of small animals using wide-field excitation

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Vivek; Chen, Jin; Intes, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    The design and characterization of a time-resolved functional imager using a wide-field excitation scheme for small animal imaging is described. The optimal operation parameters are established based on phantom studies. The performance of the platform for functional imaging and the simultaneous 3D reconstruction of absorption and scattering coefficients is investigated in vitro. PMID:21258454

  4. A Near IR Fabry-Perot Interferometer for Wide Field, Low Resolution Hyperspectral Imaging on the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, R. K.; Satyapal, S.; Greenhouse, M. A.; Barclay, R.; Amato, D.; Arritt, B.; Brown, G.; Harvey, V.; Holt, C.; Kuhn, J.

    2000-01-01

    We discuss work in progress on a near-infrared tunable bandpass filter for the Goddard baseline wide field camera concept of the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM). This filter, the Demonstration Unit for Low Order Cryogenic Etalon (DULCE), is designed to demonstrate a high efficiency scanning Fabry-Perot etalon operating in interference orders 1 - 4 at 30K with a high stability DSP based servo control system. DULCE is currently the only available tunable filter for lower order cryogenic operation in the near infrared. In this application, scanning etalons will illuminate the focal plane arrays with a single order of interference to enable wide field lower resolution hyperspectral imaging over a wide range of redshifts. We discuss why tunable filters are an important instrument component in future space-based observatories.

  5. Keratoprosthesis: A Review of Recent Advances in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Salvador-Culla, Borja; Kolovou, Paraskevi E.

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery in the years of the French Revolution, the field of keratoprostheses has evolved significantly. However, the path towards its present state has not always been an easy one. Initially discarded for its devastating complications, the introduction of new materials and the discovery of antibiotics in the last century gave new life to the field. Since then, the use of keratoprostheses for severe ocular surface disorders and corneal opacities has increased significantly, to the point that it has become a standard procedure for corneal specialists worldwide. Although the rate of complications has significantly been reduced, these can impede the long-term success, since some of them can be visually devastating. In an attempt to overcome these complications, researchers in the field have been recently working on improving the design of the currently available devices, by introducing the use of new materials that are more biocompatible with the eye. Here we present an update on the most recent research in the field. PMID:27213461

  6. ELECTRON HOLOGRAPHY OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS - RECENT THEORETICAL ADVANCES.

    SciTech Connect

    BELEGGIA,M.; POZZI, G.; TONOMURA, A.

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown in this work that the Fourier space approach can be fruitfully applied to the calculation of the fields and the associated electron optical phase shift of several magnetic and electrostatic structures, like superconducting vortices in conventional and high-T{sub c} superconductors, reverse biased p-n junctions, magnetic domains and nanoparticles. In all these cases, this novel approach has led to unexpected but extremely interesting results, very often expressed in analytical form, which allow the quantitative and reliable interpretation of the experimental data collected by means of electron holography or of more conventional Lorentz microscopy techniques. Moreover, it is worth recalling that whenever long-range electromagnetic fields are involved, a physical model of the object under investigation is necessary in order to take into account correctly the perturbation of the reference wave induced by the tail of the field protruding into the vacuum. For these reasons, we believe that the Fourier space approach for phase computations we have introduced and discussed in this chapter will represent an invaluable tool for the investigation of electromagnetic fields at the meso- and nano-scale.

  7. Quantifying the area-wide dispersal patterns of honeybees in commercial alfalfa fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to examine the foraging range of honey bees in an agroecosystem dominated by a glyphosate-resistant Roundup Ready® (RR) alfalfa seed production field and several non-RR fields. Honey bee self-marking devices were attached to colonies originating from nine different apiary locat...

  8. A Novel superconducting toroidal field magnet concept using advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, J.

    1992-03-01

    The plasma physics database indicates that two distinct approaches to tokamak design may lead to commercial fusion reactors: low Aspect ratio, high plasma current, relatively low magnetic field devices, and high Aspect ratio, high field devices. The former requires significant enhancements in plasma performance, while the latter depends primarily upon technology development. The key technology for the commercialization of the high-field approach is large, high magnetic field superconducting magnets. In this paper, the physics motivation for the high field approach and key superconducting magnet (SCM) development issues are reviewed. Improved SCM performance may be obtained from improved materials and/or improved engineering. Superconducting materials ranging from NbTi to high- T c oxides are reviewed, demonstrating the broad range of potential superconducting materials. Structural material options are discussed, including cryogenic steel alloys and fiber-reinforced composite materials. Again, the breadth of options is highlighted. The potential for improved magnet engineering is quantified in terms of the Virial Theorem Limit, and two examples of approaches to highly optimized magnet configurations are discussed. The force-reduced concept, which is a finite application of the force-free solutions to Ampere's Law, appear promising for large SCMs but may be limited by the electromagnetics of a fusion plasma. The Solid Superconducting Cylinder (SSC) concept is proposed. This concept combines the unique properties of high- T c superconductors within a low- T c SCM to obtain (1) significant reductions in the structural material volume, (2) a decoupling of the tri-axial (compressive and tensile) stress state, and (3) a demountable TF magnet system. The advantages of this approach are quantified in terms of a 24 T commercial reactor TF magnet system. Significant reductions in the mechanical stress and the TF radial build are demonstrated.

  9. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 Observations of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Two groups have recently used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC 2) to acquire new high-resolution images of the planet Neptune. Members of the WFPC-2 Science Team, lead by John Trauger, acquired the first series of images on 27 through 29 June 1994. These were the highest resolution images of Neptune taken since the Voyager-2 flyby in August of 1989. A more comprehensive program is currently being conducted by Heidi Hammel and Wes Lockwood. These two sets of observations are providing a wealth of new information about the structure, composition, and meteorology of this distant planet's atmosphere.

    Neptune is currently the most distant planet from the sun, with an orbital radius of 4.5 billion kilometers (2.8 billion miles, or 30 Astronomical Units). Even though its diameter is about four times that of the Earth (49,420 vs. 12,742 km), ground-based telescopes reveal a tiny blue disk that subtends less than 1/1200 of a degree (2.3 arc-seconds). Neptune has therefore been a particularly challenging object to study from the ground because its disk is badly blurred by the Earth's atmosphere. In spite of this, ground-based astronomers had learned a great deal about this planet since its position was first predicted by John C. Adams and Urbain Leverrier in 1845. For example, they had determined that Neptune was composed primarily of hydrogen and helium gas, and that its blue color caused by the presence of trace amounts of the gas methane, which absorbs red light. They had also detected bright cloud features whose brightness changed with time, and tracked these clouds to infer a rotation period between 17 and 22 hours.

    When the Voyager-2 spacecraft flew past the Neptune in 1989, its instruments revealed a surprising array of meteorological phenomena, including strong winds, bright, high-altitude clouds, and two large dark spots attributed to long-lived giant storm systems. These bright clouds and dark spots were tracked as they

  10. Non-invasive continuous imaging of drug release from soy-based skin equivalent using wide-field interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabai, Haniel; Baranes-Zeevi, Maya; Zilberman, Meital; Shaked, Natan T.

    2013-04-01

    We propose an off-axis interferometric imaging system as a simple and unique modality for continuous, non-contact and non-invasive wide-field imaging and characterization of drug release from its polymeric device used in biomedicine. In contrast to the current gold-standard methods in this field, usually based on chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques, our method requires no user intervention during the experiment, and only one test-tube is prepared. We experimentally demonstrate imaging and characterization of drug release from soy-based protein matrix, used as skin equivalent for wound dressing with controlled anesthetic, Bupivacaine drug release. Our preliminary results demonstrate the high potential of our method as a simple and low-cost modality for wide-field imaging and characterization of drug release from drug delivery devices.

  11. A low-cost and versatile system for projecting wide-field visual stimuli within fMRI scanners

    PubMed Central

    Greco, V.; Frijia, F.; Mikellidou, K.; Montanaro, D.; Farini, A.; D’Uva, M.; Poggi, P.; Pucci, M.; Sordini, A.; Morrone, M. C.; Burr, D. C.

    2016-01-01

    We have constructed and tested a custom-made magnetic-imaging-compatible visual projection system designed to project on a very wide visual field (~80°). A standard projector was modified with a coupling lens, projecting images into the termination of an image fiber. The other termination of the fiber was placed in the 3-T scanner room with a projection lens, which projected the images relayed by the fiber onto a screen over the head coil, viewed by a participant wearing magnifying goggles. To validate the system, wide-field stimuli were presented in order to identify retinotopic visual areas. The results showed that this low-cost and versatile optical system may be a valuable tool to map visual areas in the brain that process peripheral receptive fields. PMID:26092392

  12. A low-cost and versatile system for projecting wide-field visual stimuli within fMRI scanners.

    PubMed

    Greco, V; Frijia, F; Mikellidou, K; Montanaro, D; Farini, A; D'Uva, M; Poggi, P; Pucci, M; Sordini, A; Morrone, M C; Burr, D C

    2016-06-01

    We have constructed and tested a custom-made magnetic-imaging-compatible visual projection system designed to project on a very wide visual field (~80°). A standard projector was modified with a coupling lens, projecting images into the termination of an image fiber. The other termination of the fiber was placed in the 3-T scanner room with a projection lens, which projected the images relayed by the fiber onto a screen over the head coil, viewed by a participant wearing magnifying goggles. To validate the system, wide-field stimuli were presented in order to identify retinotopic visual areas. The results showed that this low-cost and versatile optical system may be a valuable tool to map visual areas in the brain that process peripheral receptive fields.

  13. Wide-Viewing-Angle Hybrid Aligned Nematic Liquid Crystal Cell Controlled by Complex Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seung Ho; Kim, Hyang Yul; Kim, Jae-Hyung; Nam, Sang-Hee; Lee, Myong-Hoon; Lee, Seung Hee

    2002-07-01

    We have developed a hybrid aligned nematic liquid crystal (LC) cell driven by a complex electric field. In the device, the pixel electrode exists on the bottom substrate and the counter electrodes exist on the top and bottom substrates such that with a bias voltage both vertical and horizontal fields are generated. The LC molecules are hybrid aligned with homogeneous alignment on the bottom substrate where the alignment direction is coincident with one of the transmission axes of the crossed polarizers. Therefore, the cell appears to be black in the absence of an electric field. When a voltage is applied to obtain a white state, both vertical and horizontal fields enable the LC molecules to rotate with lowered tilt angles than those in the dark state. The device shows a much wider viewing angle than that of the twisted nematic mode, high light efficiency and low driving voltage in electro-optic characteristics.

  14. Constraints on lunar dynamo mechanism for interpreting lunar-wide magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemant Singh, Kumar; Kuang, Weijia

    2015-04-01

    Moon, once considered an in-active celesitial body, surprisingly showed evidences of magnetized crust in satellite and returned samples from Apollo mission. Several mechanisms have been suggested in the past for the origin of the lunar magnetization, but the origin of the magnetization remains unknown. Among the suggested mechanisms is the paleo lunar dynamo, i.e. the crustal magnetization was acquired in an internal magnetic field generated by a dynamo once operated in the lunar core. A key for this to work is that the generated field strength should be sufficient to explain observations. The paleo field strengths from the past paleomagnetic measurements of returned samples show that they vary from different sample sites, ranging from 33.3 (±8.18) to 5430 (±1330) nT. Results from the satellite data are more than an order of magnitude weaker than those from the samples. The dynamo field strength could be significantly weaker. Simple envelope estimation of magnetic induction can lead to the necessary condition for a dynamo is magnetic Reynolds number ≥ 10, which is approximately two orders of magnitude smaller than that estimated for the Earth's core. Our estimation with a strong-field lunar dynamo suggests that the field strengths are between 155 and 700 nT, depending on the lunar core size. This estimation is consistent with more recent results from paleomagnetic analysis of Apollo sample (76535) which provides paleointensity of the Moon to be at least 300 to 1000 nT.

  15. A Demonstration of Accurate Wide-field V-band Photometry Using a Consumer-grade DSLR Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloppenborg, B. K.; Pieri, R.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Maravelias, G.; Pearson, T.

    2012-07-01

    The authors examined the suitability of using a Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) camera for stellar photometry and, in particular, investigated wide field exposures made with minimal equipment for analysis of bright variable stars. A magnitude-limited sample of stars was evaluated exhibiting a wide range of (B-V) colors taken from four fields between Cygnus and Draco. Experiments comparing green channel DSLR photometry with VT photometry of the Tycho 2 catalogue showed very good agreement. Encouraged by the results of these comparisons, a method for performing color-based transformations to the more widely used Johnson V filter band was developed and tested. This method is similar to that recommended for Tycho 2 VT data. The experimental evaluation of the proposed method led to recommendations concerning the feasibility of high precision DSLR photometry for certain types of variable star projects. Most importantly, we have demonstrated that DSLR cameras can be used as accurate, wide field photometers with only a minimal investment of funds and time.

  16. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 Observations of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Two groups have recently used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC 2) to acquire new high-resolution images of the planet Neptune. Members of the WFPC-2 Science Team, lead by John Trauger, acquired the first series of images on 27 through 29 June 1994. These were the highest resolution images of Neptune taken since the Voyager-2 flyby in August of 1989. A more comprehensive program is currently being conducted by Heidi Hammel and Wes Lockwood. These two sets of observations are providing a wealth of new information about the structure, composition, and meteorology of this distant planet's atmosphere.

    Neptune is currently the most distant planet from the sun, with an orbital radius of 4.5 billion kilometers (2.8 billion miles, or 30 Astronomical Units). Even though its diameter is about four times that of the Earth (49,420 vs. 12,742 km), ground-based telescopes reveal a tiny blue disk that subtends less than 1/1200 of a degree (2.3 arc-seconds). Neptune has therefore been a particularly challenging object to study from the ground because its disk is badly blurred by the Earth's atmosphere. In spite of this, ground-based astronomers had learned a great deal about this planet since its position was first predicted by John C. Adams and Urbain Leverrier in 1845. For example, they had determined that Neptune was composed primarily of hydrogen and helium gas, and that its blue color caused by the presence of trace amounts of the gas methane, which absorbs red light. They had also detected bright cloud features whose brightness changed with time, and tracked these clouds to infer a rotation period between 17 and 22 hours.

    When the Voyager-2 spacecraft flew past the Neptune in 1989, its instruments revealed a surprising array of meteorological phenomena, including strong winds, bright, high-altitude clouds, and two large dark spots attributed to long-lived giant storm systems. These bright clouds and dark spots were tracked as they

  17. Integrating Field-Centered, Project Based Activities with Academic Year Coursework: A Curriculum Wide Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, P. R.; Brown, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Based upon constructivist principles and the recognition that many students are motivated by hands-on activities and field experiences, we designed a new undergraduate curriculum at Lake Superior State University. One of our major goals was to develop stand-alone field projects in most of the academic year courses. Examples of courses impacted include structural geology, geophysics, and geotectonics, Students learn geophysical concepts in the context of near surface field-based geophysical studies while students in structural geology learn about structural processes through outcrop study of fractures, folds and faults. In geotectonics students learn about collisional and rifting processes through on-site field studies of specific geologic provinces. Another goal was to integrate data and samples collected by students in our sophomore level introductory field course along with stand-alone field projects in our clastic systems and sequence stratigraphy courses. Our emphasis on active learning helps students develop a meaningful geoscience knowledge base and complex reasoning skills in authentic contexts. We simulate the activities of practicing geoscientists by engaging students in all aspects of a project, for example: field-oriented project planning and design; acquiring, analyzing, and interpreting data; incorporating supplemental material and background data; and preparing oral and written project reports. We find through anecdotal evidence including student comments and personal observation that the projects stimulate interest, provide motivation for learning new concepts, integrate skill and concept acquisition vertically through the curriculum, apply concepts from multiple geoscience subdisiplines, and develop soft skills such as team work, problem solving, critical thinking and communication skills. Through this projected-centered Lake Superior State University geology curriculum students practice our motto of "learn geology by doing geology."

  18. [Application of advanced engineering technologies to medical and rehabilitation fields].

    PubMed

    Fujie, Masakatsu

    2012-07-01

    The words "Japan syndrome" can now be heard increasingly through the media. Facing the approach of an elderly-dominated society, Robot Technology(RT)is expected to play an important role in Japan's medical, rehabilitation, and daily support fields. The industrial robot, which has already spread through the world with a great success in certain isolated environments by doing the work which is specialized for the thing with the hard known characteristic. By comparison, in the medical and rehabilitation fields, environments always change intricately, and individual characteristics differ from person to person. Furthermore, there are many times when a robot will be asked to directly interact with people. Moreover, the relation between a robot and a person turns into a relation which should involve contact flexibly according to a situation, and also turns into a relation which should avoid contact. In our group, we have so far developed practical rehabilitation and medical robots which can respond to difficulties such as environmental change and individual specificity. In developing rehabilitation robots, it is especially important to consider intuitive operability and individual differences. In addition, in developing medical robots, it is important to replace the experimental knowledge of surgeons to the mechanical quantitative properties. In this article, we introduce some practical examples of rehabilitation and medical robots interweaving several detailed technologies we have so far developed.

  19. Ground-based astrometry with wide field imagers. V. Application to near-infrared detectors: HAWK-I@VLT/ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libralato, M.; Bellini, A.; Bedin, L. R.; Piotto, G.; Platais, I.; Kissler-Patig, M.; Milone, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    High-precision astrometry requires accurate point-spread function modeling and accurate geometric-distortion corrections. This paper demonstrates that it is possible to achieve both requirements with data collected at the high acuity wide-field K-band imager (HAWK-I), a wide-field imager installed at the Nasmyth focus of UT4/VLT ESO 8 m telescope. Our final astrometric precision reaches ~3 mas per coordinate for a well-exposed star in a single image with a systematic error less than 0.1 mas. We constructed calibrated astro-photometric catalogs and atlases of seven fields: the Baade's window, NGC 6656, NGC 6121, NGC 6822, NGC 6388, NGC 104, and the James Webb Space Telescope calibration field (in the Large Magellanic Cloud). We make these catalogs and images electronically available to the community. Furthermore, as a demonstration of the efficacy of our approach, we combined archival material taken with the optical wide-field imager at the MPI/ESO 2.2 m with HAWK-I observations. We showed that we are able to achieve an excellent separation between cluster members and field objects for NGC 6656 and NGC 6121 with a time base-line of about 8 years. Using both HST and HAWK-I data, we also study the radial distribution of the SGB populations in NGC 6656 and conclude that the radial trend is flat within our uncertainty. We also provide membership probabilities for most of the stars in NGC 6656 and NGC 6121 catalogs and estimate membership for the published variable stars in these two fields. Catalogs, fortran code, and distortion maps are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/563/A80Based on observations with the 8 m VLT ESO telescope.

  20. AO modelling for wide-field E-ELT instrumentation using Monte-Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, Alastair; Morris, Simon; Morris, Tim; Myers, Richard

    2014-08-01

    Extensive simulations of AO performance for several E-ELT instruments (including EAGLE, MOSAIC, HIRES and MAORY) have been ongoing using the Monte-Carlo Durham AO Simulation Package. We present the latest simulation results, including studies into DM requirements, dependencies of performance on asterism, detailed point spread function generation, accurate telescope modelling, and studies of laser guide star effects. Details of simulations will be given, including the use of optical models of the E-ELT to generate wave- front sensor pupil illumination functions, laser guide star modelling, and investigations of different many-layer atmospheric profiles. We discuss issues related to ELT-scale simulation, how we have overcome these, and how we will be approaching forthcoming issues such as modelling of advanced wavefront control, multi-rate wavefront sensing, and advanced treatment of extended laser guide star spots. We also present progress made on integrating simulation with AO real-time control systems. The impact of simulation outcomes on instrument design studies will be discussed, and the ongoing work plan presented.