Science.gov

Sample records for advanced x-ray spectroscopy

  1. The Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Bookbinder, Jay; Petre, Robert; Smith, Randall; Ptak, Andrew; Tananbaum, Harvey; Garcia, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Following recommendations from the 2010 "New Worlds, New Horizons" (NWNH) report, the Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO) concept streamlines the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) mission to concentrate on the science objectives that are enabled by high-resolution spectroscopic capabilities. AXSIO will trace orbits close to the event horizon of black holes, measure black hole spin for tens of supermassive black holes (SMBH), use spectroscopy to characterize outflows and the environment of AGN during their peak activity, observe 5MBH out to redshift z=6, map bulk motions and turbulence in galaxy clusters, find the missing baryons in the cosmic web using background quasars, and observe the process of cosmic feedback where black holes and supernovae inject energy on galactic and intergalactic scales. These measurements are enabled by a 0.9 sq m collecting area at 1.25 keV, a micro calorimeter array providing high-resolution spectroscopic imaging and a deployable high efficiency grating spectrometer. AXSIO delivers a 30-fold increase in effective area for high resolution spectroscopy. The key simplifications are guided by recommendations in the NWNH panel report include a reduction in focal length from 20m to 10m, eliminating the extendable optical bench, and a reduction in the instrument complement from six to two, avoiding a movable instrument platform. A focus on spectroscopic science allows the spatial resolution requirement to be relaxed to 10 arc sec (with a 5 arc sec goal). These simplifications decrease the total mission cost to under the $2B cost to NASA recommended by NWNH. AXSIO will be available to the entire astronomical community with observing allocations based on peer-review.

  2. The Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Bookbinder, Jay; Petre, Robert; Smith, Randall; Ptak, Andrew; Tananbaum, Harvey; Bregman, Joel; Garcia, Michael; Zhang, W.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C.; Bandler, S.

    2012-09-01

    Following recommendations from the 2010 "New Worlds, New Horizons" (NWNH) report, the Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO) concept streamlines the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) mission to concentrate on the science objectives that are enabled by high-resolution spectroscopic capabilities. AXSIO will trace orbits close to the event horizon of black holes, measure black hole spin for tens of supermassive black holes (SMBH), use spectroscopy to characterize outflows and the environment of AGN during their peak activity, observe SMBH out to redshift z=6, map bulk motions and turbulence in galaxy clusters, find the missing baryons in the cosmic web using background quasars, and observe the process of cosmic feedback where black holes and supernovae inject energy on galactic and intergalactic scales. These measurements are enabled by a 0.9 sq m collecting area at 1.25 keV, a microcalorimeter array providing high-resolution spectroscopic imaging and a deployable high efficiency grating spectrometer. AXSIO delivers a 30-fold increase in effective area for high-resolution spectroscopy. The key simplifications are guided by recommendations in the NWNH panel report include a reduction in focal length from 20m to 10m, eliminating the extendable optical bench, and a reduction in the instrument complement from six to two, avoiding a movable instrument platform. A focus on spectroscopic science allows the spatial resolution requirement to be relaxed to 10 arcsec (with a 5 arc sec goal). These simplifications decrease the total mission cost to under the $2B cost to NASA recommended by NWNH. AXSIO will be available to the entire astronomical community with observing allocations based on peer- review.

  3. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  4. Advanced experimental applications for x-ray transmission gratings spectroscopy using a novel grating fabrication method.

    PubMed

    Hurvitz, G; Ehrlich, Y; Strum, G; Shpilman, Z; Levy, I; Fraenkel, M

    2012-08-01

    A novel fabrication method for soft x-ray transmission grating and other optical elements is presented. The method uses focused-ion-beam technology to fabricate high-quality free standing grating bars on transmission electron microscopy grids. High quality transmission gratings are obtained with superb accuracy and versatility. Using these gratings and back-illuminated CCD camera, absolutely calibrated x-ray spectra can be acquired for soft x-ray source diagnostics in the 100-3000 eV spectral range. Double grating combinations of identical or different parameters are easily fabricated, allowing advanced one-shot application of transmission grating spectroscopy. These applications include spectroscopy with different spectral resolutions, bandwidths, dynamic ranges, and may serve for identification of high-order contribution, and spectral calibrations of various x-ray optical elements. PMID:22938276

  5. Advanced experimental applications for x-ray transmission gratings spectroscopy using a novel grating fabrication method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurvitz, G.; Ehrlich, Y.; Strum, G.; Shpilman, Z.; Levy, I.; Fraenkel, M.

    2012-08-01

    A novel fabrication method for soft x-ray transmission grating and other optical elements is presented. The method uses focused-ion-beam technology to fabricate high-quality free standing grating bars on transmission electron microscopy grids. High quality transmission gratings are obtained with superb accuracy and versatility. Using these gratings and back-illuminated CCD camera, absolutely calibrated x-ray spectra can be acquired for soft x-ray source diagnostics in the 100-3000 eV spectral range. Double grating combinations of identical or different parameters are easily fabricated, allowing advanced one-shot application of transmission grating spectroscopy. These applications include spectroscopy with different spectral resolutions, bandwidths, dynamic ranges, and may serve for identification of high-order contribution, and spectral calibrations of various x-ray optical elements.

  6. Advances in transmission x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect

    Ceglio, N.M.

    1983-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics are reviewed. Specific advances in coded aperture imaging, zone plate lens fabrication, time and space resolved spectroscopy, and CCD x-ray detection are discussed.

  7. Thin film subsurface environments; Advanced X-ray spectroscopies and a novel Bayesian inference modeling algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Jonathan R.

    New condensed matter metrologies are being used to probe ever smaller length scales. In support of the diverse field of materials research synchrotron based spectroscopies provide sub-micron spatial resolutions and a breadth of photon wavelengths for scientific studies. For electronic materials the thinnest layers in a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) device have been reduced to just a few nanometers. This raises concerns for layer uniformity, complete surface coverage, and interfacial quality. Deposition processes like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been shown to deposit the needed high-quality films for the requisite thicknesses. However, new materials beget new chemistries and, unfortunately, unwanted side-reactions and by-products. CVD/ALD tools and chemical precursors provided by our collaborators at Air Liquide utilized these new chemistries and films were deposited for which novel spectroscopic characterization methods were used. The second portion of the thesis focuses on fading and decomposing paint pigments in iconic artworks. Efforts have been directed towards understanding the micro-environments causing degradation. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) and variable kinetic energy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (VKE-XPS) are advanced XPS techniques capable of elucidating both chemical environments and electronic band structures in sub-surface regions of electronic materials. HAXPES has been used to study the electronic band structure in a typical CMOS structure; it will be shown that unexpected band alignments are associated with the presence of electronic charges near a buried interface. Additionally, a computational modeling algorithm, Bayes-Sim, was developed to reconstruct compositional depth profiles (CDP) using VKE-XPS data sets; a subset algorithm also reconstructs CDP from angle-resolved XPS data. Reconstructed CDP produced by Bayes-Sim were most strongly correlated to the real

  8. Toward Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Henry Herng Wei

    2004-04-16

    The realization of tunable, ultrashort pulse x-ray sources promises to open new venues of science and to shed new light on long-standing problems in condensed matter physics and chemistry. Fundamentally new information can now be accessed. Used in a pump-probe spectroscopy, ultrashort x-ray pulses provide a means to monitor atomic rearrangement and changes in electronic structure in condensed-matter and chemical systems on the physically-limiting time-scales of atomic motion. This opens the way for the study of fast structural dynamics and the role they play in phase transitions, chemical reactions and the emergence of exotic properties in materials with strongly interacting degrees of freedom. The ultrashort pulse x-ray source developed at the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is based on electron slicing in storage rings, and generates {approx}100 femtosecond pulses of synchrotron radiation spanning wavelengths from the far-infrared to the hard x-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The tunability of the source allows for the adaptation of a broad range of static x-ray spectroscopies to useful pump-probe measurements. Initial experiments are attempted on transition metal complexes that exhibit relatively large structural changes upon photo-excitation and which have excited-state evolution determined by strongly interacting structural, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. Specifically, iron(II) complexes undergo a spin-crossover transition upon optical irradiation. The dynamics of the transition involve a metal-to-ligand charge transfer, a {Delta}S=2 change in magnetic moment and 10% bond dilation in the first coordination shell of the iron. Studies of the electronic dynamics are studied with time-resolved optical absorption measurements. The current progress of time-resolved structural studies to complete the picture of the spin-crossover transition is presented.

  9. Soft x-ray spectroscopy undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, K.J.; Xu, Z.; Moore, J.F.; Gluskin, E.

    1997-09-01

    Construction of the high-resolution soft x ray spectroscopy undulator beamline, 2ID-C, at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been completed. The beamline, one of two soft x ray beamlines at the APS, will cover the photon energy range from 500 to 3,000 eV, with a maximum resolving power between 7,000 and 14,000. The optical design is based on a spherical grating monochromator (SGM) giving both high resolution and high flux throughput. Photon flux is calculated to be approximately 10{sup 12}--10{sup 13} photons per second with a beam size of approximately 1 x 1 mm{sup 2} at the sample.

  10. X-ray astronomical spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Stephen S.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions of the Goddard group to the history of X-ray astronomy are numerous and varied. One role that the group has continued to play involves the pursuit of techniques for the measurement and interpretation of the X-ray spectra of cosmic sources. The latest development is the selection of the X-ray microcalorimeter for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) study payload. This technology is likely to revolutionize the study of cosmic X-ray spectra.

  11. Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular Environmental Science Beamline at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, Hendrik; Andersson, Klas J.; Araki, Tohru; Benzerara, Karim; Brown, Gordon E.; Dynes, Jay J.; Ghosal, Sutapa; Gilles, Mary K.; Hansen, Hans C.; Hemminger, J. C.; Hitchcock, Adam P.; Ketteler, Guido; Kilcoyne, Arthur L.; Kneedler, Eric M.; Lawrence, John R.; Leppard, Gary G.; Majzlam, Juraj; Mun, B. S.; Myneni, Satish C.; Nilsson, Anders R.; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Ogletree, D. F.; Pecher, Klaus H.; Salmeron, Miquel B.; Shuh, David K.; Tonner, Brian; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Warwick, Tony; Yoon, T. H.

    2006-02-01

    We present examples of the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopies and microscopies to environmentally-relevant samples. The experiments were performed at the Molecular Environmental Science beamline (11.0.2) at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Examples range from the study of water monolayers on Pt(111) single crystal surfaces using X-ray emission spectroscopy and the examination of alkali halide solution/water vapor interfaces using ambient pressure photoemission spectroscopy, to the investigation of actinides, river-water biofilms, Al-containing colloids and mineral-bacteria suspensions using scanning transmission X-ray spectromicroscopy. The results of our experiments show that spectroscopy and microscopy in the soft X-ray energy range are excellent tools for the investigation of environmentally relevant samples under realistic conditions, i.e. with water or water vapor present at ambient temperature.

  12. X-ray astronomical spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of the X-ray spectroscopy of celestial X-ray sources, ranging from nearby stars to distant quasars, is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of such spectroscopy as a useful and unique tool in the elucidation of the physical parameters of the sources. The spectroscopic analysis of degenerate and nondegenerate stellar systems, galactic clusters and active galactic nuclei, and supernova remnants is discussed.

  13. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains. PMID:26967404

  14. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  15. Advanced signal separation and recovery algorithms for digital x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Imbaby I.; El Tokhy, Mohamed S.

    2015-02-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is widely used for in-situ applications for samples analysis. Therefore, spectrum drawing and assessment of x-ray spectroscopy with high accuracy is the main scope of this paper. A Silicon Lithium Si(Li) detector that cooled with a nitrogen is used for signal extraction. The resolution of the ADC is 12 bits. Also, the sampling rate of ADC is 5 MHz. Hence, different algorithms are implemented. These algorithms were run on a personal computer with Intel core TM i5-3470 CPU and 3.20 GHz. These algorithms are signal preprocessing, signal separation and recovery algorithms, and spectrum drawing algorithm. Moreover, statistical measurements are used for evaluation of these algorithms. Signal preprocessing based on DC-offset correction and signal de-noising is performed. DC-offset correction was done by using minimum value of radiation signal. However, signal de-noising was implemented using fourth order finite impulse response (FIR) filter, linear phase least-square FIR filter, complex wavelet transforms (CWT) and Kalman filter methods. We noticed that Kalman filter achieves large peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) and lower error than other methods. However, CWT takes much longer execution time. Moreover, three different algorithms that allow correction of x-ray signal overlapping are presented. These algorithms are 1D non-derivative peak search algorithm, second derivative peak search algorithm and extrema algorithm. Additionally, the effect of signal separation and recovery algorithms on spectrum drawing is measured. Comparison between these algorithms is introduced. The obtained results confirm that second derivative peak search algorithm as well as extrema algorithm have very small error in comparison with 1D non-derivative peak search algorithm. However, the second derivative peak search algorithm takes much longer execution time. Therefore, extrema algorithm introduces better results over other algorithms. It has the advantage of recovering and

  16. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of aluminum and copper cleaning procedures for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, R.A.; McDowell, M.W.; Noonan, J.R. )

    1994-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), presently under construction, will produce x rays of unprecedented brightness. The storage ring where the x rays will be produced will be constructed from an extruded 6063 aluminum alloy, while transition pieces (flanges, etc.) will be made from a 2219 aluminum alloy. In addition, cooled photon absorbers will be placed in strategic locations throughout the ring to intercept the majority of the unused high power-density radiation. These will be made of either CDA-101 (OFHC) copper or glidcop (a dispersion strengthened copper alloy). Before any of these components can be assembled they must be cleaned to remove surface contaminants so that the ultrahigh vacuum ([lt]0.1 nTorr) necessary for successful operation can be achieved. Many recipes for cleaning aluminum and copper exist; however, most of them involve the use of chemicals that present safety and/or environmental concerns. We have undertaken an x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the effects of a variety of commercially available cleaners on the surface cleanliness of aluminum and copper. Several important results have been identified in this study. A simple alkaline detergent in an ultrasonic bath cleans aluminum alloys as effectively as the more aggressive cleaning solutions. The detergent can be used at 65 [degree]C to clean the 6063 alloy and at 50 [degree]C to clean the 2219 alloy. A citric acid based cleaner was found to be effective at cleaning copper, although the surface oxidizes rapidly. To date, we have been unable to find a universal cleaning procedure, i.e., one that is optimal for cleaning both Al and Cu.

  17. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissue, and can cause tissue death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light ... location of cavities within these light areas. The x-ray on the left clearly shows that the opacities ...

  18. X-ray spectroscopy of magnetic CVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Giorgio

    I discuss two topics in X-ray spectroscopy of magnetic CVs: reflection from the white dwarf surface, and opacity effects in the post shock plasma. I also briefly mention future observational perspectives, with particular emphasis on the Constellation X-ray mission.

  19. Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF): An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; ODell, S. L.; Elsner, R. F.; VanSpeybroeck, L. P.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) is the x-ray component of NASA's Great Observatories. To be launched in late 1998, AXAF will provide unprecedented capabilities for high-resolution imaging, spectrometric imaging, and high-resolution disperse spectroscopy, over the x-ray band from about 0.1 keV to 10 keV. With these capabilities, AXAF observations will address many of the outstanding questions in astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  20. Large Area X-Ray Spectroscopy Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H.

    1997-01-01

    The Large Area X-ray Spectroscopy (LAXS) mission concept study continues to evolve strongly following the merging of the LAXS mission with the Next Generation X-ray Observatory (NGXO, PI: Nick White) into the re-named High Throughput X-ray Spectroscopy (HTXS) Mission. HTXS retains key elements of the LAXS proposal, including the use of multiple satellites for risk-reduction and cost savings. A key achievement of the program has been the recommendation by the Structure and Evolution of the Universe (SEUS) (April 1997) for a new start for the HTXS mission in the 2000-2004 timeframe.

  1. Hard X-ray Pump, X-ray Probe Spectroscopy of Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loether, Aaron; Decamp, Matt; Walko, Donald

    Recent advancements in intense x-ray pulses have made it possible to perform hard x-ray pump probe spectroscopy. Inspired by optical pump probe, we've built a retroreflector for use with synchrotron based x-rays, using Germanium crystals at Bragg condition in place of mirrors, to control relative timing of x-ray pulses and perform time resolved measurements. Testing of multiple versions of the retroreflector was done both experimentally and via simulation; the comparison allows us to show efficiencies achievable theoretically and realistically. A proof of concept time resolved diffraction experiment on a Germanium 111 crystal was performed utilizing high intensity broadband x-ray pulses and the resulting heating and propagated strains were measured by low intensity monochromatic x-ray pulses. This work was supported from the DOE-EPSCoR Grant No. DE-FG02-11ER46816. Use of the 178 Advanced Photon Source was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, 179 Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  2. Photoelectron and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Of Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J; Chung, B; Schulze, R; Farr, J; Shuh, D

    2003-11-12

    We have performed Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy upon highly radioactive samples of Plutonium at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, CA, USA. First results from alpha and delta Plutonium are reported as well as plans for future studies of actinide studies.

  3. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  4. X-ray spectroscopy: Enlightened state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCusker, James K.

    2014-07-01

    Determining the sequence of events following photon absorption by a molecule can be a surprisingly challenging task. An innovative use of time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy has revealed an important insight into the ultrafast excited-state dynamics of a well-known inorganic chromophore.

  5. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of cleaning procedures for synchrotron radiation beamline materials at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Ryding, D.; Liu, C.; Kuzay, T.M.; McDowell, M.W.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    1995-05-01

    TZM (a high-temperature molybdenum alloy), machinable tungsten, and 304 stainless steel were cleaned using environmentally safe, commercially available cleaning detergents. The surface cleanliness was evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that a simple alkaline detergent is very effective at removal of organic and inorganic surface contaminants or foreign particle residue from machining processes. The detergent can be used with ultrasonic agitation at 140 {degree}F to clean the TZM molybdenum, machinable tungsten, and 304 stainless steel. A citric-acid-based detergent was also found to be effective at cleaning metal oxides, such as iron oxide, molybdenum oxide, as well as tungsten oxides, at mild temperatures with ultrasonic agitation, and it can be used to replace strong inorganic acids to improve cleaning safety and minimize waste disposal and other environmental problems. The efficiency of removing the metal oxides depends on both cleaning temperature and time. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Vacuum} {ital Society}

  6. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of cleaning procedures for synchrotron radiation beamline materials at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Ryding, D.; Liu, C.; Kuzay, T.M.; McDowell, M.W.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    TZM (a high temperature molybdenum alloy), machinable tungsten, and 304 stainless steel were cleaned using environmentally safe, commercially available cleaning detergents. The surface cleanliness was evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that a simple alkaline detergent is very effective at removal of organic and inorganic surface contaminants or foreign particle residue from machining processes. The detergent can be used with ultrasonic agitation at 140 F to clean the TZM molybdenum, machinable tungsten, and 304 stainless steel. A citric-acid-based detergent was also found to be effective at cleaning metal oxides, such as iron oxide, molybdenum oxide, as well as tungsten oxides at mild temperatures with ultrasonic agitation, and it can be used to replace strong inorganic acids to improve cleaning safety and minimize waste disposal and other environmental problems. The efficiency of removing the metal oxides depends on both cleaning temperature and time.

  7. AXIOM: Advanced X-ray imaging of the magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sembay, S.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C.; Kataria, D.; Kemble, S.; Milan, S.; Owen, C. J.; Read, A. M.; Peacocke, L.; Arridge, C. S.; Coates, A. J.; Collier, M. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Fraser, G.; Jones, G. H.; Lallement, R.; Lester, M.; Porter, F. S.; Yeoman, T.

    2012-04-01

    AXIOM (Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere) is a concept mission which aims to explain how the Earth's magnetosphere responds to the changing impact of the solar wind using a unique method never attempted before; performing wide-field soft X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of the magnetosheath, magnetopause and bow shock at high spatial and temporal resolution. Global imaging of these regions is possible because of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) process which produces elevated soft X-ray emission from the interaction of high charge-state solar wind ions with primarily neutral hydrogen in the Earth's exosphere and near-interplanetary space.

  8. AXIOM: Advanced X-Ray Imaging Of the Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sembay, S.; Branduardi-Rayrnont, G.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C; Kataria, D.; Kemble, S.; Milan, S.; Owen, C. J.; Read, A. M.; Peacocke, L.; Arridge, C. S.; Coates, A. J.; Collier, M. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Fraser, G.; Jones, G. H.; Lallement, R.; Lester, M.; Porter, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    AXIOM (Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere) is a concept mission which aims to explain how the Earth's magnetosphere responds to the changing impact of the solar wind using a unique method never attempted before; performing wide-field soft X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of the magnetosheath. magnetopause and bow shock at high spatial and temporal resolution. Global imaging of these regions is possible because of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) process which produces elevated soft X-ray emission from the interaction of high charge-state solar wind ions with primarily neutral hydrogen in the Earth's exosphere and near-interplanetary space.

  9. Large Area X-ray Spectroscopy Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, Harvey

    1996-01-01

    The Large Area X-ray Spectroscopy (LAXS) mission study concept has evolved strongly over the last year culminating in the merging of LAXS with the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) proposal for a similar mission, the Next Generation X-ray Observatory (NGXO, PI: Nick White). The resulting merger, re-named the High Throughput X-rays Spectroscopy (HTXS) Mission has also expanded by the inclusion of another SAO proposed new mission concept proposal, the Hard X-Ray Telescope (PI: Paul Gorenstein). The resultant multi-instrument mission retains much of heritage from the LAXS proposal, including the use of multiple satellites for robustness. These mergers resulted from a series of contacts between various team members, via e-mail, telecons, and in-person meetings. The impetus for the mergers was the fundamental similarity between the missions, and the recognition that all three proposal teams had significant contributions to make in the effort to define the next stage in the X-ray exploration of the universe. We have enclosed four items that represent some of the work that has occurred during the first year of the study: first, a presentation at the Leicester meeting, second a presentation that was made to Dan Goldin following the merging of LAXS and NGXO, third a copy of the first announcement for the Workshop, and finally the interim report that was prepared by the HTXS study team towards the end of the first year. This last document provides the foundation for the HTXS Technology Roadmap that is being generated. The HTXS roadmap will define the near-term goals that the merged mission must achieve over the next few years. A web site has been developed and populated that contains much of the material that has been generated over the past year.

  10. The superconducting high-resolution soft X-ray spectrometer at the advanced biological and environmental X-ray facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, S.; Drury, O. B.; George, S. J.; Cramer, S. P.

    2007-11-01

    We have built a 36-pixel superconducting tunnel junction X-ray spectrometer for chemical analysis of dilute samples in the soft X-ray band. It offers an energy resolution of ˜10-20 eV FWHM below 1 keV, a solid angle coverage of ˜10 -3, and can be operated at total rates of up to ˜10 6 counts/s. Here, we describe the spectrometer performance in speciation measurements by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Advanced Biological and Environmental X-ray facility at the ALS synchrotron.

  11. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy using microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.; Holt, S. S.; Madejski, G. M.; Moseley, S. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1988-01-01

    The use of microcalorimeters for high-resolution, high quantum efficiency, nondispersive X-ray spectroscopy has been demonstrated over the past few years. In this paper, the principles of X-ray calorimetry are reviewed, and the results of ongoing X-ray tests using microcalorimetry are summarized. An approach to building an X-ray calorimeter spectrometer is discussed.

  12. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Photoionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Spectroscopy allows study of sources on small spatial scales, and can provide detailed diagnostic information about elemental abundances, temperature, density and gas dynamics. For compact sources such as accreting black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGN) and X-ray binaries X-ray spectra provide truly unique insight. Observations using Chandra and XMM have revealed components of gas in these systems which were previously unknown or poorly studied. Interpretation of these data presents modeling and analysis challenges, and requires an understanding of atomic physics, ionization and spectrum formation in a radiation-dominated environment. In this talk I will discuss examples, and how they have contributed to our understanding of accreting sources and the nearby gas.

  13. Advanced X-ray diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila-Comamala, J.; Jefimovs, K.; Pilvi, T.; Ritala, M.; Sarkar, S. S.; Solak, H. H.; Guzenko, V. A.; Stampanoni, M.; Marone, F.; Raabe, J.; Tzvetkov, G.; Fink, R. H.; Grolimund, D.; Borca, C. N.; Kaulich, B.; David, C.

    2009-09-01

    X-ray microscopy greatly benefits from the advances in x-ray optics. At the Paul Scherrer Institut, developments in x-ray diffractive optics include the manufacture and optimization of Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) and diffractive optical elements for both soft and hard x-ray regimes. In particular, we demonstrate here a novel method for the production of ultra-high resolution FZPs. This technique is based on the deposition of a zone plate material (iridium) onto the sidewalls of a prepatterned template structure (silicon) by atomic layer deposition. This approach overcomes the limitations due to electron-beam writing of dense patterns in FZP fabrication and provides a clear route to push the resolution into sub-10 nm regime. A FZP fabricated by this method was used to resolve test structures with 12 nm lines and spaces at the scanning transmission x-ray microscope of the PolLux beamline of the Swiss Light Source at 1.2 keV photon energy.

  14. X-Ray spectroscopy of cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea

    1996-01-01

    Cooling flows in clusters of galaxies occur when the cooling time of the gas is shorter than the age of the cluster; material cools and falls to the center of the cluster potential. Evidence for short X-ray cooling times comes from imaging studies of clusters and X-ray spectroscopy of a few bright clusters. Because the mass accretion rate can be high (a few 100 solar mass units/year) the mass of material accumulated over the lifetime of a cluster can be as high as 10(exp 12) solar mass units. However, there is little evidence for this material at other wavelengths, and the final fate of the accretion material is unknown. X-ray spectra obtained with the Einstein SSS show evidence for absorption; if confirmed this result would imply that the accretion material is in the form of cool dense clouds. However ice on the SSS make these data difficult to interpret. We obtained ASCA spectra of the cooling flow cluster Abell 85. Our primary goals were to search for multi-temperature components that may be indicative of cool gas; search for temperature gradients across the cluster; and look for excess absorption in the cooling region.

  15. The Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility. Observing the Universe in X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, V.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the Advanced X ray Astronophysics Facility (AXAF) program is presented. Beginning with a brief introduction to X ray astrophysics, the AXAF observatory is described including the onboard instrumentation and system capabilities. Possible X ray sources suitable for AXAF observation are identified and defined.

  16. New developments in micro-X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy for high-pressure research at 16-BM-D at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Changyong Popov, Dmitry; Ikuta, Daijo; Lin, Chuanlong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Rod, Eric; Bommannavar, Arunkumar; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-07-15

    The monochromator and focusing mirrors of the 16-BM-D beamline, which is dedicated to high-pressure research with micro-X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) (6-45 keV) spectroscopy, have been recently upgraded. Monochromatic X-rays are selected by a Si (111) double-crystal monochromator operated in an artificial channel-cut mode and focused to 5 μm × 5 μm (FWHM) by table-top Kirkpatrick-Baez type mirrors located near the sample stage. The typical X-ray flux is ∼5 × 10{sup 8} photons/s at 30 keV. The instrumental resolution, Δq/q{sub max}, reaches to 2 × 10{sup −3} and is tunable through adjustments of the detector distance and X-ray energy. The setup is stable and reproducible, which allows versatile application to various types of experiments including resistive heating and cryogenic cooling as well as ambient temperature compression. Transmission XANES is readily combined with micro-XRD utilizing the fixed-exit feature of the monochromator, which allows combined XRD-XANES measurements at a given sample condition.

  17. Miniaturization in x ray and gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Wang, Yuzhong J.; Bradley, James G.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents advances in two new sensor technologies and a miniaturized associated electronics technology which, when combined, can allow for very significant miniaturization and for the reduction of weight and power consumption in x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy systems: (1) Mercuric iodide (HgI2) x-ray technology, which allows for the first time the construction of truly portable, high-energy resolution, non-cryogenic x-ray fluorescence (XRF) elemental analyzer systems, with parameters approaching those of laboratory quality cryogenic instruments; (2) the silicon avalanche photodiode (APD), which is a solid-state light sensitive device with internal amplification, capable of uniquely replacing the vacuum photomultiplier tube in scintillation gamma-ray spectrometer applications, and offering substantial improvements in size, ruggedness, low power operation and energy resolution; and (3) miniaturized (hybridized) low noise, low power amplification and processing electronics, which take full advantage of the favorable properties of these new sensors and allow for the design and fabrication of advanced, highly miniaturized x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy systems. The paper also presents experimental results and examples of spectrometric systems currently under construction. The directions for future developments are discussed.

  18. New developments in high pressure x-ray spectroscopy beamline at High Pressure Collaborative Access Team

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Y. M. Chow, P.; Boman, G.; Bai, L. G.; Rod, E.; Bommannavar, A.; Kenney-Benson, C.; Sinogeikin, S.; Shen, G. Y.

    2015-07-15

    The 16 ID-D (Insertion Device - D station) beamline of the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source is dedicated to high pressure research using X-ray spectroscopy techniques typically integrated with diamond anvil cells. The beamline provides X-rays of 4.5-37 keV, and current available techniques include X-ray emission spectroscopy, inelastic X-ray scattering, and nuclear resonant scattering. The recent developments include a canted undulator upgrade, 17-element analyzer array for inelastic X-ray scattering, and an emission spectrometer using a polycapillary half-lens. Recent development projects and future prospects are also discussed.

  19. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  20. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  1. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also presentmore » data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.« less

  2. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  3. X-ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.R.; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.

    2006-01-17

    We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.

  4. Technology development for soft X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törmä, P. T.; Sipilä, H. J.; Koskinen, T.; Mattila, M.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray spectroscopy instruments lose part of their performance due to the lack of suitable components for soft X-ray region below 1 keV. Therefore, in the analysis of low atomic number elements including lithium, beryllium, boron and carbon instrument sensitivity is often limited. In this work we describe how the performance of the spectroscopy of soft X-rays is significantly improved when all devices integrated in the spectroscopic instrument are suitable for both soft and hard X-rays. This concept is based on utilizing ultra-thin SiN X-ray windows with proven performance not only as a detector window but also as an X-ray source window. By including a soft-X-ray-sensitive silicon drift detector with efficient surface charge collection in this concept the sensitivity and performance of the instrument is significantly increased.

  5. Advanced x-ray imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, John L. (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An x-ray spectrometer that also provides images of an x-ray source. Coded aperture imaging techniques are used to provide high resolution images. Imaging position-sensitive x-ray sensors with good energy resolution are utilized to provide excellent spectroscopic performance. The system produces high resolution spectral images of the x-ray source which can be viewed in any one of a number of specific energy bands.

  6. The Need for X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken

    2011-01-01

    For over four decades, X-ray, EUV, and UV spectral observations have been used to measure physical properties of the solar atmosphere. During this time, there has been substantial improvement in the spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution of the observations for the EUV and UV wavelength ranges. At wavelengths below 100 Angstroms, however, observations of the solar corona with simultaneous spatial and spectral resolution are limited, and not since the late 1970's have spatially resolved solar X-ray spectra been measured. The soft-X-ray wavelength range is dominated by emission lines formed at high temperatures and provides diagnostics unavailable in any other wavelength range. In this presentation, we will discuss the important science questions that can be answered using spatially and spectrally resolved X-ray spectra.

  7. Crystals for astronomical X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burek, A.

    1976-01-01

    Crystal spectrometric properties and the factors that affect their measurement are discussed. Theoretical and experimental results on KAP are summarized and theoretical results based on the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction are given for the acid phthalates as well as for the commonly used planes of ADP, PET and EDDT. Anomalous dispersion is found to be important for understanding the details of crystal Bragg reflection properties at long X-ray wavelengths and some important effects are pointed out. The theory of anomalous dispersion is applied to explain the anomalous reflectivity exhibited by KAP at 23.3 A.

  8. Tokamak Spectroscopy for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fournier, Kevin B.; Finkenthal, M.; Pacella, D.; May, M. J.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Mattioli, M.; Leigheb, M.; Rice, J. E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the measured x-ray and Extreme Ultraviolet (XUV) spectra of three astrophysically abundant elements (Fe, Ca and Ne) from three different tokamak plasmas. In every case, each spectrum touches on an issue of atomic physics that is important for simulation codes to be used in the analysis of high spectral resolution data from current and future x-ray telescopes. The utility of the tokamak as a laboratory test bed for astrophysical data is demonstrated. Simple models generated with the HULLAC suite of codes demonstrate how the atomic physics issues studied can affect the interpretation of astrophysical data.

  9. Advances toward high spectral resolution quantum X-ray calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Kelley, R. L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Mccammon, D.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal detectors for X-ray spectroscopy combining high spectral resolution and quantum efficiency have been developed. These microcalorimeters measure the energy released in the absorption of a single photon by sensing the rise in temperature of a small absorbing structure. The ultimate energy resolution of such a device is limited by the thermodynamic power fluctuations in the thermal link between the calorimeter and isothermal bath and can in principle be made as low as 1 eV. The performance of a real device is degraded due to noise contributions such as excess 1/f noise in the thermistor and incomplete conversion of energy into phonons. The authors report some recent advances in thermometry, X-ray absorption and thermalization, fabrication techniques, and detector optimization in the presence of noise. These improvements have resulted in a device with a spectral resolution of 17 eV FWHM, measured at 6 keV.

  10. X-ray spectroscopy of manganese clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Grush, M.M. |

    1996-06-01

    Much of this thesis represents the groundwork necessary in order to probe Mn clusters more productively than with conventional Mn K-edge XAS and is presented in Part 1. Part 2 contains the application of x-ray techniques to Mn metalloproteins and includes a prognosis at the end of each chapter. Individual Mn oxidation states are more readily distinguishable in Mn L-edge spectra. An empirical mixed valence simulation routine for determining the average Mn oxidation state has been developed. The first Mn L-edge spectra of a metalloprotein were measured and interpreted. The energy of Mn K{beta} emission is strongly correlated with average Mn oxidation state. K{beta} results support oxidation states of Mn(III){sub 2}(IV){sub 2} for the S{sub 1} state of Photosystem II chemical chemically reduced preparations contain predominantly Mn(II). A strength and limitation of XAS is that it probes all of the species of a particular element in a sample. It would often be advantageous to selectively probe different forms of the same element. The first demonstration that chemical shifts in x-ray fluorescence energies can be used to obtain oxidation state-selective x-ray absorption spectra is presented. Spin-dependent spectra can also be used to obtain a more simplified picture of local structure. The first spin-polarized extended x-ray absorption fine structure using Mn K{beta} fluorescence detection is shown.

  11. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Montenegro, M.; Pradhan, A. K.; Pitzer, R.

    2009-06-01

    Inner shell transitions, such as 1s-2p, in heavy elements can absorb or produce hard X-rays, and hence are widely used in nanoparticles. Bio-medical research for cancer treatment has been using heavy element nanoparticles, embeded in malignant tumor, for efficient absorption of irradiated X-rays and leading emission of hard X-rays and energetic electrons to kill the surrounding cells. Ejection of a 1s electron during ionization of the element by absorption of a X-ray photon initiates the Auger cascades of emission of photons and electrons. We have investigated gold nanoparticles for the optimal energy range, below the K-edge (1s) ionization threshold, that corresponds to resonant absorption of X-rays with large attenuation coefficients, orders of magnitude higher over the background as well as to that at K-edge threshold. We applied these attenuation coefficients in Monte Carlo simulation to study the intensities of emission of photons and electrons by Auger cascades. The numerical experiments were carried out in a phantom of water cube with a thin layer, 0.1mm/g, of gold nanoparticles 10 cm inside from the surface using the well-known code Geant4. We will present results on photon and electron emission spectra from passing monochromatic X-ray beams at 67 keV, which is the resonant energy for resonant K_{α} lines, at 82 keV, the K-shell ionization threshold, and at 2 MeV where the resonant effect is non-existent. Our findings show a high peak in the gold nanoparticle absorption curve indicating complete absorption of radiation within the gold layer. The photon and electron emission spectra show resonant features. Acknowledgement: Partially supported by a Large Interdisciplinary Grant award of the Ohio State University and NASA APRA program (SNN). The computational work was carried out on the Cray X1 and Itanium 4 cluster at the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus Ohio. "Resonant X-ray Irradiation of High-Z Nanoparticles For Cancer Theranostics" (refereed

  12. Beyond hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Simultaneous combination with x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Castro, German R.

    2013-05-15

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) is a powerful and novel emerging technique for the nondestructive determination of electronic properties and chemical composition of bulk, buried interfaces and surfaces. It benefits from the exceptionally large escape depth of high kinetic energy photoelectrons, increasing the information depth up to several tens of nanometers. Complementing HAXPES with an atomic structure sensitive technique (such as x-ray diffraction) opens a new research field with major applications for materials science. At SpLine, the Spanish CRG beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, we have developed a novel experimental set-up that combines HAXPES and x-ray diffraction (x-ray reflectivity, surface x-ray diffraction, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and reciprocal space maps). Both techniques can be operated simultaneously on the same sample and using the same excitation source. The set-up includes a robust 2S + 3D diffractometer hosting a ultrahigh vacuum chamber equipped with a unique photoelectron spectrometer (few eV < electron kinetic energy < 15 keV), x-ray tube (Mg/Ti), 15 keV electron gun, and auxiliary standard surface facilities (molecular beam epitaxy evaporator, ion gun, low energy electron diffraction, sample heating/cooling system, leak valves, load-lock sample transfer, etc.). This end-station offers the unique possibility of performing simultaneous HAXPES + x-ray diffraction studies. In the present work, we describe the experimental set-up together with two experimental examples that emphasize its outstanding capabilities: (i) nondestructive characterization of the Si/Ge and HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} interfaces on Ge-based CMOS devices, and (ii) strain study on La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} ultrathin films grown on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrate.

  13. X-ray Spectroscopy of Stellar Coronae: History - Present - Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewe, Rolf

    1996-12-01

    Since in 1948 X-rays were detected from the solar corona, stellar coronae were among the first predicted non-solar X-ray sources. However, because of their relatively low X-ray luminosity, the first non-solar stellar corona was not detected in X-rays until 1974 - twelve years after the discovery of the first non-solar X-ray source. After the 1980s, with the advent of sensitive X-ray imaging instruments on board the EINSTEIN, EXOSAT, and later the ROSAT observatories, the study of stellar coronae has become a vastly growing field of research. These X-ray observations have demonstrated that X-ray emitting coronae are a common feature among stars on the cool side of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, with the probable exception of single very cool giant and supergiant stars and A-type dwarfs. The instruments on board these satellites provided for the first time a taste of what can be achieved with X-ray spectroscopy and with the advent of the EUVE (1992) and ASCA (1993), detailed spectroscopy of stellar coronae in the EUV and X-ray regimes got off to a real start. The observations have permitted the identification of coronal material at different temperatures whose existence relates to a range of possible magnetic loop structures in the hot outer atmospheres of stars. The higher spectral resolution of the next generation of spectrometers on board NASA's AXAF (1998), ESA's XMM (1999), and the Japanese ASTRO-E (2000) will improve the determination of coronal temperature structure, abundances, and densities from which loop geometries can be derived and will enable velocity diagnostics. This paper reviews our present knowledge of observational stellar X-ray spectroscopy up to EUVE and ASCA and briefly discusses the perspectives for coronal diagnostics offered by AXAF, XMM, and ASTRO-E.

  14. Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility - Extending man's vision into the X-ray universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Lee A.; Hammond, Walter E.; Ballance, Judy L. C.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility will open a clear window into the X-ray universe. This paper presents an overview of the history, objectives, and status of the program and its projected impact on man's knowledge of the cosmos. The program is shown to be a total system composed of subsystems and their interfaces, verification activities, operations considerations, and a comprehensive interface with the scientific community.

  15. X-ray resonant Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, P.L.; LeBrun, T.; Deslattes, R.D.

    1995-08-01

    X-ray resonant Raman scattering presents great promise as a high-resolution spectroscopic probe of the electronic structure of matter. Unlike other methods, the technique avoids the loss of energy resolution resulting from the lifetime broadening of short-lived core-excited states. In addition, measurements of polarization and angular anisotropies yield information on the symmetries of electronic states of atoms and molecules. We studied the L{sub 3} edge of xenon, where the lifetime broadening is a major feature of the spectra recorded previously. X-ray fluorescence spectra were taken of both the L{alpha}{sub l,2} and L{beta}{sub 2,15} peaks over a range of energies from 10 eV below the edge to 40 eV above. These spectra show the evolution of resonant Raman scattering into characteristic fluorescence as the photon energy is scanned across the edge, and confirm several features of these spectra such as asymmetries in resonant peak shapes due to the onset of the ionization continuum. These results constitute the most comprehensive study of X-ray resonant Raman scattering to date, and were submitted for publication. Studies of other cases are under way, and new instruments that would match the unique characteristics of the APS - and thus render a new range of experiments possible - are under consideration.

  16. A whole-system approach to x-ray spectroscopy in cargo inspection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Gozani, Tsahi; Ryge, Peter; Sinha, Shrabani; Shaw, Tim; Strellis, Dan

    2013-04-01

    The bremsstrahlung x-ray spectrum used in high-energy, high-intensity x-ray cargo inspection systems is attenuated and modified by the materials in the cargo in a Z-dependent way. Therefore, spectroscopy of the detected x rays yields information about the Z of the x-rayed cargo material. It has previously been shown that such ZSpectroscopy (Z-SPEC) is possible under certain circumstances. A statistical approach, Z-SCAN (Z-determination by Statistical Count-rate ANalysis), has also been shown to be effective, and it can be used either by itself or in conjunction with Z-SPEC when the x-ray count rate is too high for individual x-ray spectroscopy. Both techniques require fast x-ray detectors and fast digitization electronics. It is desirable (and possible) to combine all techniques, including x-ray imaging of the cargo, in a single detector array, to reduce costs, weight, and overall complexity. In this paper, we take a whole-system approach to x-ray spectroscopy in x-ray cargo inspection systems, and show how the various parts interact with one another. Faster detectors and read-out electronics are beneficial for both techniques. A higher duty-factor x-ray source allows lower instantaneous count rates at the same overall x-ray intensity, improving the range of applicability of Z-SPEC in particular. Using an intensity-modulated advanced x-ray source (IMAXS) allows reducing the x-ray count rate for cargoes with higher transmission, and a stacked-detector approach may help material discrimination for the lowest attenuations. Image processing and segmentation allow derivation of results for entire objects, and subtraction of backgrounds. We discuss R&D performed under a number of different programs, showing progress made in each of the interacting subsystems. We discuss results of studies into faster scintillation detectors, including ZnO, BaF2 and PbWO4, as well as suitable photo-detectors, read-out and digitization electronics. We discuss high-duty-factor linear

  17. A whole-system approach to x-ray spectroscopy in cargo inspection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Gozani, Tsahi; Ryge, Peter; Sinha, Shrabani; Shaw, Tim; Strellis, Dan

    2013-04-19

    The bremsstrahlung x-ray spectrum used in high-energy, high-intensity x-ray cargo inspection systems is attenuated and modified by the materials in the cargo in a Z-dependent way. Therefore, spectroscopy of the detected x rays yields information about the Z of the x-rayed cargo material. It has previously been shown that such ZSpectroscopy (Z-SPEC) is possible under certain circumstances. A statistical approach, Z-SCAN (Z-determination by Statistical Count-rate ANalysis), has also been shown to be effective, and it can be used either by itself or in conjunction with Z-SPEC when the x-ray count rate is too high for individual x-ray spectroscopy. Both techniques require fast x-ray detectors and fast digitization electronics. It is desirable (and possible) to combine all techniques, including x-ray imaging of the cargo, in a single detector array, to reduce costs, weight, and overall complexity. In this paper, we take a whole-system approach to x-ray spectroscopy in x-ray cargo inspection systems, and show how the various parts interact with one another. Faster detectors and read-out electronics are beneficial for both techniques. A higher duty-factor x-ray source allows lower instantaneous count rates at the same overall x-ray intensity, improving the range of applicability of Z-SPEC in particular. Using an intensity-modulated advanced x-ray source (IMAXS) allows reducing the x-ray count rate for cargoes with higher transmission, and a stacked-detector approach may help material discrimination for the lowest attenuations. Image processing and segmentation allow derivation of results for entire objects, and subtraction of backgrounds. We discuss R and D performed under a number of different programs, showing progress made in each of the interacting subsystems. We discuss results of studies into faster scintillation detectors, including ZnO, BaF{sub 2} and PbWO{sub 4}, as well as suitable photo-detectors, read-out and digitization electronics. We discuss high

  18. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  19. AXIOM: advanced X-ray imaging of the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Sembay, Steve F.; Eastwood, Jonathan P.; Sibeck, David G.; Abbey, Tony A.; Brown, Patrick; Carter, Jenny A.; Carr, Chris M.; Forsyth, Colin; Kataria, Dhiren; Kemble, Steve; Milan, Steve E.; Owen, Chris J.; Peacocke, Lisa; Read, Andy M.; Coates, Andrew J.; Collier, Michael R.; Cowley, Stan W. H.; Fazakerley, Andrew N.; Fraser, George W.; Jones, Geraint H.; Lallement, Rosine; Lester, Mark; Porter, F. Scott; Yeoman, Tim K.

    2012-04-01

    Planetary plasma and magnetic field environments can be studied in two complementary ways—by in situ measurements, or by remote sensing. While the former provide precise information about plasma behaviour, instabilities and dynamics on local scales, the latter offers the global view necessary to understand the overall interaction of the magnetospheric plasma with the solar wind. Some parts of the Earth's magnetosphere have been remotely sensed, but the majority remains unexplored by this type of measurements. Here we propose a novel and more elegant approach employing remote X-ray imaging techniques, which are now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange X-ray emissions in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. In this article we describe how an appropriately designed and located X-ray telescope, supported by simultaneous in situ measurements of the solar wind, can be used to image the dayside magnetosphere, magnetosheath and bow shock, with a temporal and spatial resolution sufficient to address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the Earth's magnetosphere on a global level. Global images of the dayside magnetospheric boundaries require vantage points well outside the magnetosphere. Our studies have led us to propose `AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging of the Magnetosphere', a concept mission using a Vega launcher with a LISA Pathfinder-type Propulsion Module to place the spacecraft in a Lissajous orbit around the Earth-Moon L1 point. The model payload consists of an X-ray Wide Field Imager, capable of both imaging and spectroscopy, and an in situ plasma and magnetic field measurement package. This package comprises a Proton-Alpha Sensor, designed to measure the bulk properties of the solar wind, an Ion Composition Analyser, to characterise the minor ion populations in the solar wind that cause charge exchange emission, and a Magnetometer, designed to measure the strength and

  20. AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Sembay, S. F.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C.; Kataria, D.; Kemble, S.; Milan, S. E.; Owen, C. J.; Peacocke, L.; Read, A. M.; Coates, A. J.; Collier, M. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Fraser, G. W.; Jones, G. H.; Lallement, R.; Lester, M.; Porter, F. S.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    Planetary plasma and magnetic field environments can be studied in two complementary ways - by in situ measurements, or by remote sensing. While the former provide precise information about plasma behaviour, instabilities and dynamics on local scales, the latter offers the global view necessary to understand the overall interaction of the magnetospheric plasma with the solar wind. Some parts of the Earth's magnetosphere have been remotely sensed, but the majority remains unexplored by this type of measurements. Here we propose a novel and more elegant approach employing remote X-ray imaging techniques. which are now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange X-ray emissions in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. In this article we describe how an appropriately designed and located. X-ray telescope, supported by simultaneous in situ measurements of the solar wind, can be used to image the dayside magnetosphere, magnetosheath and bow shock. with a temporal and spatial resolution sufficient to address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the Earth's magnetosphere on a global level. Global images of the dayside magnetospheric boundaries require vantage points well outside the magnetosphere. Our studies have led us to propose 'AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere', a concept mission using a Vega launcher with a LISA Pathfinder-type Propulsion Module to place the spacecraft in a Lissajous orbit around the Earth - Moon Ll point. The model payload consists of an X-ray Wide Field Imager, capable of both imaging and spectroscopy, and an in situ plasma and magnetic field measurement package. This package comprises a Proton-Alpha Sensor, designed to measure the bulk properties of the solar wind, an Ion Composition Analyser, to characterize the minor ion populations in the solar wind that cause charge exchange emission, and a Magnetometer, designed to measure the strength and

  1. AXIOM: Advanced X-Ray Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Sembay, S. F.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C.; Kataria, D.; Kemble, S.; Milan, S. E.; Owen, C. J.; Peacocke, L.; Read, A. M.; Coates, A. J.; Collier, M. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Fraser, G. W.; Jones, G. H.; Lallement, R.; Lester, M.; Porter, F. S.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2011-01-01

    Planetary plasma and magnetic field environments can be studied in two complementary ways by in situ measurements, or by remote sensing. While the former provide precise information about plasma behaviour, instabilities and dynamics on local scales, the latter offers the global view necessary to understand the overall interaction of the magnetospheric plasma with the solar wind. Some parts of the Earth's magnetosphere have been remotely sensed, but the majority remains unexplored by this type of measurements. Here we propose a novel and more elegant approach employing remote X-ray imaging techniques, which are now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange X-ray emissions in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. In this article we describe how an appropriately designed and located X-ray telescope, supported by simultaneous in situ measurements of the solar wind, can be used to image the dayside magnetosphere, magnetosheath and bow shock, with a temporal and spatial resolution sufficient to address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the Earth's magnetosphere on a global level. Global images of the dayside magnetospheric boundaries require vantage points well outside the magnetosphere. Our studies have led us to propose AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere, a concept mission using a Vega launcher with a LISA Pathfinder-type Propulsion Module to place the spacecraft in a Lissajous orbit around the Earth Moon L1 point. The model payload consists of an X-ray Wide Field Imager, capable of both imaging and spectroscopy, and an in situ plasma and magnetic field measurement package. This package comprises a Proton-Alpha Sensor, designed to measure the bulk properties of the solar wind, an Ion Composition Analyser, to characterize the minor ion populations in the solar wind that cause charge exchange emission, and a Magnetometer, designed to measure the strength and direction

  2. Diagnostics of the Solar Wind Composition by X-Ray Spectroscopy of Comets from Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.

    2003-12-01

    X-rays are excited in comets by charge exchange of the solar wind heavy ions with cometary neutrals, which are mostly H2O, OH, and O. The excitation cross sections are known with a reasonable accuracy from theory and laboratory studies. The advanced capabilities of the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) and the recently developed method of analysis [Krasnopolsky et al. Icarus 160, 437, 2002] of the CXO observations of comets result in identification of the emissions excited by the solar wind ions O+8, O+7, C+6, C+5, Ne+9, Ne+8, Mg+10, Mg+9, Mg+8, and Si+9. The CXO observations of comets McNaught-Hartley (MH) and LINEAR S4 (S4) have been processed using this method to compare X-rays from those comets and the composition of the solar wind. The X-ray isophotes are crescent-like in S4 and more circular in MH because of the different phase angles (98° and 44° , respectively). The peak X-ray brightness is greater in S4 than that in MH by a factor of 1.5 and smaller by a factor of 1.7 after the correction for heliocentric distance. The X-ray luminosities of MH and S4 are equal to 8.6 and 1.4*E-15 erg s-1 inside the apertures of ρ = 1.5 and 0.5*E4 km, respectively. (Brightness is 0.2 of the peak value at these ρ .) Efficiencies of X-ray excitation corrected to the solar wind flow are similar and equal to 4.3*E-14 erg AU3/2 in both comets. This confirms the solar wind excitation of X-rays in comets. The line identification is given. Ion ratios in the solar wind have been extracted from the spectra. O+8/O+7 is equal to 0.29+/-0.04 and 0.14+/-0.03 in MH and S4. These ratios correspond to T=2.17 and 1.93*E6K and correlate with the solar wind speed of 390 and 500 km s-1 in MH and S4, respectively. Ne+9/O+7 is (15+/-6)*E-3 and (19+/-7)*E-3, and C+6/O+7 is 0.7+/-0.2 in both MH and S4. X-ray spectroscopy of comets may be used as a diagnostic tool to study the solar wind composition.

  3. X-Ray Spectroscopy Using Low Temperature Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    After several decades of development, a significant amount of the effort in low temperature detectors (LTDs) is concentrated on deploying real-world experiments. This has resulted from a great deal of basic detector physics performed by several generations of students, post-docs, and researchers. One of the most fruitful applications of LTDs is in non-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. LTD x-ray spectrometers are broadband, efficient, moderately high-resolution, and can handle moderately high count rates. However, they require significantly more power, mass, and infrastructure compared to traditional solid state x-ray spectrometers, and cannot achieve, at least at low energies, the resolving powers achieved with dispersive spectrometers. In several fields, however, LTDs have or will make a significant contribution. In this review, we will discuss x-ray spectroscopy in general, the fields of science where LTDs are making a significant impact, and some of the current and near-term LTD spectrometers.

  4. The High Throughput X-ray Spectroscopy (HTXS) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, N. E.; Tananbaum, H.; Kahn, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    The HTXS mission concept combines large effective area (approximately 15,000 sq cm at 1 keV), high spectral resolution (E/Delta(E) approximately 300-3000), and broad energy bandpass (0.25-40 keV and possibly up to 100 keV) by using replicated optics together with a complement of spectroscopic instrumentation including reflection gratings readout by charge-coupled device detectors (CCDs), quantum micro-calorimeters, and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) or comparable high energy detectors. An essential feature of this concept involves minimization of cost (approximately $350M for development and approximately $500-600M including launches) and risk by building six identical modest satellites to achieve the large area. Current mission and technology studies are targeted towards a new start in the 2002 timeframe, with first launch around 2005-2006. The HTXS mission represents a major advance, providing as much as a factor of 100 increase in sensitivity over currently planned high resolution X ray spectroscopy missions. HTXS will mark the start of a new era when high quality X ray spectra will be obtained for all classes of X ray sources, over a wide range of luminosity and distance. With its increased capabilities, HTXS will address many fundamental astrophysics questions such as the origin and distribution of the elements from carbon to zinc, the formation and evolution of clusters of galaxies, the validity of general relativity in the strong gravity limit, the evolution of supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei, the details of supernova explosions and their aftermath, and the mechanisms involved in the heating of stellar coronae and driving of stellar winds.

  5. The X-ray spectroscopy of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    1985-01-01

    The scientific goals of X-ray spectroscopy of active galactic nuclei are discussed. The underlying energy source, the regions responsible for the optical emission lines, the different types of active galaxies, and cosmology are considered. The requirements for an X-ray mission of broad band width, large collecting area, modest spatial resolution and good spectral resolution are outlined. It is concluded that the ESA XMM mission meets these requirements.

  6. Kinoform optics applied to x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Sandy, A. R.; Narayanan, S.; Sprung, M.; Su, J.-D.; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Isakovic, A. F.; Stein, A.; BNL

    2010-01-01

    Moderate-demagnification higher-order silicon kinoform focusing lenses have been fabricated to facilitate small-angle X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) experiments. The geometric properties of such lenses, their focusing performance and their applicability for XPCS measurements are described. It is concluded that one-dimensional vertical X-ray focusing via silicon kinoform lenses significantly increases the usable coherent flux from third-generation storage-ring light sources for small-angle XPCS experiments.

  7. AXAF: The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) will be the X-ray astronomy component of U.S. space exploration via Great Observatories (mostly orbital) for the remainder of the century. AXAF and the research planned for it are discussed for a lay audience.

  8. The x-ray advanced concepts testbed (XACT) sounding rocket payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendreau, Keith; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Asami, Fumi; Baker, Robert; Balsamo, Erin; Black, Kevin; Duran-Aviles, Carlos; Enoto, Teruaki; Gregory, Kyle; Hahne, Devin; Hayato, Asami; Hill, Joe; Huegel, Fred; Iwahashi, Takanori; Iwakiri, Wataru; Jahoda, Keith; Jalota, Lalit; Kaaret, Philip; Kaneko, Kenta; Kenyon, Steven; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koenecke, Richard; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Okajima, Takashi; Olsen, Larry; Porter, F. Scott; Rush, Kurt; Serlemitsos, Peter; Soong, Yang; Takeuchi, Yoko; Tamagawa, Toru; Yamada, Shin'ya; Yoshikawa, Akifumi

    2012-09-01

    The scientific objective of the X-ray Advanced Concepts Testbed (XACT) is to measure the X-ray polarization properties of the Crab Nebula, the Crab pulsar, and the accreting binary Her X-1. Polarimetry is a powerful tool for astrophysical investigation that has yet to be exploited in the X-ray band, where it promises unique insights into neutron stars, black holes, and other extreme-physics environments. With powerful new enabling technologies, XACT will demonstrate X-ray polarimetry as a practical and flight-ready astronomical technique. Additional technologies that XACT will bring to flight readiness will also provide new X-ray optics and calibration capabilities for NASA missions that pursue space-based X-ray spectroscopy, timing, and photometry.

  9. Observing Solvation Dynamics with Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Emission Spectroscopy and X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Haldrup, Kristoffer; Gawelda, Wojciech; Abela, Rafael; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Bergmann, Uwe; Bordage, Amélie; Cammarata, Marco; Canton, Sophie E; Dohn, Asmus O; van Driel, Tim Brandt; Fritz, David M; Galler, Andreas; Glatzel, Pieter; Harlang, Tobias; Kjær, Kasper S; Lemke, Henrik T; Møller, Klaus B; Németh, Zoltán; Pápai, Mátyás; Sas, Norbert; Uhlig, Jens; Zhu, Diling; Vankó, György; Sundström, Villy; Nielsen, Martin M; Bressler, Christian

    2016-02-18

    In liquid phase chemistry dynamic solute-solvent interactions often govern the path, ultimate outcome, and efficiency of chemical reactions. These steps involve many-body movements on subpicosecond time scales and thus ultrafast structural tools capable of capturing both intramolecular electronic and structural changes, and local solvent structural changes are desired. We have studied the intra- and intermolecular dynamics of a model chromophore, aqueous [Fe(bpy)3](2+), with complementary X-ray tools in a single experiment exploiting intense XFEL radiation as a probe. We monitored the ultrafast structural rearrangement of the solute with X-ray emission spectroscopy, thus establishing time zero for the ensuing X-ray diffuse scattering analysis. The simultaneously recorded X-ray diffuse scattering patterns reveal slower subpicosecond dynamics triggered by the intramolecular structural dynamics of the photoexcited solute. By simultaneous combination of both methods only, we can extract new information about the solvation dynamic processes unfolding during the first picosecond (ps). The measured bulk solvent density increase of 0.2% indicates a dramatic change of the solvation shell around each photoexcited solute, confirming previous ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Structural changes in the aqueous solvent associated with density and temperature changes occur with ∼1 ps time constants, characteristic for structural dynamics in water. This slower time scale of the solvent response allows us to directly observe the structure of the excited solute molecules well before the solvent contributions become dominant. PMID:26783685

  10. X-ray spectroscopy of low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juett, Adrienne Marie

    2004-10-01

    I present high-resolution X-ray grating spectroscopy of neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) using instruments onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton). The first part of this thesis concentrates on results from the subset of LMXBs with orbital periods less than an hour, known as ultracompact binaries. Previous low- resolution X-ray spectra of four systems (4U 0614+091, 2S 0918-549, 4U 1543-624, and 4U 1850-087) all contain a broad residual near 0.7 keV which had been attributed to unresolved line emission. I show that this residual is due to an incorrect model of the intervening photoelectric absorption and can be accounted for by allowing a non-standard Ne/O abundance ratio in the intervening material. I propose that there is neon-rich material local to each binary and that the mass donor is a low-mass, neon-rich degenerate dwarf in an ultracompact binary. Follow-up spectroscopy of 2S 0918-549 and 4U 1543-624 with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) onboard Chandra and the Reflection Grating Spectrometer onboard XMM confirms the excess neutral neon absorption. Interestingly, the Ne/O ratio of 4U 1543-624 varies by a factor of three between the Chandra and XMM observations, supporting the suggestion that some of the absorption originates local to the binaries. I also present X-ray spectroscopy of another ultracompact binary, the accretion-powered millisecond pulsar XTE J0929-314. No emission or absorption features are found in the high-resolution spectrum of this source, and the neutral absorption edge depths are consistent with the estimated interstellar absorption. The second part of this thesis uses LMXBs as probes of the interstellar medium (ISM). High-resolution X-ray studies of ISM absorption features can provide measurements of the relative abundances and ionization fractions of all the elements from carbon through iron. X-ray studies also probe the ISM on larger scales than is

  11. Soft X-Ray and Vacuum Ultraviolet Based Spectroscopy of the Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    2011-03-17

    The subjects of discussion included: VUV photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Synchrotron-radiation-based photoelectron spectroscopy, Soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, Soft x-ray emission spectroscopy, Inverse photoelectron spectroscopy, Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy, Low energy IPES, Resonant inverse photoelectron spectroscopy.

  12. X-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnopper, Herbert

    2002-04-01

    Extra-solar X-ray astronomy became a reality in 1962 after a successful rocket flight discovered an X-ray source in the constellation Scorpius. The X-ray "telescope" consisted of a roughly collimated Geiger counter. New sources were discovered by many groups in a rapid series of rocket flights that were characterized by finer angular and spectral measurements made with better mechanical collimators and proportional detectors. These discoveries led to the association of the newly discovered X-ray sources with objects already know in other wavelength bands. It was quickly understood that high precision measurements of angular position, spectral features and timing fluctuations were needed to make physical sense of the X-ray data and to put it into the context of the wealth of data obtained from other wavelength bands. These needs were met by a succession of major missions that began with UHURU (1970) and followed with the X-ray telescopes on EINSTEIN (1977), EXOSAT (1983), ROSAT (1990), GINGA (1987), ASCA (1993), CHANDRA (1999) and XMM.(1999). Each brought greater precision to measurements that allowed highly refined interpretations of the properties of x-ray sources. Several of the technical milestones that made these advances possible will be discussed.

  13. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser.

    PubMed

    Higley, Daniel J; Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L; Jal, Emmanuelle; Yuan, Edwin; Liu, Tianmin; Lutman, Alberto A; MacArthur, James P; Arenholz, Elke; Chen, Zhao; Coslovich, Giacomo; Denes, Peter; Granitzka, Patrick W; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C; Joseph, John; Le Guyader, Loïc; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Shafer, Padraic; Stöhr, Joachim; Tsukamoto, Arata; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H; Dürr, Hermann A; Schlotter, William F

    2016-03-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L(3,2)-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature. PMID:27036761

  14. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higley, Daniel J.; Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Jal, Emmanuelle; Yuan, Edwin; Liu, Tianmin; Lutman, Alberto A.; MacArthur, James P.; Arenholz, Elke; Chen, Zhao; Coslovich, Giacomo; Denes, Peter; Granitzka, Patrick W.; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Joseph, John; Le Guyader, Loïc; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Shafer, Padraic; Stöhr, Joachim; Tsukamoto, Arata; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H.; Dürr, Hermann A.; Schlotter, William F.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L3,2-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature.

  15. X-ray and Electron Spectroscopy of Water.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Harada, Yoshihisa; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Besley, Nicholas A; Winter, Bernd; Rehr, John J; Pettersson, Lars G M; Nilsson, Anders

    2016-07-13

    Here we present an overview of recent developments of X-ray and electron spectroscopy to probe water at different temperatures. Photon-induced ionization followed by detection of electrons from either the O 1s level or the valence band is the basis of photoelectron spectroscopy. Excitation between the O 1s and the unoccupied states or occupied states is utilized in X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopies. These techniques probe the electronic structure of the liquid phase and show sensitivity to the local hydrogen-bonding structure. Both experimental aspects related to the measurements and theoretical simulations to assist in the interpretation are discussed in detail. Different model systems are presented such as the different bulk phases of ice and various adsorbed monolayer structures on metal surfaces. PMID:27244473

  16. Capturing Transient Electronic and Molecular Structures in Liquids by Picosecond X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gawelda, W.; Pham, V. T.; El Nahhas, A.; Kaiser, M.; Zaushitsyn, Y.; Bressler, C.; Chergui, M.; Johnson, S. L.; Grolimund, D.; Abela, R.; Hauser, A.

    2007-02-02

    We describe an advanced setup for time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) Spectroscopy with picosecond temporal resolution. It combines an intense femtosecond laser source synchronized to the x-ray pulses delivered into the microXAS beamline of the Swiss Light Source (SLS). The setup is applied to measure the short-lived high-spin geometric structure of photoexcited aqueous Fe(bpy)3 at room temperature.

  17. Femtosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy with hard x-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Kameshima, Takashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Obara, Yuki; Misawa, Kazuhiko; Bhattacharya, Atanu; Kurahashi, Naoya; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2013-09-23

    We have developed a method of dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a hard x-ray free electron laser (XFEL), generated by a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mechanism. A transmission grating was utilized for splitting SASE-XFEL light, which has a relatively large bandwidth (ΔE/E ∼ 5 × 10{sup −3}), into several branches. Two primary split beams were introduced into a dispersive spectrometer for measuring signal and reference spectra simultaneously. After normalization, we obtained a Zn K-edge absorption spectrum with a photon-energy range of 210 eV, which is in excellent agreement with that measured by a conventional wavelength-scanning method. From the analysis of the difference spectra, the noise ratio was evaluated to be ∼3 × 10{sup −3}, which is sufficiently small to trace minute changes in transient spectra induced by an ultrafast optical laser. This scheme enables us to perform single-shot, high-accuracy x-ray absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution.

  18. Indirectly illuminated X-ray area detector for X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Yuya; Imai, Ryo; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Yagi, Naoto; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki

    2010-11-01

    An indirectly illuminated X-ray area detector is employed for X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). The detector consists of a phosphor screen, an image intensifier (microchannel plate), a coupling lens and either a CCD or CMOS image sensor. By changing the gain of the image intensifier, both photon-counting and integrating measurements can be performed. Speckle patterns with a high signal-to-noise ratio can be observed in a single shot in the integrating mode, while XPCS measurement can be performed with much fewer photons in the photon-counting mode. By switching the image sensor, various combinations of frame rate, dynamic range and active area can be obtained. By virtue of these characteristics, this detector can be used for XPCS measurements of various types of samples that show slow or fast dynamics, a high or low scattering intensity, and a wide or narrow range of scattering angles. PMID:20975218

  19. X-ray induced damage in DNA monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ptasinska, Sylwia; Stypczynska, Agnieszka; Nixon, Tony; Mason, Nigel J.; Klyachko, Dimitri V.; Sanche, Leon

    2008-08-14

    In this work, the chemical changes in calf thymus DNA samples were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The DNA samples were irradiated for over 5 h and spectra were taken repeatedly every 30 min. In this approach the X-ray beam both damages and probes the samples. In most cases, XPS spectra have complex shapes due to contributions of C, N, and O atoms bonded at several different sites. We show that from a comparative analysis of the modification in XPS line shapes of the C 1s, O 1s, N 1s, and P 2p peaks, one can gain insight into a number of reaction pathways leading to radiation damage to DNA.

  20. Effect of X-ray flux on polytetrafluoroethylene in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Pepper, S. V.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of the X-ray flux in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (STAT) on the constitution of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface has been examined. The radiation dose rate for our specimen was about 10 to the 7th rad/s. The structure, magnitude and binding energy of the C(1s) and F(1s) features of the XPS spectrum and the mass spectrum of gaseous species evolved during irradiation are observed. The strong time dependence of these signals over a period of several hours indicated that the surface constitution of PTFE is greatly affected by this level of radiation dose. The results are consistent with the development of a heavily cross-linked or branched structure in the PTFE surface region and the evolution of short chain fragments into the gas phase.

  1. First results from the high-brightness x-ray spectroscopy beamline at ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, R.C.C.; Ng, W.; Jones, G.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goal of high brightness at the sample for use in the X-ray Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy (XAMS) science, surface and interface science, biology and x-ray optical development programs at ALS. X-ray absorption and time of flight photo emission measurements in 2 - 5 keV photon energy in argon along with the flux, resolution, spot size and stability of the beamline will be discussed. Prospects for future XAMS measurements will also be presented.

  2. Advanced High Brilliance X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Walter M.

    1998-01-01

    The possibility to dramatically increase the efficiency of laboratory based protein structure measurements through the use of polycapillary X-ray optics was investigated. This project initiated April 1, 1993 and concluded December 31, 1996 (including a no cost extension from June 31, 1996). This is a final report of the project. The basis for the project is the ability to collect X-rays from divergent electron bombardment laboratory X-ray sources and redirect them into quasiparallel or convergent (focused) beams. For example, a 0.1 radian (approx. 6 deg) portion of a divergent beam collected by a polycapillary collimator and transformed into a quasiparallel beam of 3 millradian (0.2 deg) could give a gain of 6(exp 2)/0.2(exp 2) x T for the intensity of a diffracted beam from a crystal with a 0.2 deg diffraction width. T is the transmission efficiency of the polycapillary diffraction optic, and for T=0.5, the gain would be 36/0.04 x O.5=45. In practice, the effective collection angle will depend on the source spot size, the input focal length of the optic (usually limited by the source spot-to-window distance on the x-ray tube) and the size of the crystal relative to the output diameter of the optic. The transmission efficiency, T, depends on the characteristics (fractional open area, surface roughness, shape and channel diameter) of the polycapillary optic and is typically in the range 0.2-0.4. These effects could substantially reduce the expected efficiency gain. During the course of this study, the possibility to use a weakly focused beam (0.5 deg convergence) was suggested which could give an additional 10-20 X efficiency gain for small samples . Weakly focused beams from double focusing mirrors are frequently used for macromolecular crystallography studies. Furthermore the crystals are typically oscillated by as much as 2 deg during each X-ray exposure in order to increase the reciprocal space (number of crystal planes) sampled and use of a slightly convergent

  3. AXAF: The Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellerin, Charles J.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Neal, Valerie

    2005-01-01

    X-rays are produced by violent, energetic, and explosive phenomena in the universe. The Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) is an orbiting observatory designed to view these X-rays. The National Academy of Sciences Survey Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics has recommended AXAF as the #1 priority among all major new astronomy programs. The scientific importance of AXAF was also highlighted by the Academy's Survey Committee on Physics. Why has AXAF earned such enthusiastic support, not only among astronomers, but also broadly within the nation's scientific community?

  4. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Database (Version 4.1)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 20 X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Database (Version 4.1) (Web, free access)   The NIST XPS Database gives access to energies of many photoelectron and Auger-electron spectral lines. The database contains over 22,000 line positions, chemical shifts, doublet splittings, and energy separations of photoelectron and Auger-electron lines.

  5. Single atom identification by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, T. C.; Dellby, N.; Krivanek, O. L.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Falke, M.; Kaeppel, A.; Terborg, R.; Zan, R.

    2012-04-09

    Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, single, isolated impurity atoms of silicon and platinum in monolayer and multilayer graphene are identified. Simultaneously acquired electron energy loss spectra confirm the elemental identification. Contamination difficulties are overcome by employing near-UHV sample conditions. Signal intensities agree within a factor of two with standardless estimates.

  6. A laboratory-based hard x-ray monochromator for high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements.

    PubMed

    Seidler, G T; Mortensen, D R; Remesnik, A J; Pacold, J I; Ball, N A; Barry, N; Styczinski, M; Hoidn, O R

    2014-11-01

    We report the development of a laboratory-based Rowland-circle monochromator that incorporates a low power x-ray (bremsstrahlung) tube source, a spherically bent crystal analyzer, and an energy-resolving solid-state detector. This relatively inexpensive, introductory level instrument achieves 1-eV energy resolution for photon energies of ∼5 keV to ∼10 keV while also demonstrating a net efficiency previously seen only in laboratory monochromators having much coarser energy resolution. Despite the use of only a compact, air-cooled 10 W x-ray tube, we find count rates for nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy comparable to those achieved at monochromatized spectroscopy beamlines at synchrotron light sources. For x-ray absorption near edge structure, the monochromatized flux is small (due to the use of a low-powered x-ray generator) but still useful for routine transmission-mode studies of concentrated samples. These results indicate that upgrading to a standard commercial high-power line-focused x-ray tube or rotating anode x-ray generator would result in monochromatized fluxes of order 10(6)-10(7) photons/s with no loss in energy resolution. This work establishes core technical capabilities for a rejuvenation of laboratory-based hard x-ray spectroscopies that could have special relevance for contemporary research on catalytic or electrical energy storage systems using transition-metal, lanthanide, or noble-metal active species. PMID:25430123

  7. A laboratory-based hard x-ray monochromator for high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Seidler, G. T. Mortensen, D. R.; Remesnik, A. J.; Pacold, J. I.; Ball, N. A.; Barry, N.; Styczinski, M.; Hoidn, O. R.

    2014-11-15

    We report the development of a laboratory-based Rowland-circle monochromator that incorporates a low power x-ray (bremsstrahlung) tube source, a spherically bent crystal analyzer, and an energy-resolving solid-state detector. This relatively inexpensive, introductory level instrument achieves 1-eV energy resolution for photon energies of ∼5 keV to ∼10 keV while also demonstrating a net efficiency previously seen only in laboratory monochromators having much coarser energy resolution. Despite the use of only a compact, air-cooled 10 W x-ray tube, we find count rates for nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy comparable to those achieved at monochromatized spectroscopy beamlines at synchrotron light sources. For x-ray absorption near edge structure, the monochromatized flux is small (due to the use of a low-powered x-ray generator) but still useful for routine transmission-mode studies of concentrated samples. These results indicate that upgrading to a standard commercial high-power line-focused x-ray tube or rotating anode x-ray generator would result in monochromatized fluxes of order 10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} photons/s with no loss in energy resolution. This work establishes core technical capabilities for a rejuvenation of laboratory-based hard x-ray spectroscopies that could have special relevance for contemporary research on catalytic or electrical energy storage systems using transition-metal, lanthanide, or noble-metal active species.

  8. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A; Rodríguez de la Fuente, O; Collado, V; Rubio-Zuazo, J; Monton, C; Castro, G R; García, M A

    2012-08-01

    We present an experimental setup for the simultaneous measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) on metallic thin films at a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of x-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of x-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to study changes in the films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be also carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this setup range from 10(-3) to 10(-5), depending on the particular experiment. PMID:22938268

  9. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, A.; Rodriguez de la Fuente, O.; Collado, V.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Castro, G. R.; Monton, C.; Garcia, M. A.

    2012-08-15

    We present an experimental setup for the simultaneous measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) on metallic thin films at a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of x-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of x-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to study changes in the films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be also carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this setup range from 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -5}, depending on the particular experiment.

  10. An upgraded x-ray spectroscopy diagnostic on MST.

    PubMed

    Clayton, D J; Almagri, A F; Burke, D R; Forest, C B; Goetz, J A; Kaufman, M C; O'Connell, R

    2010-10-01

    An upgraded x-ray spectroscopy diagnostic is used to measure the distribution of fast electrons in MST and to determine Z(eff) and the particle diffusion coefficient D(r). A radial array of 12 CdZnTe hard-x-ray detectors measures 10-150 keV Bremsstrahlung from fast electrons, a signature of reduced stochasticity and improved confinement in the plasma. A new Si soft-x-ray detector measures 2-10 keV Bremsstrahlung from thermal and fast electrons. The shaped output pulses from both detector types are digitized and the resulting waveforms are fit with Gaussians to resolve pileup and provide good time and energy resolution. Lead apertures prevent detector saturation and provide a well-known etendue, while lead shielding prevents pickup from stray x-rays. New Be vacuum windows transmit >2 keV x-rays, and additional Al and Be filters are sometimes used to reduce low energy flux for better resolution at higher energies. Measured spectra are compared to those predicted by the Fokker-Planck code CQL3D to deduce Z(eff) and D(r). PMID:21034007

  11. A stored-ion target for x-ray spectroscopy of multicharged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kanter, E.P.

    1996-08-01

    With the evolution of the new third generation synchrotron radiation sources providing intense beams of hard x-rays, it is natural to consider exploiting these to investigate the 3-body Coulomb problem. The atomic physics community could advance this field considerably by developing general techniques to investigate the x-ray spectroscopy of heliumlike ions. To do so, however, requires the development of a target of such ions with sufficient density to permit photoexcitation studies in the hard x-ray regime. A possible scheme to achieve this is described. Such a target system would permit x-ray studies with exotic species such as highly charged atomic ions, size-selected cluster ions, and atomic and molecular negative ions which have hitherto been impractical to study with conventional techniques.

  12. Advanced X-Ray Telescope Mirrors Provide Sharpest Focus Ever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-03-01

    Performing beyond expectations, the high- resolution mirrors for NASA's most powerful orbiting X-ray telescope have successfully completed initial testing at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Calibration Facility, Huntsville, AL. "We have the first ground test images ever generated by the telescope's mirror assembly, and they are as good as -- or better than -- expected," said Dr. Martin Weisskopf, Marshall's chief scientist for NASA's Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The mirror assembly, four pairs of precisely shaped and aligned cylindrical mirrors, will form the heart of NASA's third great observatory. The X-ray telescope produces an image by directing incoming X-rays to detectors at a focal point some 30 feet beyond the telescope's mirrors. The greater the percentage of X-rays brought to focus and the smaller the size of the focal spot, the sharper the image. Tests show that on orbit, the mirror assembly of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility will be able to focus approximately 70 percent of X-rays from a source to a spot less than one-half arc second in radius. The telescope's resolution is equivalent to being able to read the text of a newspaper from half a mile away. "The telescope's focus is very clear, very sharp," said Weisskopf. "It will be able to show us details of very distant sources that we know are out there, but haven't been able to see clearly." In comparison, previous X-ray telescopes -- Einstein and Rosat -- were only capable of focusing X- rays to five arc seconds. The Advanced X-ray Telescope's resolving power is ten times greater. "Images from the new telescope will allow us to make major advances toward understanding how exploding stars create and disperse many of the elements necessary for new solar systems and for life itself," said Dr. Harvey Tananbaum, director of the Advanced X- ray Astrophysics Facility Science Center at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, in Cambridge, MA -- responsible for the telescope

  13. Atomic Multiplets in X-ray Spectroscopies of Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delley, Bernard; Uldry, Anne-Christine

    2013-03-01

    The electronic structures of compounds involving open d- and f- shell are studied frequently by X-ray and electron spectroscopies. For a better understanding of the multiplets arising in spectra involving one or more open shells, we have developed recently an easy to use program multiX,[2] which is available to download.[3] This first step allows the inclusion of the crystal environment as a crystal field entered simply as positions and charges of a cluster of atoms around the core hole site. This often gives valuable insights in the case of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and resonant inelastic x-ray spectroscopy (RIXS) measurements. However, in many cases it is desirable to allow for hybridization of the open shell electrons with the orbitals of neighbor atoms. This requires dealing with a significantly larger active Hilbert space. This is addressed with our recent Lanczos-based procedure to calculate spectra. First results will be discussed. Swiss SNF grant 200021-129970 is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Imaging and nondispersive spectroscopy of soft X rays using a laboratory X-ray charge-coupled-device system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luppino, Gerard A.; Doty, John P.; Ricker, George R.; Vallerga, John V.; Ceglio, Natale M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a laboratory instrument for imaging and nondispersive spectroscopy of soft X-rays (300 eV to 10 keV) utilizing a virtual-phase CCD. This instrument has achieved a spatial resolution of 22 microns (limited by pixel size) with an overall array area of 584 x 390 pixels. It has achieved an energy resolution of about 140 eV FWHM for single-pixel Fe-55 X-ray events (5.9 keV) with the CCD operated at -30 C. The CCD has been operated in photon-counting mode at room temperature, and X-ray spectra with an energy resolution of about 450 eV at 5.9 keV have been obtained. The low energy X-ray sensitivity of the CCD also has been demonstrated by detecting carbon K-alpha X-rays (277eV).

  15. Quantitative investigation of two metallohydrolases by X-ray absorption spectroscopy near-edge spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.; Chu, W. S.; Yang, F. F.; Yu, M. J.; Chen, D. L.; Guo, X. Y.; Zhou, D. W.; Shi, N.; Marcelli, A.; Niu, L. W.; Teng, M. K.; Gong, W. M.; Benfatto, M.; Wu, Z. Y.

    2007-09-01

    The last several years have witnessed a tremendous increase in biological applications using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (BioXAS), thanks to continuous advancements in synchrotron radiation (SR) sources and detector technology. However, XAS applications in many biological systems have been limited by the intrinsic limitations of the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique e.g., the lack of sensitivity to bond angles. As a consequence, the application of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy changed this scenario that is now continuously changing with the introduction of the first quantitative XANES packages such as Minut XANES (MXAN). Here we present and discuss the XANES code MXAN, a novel XANES-fitting package that allows a quantitative analysis of experimental data applied to Zn K-edge spectra of two metalloproteins: Leptospira interrogans Peptide deformylase ( LiPDF) and acutolysin-C, a representative of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) from Agkistrodon acutus venom. The analysis on these two metallohydrolases reveals that proteolytic activities are correlated to subtle conformation changes around the zinc ion. In particular, this quantitative study clarifies the occurrence of the LiPDF catalytic mechanism via a two-water-molecules model, whereas in the acutolysin-C we have observed a different proteolytic activity correlated to structural changes around the zinc ion induced by pH variations.

  16. Probing deeper by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Risterucci, P.; Renault, O. Martinez, E.; Delaye, V.; Detlefs, B.; Zegenhagen, J.; Gaumer, C.; Grenet, G.; Tougaard, S.

    2014-02-03

    We report an hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method combining high excitation energy (15 keV) and improved modelling of the core-level energy loss features. It provides depth distribution of deeply buried layers with very high sensitivity. We show that a conventional approach relying on intensities of the core-level peaks is unreliable due to intense plasmon losses. We reliably determine the depth distribution of 1 ML La in a high-κ/metal gate stack capped with 50 nm a-Si. The method extends the sensitivity of photoelectron spectroscopy to depths beyond 50 nm.

  17. Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) science instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dailey, C. C.; Cumings, N. P.; Winkler, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    AXAF is to be equipped with a high performance X-ray telescope for the conduction of detailed astrophysics research. The observatory is to be serviced by the Space Station or the Shuttle, depending on capabilities during the AXAF operational period. The AXAF is to utilize the wavelength band from 1.2 A to 120 A. Attention is given to the AXAF science team, the AXAF observatory characteristics, the AXAF science instrument definition program, the Advanced Charge Coupled Device (CCD) Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), the High Resolution Camera (HRC), the Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS), the X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), the transmission gratings, and the program schedule.

  18. Operando X-ray absorption and infrared fuel cell spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Emily A.; Kendrick, Ian; Jia, Qingying; Grice, Corey; Segre, Carlo U.; Smotkin, Eugene S.

    2011-11-17

    A polymer electrolyte fuel cell enables operando X-ray absorption and infrared spectroscopy of the membrane electrode assembly catalytic layer with flowing fuel and air streams at controlled temperature. Time-dependent X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra of the Pt and Ni edge of Pt based catalysts of an air-breathing cathode show that catalyst restructuring, after a potential step, has time constants from minutes to hours. The infrared Stark tuning plots of CO adsorbed on Pt at 100, 200, 300 and 400 mV vs. hydrogen reference electrode were obtained. The Stark tuning plots of CO adsorbed at 400 mV exhibit a precipitous drop in frequency coincident with the adsorption potential. The turn-down potential decreases relative to the adsorption potential and is approximately constant after 300 mV. These Stark tuning characteristics are attributed to potential dependent adsorption site selection by CO and competitive adsorption processes.

  19. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility high resolution camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen S.; Chappell, Jon H.

    1986-01-01

    The HRC (High Resolution Camera) is a photon counting instrument to be flown on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). It is a large field of view, high angular resolution, detector for the X-ray telescope. The HRC consists of a CsI coated microchannel plate (MCP) acting as a soft X-ray photocathode, followed by a second MCP for high electronic gain. The MCPs are readout by a crossed grid of resistively coupled wires to provide high spatial resolution along with timing and pulse height data. The instrument will be used in two modes, as a direct imaging detector with a limiting sensitivity of 10 to the -15th ergs/sq cm sec in a 10 to the 5th second exposure, and as a readout for an objective transmission grating providing spectral resolution of several hundreds to thousands.

  20. Ultrafast x-ray-induced nuclear dynamics in diatomic molecules using femtosecond x-ray-pump-x-ray-probe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, C. S.; Picón, A.; Bostedt, C.; Rudenko, A.; Marinelli, A.; Moonshiram, D.; Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Bomme, C.; Bucher, M.; Doumy, G.; Erk, B.; Ferguson, K. R.; Gorkhover, T.; Ho, P. J.; Kanter, E. P.; Krässig, B.; Krzywinski, J.; Lutman, A. A.; March, A. M.; Ray, D.; Young, L.; Pratt, S. T.; Southworth, S. H.

    2016-07-01

    The capability of generating two intense, femtosecond x-ray pulses with a controlled time delay opens the possibility of performing time-resolved experiments for x-ray-induced phenomena. We have applied this capability to study the photoinduced dynamics in diatomic molecules. In molecules composed of low-Z elements, K -shell ionization creates a core-hole state in which the main decay mode is an Auger process involving two electrons in the valence shell. After Auger decay, the nuclear wave packets of the transient two-valence-hole states continue evolving on the femtosecond time scale, leading either to separated atomic ions or long-lived quasibound states. By using an x-ray pump and an x-ray probe pulse tuned above the K -shell ionization threshold of the nitrogen molecule, we are able to observe ion dissociation in progress by measuring the time-dependent kinetic energy releases of different breakup channels. We simulated the measurements on N2 with a molecular dynamics model that accounts for K -shell ionization, Auger decay, and the time evolution of the nuclear wave packets. In addition to explaining the time-dependent feature in the measured kinetic energy release distributions from the dissociative states, the simulation also reveals the contributions of quasibound states.

  1. AXSIS: Exploring the frontiers in attosecond X-ray science, imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärtner, F. X.; Ahr, F.; Calendron, A.-L.; Çankaya, H.; Carbajo, S.; Chang, G.; Cirmi, G.; Dörner, K.; Dorda, U.; Fallahi, A.; Hartin, A.; Hemmer, M.; Hobbs, R.; Hua, Y.; Huang, W. R.; Letrun, R.; Matlis, N.; Mazalova, V.; Mücke, O. D.; Nanni, E.; Putnam, W.; Ravi, K.; Reichert, F.; Sarrou, I.; Wu, X.; Yahaghi, A.; Ye, H.; Zapata, L.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Miller, R. J. D.; Berggren, K. K.; Graafsma, H.; Meents, A.; Assmann, R. W.; Chapman, H. N.; Fromme, P.

    2016-09-01

    -, accelerator,- X-ray scientists as well as spectroscopists and biochemists optimizes X-ray pulse parameters, in tandem with sample delivery, crystal size, and advanced X-ray detectors. Ultimately, the new capability, attosecond serial X-ray crystallography and spectroscopy, will be applied to one of the most important problems in structural biology, which is to elucidate the dynamics of light reactions, electron transfer and protein structure in photosynthesis.

  2. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Iwao; Tanida, Hajime; Kawauchi, Sigehiro; Harada, Makoto; Nomura, Masaharu

    1997-09-01

    An apparatus has been constructed for x-ray absorption spectroscopy of elements at air/aqueous solution interface. Its surface sensitivity is gained from glancing incidence of synchrotron radiation under total reflection condition. The absorption is detected by total conversion He ion-yield method. This apparatus was operated at the beam line 7C of Photon Factory, where the incident photon beam comes from a sagittal focus double-crystal monochromator via a 70-cm-long bent mirror. The mirror focuses the beam vertically and changes the beam direction downward by 1 mrad to irradiate solution surface. The essential requirement of this technique, ripple-free liquid surface at accurate position, was attained by introducing a trough on a floating boat, continuous surface level monitoring, and an automatic Z-stage control. The x-ray absorption edge jump demonstrated that surface concentration of bromide ion follows the Langmuir type adsorption for tetraalkylammonuim bromide solution. By comparing the jump values for surface-active and -inactive bromide salt solutions, the detecting depth of the present technique was determined to be 8.8 nm. An extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis of bromide ion segregated to the surface by stearyltrimethylammonium cation indicated that its solvation structure is different from that of bulk.

  3. The Advanced X-ray Timing Array (AXTAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Paul; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Strohmayer, Tod

    The Advanced X-ray Timing Array (AXTAR) is an X-ray observatory mission concept that combines very large collecting area, broadband spectral coverage, high time resolution, highly flexible scheduling, and an ability to respond promptly to time-critical targets of opportunity. It is optimized for submillisecond timing of bright Galactic X-ray sources in order to study phenomena at the natural time scales of neutron star surfaces and black hole event horizons, thus probing the physics of ultradense matter, strongly curved spacetimes, and intense magnetic fields. AXTAR's main instrument, the Large Area Timing Array (LATA), is a collimated, thick Si pixel detector with 2-50 keV coverage and 8m2 collecting area. Key features of the LATA include: 1 microsecond absolute time accuracy, 600 eV energy resolution, and minimal deadtime even on sources as bright as Sco X-1. For timing observations of accreting neutron stars and black holes, AXTAR provides at least an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over both the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and Constellation-X. A sensitive Sky Monitor acts as a trigger for pointed observations of X-ray transients and also provides continuous monitoring of the X-ray sky with 20 times the sensitivity of the RXTE ASM and a source localization accuracy of 1 arcmin. The baseline mission concept builds on detector and electronics technology previously developed for other applications with support from NASA, DOE, DARPA, and DHS, and thus offers high scientific impact at moderate, known cost and minimal technical risk.

  4. The Advanced X-ray Timing Array (AXTAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Paul S.; Chakrabarty, D.; Strohmayer, T.; AXTAR Collaboration

    2008-03-01

    The Advanced X-ray Timing Array (AXTAR) is an X-ray observatory combining very large collecting area, broadband spectral coverage, high time resolution, highly flexible scheduling, and an ability to respond promptly to time-critical targets of opportunity. It is optimized for submillisecond timing of bright Galactic X-ray sources in order to study phenomena at the natural time scales of neutron star surfaces and black hole event horizons, thus probing the physics of ultradense matter, strongly curved spacetimes, and intense magnetic fields. AXTAR's main instrument, the Large Area Timing Array (LATA), is a collimated, thick Si pixel detector with 2-50 keV coverage and 8 m2 collecting area. Key features of the LATA include: 1 µs absolute time accuracy, 600 eV energy resolution, and minimal deadtime even on sources as bright as Sco X-1. For timing observations of accreting neutron stars and black holes, AXTAR provides at least an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over both the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and Constellation-X. A sensitive Sky Monitor acts as a trigger for pointed observations of X-ray transients and also provides continuous monitoring of the X-ray sky with 20 times the sensitivity of the RXTE ASM and a source localization accuracy of 1 arcmin. The baseline mission concept builds on detector and electronics technology previously developed for other applications with support from NASA, DOE, DARPA, and DHS, and thus offers high scientific impact at moderate, known cost and minimal technical risk.

  5. Stochastic stimulated electronic x-ray Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimberg, Victor; Rohringer, Nina

    2016-05-01

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) is a well-established tool for studying electronic, nuclear, and collective dynamics of excited atoms, molecules, and solids. An extension of this powerful method to a time-resolved probe technique at x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) to ultimately unravel ultrafast chemical and structural changes on a femtosecond time scale is often challenging, due to the small signal rate in conventional implementations at XFELs that rely on the usage of a monochromator setup to select a small frequency band of the broadband, spectrally incoherent XFEL radiation. Here, we suggest an alternative approach, based on stochastic spectroscopy, which uses the full bandwidth of the incoming XFEL pulses. Our proposed method is relying on stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, where in addition to a pump pulse that resonantly excites the system a probe pulse on a specific electronic inelastic transition is provided, which serves as a seed in the stimulated scattering process. The limited spectral coherence of the XFEL radiation defines the energy resolution in this process and stimulated RIXS spectra of high resolution can be obtained by covariance analysis of the transmitted spectra. We present a detailed feasibility study and predict signal strengths for realistic XFEL parameters for the CO molecule resonantly pumped at the [Formula: see text] transition. Our theoretical model describes the evolution of the spectral and temporal characteristics of the transmitted x-ray radiation, by solving the equation of motion for the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom of the system self consistently with the propagation by Maxwell equations. PMID:26958585

  6. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Accretion Shocks in Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    2011-01-01

    High resolution X-ray spectroscopy of accreting young stars is providing new insights into the physical conditions of the shocked plasma. While young stars exhibit exceedingly active coronae (>10 MK) with highly energetic flares, the relatively low temperature ( 3 MK), high density (>1012 cm-3) accretion shock can only be clearly distinguished at high spectral resolution. The nearby Classical T Tauri star TW Hydrae was the first to show evidence of accretion using 50 ks with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG). More recently a Chandra HETG Large Program (489 ks obtained over the course of one month) on TW Hydrae has found evidence for a new type of coronal structure. In the standard model, the accreting gas shocks near the atmosphere of the star and gently settles onto the surface as it slows down and cools. On TW Hydrae the observed post-shock region is not this predicted settling flow, since its mass is 30 times the mass of material that passes through the shock. Instead the stellar atmosphere must be heated to soft X-ray emitting temperatures. Of the CTTS systems observed with the gratings on Chandra and XMM-Newton not all show the accretion shock signature; however, all of them show excess soft X-ray emission related to accretion. The production of highly charged ions in the proximity of both open and closed magnetic field lines has important implications for coronal heating, winds and jets in the presence of accretion. This work is supported by the Chandra X-ray Observatory through a NASA contract with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  7. Stochastic stimulated electronic x-ray Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kimberg, Victor; Rohringer, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) is a well-established tool for studying electronic, nuclear, and collective dynamics of excited atoms, molecules, and solids. An extension of this powerful method to a time-resolved probe technique at x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) to ultimately unravel ultrafast chemical and structural changes on a femtosecond time scale is often challenging, due to the small signal rate in conventional implementations at XFELs that rely on the usage of a monochromator setup to select a small frequency band of the broadband, spectrally incoherent XFEL radiation. Here, we suggest an alternative approach, based on stochastic spectroscopy, which uses the full bandwidth of the incoming XFEL pulses. Our proposed method is relying on stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, where in addition to a pump pulse that resonantly excites the system a probe pulse on a specific electronic inelastic transition is provided, which serves as a seed in the stimulated scattering process. The limited spectral coherence of the XFEL radiation defines the energy resolution in this process and stimulated RIXS spectra of high resolution can be obtained by covariance analysis of the transmitted spectra. We present a detailed feasibility study and predict signal strengths for realistic XFEL parameters for the CO molecule resonantly pumped at the O1s→π* transition. Our theoretical model describes the evolution of the spectral and temporal characteristics of the transmitted x-ray radiation, by solving the equation of motion for the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom of the system self consistently with the propagation by Maxwell equations. PMID:26958585

  8. High-Resolution Structure of the Photosynthetic Mn4Ca Catalyst from X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Pushkar, Yulia; Sauer, Kenneth; Glatzel, Pieter; Bergmann, Uwe; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2007-08-01

    The application of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy methods to study the photosynthetic water oxidizing complex, which contains a unique hetero-nuclear catalytic Mn4Ca cluster, are described. Issues of X-ray damage especially at the metal sites in the Mn4Ca cluster are discussed. The structure of the Mn4Ca catalyst at high-resolution which has so far eluded attempts of determination by X-ray diffraction, EXAFS and other spectroscopic techniques has been addressed using polarized EXAFS techniques applied to oriented PS II membrane preparations and PS II single crystals. A review of how the resolution of traditional EXAFS techniques can be improved, using methods such as range-extended EXAFS is presented, and the changes that occur in the structure of the cluster as it advances through the catalytic cycle are described. X-ray absorption and emission techniques (XANES and K? emission) have been used earlier to determine the oxidation states of the Mn4Ca cluster, and in this report we review the use of X-ray resonant Raman spectroscopy to understand the electronic structure of the Mn4Ca cluster as it cycles through the intermediate S-states.

  9. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy peak assignment for perfluoropolyether oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mori, Shigeyuki; Morales, Wilfredo

    1990-01-01

    Perfluoroalkylpolyether (PFPE) oils are increasingly being used as vacuum pump oils and as lubricants for magnetic recording media and instrumentation for satellites. In this paper, the relative binding energies of three PFPE oils are determined. When sample oils are continuously irradiated during X-ray spectroscopy (XPS) measurements, the relative peak intensity of the spectra is altered significantly, indicating that gaseous products form from the oils during XPS measurements. Thus, attention should be paid to chemical changes when XPE is used to characterize fluorinated carbons such as PFPE oils.

  10. X-ray Imaging Spectroscopy for Planetary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Ralph P.; Kenter, A.; Murray, S.; Elvis, M.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Garcia, M.; Forman, W.; Geary, J.; McCoy, T.; Smith, R.

    2012-10-01

    We are developing monolithic backside illuminated CMOS detectors as soft X-ray imaging spectrometers for high energy astrophysics missions. These devices represent a significant advance over CCD technology and have unique properties that would make them ideal sensors for various planetary mission concepts. The benefits of CMOS include higher levels of integration which provide maximum pixel gain and therefore very low noise, very fast parallel output signal chains for high frame rates. CMOS imaging detectors have zero or one charge transfer so that they can withstand many orders of magnitude more radiation than conventional CCDs before degradation. The capability of high read rates provides dynamic range and temporal resolution. Additionally, the rapid read rates minimize shot noise from thermal dark current and optical light. CMOS detectors can therefore run at warmer temperatures and with ultra-thin optical blocking filters. Thin OBFs provide near unity quantum efficiency below 1 keV, thus maximizing response at the C and O lines. Possible mission concepts for these sensors include X-ray fluorescence studies of rocky bodies, and investigation of the magnetospheres of the gas giants and their moons. In this presentation, we discuss the current state of our technology development and outline its scientific potential for planetary physics with particular emphasis on studies of the Jovian magnetosphere. We contrast the capabilities of our instrument with that which has been achieved by the current generation of Earth-orbiting X-ray observatories.

  11. Near Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, D.P.; Acremann, Y.; Scherz, A.; Burkhardt, M.; Stohr, J.; Beye, M.; Schlotter, W.F.; Beeck, T.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Pietzsch, A.; Wurth, W.; Fohlisch, A.; /Hamburg U.

    2009-12-11

    We demonstrate the feasibility of Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy on solids by means of femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL). Our experiments, carried out at the Free-Electron Laser at Hamburg (FLASH), used a special sample geometry, spectrographic energy dispersion, single shot position-sensitive detection and a data normalization procedure that eliminates the severe fluctuations of the incident intensity in space and photon energy. As an example we recorded the {sup 3}D{sub 1} N{sub 4,5}-edge absorption resonance of La{sup 3+}-ions in LaMnO{sub 3}. Our study opens the door for x-ray absorption measurements on future x-ray FEL facilities.

  12. X-ray-induced photo-chemistry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    George, Graham N.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Pushie, M. Jake; Nienaber, Kurt; Hackett, Mark J.; Ascone, Isabella; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Aitken, Jade B.; Levina, Aviva; Glover, Christopher; Lay, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    As synchrotron light sources and optics deliver greater photon flux on samples, X-ray-induced photo-chemistry is increasingly encountered in X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments. The resulting problems are particularly pronounced for biological XAS experiments. This is because biological samples are very often quite dilute and therefore require signal averaging to achieve adequate signal-to-noise ratios, with correspondingly greater exposures to the X-ray beam. This paper reviews the origins of photo-reduction and photo-oxidation, the impact that they can have on active site structure, and the methods that can be used to provide relief from X-ray-induced photo-chemical artifacts. PMID:23093745

  13. Capturing molecular structural dynamics by 100 ps time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tokushi; Nozawa, Shunsuke; Ichiyanagi, Kohei; Tomita, Ayana; Chollet, Matthieu; Ichikawa, Hirohiko; Fujii, Hiroshi; Adachi, Shin Ichi; Koshihara, Shin Ya

    2009-01-01

    An experimental set-up for time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 100 ps time resolution at beamline NW14A at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring is presented. The X-ray positional active feedback to crystals in a monochromator combined with a figure-of-merit scan of the laser beam position has been utilized as an essential tool to stabilize the spatial overlap of the X-ray and laser beams at the sample position. As a typical example, a time-resolved XAFS measurement of a photo-induced spin crossover reaction of the tris(1,10-phenanthrorine)iron(II) complex in water is presented. PMID:19096182

  14. The Short-Pulse X-ray Facility at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Linda; Evans, Paul

    2013-05-01

    The Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) Facility will extend time-resolved x-ray scattering and spectroscopy to the picosecond time scale while retaining the powerful characteristics of synchrotron radiation, i.e., user-controlled continuous tunability of energy, polarization, and bandwidth combined with exquisite x-ray energy and pulse-length stability over a wide energy range. Experiments at the SPX facility will produce 1-ps stroboscopic snapshots of molecular rotations, molecular excited-state transient structures, stress/strain wave propagation, magnetic domain wall dynamics, phase transitions, and the coupling between electronic, vibrational, and magnetic degrees of freedom in condensed matter systems. Time-resolved studies of transient dynamics will be possible with simultaneous picosecond time resolution and picometer structural precision for a variety of atomic, molecular, supramolecular, nanoscale, and bulk material systems. Pump-probe experiments using high-average-power, sub-picosecond, high-repetition-rate laser systems will make efficient use of the MHz x-ray rates of the SPX. Five end stations for x-ray scattering, diffraction, spectroscopy, imaging, and microscopy can be developed as part of the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade project. The Advanced Photon Source is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Dept of Energy Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  15. Small pixel CZT detector for hard X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew David; Cernik, Robert; Chen, Henry; Hansson, Conny; Iniewski, Kris; Jones, Lawrence L.; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C.

    2011-10-01

    A new small pixel cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has been developed for hard X-ray spectroscopy. The X-ray performance of four detectors is presented and the detectors are analysed in terms of the energy resolution of each pixel. The detectors were made from CZT crystals grown by the travelling heater method (THM) bonded to a 20×20 application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and data acquisition (DAQ) system. The detectors had an array of 20×20 pixels on a 250 μm pitch, with each pixel gold-stud bonded to an energy resolving circuit in the ASIC. The DAQ system digitised the ASIC output with 14 bit resolution, performing offset corrections and data storage to disc in real time at up to 40,000 frames per second. The detector geometry and ASIC design was optimised for X-ray spectroscopy up to 150 keV and made use of the small pixel effect to preferentially measure the electron signal. A 241Am source was used to measure the spectroscopic performance and uniformity of the detectors. The average energy resolution (FWHM at 59.54 keV) of each pixel ranged from 1.09±0.46 to 1.50±0.57 keV across the four detectors. The detectors showed good spectral performance and uniform response over almost all pixels in the 20×20 array. A large area 80×80 pixel detector will be built that will utilise the scalable design of the ASIC and the large areas of monolithic spectroscopic grade THM grown CZT that are now available. The large area detector will have the same performance as that demonstrated here.

  16. Hetero-site-specific X-ray pump-probe spectroscopy for femtosecond intramolecular dynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Picón, A.; Lehmann, C. S.; Bostedt, C.; Rudenko, A.; Marinelli, A.; Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Bomme, C.; Bucher, M.; et al

    2016-05-23

    New capabilities at X-ray free-electron laser facilities allow the generation of two-colour femtosecond X-ray pulses, opening the possibility of performing ultrafast studies of X-ray-induced phenomena. Specifically, the experimental realization of hetero-site-specific X-ray-pump/X-ray-probe spectroscopy is of special interest, in which an X-ray pump pulse is absorbed at one site within a molecule and an X-ray probe pulse follows the X-ray-induced dynamics at another site within the same molecule. In this paper, we show experimental evidence of a hetero-site pump-probe signal. By using two-colour 10-fs X-ray pulses, we are able to observe the femtosecond time dependence for the formation of F ionsmore » during the fragmentation of XeF2 molecules following X-ray absorption at the Xe site.« less

  17. Hetero-site-specific X-ray pump-probe spectroscopy for femtosecond intramolecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Picón, A; Lehmann, C S; Bostedt, C; Rudenko, A; Marinelli, A; Osipov, T; Rolles, D; Berrah, N; Bomme, C; Bucher, M; Doumy, G; Erk, B; Ferguson, K R; Gorkhover, T; Ho, P J; Kanter, E P; Krässig, B; Krzywinski, J; Lutman, A A; March, A M; Moonshiram, D; Ray, D; Young, L; Pratt, S T; Southworth, S H

    2016-01-01

    New capabilities at X-ray free-electron laser facilities allow the generation of two-colour femtosecond X-ray pulses, opening the possibility of performing ultrafast studies of X-ray-induced phenomena. Particularly, the experimental realization of hetero-site-specific X-ray-pump/X-ray-probe spectroscopy is of special interest, in which an X-ray pump pulse is absorbed at one site within a molecule and an X-ray probe pulse follows the X-ray-induced dynamics at another site within the same molecule. Here we show experimental evidence of a hetero-site pump-probe signal. By using two-colour 10-fs X-ray pulses, we are able to observe the femtosecond time dependence for the formation of F ions during the fragmentation of XeF2 molecules following X-ray absorption at the Xe site. PMID:27212390

  18. Hetero-site-specific X-ray pump-probe spectroscopy for femtosecond intramolecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picón, A.; Lehmann, C. S.; Bostedt, C.; Rudenko, A.; Marinelli, A.; Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Bomme, C.; Bucher, M.; Doumy, G.; Erk, B.; Ferguson, K. R.; Gorkhover, T.; Ho, P. J.; Kanter, E. P.; Krässig, B.; Krzywinski, J.; Lutman, A. A.; March, A. M.; Moonshiram, D.; Ray, D.; Young, L.; Pratt, S. T.; Southworth, S. H.

    2016-05-01

    New capabilities at X-ray free-electron laser facilities allow the generation of two-colour femtosecond X-ray pulses, opening the possibility of performing ultrafast studies of X-ray-induced phenomena. Particularly, the experimental realization of hetero-site-specific X-ray-pump/X-ray-probe spectroscopy is of special interest, in which an X-ray pump pulse is absorbed at one site within a molecule and an X-ray probe pulse follows the X-ray-induced dynamics at another site within the same molecule. Here we show experimental evidence of a hetero-site pump-probe signal. By using two-colour 10-fs X-ray pulses, we are able to observe the femtosecond time dependence for the formation of F ions during the fragmentation of XeF2 molecules following X-ray absorption at the Xe site.

  19. Hetero-site-specific X-ray pump-probe spectroscopy for femtosecond intramolecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Picón, A.; Lehmann, C. S.; Bostedt, C.; Rudenko, A.; Marinelli, A.; Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Bomme, C.; Bucher, M.; Doumy, G.; Erk, B.; Ferguson, K. R.; Gorkhover, T.; Ho, P. J.; Kanter, E. P.; Krässig, B.; Krzywinski, J.; Lutman, A. A.; March, A. M.; Moonshiram, D.; Ray, D.; Young, L.; Pratt, S. T.; Southworth, S. H.

    2016-01-01

    New capabilities at X-ray free-electron laser facilities allow the generation of two-colour femtosecond X-ray pulses, opening the possibility of performing ultrafast studies of X-ray-induced phenomena. Particularly, the experimental realization of hetero-site-specific X-ray-pump/X-ray-probe spectroscopy is of special interest, in which an X-ray pump pulse is absorbed at one site within a molecule and an X-ray probe pulse follows the X-ray-induced dynamics at another site within the same molecule. Here we show experimental evidence of a hetero-site pump-probe signal. By using two-colour 10-fs X-ray pulses, we are able to observe the femtosecond time dependence for the formation of F ions during the fragmentation of XeF2 molecules following X-ray absorption at the Xe site. PMID:27212390

  20. Hubbard Model Approach to X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Towfiq

    We have implemented a Hubbard model based first-principles approach for real-space calculations of x-ray spectroscopy, which allows one to study excited state electronic structure of correlated systems. Theoretical understanding of many electronic features in d and f electron systems remains beyond the scope of conventional density functional theory (DFT). In this work our main effort is to go beyond the local density approximation (LDA) by incorporating the Hubbard model within the real-space multiple-scattering Green's function (RSGF) formalism. Historically, the first theoretical description of correlated systems was published by Sir Neville Mott and others in 1937. They realized that the insulating gap and antiferromagnetism in the transition metal oxides are mainly caused by the strong on-site Coulomb interaction of the localized unfilled 3d orbitals. Even with the recent progress of first principles methods (e.g. DFT) and model Hamiltonian approaches (e.g., Hubbard-Anderson model), the electronic description of many of these systems remains a non-trivial combination of both. X-ray absorption near edge spectra (XANES) and x-ray emission spectra (XES) are very powerful spectroscopic probes for many electronic features near Fermi energy (EF), which are caused by the on-site Coulomb interaction of localized electrons. In this work we focus on three different cases of many-body effects due to the interaction of localized d electrons. Here, for the first time, we have applied the Hubbard model in the real-space multiple scattering (RSGF) formalism for the calculation of x-ray spectra of Mott insulators (e.g., NiO and MnO). Secondly, we have implemented in our RSGF approach a doping dependent self-energy that was constructed from a single-band Hubbard model for the over doped high-T c cuprate La2-xSrxCuO4. Finally our RSGF calculation of XANES is calculated with the spectral function from Lee and Hedin's charge transfer satellite model. For all these cases our

  1. Picosecond-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy at low signal contrast using a hard X-ray streak camera

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Bernhard W.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Jiao, Yishuo

    2015-06-24

    A picosecond-resolving hard-X-ray streak camera has been in operation for several years at Sector 7 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Several upgrades have been implemented over the past few years to optimize integration into the beamline, reduce the timing jitter, and improve the signal-to-noise ratio. These include the development of X-ray optics for focusing the X-rays into the sample and the entrance slit of the streak camera, and measures to minimize the amount of laser light needed to generate the deflection-voltage ramp. For the latter, the photoconductive switch generating the deflection ramp was replaced with microwave power electronics. With these, the streak camera operates routinely at 88 MHz repetition rate, thus making it compatible with all of the APS fill patterns including use of all the X-rays in the 324-bunch mode. Sample data are shown to demonstrate the performance.

  2. Proposal to DOE Basic Energy Sciences: Ultrafast X-ray science facility at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenlein, Robert W.; Falcone, Roger W.; Abela, R.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Belkacem, A.; Berrah, N.; Bozek, J.; Bressler, C.; Cavalleri, A.; Chergui, M.; Glover, T.E.; Heimann, P.A.; Hepburn, J.; Larsson, J.; Lee, R.W.; McCusker, J.; Padmore, H.A.; Pattison, P.; Pratt, S.T.; Shank, C.V.; Wark, J.; Chang, Z.; Robin, D.W.; Schlueter, R.D.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2001-12-12

    We propose to develop a true user facility for ultrafast x-ray science at the Advanced Light Source. This facility will be unique in the world, and will fill a critical need for the growing ultrafast x-ray research community. The development of this facility builds upon the expertise from long-standing research efforts in ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and the development of femtosecond x-ray sources and techniques at both the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at U.C. Berkeley. In particular, the technical feasibility of a femtosecond x-ray beamline at the ALS has already been demonstrated, and existing ultrafast laser technology will enable such a beamline to operate near the practical limit for femtosecond x-ray flux and brightness from a 3rd generation synchrotron.

  3. X-ray Spectroscopy and Magnetism in Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainctavit, Philippe; Brice-Profeta, Sandrine; Gaudry, Emilie; Letard, Isabelle; Arrio, Marie-Anne

    The objective of this paper is to present the kind of information that can be gained in the field of mineralogy from the use of x-ray magnetic spectroscopies. We review some of the questions that are unsettled and that could benefit from an interdisciplinary approach where magnetism, spectroscopy and mineralogy could be mixed. Most of the attention is focused on iron and some other 3d transition elements. The mineralogy of planetary cores and its relation with known meteorites are exemplified. The various oxide phases in the mantle and the nature of iron in these phases is also underlined. The presence of transition elements in insulating minerals and its relation with macroscopic properties such as the color of gemstones are reviewed. Finally an introduction to paleomagnetism is given with a special attention to nanomaghemites.

  4. An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Mo oxidation in Pb at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shanshan; Olive, Daniel; Terry, Jeff; Segre, Carlo U.

    2009-06-30

    The corrosion of fuel cladding and structural materials by lead and lead-bismuth eutectic in the liquid state at elevated temperatures is an issue that must be considered when designing advanced nuclear systems and high-power spallation neutron targets. In this work, lead corrosion studies of molybdenum were performed to investigate the interaction layer as a function of temperature by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In situ X-ray absorption measurements on a Mo substrate with a 3-6 {micro}m layer of Pb deposited by thermal evaporation were performed at temperatures up to 900 C and at a 15{sup o} angle to the incident X-rays. The changes in the local atomic structure of the corrosion layer are visible in the difference extended X-ray absorption fine structure and the linear combination fitting of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure to as-deposited molybdenum sample and molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub 2} and MoO{sub 3}) standards. The data are consistent with the appearance of MoO{sub 3} in an intermediate temperature range (650-800 C) and the more stable MoO{sub 2} phase dominating at high and low temperatures.

  5. Astrophysics with Laboratory X-ray and EUV spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Improvements in the spectral resolution of x-ray observatories have necessitated increasing accuracies in the spectral models used in the analysis of astrophysical data. In response, we have been carrying out laboratory measurements to assess the fidelity of the atomic data used in the models and to calibrate specific spectral diagnostics. The goal is to meet the current need for spectroscopic models to be able to predict line intensities on the order of a few percent for the strongest transitions and to represent line positions with spectroscopic accuracy. Our spectroscopy measurements are performed in the extreme ultraviolet and x-ray regimes and are mostly carried out at the electron beam ion trap facility at Livermore, which produces the relevant ions in a density and temperature environment similar to those of astrophysical plasmas. Examples discussed in this talk fall into four categories. (1) The identification of lines seen in astrophysical spectra but missing in the models; (2) the establishment of benchmark wavelengths for K-shell transitions in M-shell ions and for L-shell transitions in L-shell ions needed for the interpretation of absorption line features; (3) the calibration of the line emission of key spectroscopic diagnostics, such as the L-shell lines of Fe XVII; (4) the disentanglement of line excitation processes, especially those associated with charge exchange, that produce x-ray emission from comets, planets, and the interstellar medium. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and supported by NASA's Astrophysics Research and Analysis Program under Contracts NNG14WF24I and NNG13WF99I.

  6. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy on the Einstein Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. W.

    1979-01-01

    The X-ray spectroscope presented features both spectral and one dimensional spatial resolution. The capabilities of observing sources like supernova remnants, X-ray stars, and the halo surrounding galaxies are discussed.

  7. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, Ingrid J.; George, Graham N.

    2007-02-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is proving invaluable in determining the average chemical form of metals or metalloids in intact biological tissues. As most tissues have spatial structure, there is great additional interest in visualizing the spatial location of the metal(loid) as well as its chemical forms. XAS imaging gives the opportunity of producing maps of specific chemical types of elements in vivo in dilute biological systems. X-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques are routinely used to study samples with spatial heterogeneity. Microprobe produces elemental maps, with chemical sensitivity obtained by recording micro-XAS spectra at selected point locations on the map. Unfortunately, using these procedures spatial detail may be lost as the number of point spectra recorded generally is limited. A powerful extension of microprobe is XAS imaging or chemically specific imaging. Here, the incident energy is tuned to features in the near-edge which are characteristic of the expected chemical forms of the element. With a few simple assumptions, these XAS images can then be converted to quantitative images of specific chemical form, yielding considerable clarity in the distributions.

  8. Experimental characterization of hohlraum conditions by X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Back, C.A.; Hsieh, E.J.; Kauffman, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Spectroscopy is a powerful technique used to measure the plasma parameters relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) plasmas. For instance, the onset of spectral signals from multilayer targets have been used to determine ablation rate scalings. Temperature and density measurements in coronal plasmas have enabled the study of laser coupling efficiency as a function of the laser wavelengths. More recently, dopants have been successfully used to determine capsule conditions of ICF targets. However, few spectroscopic studies have been performed to diagnose plasma conditions of the hohlraum itself. Several laboratories have studied enclosed cavities, previously concentrating on measurements of the radiative heat wave, the x-ray conversion efficiency, and temporal evolution of Au x rays. Measurements of electron temperature T{sub e} and electron densities n{sub e} are difficult because many physical processes occur and each diagnostic`s line-of-sight is restricted by the hohlraum wall. However, they are worth pursuing because they can provide critical information on the target energetics and the evolution of plasma parameters important to achieving fusion. Here the authors discuss spectroscopic tracers to diagnose plasma conditions in the hohlraum, using time- and space-resolved measurements. The tracers are typically mid-Z elements which are placed on the hohlraum wall or supended in the hohlraum volume. To demonstrate the breadth of measurements that can be performed, three types of experiments are presented.

  9. (Diffraction gratings used in x-ray spectroscopy): Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.I.

    1988-11-01

    This subcontract was initiated in order to facilitate the development at MIT of technologies for fabricating the very fine diffraction grating required in x-ray spectroscopy at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL). These gratings are generally gold transmission gratings with spatial periods of 200 nm or less. The major focus of our efforts was to develop a means of fabricating gratings of 100 nm period. We explored two approaches: e-beam fabrication of x-ray lithography masks, and achromatic holographic lithography. This work was pursued by Erik Anderson as a major component of his Ph.D. thesis. Erik was successful in both the e-beam and holographic approaches. However, the e-beam method proved to be highly impractical: exposure times of about 115 days would be required to cover an area of 1 cm/sup 2/. The achromatic holography, on the other hand, should be capable of exposing areas well in excess of 1 cm/sup 2/ in times under 1 hour. Moreover, 100 nm-period gratings produced by achromatic holography are coherent over their entire area whereas gratings produced by e-beam lithography are coherent only over areas /approximately/100 ..mu..m. The remainder of this report consists of portions excerpted from Erik Anderson's thesis. These contain all the details of our work on 100 nm period gratings. 26 refs., 17 figs.

  10. Soft x-ray spectromicroscopy development for materials science at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, T.; Padmore, H.; Ade, H.; Hitchcock, A.P.; Rightor, E.G.; Tonner, B.P.

    1996-08-01

    Several third generation synchrotron radiation facilities are now operational and the high brightness of these photon sources offers new opportunities for x-ray microscopy. Well developed synchrotron radiation spectroscopy techniques are being applied in new instruments capable of imaging the surface of a material with a spatial resolution smaller than one micron. There are two aspects to this. One is to further the field of surface science by exploring the effects of spatial variations across a surface on a scale not previously accessible to x-ray measurements. The other is to open up new analytical techniques in materials science using x-rays, on a spatial scale comparable to that of the processes or devices to be studied. The development of the spectromicroscopy program at the Advanced Light Source will employ a variety of instruments, some are already operational. Their development and use will be discussed, and recent results will be presented to illustrate their capabilities.

  11. The Constellation-X Spectroscopy X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, Robert; Content, David; Lehan, John; O'Dell, Stephen; Owens, Scott; Podgorsky, William; Stewart, Jeff; Zhang, William

    2004-01-01

    The status of technology development for the Constellation-X Spectroscopy X-ray Telescope (SXT) mirror is presented. The SXT mirror combines a large (1.6 m) aperture with modest (12 arc sec half power diameter) angular resolution and low mass (750 kg). The overall collecting area, larger than 9,600 square cm at 0.25 keV, requires high throughput, and thus nesting of a substantial number of thin reflectors. A phased development program is underway to develop reflectors, mounting and alignment approaches, and metrology techniques for components and the mirror has a whole. The latest results in all these areas are summarized, along with an overview of results of optical testing of reflector performance.

  12. Polytetrafluoroethylene transfer film studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was rubbed against nickel in ultrahigh vacuum at loads up to 3.9 N and speeds up to 94 mm/sec. The transfer film formed on the nickel was analyzed using X-ray phototectron spectroscopy. The film was indistinguishable from bulk PTFE except for the possible presence of a small amount of NiF2. The transfer film was found to be about 1 molecule (0.5 nm) thick under all conditions; but at speeds above 10 mm/sec, there was evidence of bulk transfer in the form of fragments as well. The thickness measurements required a choice among conflicting published values of the inelastic mean free path for electrons in polymers. The values chosen gave internally consistent results.

  13. X-Ray Imaging-Spectroscopy of Abell 1835

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. R.; Paerels, F. B. S.; Kaastra, J. S.; Arnaud, M.; Reiprich T. H.; Fabian, A. C.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Jernigan, J. G.; Sakelliou, I.

    2000-01-01

    We present detailed spatially-resolved spectroscopy results of the observation of Abell 1835 using the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) and the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) on the XMM-Newton observatory. Abell 1835 is a luminous (10(exp 46)ergs/s), medium redshift (z = 0.2523), X-ray emitting cluster of galaxies. The observations support the interpretation that large amounts of cool gas are present in a multi-phase medium surrounded by a hot (kT(sub e) = 8.2 keV) outer envelope. We detect O VIII Ly(alpha) and two Fe XXIV complexes in the RGS spectrum. The emission measure of the cool gas below kT(sub e) = 2.7 keV is much lower than expected from standard cooling-flow models, suggesting either a more complicated cooling process than simple isobaric radiative cooling or differential cold absorption of the cooler gas.

  14. VUV and soft x-ray spectroscopy of actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C. G.; Joyce, J. J.; Durakiewicz, T.; Guziewicz, E.

    2004-01-01

    Optical and photoelectron spectroscopies using VUV and Soft X-ray photons are powerful tools for studies of elemental and compound actinides. Large changes in the relative atomic cross sections of the 5f, 6d and sp electrons allow decomposition of the character of the valence bands using photoemission. Resonant enhancement of photoelectrons and Auger electrons at the 5d core threshold further aids the decomposition and gives a measure of elemental specificity. Angle-resolved photoemission can be used to map the momentum dependence of the electronic states. The large changes in relative cross section with photon energy yields further details when the mapping is done at equivalent points in multiple zones. Spectra for well understood rare earth materials will be presented to establish spectral characteristics for known atomic character initial states. These signatures will be applied to the case of USb to investigate f-d hybridization near the Fermi level.

  15. Hard x ray/microwave spectroscopy of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Dale E.

    1992-01-01

    The joint study of hard x ray and microwave observations of solar flares is extremely important because the two complementary ways of viewing the accelerated electrons yield information that cannot be obtained using hard x rays or microwaves alone. The microwaves can provide spatial information lacking in the hard x rays, and the x ray data can give information on the energy distribution of electrons that remove ambiguities in the radio data. A prerequisite for combining the two data-sets, however, is to first understand which range of microwave frequencies correlate best with the hard x rays. This SMM Guest Investigator grant enabled us to combine multi-frequency OVRO data with calibrated hard x ray data to shed light on the relationship between the two emissions. In particular, the questions of which microwave frequencies correspond to which hard x ray energies, and what is the corresponding energy of the electrons that produce both types of emission are investigated.

  16. Electronic Structure of In2O3 from Resonant X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, L.; DeMasi, A; Cho, S; Smith, K; Fuchs, F; Bechstedt, F; Korber, C; Klein, A; Payne, D; Egdell, R

    2009-01-01

    The valence and conduction band structures of In2O3 have been measured using a combination of valence band x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, O K-edge resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, and O K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Excellent agreement is noted between the experimental spectra and O 2p partial density of states calculated within hybrid density functional theory. Our data are consistent with a direct band gap for In2O3.

  17. Implications of stimulated resonant X-ray scattering for spectroscopy, imaging, and diffraction in the regime from soft to hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Simon; Beye, Martin; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    The ultrahigh peak brilliance available at X-ray free-electron lasers opens the possibility to transfer nonlinear spectroscopic techniques from the optical and infrared into the X-ray regime. Here, we present a conceptual treatment of nonlinear X-ray processes with an emphasis on stimulated resonant X-ray scattering as well as a quantitative estimate for the scaling of stimulated X-ray scattering cross sections. These considerations provide the order of magnitude for the required X-ray intensities to experimentally observe stimulated resonant X-ray scattering for photon energies ranging from the extreme ultraviolet to the soft and hard X-ray regimes. At the same time, the regime where stimulated processes can safely be ignored is identified. With this basis, we discuss prospects and implications for spectroscopy, scattering, and imaging experiments at X-ray free-electron lasers.

  18. Excited-state molecular structures captured by x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy : a decade and beyond.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. X.; Zhang, X.; Lockard, J. V.; Stickrath, A. B.; Attenkofer, K.; Jennings, G.; Liu, D.-J.; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-03-02

    Transient molecular structures along chemical reaction pathways are important for predicting molecular reactivity, understanding reaction mechanisms, as well as controlling reaction pathways. During the past decade, X-ray transient absorption spectroscopy (XTA, or LITR-XAS, laser-initiated X-ray absorption spectroscopy), analogous to the commonly used optical transient absorption spectroscopy, has been developed. XTA uses a laser pulse to trigger a fundamental chemical process, and an X-ray pulse(s) to probe transient structures as a function of the time delay between the pump and probe pulses. Using X-ray pulses with high photon flux from synchrotron sources, transient electronic and molecular structures of metal complexes have been studied in disordered media from homogeneous solutions to heterogeneous solution-solid interfaces. Several examples from the studies at the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne National Laboratory are summarized, including excited-state metalloporphyrins, metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) states of transition metal complexes, and charge transfer states of metal complexes at the interface with semiconductor nanoparticles. Recent developments of the method are briefly described followed by a future prospective of XTA. It is envisioned that concurrent developments in X-ray free-electron lasers and synchrotron X-ray facilities as well as other table-top laser-driven femtosecond X-ray sources will make many breakthroughs and realise dreams of visualizing molecular movies and snapshots, which ultimately enable chemical reaction pathways to be controlled.

  19. Advanced water window x-ray microscope design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, D. L.; Wang, C.; Jiang, W.; Lin, J.

    1992-01-01

    The project was focused on the design and analysis of an advanced water window soft-x-ray microscope. The activities were accomplished by completing three tasks contained in the statement of work of this contract. The new results confirm that in order to achieve resolutions greater than three times the wavelength of the incident radiation, it will be necessary to use aspherical mirror surfaces and to use graded multilayer coatings on the secondary (to accommodate the large variations of the angle of incidence over the secondary when operating the microscope at numerical apertures of 0.35 or greater). The results are included in a manuscript which is enclosed in the Appendix.

  20. Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility thermal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, C. G.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual active/passive thermal control system design is presented for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), where the design variables considered in system optimization were vehicle orientation for environmental extremes, thermal coating properties, and insulation materials. Because power and weight are at a premium, the design was limited to one power module, resulting in a thermal control limit of 441 W of regulated power. The present study has determined that all thermal control objectives for AXAF's instruments can be met by the design considered. The thermal resistance schematics employed in this conceptual study are presented, together with simulated performance characteristics.

  1. X-Ray Line Spectroscopy of Massive X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liedahl, D. A.; Sako, M.; Wojdowski, P. S.; Paerels, F.; Kahn, S. M.

    2000-01-01

    Spectra from ASCA have provided the most, detailed view to date of the X-ray spectral properties of stellar winds in massive X-ray binaries. Using detailed atomic models that account for recombination cascade kinetics, we have reexamined archival data from Vela X-1 and Cen X-3 in the context of simple models of their wind geometries and velocity distributions. Our approach emphasizes apparent differential emission measure (DEM) distributions, and their dependence on orbital phase and wind parameters. A grid of theoretical DEM distributions is used to generate model spectra, which are compared to the data. We obtain good fits, and derive constraints oil the stellar wind parameters. We provide a summary of the method, and show that, even though the companion stars in Vela X-1 and Cen X-3 have comparable mass-loss rates, the winds in these two systems are dramatically different, in character.

  2. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bacterial sulfur globules

    SciTech Connect

    George, Graham N.

    2002-08-01

    Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful in situ probe of sulfur biochemistry in intact cells and tissues. Under favorable circumstances the technique can provide quantitative information on the chemical identify of the sulfur species that are present in a sample. Prange et al. have recently reported an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of bacterial sulfur storage globules. Unfortunately there are substantial problems with the experimental technique employed that, they contend, lead to completely erroneous conclusions. In the more recent of their two papers Prange et al. employed a curve-fitting method similar to that used by us (for more than 10 years). In essence, the method employs simply fitting a linear combination of the spectra of standard compounds to that of the unknown, in this case cultures of bacterial cells. This type of analysis can provide quantitative estimates of the individual sulfur types in the sample, but is critically dependent upon the choice of reference spectra. Prange et al. deduce substantial differences between the chemical forms of sulfur stored in the globules of different organisms; they conclude that the globules of Beggiatoa alba and Thiomargarita namibiensis contain cyclo-octasulfur (S{sub 8}), while those of other organisms contain polythionates (Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans) and polymeric sulfur (e.g. Allochromatium vinosum). This is in contradiction with an earlier study, in which they found that sulfur in all globule species examined resembled that expected for various sized spherical particles of S{sub 8}. The discrepancy is due to an experimental artefact in the work of Prange et al. arising from their choice of transmittance detection, which is also discussed.

  3. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) Applications Using Microfocused X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, Robert; Cormia, Robert; Siordia, Ruth

    1986-08-01

    A focusing quartz crystal monochromator system. has been developed that provides a bright X-ray spot at 1486.6ev. The X-ray spot size may he varied from one-hundred fifty (150) to one-thousand (1000) microns in four (4) steps. The X-ray system is combined with a high. performance electron lens that collects greater than five (5) percent of the photoemitted electrons and passes them into a hemispherical capacitor energy analyzer. The electrons are detected at the exit plane with a two (2) dimensional position sensitivity detector. Using this system, XPS has been carried out on a wide variety of practical samples. We will provide a brief review of the system, design followed by examples of the solution to unique problems. Samples which have been CLosen for discussion include: Crash Zone on a Winchester Disk An interocular Lens . Single 5 micron Carbon. Fiber Plasma Modified Polymeric Say The unique benefits of a focused. source with high energy resolution will also be discussed.

  4. Advancements in hard x-ray multilayers for x-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windt, David L.

    2015-09-01

    This paper is focused on recent progress in the development of broad-band multilayer coatings designed for hard X-ray energies, for use in future astronomical telescopes. We describe a new laboratory-based hard X-ray reflectometer for atwavelength characterization of multilayer films, we present the results of an experimental comparison of the hard X-ray performance of several W-based periodic multilayer coatings, and we describe the optimization and experimental performance of new non-periodic Co-based multilayer coatings (both depth-graded and aperiodic), designed for continuous response through the W and Pt K-edges near 70 and 80 keV, respectively. We discuss future research directions in light of these new results.

  5. 2-ps Hard X-Ray Streak Camera Measurements at Sector 7 Beamline of the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Chollet, M.; Ahr, B.; Walko, D.A.; Rose-Petruck, C.; Adams, B.

    2011-08-02

    A hard X-ray streak camera capable of 2-ps time resolution is in operation at the Sector 7 beamline of the Advanced Photon Source. It is used for laser-pump, X-ray probe experiments using the Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser system installed on the beamline. This streak camera, combined with standardized and prealigned experimental setups, can perform time-resolved liquid-phase absorption spectroscopy, reflectivity, and diffraction experiments.

  6. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Mascali, David; Castro, Giuseppe; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Caliri, Claudia; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs-Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed "on-line" during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure. PMID:26931918

  7. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, David; Castro, Giuseppe; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Caliri, Claudia; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed "on-line" during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  8. Advanced X-Ray Timing Array (AXTAR) Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Randall C.; Thompson, Kevin S.

    2011-01-01

    The animation depicts NASA's concept for a next-generation Advanced X-ray Timing Mission. The models and their textures doe not necessarily represent the final iteration. Delivery specifications include launch with Taurus II or Falcon 9, mass of 2650 kg, with a circular low earth orbit at approximately 600 km. The inclination depends on the launch vehicle and spacecraft mass. AXTAR's prime instrument will probe the physics of neutron stars and black holes through X-ray timing and spectral measurements. The primary instrument will be the Large Area Timing Array (LATA). The Sky Monitor Clusters configuration consists of 27 Sky Monitor cameras th at are grouped in five clusters. This configuration will achieve approximately 85 percent all sky coverage. Spacecraft components include a science bus to house the LATA of supermodules; a spacecraft bus to house components such as propulsion tanks, avionics, and reaction wheels; solar arrays configured from space-qualified GaAs 3-junction cells; star trackers for attitude knowledge; a propulsion system of four pods, each containing one 100 lbf and two 5 lbf engines; a launch vehicle adaptor; and a radiation shield.

  9. Testing black holes via X-ray reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Nampalliwar, Sourabh; Cardenas-Avendano, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    Astrophysical black hole candidates are thought to be the Kerr black holes of general relativity. However, a direct observational evidence is still lacking. The study of the properties of the radiation emitted by gas in the inner part of the accretion disk can provide useful information on the spacetime geometry around these compact objects and test the Kerr black hole hypothesis. The iron line method is the most promising techniques to test black hole candidates. In this talk, we present a new reflection model for testing the Kerr black hole hypothesis. We use the formalism of the transfer function and we split the calculations into two blocks. One is the calculation of the transfer function, which takes into account all the relativistic effects and only depends on the background metric. The second block is the calculation of the intrinsic spectrum in the rest frame of the gas. We have developed a code to compute transfer functions in arbitrary stationary and axisymmetric spacetimes. The transfer functions are tabulated in FITS files and combined with XILLVER, which is the best reflection code available today. The result is best model to test black hole candidates via X-ray reflection spectroscopy.

  10. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Dinuclear Metallohydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, David L.; Schenk, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    In this mini-review, we briefly discuss the physical origin of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) before illustrating its application using dinuclear metallohydrolases as exemplary systems. The systems we have selected for illustrative purposes present a challenging problem for XAS, one that is ideal to demonstrate the potential of this methodology for structure/function studies of metalloenzymes in general. When the metal ion is redox active, XAS provides a sensitive measure of oxidation-state-dependent differences. When the metal ion is zinc, XAS is the only spectroscopic method that will provide easily accessible structural information in solution. In the case of heterodimetallic sites, XAS has the unique ability to interrogate each metal site independently in the same sample. One of the strongest advantages of XAS is its ability to examine metal ion site structures with crystallographic precision, without the need for a crystal. This is key for studying flexible metal ion sites, such as those described in the selected examples, because it allows one to monitor structural changes that occur during substrate turnover. PMID:25229134

  11. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of the Rare Earth orthophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Shuh, D.K.; Terminello, L.J.; Boatner, L.A.; Abraham, M.M.

    1993-06-01

    X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) of the Rare Earth (RE) 3d levels yields sharp peaks near the edges as a result of strong, quasi-atomic 3d{sup 10}4f{sup n} {yields} 3d-{sup 9}4f{sup n+1} transitions and these transitions exhibit a wealth of spectroscopic features. The XAS measurements of single crystal REPO{sub 4} (RE = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Er) at the 3d edge were performed in the total yield mode at beam line 8-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). The XAS spectra of the RE ions in the orthophosphate matrix generally resemble the XAS of the corresponding RE metal. This is not unexpected and emphasizes the major contribution of the trivalent state to the electronic transitions at the RE 3d edges. These spectra unequivocally identify the transitions originating from well-characterized RE cores and correlate well with previous theoretical investigations.

  12. High-efficiency blazed transmission gratings for high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alexander R.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2015-09-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy of astrophysical sources is the key to gaining a quantitative understanding of the history, dynamics, and current conditions of the cosmos. A large-area (> 1,000 cm2), high resolving power (R = λ/Δλ> 3000) soft x-ray grating spectrometer (XGS) that covers the lines of C, N, O, Ne and Fe ions is the ideal tool to address a number of high-priority science questions from the 2010 Decadal Survey, such as the connection between super-massive black holes and large-scale structure via cosmic feedback, the evolution of large- scale structure, the behavior of matter at high densities, and the conditions close to black holes. While no grating missions or instruments are currently approved, an XGS aboard a potential future X-ray Surveyor could easily surpass the above performance metrics. To improve the chances for future soft x-ray grating spectroscopy missions or instruments, grating technology has to progress and advance to higher Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). To that end we have developed Critical-Angle Transmission (CAT) gratings that combine the advantages of blazed reflection gratings (high efficiency, use of higher diffraction orders) with those of conventional transmission gratings (low mass, relaxed alignment tolerances and temperature requirements, high transparency at higher energies). A CAT grating-based spectrometer can provide performance 1-2 orders of magnitude better than current grating instruments on Chandra and Newton-XMM with minimal resource requirements. At present we have fabricated large-area freestanding CAT gratings with narrow integrated support structures from silicon-on- insulator wafers using advanced lithography and a combination of deep reactive-ion and wet etching. Our latest x-ray test results show record high absolute diffraction efficiencies in blazed orders in excess of 30% with room for improvement.

  13. High-efficiency blazed transmission gratings for high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alexander R.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy of astrophysical sources is the key to gaining a quantitative understanding of the history, dynamics, and current conditions of the cosmos. A large-area (> 1,000 cm2), high resolving power (R = λ/Δλ > 3,000) soft x-ray spectrometer that covers the lines of C, N, O, Ne and Fe ions is the ideal tool to address a number of high-priority sciences questions from the 2010 Decadal Survey, such as the connection between super-massive black holes and large-scale structure via cosmic feedback, the evolution of large-scale structure, the behavior of matter at high densities, and the conditions close to black holes. Numerous mission concepts that meet these requirements have been studied and proposed over the last few years, including grating instruments for the International X-ray Observatory. Nevertheless, no grating missions are currently approved. To improve the chances for future soft x-ray grating spectroscopy missions, grating technology has to progress and be advanced to higher TRLs. We have developed Critical-Angle Transmission (CAT) gratings that combine the advantages of blazed reflection gratings (high efficiency, use of higher diffraction orders) with those of conventional transmission gratings (low mass, relaxed alignment tolerances and temperature requirements, transparent at higher energies). A CAT grating-based spectrometer can provide performance 1-2 orders of magnitude better than current grating instruments on Chandra and Newton-XMM with minimal resource requirements. We have fabricated large-area free-standing CAT gratings with minimal integrated support structures from silicon-on-insulator wafers using advanced lithography and a combination of deep reactive-ion and wet etching, and will present our latest x-ray test results showing record high diffraction efficiencies in blazed orders.

  14. High-brightness beamline for x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, R.C.C.; Jones, G.; Lindle, D.W.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goals of high energy resolution, high flux, and high brightness at the sample. When completed later this year, it will be the first ALS monochromatic hard x-ray beamline, and its brightness will be an order of magnitude higher than presently available in this energy range. In addition, it will provide flux and resolution comparable to any other beamline now in operation. To achieve these goals, two technical improvements, relative to existing x-ray beamlines, were incorporated. First, a somewhat novel optical design for x-rays, in which matched toroidal mirrors are positioned before and after the double-crystal monochromator, was adopted. This configuration allows for high resolution by passing a collimated beam through the monochromator, and for high brightness by focusing the ALS source on the sample with unit magnification. Second, a new {open_quotes}Cowan type{close_quotes} double-crystal monochromator based on the design used at NSLS beamline X-24A was developed. The measured mechanical precision of this new monochromator shows significant improvement over existing designs, without using positional feedback available with piezoelectric devices. Such precision is essential because of the high brightness of the radiation and the long distance (12 m) from the source (sample) to the collimating (focusing) mirror. This combination of features will provide a bright, high resolution, and stable x-ray beam for use in the x-ray spectroscopy program at the ALS.

  15. A short-pulse X-ray beamline for spectroscopy and scattering.

    PubMed

    Reininger, R; Dufresne, E M; Borland, M; Beno, M A; Young, L; Evans, P G

    2014-09-01

    Experimental facilities for picosecond X-ray spectroscopy and scattering based on RF deflection of stored electron beams face a series of optical design challenges. Beamlines designed around such a source enable time-resolved diffraction, spectroscopy and imaging studies in chemical, condensed matter and nanoscale materials science using few-picosecond-duration pulses possessing the stability, high repetition rate and spectral range of synchrotron light sources. The RF-deflected chirped electron beam produces a vertical fan of undulator radiation with a correlation between angle and time. The duration of the X-ray pulses delivered to experiments is selected by a vertical aperture. In addition to the radiation at the fundamental photon energy in the central cone, the undulator also emits the same photon energy in concentric rings around the central cone, which can potentially compromise the time resolution of experiments. A detailed analysis of this issue is presented for the proposed SPXSS beamline for the Advanced Photon Source. An optical design that minimizes the effects of off-axis radiation in lengthening the duration of pulses and provides variable X-ray pulse duration between 2.4 and 16 ps is presented. PMID:25178012

  16. X ray microscope assembly and alignment support and advanced x ray microscope design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Considerable efforts have been devoted recently to the design, analysis, fabrication, and testing of spherical Schwarzschild microscopes for soft x ray application in microscopy and projection lithography. The spherical Schwarzschild microscope consists of two concentric spherical mirrors configured such that the third order spherical aberration and coma are zero. Since multilayers are used on the mirror substrates for x ray applications, it is desirable to have only two reflecting surfaces in a microscope. In order to reduce microscope aberrations and increase the field of view, generalized mirror surface profiles have been considered in this investigation. Based on incoherent and sine wave modulation transfer function (MTF) calculations, the object plane resolution of a microscope has been analyzed as a function of the object height and numerical aperture (NA) of the primary for several spherical Schwarzschild, conic, and aspherical head reflecting two mirror microscope configurations.

  17. A new endstation at the Swiss Light Source for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of liquid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Matthew A.; Redondo, Amaia Beloqui; Duyckaerts, Nicolas; Mächler, Jean-Pierre; Jordan, Inga; Wörner, Hans Jakob; Lee, Ming-Tao; Ammann, Markus; Nolting, Frithjof; Kleibert, Armin; Huthwelker, Thomas; Birrer, Mario; Honegger, Juri; Wetter, Reto; Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van

    2013-07-15

    A new liquid microjet endstation designed for ultraviolet (UPS) and X-ray (XPS) photoelectron, and partial electron yield X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies at the Swiss Light Source is presented. The new endstation, which is based on a Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 electron spectrometer, is the first liquid microjet endstation capable of operating in vacuum and in ambient pressures up to the equilibrium vapor pressure of liquid water at room temperature. In addition, the Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 energy analyzer of this new endstation allows for XPS measurements up to 7000 eV electron kinetic energy that will enable electronic structure measurements of bulk solutions and buried interfaces from liquid microjet samples. The endstation is designed to operate at the soft X-ray SIM beamline and at the tender X-ray Phoenix beamline. The endstation can also be operated using a Scienta 5 K ultraviolet helium lamp for dedicated UPS measurements at the vapor-liquid interface using either He I or He II α lines. The design concept, first results from UPS, soft X-ray XPS, and partial electron yield XAS measurements, and an outlook to the potential of this endstation are presented.

  18. Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility Delivery Delayed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-12-01

    TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA, has notified NASA that it will be unable to deliver the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) to NASA's Kennedy Space Center, FL, on June 1, 1998, as required by contract, because it has experienced delays in assembly and testing of the facility. TRW is NASA's prime contractor for the observatory. NASA and contractor officials met at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC, this week to discuss the issue. While no new delivery date was agreed upon, the agency has directed TRW to develop a plan of action that would show how the contractor can minimize impact to the June 1 delivery. Although a delay in delivery could delay the launch, currently scheduled for August 1998 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia's STS-93 mission, and could result in additional program costs, the exact impact is not yet known. "The delay in delivery of the observatory is unfortunate," said Fred Wojtalik, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center observatory projects office manager in Huntsville, AL. "However, our first priority is to launch a world-class observatory which has been thoroughly tested and meets all requirements. We will work closely with TRW to ensure that happens." The delay is primarily due to TRW's difficulty in configuring and programming its Integrated Spacecraft Automated Test System to test the observatory before it is delivered to NASA. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility is expected to play a vital role in answering fundamental questions about the universe, including its age and size, and will probe the nature and amounts of so-called "dark matter," providing unique insight into one of nature's great puzzles. The observatory also will allow scientists to see and measure the details of hot gas clouds in clusters of galaxies; observe X-rays generated when stars are torn apart by the incredibly strong gravity around massive black holes in the centers of galaxies; and provide images that will help understand how exploding stars

  19. In Situ Soft X-ray Spectroscopy Characterization of Interfacial Phenomena in Energy Materials and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jinghua; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Kapilashrami, Mukes; Glans, Per-Anders; Bora, Debajeet; Braun, Artur; Velasco Vélez, Juan Jesús; Salmeron, Miquel; ALS/LBNL Team; EMPA, MSD/LBNL Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Advanced energy technology arises from the understanding in basic science, thus rest in large on in-situ/operando characterization tools for observing the physical and chemical interfacial processes, which has been largely limited in a framework of thermodynamic and kinetic concepts or atomic and nanoscale. In many important energy systems such as energy conversion, energy storage and catalysis, advanced materials and functionality in devices are based on the complexity of material architecture, chemistry and interactions among constituents within. To understand and thus ultimately control the energy conversion and energy storage applications calls for in-situ/operando characterization tools. Soft X-ray spectroscopy offers a number of very unique features. We will present our development of the in-situ/operando soft X-ray spectroscopic tools of catalytic and electrochemical reactions in recent years, and reveal how to overcome the challenge that soft X-rays cannot easily peek into the high-pressure catalytic cells or liquid electrochemical cells. In this presentation a number of examples are given, including the nanocatalysts and the recent experiment performed for studying the hole generation in a specifically designed photoelectrochemical cell under operando conditions. The ALS is supported by the the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Design and performance of a soft-x-ray interferometer for ultra-high-resolution fourier transform spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Hussain, Z.; Duarte, R.M.; Howells, M.R.

    1997-04-01

    A Fourier Transform Soft X-ray spectrometer (FT-SX) has been designed and is under construction for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a branch of beamline 9.3.2. The spectrometer is a novel soft x-ray interferometer designed for ultra-high resolution (theoretical resolving power E/{delta}E{approximately}10{sup 6}) spectroscopy in the photon energy region of 60-120 eV. This instrument is expected to provide experimental results which sensitively test models of correlated electron processes in atomic and molecular physics. The design criteria and consequent technical challenges posed by the short wavelengths of x-rays and desired resolving power are discussed. The fundamental and practical aspects of soft x-ray interferometry are also explored.

  1. X-ray spectroscopy of five BL Lacertae objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Holt, S. S.

    1986-01-01

    Five X-ray bright BL Lacertae objects were observed in the energy range 0.6-4.5 keV with the solid state spectrometer (SSS) of the Einstein Observatory. The 14 SSS spectra obtained represent most of the X-ray spectra of BL Lac objects with resolution better than approximately 3. These data do not reveal the presence of large amounts of thermal gas, with upper limits for the equivalent width of individual spectral features typically less that about 100 eV. However, the SSS spectra are the first set of X-ray data to indicate low-energy absorption in excess of that caused by the cold interstellar matter in the Galaxy. Comparison with contemporaneous, lower energy X-ray data implies that this absorption does not arise in cold neutral material, but in hotter, highly ionized material, probably intrinsic to the source. All five BL Lac objects have X-ray continua that are well fitted by power-law models, with power-law energy indices usually greater than about 1. In a few cases, a flattening at higher energies is observed; these and other data suggest that two-component X-ray spectra, steep at low energies and flat at high energies, are a common feature of BL Lac objects. Three of the five sources clearly vary between SSS observations, with time scales ranging from days to years. A historical synopsis of the X-ray spectral data confirms the tendency for BL Lacertae objects to be highly variable in the X-ray band but reveals no correlation between spectral and intensity changes.

  2. Electron Spectroscopy: Ultraviolet and X-Ray Excitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, A. D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reviews recent growth in electron spectroscopy (54 papers cited). Emphasizes advances in instrumentation and interpretation (52); photoionization, cross-sections and angular distributions (22); studies of atoms and small molecules (35); transition, lanthanide and actinide metal complexes (50); organometallic (12) and inorganic compounds (2);…

  3. FPGA-based compression of streaming x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy data

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, Timothy; Jemian, Peter; Narayanan, Surcsh; Sandy, Alec; Sikorski, Marcin; Sprung, Michael; Weizeorick, John

    2011-08-09

    A data acquisition system to perform real-time background subtraction and lower-level-discrimination-based compression of streaming x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) data from a fast charge-coupled device (CCD) area detector has been built and put into service at the Advanced Photon source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. A commercial frame grabber with on-board field-programmable gate array (FPGA) was used in the design, and continuously processes 60 frames per second each consisting of 1,024 x 1,024 pixels with up to 64512 photon hits per frame.

  4. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Machek, Pavel; Froeba, Michael; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brueggmann, Ulf; Draeger, Guenter

    2007-01-19

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 {mu}m thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5x1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  5. Johann Spectrometer for High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machek, Pavel; Welter, Edmund; Caliebe, Wolfgang; Brüggmann, Ulf; Dräger, Günter; Fröba, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A newly designed vacuum Johann spectrometer with a large focusing analyzer crystal for inelastic x-ray scattering and high resolution fluorescence spectroscopy has been installed at the DORIS III storage ring. Spherically bent crystals with a maximum diameter of 125 mm, and cylindrically bent crystals are employed as dispersive optical elements. Standard radius of curvature of the crystals is 1000 mm, however, the design of the mechanical components also facilitates measurements with smaller and larger bending radii. Up to four crystals are mounted on a revolving crystal changer which enables crystal changes without breaking the vacuum. The spectrometer works at fixed Bragg angle. It is preferably designed for the measurements in non-scanning mode with a broad beam spot, and offers a large flexibility to set the sample to the optimum position inside the Rowland circle. A deep depletion CCD camera is employed as a position sensitive detector to collect the energy-analyzed photons on the circumference of the Rowland circle. The vacuum in the spectrometer tank is typically 10-6 mbar. The sample chamber is separated from the tank either by 25 μm thick Kapton windows, which allows samples to be measured under ambient conditions, or by two gate valves. The spectrometer is currently installed at wiggler beamline W1 whose working range is 4-10.5 keV with typical flux at the sample of 5×1010photons/s/mm2. The capabilities of the spectrometer are illustrated by resonant inelastic experiments on 3d transition metals and rare earth compounds, and by chemical shift measurements on chromium compounds.

  6. X-ray spectroscopy and imaging of a plasma collision

    SciTech Connect

    Chenais-Popovics, C.; Rancu, O.; Renaudin, P.

    1995-07-14

    The collision of laser-produced plasmas has been diagnosed by x-ray spectroscopy and imaging. The two colliding plasmas are produced on Al thin foils at a distance of 200 to 900 {mu}m irradiated at {lambda} = 0.53 {mu}m with laser intensities of 3 {times} 10{sup 13} to 6 {times} 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}. Interpenetration of the plasmas was visualized by replacing one of the foils material by magnesium. The main diagnostics viewing the inter-target space were time-resolved monochromatic imaging of the 1s{sup 2} 1s3p aluminum line (He{Beta} at {lambda} {minus} 6.635 {Angstrom}). Doppler broadening measurement with a vertical Johann very high resolution spectrograph in the range 6.5--6.7{Angstrom}, space-resolved high resolution spectra of the dielectronic satellites of the 1s-2p 1 yman, space-resolved spectra with a flat-crystal spectrograph in the range 5--7 {Angstrom} and in the range of 43--48 {Angstrom} obtained with a new OHM crystal spectrograph and a pinhole camera. A multifluid eulerian monodimensional hydrodynamic code coupled with a radiative-atomic package provided simulations of the experiments. Hydrodynamic 2D simulations calculating the lateral expansion of the plasma enabled a reliable treatment of reabsorption along the line of sight of the spectrographs. The size the time duration of the collision, the plasma parameters (Te,Ti and ne) in the collision region and interpenetration were measured. The hydrocode simulations give a good understanding of the behavior of the collision in function of intertarget distance and laser intensity.

  7. Centaurus X-3. [early x-ray binary star spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Cowley, A. P.; Crampton, D.; Van Paradus, J.; White, N. E.

    1979-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of Krzeminski's star at dispersions 25-60 A/mm are described. The primary is an evolved star of type O6-O8(f) with peculiarities, some of which are attributable to X-ray heating. Broad emission lines at 4640A (N III), 4686 A(He II) and H-alpha show self-absorption and do not originate entirely from the region near the X-ray star. The primary is not highly luminous (bolometric magnitude about -9) and does not show signs of an abnormally strong stellar wind. The X-ray source was 'on' at the time of optical observations. Orbital parameters are presented for the primary, which yield masses of 17 + or - 2 and 1.0 + or - 3 solar masses for the stars. The optical star is undermassive for its luminosity, as are other OB-star X-ray primaries. The rotation is probably synchronized with the orbital motion. The distance to Cen X-3 is estimated to be 10 + or - 1 kpc. Basic data for 12 early-type X-ray primaries are discussed briefly

  8. Soft x-ray spectroscopy in atmospheric pressure helium

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, M.D.; van der Laan, G.; Flaherty, J.V.; Padmore, H.A. )

    1992-01-01

    We report on an environmental chamber, which is attached to a UHV beamline, in which soft x-ray measurements can be done at atmospheric pressure in helium. X-ray measurements in air can only be performed at energies above about 3 keV because of the strong absorption of soft x rays by oxygen and nitrogen. However, a low-{ital Z} scatterer such as helium has a long absorption length for soft x rays even at atmospheric pressure. Thus, this new chamber allows soft x-ray experiments to be performed on samples with physical properties that are incompatible with UHV conditions, e.g., liquid and frozen aqueous solutions, corrosive materials, etc. A helium-tight tank has been installed behind the vacuum experimental chamber of the double crystal beamline 3.4 at the Daresbury SRS. The tank is purged with helium at atmospheric pressure and the gas in the tank is isolated from the high vacuum of the rest of the beamline by a thin mylar window which is supported on a capillary array. The tank contains a sample stage, two ionization chambers and a parallel-plate gas proportional counter for fluorescence detection of dilute samples, which has produced good results on the {ital K} edges of Cl, S, and P.

  9. Double conical crystal x-ray spectrometer for high resolution ultrafast x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy of Al K edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, A.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Harmand, M.; Hulin, S.; Santos, J. J.; Descamps, D.; Petit, S.; Bouillaud, R.

    2010-06-01

    An x-ray spectrometer devoted to dynamical studies of transient systems using the x-ray absorption fine spectroscopy technique is presented in this article. Using an ultrafast laser-induced x-ray source, this optical device based on a set of two potassium acid phthalate conical crystals allows the extraction of x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy structures following the Al absorption K edge. The proposed experimental protocol leads to a measurement of the absorption spectra free from any crystal reflectivity defaults and shot-to-shot x-ray spectral fluctuation. According to the detailed analysis of the experimental results, a spectral resolution of 0.7 eV rms and relative fluctuation lower than 1% rms are achieved, demonstrated to be limited by the statistics of photon counting on the x-ray detector.

  10. X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms at SIDDHARTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cargnelli, M.; Bazzi, M.; Beer, G.; Berucci, C.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Curceanu, C.; d'Uffizi, A.; Fiorini, C.; Ghio, F.; Guaraldo, C.; Hayano, R.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Levi Sandri, P.; Marton, J.; Okada, S.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Quaglia, R.; Romero Vidal, A.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Tatsuno, H.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Wünschek, B.; Zmeskal, J.

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray measurements of kaonic atoms play an important role for understanding the low-energy QCD in the strangeness sector. The SIDDHARTA experiment studied the X-ray transitions of 4 light kaonic atoms (H, D, 3He, and 4He) using the DAFNE electron-positron collider at LNF (Italy). Most precise values of the shift and width of the kaonic hydrogen 1s state were determined, which have been now used as fundamental information for the low-energy K-p interaction in theoretical studies. An upper limit of the X-ray yield of kaonic deuterium was derived, important for future K-d experiments. The shifts and widths of the kaonic 3He and 4He 2p states were obtained, confirming the end of the "kaonic helium puzzle". In this contribution also the plans for new experiments of kaonic deuterium are being presented.

  11. Cosmic X-ray spectroscopy with multilayer optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Martinez, Dennis S.; Paris, Elizabeth S.; Hoover, Richard B.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Multilayer optics operated at normal incidence offer a powerful new technology for the study of the solar spectrum in the XUV. The spectra of most cosmic X-ray sources are strongly extinguished at wavelengths above 40 A due to absorption and scattering by interstellar grains. We describe a number of configurations which allow multilayer optics to be used at nonnormal angles of incidence in conjunction with grazing incidence optics to analyze the spectra of cosmic X-ray sources in the wavelength interval between 1.5 and 40 A. These optical configurations utilize both multilayer mirrors and gratings, and permit the efficient observation of extended sources using stigmatic spectrographs. The response of the instruments described to typical cosmic X-ray sources is also discussed.

  12. Nanoscale spectroscopy with polarized X-rays by NEXAFS-TXM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, Peter; Bittencourt, Carla; Rehbein, Stefan; Umek, Polona; Ke, Xiaoxing; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Ewels, Chris P.; Schneider, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) is an essential analytical tool in material science. Combining NEXAFS with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) adds spatial resolution and the possibility to study individual nanostructures. Here, we describe a full-field transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) that generates high-resolution, large-area NEXAFS data with a collection rate two orders of magnitude faster than is possible with STXM. The TXM optical design combines a spectral resolution of E/ΔE = 1 × 104 with a spatial resolution of 25 nm in a field of view of 15-20 µm and a data acquisition time of ~1 s. As an example, we present image stacks and polarization-dependent NEXAFS spectra from individual anisotropic sodium and protonated titanate nanoribbons. Our NEXAFS-TXM technique has the advantage that one image stack visualizes a large number of nanostructures and therefore already contains statistical information. This new high-resolution NEXAFS-TXM technique opens the way to advanced nanoscale science studies.

  13. Examination of the local structure in composite and lowdimensional semiconductor by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.; Demchenko, I.N.; Piskorska, E.; Wolska,A.; Talik, E.; Zakharov, D.N.; Liliental-Weber, Z.

    2006-09-25

    X-ray absorption methods have been successfully used to obtain quantitative information about local atomic composition of two different materials. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure analysis and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy allowed us to determine seven chemical compounds and their concentrations in c-BN composite. Use of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure in combination with Transmission Electron Microscopy enabled us to determine the composition and size of buried Ge quantum dots. It was found that the quantum dots consisted out of pure Ge core covered by 1-2 monolayers of a layer rich in Si.

  14. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neely, W. C.; Bozak, M. J.; Williams, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) studies of each of sample received were completed. Since low angle X-ray could not be performed because of instrumentation problems, Auger spectrometry was employed instead. The results of these measurements for each of the samples is discussed in turn.

  15. High-rate x-ray spectroscopy in mammography with a CdTe detector: A digital pulse processing approach

    SciTech Connect

    Abbene, L.; Gerardi, G.; Principato, F.; Del Sordo, S.; Ienzi, R.; Raso, G.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose:Direct measurement of mammographic x-ray spectra under clinical conditions is a difficult task due to the high fluence rate of the x-ray beams as well as the limits in the development of high resolution detection systems in a high counting rate environment. In this work we present a detection system, based on a CdTe detector and an innovative digital pulse processing (DPP) system, for high-rate x-ray spectroscopy in mammography. Methods: The DPP system performs a digital pile-up inspection and a digital pulse height analysis of the detector signals, digitized through a 14-bit, 100 MHz digitizer, for x-ray spectroscopy even at high photon counting rates. We investigated on the response of the digital detection system both at low (150 cps) and at high photon counting rates (up to 500 kcps) by using monoenergetic x-ray sources and a nonclinical molybdenum anode x-ray tube. Clinical molybdenum x-ray spectrum measurements were also performed by using a pinhole collimator and a custom alignment device. Results: The detection system shows excellent performance up to 512 kcps with an energy resolution of 4.08% FWHM at 22.1 keV. Despite the high photon counting rate (up to 453 kcps), the molybdenum x-ray spectra, measured under clinical conditions, are characterized by a low number of pile-up events. The agreement between the attenuation curves and the half value layer values, obtained from the measured spectra, simulated spectra, and from the exposure values directly measured with an ionization chamber, also shows the accuracy of the measurements. Conclusions: These results make the proposed detection system a very attractive tool for both laboratory research and advanced quality controls in mammography.

  16. New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Proslier, T.; Stodolna, J.; Sutton, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Westphal, A.J.; Zasadzinski, J.

    2012-03-13

    Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotron techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial resolution

  17. Corrosion and degradation studies utilizing X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hixson, Holly Gwyndolen

    1997-08-01

    This dissertation involves studies of corrosion behavior at the surface of various metal samples, as well as the degradation of wool fibers obtained from the Star-Spangled Banner. Molybdenum metal and iron-zinc alloys were examined under corrosive conditions, and the degradation of the wool fibers was studied. The behavior of a polished molybdenum metal surface upon exposure to both aerated and deaerated water and 1.0 M NaCl solution was studied by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Exposure to deaerated water and NaCl failed to produce oxidation of the metal surfaces, but exposing the polished metal surface to aerated water produced significant oxidation. Metal surfaces cleaned by argon-ion etching were found to be inert to oxidation by aerated water. The etching process also appears to passivate the metal surface. The behavior of molybdenum metal in 0.5 M Hsb2SOsb4 treated at various potentials has been studied using core and valence band XPS. The study indicates that Mosp{IV} and Mosp{VI} (including possibly Mosp{V} in some cases) were formed as the potential of the system was increased within the active range of molybdenum. The corrosive behavior of iron-zinc alloys that have been electroplated on plain steel in both aerated and deaerated quadruply-distilled water has been studied using XPS. Several different iron-zinc alloys were electroplated for comparative purposes: an iron-rich alloy, a zinc-rich alloy, and an alloy of similar iron and zinc composition. Treatment in aerated water produces oxidation for the iron-rich and similar composition alloys, but the oxide is reduced for the zinc-rich alloy. Degradation of the fibers in the original Star-Spangled Banner has been monitored using XPS and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Comparison of white and red wool fibers and linen fibers from the flag with new, mechanically-abraded, and chemically-treated white, red, and linen fibers, respectively, was performed in an attempt to determine the fibers' levels

  18. Soft X-ray spectroscopy of the Cygnus Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntaffer, Randall L.

    My thesis work consisted of the design, fabrication and launch of a sounding rocket payload to observe the spectrum of the soft X-ray emission from the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant. This payload was designated the Cygnus X-ray Emission Spectroscopic Survey (CyXESS) and launched from White Sands Missile Range on November 20th, 2006. The novel X-ray spectrograph incorporated a wire- grid collimator feeding an array of gratings in the extreme off-plane mount which ultimately dispersed the spectrum onto never before flown Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors. This instrument recorded 65 seconds of usable data between 43-49.5 Å in two prominent features. The first feature near 45 Å is dominated by the He-like triplet of O VII in second order with contributions from Mg X and Si IX-Si XII in first order, while the second feature near 47.5 Å is first order S IX and S X. Fits to the spectra give an equilibrium plasma at log( T )=6.2 ( kT e =0.14 keV) and near cosmic abundances. This is consistent with previous observations, which demonstrated that the soft x-ray emission from the Cygnus Loop is dominated by interactions between the initial blast wave with the walls of a precursor formed cavity surrounding the Cygnus Loop.

  19. Si(Li) X-ray astronomical spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.

    1975-01-01

    The general considerations involved in the choice of Si(Li) as a non-dispersive spectrometer for X-ray astronomy are discussed. In particular, its adaptation to HEAO-B is described as an example of the space-borne application of Si(Li) technology.

  20. Innovations in X-ray-induced electron emission spectroscopy (XIEES)

    SciTech Connect

    Pogrebitsky, K. Ju. Sharkov, M. D.

    2010-06-15

    Currently, a pressing need has arisen for controlling the local atomic and electron structure of materials irrespective of their aggregate state. Efficient approaches to the studies of short-range order are based on phenomena accompanied by interference of secondary electrons excited by primary X-ray radiation. The set of such approaches are commonly referred to as the X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) methods. In reality, the XAFS methods are based on the use of synchrotron radiation and applied to structural studies in two modes of measurements, transmission analysis and recording of secondary effects. Only two such effects-specifically, the X-ray fluorescence an d X-ray-induced electron emission effect-are commonly discussed. Access to synchrotron accelerators is problematic for most researchers, so a demand is created for designing laboratory systems that make direct access possible. Since the power of laboratory systems is much lower than that of synchrotrons, it is essential to use much more efficient detectors of secondary electrons. In addition, it is of interest to analyze energy characteristics with a high spatial resolution. Channel multipliers and multichannel boards are incapable of providing such a possibility. For this reason, an improved electron detector has been developed to analyze the photoemission effect in an accelerating field.

  1. Laboratory Spectroscopy in Support of X-ray Astrophysics Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2004-05-01

    A multi-institutional, multi-faceted laboratory astrophysics program is being carried out at the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility using various unique capabilities, such as a Maxwellian plasma simulator, an assortment of crystal and grating spectrometers, including a 45 m grazing incidence spectrometer, and a 6x6 microcalorimeter array from the ASTRO-E mission. Our measurements aim to address specific issues associated with recent X-ray observations. In particular, we are conducting complete spectral surveys to identify and catalog unknown emission lines from L-shell ions that fall into the 20--100 Å region. We are also measuring the stationary wavelengths of K-shell absorption lines needed for determining the flows of absorbers surrounding AGNs. Our measurements calibrate diagnostic line ratios, including those of in Fe XVII, and have discovered the first X-ray diagnostic for magnetic field strength. We have also successfully simulated the X-ray emission of comets C/Linear 1999 S4 and C/McNaught-Hartley 1999 T1. An overview of recent results will be given, including recent measurements obtained with the X-ray microcalorimeter from the upcoming ASTRO-E2 mission. This work was supported by NASA SARA and Planetary Atmospheres programs and performed under the auspices of the DOE by UC-LLNL under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  2. Probing interfacial electron dynamics with time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neppl, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Time-resolved core-level spectroscopy techniques using laser pulses to initiate and short X-ray pulses to probe photo-induced processes have the potential to provide electronic state- and atomic site-specific insight into fundamental electron dynamics at complex interfaces. We describe the implementation of femto- and picosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to follow light-driven electron dynamics at dye-semiconductor interfaces on femto- to nanosecond timescales, and from the perspective of individual atomic sites. A distinct transient binding-energy shift of the Ru3d photoemission lines originating from the metal centers of N3 dye-molecules adsorbed on nanoporous ZnO is observed 500 fs after resonant HOMO-LUMO excitation with a visible laser pulse. This dynamical chemical shift is accompanied by a characteristic surface photo-voltage response of the semiconductor substrate. The two phenomena and their correlation will be discussed in the context of electronic bottlenecks for efficient interfacial charge-transfer and possible charge recombination and relaxation pathways leading to the neutralization of the transiently oxidized dye following ultrafast electron injection. First steps towards in operando time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques to monitor interfacial chemical dynamics will be presented.

  3. Synchrotron soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of carbon and silicon nanostructures for energy applications.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jun; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Xuhui; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2014-12-10

    Carbon and silicon materials are two of the most important materials involved in the history of the science and technology development. In the last two decades, C and Si nanoscale materials, e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene, and silicon nanowires, and quantum dots, have also emerged as the most interesting nanomaterials in nanoscience and nanotechnology for their myriad promising applications such as for electronics, sensors, biotechnology, etc. In particular, carbon and silicon nanostructures are being utilized in energy-related applications such as catalysis, batteries, solar cells, etc., with significant advances. Understanding of the nature of surface and electronic structures of nanostructures plays a key role in the development and improvement of energy conversion and storage nanosystems. Synchrotron soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and related techniques, such as X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), show unique capability in revealing the surface and electronic structures of C and Si nanomaterials. In this review, XAS is demonstrated as a powerful technique for probing chemical bonding, the electronic structure, and the surface chemistry of carbon and silicon nanomaterials, which can greatly enhance the fundamental understanding and also applicability of these nanomaterials in energy applications. The focus is on the unique advantages of XAS as a complementary tool to conventional microscopy and spectroscopy for effectively providing chemical and structural information about carbon and silicon nanostructures. The employment of XAS for in situ, real-time study of property evolution of C and Si nanostructures to elucidate the mechanisms in energy conversion or storage processes is also discussed. PMID:25204894

  4. Capturing interfacial photoelectrochemical dynamics with picosecond time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Neppl, Stefan; Shavorskiy, Andrey; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew; Slaughter, Daniel S; Troy, Tyler; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Ahmed, Musahid; Gul, Sheraz; Rude, Bruce; Zhang, Jin Z; Tremsin, Anton S; Glans, Per-Anders; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Wu, Cheng Hao; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved core-level spectroscopy using laser pulses to initiate and short X-ray pulses to trace photoinduced processes has the unique potential to provide electronic state- and atomic site-specific insight into fundamental electron dynamics in complex systems. Time-domain studies using transient X-ray absorption and emission techniques have proven extremely valuable to investigate electronic and structural dynamics in isolated and solvated molecules. Here, we describe the implementation of a picosecond time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (TRXPS) technique at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its application to monitor photoinduced electron dynamics at the technologically pertinent interface formed by N3 dye molecules anchored to nanoporous ZnO. Indications for a dynamical chemical shift of the Ru3d photoemission line originating from the N3 metal centre are observed ∼30 ps after resonant HOMO-LUMO excitation with a visible laser pump pulse. The transient changes in the TRXPS spectra are accompanied by a characteristic surface photovoltage (SPV) response of the ZnO substrate on a pico- to nanosecond time scale. The interplay between the two phenomena is discussed in the context of possible electronic relaxation and recombination pathways that lead to the neutralisation of the transiently oxidised dye after ultrafast electron injection. A detailed account of the experimental technique is given including an analysis of the chemical modification of the nano-structured ZnO substrate during extended periods of solution-based dye sensitisation and its relevance for studies using surface-sensitive spectroscopy techniques. PMID:25415599

  5. Soft X-ray induced damage in PVA-based membranes in water environment monitored by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzvetkov, George; Späth, Andreas; Fink, Rainer H.

    2014-10-01

    The effect of synchrotron X-ray flux in a soft X-ray scanning-transmission microspectroscope (STXM) instrument on the chemical structure of air-filled poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) based microbubbles and their stabilizing shell has been examined. Prolonged soft X-ray illumination of the particles in aqueous suspension leads to the breaking of the microbubbles' protective polymer shell and substantial chemical changes. The latter were clarified via a micro-spot C K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy with further respect to the absorbed X-ray doses. Our results revealed a continuous degradation of the PVA network associated with formation of carbonyl- and carboxyl-containing species as well as an increased content of unsaturated bonds. The observed effects must be taken into account in studies of micro- and nanostructured polymer materials utilizing X-rays.

  6. Electrochemical in-situ reaction cell for X-ray scattering, diffraction and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Artur; Granlund, Eric; Cairns, Elton J.

    2003-01-27

    An electrochemical in-situ reaction cell for hard X-ray experiments with battery electrodes is described. Applications include the small angle scattering, diffraction, and near-edge spectroscopy of lithium manganese oxide electrodes.

  7. Advances in photographic X-ray imaging for solar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, J. Daniel; Schueller, R.; Waljeski, K.; Davis, John M.

    1989-01-01

    The technique of obtaining quantitative data from high resolution soft X-ray photographic images produced by grazing incidence optics was successfully developed to a high degree during the Solar Research Sounding Rocket Program and the S-054 X-Ray Spectrographic Telescope Experiment Program on Skylab. Continued use of soft X-ray photographic imaging in sounding rocket flights of the High Resolution Solar Soft X-Ray Imaging Payload has provided opportunities to further develop these techniques. The developments discussed include: (1) The calibration and use of an inexpensive, commercially available microprocessor controlled drum type film processor for photometric film development; (2) The use of Kodak Technical Pan 2415 film and Kodak SO-253 High Speed Holographic film for improved resolution; and (3) The application of a technique described by Cook, Ewing, and Sutton for determining the film characteristics curves from density histograms of the flight film. Although the superior sensitivity, noise level, and linearity of microchannel plate and CCD detectors attracts the development efforts of many groups working in soft X-ray imaging, the high spatial resolution and dynamic range as well as the reliability and ease of application of photographic media assures the continued use of these techniques in solar X-ray astronomy observations.

  8. Advances in photographic X-ray imaging for solar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, D.; Schueller, R.; Waljeski, K.; Davis, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The technique of obtaining quantitative data from high resolution soft X-ray photographic images produced by grazing incidence optics was successfully developed to a high degree during the AS&E Solar Research Sounding Rocket Program and the S-054 X-Ray Spectrographic Telescope Experiment Program on Skylab. Continued use of soft X-Ray photographic imaging in sounding rocket flights of the AS&E High Resolution Solar Soft X-Ray Imaging Payload has provided opportunities to further develop these techniques. The developments discussed include: (1) the calibration and use of an inexpensive, commercially available microprocessor controlled drum type film processor for photometric film development, (2) the use of Kodak Technical Pan 2415 film and Kodak SO-253 High Speed Holographic film for improved resolution, and (3) the application of a technique described by Cook, Ewing, and Sutton (1988) for determining the film characteristics curves from density histograms of the flight film. Although the superior sensitivity, noise level, and linearity of microchannel plate and CCD detectors attracts the development efforts of many groups working in soft X-ray imaging, the high spatial resolution and dynamic range as well as the reliability and ease of application of photographic media assures the continued use of these techniques in solar X-ray astronomy observations.

  9. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>10(13) photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv < 0.1) is not achievable with a differential energy threshold (DET) X-ray spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO2 converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV. PMID:27131669

  10. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>1013 photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv < 0.1) is not achievable with a differential energy threshold (DET) X-ray spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO2 converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV.

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of chicken sulfite oxidase crystals

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Pickering, I.J.; Kisker, C.

    1999-05-17

    Sulfite oxidase catalyzes the physiologically vital oxidation of sulfite to sulfate. Recently, the crystal structure of chicken sulfite oxidase has been reported at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. In contrast to the information available from previous X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies, the active site indicated by crystallography was a mono-oxo species. Because of this the possibility that the crystals did in fact contain a reduced molybdenum species was considered in the crystallographic work. The authors report herein an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of polycrystalline sulfite oxidase prepared in the same manner as the previous single-crystal samples, and compare this with data for frozen solutions of oxidized and reduced enzyme.

  12. Soft X-ray spectroscopy of solar flares - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the current status of high spectral resolution soft X-ray observations of solar flares is given. The review concentrates primarily on recent results and interpretations of results obtained from orbiting Bragg crystal spectrometers flow during the last solar maximum on the US DoD P78-1 spacecraft, the NASA SMM, and the ISAS Hinotori spacecraft. Results and several key issues regarding interpretation of the spectra are presented. Specifically, the dynamics of coronal flare plasmas as revealed by X-ray line profiles and wavelength shifts are discussed. Recent results concerning the theory of chromospheric evaporation are given. The temperature of coronal flare plasma is discussed within the context of a differential mission measure. Results concerning electron density measurements, nonequilibrium processes, and relative element abundances are also reviewed.

  13. High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy Using Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    During the past 13 years high resolution X ray spectrometers have been developed that use cryogenically cooled microcalorimeters. These devices have inherently high signal-to-noise by operating at temperatures below 0.1 K and can achieve an energy resolution of < 10 eV over the 0.1-10 keV band. Existing devices use doped semiconductor thermometers and typically employ HgTe absorbers. The energy resolution depends on achieving a low heat capacity for the device. For soft X ray applications a relatively thin absorber (approximately 1 micrometer) may be used and an energy resolution of approximately 7 eV has been achieved. For applications up to approximately 10 keV an absorber thickness of approximately 10 micrometer is required and the energy resolution is typically approximately 12 eV. Improvements to the energy resolution in this energy band could be achieved if the problems of thermalizing X rays in low heat capacity superconductors can be overcome. The recent work on transition edge thermometers by Irwin et nl. looks particularly promising because of the higher sensitivity achievable from a sharp superconducting transition. The relatively low impedance of such a device permits the use of a low noise SQUID amplifier for readout. This would also significantly reduce the cryogen heat load compared with JFETs required by higher impedance semiconductor thermometers.

  14. High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy with a Microcalorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Norrell, J.; Anderson, I.

    2005-01-01

    Energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) is often the preferred choice for X-ray microanalysis, but there are still many disadvantages associated with EDS, the most significant of which is the relatively poor energy resolution, which limits detection sensitivity and the ability to distinguish among closely spaced spectral features, limiting even qualitative analysis. A new type of EDS detector that operates on the principle of microcalorimetry has the potential to eliminate this shortcoming, reaching resolutions an order of magnitude better. The detector consists of an absorber in thermal contact with a transition edge sensor (TES). An X-ray from the specimen hits the absorber and manifests itself as a change in temperature. Because the system is kept at 80 mK, the heat capacity is low and the temperature spike is observable. The TES responds to the increase in temperature by transitioning from its superconducting to its normal conducting state, thus sharply raising the overall resistance of the circuit. The circuit is kept at a constant voltage, so the increase in resistance is manifested as a decrease in current flow. This decrease in current is measured by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), and by integrating the current over time, the energy of the incident X-ray is determined. The prototype microcalorimeter was developed by NIST, and this technology is now available commercially through a partnership between Vericold Technologies and EDAX International. ORNL has received the first of these commercial microcalorimeters in the United States. The absorber in this detector is gold, and the TES consists of a gold-iridium bilayer. It is designed to offer spectral resolution of 10-15 eV at a count rate of ~150 s-1. The goal of this project was to analyze and document the performance of the detector, with particular attention given to the effects of an X-ray optic used to improve collection efficiency, the multiple window system and any other sources

  15. Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF): Science working group report. [space shuttle payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) mission concept is examined from a scientific viewpoint. A brief description of the development of X-ray astronomy and a summary description of AXAF, the scientific objectives of the facility, a description of representative scientific instruments, requirements for X-ray ground testing, and a summary of studies related to spacecraft and support subsystems, are included.

  16. Development of X-ray facilities for materials research at the Advanced Photon Source. Final technical report for period AUGUST 15, 1996 - AUGUST 14, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Bedzyk, Michael J.

    2000-09-01

    The P.I. and his research team successfully used the funds from the DOE Instrumentation grant entitled, 'Development of X-Ray Facilities for Materials Research at the Advanced Photon Source,' to design, build, test, and commission a customized surface science x-ray scattering spectroscopy chamber. This instrumentation, which is presently in use at an APS x-ray undulator beam line operated by the DuPont-Northwestern-Dow Collaborative Access Team, is used for x-ray measurements of surface, interface, thin film and nano-structures.

  17. Feasibility of Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy for Tracking Transient Species

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopies, when combined in laser-pump, X-ray-probe measurement schemes, can be powerful tools for tracking the electronic and geometric structural changes that occur during the course of a photoinitiated chemical reaction. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is considered an established technique for such measurements, and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of the strongest core-to-core emission lines (Kα and Kβ) is now being utilized. Flux demanding valence-to-core XES promises to be an important addition to the time-resolved spectroscopic toolkit. In this paper we present measurements and density functional theory calculations on laser-excited, solution-phase ferrocyanide that demonstrate the feasibility of valence-to-core XES for time-resolved experiments. We discuss technical improvements that will make valence-to-core XES a practical pump–probe technique. PMID:26568779

  18. Soft x-ray spectroscopy for probing electronic and chemical states of battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanli, Yang; Ruimin, Qiao

    2016-01-01

    The formidable challenge of developing high-performance battery system stems from the complication of battery operations, both mechanically and electronically. In the electrodes and at the electrode-electrolyte interfaces, chemical reactions take place with evolving electron states. In addition to the extensive studies of material synthesis, electrochemical, structural, and mechanical properties, soft x-ray spectroscopy provides unique opportunities for revealing the critical electron states in batteries. This review discusses some of the recent soft x-ray spectroscopic results on battery binder, transition-metal based positive electrodes, and the solid-electrolyte-interphase. By virtue of soft x-ray’s sensitivity to electron states, the electronic property, the redox during electrochemical operations, and the chemical species of the interphases could be fingerprinted by soft x-ray spectroscopy. Understanding and innovating battery technologies need a multimodal approach, and soft x-ray spectroscopy is one of the incisive tools to probe the chemical and physical evolutions in batteries.

  19. Advances in kilovoltage x-ray beam dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Robin; Healy, Brendan; Holloway, Lois; Kuncic, Zdenka; Thwaites, David; Baldock, Clive

    2014-03-01

    This topical review provides an up-to-date overview of the theoretical and practical aspects of therapeutic kilovoltage x-ray beam dosimetry. Kilovoltage x-ray beams have the property that the maximum dose occurs very close to the surface and thus, they are predominantly used in the treatment of skin cancers but also have applications for the treatment of other cancers. In addition, kilovoltage x-ray beams are used in intra operative units, within animal irradiators and in on-board imagers on linear accelerators and kilovoltage dosimetry is important in these applications as well. This review covers both reference and relative dosimetry of kilovoltage x-ray beams and provides recommendations for clinical measurements based on the literature to date. In particular, practical aspects for the selection of dosimeter and phantom material are reviewed to provide suitable advice for medical physicists. An overview is also presented of dosimeters other than ionization chambers which can be used for both relative and in vivo dosimetry. Finally, issues related to the treatment planning and the use of Monte Carlo codes for solving radiation transport problems in kilovoltage x-ray beams are presented.

  20. Fundamental studies of X-ray and secondary electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulapudi, Satya Prasad

    Microanalysis of submicron particles in the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is only possible by using low incident electron beam energies due to smaller interaction volume and suppressed beam induced charging. Such low beam energies must use L- and M-lines rather than the familiar K-lines. The information about the fundamental parameters of X-ray emission and transport at low energies is limited, so the use of L- and M-lines is problematic. The rate of generation of X-rays from an element irradiated at some energy E depends on the product of the ionization cross-section sigma(E) and the fluorescent yield o. Unfortunately neither of these quantities is well established independently, especially outside of the K-series of lines. Therefore the absolute X-ray generation efficiencies (photons/electron) were directly measured and parameterized for a wide range of K, L , and M lines from different elements. It is anticipated that a complete set of such data would be of great value in applications such as spectrum simulation and standardless analysis. Secondary electron spectra have been collected from both pure elements and from compounds examined under conditions approximating those found in a scanning electron microscope. Despite the presence of substantial surface contamination these spectra are found to be reproducible and characteristic of the underlying material. Typically the peak in such spectra is found to be at an energy of about 5 eV, and 50% of the total secondary electron emission falls within the range 0--12 eV. These data may be of value for the design of detectors for scanning microscopy and might have applications for microanalysis.

  1. Advanced X-Ray Sources Ensure Safe Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Ames Research Center awarded inXitu Inc. (formerly Microwave Power Technology), of Mountain View, California, an SBIR contract to develop a new design of electron optics for forming and focusing electron beams that is applicable to a broad class of vacuum electron devices. This technology offers an inherently rugged and more efficient X-ray source for material analysis; a compact and rugged X-ray source for smaller rovers on future Mars missions; and electron beam sources to reduce undesirable emissions from small, widely distributed pollution sources; and remediation of polluted sites.

  2. Advances Toward Inner-Shell Photo-Ionization X-Ray Lasing at 45 (Angstrom)

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, S J; Weber, F A; Celliers, P M; Eder, D C

    2002-07-18

    The inner-shell photo-ionization (ISPI) scheme requires photon energies at least high enough to photo-ionize the K-shell. {approx}286 eV, in the case of carbon. As a consequence of the higher cross-section, the inner-shell are selectively knocked out, leaving a hole state 1s2s{sup 2}2p{sup 2} in the singly charged carbon ion. This generates a population inversion to the radiatively connected state 1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}2p in C+, leading to gain on the 1s-2p transition at 45 {angstrom}. The resonant character of the lasing transition in the single ionization state intrinsically allows much higher quantum efficiency compared to other schemes. Competing processes that deplete the population inversion include auto-ionization, Auger decay, and in particular collisional ionization of the outer-shell electrons by electrons generated during photo-ionization. These competing processes rapidly quench the gain. Consequently, the pump method must be capable of populating the inversion at a rate faster than the competing processes. This can be achieved by an ultra-fast, high intensity laser that is able to generate an ultra-fast, bright x-ray source. With current advances in the development of high-power, ultra-short pulse lasers it is possible to realize fast x-ray sources based that can deliver powerful pulses of light in the multiple hundred terawatt regime and beyond. They will discuss in greater detail concept, target design and a series of x-ray spectroscopy investigations they have conducted in order to optimize the absorber/x-ray converter--filter package.

  3. X-ray spectroscopy of the SSME plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olive, Dan F.

    1988-01-01

    In order to examine the potential of using SSME exhaust plume radiation in the soft X-ray spectrum as an early warning system of imminent engine failure, a low cost, low risk experiment was devised. An approach was established, equipment was leased, the system was installed and checked out, and data were successfully acquired demonstrating the proof-of-concept. One spectrum measurement of the SSME plume was acquired during a 300 second burn on the A-1 Test Stand. This spectrum showed a prominent, line emission feature at about 34.5 KeV, a result which was not expected, nor can it be explained at this time. If X-ray spectra are to be useful as a means of monitoring nominal engine operation, it will be necessary to explore this region of the EM spectrum in greater detail. The presence of structure in the spectrum indicates that this technology may prove to be useful as an engine health monitoring system.

  4. Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopies of chemical systems: New perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Chergui, Majed

    2016-01-01

    The past 3–5 years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of time-resolved X-ray spectroscopic studies, mainly driven by novel technical and methodological developments. The latter include (i) the high repetition rate optical pump/X-ray probe studies, which have greatly boosted the signal-to-noise ratio for picosecond (ps) X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, while enabling ps X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at synchrotrons; (ii) the X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are a game changer and have allowed the first femtosecond (fs) XES and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering experiments to be carried out; (iii) XFELs are also opening the road to the development of non-linear X-ray methods. In this perspective, I will mainly focus on the most recent technical developments and briefly address some examples of scientific questions that have been addressed thanks to them. I will look at the novel opportunities in the horizon. PMID:27376102

  5. Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopies of chemical systems: New perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chergui, Majed

    2016-05-01

    The past 3-5 years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of time-resolved X-ray spectroscopic studies, mainly driven by novel technical and methodological developments. The latter include (i) the high repetition rate optical pump/X-ray probe studies, which have greatly boosted the signal-to-noise ratio for picosecond (ps) X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, while enabling ps X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at synchrotrons; (ii) the X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are a game changer and have allowed the first femtosecond (fs) XES and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering experiments to be carried out; (iii) XFELs are also opening the road to the development of non-linear X-ray methods. In this perspective, I will mainly focus on the most recent technical developments and briefly address some examples of scientific questions that have been addressed thanks to them. I will look at the novel opportunities in the horizon. PMID:27376102

  6. X-ray interferometry development at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W.-K.

    1999-11-22

    In this paper, we report initial test results of a four-bounce Bragg reflection X-ray interferometer at 7.46 keV and, for the first time to our knowledge, at the higher energy of 14.91 keV where the spectral acceptance is much smaller.

  7. Very high resolution UV and X-ray spectroscopy and imagery of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M.; Brown, W. A.; Haisch, B. M.

    1987-01-01

    A scientific investigation of the physics of the solar atmosphere, which uses the techniques of high resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy and high resolution UV imagery, is described. The experiments were conducted during a series of three sounding rocket flights. All three flights yielded excellent images in the UV range, showing unprecedented spatial resolution. The second flight recorded the X-ray spectrum of a solar flare, and the third that of an active region. A normal incidence multi-layer mirror was used during the third flight to make the first astronomical X-ray observations using this new technique.

  8. Laser-driven hard-x-ray generation based on ultrafast selected energy x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of Ni compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shan Fang; Carter, Josh D.; Ng, Vicky; Guo Ting

    2005-02-01

    Three Ni compounds were studied by ultrafast selected energy x-ray absorption spectroscopy using a laser-driven electron x-ray source with a tungsten target. The measured K edges of these Ni compounds using this self-referencing method were made identical to those measured with synchrotron x-ray sources. This enabled us to determine the absolute peak positions of tungsten L{alpha}{sub 1} and L{alpha}{sub 2} emitted from this source to be within 1 eV of those from the neutral tungsten atoms, which strongly suggested that the x rays were emitted from high energy electrons interacting with tungsten atoms in the solid target. This is the best evidence to date that directly supports the cold atom x-ray generation theory.

  9. X-ray imaging in advanced studies of ophthalmic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Antunes, Andrea; Safatle, Angelica M. V.; Barros, Paulo S. M.; Morelhao, Sergio L.

    2006-07-15

    Microscopic characterization of pathological tissues has one major intrinsic limitation, the small sampling areas with respect to the extension of the tissues. Mapping possible changes on vast tissues and correlating them with large ensembles of clinical cases is not a feasible procedure for studying most diseases, as for instance vision loss related diseases and, in particular, the cataract. Although intraocular lens implants are successful treatments, cataract still is a leading public-health issue that grows in importance as the population increases and life expectancy is extended worldwide. In this work we have exploited the radiation-tissue interaction properties of hard x-rays--very low absorption and scattering--to map distinct lesions on entire eye lenses. At the used synchrotron x-ray photon energy of 20 keV (wavelength {lambda}=0.062 nm), scattering and refraction are angular resolved effects. It allows the employed x-ray image technique to efficiently characterize two types of lesions in eye lenses under cataractogenesis: distributions of tiny scattering centers and extended areas of fiber cell compaction. The data collection procedure is relatively fast; allowing dozens of samples to be totally imaged (scattering, refraction, and mass absorption images) in a single day of synchrotron beam time. More than 60 cases of canine cataract, not correlated to specific causes, were investigated in this first application of x-rays to image entire lenses. Cortical opacity cases, or partial opacity, could be related to the presence of calcificated tissues at the cortical areas, clearly visible in the images, whose elemental contents were verified by micro x-ray fluorescence as very rich in calcium. Calcificated tissues were also observed at nuclear areas in some cases of hypermature cataract. Total opacity cases without distinguishable amount of scattering centers consist in 70% of the analyzed cases, where remarkable fissure marks owing to extended areas of fiber

  10. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Bromine Compounds and Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Luo, Yi; Le, Linh; Pradhan, A. K.; Chowdhury, E.; Pitzer, R.; Montenegro, M.

    2010-06-01

    In conventional biomedical applications intense and broadband high energy X-rays are used in therapy and diagnostics (theranostics) to ensure sufficient tissue penetration for imaging or treatment. To avoid damages incurred by these, our proposed method, Resonant Theranosticsb,c, aims to find narrow energy regions that corresponds to resonant absorption or emission. We show that such energy bands lie below the K-shell ionization energy, contrary to the research focus on the K-shell ionization energy itself. Targeting these energy bands, Auger processes can be initiated to produce a number of photons and electrons from each atomic/molecular species via photon fluorescence and electron ejections. We will report our study on the bromine compound bromodeoxyuridyne (BUdR), widely used as radiological contrast agent in radiation imaging. The active system is Br^o-Br^+ combination, which can emit or absorb X-rays in the relative narrow energy range of 12 to 13.6 keV, through 1s-np transitions. We will present the oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for various Auger or K-shell 1s-np transitions. We will show that the corresponding cross sections and attenuation coefficients per unit mass, are orders of magnitude higher than the background and that at K-shell ionization energy. Employing these attenuation coefficients in the Monte Carlo simulation program Geant4, we study the intensities of photon and electron emission spectra. Acknowledgment: Partially support: Large Interdisciplinary Grant award of the Ohio State University and NASA (SNN). The computational work was carried out at the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus Ohio. "Resonant X-Ray Enhancement of the Auger Effect in High-Z atoms, molecules, and Nanoparticles: Biomedical Applications", A. K. Pradhan, S. N. Nahar, M. Montenegro, Yan Yu, H. L. Zhang, C. Sur, M. Mrozik, R. M. Pitzer, J. of Phys. Chem. A, 113 (2009), 12356. "Monte Carlo Simulations and Atomic Calculations for Auger Processes in

  11. X-ray Spectroscopy of Hot Dense Plasmas: Experimental Limits, Line Shifts and Field Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, Oldrich; Sauvan, Patrick; Dalimier, Elisabeth; Riconda, Caterina; Rosmej, Frank B.; Weber, Stefan; Nicolai, Philippe; Peyrusse, Olivier; Uschmann, Ingo; Hoefer, Sebastian; Kaempfer, Tino; Loetzsch, Robert; Zastrau, Ulf; Foerster, Eckhart; Oks, Eugene

    2008-10-22

    High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is capable of providing complex information on environmental conditions in hot dense plasmas. Benefiting from application of modern spectroscopic methods, we report experiments aiming at identification of different phenomena occurring in laser-produced plasma. Fine features observed in broadened profiles of the emitted x-ray lines and their satellites are interpreted using theoretical models predicting spectra modification under diverse experimental situations.

  12. GaAs arrays for X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Alan; Andersson, Hans; Campbell, M.; Lumb, David H.; Nenonen, Seppo A. A.; Tlustos, Lukas

    2004-09-01

    We present results from our compound semiconductor laboratory program and describe the development of a large area GaAs imaging array for planetary remote sensing applications. The device is fabricated from ~150 micron thick epitaxial material, patterned into a 64 x 64 pixel array, back-thinned and contacted. It will be flip-chip bump bonded onto a custom designed, fully spectroscopic, low noise (< 20 e- rms) active pixel sensor ASIC. At present, the ASIC is still under development and so in order to validate and qualify the various technological steps, we have produced a GaAs imager based on the MEDIPIX-1 format using a MEDIPIX-1 readout chip. In X-ray tests, the device was found to work well with a bump yield of 99.9%. After flat field corrections, the spatial uniformity of the array was commensurate with Poisson noise.

  13. Arcus: An X-ray Grating Spectroscopy Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Randall K.; Arcus Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present the design and scientific motivation for Arcus, an X-ray grating spectrometer mission to be proposed to NASA as a MIDEX in 2016. This mission will observe structure formation at and beyond the edges of clusters and galaxies, feedback from supermassive black holes, the structure of the interstellar medium and the formation and evolution of stars. Key mission design parameters are R~3000 and >700 cm^2 of effective area at the crucial O VII and O VIII lines, with the full bandpass going from ~10-50Å. Arcus will use the silicon pore optics proposed for ESA's Athena mission, paired with off-plane gratings being developed at the University of Iowa and combined with MIT/Lincoln Labs CCDs.

  14. X-ray Spectroscopy for Quality Control of Chemotherapy Drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H.; Bermudez, J.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Angeli-Greaves, M.

    2007-10-26

    We develop a method, employing Compton peak standardization and the use of matrix-matched spiked samples with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF), for the determination of platinum plasma concentrations of patients undergoing chemotherapy with Pt-bearing drugs. Direct blood plasma analysis attains Pt detection limits of 70 ng/ml. Measurement results of prescribed drug doses are compared to achieved blood Pt concentrations indicating a lack of expected correlations. Direct analysis of Pt-containing infused drugs from a variety of suppliers indicates cases of abnormal concentrations which raises quality control issues. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of the method for pharmacokinetic studies or for routine optimization and quality control of Pt chemotherapy treatments.

  15. X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy: the Potential of Astrophysics-developed Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, M.; Allen, B.; Hong, J.; Grindlay, J.; Kraft, R.; Binzel, R. P.; Masterton, R.

    2012-12-01

    X-ray fluorescence from the surface of airless bodies has been studied since the Apollo X-ray fluorescence experiment mapped parts of the lunar surface in 1971-1972. That experiment used a collimated proportional counter with a resolving power of ~1 and a beam size of ~1degree. Filters separated only Mg, Al and SI lines. We review progress in X-ray detectors and imaging for astrophysics and show how these advances enable much more powerful use of X-ray fluorescence for the study of airless bodies. Astrophysics X-ray instrumentation has developed enormously since 1972. Low noise, high quantum efficiency, X-ray CCDs have flown on ASCA, XMM-Newton, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, Swift and Suzaku, and are the workhorses of X-ray astronomy. They normally span 0.5 to ~8 keV with an energy resolution of ~100 eV. New developments in silicon based detectors, especially individual pixel addressable devices, such as CMOS detectors, can withstand many orders of magnitude more radiation than conventional CCDs before degradation. The capability of high read rates provides dynamic range and temporal resolution. Additionally, the rapid read rates minimize shot noise from thermal dark current and optical light. CMOS detectors can therefore run at warmer temperatures and with ultra-thin optical blocking filters. Thin OBFs mean near unity quantum efficiency below 1 keV, thus maximizing response at the C and O lines.such as CMOS detectors, promise advances. X-ray imaging has advanced similarly far. Two types of imager are now available: specular reflection and coded apertures. X-ray mirrors have been flown on the Einstein Observatory, XMM-Newton, Chandra and others. However, as X-ray reflection only occurs at small (~1degree) incidence angles, which then requires long focal lengths (meters), mirrors are not usually practical for planetary missions. Moreover the field of view of X-ray mirrors is comparable to the incident angle, so can only image relatively small regions. More useful

  16. Time-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques for real-time studies of interfacial charge transfer dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Hertlein, Marcus; Guo Jinghua; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Cordones, Amy; Vura-Weis, Josh; Siefermann, Katrin; Slaughter, Daniel; Sturm, Felix; Weise, Fabian; Khurmi, Champak; Belkacem, Ali; Weber, Thorsten; Gessner, Oliver; Bluhm, Hendrik; Strader, Matthew; Cho, Hana; Coslovich, Giacomo; Kaindl, Robert A.; Lin, Ming-Fu; and others

    2013-04-19

    X-ray based spectroscopy techniques are particularly well suited to gain access to local oxidation states and electronic dynamics in complex systems with atomic pinpoint accuracy. Traditionally, these techniques are applied in a quasi-static fashion that usually highlights the steady-state properties of a system rather than the fast dynamics that often define the system function on a molecular level. Novel x-ray spectroscopy techniques enabled by free electron lasers (FELs) and synchrotron based pump-probe schemes provide the opportunity to monitor intramolecular and interfacial charge transfer processes in real-time and with element and chemical specificity. Two complementary time-domain xray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques are presented that are applied at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to study charge transfer processes in N3 dye-sensitized ZnO semiconductor nanocrystals, which are at the heart of emerging light-harvesting technologies.

  17. Note: Application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Cheng-Jun Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M.; Zhang, Bangmin; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G. M.; Venkatesan, T.

    2014-04-15

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam.

  18. Optical Metrology for the Segmented Optics on the Constellation-X Spectroscopy X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Content, David; Colella, David; Fleetwood, Charles; Hadjimichael, Theo; Lehan, John; McMann, Joseph; Reid, Paul; Saha, Timo; Wright, Geraldine; Zhang, William

    2004-01-01

    We present the metrology requirements and metrology implementation necessary to prove out the reflector technology for the Constellation X(C-X) spectroscopy X-ray telescope (SXT). This segmented, 1.6m diameter highly nested Wolter-1 telescope presents many metrology and alignment challenges. In particular, these mirrors have a stringent imaging error budget as compared to their intrinsic stiffness; This is required for Constellation-X to have sufficient effective area with the weight requirement. This has implications for the metrology that can be used. A variety of contract and noncontact optical profiling and interferometric methods are combined to test the formed glass substrates before replication and the replicated reflector segments.The reflectors are tested both stand-alone and in-situ in an alignment tower.Some of these methods have not been used on prior X-ray telescopes and some are feasible only because of the segmented approach used on the SXT. Methods discussed include high precision coordinate measurement machines using very low force or optical probe axial interferometric profiling azimuthal circularity profiling and use of advanced null optics such as conical computer generated hologram (CGHs).

  19. Confirming X-ray Triggered Disk Accretion With K Band Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey, Kevin R.; Forbrich, Jan; Gutermuth, Rob; Stauffer, John; Morales-Calderon, Maria; Rebull, Luisa; Plavchan, Peter; Megeath, Tom

    2010-08-01

    The Ceph C star forming region will be monitored in Sept. 2010 by both the Chandra X-ray Observatory and Spitzer Space Telescope. These observations will link stellar X-ray flares with mid-IR disk afterglows, indicating how coronal emission affects the temperature or structure of circumstellar disks. We propose to use the MOIRCS and TripleSpec spectrographs at the Subuaru and Palomar Observatories to obtain multi-epoch K band spectroscopy for ~80 young stellar objects (YSOs) in Ceph C. These spectra will: a) measure temperature sensitive spectral features (e.g., CO, H_2O, Na, Ca) to establish each YSO's temperature, and thus mass, and b) diagnose the strength of the Brackett Gamma (HI) emission line, providing an estimate of the central star's mass accretion rate. These spectra will provide a unique characterization of each YSOs photosphere, complementing the coronal and disk variability captured by our contemporaneous Chandra and Spitzer observations. Interpreting these data in tandem will inform our understanding the star-disk connection at young ages and advance our understanding of the physical processes governing star and planet formation.

  20. X-ray absorption spectroscopy as a probe of dissolved polysulfides in lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Tod; Prendergast, David

    2015-03-01

    There has been enormous interest lately in lithium sulfur batteries, since they have 5 times the theoretical capacity of lithium ion batteries. Large-scale adoption of this technology has been hampered by numerous shortcomings, chiefly the poor utilization of the active cathode material and rapid capacity fading during cycling. Overcoming these limitations requires methods capable of identifying and quantifying the products of the poorly understood electrochemical reactions. One recent advance has been the use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), an element-specific probe of the unoccupied energy levels around an excited atom upon absorption of an X-ray photon, to identify the reaction products and intermediates. In this talk, we'll present first principles molecular dynamics and spectral simulations of dissolved lithium polysulfide species, showing how finite temperature dynamics, molecular geometry, molecular charge state and solvent environment conspire to determine the peak positions and intensity of the XAS. We'll present a spectral analysis of the radical (-1e charge) species, and reveal a unique low energy feature that can be used to identify these species from their more common dianion (-2e charge) counterparts.

  1. X-ray imaging and spectroscopy using low cost COTS CMOS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, David W.

    2012-08-01

    Whilst commercial X-ray sensor arrays are capable of both imaging and spectroscopy they are currently expensive and this can limit their widespread use. This study examines the use of very low cost CMOS sensors for X-ray imaging and spectroscopy based on the commercial off the shelf (COTS) technology used in cellular telephones, PC multimedia and children's toys. Some examples of imaging using a 'webcam' and a modified OmniVision OV7411 sensor are presented, as well as a simple energy dispersive X-ray detector based on an OmniVision OV7221 sensor. In each case X-ray sensitivity was enabled by replacing the sensor's front glass window with a 5 μm thick aluminium foil, with X-rays detected as an increase in a pixel's dark current due to the generation of additional electron-hole pairs within its active region. The exposure control and data processing requirements for imaging and spectroscopy are discussed. The modified OV7221 sensor was found to have a linear X-ray energy calibration and a resolution of approximately 510 eV.

  2. Cylindrical Crystal Imaging Spectrometer (CCIS) for cosmic X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnopper, H. W.; Taylor, P. O.

    1981-01-01

    A "stigmatic" focusing, Bragg crystal spectrometer was developed and used for high spectral resolution X-ray emission line diagnostics on hot laboratory plasmas. The concept be applied at the focal plane of an orbiting X-ray telescope where it offers several advantages over conventional spectrometers, i.e., mechanical simplicity, high resolving power and sensitivity, simultaneous measurement of an extended segment of spectrum, and good imaging properties. The instrument features a simple, unambiguous, non-scanning spectrum readout that is not adversely affected by either spacecraft pointing error or source extent. The performance of the instrument is estimated in the context of the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysical Facility mission.

  3. Characterization of an Yb:LuVO 4 single crystal using X-ray topography, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paszkowicz, W.; Romanowski, P.; Bąk-Misiuk, J.; Wierzchowski, W.; Wieteska, K.; Graeff, W.; Iwanowski, R. J.; Heinonen, M. H.; Ermakova, O.; Dąbkowska, H.

    2011-10-01

    Knowledge on the defect and electronic structure allows for improved modeling of material properties. A short literature review has shown that the information on defect structure of rare earth orthovanadate single crystals is limited. In this paper, defect and electronic structure of a needle-shaped Yb:LuVO 4 single crystal grown by the slow cooling method have been studied by means of X-ray diffraction topography employing white synchrotron beam, high-resolution diffraction (HRD) and photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Topographic investigations show that the crystal is composed of two blocks disoriented by about 1.5° and separated by a narrow deformed region. Some contrasts observed within the crystal volume may be attributed to glide bands and sector boundaries. The contrasts appearing in the vicinity of the surface may be interpreted as due to the presence of small inclusions. The HRD study indicates, in particular, that among point defects, the vacancy type defects dominate and that the density of other defects is small in comparison. The XPS measurements enabled, despite highly insulating properties of the studied crystal, an analysis of its bulk electronic structure, including the main core-levels (O 1 s, V 2 p, Lu 4 f) as well as the valence band range.

  4. Probing electrode/electrolyte interfaces in situ by X-ray spectroscopies: old methods, new tricks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng Hao; Weatherup, Robert S; Salmeron, Miquel B

    2015-11-11

    Electrode/electrolyte interfaces play a vital role in various electrochemical systems, but in situ characterization of such buried interfaces remains a major challenge. Several efforts to develop techniques or to modify existing techniques to study such interfaces are showing great promise to overcome this challenge. Successful examples include electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM), surface-sensitive vibrational spectroscopies, environmental transmission electron microscopy (E-TEM), and surface X-ray scattering. Other techniques such as X-ray core-level spectroscopies are element-specific and chemical-state-specific, and are being widely applied in materials science research. Herein we showcase four types of newly developed strategies to probe electrode/electrolyte interfaces in situ with X-ray core-level spectroscopies. These include the standing wave approach, the meniscus approach, and two liquid cell approaches based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These examples demonstrate that with proper modifications, many ultra-high-vacuum based techniques can be adapted to study buried electrode/electrolyte interfaces and provide interface-sensitive, element- and chemical-state-specific information, such as solute distribution, hydrogen-bonding network, and molecular reorientation. At present, each method has its own specific limitations, but all of them enable in situ and operando characterization of electrode/electrolyte interfaces that can provide important insights into a variety of electrochemical systems. PMID:26514115

  5. Simultaneous X-ray and optical spectroscopy of the Oef supergiant λ Cephei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauw, G.; Hervé, A.; Nazé, Y.; González-Pérez, J. N.; Hempelmann, A.; Mittag, M.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Schröder, K.-P.; Gosset, E.; Eenens, P.; Uuh-Sonda, J. M.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Probing the structures of stellar winds is of prime importance for the understanding of massive stars. Based on their optical spectral morphology and variability, it has been suggested that the stars in the Oef class feature large-scale structures in their wind. Aims: High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and time-series of X-ray observations of presumably single O-type stars can help us understand the physics of their stellar winds. Methods: We have collected XMM-Newton observations and coordinated optical spectroscopy of the O6 Ief star λ Cep to study its X-ray and optical variability and to analyse its high-resolution X-ray spectrum. We investigate the line profile variability of the He ii λ 4686 and Hα emission lines in our time series of optical spectra, including a search for periodicities. We further discuss the variability of the broadband X-ray flux and analyse the high-resolution spectrum of λ Cep using line-by-line fits as well as a code designed to fit the full high-resolution X-ray spectrum consistently. Results: During our observing campaign, the He ii λ 4686 line varies on a timescale of ~18 h. On the contrary, the Hα line profile displays a modulation on a timescale of 4.1 days which is likely the rotation period of the star. The X-ray flux varies on timescales of days and could in fact be modulated by the same 4.1-day period as Hα, although both variations are shifted in phase. The high-resolution X-ray spectrum reveals broad and skewed emission lines as expected for the X-ray emission from a distribution of wind-embedded shocks. Most of the X-ray emission arises within less than 2 R∗ above the photosphere. Conclusions: The properties of the X-ray emission of λ Cep generally agree with the expectations of the wind-embedded shock model. There is mounting evidence for the existence of large-scale structures that modulate the Hα line and about 10% of the X-ray emission of λ Cep. Based on observations collected with XMM-Newton, an ESA

  6. FORTRAN program for x ray photoelectron spectroscopy data reformatting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, Phillip B.

    1989-01-01

    A FORTRAN program has been written for use on an IBM PC/XT or AT or compatible microcomputer (personal computer, PC) that converts a column of ASCII-format numbers into a binary-format file suitable for interactive analysis on a Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) computer running the VGS-5000 Enhanced Data Processing (EDP) software package. The incompatible floating-point number representations of the two computers were compared, and a subroutine was created to correctly store floating-point numbers on the IBM PC, which can be directly read by the DEC computer. Any file transfer protocol having provision for binary data can be used to transmit the resulting file from the PC to the DEC machine. The data file header required by the EDP programs for an x ray photoelectron spectrum is also written to the file. The user is prompted for the relevant experimental parameters, which are then properly coded into the format used internally by all of the VGS-5000 series EDP packages.

  7. Ultrafast conversions between hydrogen bonded structures in liquid water observed by femtosecond x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Haidan; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2010-05-01

    We present the first femtosecond soft x-ray spectroscopy in liquids, enabling the observation of changes in hydrogen bond structures in water via core-hole excitation. The oxygen K-edge of vibrationally excited water is probed with femtosecond soft x-ray pulses, exploiting the relation between different water structures and distinct x-ray spectral features. After excitation of the intramolecular OH stretching vibration, characteristic x-ray absorption changes monitor the conversion of strongly hydrogen-bonded water structures to more disordered structures with weaker hydrogen-bonding described by a single subpicosecond time constant. The latter describes the thermalization time of vibrational excitations and defines the characteristic maximum rate with which nonequilibrium populations of more strongly hydrogen-bonded water structures convert to less-bonded ones. On short time scales, the relaxation of vibrational excitations leads to a transient high-pressure state and a transient absorption spectrum different from that of statically heated water.

  8. X-ray spectroscopy of AGN with the AXAF 'Microcalorimeter'. [Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Stephen S.

    1987-01-01

    A novel technique for X-ray spectroscopy has been configured as part of the definition payload of the AXAF Observatory. It is basically a calorimeter which, operating at 0.1 K, senses the total conversion of single photoelectrically absorbed X-rays via the differential temperature rise of the absorber. The technique promises to achieve less than 10 eV FWHM with near-unit efficiency simultaneously over the entire AXAF bandpass. This combination of high resolution and high efficiency allows for the possibility of investigating thermal, fluorescent and absorption X-ray line features in many types of X-ray source, including a large sample of active galactic nuclei.

  9. Local structure analysis of magnetic transparent conducting films by x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Toshihiro

    2016-02-01

    We prepared Mn-doped indium-tin oxide (ITO) films on glass substrates by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering and investigated local structures surrounding Mn ions in the films by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Fourier transform of the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectrum indicated that the Mn ions preferably substitute the In ions at the b sites of the In2O3 lattice. According to the threshold energy obtained from the inflection point of the edge in the x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum, the valence of the Mn ions was evaluated to range from  +2 to  +3. These x-ray absorption spectroscopic data are useful for revealing the origin of the magnetism of the Mn-doped ITO films.

  10. Design and Operation of a High Pressure Reaction Cell for in situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bare,S.; Yang, N.; Kelly, S.; Mickelson, G.; Modica, F.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of catalytic reactions have been instrumental in advancing the understanding of catalytic processes. These measurements require an in situ catalysis reaction cell with unique properties. Here we describe the design and initial operation of an in situ/operando catalysis reaction cell for transmission X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements. The cell is designed: to be an ideal catalytic reactor with no mass transfer effects; to give the same conversion and selectivity under similar space velocities as standard laboratory micro-reactors; to be operational temperatures up to 600 {sup o}C and pressures up to 14 bar; to be X-ray transparent allowing XAS measurement to be collected in transmission for all elements with Z {>=} 23 (vanadium K-edge at 5.5 keV); to measure the actual catalyst bed temperature; to not use o-ring seals, or water cooling; to be robust, compact, easy to assemble, and use, and relatively low cost to produce. The heart of the cell is fabricated from an X-ray transparent beryllium tube that forms a plug flow reactor. XAFS data recorded during the reduction of a Re/{gamma}-A{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst as a function of hydrogen pressure from 0.05 to 8 bar, and from a Pt-Sn/{gamma}-A{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst during n-heptane reforming are given as initial examples of the versatility of the reactor.

  11. X-ray diffraction and electron spectroscopy of epitaxial molecular C sub 60 films

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, W.M.; Ohlberg, D.A.A.; You, H.K.; Williams, R.S.; Anz, S.J.; Alvarez, M.M.; Whetten, R.L.; Rubin, Y.; Diederich, F.N. )

    1991-06-13

    Films of the new carbon allotrope, molecular C{sub 60}, also known as Buckminsterfullerene, have been grown on Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The films have been characterized with X-ray 2{theta} diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The diffraction data from oriented films show that close-packed planes of C{sub 60} molecules are stacked parallel to the substrate surface but that the correlation length for X-ray scattering is less than 200 {angstrom}. The electron spectroscopic data show that the C atoms of C{sub 60} are essentially sp{sup 2}-bonded, but there are significant differences with respect to graphite.

  12. Ultra-soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy: A bulk and surface probe of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.A. ); Mitchell, G.E.; Dekoven, B.M. ); Yeh, A.T.; Gland, J.L. ); Moodenbaugh, A.R. )

    1993-01-01

    Direct comparisons between surface and bulk of diverse materials can be made by simultaneous electron yield (5 nm depth sensitivity) and fluorescence yield (200 nm) ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements utilizing a rapid sample interchange apparatus. For example the orientations of functional groups have been characterized at and near the surface of a series of model polymeric materials highlighting the chemical and molecular sensitivity of ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition we discuss a bulk sensitive use of fluorescence yield to non destructively study a buried metal polymer interface. A second bulk sensitive example is the use of fluorescence yield oxygen K near edge x-ray spectroscopy as a method to determine the hole state density of high Tc materials.

  13. Ultra-soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy: A bulk and surface probe of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.A.; Mitchell, G.E.; Dekoven, B.M.; Yeh, A.T.; Gland, J.L.; Moodenbaugh, A.R.

    1993-06-01

    Direct comparisons between surface and bulk of diverse materials can be made by simultaneous electron yield (5 nm depth sensitivity) and fluorescence yield (200 nm) ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements utilizing a rapid sample interchange apparatus. For example the orientations of functional groups have been characterized at and near the surface of a series of model polymeric materials highlighting the chemical and molecular sensitivity of ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition we discuss a bulk sensitive use of fluorescence yield to non destructively study a buried metal polymer interface. A second bulk sensitive example is the use of fluorescence yield oxygen K near edge x-ray spectroscopy as a method to determine the hole state density of high Tc materials.

  14. Optical and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of α-Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Ram; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Vinay; Choudhary, R. J.; Phase, D. M.

    2016-05-01

    α-Al2O3 powder sample was synthesized at 550 °C via solution combustion synthesis (SCS) method using urea as an organic fuel. The sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Optical spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) without any further thermal treatment. XRD study reveals that the powder crystallized directly in the hexagons α-Al2O3 phase. A band gap of 5.7 eV was estimated using diffuse reflectance spectra. For surface investigation X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS) was carried out. The XPS survey scan study of α-Al2O3 powder reveals that the sample is free from impurity. The core levels of Al-2s and O-1s are also reported.

  15. The BioCAT undulator beamline 18ID: A facility for biological non-crystalline diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Fischetti, R.; Stepanov, S.; Rosenbaum, G.; Barrea, R.; Black, E.; Gore, D.; Heurich, R.; Kondrashkina, E.; Kropf, A.J.; Wang, S.; Zhang, K.; Irving, T.C.; Bunker, G.B.

    2008-07-02

    The 18ID undulator beamline of the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, IL, USA, is a high-performance instrument designed for, and dedicated to, the study of partially ordered and disordered biological materials using the techniques of small-angle X-ray scattering, fiber diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The beamline and associated instrumentation are described in detail and examples of the representative experimental results are presented.

  16. Constraining Black Hole Spin with X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenneman, L. W.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2005-12-01

    Because black holes cannot be observed directly, what we know of the spacetime immediately surrounding the event horizon must be gleaned through indirect methods. One of the most telling diagnostic tools currently employed for this purpose is the observation of relativistically broadened X-ray spectral lines emitted from the inner regions of the accretion disk surrounding the black hole. By fitting the data with established models, we can obtain best-fit values for the parameters governing the line broadening mechanisms. In particular, evaluating the angular momentum of a black hole against its other environmental parameters could provide valuable information about the nature of the accretion mechanism, as well as the structure and evolution of the black hole/accretion disk system. The publicly available models currently being used for such fits have become out of date to the point where they are inadequate for modeling high-quality data from observatories such as Chandra and XMM-Newton. I have revised these existing models to speed up the run time of the code and have added a free parameter describing black hole spin. The new model, known as kerrdisk, is currently being applied to a sample of very high signal-to-noise XMM and Chandra data. Herein I present the fitting results for the canonical Seyfert-1 galaxy MCG--6-30-15, thought to harbor a black hole of near-maximal spin based on the observed breadth of the Fe-K line emitted from its disk. Above 2 keV the system is very accurately described by a power law continuum, a narrow cold iron line at 6.4 keV, a narrow ionized H-like iron line at 6.9 keV, and a highly broadened iron line centered at ˜ 6.5 keV with a spin parameter of a > 0.9. We gratefully acknowledge funding from NSF grant AST0205990, which has contributed to this research.

  17. Advances in the development of encapsulants for mercuric iodide X-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Wang, Y. J.; Schnepple, W. F.; Bradley, J. G.; Albee, A. L.

    1990-01-01

    Advances in the development of protective impermeable encapsulants with high transparency to ultra-low-energy X-rays for use on HgI2 X-ray detectors are reported. Various X-ray fluorescence spectra from coated detectors are presented. The X-ray absorption in the encapsulants has been analyzed using characteristic radiation from various elements. Results suggest that low-energy cutoffs for the detectors are not determined solely by the encapsulating coatings presently employed but are also influenced by the front electrode and surface effects, which can affect the local electric field or the surface recombination velocity. An energy resolution of 182 eV (FWHM) has been achieved for Ni L lines at 850 eV. Improved detector sensitivity to X-ray energies under 700 eV is demonstrated.

  18. Center for X-ray Optics, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    This report briefly reviews the following topics: soft-x-ray imaging; reflective optics for hard x-rays; coherent XUV sources; spectroscopy with x-rays; detectors for coronary artery imaging; synchrotron-radiation optics; and support for the advanced light source.

  19. Advanced laser driver for soft x-ray projection lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, L.E.; Beach, R.J.; Dane, C.B.; Reichert, P.; Honig, J.N.; Hackel, L.A.

    1994-03-01

    A diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser for use as a driver for a soft x-ray projection lithography system is described. The laser will output 0.5 to 1 J per pulse with about 5 ns pulse width at up to 1.5 kHz repetition frequency. The design employs microchannel-cooled diode laser arrays for optical pumping, zigzag slab energy storage, and a single frequency oscillator injected regenerative amplifier cavity using phase conjugator beam correction for near diffraction limited beam quality. The design and initial results of this laser`s activation experiments will be presented.

  20. Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) science instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, Carl E.; Dailey, Carroll C.; Cumings, Nesbitt P.

    1991-01-01

    The overall AXAF program is summarized, with particular emphasis given to its science instruments. The science objectives established for AXAF are to determine the nature of celestial objects, from normal stars to quasars, to elucidate the nature of the physical processes which take place in and between astronomical objects, and to shed light on the history and evolution of the universe. Attention is given to the AXAF CCD imaging spectrometer, which is to provide spectrally and temporally resolved imaging, or, in conjunction with transmission grating, high-resolution dispersed spectral images of celestial sources. A high-resolution camera, an X-ray spectrometer, and the Bragg Crystal Spectrometer are also discussed.

  1. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, F. Evertsson, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Lundgren, E.; Zhang, F.; Pan, J.; Carlà, F.; Nilsson, J.-O.

    2014-07-21

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  2. The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M.; Lee, Sooheyong; Lemke, Henrik T.; Nelson, Silke; Bong, Eric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Srinivasan, Venkat; Stefanescu, Daniel; Zhu, Diling; Robert, Aymeric

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milli­seconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. A description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented. PMID:25931061

  3. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, F.; Zhang, F.; Evertsson, J.; Carlà, F.; Pan, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Nilsson, J.-O.; Lundgren, E.

    2014-07-01

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  4. The X-ray correlation spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M.; Lee, Sooheyong; Lemke, Henrik T.; Nelson, Silke; Bong, Eric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Srinivasan, Venkat; Stefanescu, Daniel; Zhu, Diling; Robert, Aymeric

    2015-03-03

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milliseconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. In addition, a description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented.

  5. The X-ray correlation spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M.; Lee, Sooheyong; et al

    2015-03-03

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milliseconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. In addition, a description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented.

  6. Tenth International Colloquium on UV and X-Ray Spectroscopy of Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Eric H.; Kahn, Steven M.

    UV and X-ray spectroscopy of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas draws interest from many disciplines. Contributions from international specialists are collected together in this book from a timely recent conference. In astrophysics, the Hubble Space Telescope, Astro 1 and ROSAT observatories are now providing UV and X-ray spectra and images of cosmic sources in unprecedented detail, while the Yohkoh mission recently collected superb data on the solar corona. In the laboratory, the development of ion-trap facilities and novel laser experiments are providing vital new data on high temperature plasmas. Recent innovations in the technology of spectroscopic instrumentation are discussed. These papers constitute an excellent up-to-date review of developments in short-wavelength spectroscopy and offer a solid introduction to its theoretical and experimental foundations. These proceedings give an up-to-date review of developments in short-wavelength spectroscopy and offer a solid introduction to its theoretical and experimental foundations. Various speakers presented some of the first results from the high resolution spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, the high sensitivity far ultraviolet and X-ray spectrometers of the ASTRO 1 Observatory, the imaging X-ray spectrometer on the ROSAT Observatory, and the high resolution solar X-ray spectrometer on Yohkoh. The development of ion trap devices had brought about a revolution in laboratory investigations of atomic processes in highly charged atoms. X-ray laser experiments had not only yielded considerable insight into electron ion interactions in hot dense plasmas, but also demonstrated the versatility of laser plasmas as laboratory X-ray sources. Such measurements also motivated and led to refinements in the development of large-scale atomic and molecular codes. On the instrumental side, the design and development of the next series of very powerful short wavelength observatories had generated a large number of

  7. Mode-Locked Multichromatic X-Rays in a Seeded Free-Electron Laser for Single-Shot X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; Ding, Yuantao; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-05-10

    We present the promise of generating gigawatt mode-locked multichromatic x rays in a seeded free-electron laser (FEL). We show that, by using a laser to imprint periodic modulation in electron beam phase space, a single-frequency coherent seed can be amplified and further translated to a mode-locked multichromatic output in an FEL. With this configuration the FEL output consists of a train of mode-locked ultrashort pulses which span a wide frequency gap with a series of equally spaced sharp lines. These gigawatt multichromatic x rays may potentially allow one to explore the structure and dynamics of a large number of atomic states simultaneously. The feasibility of generating mode-locked x rays ranging from carbon K edge ({approx}284 eV) to copper L{sub 3} edge ({approx}931 eV) is confirmed with numerical simulation using the realistic parameters of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) and LCLS-II. We anticipate that the mode-locked multichromatic x rays in FELs may open up new opportunities in x-ray spectroscopy (i.e. resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, time-resolved scattering and spectroscopy, etc.).

  8. Superconducting tunnel junction x-ray detectors for high resolution spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Labov, S., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    We are developing low-tcmpaature detectors for optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and gamma-ray spectroscopy, and for biomolecular mass spectrometry. We present here a some of our recent work in developing these detectors and some of the first results in applying these detectors to X-ray fluorescence analysis. We have measured thin-film Nb/Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al/Nb superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) X-ray detectors in the 0 2 to 1 keV band with a range of different junction sizes and aluminum film thicknesses. In one case, we have achieved the statistical limit to the energy resolution in this band. We have measured the performance of these STJ detectors as a function of count rate. and demonstrated a resolution of 13 eV FWHM at 271 eV with an output count rate of 20,600 cts/s Using X rays from SSRL to study compos- ite materials, we have demonstrated that we can resolve the L lines of transition metals from the nearby K lines of light elements We describe the first use of a low-temperature X-ray detector to measure X-ray fluoresccncc from the dilute metal component in a protein.

  9. Surface Dynamics of Block Copolymer Films by X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Sanghoon; Cha, Wonsuk; Lee, Heeju; Li, Xiaolong; Kim, Hyunjung; Jiang, Zhang; Narayanan, Suresh; Ruehm, Adrian; Sinha, S. K.

    2009-04-19

    We investigated the structure and dynamics of supported block copolymer films of poly(styrene)-b-poly(dimethylsiloxane)(PS-b-PDMS) in the spherical phase by x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) in grazing angle geometry. The temperature range studied was between 160 deg. and 210 deg. C, much higher than glass transition temperature (Tg), with thickness from 40 nm to 600 nm. Using x-ray reflectivity and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we found that the PDMS-rich layer near the surface appeared at a temperature higher than Tg. Universal scaling of the dynamics, even with the bilayer model, was observed. From the fitting with the bilayer model, viscosities from both layers were obtained. The results from the surface dynamics are compared with the theory of overdamped thermal capillary waves on thin films.

  10. A model for testing strong gravity via X-ray reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Nampalliwar, Sourabh; Cardenas-Avendano, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    Astrophysical black hole candidates are thought to be the Kerr black holes of general relativity. However, a direct observational evidence is still lacking. The X-ray radiation produced in the inner part of the accretion disk can be a powerful tool to test the Kerr nature of these objects. In this talk, we present a new model for testing the Kerr black hole hypothesis via X-ray reflection spectroscopy. We employ the formalism of the transfer function proposed by Cunningham 40 years ago. The transfer function acts as an integration kernel and takes into account all the relativistic effects. We have developed a code to compute transfer functions in arbitrary stationary and axisymmetric spacetimes. These transfer functions are tabulated in FITS files and combined with XILLVER. The result is best model that we can have today for testing black hole candidates via X-ray reflection spectroscopy.

  11. Application of X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy to the study of nuclear structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shanshan

    One of key technologies for the next generation nuclear systems are advanced materials, including high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistance core materials and so on. Local structure determination in these systems, which often are crystallographically intractable, is critical to gaining an understanding of their properties. In this thesis, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), including Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), is used to examine the geometric and electronic structure of nuclear structural materials under varying conditions. The thesis is divided into two main sections. The first examines the structural analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) which are dispersion strengthened by an ultra high density of Y-Ti-O enriched nano-features, resulting in remarkable high temperature creep strength and radiation damage resistance. Titanium and Yttrium K-edge XAS shows commercial alloys MA957 and J12YWT more closely resemble the as received Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti (wt. %) powders, and mechanically alloyed (MA) powders with 0.25Y2O3 (wt. %). It shows that a significant fraction of substitutional Ti remains dissolved in the (BCC) ferrite matrix. In contrast, annealed powders and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidated alloys show high temperature heat treatments shift the Y and Ti to more oxidized states that are consistent with combinations of Y2Ti2O7 and, especially, TiO. The second section describes corrosion studies of Pb with 316L stainless steel, molybdenum and spinet (MgAl2O4) at high temperature by XAS. The corrosion of fuel cladding and structural materials by liquid lead at elevated temperatures is an issue that must be considered when designing advanced nuclear systems and high-power spallation neutron targets. The results of ex-situ studies show that a Mo substrate retained a smooth and less corroded surface than 316L stainless steel sample at elevated temperature. In

  12. Recent advances in X-ray nanolithography using synchrotron radiation at Super-ACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseaux, F.; Chen, Y.; Haghiri-Gosnet, A. M.; Launois, H.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes our recent advances in high resolution synchrotron radiation lithography. Fabrication processes of high resolution X-ray masks based on our current {SiC}/{W} technology have been optimized to be compatible with a commercial Karl Süss stepper. As a result, well defined 50 nm wide isolated lines and small gratings of period down to 100 nm have been fabricated and tested in proximity X-ray lithography with the stepper. Replication tests were done with a minimum gap setting down to 5 μm. Results show that proximity X-ray lithography using synchrotron radiation is a viable technology for printing 50 nm linewidth features.

  13. Advanced X-Ray Timing Array Mission: Conceptual Spacecraft Design Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. C.; Johnson, L.; Thomas, H. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Baysinger, M.; Maples, C. D.; Fabisinski, L.L.; Hornsby, L.; Thompson, K. S.; Miernik, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced X-Ray Timing Array (AXTAR) is a mission concept for submillisecond timing of bright galactic x-ray sources. The two science instruments are the Large Area Timing Array (LATA) (a collimated instrument with 2-50-keV coverage and over 3 square meters of effective area) and a Sky Monitor (SM), which acts as a trigger for pointed observations of x-ray transients. The spacecraft conceptual design team developed two spacecraft concepts that will enable the AXTAR mission: A minimal configuration to be launched on a Taurus II and a larger configuration to be launched on a Falcon 9 or similar vehicle.

  14. ADVANCES IN X-RAY COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY AT THE NSLS.

    SciTech Connect

    DOWD,B.A.

    1998-08-07

    The X-Ray Computed Microtomography workstation at beamline X27A at the NSLS has been utilized by scientists from a broad range of disciplines from industrial materials processing to environmental science. The most recent applications are presented here as well as a description of the facility that has evolved to accommodate a wide variety of materials and sample sizes. One of the most exciting new developments reported here resulted from a pursuit of faster reconstruction techniques. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program has been developed and implemented, that is based on a refinement of the ''gridding'' algorithm first developed for use with radio astronomical data. This program has reduced the reconstruction time to 8.5 sec for a 929 x 929 pixel{sup 2} slice on an R10,000 CPU, more than 8x reduction compared with the Filtered Back-Projection method.

  15. Advances in x-ray computed microtomography at the NSLS

    SciTech Connect

    Dowd, B.A.; Andrews, A.B.; Marr, R.B.; Siddons, D.P.; Jones, K.W.; Peskin, A.M.

    1998-08-01

    The X-Ray Computed Microtomography workstation at beamline X27A at the NSLS has been utilized by scientists from a broad range of disciplines from industrial materials processing to environmental science. The most recent applications are presented here as well as a description of the facility that has evolved to accommodate a wide variety of materials and sample sizes. One of the most exciting new developments reported here resulted from a pursuit of faster reconstruction techniques. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program has been developed and implemented, that is based on a refinement of the gridding algorithm first developed for use with radio astronomical data. This program has reduced the reconstruction time to 8.5 sec for a 929 x 929 pixel{sup 2} slice on an R10,000 CPU, more than 8x reduction compared with the Filtered Back-Projection method.

  16. Telescope Scientist on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanSpeybroeck, Leon

    1999-01-01

    The most important activity during this reporting period was the calibration of the AXAF High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) and the analysis of the copious data which were obtained during that project. The calibration was highly successful, and will result in the AXAF being by far the best calibrated X-ray observatory ever flown, and more accurate results by all of its users. This period also included participation in the spacecraft alignment and assembly activities and final flight readiness reviews. The planning of the first year of Telescope Scientist AXAF observations also was accomplished. The Telescope Scientist team also served as a technical resource for various problems which were encountered during this period. Many of these contributions have been documented in memoranda sent to the project.

  17. Telescope Scientist on the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Carl M. (Technical Monitor); VanSpeybroeck, Leon; Tananbaum, Harvey D.

    2004-01-01

    In this period, the Chandra X-ray Observatory continued to perform exceptionally well, with many scientific observations and spectacular results. The HRMA performance continues to be essentially identical to that predicted from ground calibration data. The Telescope Scientist Team has improved the mirror model to provide a more accurate description to the Chandra observers, enabling them to reduce the systematic errors and uncertainties in their data reduction. There also has been good progress in the scientific program. Using the Telescope Scientist GTO time, we carried out an extensive Chandra program to observe distant clusters of galaxies. The goals of this program were to use clusters to derive cosmological constraints and to investigate the physics and evolution of clusters. A total of 71 clusters were observed with ACIS-I; the last observations were completed in December 2003.

  18. Chandra X-Ray Imaging and Spectroscopy of the M87 Jet and Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. S.; Yang, Y.

    2002-03-01

    We report X-ray imaging spectroscopy of the jet of M87 at subarcsecond resolution with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The galaxy nucleus and all the knots seen at radio and optical wavelengths, as far from the nucleus as knot C, are detected in the X-ray observations. There is a strong trend for the ratio of X-ray-to-radio, or optical, flux to decline with increasing distance from the nucleus. At least three knots are displaced from their radio/optical counterparts, being tens of parsecs closer to the nucleus at X-ray than at radio or optical wavelengths. The X-ray spectra of the nucleus and knots are well described by power laws absorbed by cold gas, with only the unresolved nucleus exhibiting intrinsic absorption. In view of the similar spectra of the nucleus and jet knots, and the high X-ray flux of the knots closest to the nucleus, we suggest that the X-ray emission coincident with the nucleus may actually originate from the parsec- or subparsec-scale jet rather than the accretion disk. Arguments are given that the X-ray emission process is unlikely to be inverse Compton scattering. Instead, we favor synchrotron radiation. Plotted as νSν, the spectra of the knots generally peak in or just above the optical-near-infrared band. However, the overall spectra of at least three knots cannot be described by simple models in which the spectral index monotonically increases with frequency, as would result from synchrotron losses or a high-energy cut-off to the injected electron spectrum. Instead, these spectra must turn down just above the optical band and then flatten in the X-ray band. In the context of a synchrotron model, this result suggests that either the X-ray-emitting electrons/positrons in these knots represent a separate ``population'' from those that emit the radio and optical radiation or that the magnetic field is highly inhomogeneous. If the former interpretation is correct, our results provide further support for the notion that radio galaxies produce

  19. Introduction of soft X-ray spectromicroscopy as an advanced technique for plant biopolymers research.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Chithra; Christensen, Colleen R; Gaillard, Cedric; Lahlali, Rachid; Blair, Lisa M; Perumal, Vijayan; Miller, Shea S; Hitchcock, Adam P

    2015-01-01

    Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy coupled with nano-scale microscopy has been widely used in material science, environmental science, and physical sciences. In this work, the advantages of soft X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy for plant biopolymer research were demonstrated by determining the chemical sensitivity of the technique to identify common plant biopolymers and to map the distributions of biopolymers in plant samples. The chemical sensitivity of soft X-ray spectroscopy to study biopolymers was determined by recording the spectra of common plant biopolymers using soft X-ray and Fourier Transform mid Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy techniques. The soft X-ray spectra of lignin, cellulose, and polygalacturonic acid have distinct spectral features. However, there were no distinct differences between cellulose and hemicellulose spectra. Mid infrared spectra of all biopolymers were unique and there were differences between the spectra of water soluble and insoluble xylans. The advantage of nano-scale spatial resolution exploited using soft X-ray spectromicroscopy for plant biopolymer research was demonstrated by mapping plant cell wall biopolymers in a lentil stem section and compared with the FT-IR spectromicroscopy data from the same sample. The soft X-ray spectromicroscopy enables mapping of biopolymers at the sub-cellular (~30 nm) resolution whereas, the limited spatial resolution in the micron scale range in the FT-IR spectromicroscopy made it difficult to identify the localized distribution of biopolymers. The advantages and limitations of soft X-ray and FT-IR spectromicroscopy techniques for biopolymer research are also discussed. PMID:25811457

  20. Introduction of Soft X-Ray Spectromicroscopy as an Advanced Technique for Plant Biopolymers Research

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Chithra; Christensen, Colleen R.; Gaillard, Cedric; Lahlali, Rachid; Blair, Lisa M.; Perumal, Vijayan; Miller, Shea S.; Hitchcock, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy coupled with nano-scale microscopy has been widely used in material science, environmental science, and physical sciences. In this work, the advantages of soft X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy for plant biopolymer research were demonstrated by determining the chemical sensitivity of the technique to identify common plant biopolymers and to map the distributions of biopolymers in plant samples. The chemical sensitivity of soft X-ray spectroscopy to study biopolymers was determined by recording the spectra of common plant biopolymers using soft X-ray and Fourier Transform mid Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy techniques. The soft X-ray spectra of lignin, cellulose, and polygalacturonic acid have distinct spectral features. However, there were no distinct differences between cellulose and hemicellulose spectra. Mid infrared spectra of all biopolymers were unique and there were differences between the spectra of water soluble and insoluble xylans. The advantage of nano-scale spatial resolution exploited using soft X-ray spectromicroscopy for plant biopolymer research was demonstrated by mapping plant cell wall biopolymers in a lentil stem section and compared with the FT-IR spectromicroscopy data from the same sample. The soft X-ray spectromicroscopy enables mapping of biopolymers at the sub-cellular (~30 nm) resolution whereas, the limited spatial resolution in the micron scale range in the FT-IR spectromicroscopy made it difficult to identify the localized distribution of biopolymers. The advantages and limitations of soft X-ray and FT-IR spectromicroscopy techniques for biopolymer research are also discussed. PMID:25811457

  1. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    The Center for X-Ray Optics has made substantial progress during the past year on the development of very high resolution x-ray technologies, the generation of coherent radiation at x-ray wavelengths, and, based on these new developments, had embarked on several scientific investigations that would not otherwise have been possible. The investigations covered in this report are topics on x-ray sources, x-ray imaging and applications, soft x-ray spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation, advanced light source and magnet structures for undulators and wigglers. (LSP)

  2. Combination of Raman, Infrared, and X-Ray Energy-Dispersion Spectroscopies and X-Ray Diffraction to Study a Fossilization Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa Filho, Francisco Eduardo; da Silva, João Hermínio; Feitosa Saraiva, Antônio Álamo; Brito, Deyvid Dennys S.; Viana, Bartolomeu Cruz; de Oliveira Abagaro, Bruno Tavares; de Tarso Cavalcante Freire, Paulo

    2011-12-01

    X-ray diffraction was combined with X-ray energy-dispersion, Fourier-transform infrared, and Raman spectroscopies to study the fossilization of a Cretaceous specimen of the plant Brachyphyllum castilhoi, a fossil from the Ipubi Formation, in the Araripe Sedimentary Basin, Northeastern Brazil. Among the possible fossilization processes, which could involve pyrite, silicon oxide, calcium oxide, or other minerals, we were able to single out pyritization as the central mechanism producing the fossil, more than 100 million years ago. In addition to expanding the knowledge of the Ipubi Formation, this study shows that, when combined with other experimental techniques, Raman spectroscopy is a valuable tool at the paleontologist's disposal.

  3. Pump-Flow-Probe X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy as a Tool for Studying Intermediate States of Photocatalytic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Smolentsev, Grigory; Guda, Alexander; Zhang, XIaoyi; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Andreiadis, Eugen; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Canton, Sophie E.; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Artero, Vincent; Sundstrom, Villy

    2014-01-01

    A new setup for pump-flow-probe X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been implemented at the SuperXAS beamline of the Swiss Light Source. It allows recording X-ray absorption spectra with a time resolution of tens of microseconds and high detection efficiency for samples with sub-mM concentrations. A continuous wave laser is used for the photoexcitation, with the distance between laser and X-ray beams and velocity of liquid flow determining the time delay, while the focusing of both beams and the flow speed define the time resolution. This method is compared with the alternative measurement technique that utilizes a 1 kHz repetition rate laser and multiple X-ray probe pulses. Such an experiment was performed at beamline 11ID-D of the Advanced Photon Source. Advantages, limitations and potential for improvement of the pump-flow-probe setup are discussed by analyzing the photon statistics. Both methods, with Co K-edge probing were applied to the investigation of a cobaloxime-based photo-catalytic reaction. The interplay between optimizing for efficient photoexcitation and time resolution as well as the effect of sample degradation for these two setups are discussed. PMID:24443663

  4. Rapid Mapping of Lithiation Dynamics in Transition Metal Oxide Particles with Operando X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowack, Lea; Grolimund, Daniel; Samson, Vallerie; Marone, Federica; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-02-01

    Since the commercialization of lithium ion batteries (LIBs), layered transition metal oxides (LiMO2, where M = Co, Mn, Ni, or mixtures thereof) have been materials of choice for LIB cathodes. During cycling, the transition metals change their oxidation states, an effect that can be tracked by detecting energy shifts in the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can therefore be used to visualize and quantify lithiation kinetics in transition metal oxide cathodes; however, in-situ measurements are often constrained by temporal resolution and X-ray dose, necessitating compromises in the electrochemistry cycling conditions used or the materials examined. We report a combined approach to reduce measurement time and X-ray exposure for operando XAS studies of lithium ion batteries. A highly discretized energy resolution coupled with advanced post-processing enables rapid yet reliable identification of the oxidation state. A full-field microscopy setup provides sub-particle resolution over a large area of battery electrode, enabling the oxidation state within many transition metal oxide particles to be tracked simultaneously. Here, we apply this approach to gain insights into the lithiation kinetics of a commercial, mixed-metal oxide cathode material, nickel cobalt aluminium oxide (NCA), during (dis)charge and its degradation during overcharge.

  5. Rapid Mapping of Lithiation Dynamics in Transition Metal Oxide Particles with Operando X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nowack, Lea; Grolimund, Daniel; Samson, Vallerie; Marone, Federica; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Since the commercialization of lithium ion batteries (LIBs), layered transition metal oxides (LiMO2, where M = Co, Mn, Ni, or mixtures thereof) have been materials of choice for LIB cathodes. During cycling, the transition metals change their oxidation states, an effect that can be tracked by detecting energy shifts in the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can therefore be used to visualize and quantify lithiation kinetics in transition metal oxide cathodes; however, in-situ measurements are often constrained by temporal resolution and X-ray dose, necessitating compromises in the electrochemistry cycling conditions used or the materials examined. We report a combined approach to reduce measurement time and X-ray exposure for operando XAS studies of lithium ion batteries. A highly discretized energy resolution coupled with advanced post-processing enables rapid yet reliable identification of the oxidation state. A full-field microscopy setup provides sub-particle resolution over a large area of battery electrode, enabling the oxidation state within many transition metal oxide particles to be tracked simultaneously. Here, we apply this approach to gain insights into the lithiation kinetics of a commercial, mixed-metal oxide cathode material, nickel cobalt aluminium oxide (NCA), during (dis)charge and its degradation during overcharge. PMID:26908198

  6. Rapid Mapping of Lithiation Dynamics in Transition Metal Oxide Particles with Operando X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nowack, Lea; Grolimund, Daniel; Samson, Vallerie; Marone, Federica; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Since the commercialization of lithium ion batteries (LIBs), layered transition metal oxides (LiMO2, where M = Co, Mn, Ni, or mixtures thereof) have been materials of choice for LIB cathodes. During cycling, the transition metals change their oxidation states, an effect that can be tracked by detecting energy shifts in the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can therefore be used to visualize and quantify lithiation kinetics in transition metal oxide cathodes; however, in-situ measurements are often constrained by temporal resolution and X-ray dose, necessitating compromises in the electrochemistry cycling conditions used or the materials examined. We report a combined approach to reduce measurement time and X-ray exposure for operando XAS studies of lithium ion batteries. A highly discretized energy resolution coupled with advanced post-processing enables rapid yet reliable identification of the oxidation state. A full-field microscopy setup provides sub-particle resolution over a large area of battery electrode, enabling the oxidation state within many transition metal oxide particles to be tracked simultaneously. Here, we apply this approach to gain insights into the lithiation kinetics of a commercial, mixed-metal oxide cathode material, nickel cobalt aluminium oxide (NCA), during (dis)charge and its degradation during overcharge. PMID:26908198

  7. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1990-01-01

    After a brief review of the principal problems of AGN research, selected potential high-resolution observations are discussed with a view toward assessing their scientific value and the degree of resolution they will require. Two classes of observations pertaining directly to AGNs are discussed. Fe K-alpha spectroscopy relevant to the dynamical and thermal character of the emission line zones; and measurement of resonance line absorption by highly-ionized species in BL Lac objects, which should provide information about entrainment of interstellar material by relativistic jets. A third class of potentially important observations uses AGNs as background light sources in order to directly measure the distance to clusters of galaxies.

  8. Development of grating-based x-ray Talbot interferometry at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Marathe, Shashidhara; Xiao Xianghui; Wojcik, Michael J.; Divan, Ralu; Butler, Leslie G.; Ham, Kyungmin; Fezzaa, Kamel; Erdmann, Mark; Wen, Han H.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Macrander, Albert T.; De Carlo, Francesco; Mancini, Derrick C.; Assoufid, Lahsen

    2012-07-31

    We report on the ongoing effort to develop hard x-ray Talbot interferometry at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory, USA. We describe the design of the interferometer and preliminary results obtained at 25 keV using a feather and a phantom sample lithographically fabricated of gold. We mention the future developmental goals and applications of this technique as a metrology tool for x-ray optics and beam wavefront characterization.

  9. X-ray spectroscopy of highly-ionized atoms in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R.E.; Bennett, C.; Chen, M.H.; Cowan, T.; Dietrich, D.; Henderson, J.R.; Knapp, D.A.; Levine, M.A.; Schneider, M.B.; Scofield, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    An Electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged-ions (q /le/ 70+) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of dielectronic recombination, electron impact excitation and transition energies are presented. 15 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  10. LISA: the Italian CRG beamline for x-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at ESRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Acapito, F.; Trapananti, A.; Puri, A.

    2016-05-01

    LISA is the acronym of Linea Italiana per la Spettroscopia di Assorbimento di raggi X (Italian beamline for X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy) and is the upgrade of the former GILDA beamline installed on the BM08 bending magnet port of European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). Within this contribution a full description of the project is provided.

  11. Passive Spectroscopy Bolometers, Grating- And X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Scott, S; Paul, S; Ince-Cushmann, A; Reinke, M; Rice, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Gu, M F; Lee, S G; Broennimann, C; Eikenberry, E F

    2007-11-07

    This tutorial gives a brief introduction into passive spectroscopy and describes the working principles of bolometers, a high-resolution grating spectrometer, and a novel X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, which is of particular interest for profile measurements of the ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity on ITER and future burning plasma experiments.

  12. Application of x-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of corrosion and inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, A.J.; Isaacs, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique for determination of valency and coordination. Measurements can be made in air or in situ under electrochemical control. The technique will be described and its application to the analysis of passive oxide films, corrosion products, and inhibitors will be reviewed.

  13. Passive Spectroscopy Bolometers, Grating- And X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Scott, S.; Paul, S.; Ince-Cushman, A.; Reinke, M.; Rice, J. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gu, M. F.; Lee, S. G.; Broennimann, Ch.; Eikenberry, E. F.

    2008-03-12

    This tutorial gives a brief introduction into passive spectroscopy and describes the working principles of bolometers, a high-resolution grating spectrometer, and a novel X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, which is also of particular interest for profile measurements of the ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity on ITER and future burning plasma experiments.

  14. Properties of a transmission grating behind a grazing incidence telescope for cosmic x-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Beuermann, K P; Lenzen, R; Bräuninger, H

    1977-05-01

    Third-order aberrations are discussed of a transmission grating positioned behind a Wolter type I telescope, using Fermat's principle. We describe the conditions required to obtain a coma-free grating. The performance of a grating spectrometer for cosmic x-ray spectroscopy is discussed in some detail. PMID:20168712

  15. The Mn4Ca photosynthetic water-oxidation catalyst studied by simultaneous X-ray spectroscopy and crystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Rosalie; Kern, Jan; Hattne, Johan; Koroidov, Sergey; Hellmich, Julia; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Bergmann, Uwe; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of photosystem II and the catalytic intermediate states of the Mn4CaO5 cluster involved in water oxidation have been studied intensively over the past several years. An understanding of the sequential chemistry of light absorption and the mechanism of water oxidation, however, requires a new approach beyond the conventional steady-state crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. In this report, we present the preliminary progress using an X-ray free-electron laser to determine simultaneously the light-induced protein dynamics via crystallography and the local chemistry that occurs at the catalytic centre using X-ray spectroscopy under functional conditions at room temperature. PMID:24914152

  16. Catalysts at work: From integral to spatially resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Kimmerle, Bertram; Baiker, Alfons; Boye, Pit; Schroer, Christian G.; Glatzel, Pieter; Borca, Camelia N.; Beckmann, Felix

    2009-09-25

    Spectroscopic studies on heterogeneous catalysts have mostly been done in an integral mode. However, in many cases spatial variations in catalyst structure can occur, e.g. during impregnation of pre-shaped particles, during reaction in a catalytic reactor, or in microstructured reactors as the present overview shows. Therefore, spatially resolved molecular information on a microscale is required for a comprehensive understanding of theses systems, partly in ex situ studies, partly under stationary reaction conditions and in some cases even under dynamic reaction conditions. Among the different available techniques, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a well-suited tool for this purpose as the different selected examples highlight. Two different techniques, scanning and full-field X-ray microscopy/tomography, are described and compared. At first, the tomographic structure of impregnated alumina pellets is presented using full-field transmission microtomography and compared to the results obtained with a scanning X-ray microbeam technique to analyse the catalyst bed inside a catalytic quartz glass reactor. On the other hand, by using XAS in scanning microtomography, the structure and the distribution of Cu(0), Cu(I), Cu(II) species in a Cu/ZnO catalyst loaded in a quartz capillary microreactor could be reconstructed quantitatively on a virtual section through the reactor. An illustrating example for spatially resolved XAS under reaction conditions is the partial oxidation of methane over noble metal-based catalysts. In order to obtain spectroscopic information on the spatial variation of the oxidation state of the catalyst inside the reactor XAS spectra were recorded by scanning with a micro-focussed beam along the catalyst bed. Alternatively, full-field transmission imaging was used to efficiently determine the distribution of the oxidation state of a catalyst inside a reactor under reaction conditions. The new technical approaches together with quantitative data

  17. Testing interaction models by using x-ray absorption spectroscopy: solid Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Cicco, Andrea; Minicucci, Marco; Principi, Emiliano; Witkowska, Agnieszka; Rybicki, Jaroslaw; Laskowski, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Structural models obtained using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and realistic interatomic potentials for solid metals are tested using experimental results obtained by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Accurate L-edge extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) measurements of Pb grains dispersed in BN and graphite matrices have been collected for temperatures up to the melting point. The thermal expansion of the grains was measured by energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction techniques and found to be coincident with that of pure Pb up to the limit of the present measurements. L3-edge EXAFS measurements of solid Pb at various temperatures have been analysed using advanced data-analysis techniques (GNXAS) based on exact spherical-wave multiple-scattering simulation of the absorption cross-section. Realistic structural models for solid Pb were obtained from MD simulations using an empirical pair potential (Dzugutov, Larsson and Ebbsjo (DLE)), a tight-binding (TB) square-root functional, and an embedded-atom (EA) model potential parametrized by us. The short-range pair distribution function g(r) reconstructed by means of EXAFS is compared with those obtained by MD simulations. The empirical DLE potential, originally designed for the liquid state, is too soft, showing too-large values for the average distance R, variance σ2, and skewness β. The TB and EA potentials are both compatible with XAS data as regards the average distance and skewness of the first neighbours. The distance variance, associated with the thermal vibration amplitudes, is underestimated for the TB potential, while the EA model is found to be in agreement with XAS data. The present results are also compared with those from a previous EXAFS study on solid lead, where the cumulant expansion and a simple one-dimensional anharmonic oscillator model were used. The need for realistic interaction models and appropriate simulation schemes for reliable XAS data analysis is emphasized

  18. Two-dimensional stimulated resonance Raman spectroscopy of molecules with broadband x-ray pulses

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Jason D.; Zhang, Yu; Healion, Daniel; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-01-01

    Expressions for the two-dimensional stimulated x-ray Raman spectroscopy (2D-SXRS) signal obtained using attosecond x-ray pulses are derived. The 1D- and 2D-SXRS signals are calculated for trans-N-methyl acetamide (NMA) with broad bandwidth (181 as, 14.2 eV FWHM) pulses tuned to the oxygen and nitrogen K-edges. Crosspeaks in 2D signals reveal electronic Franck-Condon overlaps between valence orbitals and relaxed orbitals in the presence of the core-hole. PMID:22583220

  19. High-Resolution Kaonic-Atom X-ray Spectroscopy with Transition-Edge-Sensor Microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, S.; Bennett, D. A.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Irwin, K. D.; Ishimoto, S.; Sato, M.; Schmidt, D. R.; Swetz, D. S.; Tatsuno, H.; Ullom, J. N.; Yamada, S.

    2014-09-01

    We are preparing for an ultra-high resolution X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms using an X-ray spectrometer based on an array of superconducting transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeters developed by NIST. The instrument has excellent energy resolutions of 2-3 eV (FWHM) at 6 keV and a large collecting area of about 20 mm. This will open new door to investigate kaon-nucleus strong interaction and provide new accurate charged-kaon mass value.

  20. Testing LaMgAl11O19 crystal for x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Baronova, E. O.; Kalashnikova, I. I.; Stepanenko, M. M.

    2004-10-01

    We investigated the properties of the rare earth crystal LaMgAl11O19 and its application to soft x-ray spectroscopy. Its relative reflectivity and half-width rocking curve were measured to up to the reflection order of 28. In addition, a comparative measurement of the iron L-shell soft x-ray line emission was made on the EBIT-I Livermore electron beam ion trap by fielding the LaMgAl11O19 crystal side by side with a rubidium hydrogen phthalate crystal in a flat crystal spectrometer. From these measurements, reflectivity and spectral resolving power were determined.

  1. Thermal Expansion Behaviour of Silver Examined by Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dubiel, M.; Chasse, A.; Haug, J.; Schneider, R.; Kruth, H.

    2007-02-02

    EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) investigations are reported concerning the thermal expansion behaviour of silver in an extended range of temperature from 10 K to about 950 K measured in transmission mode. Both the ratio method and an EXAFS fitting procedure were applied to reveal the temperature dependence of EXAFS parameters. Models based on quantum and classical thermodynamic perturbation theory have been used to interpret experimental data and compared to XRD (X-ray diffraction) results of bulk silver material. The description of thermodynamic data of thermal expansion of silver in the complete range of temperature by EXAFS Spectroscopy was successful by first calculations using third order quantum perturbation theory.

  2. Photoemission spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis of 3D topological and Kondo insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibayev, Pavel

    2015-03-01

    The advantage of studying 3D topological insulators (TIs), compounds that have attracted the attention of many in the condensed matter field, is the ability for their existence at room temperature and no magnetic fields, allowing both for resolving their band structure via angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and understanding electrical transport and other properties via X-ray diffraction (XRD) and point-contact spectroscopy (PCS). A comprehensive quantitative analysis of Bi2Se3, a 3D TI, was carried out using these methods. The Bi2Se3\\ crystals were synthesized in-house at Princeton University. A first-principles calculation based on density functional theory, DFT, was performed using the Abinit software. The band structure of the crystal was then resolved via ARPES at the Advanced Light Source in LBNL, resulting in a surprisingly stark and clear single Dirac cone. A large band gap was confirmed, suggesting an increased potential for applications. In contrast, Kondo insulators are found in rare-earth based materials with f-electron degrees of freedom. Photon energy dependent dispersion relationships and temperature dependence studies were performed on a Kondo candidate CeB6 via ARPES, showing an even number of Dirac cones and a non-TI behavior. Analysis of I-V characteristics through PCS will follow, in addition to characterization via Bruker XRD for both compounds. Research group led by Professor M. Zahid Hasan (Princeton University).

  3. Recent advances in X-ray microanalysis in dermatology

    SciTech Connect

    Forslind, B.; Grundin, T.G.; Lindberg, M.; Roomans, G.M.; Werner, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Electron microprobe and proton microprobe X-ray analysis can be used in several areas of dermatological research. With a proton probe, the distribution of trace elements in human hair can be determined. Electron microprobe analysis on freeze-dried cryosections of guinea-pig and human epidermis shows a marked gradient of Na, P and K over the stratum granulosum. In sections of freeze-substituted human skin this gradient is less steep. This difference is likely to be due to a decrease in water content of the epidermis towards the stratum corneum. Electron microprobe analysis of the epidermis can, for analysis of trace elements, be complemented by the proton microprobe. Quantitative agreement between the two techniques can be obtained by the use of a standard. Proton microprobe analysis was used to determine the distribution of Ni or Cr in human epidermis exposed to nickel or chromate ions. Possible differences in water content between the stratum corneum of patients with atopic eczema and normal stratum corneum was investigated in skin freeze-substituted with Br-doped resin. No significant differences were observed.

  4. Energy-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy using an X-ray free-electron laser in a shot-by-shot mode

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Hellmich, Julia; Glöckner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Schafer, Donald W.; Sellberg, Jonas; Kenney, Christopher; Herbst, Ryan; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Herrmann, Sven; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Latimer, Matthew J.; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc M.; Miahnahri, Alan; Seibert, M. Marvin; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Glatzel, Pieter; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    The ultrabright femtosecond X-ray pulses provided by X-ray free-electron lasers open capabilities for studying the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of systems beyond what is possible with synchrotron sources. Recently, this “probe-before-destroy” approach has been demonstrated for atomic structure determination by serial X-ray diffraction of microcrystals. There has been the question whether a similar approach can be extended to probe the local electronic structure by X-ray spectroscopy. To address this, we have carried out femtosecond X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at the Linac Coherent Light Source using redox-active Mn complexes. XES probes the charge and spin states as well as the ligand environment, critical for understanding the functional role of redox-active metal sites. Kβ1,3 XES spectra of MnII and Mn2III,IV complexes at room temperature were collected using a wavelength dispersive spectrometer and femtosecond X-ray pulses with an individual dose of up to >100 MGy. The spectra were found in agreement with undamaged spectra collected at low dose using synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that the intact electronic structure of redox active transition metal compounds in different oxidation states can be characterized with this shot-by-shot method. This opens the door for studying the chemical dynamics of metal catalytic sites by following reactions under functional conditions. The technique can be combined with X-ray diffraction to simultaneously obtain the geometric structure of the overall protein and the local chemistry of active metal sites and is expected to prove valuable for understanding the mechanism of important metalloproteins, such as photosystem II. PMID:23129631

  5. Near-infrared spectroscopy of faint discrete X-ray point sources constituting the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Dubath, Pierre; Yoshida, Tessei; Suzuki, Kensuke; Ebisawa, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) is an apparently extended X-ray emission along the Galactic plane. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a hard continuum with a strong Fe K emission feature in the 6-7 keV band. A substantial fraction (˜80%) of the GRXE in the Fe band was resolved into point sources by deep Chandra imaging observations; thus GRXE is mostly composed of dim Galactic X-ray point sources, at least in this energy band. To investigate the populations of these dim X-ray point sources, we carried out near-infrared (NIR) follow-up spectroscopic observations in two deep Chandra fields located in the Galactic plane at (l, b) = (0.1°, -1.4°) and (28.5°, 0.0°) using NTT/SofI and Subaru/MOIRCS. We obtained well-exposed NIR spectra from 65 objects and found that there are three main classes of Galactic sources based on the X-ray color and NIR spectral features: those having (A) hard X-ray spectra and NIR emission features such as H I (Brγ), He I, and He II (2 objects), (B) soft X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (46 objects), and (C) hard X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (17 objects). From these features, we argue that class A sources are cataclysmic variables (CVs), and class B sources are late-type stars with enhanced coronal activity, which is in agreement with current knowledge. Class C sources possibly belong to a new group of objects, which has been poorly studied so far. We argue that the candidate sources for class C are the binary systems hosting white dwarfs and late-type companions with very low accretion rates. It is likely that this newly recognized class of sources contribute to a non-negligible fraction of the GRXE, especially in the Fe K band.

  6. Near-infrared spectroscopy of faint discrete X-ray point sources constituting the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Dubath, Pierre; Yoshida, Tessei; Suzuki, Kensuke; Ebisawa, Ken

    2016-05-01

    The Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) is an apparently extended X-ray emission along the Galactic plane. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a hard continuum with a strong Fe K emission feature in the 6-7 keV band. A substantial fraction (˜80%) of the GRXE in the Fe band was resolved into point sources by deep Chandra imaging observations; thus GRXE is mostly composed of dim Galactic X-ray point sources, at least in this energy band. To investigate the populations of these dim X-ray point sources, we carried out near-infrared (NIR) follow-up spectroscopic observations in two deep Chandra fields located in the Galactic plane at (l, b) = (0.1°, -1.4°) and (28.5°, 0.0°) using NTT/SofI and Subaru/MOIRCS. We obtained well-exposed NIR spectra from 65 objects and found that there are three main classes of Galactic sources based on the X-ray color and NIR spectral features: those having (A) hard X-ray spectra and NIR emission features such as H I (Brγ), He I, and He II (2 objects), (B) soft X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (46 objects), and (C) hard X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (17 objects). From these features, we argue that class A sources are cataclysmic variables (CVs), and class B sources are late-type stars with enhanced coronal activity, which is in agreement with current knowledge. Class C sources possibly belong to a new group of objects, which has been poorly studied so far. We argue that the candidate sources for class C are the binary systems hosting white dwarfs and late-type companions with very low accretion rates. It is likely that this newly recognized class of sources contribute to a non-negligible fraction of the GRXE, especially in the Fe K band.

  7. Sequential single shot X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy at the SACLA free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Kwaśniewski, Paweł; Roseker, Wojciech; Fischer, Birgit; Schroer, Martin A.; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sprung, Michael; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Glownia, James; Chollet, Matthieu; Nelson, Silke; Robert, Aymeric; Gutt, Christian; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Grübel, Gerhard

    2015-11-27

    In this study, hard X-ray free electron lasers allow for the first time to access dynamics of condensed matter samples ranging from femtoseconds to several hundred seconds. In particular, the exceptional large transverse coherence of the X-ray pulses and the high time-averaged flux promises to reach time and length scales that have not been accessible up to now with storage ring based sources. However, due to the fluctuations originating from the stochastic nature of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process the application of well established techniques such as X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is challenging. Here we demonstrate a single-shot based sequential XPCS study on a colloidal suspension with a relaxation time comparable to the SACLA free-electron laser pulse repetition rate. High quality correlation functions could be extracted without any indications for sample damage. This opens the way for systematic sequential XPCS experiments at FEL sources.

  8. Sequential Single Shot X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy at the SACLA Free Electron Laser

    PubMed Central

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Kwaśniewski, Paweł; Roseker, Wojciech; Fischer, Birgit; Schroer, Martin A.; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sprung, Michael; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Glownia, James; Chollet, Matthieu; Nelson, Silke; Robert, Aymeric; Gutt, Christian; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Grübel, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Hard X-ray free electron lasers allow for the first time to access dynamics of condensed matter samples ranging from femtoseconds to several hundred seconds. In particular, the exceptional large transverse coherence of the X-ray pulses and the high time-averaged flux promises to reach time and length scales that have not been accessible up to now with storage ring based sources. However, due to the fluctuations originating from the stochastic nature of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process the application of well established techniques such as X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is challenging. Here we demonstrate a single-shot based sequential XPCS study on a colloidal suspension with a relaxation time comparable to the SACLA free-electron laser pulse repetition rate. High quality correlation functions could be extracted without any indications for sample damage. This opens the way for systematic sequential XPCS experiments at FEL sources. PMID:26610328

  9. Pushing the Boundaries of X-ray Grating Spectroscopy in a Suborbital Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEntaffer, Randall L.; DeRoo, Casey; Schultz, Ted; Zhang, William W.; Murray, Neil J.; O'Dell, Stephen; Cash, Webster

    2013-01-01

    Developments in grating spectroscopy are paramount for meeting the soft X-ray science goals of future NASA X-ray Observatories. While developments in the laboratory setting have verified the technical feasibility of using off-plane reflection gratings to reach this goal, flight heritage is a key step in the development process toward large missions. To this end we have developed a design for a suborbital rocket payload employing an Off-Plane X-ray Grating Spectrometer. This spectrometer utilizes slumped glass Wolter-1 optics, an array of gratings, and a CCD camera. We discuss the unique capabilities of this design, the expected performance, the science return, and the perceived impact to future missions.

  10. Gas cell for in situ soft X-ray transmission-absorption spectroscopy of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drisdell, W. S.; Kortright, J. B.

    2014-07-15

    A simple gas cell design, constructed primarily from commercially available components, enables in situ soft X-ray transmission-absorption spectroscopy of materials in contact with gas at ambient temperature. The cell has a minimum X-ray path length of 1 mm and can hold gas pressures up to ∼300 Torr, and could support higher pressures with simple modifications. The design enables cycling between vacuum and gas environments without interrupting the X-ray beam, and can be fully sealed to allow for measurements of air-sensitive samples. The cell can attach to the downstream port of any appropriate synchrotron beamline, and offers a robust and versatile method for in situ measurements of certain materials. The construction and operation of the cell are discussed, as well as sample preparation and proper spectral analysis, illustrated by examples of spectral measurements. Potential areas for improvement and modification for specialized applications are also mentioned.

  11. Sequential Single Shot X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy at the SACLA Free Electron Laser.

    PubMed

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Kwaśniewski, Paweł; Roseker, Wojciech; Fischer, Birgit; Schroer, Martin A; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sprung, Michael; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Glownia, James; Chollet, Matthieu; Nelson, Silke; Robert, Aymeric; Gutt, Christian; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Grübel, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Hard X-ray free electron lasers allow for the first time to access dynamics of condensed matter samples ranging from femtoseconds to several hundred seconds. In particular, the exceptional large transverse coherence of the X-ray pulses and the high time-averaged flux promises to reach time and length scales that have not been accessible up to now with storage ring based sources. However, due to the fluctuations originating from the stochastic nature of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process the application of well established techniques such as X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is challenging. Here we demonstrate a single-shot based sequential XPCS study on a colloidal suspension with a relaxation time comparable to the SACLA free-electron laser pulse repetition rate. High quality correlation functions could be extracted without any indications for sample damage. This opens the way for systematic sequential XPCS experiments at FEL sources. PMID:26610328

  12. Sequential Single Shot X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy at the SACLA Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Kwaśniewski, Paweł; Roseker, Wojciech; Fischer, Birgit; Schroer, Martin A.; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sprung, Michael; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Glownia, James; Chollet, Matthieu; Nelson, Silke; Robert, Aymeric; Gutt, Christian; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Grübel, Gerhard

    2015-11-01

    Hard X-ray free electron lasers allow for the first time to access dynamics of condensed matter samples ranging from femtoseconds to several hundred seconds. In particular, the exceptional large transverse coherence of the X-ray pulses and the high time-averaged flux promises to reach time and length scales that have not been accessible up to now with storage ring based sources. However, due to the fluctuations originating from the stochastic nature of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process the application of well established techniques such as X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is challenging. Here we demonstrate a single-shot based sequential XPCS study on a colloidal suspension with a relaxation time comparable to the SACLA free-electron laser pulse repetition rate. High quality correlation functions could be extracted without any indications for sample damage. This opens the way for systematic sequential XPCS experiments at FEL sources.

  13. Polarization spectroscopy of x-ray transitions from beam-excited highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Lopez-Urrutia, J.C.; Decaux, V.; Widmann, K.; Neill, P.

    1997-01-01

    Polarization spectroscopy of x-ray lines represents a diagnostic tool to ascertain the presence of electron beams in high-temperature plasmas. Making use of the Livermore electron beam ion trap, which optimizes the linear x-ray line polarization by exciting highly charged ions with a monoenergetic electron beam, we have begun to develop polarization diagnostics and test theoretical models. Our measurement relies on the sensitivity of crystal spectrometers to the linear polarization of x-ray lines which depends on the value of the Bragg angle. We employed two spectrometers with differing analyzing crystals and simultaneously recorded the K-shell emission from heliumlike Fe{sup 24+} and lithiumlike Fe{sup 23+} ions at two different Bragg angles. A clear difference in the relative intensities of the dominant transitions is observed, which is attributed to the amount of linear polarization of the individual lines. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Superconducting Detector System for High-Resolution Energy-Dispersive Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Niedermayr, T; Drury, O; Funk, T; Frank, M; Labov, S E; Cramer, S

    2001-02-21

    Synchrotron-based soft x-ray spectroscopy is often limited by detector performance. Grating spectrometers have the resolution, but lack the efficiency for the analysis of dilute samples. Semiconducting Si(Li) or Ge detectors are efficient, but often lack the resolution to separate weak signals from strong nearby lines in multi-element samples. Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) operated at temperatures below 1 K can be used as high-resolution high-efficiency x-ray detectors. They combine high energy resolution around 10 eV FWHM with the broad band efficiency of energy-dispersive detectors. We have designed a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate STJ detectors in x-ray fluorescence measurements at beam line 4 of the ALS. We demonstrate the capabilities of such a detector system for fluorescence analysis of dilute metal sites in proteins and inorganic model compounds.

  15. Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy and Diffraction of Photosystem II at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Gildea, Richard J.; Echols, Nathaniel; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Koroidov, Sergey; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R.; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Koglin, Jason E.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Glatzel, Pieter; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Intense femtosecond X-ray pulses produced at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) were used for simultaneous X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of microcrystals of Photosystem II (PS II) at room temperature. This method probes the overall protein structure and the electronic structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of PS II. XRD data are presented from both the dark state (S1) and the first illuminated state (S2) of PS II. Our simultaneous XRD/XES study shows that the PS II crystals are intact during our measurements at the LCLS, not only with respect to the structure of PS II, but also with regard to the electronic structure of the highly radiation sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster, opening new directions for future dynamics studies. PMID:23413188

  16. In situ/operando soft x-ray spectroscopy characterization of ion solvation and catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua

    Many important systems especially in energy-related regime are based on the complexity of material architecture, chemistry and interactions among constituents within. To understand and thus ultimately control the varying applications calls for in-situ/operando characterization tools. We will present the recent development of the in-situ/operando soft X-ray spectroscopic in the studies of catalytic and alkali ion solvation under bias condition, and reveal how to overcome the challenge that soft X-rays cannot easily peek into the high-pressure catalytic cells or liquid electrochemical cells. Also the different feasible detection approaches can provide surface and bulk sensitivity experimentally from those in-situ cells. The unique design of in-situ/operando soft X-ray spectroscopy instrumentation and fabrication principle with examples in Ca, Na, Mg based solutions at ambient pressure/temperature and high temperature (~250°C) gas catalysis will be shown.

  17. Bayesian Comparison of Fit Parameters: An Application to Time-Resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, V.

    Analysis of X-ray data of the stars AD Leo and Wolf 630, obtained with ROSAT provide important clues to the structure of the coronae on these low-mass, main-sequence stars. In particular, time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of these stars allow us to derive estimates for the low- and high-temperature components of the plasma emission measures. Using Bayes' theorem, we show that the high-temperature components are correlated with the X-ray light-curves of the stars, while the low-temperature components are steady. Thus we are able to model the low-temperature emission as relatively compact, quiescent, static coronal loops, and the high-temperature emission as unstable flaring components.

  18. Structural studies of homoisoflavonoids: NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievänen, Elina; Toušek, Jaromír; Lunerová, Kamila; Marek, Jaromír; Jankovská, Dagmar; Dvorská, Margita; Marek, Radek

    2010-08-01

    In this article we present a detailed structural investigation for five homoisoflavonoids, molecules important from the pharmacological point of view. For studying the electron distribution as well as its influence on the physicochemical properties, NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and theoretical calculations have been used. Nuclear magnetic shieldings obtained by using DFT calculations for optimized molecular geometries are correlated with the experimentally determined chemical shifts. The theoretical data are well in agreement with the experimental values. The single crystal X-ray structures of homoisoflavonoid derivatives 1, 3, and 4 have been solved. The molecular geometries and crystal packing determined by X-ray diffraction are used for characterizing the intermolecular interactions. Electron distribution is crucial for the stability of radicals and hence the antioxidant efficiency of flavonoid structures. The hydrogen bonding governs the formation of complexes of homoisoflavonoids with biological targets.

  19. X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF YB3+-DOPED OPTICAL FIBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Citron, Robert; Kropf, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Optical fibers doped with Ytterbium-3+ have become increasingly common in fiber lasers and amplifiers. Yb-doped fibers provide the capability to produce high power and short pulses at specific wavelengths, resulting in highly effective gain media. However, little is known about the local structure, distribution, and chemical coordination of Yb3+ in the fibers. This information is necessary to improve the manufacturing process and optical qualities of the fibers. Five fibers doped with Yb3+ were studied using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), in addition to Yb3+ mapping. The Yb3+ distribution in each fiber core was mapped with 2D and 1D intensity scans, which measured X-ray fluorescence over the scan areas. Two of the five fibers examined showed highly irregular Yb3+ distributions in the core center. In four of the five fibers Yb3+ was detected outside of the given fiber core dimensions, suggesting possible Yb3+ diffusion from the core, manufacturing error, or both. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis has so far proven inconclusive, but did show that the fibers had differing EXAFS spectra. The Yb3+ distribution mapping proved highly useful, but additional modeling and examination of fiber preforms must be conducted to improve XAS analysis, which has been shown to have great potential for the study of similar optical fi bers.

  20. Novel technique for high-precision Bragg-angle determination in crystal x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, J.; Bruhns, H.; Trinczek, M.; Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Ullrich, J.

    2005-07-15

    A novel technique for a high-precision large acceptance determination of the Bragg angle in crystal x-ray spectroscopy is presented and demonstrated. The method exploits visible light beams as fiducials reflected on the x-ray crystal's surface to ensure exact knowledge of the position on the crystal at which the x rays are reflected, replacing entrance slits, thus making flat crystals suitable for low x-ray fluxes. It can be shown that many error sources arising from uncertainties in the determination of geometrical properties are eliminated in this way. A flat crystal x-ray spectrometer based on this technique has been designed, built, and tested using the most precisely known wavelengths emitted by highly charged ions, namely H- and He-like argon. The result for the 1s2p {sup 1}P{sub 1}{yields}1s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} w-line of He-like argon exhibits a statistical uncertainty of 3.8 ppm and an estimated systematic error of about 3 ppm, thus becoming the most accurate measurement of the He-like resonance transition in highly charged ions. It is shown that achieving a systematic error of below 1 ppm is feasible with this method. Therefore, our technique should allow reaching total accuracies approaching 1 ppm on transitions of mid-Z highly charged ions, which would provide challenging tests for state-of-the-art theoretical predictions.

  1. Speciation of metal(loid)s in environmental samples by X-ray absorption spectroscopy: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Gräfe, Markus; Donner, Erica; Collins, Richard N; Lombi, Enzo

    2014-04-25

    Element specificity is one of the key factors underlying the widespread use and acceptance of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) as a research tool in the environmental and geo-sciences. Independent of physical state (solid, liquid, gas), XAS analyses of metal(loid)s in complex environmental matrices over the past two decades have provided important information about speciation at environmentally relevant interfaces (e.g. solid-liquid) as well as in different media: plant tissues, rhizosphere, soils, sediments, ores, mineral process tailings, etc. Limited sample preparation requirements, the concomitant ability to preserve original physical and chemical states, and independence from crystallinity add to the advantages of using XAS in environmental investigations. Interpretations of XAS data are founded on sound physical and statistical models that can be applied to spectra of reference materials and mixed phases, respectively. For spectra collected directly from environmental matrices, abstract factor analysis and linear combination fitting provide the means to ascertain chemical, bonding, and crystalline states, and to extract quantitative information about their distribution within the data set. Through advances in optics, detectors, and data processing, X-ray fluorescence microprobes capable of focusing X-rays to micro- and nano-meter size have become competitive research venues for resolving the complexity of environmental samples at their inherent scale. The application of μ-XANES imaging, a new combinatorial approach of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and XANES spectroscopy at the micron scale, is one of the latest technological advances allowing for lateral resolution of chemical states over wide areas due to vastly improved data processing and detector technology. PMID:24725743

  2. Spatially resolved X-ray line spectroscopy of Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelg, Eric V.; Hwang, Una

    1996-01-01

    Narrow band X-ray images of Tycho's supernova remnant, acquired with the solid-state spectrometer onboard the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), are presented. The remnant is mapped in several prominent emission lines and in the 1.4 keV to 1.7 keV and 4 keV to 6 keV continua. A spatial resolution of approximately 0.5 min was obtained. No significant correlation was found for Tycho between the X-ray 4 keV to 6 keV continuum and the radio morphology.

  3. SURFACE SEGREGATION STUDIES OF SOFC CATHODES: COMBINING SOFT X-RAYS AND ELECTROCHEMICAL IMPEDENCE SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Miara, Lincoln J.; Piper, L.F.J.; Davis, Jacob N.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Basu, Soumendra; Smith, K. E.; Pal, Uday B.; Gopalan, Srikanth

    2010-12-01

    A system to grow heteroepitaxial thin-films of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes on single crystal substrates was developed. The cathode composition investigated was 20% strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (LSM) grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on single crystal (111) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates. By combining electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy XAS measurements, we conclude that electrically driven cation migration away from the two-phase gas-cathode interface results in improved electrochemical performance. Our results provide support to the premise that the removal of surface passivating phases containing Sr2+ and Mn2+, which readily form at elevated temperatures even in O2 atmospheric pressures, is responsible for the improved cathodic performance upon application of a bias.

  4. Soft x-ray spectroscopy studies of novel electronic materials using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, David, Jr.

    Soft x-ray spectroscopy can provide a wealth of information on the electronic structure of solids. In this work, a suite of soft x-ray spectroscopies is applied to organic and inorganic materials with potential applications in electronic and energy generation devices. Using the techniques of x-ray absorption (XAS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), the fundamental properties of these different materials are explored. Cycloparaphenylenes (CPPs) are a recently synthesized family of cyclic hydrocarbons with very interesting properties and many potential applications. Unusual UV/Visible fluorescence trends have spurred a number of theoretical investigations into the electronic properties of the CPP family, but thus far no comprehensive electronic structure measurements have been conducted. XPS, XAS, and XES data for two varieties, [8]- and [10]-CPP, are presented here, and compared with the results of relevant DFT calculations. Turning towards more application-centered investigations, similar measurements are applied to two materials commonly used in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes: La1-xSrxMnO 3 (LSMO) and La1-xSr1- xCo1-yFe yO3 (LSCF). Both materials are structurally perovskites, but they exhibit strikingly different electronic properties. SOFC systems very efficiently produce electricity by catalyzing reactions between oxygen and petroleum-based hydrocarbons at high temperatures (> 800 C). Such systems are already utilized to great effect in many industries, but more widespread adoption could be had if the cells could operate at lower temperatures. Understanding the electronic structure and operational evolution of the cathode materials is essential for the development of better low-temperature fuel cells. LSCF is a mixed ion-electron conductor which holds promise for low-temperature SOFC applications. XPS spectra of LSCF thin films are collected as the films are heated and gas-dosed in a controlled environment. The

  5. Chandra X-ray Observatory high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy of stars: Modeling and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenemoerder, David P.

    2004-05-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory grating spectrometers allow study of stellar spectra at resolutions on the order of 1000. Prior x-ray observatories' low resolution data have shown that nearly all classes of stars emit x rays. Chandra reveals details of line and continuum contributions to the spectra which can be interpreted through application of plasma models based on atomic databases. For cool stars with hot coronas interpreted in the solar paradigm, assumption of collisional ionization equilibrium allows derivation of temperature distributions and elemental abundances. Densities can be derived from He-like ion's metastable transition lines. Abundance trends are unlike the Sun, as are the very hot temperature distributions. For young stars, there is evidence of accretion driven x-ray emission, rather than magnetically confined plasma emission. For some hot stars, the expected emission mechanism of shocked winds has been challenged; there is now evidence for magnetically confined thermal plasmas. The helium-like line emission in hot stars is susceptible to photoexcitation, which can also be exploited to derive wind structure.

  6. The Astro-H Mission and High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Mitsuda, K.; Awaki, H.; Fujimoto, R.; den Herder, J. W.; Ishida, M.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Kunieda, H.; Maeda, Y.; McCammon, D.; Ohashi, T.; Okajima, T.; Porter, F.; Serlemitsos, P.; Soong, Y.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Takahashi, T.; Takei, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Tawara, Y.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Astro-H Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science (JAXA/ISAS) is developing a major new high-energy astrophysics observatory. Astro-H will provide broadband, high-resolution spectroscopy and imaging over the 0.3-600 keV band using four co-aligned instruments operated simultaneously. The mission will have major US participation supported by NASA as well as contributions from Europe and Canada. For high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy, the soft x-ray spectrometer (SXS) will feature an x-ray calorimeter spectrometer and x-ray mirror. The instrument will cover the energy range 0.3-12 keV and is expected to have an energy resolution better than 5 eV (FWHM) with a collecting area of over 200 cm2 at 6 keV. The cooling system will have both cryogenic and mechanical coolers for up to five years of operation. The SXS is a joint collaboration between NASA/GSFC, ISAS/JAXA and SRON, and the NASA participation was selected as an Explorers Mission of Opportunity in June 2008. As part of this investigation, a fully supported US guest observer program was also proposed and is under review by NASA. Other instruments on Astro-H include a soft x-ray imager (SXI) consisting of a large area CCD camera with 35 arcmin field-of-view and a hard x-ray imager (HXI) that uses focusing x-ray optics combined with both double-sided silicon strip detectors and CdTe array. The 12-m focal length optical system will provide an effective area of 300 cm2 at 30 keV, and high sensitivity from 10-80 keV using multilayer x-ray mirrors with 2-4 arcmin imaging. The soft gamma detector (SGD) is a non-focusing instrument based on a new, narrow-field-of-view Compton telescope with an energy range of 10-600 keV and sensitivity at 300 keV that is more than 10 times higher than Suzaku. Astro-H is planned for launch in 2014 aboard a JAXA HII-A rocket.

  7. X-ray beam size measurements on the Advanced Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Struve, K.W.; Chambers, F.W.; Lauer, E.J.; Slaughter, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    The electron beam size has been determined on the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) by intercepting the beam with a target and measuring the resulting x-ray intensity as a function of time as the target is moved through the beam. Several types of targets have been used. One is a tantalum rod which extends completely across the drift chamber. Another is a tungsten powder filled carbon crucible. Both of these probes are moved from shot to shot so that the x-ray signal intensity varies with probe position. A third is a larger tantalum disk which is inserted on beam axis to allow determining beam size on a one shot basis. The x-ray signals are detected with an MCP photomultiplier tube located at 90/sup 0/ to the beamline. It is sufficiently shielded to reject background x-rays and neutrons. The signals were digitized, recorded and later unfolded to produce plots of x-ray intensity versus probe position for several times during the pulse. The presumption that the x-ray intensity is proportional to beam current density is checked computationally. Details of the probe construction and PMT shielding, as well as sample measurements are given.

  8. Recent Advances in Computational Studies of Charge Exchange X-ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbee, Renata

    2016-06-01

    Interest in astrophysical sources of charge exchange (CX) has grown since X-ray emission from comet Hyakutake was first observed, the origin of which is primarily due to CX processes between neutral species in the comet’s atmosphere and highly charged ions from the solar wind. More recent observations have shown that CX may have a significant contribution to the X-ray emission spectra of a wide variety of environments within our solar system including solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with neutral gases in the heliosphere and in planetary atmospheres, as well as beyond the solar system in galaxy clusters, supernova remnants, and star forming galaxies.While the basic process of CX has been studied for many decades, the reliability of the existing data is not uniform, and the coverage of the astrophysically important projectile and target combinations and collisional velocities is insufficient. The need for reliable and robust CX X-ray emission models will only be amplified with the with the high resolution X-ray spectra expected from the soft X-ray imaging calorimeter spectrometer (SXS) onboard the Hitomi X-ray observatory. In this talk, I will discuss recent advances in theoretical CX cross sections and X-ray modeling with a focus on CX diagnostics. The need for experimental X-ray spectra and cross sections for benchmarking current theory will also be highlighted. This work was performed in collaboration with David Lyons, Patrick Mullen, David Schultz, Phillip Stancil, and Robin Shelton. Work at UGA was partially supported by NASA grant NNX09AC46G.

  9. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  10. X-ray photo-emission and energy dispersive spectroscopy of HA coated titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.; Steinberg, A.D.; Krauss, A.R.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition changes of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium using surface analysis (x-ray photo-emission) and bulk analysis (energy dispersive spectroscopy). The specimens examined were controls, 30 minutes and 3 hours aged specimens in distilled water or 0.2M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at room temperature. Each x-ray photo-emission cycle consisted of 3 scans followed by argon sputtering for 10 minutes for a total of usually 20 cycles, corresponding to a sampling depth of {approximately} 1500 {angstrom}. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was on a 110 by 90 {mu}m area for 500 sec. Scanning electron microscopy examination showed crystal formation (3P{sub 2}O{sub 5}*2CAO*?H{sub 2}O by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis) on the HA coating for the specimens aged in sodium phosphate buffer. The x-ray photo-emission results indicated the oxidation effect of water on the titanium (as TiO{sub 2}) and the effect of the buffer to increase the surface concentration of phosphorous. No differences in the chemical composition were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The crystal growth was only observed for the sodium phosphate buffer specimens and only on the HA surface.

  11. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hamad, K.S.

    2000-05-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  12. Structure of the Mn complex in photosystem II: Insights from x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2002-04-02

    We have used Mn K-edge absorption and Kb emission spectroscopies to determine the oxidation states of the Mn complex in the various S-states. We have started exploring the new technique of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy (RIXS); this technique can be characterized as a Raman process that uses K-edge energies (1s to 4p, {approx}6550 eV) to obtain L-edge-like spectra (2p to 3d, {approx}650 eV). The relevance of these data to the oxidation states and structure of the Mn complex is presented. We have obtained EXAFS data from the S0 and S3 states and observed heterogeneity in the Mn-Mn distances, leading us to conclude that there may be three rather than two di-(mu)-oxo bridged units present per tetranuclear Mn cluster. In addition, we have obtained data using Ca/Sr X-ray spectroscopy that provide evidence for a heteronuclear Mn/Ca cluster. The possibility of three di-(mu)-oxo-bridged Mn Mn moieties and the proximity of Ca is incorporated into developing structural models for the Mn cluster. The involvement of bridging and terminal O ligands of Mn in the mechanism of oxygen evolution is discussed in the context of our X-ray spectroscopy results.

  13. Multilayer graphene stacks grown by different methods-thickness measurements by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and optical transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarczyk, M. Kowalski, G.; Kępa, H.; Grodecki, K.; Drabińska, A.; Strupiński, W.

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Optical absorption estimates of the thickness of graphene multi layer stacks (number of graphene layers) are presented for three different growth techniques. The objective of this work was focused on comparison and reconciliation of the two already widely used methods for thickness estimates (Raman and Absorption) with the calibration of the X-ray method as far as Scherer constant K is concerned and X-ray based Wagner-Aqua extrapolation method.

  14. Nondestructive Evaluation of Advanced Materials with X-ray Phase Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Zhengwei

    2005-01-01

    X-ray radiation has been widely used for imaging applications since Rontgen first discovered X-rays over a century ago. Its large penetration depth makes it ideal for the nondestructive visualization of the internal structure and/or defects of materials unobtainable otherwise. Currently used nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tools, X-ray radiography and tomography, are absorption-based, and work well in heavy-element materials where density or composition variations due to internal structure or defects are high enough to produce appreciable absorption contrast. However, in many cases where materials are light-weight and/or composites that have similar mass absorption coefficients, the conventional absorption-based X-ray methods for NDE become less useful. Indeed, the light-weight and ultra-high-strength requirements for the most advanced materials used or developed for current flight mission and future space exploration pose a great challenge to the standard NDE tools in that the absorption contrast arising from the internal structure of these materials is often too weak to be resolved. In this presentation, a solution to the problem, the use of phase information of X-rays for phase contrast X-ray imaging, will be discussed, along with a comparison between the absorption-based and phase-contrast imaging methods. Latest results on phase contrast X-ray imaging of lightweight Space Shuttle foam in 2D and 3D will be presented, demonstrating new opportunities to solve the challenging issues encountered in advanced materials development and processing.

  15. Technology Development for the Constellation-X Spectroscopy X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, Robert; Lehan, John; O'Dell, Stephen; Owens, Scott; Reid, Paul B.; Saha, Timo; Stewart, Jeff; Jones, William D.; Zhang, William

    2005-01-01

    The Constellation-X Spectroscopy X-ray Telescope (SXT) is a large diameter, high throughput, grazing incidence imaging mirror system, designed to perform high sensitivity spectroscopy of cosmic X-ray sources in the 0.2-10.0 keV band. The baseline effective area requirement is -3 m# at 1 keV. The system-level angular-resolution requirement is a 15-arcseconds half-power diameter, with a 5-arcsecond goal. The effective area is attained through a modular design, involving the nesting of many confocal, thin-walled Wolter I mirror segments. Considerable progress has been made in developing thin, thermally formed, glass mirror substrates that meet or better the angular-resolution requirement. Several approaches to mounting and aligning reflector segments into a mirror system are under investigation. We report here on the progress of the SXT technology development program toward reaching the performance goals.

  16. X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the basis of hybrid X-pinch radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tilikin, I. N. Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-07-15

    Results of experiments on X-ray absorption spectroscopy carried out at the BIN (270 kA, 100 ns) and XP (450 kA, 45 ns) facilities are presented. Continuum radiation of a Mo hybrid X-pinch was used as probing radiation, against which absorption lines of the plasma of exploded Al wires placed in the return current circuit of a hybrid X-pinch, as well as in a two- and four-wire array, were observed. The experiments have demonstrated that the radiation of a hybrid X-pinch hot spot can be used as probing radiation for X-ray absorption spectroscopy and that, in many parameters, such a source surpasses those on the basis of laser-produced plasma. The plasma parameters in arrays made of two and four Al wires were studied experimentally.

  17. Structural and electronic characterization of self-assembled molecular nanoarchitectures by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gulino, Antonino

    2013-02-01

    Molecular monolayers and similar nanoarchitectures are indicative of the promising future of nanotechnology. Therefore, many scientists recently devoted their efforts to the synthesis, characterization, and properties of mono- and multilayer-based systems. In this context, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is an important technique for the in-depth chemical and structural characterization of nanoscopic systems. In fact, it is a surface technique suitable for probing thicknesses of the same order of the photoelectron inelastic mean free paths (a few tens of ångströms) and allows one to immediately obtain qualitative and quantitative data, film thickness, surface coverage, molecule footprint, oxidation states, and presence of functional groups. Nevertheless, other techniques are important in obtaining a complete spectroscopic characterization of the investigated systems. Therefore, in the present review we report on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of self-assembled molecular mono- and multilayer materials including some examples on which other characterization techniques produced important results. PMID:23014858

  18. X-Ray spectroscopy of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Kenneth; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2008-01-01

    Water oxidation to dioxygen in photosynthesis is catalyzed by a Mn4Ca cluster with O bridging in Photosystem II (PS II) of plants, algae and cyanobacteria. A variety of spectroscopic methods have been applied to analyzing the participation of the complex. X-ray spectroscopy is particularly useful because it is element-specific, and because it can reveal important structural features of the complex with high accuracy and identify the participation of Mn in the redox chemistry. Following a brief history of the application of X-ray spectroscopy to PS II, an overview of newer results will be presented and a description of the present state of our knowledge based on this approach. PMID:19190720

  19. X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Photosynthetic Oxygen-Evolving Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, K.; Yano, J.; Yachandra, V.K.

    2009-05-27

    Water oxidation to dioxygen in photosynthesis is catalyzed by a Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster with O bridging in Photosystem II (PS II) of plants, algae and cyanobacteria. A variety of spectroscopic methods have been applied to analyzing the participation of the complex. X-ray spectroscopy is particularly useful because it is element-specific, and because it can reveal important structural features of the complex with high accuracy and identify the participation of Mn in the redox chemistry. Following a brief history of the application of X-ray spectroscopy to PS II, an overview of newer results will be presented and a description of the present state of our knowledge based on this approach.

  20. Total reflection X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a semiconductor lubricant elemental analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehabi, Abbas; Sasaki, Nobuharu; Kawai, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Photoelectron spectra from a typical hard disk storage media device (HDD) were measured at total reflection and non-total reflection at unburnished, acetone-cleaned, and argon-sputtered conditions. F, O, N, and C usually making the upper layer of a typical hard disk medium were detected. Enhancement of the photoelectron emission of the fluorocarbon lubricant was observed at total reflection. Pt and Co were only found by non-total X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) because they are constituents of a deeper region than the top and interface regions. Argon-sputtered, ultrasonic acetone-cleaned, and unburnished top layers were compared at total and non-total reflection conditions. Total reflection X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (TRXPS) is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for storage media lubrication layer chemical state analysis, reliable for industrial quality control application , and reproducible.

  1. X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the basis of hybrid X-pinch radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilikin, I. N.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    Results of experiments on X-ray absorption spectroscopy carried out at the BIN (270 kA, 100 ns) and XP (450 kA, 45 ns) facilities are presented. Continuum radiation of a Mo hybrid X-pinch was used as probing radiation, against which absorption lines of the plasma of exploded Al wires placed in the return current circuit of a hybrid X-pinch, as well as in a two- and four-wire array, were observed. The experiments have demonstrated that the radiation of a hybrid X-pinch hot spot can be used as probing radiation for X-ray absorption spectroscopy and that, in many parameters, such a source surpasses those on the basis of laser-produced plasma. The plasma parameters in arrays made of two and four Al wires were studied experimentally.

  2. Electrochemical flowcell for in-situ investigations by soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwanke, C.; Lange, K. M.; Golnak, R.; Xiao, J.

    2014-10-15

    A new liquid flow-cell designed for electronic structure investigations at the liquid-solid interface by soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented. A thin membrane serves simultaneously as a substrate for the working electrode and solid state samples as well as for separating the liquid from the surrounding vacuum conditions. In combination with counter and reference electrodes this approach allows in-situ studies of electrochemical deposition processes and catalytic reactions at the liquid-solid interface in combination with potentiostatic measurements. As model system in-situ monitoring of the deposition process of Co metal from a 10 mM CoCl{sub 2} aqueous solution by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented.

  3. X-ray spectroscopy of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, Ken; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K

    2007-04-05

    Water oxidation to dioxygen in photosynthesis is catalyzed by a Mn4Ca cluster with O bridging in Photosystem II (PS II) of plants, algae and cyanobacteria. A variety of spectroscopic methods have been applied to analyzing the participation of the complex. X-ray spectroscopy is particularly useful because it is element-specific, and because it can reveal important structural features of the complex with high accuracy and identify the participation of Mn in the redox chemistry. Following a brief history of the application of X-ray spectroscopy to PS II, an overview of newer results will be presented and a description of the present state of our knowledge based on this approach.

  4. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  5. X-ray and. gamma. -ray spectroscopy of solids under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ingalls, R.L.

    1990-04-20

    This report briefly describes our studies of various materials at high pressures by means of x-ray and {gamma}-ray absorption spectroscopy. High pressure provides a very effective means of studying materials. Virtually every property is altered from the color and crystal structure to the electrical and magnetic properties. The fundamental reason, of course, is that the quantum levels depend upon the atomic spacing so that both the electronic and vibrational structure is affected.

  6. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of γ-ray-irradiated single-stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eunmo; Hong, W.; Han, J. H.; Choi, D. M.; Lee, Cheol Eui; Kim, H. D.; Kim, J.

    2015-07-01

    The effects of γ-ray irradiation on herring sperm single-stranded DNA have been studied by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in the view of the bonding configurations and the structural modifications. The significant changes in the hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous bonding energies, as revealed by the XPS analysis, indicate that electron transfers result in the creation of radicals and in DNA strand breaks.

  7. Coherent X-ray and laser spectroscopy measurements of diffusion in concentrated alpha-crystallin solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunaratne, V. N. C.

    The mammalian eye lens is composed of a concentrated solution of water soluble proteins called crystallins. Alpha-crystallin, the most abundant protein found in the lens, plays a crucial role in maintaining lens transparency and lens accommodation. However, alpha-crystallins along with other ocular proteins suffer from irreversible processes such as oxidation. One cause of oxidation is radiation-induced radical formation which alters the inter-molecular interactions, thereby degrading the normal function of ocular proteins. The main goal of this thesis is to quantify molecular scale dynamics of concentrated solutions of alpha-crystallins using coherent X-rays and visible laser light. I believe a detailed analysis of the dynamics pertaining to alpha-crystallin will provide the foundation to understand molecular scale mechanisms that lead to conditions like cataract and presbyopia. I explore the dynamics of concentrated alpha-crystallin solutions by measuring diffusive motion over a range of length scales using Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). To a certain extent, the dynamical properties of crystallins obtained in this manner are consistent with established theories in colloidal physics. However, there are some deviations, which I will address in this thesis. In terms of X-ray data, I employed a new, efficient photon correlation technique to obtain the best possible signal, furthermore this technique is embedded in a stand-alone software program that has the ability to provide real time results, quickly and efficiently with the help of high performance computing resources available at Northern Illinois University (NIU). The technique has potential to be used by the coherent X-ray spectroscopy community in the future. In addition, by using X-ray scattering data, I probe potential modifications and or damage effects on alpha-crystallins due to radiation exposure. The damage analysis methodology described in this thesis

  8. Neutron and X-Ray Studies of Advanced Materials V: CENTENNIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Spanos, George

    2012-05-01

    In 2012 the diffraction community will celebrate 100 years since the prediction of X-ray diffraction by M. Laue, and following his suggestion the first beautiful diffraction experiment by W. Friedrich and P. Knipping. The significance of techniques based on the analysis of the diffraction of X-rays, neutrons, electrons and Mossbauer photons discovered later, has continued to increase in the past 100 years. The aim of this symposium is to provide a forum for discussion of using state-of-the-art neutron and X-ray scattering techniques for probing advanced materials. These techniques have been widely used to characterize materials structures across all length scales, from atomic to nano, meso, and macroscopic scales. With the development of sample environments, in-situ experiments, e.g., at temperatures and applied mechanical load, are becoming routine. The development of ultra-brilliant third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources, together with advances in X-ray optics, has created intense X-ray microbeams, which provide the best opportunities for in-depth understanding of mechanical behavior in a broad spectrum of materials. Important applications include ultra-sensitive elemental detection by X-ray fluorescence/absorption and microdiffraction to identify phase and strain with submicrometer spatial resolution. X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly exciting application compared with alternative probes of crystalline structure, orientation and strain. X-ray microdiffraction is non-destructive with good strain resolution, competitive or superior spatial resolution in thick samples, and with the ability to probe below the sample surface. Advances in neutron sources and instrumentation also bring new opportunities in neutron scattering research. In addition to characterizing the structures, neutrons are also a great tool for elucidating the dynamics of materials. Because neutrons are highly penetrating, neutrons have been used to map stress in engineering systems

  9. Undistorted X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Using s-Core-Orbital Emissions.

    PubMed

    Golnak, Ronny; Xiao, Jie; Atak, Kaan; Unger, Isaak; Seidel, Robert; Winter, Bernd; Aziz, Emad F

    2016-05-12

    Detection of secondary emissions, fluorescence yield (FY), or electron yield (EY), originating from the relaxation processes upon X-ray resonant absorption has been widely adopted for X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements when the primary absorption process cannot be probed directly in transmission mode. Various spectral distortion effects inherent in the relaxation processes and in the subsequent transportation of emitted particles (electron or photon) through the sample, however, undermine the proportionality of the emission signals to the X-ray absorption coefficient. In the present study, multiple radiative (FY) and nonradiative (EY) decay channels have been experimentally investigated on a model system, FeCl3 aqueous solution, at the excitation energy of the Fe L-edge. The systematic comparisons between the experimental spectra taken from various decay channels, as well as the comparison with the theoretically simulated Fe L-edge XA spectrum that involves only the absorption process, indicate that the detection of the Fe 3s → 2p partial fluorescence yield (PFY) gives rise to the true Fe L-edge XA spectrum. The two key characteristics generalized from this particular decay channel-zero orbital angular momentum (i.e., s orbital) and core-level emission-set a guideline for obtaining undistorted X-ray absorption spectra in the future. PMID:27101344

  10. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy of SN 1987 A: monitoring with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, R.; Haberl, F.; Aschenbach, B.; Hasinger, G.

    2010-06-01

    Context. The ongoing propagation of the supernova blast wave of SN 1987 A through its inner circumstellar ring has caused a drastic increase in X-ray luminosity in the past few years, which has allowed detailed high resolution X-ray spectroscopy to be performed with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer. Aims: We report the results of our XMM-Newton monitoring of SN 1987 A, which may be used to follow the detailed evolution of the arising supernova remnant. Methods: The fluxes and broadening of the numerous emission lines measured in the dispersed spectra provide information about the evolution of the X-ray emitting plasma and its dynamics. These were analyzed in combination with the EPIC-pn spectra, which allow a precise determination of the higher temperature plasma. We modeled individual emission lines and fitted plasma emission models. Results: For observations between 2003 and 2007 in particular, we detect significant evolution in the plasma parameters and a deceleration of the radial velocity in the lower temperature plasma regions. We detected (at 3σ-level) an iron K feature in the coadded EPIC-pn spectra. Conclusions: By comparing with Chandra grating observations in 2004, we observe a clear temporal coherence of the spectral evolution and the sudden deceleration of the expansion velocity detectable in X-ray images ~6100 days after the explosion.

  11. Origin-independent calculation of quadrupole intensities in X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bernadotte, Stephan; Atkins, Andrew J.; Jacob, Christoph R.

    2012-11-28

    For electronic excitations in the ultraviolet and visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum, the intensities are usually calculated within the dipole approximation, which assumes that the oscillating electric field is constant over the length scale of the transition. For the short wavelengths used in hard X-ray spectroscopy, the dipole approximation may not be adequate. In particular, for metal K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), it becomes necessary to include higher-order contributions. In quantum-chemical approaches to X-ray spectroscopy, these so-called quadrupole intensities have so far been calculated by including contributions depending on the square of the electric-quadrupole and magnetic-dipole transition moments. However, the resulting quadrupole intensities depend on the choice of the origin of the coordinate system. Here, we show that for obtaining an origin-independent theory, one has to include all contributions that are of the same order in the wave vector consistently. This leads to two additional contributions depending on products of the electric-dipole and electric-octupole and of the electric-dipole and magnetic-quadrupole transition moments, respectively. We have implemented such an origin-independent calculation of quadrupole intensities in XAS within time-dependent density-functional theory, and demonstrate its usefulness for the calculation of metal and ligand K-edge XAS spectra of transition metal complexes.

  12. Comparing Compositions of Modern Cast Bronze Sculptures: Optical Emission Spectroscopy Versus x-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. L.; Dunand, D. C.

    2015-07-01

    Bulk elemental compositions of 74 modern cast bronze sculptures from the collection at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Rodin Museum (Philadelphia, PA) were determined using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and a handheld x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer. The elemental compositions of the cast sculptures as measured previously by ICP-OES and presently by XRF are compared: A good match is found between the two methods for the base metal (Cu) and the two majority alloying elements (Zn and Sn). For both ICP-OES and XRF data, when the Zn composition is plotted versus the Sn composition, three discernable clusters are found that are related to the artist, foundry, casting date, and casting method; they consist of (A) high-zinc brass, (B) low-zinc, low-tin brass, and (C) low-zinc, tin bronze. Thus, our study confirms that the relatively fast, nondestructive XRF spectrometry can be used effectively over slower and invasive, but more accurate, ICP-OES to help determine a sculpture's artist, foundry, date of creation, date of casting, and casting method.

  13. Microelemental and mineral compositions of pathogenic biomineral concrements: SRXFA, X-ray powder diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, T. N.; Palchik, N. A.; Dar'in, A. V.

    2009-05-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis using synchrotron radiation (SRXRF), X-ray powder diffraction, infrared and Raman spectroscopy had been applied for determination of microelemental and mineral composition of the kidney stones, gallstones and salivalities from natives of Novosibirsk and Novosibirsk region, Russia. The relationship between mineral, organic and microelemental composition of pathogenic calcilus was shown.

  14. X-ray micro-Tomography at the Advanced Light Source

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The X-ray micro-Tomography Facility at the Advanced Light Source has been in operation since 2004. The source is a superconducting bend magnet of critical energy 10.5KeV; photon energy coverage is 8-45 KeV in monochromatic mode, and a filtered white light option yields useful photons up to 50 KeV. A...

  15. Soft X-ray synchrotron radiation investigations of actinidematerials systems utilizing X-ray emission spectroscopy and resonantinelastic X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Shuh, D.K.; Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.-H.; Nordgren, J.

    2004-01-03

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) methods have been utilized with increasing frequency over the past several years to study topics in actinide science, ranging from those of a fundamental nature to those that address a specifically-targeted technical need. In particular, the emergence of microspectroscopic and fluorescence-based techniques have permitted investigations of actinide materials at sources of soft x-ray SR. Spectroscopic techniques with fluorescence-based detection are useful for actinide investigations since they are sensitive to small amounts of material and the information sampling depth may be varied. These characteristics also serve to simplify both sample preparation and safety considerations. Examples of investigations using these fluorescence techniques will be described along with their results, as well as the prospects for future investigations utilizing these methodologies.

  16. A X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study of Manganese Containing Compounds and Photosynthetic Spinach Chloroplasts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Jon Allan

    The manganese sites in chloroplasts, long thought to be involved in photosynthetic oxygen evolution have been examined and partially characterized by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) using synchrotron radiation. The local environment about the manganese atoms is estimated from an analysis of the extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). Comparisons with and simulations of the manganese EXAFS for several reference compounds leads to a model in which the chloroplast manganese atoms are contained in a binuclear complex similar to di-u-oxo -tetrakis-(2,2'-bipyridine) dimanganese. It is suggested that the partner metal is another manganese. The bridging ligands are most probably oxygen. The remaining manganese ligands are carbon, oxygen, or nitrogen. A roughly linear correlation between the X-ray K edge onset energy and the "coordination charge" of a large number of manganese coordination complexes and compounds has been developed. Entry of the chloroplast manganese edge energy onto this correlation diagram establishes that the active pool of manganese is in an oxidation state greater than +2. If the manganese is in a dimeric form the oxidation states are most probably (II,III). Underlying these results is an extensive data analysis methodology. The method developed involves the use of many different background removal techniques, Fourier transforms and ultimately curve fitting to the modulations in the x-ray absorption cross sections. A large number of model compounds were used to evaluate the analysis method. These analyses are used to show that the two major curve fitting models available are essentially equivalent. Due to its greater versatility, the theoretical model of Teo and Lee is preferred (J. Am. Chem. Soc. (1979), 101, 2815). The results are also used to determine the informational limitations of XAS within the limits of the present understanding of X-ray absorption phenomena by inner shell electrons for atoms with atomic number greater than that

  17. Intensity-Modulated Advanced X-ray Source (IMAXS) for Homeland Security Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Johnson, William A.; Owen, Roger D.; Schonberg, Russell G.

    2009-03-01

    X-ray cargo inspection systems for the detection and verification of threats and contraband require high x-ray energy and high x-ray intensity to penetrate dense cargo. On the other hand, low intensity is desirable to minimize the radiation footprint. A collaboration between HESCO/PTSE Inc., Schonberg Research Corporation and Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc. has been formed in order to design and build an Intensity-Modulated Advanced X-ray Source (IMAXS). Such a source would allow cargo inspection systems to achieve up to two inches greater imaging penetration capability, while retaining the same average radiation footprint as present fixed-intensity sources. Alternatively, the same penetration capability can be obtained as with conventional sources with a reduction of the average radiation footprint by about a factor of three. The key idea is to change the intensity of the source for each x-ray pulse based on the signal strengths in the inspection system detector array during the previous pulse. In this paper we describe methods to accomplish pulse-to-pulse intensity modulation in both S-band (2998 MHz) and X-band (9303 MHz) linac sources, with diode or triode (gridded) electron guns. The feasibility of these methods has been demonstrated. Additionally, we describe a study of a shielding design that would allow a 6 MV X-band source to be used in mobile applications.

  18. X-ray phase-contrast imaging of the breast—advances towards clinical implementation

    PubMed Central

    Herzen, J; Willner, M; Grandl, S; Scherer, K; Bamberg, F; Reiser, M F; Pfeiffer, F; Hellerhoff, K

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer constitutes about one-quarter of all cancers and is the leading cause of cancer death in women. To reduce breast cancer mortality, mammographic screening programmes have been implemented in many Western countries. However, these programmes remain controversial because of the associated radiation exposure and the need for improvement in terms of diagnostic accuracy. Phase-contrast imaging is a new X-ray-based technology that has been shown to provide enhanced soft-tissue contrast and improved visualization of cancerous structures. Furthermore, there is some indication that these improvements of image quality can be maintained at reduced radiation doses. Thus, X-ray phase-contrast mammography may significantly contribute to advancements in early breast cancer diagnosis. Feasibility studies of X-ray phase-contrast breast CT have provided images that allow resolution of the fine structure of tissue that can otherwise only be obtained by histology. This implies that X-ray phase-contrast imaging may also lead to the development of entirely new (micro-) radiological applications. This review provides a brief overview of the physical characteristics of this new technology and describes recent developments towards clinical implementation of X-ray phase-contrast imaging of the breast. PMID:24452106

  19. X-ray Microscopy Studies of Electromigration in Advanced Copper Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, G.; Rudolph, S.; Heim, S.; Rehbein, S.; Guttmann, P.

    2006-02-07

    X-rays have the advantage that they penetrate samples which are several micrometers thick without significant sample damage, and that they provide a chemical image contrast between different dielectric layers of the Cu/low-k on-chip interconnect stack. Therefore, x-ray microscopy is an ideal tool for quantitative 3-D investigations of void dynamics with high spatial resolution of 20 nm. Using the BESSY full-field transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), we performed electromigration studies of advanced backend-of-line (BEoL) stacks of high-performance microprocessors containing copper interconnects and low-k materials. We observed void movement along the top copper/dielectric (SiNx) interface which is found to be the main pathway for electromigration-induced atomic copper transport.

  20. X-ray Microscopy Studies of Electromigration in Advanced Copper Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, G.; Guttmann, P.; Rudolph, S.; Heim, S.; Rehbein, S.; Meyer, M. A.; Zschech, E.

    2006-02-01

    X-rays have the advantage that they penetrate samples which are several micrometers thick without significant sample damage, and that they provide a chemical image contrast between different dielectric layers of the Cu/low-k on-chip interconnect stack. Therefore, x-ray microscopy is an ideal tool for quantitative 3-D investigations of void dynamics with high spatial resolution of 20 nm. Using the BESSY full-field transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), we performed electromigration studies of advanced backend-of-line (BEoL) stacks of high-performance microprocessors containing copper interconnects and low-k materials. We observed void movement along the top copper/dielectric (SiNx) interface which is found to be the main pathway for electromigration-induced atomic copper transport.

  1. Advances in Domain Connectivity for Overset Grids Using the X-Rays Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Kim, Noah; Pandya, Shishir A.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in automation and robustness of the X-rays approach to domain connectivity for overset grids are presented. Given the surface definition for each component that makes up a complex configuration, the determination of hole points with appropriate hole boundaries is automatically and efficiently performed. Improvements made to the original X-rays approach for identifying the minimum hole include an automated closure scheme for hole-cutters with open boundaries, automatic determination of grid points to be considered for blanking by each hole-cutter, and an adaptive X-ray map to economically handle components in close proximity. Furthermore, an automated spatially varying offset of the hole boundary from the minimum hole is achieved using a dual wall-distance function and an orphan point removal iteration process. Results using the new scheme are presented for a number of static and relative motion test cases on a variety of aerospace applications.

  2. Research relative to high resolution camera on the advanced X-ray astrophysics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The HRC (High Resolution Camera) is a photon counting instrument to be flown on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). It is a large field of view, high angular resolution, detector for the x-ray telescope. The HRC consists of a CsI coated microchannel plate (MCP) acting as a soft x-ray photocathode, followed by a second MCP for high electronic gain. The MCPs are readout by a crossed grid of resistively coupled wires to provide high spatial resolution along with timing and pulse height data. The instrument will be used in two modes, as a direct imaging detector with a limiting sensitivity of 10 to the -15 ergs sq cm sec in a 10 to the 5th second exposure, and as a readout for an objective transmission grating providing spectral resolution of several hundreds to thousands.

  3. Recent advances in the characterization of amorphous pharmaceuticals by X-ray diffractometry.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Seema; Terban, Maxwell W; Thakral, Naveen K; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2016-05-01

    For poorly water soluble drugs, the amorphous state provides an avenue to enhance oral bioavailability. The preparation method, in addition to sample history, can dictate the nature and the stability of the amorphous phase. Conventionally, X-ray powder diffractometry is of limited utility for characterization, but structural insights into amorphous and nanocrystalline materials have been enabled by coupling X-ray total scattering with the pair distribution function. This has shown great promise for fingerprinting, quantification, and even modeling of amorphous pharmaceutical systems. A consequence of the physical instability of amorphous phases is their crystallization propensity, and recent instrumental advances have substantially enhanced our ability to detect and quantify crystallization in a variety of complex matrices. The International Centre for Diffraction Data has a collection of the X-ray diffraction patterns of amorphous drugs and excipients and, based on the available supporting information, provides a quality mark of the data. PMID:26712710

  4. Flares from small to large: X-ray spectroscopy of Proxima Centauri with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, M.; Audard, M.; Reale, F.; Skinner, S. L.; Linsky, J. L.

    2004-03-01

    We report results from a comprehensive study of the nearby M dwarf Proxima Centauri with the XMM-Newton satellite, using simultaneously its X-ray detectors and the Optical Monitor with its U band filter. We find strongly variable coronal X-ray emission, with flares ranging over a factor of 100 in peak flux. The low-level emission is found to be continuously variable on at least three time scales (a slow decay of several hours, modulation on a time scale of 1 hr, and weak flares with time scales of a few minutes). Several weak flares are characteristically preceded by an optical burst, compatible with predictions from standard solar flare models. We propose that the U band bursts are proxies for the elusive stellar non-thermal hard X-ray bursts suggested from solar observations. In the course of the observation, a very large X-ray flare started and was observed essentially in its entirety. Its peak luminosity reached 3.9× 1028 erg s-1 [0.15-10 keV], and the total X-ray energy released in the same band is derived to be 1.5× 1032 ergs. This flare has for the first time allowed to measure significant density variations across several phases of the flare from X-ray spectroscopy of the O VII He-like triplet; we find peak densities reaching up to 4× 1011 cm-3 for plasma of about 1-5 MK. Abundance ratios show little variability in time, with a tendency of elements with a high first ionization potential to be overabundant relative to solar photospheric values. Using Fe XVII lines with different oscillator strengths, we do not find significant effects due to opacity during the flare, indicating that large opacity increases are not the rule even in extreme flares. We model the large flare in terms of an analytic 2-Ribbon flare model and find that the flaring loop system should have large characteristic sizes (≈ 1R*) within the framework of this simplistic model. These results are supported by full hydrodynamic simulations. Comparing the large flare to flares of similar

  5. X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of prototype chemical systems: Theory vs. experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Craig Philip

    Understanding the details of the intensities and spectral shapes of x-ray absorption spectra is a long-standing problem in chemistry and physics. Here, I present detailed studies of x-ray absorption for prototypical liquids, solids and gases with the goal of enhancing our general understanding of core-level spectroscopy via comparisons of modern theory and experiment. In Chapter 2, I investigate the importance of quantum motions in the x-ray absorption spectra of simple gases. It is found that rare fluctuations in atomic positions can be a cause of features in the spectra of gaseous molecules. In Chapter 3, I explore a novel quantization scheme for the excited and ground state potential surfaces for an isolated nitrogen molecule. This allows for the explicit calculation of the "correct" transition energies and peak widths (i.e. without any adjustable parameters). In Chapter 4, the importance of nuclear motion in molecular solids is investigated for glycine. We find that the inclusion of these motions permits the spectrum to be accurately calculated without any additional adjustable parameters. In Chapter 5, I provide a detailed study of the hydroxide ion solvated in water. There has been recent controversy as to how hydroxide is solvated, with two principal models invoked. I show that some of the computational evidence favoring one model of solvation over the other has been either previously obtained with inadequate precision or via a method that is systematically biased. In Chapter 6, the measured and computed x-ray absorption spectra of pyrrole in both the gas phase and when solvated by water are compared. We are able to accurately predict the spectra in both cases. In Chapter 7, the measured x-ray absorption of a series of highly charged cationic salts (YBr3, CrCl3, SnCl4 , LaCl3 and InCl3) solvated in water are presented and explained. In Chapter 8, the measured x-ray absorption spectrum at the nitrogen K-edge of aqueous triglycine is presented, including

  6. The MIT high resolution X-ray spectroscopy instruments on AXAF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canizares, C. R.; Dewey, D.; Galton, E. B.; Markert, T. H.; Smith, Henry I.; Schattenburg, M. L.; Woodgate, B. E.; Jordan, S.

    1992-01-01

    The general design and performance characteristics of MIT's two dispersive spectrometers, the Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) and the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETG), now being developed for the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), are described. Particular attention is given to the development of the critical technologies incorporated into these instruments, including BCS diffractors, imaging gas flow proportional counters, and grating elements for the HETG. The principal stages and the current status of the developments are reviewed.

  7. Effect of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the transformation and immobilization of arsenic in soils: New insights from X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jian-Xin; Wang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Cun; Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Ke; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L

    2014-08-30

    The geochemical behavior and speciation of arsenic (As) in paddy soils is strongly controlled by soil redox conditions and the sequestration by soil iron oxyhydroxides. Hence, the effects of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the adsorption, transformation and precipitation of As(III) and As(V) in soils were investigated using batch experiments and synchrotron based techniques to gain a deeper understanding at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. The results of batch sorption experiments revealed that the sorption capacity of As(V) on anoxic soil was much higher than that on control soil. Synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping studies indicated that As was heterogeneously distributed and was mainly associated with iron in the soil. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed that the primary speciation of As in the soil is As(V). These results further suggested that, when As(V) was introduced into the anoxic soil, the rapid coprecipitation of As(V) with ferric/ferrous ion prevented its reduction to As(III), and was the main mechanism controlling the immobilization of As. This research could improve the current understanding of soil As chemistry in paddy and wetland soils. PMID:25064258

  8. Highly multiplexible thermal kinetic inductance detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ulbricht, Gerhard Mazin, Benjamin A.; Szypryt, Paul; Walter, Alex B.; Bockstiegel, Clint; Bumble, Bruce

    2015-06-22

    For X-ray imaging spectroscopy, high spatial resolution over a large field of view is often as important as high energy resolution, but current X-ray detectors do not provide both in the same device. Thermal Kinetic Inductance Detectors (TKIDs) are being developed as they offer a feasible way to combine the energy resolution of transition edge sensors with pixel counts approaching CCDs and thus promise significant improvements for many X-ray spectroscopy applications. TKIDs are a variation of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) and share their multiplexibility: working MKID arrays with 2024 pixels have recently been demonstrated and much bigger arrays are under development. In this work, we present a TKID prototype, which is able to achieve an energy resolution of 75 eV at 5.9 keV, even though its general design still has to be optimized. We further describe TKID fabrication, characterization, multiplexing, and working principle and demonstrate the necessity of a data fitting algorithm in order to extract photon energies. With further design optimizations, we expect to be able to improve our TKID energy resolution to less than 10 eV at 5.9 keV.

  9. Surface Arsenic Speciation of a Drinking-Water Treatment Residual Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Makris, K.C.; Sarkar, D.; Parsons, J.G.; Datta, R.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.

    2009-06-03

    Drinking-water treatment residuals (WTRs) present a low-cost geosorbent for As-contaminated waters and soils. Previous work has demonstrated the high affinity of WTRs for As, but data pertaining to the stability of sorbed As is missing. Sorption/desorption and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), both XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) studies, were combined to determine the stability of As sorbed by an Fe-based WTR. Arsenic(V) and As(III) sorption kinetics were biphasic in nature, sorbing <90% of the initial added As (15,000 mg kg{sup -1}) after 48 h of reaction. Subsequent desorption experiments with a high P load (7500 mg kg{sup -1}) showed negligible As desorption for both As species, approximately <3.5% of sorbed As; the small amount of desorbed As was attributed to the abundance of sorption sites. XANES data showed that sorption kinetics for either As(III) or As(V) initially added to solution had no effect on the sorbed As oxidation state. EXAFS spectroscopy suggested that As added either as As(III) or as As(V) formed inner-sphere mononuclear, bidentate complexes, suggesting the stability of the sorbed As, which was further corroborated by the minimum As desorption from the Fe-WTR.

  10. Deconvolving instrumental and intrinsic broadening in core-shell x-ray spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Fister, T. T.; Seidler, G. T.; Rehr, J. J.; Kas, J. J.; Nagle, K. P.; Elam, W. T.; Cross, J. O.

    2007-05-01

    Intrinsic and experimental mechanisms frequently lead to broadening of spectral features in core-shell spectroscopies. For example, intrinsic broadening occurs in x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements of heavy elements where the core-hole lifetime is very short. On the other hand, nonresonant x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) and other energy loss measurements are more limited by instrumental resolution. Here, we demonstrate that the Richardson-Lucy (RL) iterative algorithm provides a robust method for deconvolving instrumental and intrinsic resolutions from typical XAS and XRS data. For the K-edge XAS of Ag, we find nearly complete removal of {approx}9.3 eV full width at half maximum broadening from the combined effects of the short core-hole lifetime and instrumental resolution. We are also able to remove nearly all instrumental broadening in an XRS measurement of diamond, with the resulting improved spectrum comparing favorably with prior soft x-ray XAS measurements. We present a practical methodology for implementing the RL algorithm in these problems, emphasizing the importance of testing for stability of the deconvolution process against noise amplification, perturbations in the initial spectra, and uncertainties in the core-hole lifetime.

  11. Deconvolving instrumental and intrinsic broadening in core-shell x-ray spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fister, T. T.; Seidler, G. T.; Rehr, J. J.; Kas, J. J.; Elam, W. T.; Cross, J. O.; Nagle, K. P.

    2007-05-01

    Intrinsic and experimental mechanisms frequently lead to broadening of spectral features in core-shell spectroscopies. For example, intrinsic broadening occurs in x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements of heavy elements where the core-hole lifetime is very short. On the other hand, nonresonant x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) and other energy loss measurements are more limited by instrumental resolution. Here, we demonstrate that the Richardson-Lucy (RL) iterative algorithm provides a robust method for deconvolving instrumental and intrinsic resolutions from typical XAS and XRS data. For the K -edge XAS of Ag, we find nearly complete removal of ˜9.3eV full width at half maximum broadening from the combined effects of the short core-hole lifetime and instrumental resolution. We are also able to remove nearly all instrumental broadening in an XRS measurement of diamond, with the resulting improved spectrum comparing favorably with prior soft x-ray XAS measurements. We present a practical methodology for implementing the RL algorithm in these problems, emphasizing the importance of testing for stability of the deconvolution process against noise amplification, perturbations in the initial spectra, and uncertainties in the core-hole lifetime.

  12. Gemini-GMOS Spectroscopy of X-ray Sources in the Galactic Bulge Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Jonker, P. G.; Torres, M.; McClintock, J. E.

    2013-04-01

    The Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a multiwavelength project with the aim of understanding the population of faint X-ray sources towards the Galactic center. It consists of Chandra and multiwavelength observations of two 6x1 degree strips centered 1.5 degrees above/below the Galactic plane. The main science goals of the GBS include testing binary evolution models by the number counts of detected sources (e.g., CVs and LMXBs), constraining neutron star equation of state and black hole mass function by measuring their masses, and investigating Galactic structure and formation with the spatial distribution of LMXBs. We expect to identify quiescent eclipsing neutron star and black hole LMXBs. For all these goals, it is crucial to classify the X-ray sources via optical spectroscopy. Here we present the time-resolved Gemini-GMOS spectroscopy and the radial velocity analyses of 21 X-ray sources detected by the GBS. Broad (and some double-peaked) H_alpha emissions are found for a few sources which makes them likely to be CVs.

  13. Highly multiplexible thermal kinetic inductance detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbricht, Gerhard; Mazin, Benjamin A.; Szypryt, Paul; Walter, Alex B.; Bockstiegel, Clint; Bumble, Bruce

    2015-06-01

    For X-ray imaging spectroscopy, high spatial resolution over a large field of view is often as important as high energy resolution, but current X-ray detectors do not provide both in the same device. Thermal Kinetic Inductance Detectors (TKIDs) are being developed as they offer a feasible way to combine the energy resolution of transition edge sensors with pixel counts approaching CCDs and thus promise significant improvements for many X-ray spectroscopy applications. TKIDs are a variation of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) and share their multiplexibility: working MKID arrays with 2024 pixels have recently been demonstrated and much bigger arrays are under development. In this work, we present a TKID prototype, which is able to achieve an energy resolution of 75 eV at 5.9 keV, even though its general design still has to be optimized. We further describe TKID fabrication, characterization, multiplexing, and working principle and demonstrate the necessity of a data fitting algorithm in order to extract photon energies. With further design optimizations, we expect to be able to improve our TKID energy resolution to less than 10 eV at 5.9 keV.

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of cuprous-thiolate clusters in proteins and model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pickering, I.J.; George, G.N. ); Dameron, C.T.; Kurz, B.; Winge, D.R. ); Dance, I.G. )

    1993-10-20

    Cuprous-thiolate multimetallic clusters exist in a range of different biological molecules for which no structural information exists from X-ray crystallography. Spectroscopic tools such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy have provided the major structural insights into this family of biological molecules. Recent nuclear magnetic resonance data on silver-substituted metallothionein, thought to be analogous with the copper proteins, have suggested the presence of digonal coordination. In order to test this in the copper case, we have examined a series of structurally characterized cuprous-thiolate model compounds, containing different proportions of digonal and trigonal copper sites, using copper K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The edge spectra, which have been previously used as a probe for the average copper coordination environment in proteins, show little variation between the models, indicating that these are not useful as a probe of coordination environment in the case of cuprous-thiolate clusters (as opposed to isolated metal sites). We show that systematic trends in the average Cu-S bond length from EXAFS curve-fitting analysis can be used to obtain an estimate of the fraction of digonal and trigonal copper sites. This correlation is applied to a series of different proteins containing cuprous-thiolate clusters which are found to contain significant fractions of digonal copper. 41 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Study of exploding Al wire plasmas using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, Sergey A.; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Hoyt, Cad L.; Cahill, Adam D.; Hammer, David A.

    2012-10-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic technique useful for determining the charge state, temperature and density of plasmas under a wide range of conditions and situations. Our particular interest was the study of the core-corona system generated in electrically exploded wires and wire array Z-pinches. Two wide-bandwidth spectrographs with flat and concave cylindrically bent KAP crystals, and high-resolution spectrographs with spherically bent quartz crystals have been used on the XP and COBRA pulsers at Cornell University. The hybrid X-pinch was used as the continuum x-ray source in the photon energy range of interest for absorption spectroscopy with exploding Al wire experiments. This source is capable of producing broadband continuum x-ray pulses with micron source size and 100 ps duration. Absorption spectra of single exploded Al wires and 2 - 4 wire arrays were recorded with high spatial resolution. The parameters of the dense wire core plasmas and the ablating plasma streams were estimated under different experimental conditions. New spectral features in absorption spectra were observed.

  16. Electronic structure of cobalt doped CdSe quantum dots using soft X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua T. Wright; Su, Dong; van Buuren, Tony; Meulenberg, Robert W.

    2014-08-21

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of cobalt doped CdSe quantum dots (QDs) are studied using electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry. Magnetometry measurements suggest these QDs are superparamagnetic, contrary to a spin-glass state observed in the bulk analogue. Moreover, the electron microscopy shows well formed QDs, but with cobalt existing as doped into the QD and as unreacted species not contained in the QD. X-ray absorption measurements at the Co L3-edge suggest that changes in spectra features as a function of particle size can be described considering combination of a cobalt ion in a tetrahedral crystal field and an octahedrally coordinated (impurity) phase. With decreasing particle sizes, the impurity phase increases, suggesting that small QDs can be difficult to dope.

  17. X-ray fluorescence/Auger-electron coincidence spectroscopy of vacancy cascades in atomic argon

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, U.; LeBrun, T.; Southworth, S.H.; Jung, M.; MacDonald, M.A.

    1996-12-01

    Argon L{sub 2.3}-M{sub 2.3}M{sub 2.3} Auger-electron spectra were measured in coincidence with K{alpha} fluorescent x-rays in studies of Ar K-shell vacancy decays at several photon energies above the K-threshold and on the 1s-4p resonance in atomic argon. The complex spectra recorded by conventional electron spectroscopy are greatly simplified when recorded in coincidence with fluorescent x-rays, allowing a more detailed analysis of the vacancy cascade process. The resulting coincidence spectra are compared with Hartree-Fock calculations which include shake-up transitions in the resonant case. Small energy shifts of the coincidence electron spectra are attributed to post-collision interaction with 1s photoelectrons.

  18. Past, Present and Future Prospects of High Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy of Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaastra, J.

    2006-08-01

    The first high resolution X-ray spectra of clusters of galaxies have revolutionised the study of cooling flows. These excellent data have been obtained with an instrument (the RGS of XMM-Newton) that has not been optimised for spectroscopy of extended sources. I will present a few recent examples of what can be achieved further with the RGS in combination with the imaging EPIC cameras for the study of chemical enrichment of clusters. The new generation of high spectral resolution imaging TES arrays that is currently being studied for a variety of possible future X-ray observatories (such as XEUS, Constellation-X, DIOS, Estremo and NEW) offer exciting new opportunities to study the physics of clusters of galaxies. I will present examples of how these new instruments will achieve this.

  19. Xe nanocrystals in Si studied by x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, Giuseppe; Pennisi, Agata R.; Zontone, Federico

    2007-07-15

    The structural configuration of Xe clusters, obtained by ion implantation in a Si matrix, has been investigated as a function of the temperature by x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. In contrast with previous results, we demonstrate that an accurate analysis of the data, using high order cumulants, gives evidence of Xe fcc nanocrystals at low temperature, even in the as-implanted Si; expansion of the Xe lattice is always found as a function of the temperature, with no appreciable overpressure. We point out that a dramatic modification of these conclusions can be induced by an incorrect analysis using standard symmetrical pair distribution function G(r); for this reason, all the results were checked by x-ray diffraction measurements.

  20. Instrument for x-ray absorption spectroscopy with in situ electrical control characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chun-Chao; Chang, Shu-Jui; Yang, Chao-Yao; Tseng, Yuan-Chieh; Chou, Hsiung

    2013-12-15

    We report a synchrotron-based setup capable of performing x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism with simultaneous electrical control characterizations. The setup can enable research concerning electrical transport, element- and orbital-selective magnetization with an in situ fashion. It is a unique approach to the real-time change of spin-polarized electronic state of a material/device exhibiting magneto-electric responses. The performance of the setup was tested by probing the spin-polarized states of cobalt and oxygen of Zn{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}O dilute magnetic semiconductor under applied voltages, both at low (∼20 K) and room temperatures, and signal variations upon the change of applied voltage were clearly detected.

  1. Effect of X-ray spot size on liquid jet photoelectron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Giorgia; Goel, Alok; Kleibert, Armin; Brown, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    A 30 µm pinhole is introduced in the intermediate focus of the SIM beamline at the Swiss Light Source to improve the spot size at the second downstream focus, which is used here for liquid jet X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. The 30 µm pinhole reduces the beam dimensions from 250 (v) × 100 (h) µm to 75 × 45 µm for a vertical exit slit of 100 µm. The smaller X-ray spot results in a substantial decrease in the gas-phase contribution of the spectra from 40% down to 20% and will help to simplify the interpretation and peak assignments of future experiments. PMID:26524318

  2. Picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of ultrafast aluminum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Audebert, P; Renaudin, P; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S; Geindre, J-P; Chenais-Popovics, C; Tzortzakis, S; Nagels-Silvert, V; Shepherd, R; Matsushima, I; Gary, S; Girard, F; Peyrusse, O; Gauthier, J-C

    2005-01-21

    We have used point-projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy to infer the ionization and recombination dynamics of transient aluminum plasmas. Two femtosecond beams of the 100 TW laser at the LULI facility were used to produce an aluminum plasma on a thin aluminum foil (83 or 50 nm), and a picosecond x-ray backlighter source. The short-pulse backlighter probed the aluminum plasma at different times by adjusting the delay between the two femtosecond driving beams. Absorption x-ray spectra at early times are characteristic of a dense and rather homogeneous plasma. Collisional-radiative atomic physics coupled with hydrodynamic simulations reproduce fairly well the measured average ionization as a function of time. PMID:15698184

  3. Cryogenic detector development at LLNL: ultraviolet x-ray, gamma-ray and biomolecule spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Labov, S.E.; Frank, M.; le Grand, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    We are developing low-temperature detectors for optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and gamma-ray spectroscopy, and for biomolecular mass spectrometry. We present development work on these detectors and materials analysis and biomolecular mass spectrometry. We have measured thin-film Nb/Al/Al2O3/AlNb superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) X-ray detectors in the 0.2 to 1 keV band with a range of different junction sizes and aluminum film thicknesses. In one case, we have achieved the statistical limit to the energy resolution of 13 eV FWHM at 227 eV with an output count rate of 20,600 cts/s.

  4. Detection, identification and mapping of iron anomalies in brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.; Toastmann, H.; Channell, J.E.T.; Guyodo, Y.; Batich, C.; Dobson, J.

    2008-06-16

    This work describes a novel method for the detection, identification and mapping of anomalous iron compounds in mammalian brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We have located and identified individual iron anomalies in an avian tissue model associated with ferritin, biogenic magnetite and haemoglobin with a pixel resolution of less than 5 {micro}m. This technique represents a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds in brain tissue. The potential for high-resolution iron mapping using microfocused X-ray beams has direct application to investigations of the location and structural form of iron compounds associated with human neurodegenerative disorders - a problem which has vexed researchers for 50 years.

  5. High average power, highly brilliant laser-produced plasma source for soft X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mantouvalou, Ioanna; Grötzsch, Daniel; Neitzel, Michael; Günther, Sabrina; Baumann, Jonas; Kanngießer, Birgit; Witte, Katharina; Jung, Robert; Stiel, Holger; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2015-03-15

    In this work, a novel laser-produced plasma source is presented which delivers pulsed broadband soft X-radiation in the range between 100 and 1200 eV. The source was designed in view of long operating hours, high stability, and cost effectiveness. It relies on a rotating and translating metal target and achieves high stability through an on-line monitoring device using a four quadrant extreme ultraviolet diode in a pinhole camera arrangement. The source can be operated with three different laser pulse durations and various target materials and is equipped with two beamlines for simultaneous experiments. Characterization measurements are presented with special emphasis on the source position and emission stability of the source. As a first application, a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure measurement on a thin polyimide foil shows the potential of the source for soft X-ray spectroscopy.

  6. Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using an environmental cell with silicon nitride membrane windows

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemi, Eika; Watanabe, Yoshio; Oji, Hiroshi; Cui, Yi-Tao; Son, Jin-Young

    2015-06-21

    We applied hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) to a sample under ambient pressure conditions using an environmental cell with an approximately 24 nm-thick SiN{sub x} membrane window. As a model chemical substance, europium (II) iodide (EuI{sub 2}) sealed in the cell with argon gas was investigated with HAXPES to identify the chemical species present inside the cell. The optical and morphological properties of the sample within the cell were measured with optical and fluorescent microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence, and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. We confirmed the effectiveness of the gas barrier properties of the cell with the SiN{sub x} window and demonstrated its applicability to various other optical and electron measurements as well as HAXPES.

  7. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for electrochemical reactions in ordinary solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Takuya; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kobata, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Noguchi, Hidenori; Kawasaki, Tadahiro; Uosaki, Kohei

    2013-09-09

    In situ electrochemical X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) apparatus, which allows XPS at solid/liquid interfaces under potential control, was constructed utilizing a microcell with an ultra-thin Si membrane, which separates vacuum and a solution. Hard X-rays from a synchrotron source penetrate into the Si membrane surface exposed to the solution. Electrons emitted at the Si/solution interface can pass through the membrane and be analyzed by an analyzer placed in vacuum. Its operation was demonstrated for potential-induced Si oxide growth in water. Effect of potential and time on the thickness of Si and Si oxide layers was quantitatively determined at sub-nanometer resolution.

  8. Structural studies of PCU-hydrazones: NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractions, and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veljković, Jelena; Šekutor, Marina; Molčanov, Krešimir; Lo, Rabindranath; Ganguly, Bishwajit; Mlinarić-Majerski, Kata

    2011-06-01

    In this article we present a detailed structural investigation for the configurational isomers of PCU-hydrazones. The structural characterization of these hydrazones was performed using NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and theoretical calculations. The single crystal X-ray structures of PCU-hydrazones 6B and 6C have been solved and used to conclusively confirm the characterization obtained via NMR spectra of a particular isomer. Nuclear magnetic shielding values calculated for 6A-C using DFT calculations were correlated with the experimentally determined chemical shifts. The computed results were found to be in good agreement with the observed 13C NMR values. The computed NMR results helped to ascertain the isomers of PCU-hydrazones 4A-C.

  9. Note: Sample chamber for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of battery materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pelliccione, CJ; Timofeeva, EV; Katsoudas, JP; Segre, CU

    2014-12-01

    In situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) provides element-specific characterization of both crystalline and amorphous phases and enables direct correlations between electrochemical performance and structural characteristics of cathode and anode materials. In situ XAS measurements are very demanding to the design of the experimental setup. We have developed a sample chamber that provides electrical connectivity and inert atmosphere for operating electrochemical cells and also accounts for x-ray interactions with the chamber and cell materials. The design of the sample chamber for in situ measurements is presented along with example XAS spectra from anode materials in operating pouch cells at the Zn and Sn K-edges measured in fluorescence and transmission modes, respectively. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  10. Structural conformation in a poly (ethylene oxide) film obta inedfrom X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES)

    SciTech Connect

    Kashtanov, S.; Zhuang, G.V.; Augustsson, A.; Guo, J.-H.; Nordgren, J.; Luo, Y.; Ross, P.N.

    2007-03-16

    The electronic structure of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) in a thin (< 1 {micro}) film sample was experimentally probed by X-ray emission spectroscopy. The emission spectra from this film were much sharper with more resolved fine structure than the spectra from the bulk polymer from which it was cast. Both non-resonant and resonant X-ray emission spectra were simulated using density functional theory (DFT) applied to four different models representing different conformations in the polymer. Calculated spectra were compared with experimental results for the PEO film. It was found that the best fit was obtained with the polymer conformation in PEO electrolytes from which the salt (LiMF6, M=P, As, or Sb) had been removed. This conformation is different from that in the crystalline bulk polymer and implies that film casting, commonly used to form electrolytes for Li polymer batteries, induces the same conformation in the polymer with or without the salt present.

  11. Detection, identification and mapping of iron anomalies in brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mikhaylova, A; Davidson, M; Toastmann, H; Channell, J.E.T; Guyodo, Y; Batich, C; Dobson, J

    2005-01-01

    This work describes a novel method for the detection, identification and mapping of anomalous iron compounds in mammalian brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We have located and identified individual iron anomalies in an avian tissue model associated with ferritin, biogenic magnetite and haemoglobin with a pixel resolution of less than 5 μm. This technique represents a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds in brain tissue. The potential for high-resolution iron mapping using microfocused X-ray beams has direct application to investigations of the location and structural form of iron compounds associated with human neurodegenerative disorders—a problem which has vexed researchers for 50 years. PMID:16849161

  12. X-ray rocking curve measurements of bent crystals. [used in High Resolution Spectrometer in Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakim, M. B.; Muney, W. S.; Fowler, W. B.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1988-01-01

    A three-crystal laboratory X-ray spectrometer is used to measure the Bragg reflection from concave cylindrically curved crystals to be used in the high-resolution X-ray spectrometer of the NASA Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The first two crystals, in the dispersive (1.1) arrangement, select a narrow collimated monochromatic beam in the Cu K-alpha(1) line at 1.5 A (8.1 keV), which illuminates the test crystal. The angular centroids of rocking curves measured along the surface provide a measure of the conformity of the crystal to the desired radius of curvature. Individual and combined rocking-curve widths and areas provide a measure of the resolution and efficiency at 1.54 A. The crystals analyzed included LiF(200), PET, and acid phthalates such as TAP.

  13. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of copper(II), copper(I), and mixed valence systems.

    PubMed

    Rupp, H; Weser, U

    1976-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using copper(II), copper(I) and the mixed valence Cu(II)/Cu(I) compounds was employed as a means of studying electron transfer reactions in copper proteins. The X-ray photoelectron spectra of copper(II) compounds display characteristic satellites of both variable size and resolution. Some of these satellites could be assigned to specific ligand interactions. Unlike electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements of copper(I) compounds allowed the unequivocal assignment of this oxidation state. No satellites at all could be detected in the Cu(I) spectra. Furthermore, established mixed valence Cu(II)/Cu(I) complexes including Cu2SO3-CuSO3-2H2O and Cu4Cl5 (ethylenediamine)2 proved essentially a mixture of distinct portions of Cu(I) and Cu(II). This indicates that both oxidation states of copper survive in such complexes. In contrast, all Cu X-ray photoelectron signals of the more tentatively described mixed valence complexes Na2Cu3S3 and the mineral covellite, CuI4CuII2(S2)2S2, could be attributed exclusively to Cu(I). In view of the known binding of copper with sulfur in many copper proteins, it was of utmost importance to study the copper-sulfur interactions. We have demonstrated the absence of Cu(II) in CuS. This indicates strong metal-induced polarization of sulfur resulting in electron transfer to copper to yield Cu(I). PMID:953045

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of thin foil heating by Z-pinch radiation.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, J J; Bailey, J E; Chandler, G A; Deeney, C; Douglas, M R; Jobe, D; Lake, P; Nash, T J; Nielsen, D S; Spielman, R B; Wang, P; Woodruff, P

    2002-10-01

    Absorption spectroscopy measurements of the time-dependent heating of thin foils exposed to intense z-pinch radiation sources are presented. These measurements and their analysis provide valuable benchmarks for, and insights into, the radiative heating of matter by x-ray sources. Z-pinch radiation sources with peak powers of up to 160 TW radiatively heated thin plastic-tamped aluminum foils to temperatures approximately 60 eV. The foils were located in open slots at the boundary of z-pinch hohlraums surrounding the pinch. Time-resolved Kalpha satellite absorption spectroscopy was used to measure the evolution of the Al ionization distribution, using a geometry in which the pinch served as the backlighter. The time-dependent pinch radius and x-ray power were monitored using framing camera, x-ray diode array, and bolometer measurements. A three-dimensional view factor code, within which one-dimensional (1D) radiation-hydrodynamics calculations were performed for each surface element in the view factor grid, was used to compute the incident and reemitted radiation flux distribution throughout the hohlraum and across the foil surface. Simulated absorption spectra were then generated by postprocessing radiation-hydrodynamics results for the foil heating using a 1D collisional-radiative code. Our simulated results were found to be in good general agreement with experimental x-ray spectra, indicating that the spectral measurements are consistent with independent measurements of the pinch power. We also discuss the sensitivity of our results to the spectrum of the radiation field incident on the foil, and the role of nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium atomic kinetics in affecting the spectra. PMID:12443339

  15. Recent advances and applications in the analysis of organic C and N using soft X-ray XANES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, A. W.; Dynes, J.; Regier, T. Z.; Boyko, T.; Chevrier, D. K.; Peak, D.

    2014-12-01

    Determining the chemical speciation of carbon and nitrogen in environmental samples is important for understanding the role of organic matter in contamination mobility and nutrient cycling. Despite these important applications, bulk soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy, particularly at the carbon K-edge has not been extensively applied to environmental samples until recently. The primary reasons for this gap is the lack of beamline endstations that are suitable for 'dirty' samples and the technical challenges related to acquiring and normalizing spectra from dilute samples. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the C K-edge probes the local bonding environment of C and N. Bulk XAS techniques permit for high throughput, the study of whole soils and high sampling density. These analyses are complementary to X-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) techniques which are limited by low throughput, thin particles (<100 nm) and low sampling density. In many projects, these bulk XAS measurements may be essential to understanding large scale processes in soils such as the global C cycle. Technical challenges have been largely overcome through the use of customized energy selective silicon drift detectors which enable the carbon signal to be detected separately from the signals from higher order light such as oxygen (i.e., partial fluorescence yield). Accurate normalization is now possible using the X-ray scattering signal from Au coated Si wafers as the Io. The radiation dose was minimized using a monochromator slew scanning mode in conjunction with the development of software tools to automatically sample of multiple pristine spots on a sample. Technical developments and recent applications will be presented, showing how bulk C and N XAS is now positioned to contribute significantly to advancing the characterization of organic matter in soils and environmental samples.

  16. Aqueous Cr(VI) reduction by pyrite: Speciation and characterisation of the solid phases by X-ray photoelectron, Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullet, Martine; Demoisson, Frédéric; Humbert, Bernard; Michot, Laurent J.; Vantelon, Delphine

    2007-07-01

    Optical microscopy, confocal Raman micro-spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron micro-spectroscopy (XPS) and synchrotron based micro-X-ray fluorescence (XRF), micro-X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and micro-extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were used to investigate the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) by pyrite. Special emphasis was placed on the characterisation of the solid phase formed during the reaction process. Cr(III) and Fe(III) species were identified by XPS analyses in addition to non-oxidised pyrite. Optical microscopy images and the corresponding Raman spectra reveal a strong heterogeneity of the samples with three different types of zones. (i) Reflective areas with Eg and Ag Raman wavenumbers relative to non-oxidised pyrite are the most frequently observed. (ii) Orange areas that display a drift of the Eg and Ag pyrite vibration modes of -3 and -6 cm -1, respectively. Such areas are only observed in the presence of Cr(VI) but are not specifically due to this oxidant. (iii) Bluish areas with vibration modes relative to a corundum-like structure that can be assigned to a solid solution Fe 2- xCr xO 3, x varying between 0.2 and 1.5. The heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of chromium observed by optical microscopy and associated Raman microspectroscopy is confirmed by μ-XRF. In agreement with both solution and XPS analyses, these spectroscopies clearly confirm that chromium is in the trivalent state. XANES spectra in the iron K-edge pre-edge region obtained in rich chromium areas reveal the presence of ferric ion thus revealing a systematic association between Cr(III) and Fe(III). In agreement with Raman analyses, Cr K-edge EXAFS can be interpreted as corresponding to Cr atoms involved in a substituted-type hematite structure Fe 2- xCr xO 3.

  17. Research study entitled advanced X-ray astrophysical observatory (AXAF). [system engineering for a total X-ray telescope assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasche, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    General background and overview material are presented along with data from studies performed to determine the sensitivity, feasibility, and required performance of systems for a total X-ray telescope assembly. Topics covered include: optical design, mirror support concepts, mirror weight estimates, the effects of l g on mirror elements, mirror assembly resonant frequencies, optical bench considerations, temperature control of the mirror assembly, and the aspect determination system.

  18. X-ray spectroscopy studies of nonradiative energy transfer processes in luminescent lanthanide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacold, Joseph I.

    Luminescent materials play important roles in energy sciences, through solid state lighting and possible applications in solar energy utilization, and in biomedical research and applications, such as in immunoassays and fluorescence microscopy. The initial excitation of a luminescent material leads to a sequence of transitions between excited states, ideally ending with the emission of one or more optical-wavelength photons. It is essential to understand the microscopic physics of this excited state cascade in order to rationally design materials with high quantum efficiencies or with other fine-tuning of materials response. While optical-wavelength spectroscopies have unraveled many details of the energy transfer pathways in luminescent materials, significant questions remain open for many lanthanide-based luminescent materials. For organometallic dyes in particular, quantum yields remain limited in comparison with inorganic phosphors. This dissertation reports on a research program of synchrotron x-ray studies of the excited state electronic structure and energy-relaxation cascade in trivalent lanthanide phosphors and dyes. To this end, one of the primary results presented here is the first time-resolved x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy studies of the transient 4f excited states in lanthanide-activated luminescent dyes and phosphors. This is a new application of time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy that makes it possible to directly observe and, to some extent, quantify intramolecular nonradiative energy transfer processes. We find a transient increase in 4f spectral weight associated with an excited state confined to the 4f shell of trivalent Eu. This result implies that it is necessary to revise the current theoretical understanding of 4f excitation in trivalent lanthanide activators: either transient 4f-5d mixing effects are much stronger than previously considered, or else the lanthanide 4f excited state has an unexpectedly large contribution

  19. X-ray Microscopy Resource Center at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer-Ilse, W.; Attwood, D.; Koike, M.

    1992-08-01

    The high spectral brightness of undulator radiation from the Advanced Light Source (ALS) offers a great scientific opportunity for biological x-ray microscopy. X-ray microscopy extends visible light microscopy to higher resolution and makes use of unique contrast mechanisms. It does not compete with techniques such as electron microscopy in terms of resolution, but rather offers unique advantages, including the opportunity to take images of samples in an aqueous environment. For a considerable range of resolution and sample thickness the radiation dose in x-ray microscopy is lower than in electron microscopy under the same imaging conditions. To exploit this opportunity a Biological X-ray Microscopy Resource Center will be built at the ALS. An x-ray microscope (XM) and a scanning x-ray microscope (SXM) are to be built. These two microscopes serve complementary needs. The XM gives high quality images at comparably short exposure times, while the SXM is optimized for low radiation dose. High resolution is accomplished in both microscopes with Fresnel zone plate lenses. The SXM produces a diffraction-limited focus point, which is scanned across the sample; therefore the SXM can use only the spatially coherent portion of the radiation. The SXM is best operated on an undulator source with its small phase space. An XM can use the full brightness, including the incoherent fraction of the source. It can be operated with either a bending magnet or an undulator source. The XM can be installed initially at a bending magnet, which can be available at an earlier time, and thus permits the development of diverse biological community at an earlier time. Later this XM can be moved to the undulator, or left at the bending magnet for developmental and less demanding experiments.

  20. Cadmium Chemical Form in Mine Waste Materials by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diacomanolis, V.; Ng, J. C.; Sadler, R.; Harris, H. H.; Nomura, M.; Noller, B. N.

    2010-06-01

    This study examines the molecular form of cadmium (Cd) present in mine wastes by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS; Cd>20 mg/kg) using the K-edge of Cd at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR), NW10A beam line at KEK-Tsukuba-Japan. Mine waste materials and zinc concentrate were analyzed for Cd by ICPMS prior to undertaking XAS (range 21-452 mg/kg). Model compounds (CdO, Cd(OH)2, CdCO3, Cdacetate, CdS, Cdstearate, CdDEDTC) and samples were examined in solid form at 20 K. The XANES spectra showed similar E max values for both model compounds and samples. The EXAFS showed that Cd-S in CdS, gives a flatter spectrum in the extended region compared to Cd-O found with CdCO3, CdO and Cd Stearate. Linear combination fitting with model Cd compounds did not give clear assignments of composition, indicating that more detailed EXAFS spectra is required as mineral forms containing Cd were present rather than simple Cd compounds such as CdCO3. The Cd bond for a single shell model in mine waste sample matrices appears to be either Cd-O or Cd-S, or a combination of both. Comparison of molecular data from the XAS studies with bioaccessibility data giving a prediction of bioavailability for mine waste materials provides useful information about the significance of the cadmium form as a contaminant for health risk assessment purposes.

  1. Cadmium Chemical Form in Mine Waste Materials by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Diacomanolis, V.; Ng, J. C.; Sadler, R.; Harris, H. H.; Nomura, M.; Noller, B. N.

    2010-06-23

    This study examines the molecular form of cadmium (Cd) present in mine wastes by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS; Cd>20 mg/kg) using the K-edge of Cd at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR), NW10A beam line at KEK-Tsukuba-Japan. Mine waste materials and zinc concentrate were analyzed for Cd by ICPMS prior to undertaking XAS (range 21-452 mg/kg). Model compounds (CdO, Cd(OH){sub 2}, CdCO{sub 3}, Cdacetate, CdS, Cdstearate, CdDEDTC) and samples were examined in solid form at 20 K. The XANES spectra showed similar E max values for both model compounds and samples. The EXAFS showed that Cd-S in CdS, gives a flatter spectrum in the extended region compared to Cd-O found with CdCO{sub 3}, CdO and Cd Stearate. Linear combination fitting with model Cd compounds did not give clear assignments of composition, indicating that more detailed EXAFS spectra is required as mineral forms containing Cd were present rather than simple Cd compounds such as CdCO{sub 3}. The Cd bond for a single shell model in mine waste sample matrices appears to be either Cd-O or Cd-S, or a combination of both. Comparison of molecular data from the XAS studies with bioaccessibility data giving a prediction of bioavailability for mine waste materials provides useful information about the significance of the cadmium form as a contaminant for health risk assessment purposes.

  2. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Iihara, Junji; Takebe, Toshihiko; Denlinger, Jonathan D.

    2008-03-29

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and molecular orbital calculations confirm that boron atoms in CVD-B-diamond substitute for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice to form covalent B-C bonds, while boron atoms in HPT-B-diamond react with the impurity nitrogen atoms to form hexagonal boron nitride. This suggests that the high purity diamond without nitrogen impurities is necessary to synthesize p-type B-diamond semiconductors.

  3. Microcalorimeters for High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, E.; Flowers, Bobby J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The proposal has three major objectives. The first focuses on advanced neutron-transmutation-doped (NTD)-based microcalorimeter development. Our goal is to develop an array of microcalorimeters with sub- 5 eV energy resolution that can operate with pile-up-free throughput of at least 100 Hz per pixel. The second objective is to establish our microcalorimeter as an essential x-ray diagnostic for laboratory astrophysics studies. We propose to develop a dedicated microcalorimeter spectrometer for the EBIT (electron beam ion trap). This instrument will incorporate the latest detector and cryogenic technology that we have available. The third objective is to investigate innovative ideas related to possible flight opportunities. These include compact, long lived cryo-systems, ultra-low temperature cold stages, low mass and low power electronics, and novel assemblies of thin windows with high x-ray transmission.

  4. Differentiation of biological hydroxyapatite compounds by infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and extended x-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassot, E.; Oudadesse, H.; Irigaray, J.; Curis, E.; Bénazeth, S.; Nicolis, I.

    2001-12-01

    Pure hydroxyapatite (HAP) and HAP doped with 800 ppm of zinc were implanted in cortical bone of femur diaphysis of ovines [J. L. Irigaray et al., Mater. Clin. Appl. 28, 399 (1999)]. We observed that the doped HAP was better resorbed than pure HAP. The first hypothesis is that zinc acts as a stimulator on macrophage cells and improves quantity and quality of osteoblast cells. The second hypothesis is that zinc yields HAP structure that is better resorbed in biological field. For our experiment we used HAP doped with 3000 ppm of zinc in order to have a good sensitivity. In the present work, chemical studies by inductively coupled plasma absorption emission spectrometry, x ray diffraction, and infrared were carried out to determine the composition of major and trace elements in the doped hydroxyapatite, and the crystallographic structure. These studies can indicate possible modifications induced by the insertion of zinc. We used the extended x-ray absorption fine structure experimental station of LURE (Orsay, France) to try to clarify the atomic surroundings of zinc in doped HAP structure and transformations induced in initial lattice. Despite the low zinc concentration, we got good quality fluorescence mode spectra. These spectra showed medium range order of the material that is consistent with its crystalline form. To perform the analysis, we compared the result obtained with another models like β tricalcium phosphate and we created theoretical models of zinc in substitution of calcium in order to reproduce as well as possible the experimental spectrum. After this study, only two models are coherent with experimental spectrum, zinc in substitution of calcium in site I and zinc in the interstice between the two hydroxydes.

  5. What can be Learned from X-ray Spectroscopy Concerning Hot Gas in Local Bubble and Charge Exchange Processes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Steve

    2007-01-01

    What can be learned from x-ray spectroscopy in observing hot gas in local bubble and charge exchange processes depends on spectral resolution, instrumental grasp, instrumental energy band, signal-to-nose, field of view, angular resolution and observatory location. Early attempts at x-ray spectroscopy include ROSAT; more recently, astronomers have used diffuse x-ray spectrometers, XMM Newton, sounding rocket calorimeters, and Suzaku. Future observations are expected with calorimeters on the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma mission, and the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX). The Geospheric SWCX may provide remote sensing of the solar wind and magnetosheath and remote observations of solar CMEs moving outward from the sun.

  6. Electronic Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials with Photon-in/Photon-out Soft-X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jinghua

    2008-09-22

    The applications of resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy on a variety of carbon systems have yielded characteristic fingerprints. With high-resolution monochromatized synchrotron radiation excitation, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering has emerged as a new source of information about electronic structure and excitation dynamics. Photon-in/photon-out soft-X-ray spectroscopy is used to study the electronic properties of fundamental materials, nanostructure, and complex hydrides and will offer potential in-depth understanding of chemisorption and/or physisorption mechanisms of hydrogen adsorption/desorption capacity and kinetics.

  7. Characterizing Hohlraum Plasma Conditions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Using X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, Maria Alejandra

    2015-11-01

    Improved hohlraums will have a significant impact on increasing the likelihood of indirect drive ignition at the NIF. In indirect-drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), a high-Z hohlraum converts laser power into a tailored x-ray flux that drives the implosion of a spherical capsule filled with D-T fuel. The x-radiation drive to capsule coupling sets the velocity, adiabat, and symmetry of the implosion. Previous experiments in gas-filled hohlraums determined that the laser-hohlraum energy coupling is 20-25% less than modeled, therefore identifying energy loss mechanisms that reduce the efficacy of the hohlraum drive is central to improving implosion performance. Characterizing the plasma conditions, particularly the plasma electron temperature (Te) , is critical to understanding mechanism that affect the energy coupling such as the laser plasma interactions (LPI), hohlraum x-ray conversion efficiency, and dynamic drive symmetry. The first Te measurements inside a NIF hohlraum, presented here, were achieved using K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of an Mn-Co tracer dot. The dot is deposited on a thin-walled CH capsule, centered on the hohlraum symmetry axis below the laser entrance hole (LEH) of a bottom-truncated hohlraum. The hohlraum x-ray drive ablates the dot and causes it to flow upward, towards the LEH, entering the hot laser deposition region. An absolutely calibrated streaked spectrometer with a line of sight into the LEH records the temporal history of the Mn and Co X-ray emission. The measured (interstage) Lyα/ Heα line ratios for Co and Mn and the Mn-Heα/Co-Heα isoelectronic line ratio are used to infer the local plasma Te from the atomic physics code SCRAM. Time resovled x-ray images perpendicular to the hohlraum axis record the dot expansion and trajectory into the LEH region. The temporal evolution of the measured Te and dot trajectory are compared with simulations from radiation-hydrodynamic codes. This work was performed under the auspices of the U

  8. Thermal and magnetic anomalies of α-iron: an exploration by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccato, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; Kantor, Innokenty; Mathon, Olivier; Dyadkin, Vadim; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Carnera, Alberto; Pascarelli, Sakura

    2016-09-01

    The local structure and dynamics of α-iron have been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to shed light on some thermal and magnetic anomalies observed in the last decades. The quantitative EXAFS analysis of the first two coordination shells reveals a peculiar local vibrational dynamics of α-iron: the second neighbor distance exhibits anharmonicity and vibrational anisotropy larger than the first neighbor distance. We search for possible distortions of the bcc structure to justify the unexplained magnetostriction anomalies of α-iron and provide a value for the maximum dislocation of the central Fe atom. No thermal anomalies have been detected from the current XRD data. On the contrary, an intriguing thermal anomaly at about 150 K, ascribed to a stiffening of the Fe–Fe bonds, was found by EXAFS.

  9. Study of hard disk and slider surfaces using X-ray photoemission electron microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Stammler, T.; Bhatia, C.S.; Fong, W.; Chen, C.Y.; Bogy, D.B.

    1998-04-01

    X-ray Photo Emission Electron Microscopy (X-PEEM) and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were applied to study the properties of amorphous hard carbon overcoats on disks and sliders, and the properties of the lubricant. The modification of lubricants after performing thermal desorption studies was measured by NEXAFS, and the results are compared to the thermal desorption data. The study of lubricant degradation in wear tracks is described. Sliders were investigated before and after wear test, and the modification of the slider coating as well as the transfer of lubricant to the slider was studied. The studies show that the lubricant is altered chemically during the wear. Fluorine is removed and carboxyl groups are formed.

  10. Thermal and magnetic anomalies of α-iron: an exploration by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Boccato, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; Kantor, Innokenty; Mathon, Olivier; Dyadkin, Vadim; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Carnera, Alberto; Pascarelli, Sakura

    2016-09-01

    The local structure and dynamics of α-iron have been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to shed light on some thermal and magnetic anomalies observed in the last decades. The quantitative EXAFS analysis of the first two coordination shells reveals a peculiar local vibrational dynamics of α-iron: the second neighbor distance exhibits anharmonicity and vibrational anisotropy larger than the first neighbor distance. We search for possible distortions of the bcc structure to justify the unexplained magnetostriction anomalies of α-iron and provide a value for the maximum dislocation of the central Fe atom. No thermal anomalies have been detected from the current XRD data. On the contrary, an intriguing thermal anomaly at about 150 K, ascribed to a stiffening of the Fe-Fe bonds, was found by EXAFS. PMID:27385480

  11. Multi-speckle X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy in the ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering range.

    PubMed

    Möller, Johannes; Chushkin, Yuriy; Prevost, Sylvain; Narayanan, Theyencheri

    2016-07-01

    Multi-speckle X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) measurements in the ultra-small-angle range are performed using a long pinhole collimation instrument in combination with two-dimensional photon-counting and high-sensitivity imaging detectors. The feasibility of the presented setup to measure dynamics on different time and length scales pertinent to colloidal systems is shown. This setup offers new research opportunities, such as for example in the investigation of non-equilibrium dynamics in optically opaque, complex systems over length scales from tens of nanometres to several micrometres. In addition, due to the short duration of the X-ray exposure involved in the ultra-small-angle range, possible radiation-induced effects are alleviated. Furthermore, the performance of two different detectors, a photon-counting Pilatus 300K and an integrating FReLoN CCD, are compared, and their applicability for accurate XPCS measurements is demonstrated. PMID:27359141

  12. Ultra-Small-Angle X-ray Scattering – X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy Studies of Incipient Structural Changes in Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Based Dental Composites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, F.; Allen, A.J.; Levine, L.E.; Espinal, L.; Antonucci, J.M.; Skrtic, D.; O’Donnell, J.N.R.; Ilavsky, J.

    2012-01-01

    The local structural changes in amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) based dental composites were studied under isothermal conditions using both static, bulk measurement techniques and a recently developed methodology based on combined ultra-small angle X-ray scattering – X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (USAXS-XPCS), which permits a dynamic approach. While results from conventional bulk measurements do not show clear signs of structural change, USAXS-XPCS results reveal unambiguous evidence for local structural variations on a similar time scale to that of water loss in the ACP fillers. A thermal-expansion based simulation indicates that thermal behavior alone does not account for the observed dynamics. Together, these results suggest that changes in the water content of ACP affect the composite morphology due to changes in ACP structure that occur without an amorphous-to-crystalline conversion. It is also noted that biomedical materials research could benefit greatly from USAXS-XPCS, a dynamic approach. PMID:22374649

  13. In Situ X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study of the LiNiO2 Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, A. N.; McBreen, J.; Melendres, C. A.

    1997-03-01

    LiNiO2 is one of the most promising active material for the development of novel 4V rechargeable lithium batteries. Recent x-ray diffraction studies showed that the electrochemical reactivity of this electrode is sensitive to the structure of the starting material as well as the charged products. To further examine this material, we have conducted an x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) study to determine the structure of this electrode as a function of its charge state. Specifically, the x-ray absorption Ni K-edge energy, the pre-edge structure, and local structure parameters such as bond lengths, coordination numbers and disorders were investigated at various states of charge corresponding to Li_(1-x)NiO2 for x values of 0.0, 0.11, 0.23, 0.34, 0.45, 0.82, and 0.99. The charging which proceeds via lithium de-intercalation was conducted using constant current anodization at 0.5 mA in a non aqueous electrolyte consisting of 1M LiPF6 in 1:1:3 propylene ! carbonate, ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate. The XAS results for this electrode will be compared with those of γ-NiOOH and KNiIO_6, the latter being used as a reference for quadrivalent nickel.

  14. Investigation of the Ionic Hydration in Aqueous Salt Solutions by Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jeyachandran, Y L; Meyer, F; Benkert, A; Bär, M; Blum, M; Yang, W; Reinert, F; Heske, C; Weinhardt, L; Zharnikov, M

    2016-08-11

    Understanding the molecular structure of the hydration shells and their impact on the hydrogen bond (HB) network of water in aqueous salt solutions is a fundamentally important and technically relevant question. In the present work, such hydration effects were studied for a series of representative salt solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, MgCl2, and KBr) by soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering (RIXS). The oxygen K-edge XES spectra could be described with three components, attributed to initial state HB configurations in pure water, water molecules that have undergone an ultrafast dissociation initiated by the X-ray excitation, and water molecules in contact with salt ions. The behavior of the individual components, as well as the spectral shape of the latter component, has been analyzed in detail. In view of the role of ions in such effects as protein denaturation (i.e., the Hofmeister series), we discuss the ion-specific nature of the hydration shells and find that the results point to a predominant role of anions as compared to cations. Furthermore, we observe a concentration-dependent suppression of ultrafast dissociation in all salt solutions, associated with a significant distortion of intact HB configurations of water molecules facilitating such a dissociation. PMID:27442708

  15. Time-resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Electron Transport Study in Warm Dense Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Bae, Leejin; Engelhorn, Kyle; Heimann, Philip; Ping, Yuan; Barbrel, Ben; Fernandez, Amalia; Beckwith, Martha Anne; Cho, Byoung-Ick; GIST Team; IBS Team; LBNL Collaboration; SLAC Collaboration; LLNL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The warm dense Matter represents states of which the temperature is comparable to Fermi energy and ions are strongly coupled. One of the experimental techniques to create such state in the laboratory condition is the isochoric heating of thin metal foil with femtosecond laser pulses. This concept largely relies on the ballistic transport of electrons near the Fermi-level, which were mainly studied for the metals in ambient conditions. However, they were barely investigated in warm dense conditions. We present a time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy measured for the Au/Cu dual layered sample. The front Au layer was isochorically heated with a femtosecond laser pulse, and the x-ray absorption changes around L-edge of Cu, which was attached on the backside of Au, was measured with a picosecond resolution. Time delays between the heating of the `front surface' of Au layer and the alternation of x-ray spectrum of Cu attached on the `rear surface' of Au indicate the energetic electron transport mechanism through Au in the warm dense conditions. IBS (IBS-R012-D1) and the NRF (No. 2013R1A1A1007084) of Korea.

  16. ODS steel raw material local structure analysis using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cintins, A.; Anspoks, A.; Purans, J.; Kuzmin, A.; Timoshenko, J.; Vladimirov, P.; Gräning, T.; Hoffmann, J.

    2015-03-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are promising materials for fusion power reactors, concentrated solar power plants, jet engines, chemical reactors as well as for hydrogen production from thermolysis of water. In this study we used X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Fe and Cr K-edges as a tool to get insight into the local structure of ferritic and austenitic ODS steels around Fe and Cr atoms and its transformation during mechanical alloying process. Using the analysis of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) we found that for austenitic samples a transformation of ferritic steel to austenitic steel is detectable after 10 hours of milling and proceeds till 40 hours of milling; only small amount of a-phase remains after 80 hours of milling. We found that the Cr K-edge EXAFS can be used to observe distortions inside the material and to get an impression on the formation of chromium clusters. In-situ EXAFS experiments offer a reliable method to investigate the ferritic to austenitic transformation.

  17. Sequential single shot X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy at the SACLA free electron laser

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Kwaśniewski, Paweł; Roseker, Wojciech; Fischer, Birgit; Schroer, Martin A.; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sprung, Michael; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; et al

    2015-11-27

    In this study, hard X-ray free electron lasers allow for the first time to access dynamics of condensed matter samples ranging from femtoseconds to several hundred seconds. In particular, the exceptional large transverse coherence of the X-ray pulses and the high time-averaged flux promises to reach time and length scales that have not been accessible up to now with storage ring based sources. However, due to the fluctuations originating from the stochastic nature of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) process the application of well established techniques such as X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) is challenging. Here we demonstrate a single-shotmore » based sequential XPCS study on a colloidal suspension with a relaxation time comparable to the SACLA free-electron laser pulse repetition rate. High quality correlation functions could be extracted without any indications for sample damage. This opens the way for systematic sequential XPCS experiments at FEL sources.« less

  18. Observation of iron spin-states using tabletop x-ray emission spectroscopy and microcalorimeter sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe, Y. I.; O'Neil, G. C.; Miaja-Avila, L.; Fowler, J. W.; Jimenez, R.; Silverman, K. L.; Swetz, D. S.; Ullom, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a powerful probe of the electronic and chemical state of elemental species embedded within complex compounds. X-ray sensors that combine high resolving power and high collecting efficiency are desirable for photon-starved XES experiments such as measurements of dilute, gaseous, and radiation-sensitive samples, time-resolved measurements, and in-laboratory XES. To assess whether arrays of cryogenic microcalorimeters will be useful in photon-starved XES scenarios, we demonstrate that these emerging energy-dispersive sensors can detect the spin-state of 3d electrons of iron in two different compounds, Fe2O3 and FeS2. The measurements were conducted with a picosecond pulsed laser-driven plasma as the exciting x-ray source. The use of this tabletop source suggests that time-resolved in-laboratory XES will be possible in the future. We also present simulations of {{K}}α and {{K}}β spectra that reveal the spin-state sensitivity of different combinations of sensor resolution and accumulated counts. These simulations predict that our current experimental apparatus can perform time-resolved XES measurements on some samples with a measurement time of a few 10 s of hours per time delay.

  19. Diamond sensors and polycapillary lenses for X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ravel, B.; Attenkofer, K.; Bohon, J.; Muller, E.; Smedley, J.

    2013-10-15

    Diamond sensors are evaluated as incident beam monitors for X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. These single crystal devices pose a challenge for an energy-scanning experiment using hard X-rays due to the effect of diffraction from the crystalline sensor at energies which meet the Bragg condition. This problem is eliminated by combination with polycapillary lenses. The convergence angle of the beam exiting the lens is large compared to rocking curve widths of the diamond. A ray exiting one capillary from the lens meets the Bragg condition for any reflection at a different energy from the rays exiting adjacent capillaries. This serves to broaden each diffraction peak over a wide energy range, allowing linear measurement of incident intensity over the range of the energy scan. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure data are measured with a combination of a polycapillary lens and a diamond incident beam monitor. These data are of comparable quality to data measured without a lens and with an ionization chamber monitoring the incident beam intensity.

  20. X-ray Spectroscopy for Chemical and Energy Sciences. the Case of Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, A. I.; van Bokhoven, J. A.

    2014-09-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is the enabling technology for much of the current and future processes relevant for energy conversion and chemicals synthesis. The development of new materials and processes is greatly helped by the understanding of the catalytic process at the molecular level on the macro/micro-kinetic time scale and on that of the actual bond breaking and bond making. The performance of heterogeneous catalysts is inherently the average over the ensemble of active sites. Much development aims at unravelling the structure of the active site; however, in general, these methods yield the ensemble-average structure. A benefit of X-ray-based methods is the large penetration depth of the X-rays, enabling in situ and operando measurements. Furthermore, the potential of X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy methods (XANES, EXAFS, HERFD, RIXS and HEROS) to directly measure the structure of the catalytically active site at the single nanoparticle level using nanometer beams at diffraction-limited storage ring sources is highlighted. Use of pump-probe schemes coupled with single-shot experiments will extend the time range from the micro/macro-kinetic time domain to the time scale of bond breaking and making.

  1. X-ray-absorption-spectroscopy study of manganese-containing compounds and photosynthetic spinach chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, J.A.

    1981-05-01

    The manganese sites in chloroplasts, long thought to be involved in photosynthetic oxygen evolution have been examined and partially characterized by x-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) using synchrotron radiation. The local environment about the manganese atoms is estimated from an analysis of the extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). Comparisons with and simulations of the manganese EXAFS for several reference compounds leads to a model in which the chloroplast manganese atoms are contained in a binuclear complex similar to di-u-oxo-tetrakis-(2,2'-bipyridine) dimanganese. It is suggested that the partner metal is another manganese. The bridging ligands are most probably oxygen. The remaining manganese ligands are carbon, oxygen, or nitrogen. A roughly linear correlation between the X-ray K edge onset energy and the coordination charge of a large number of manganese coordination complexes and compounds has been developed. Entry of the chloroplast manganese edge energy onto this correlation diagram establishes that the active pool of manganese is in an oxidation state greater than +2.

  2. The Constellation-X Spectroscopy X-ray Telescope: Recent Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, Robert; Lehan, John L.; Owens, Scott; Saha, Timo; Stewart, Jeff; Zhang, William W.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Jones, Wiliam D.; Reid, Paul B.

    2006-01-01

    We describe recent progress in the technology development program for the mirror system for the Constellation-X Spectroscopy X-ray Telescope (SXT). Development of this mirror represents a significant technology challenge, as it must provide a combination of large effective area (3 sq. m) and modest angular resolution (15 arc second half power diameter requirement; 5 arc second goal) with a limited mass allocation. The baseline design incorporates over 200 nested Wolter 1 mirrors. Each of these in turn is segmented in order to simplify handling of the mirrors and facilitate mass production. The X-ray reflecting surfaces are fabricated from thin, thermally formed glass sheets. Production improvements have yielded mirror segments that approach the performance requirement without the need for epoxy replication. A mounting and alignment approach incorporating piezoelectric actuators has been shown to manipulate mirror segments with the required precision without introducing significant distortion. Substantial improvements in metrology methodology have provided insights into the mirror segment forming and alignment processes. An X-ray demonstration of a mirror segment pair is planned for early 2006.

  3. Electron-ion interaction cross sections determined by x-ray spectroscopy on EBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Cauble, R.; Chantrenne, S.; Chen, M.; Knapp, D.; Marrs, R.; Phillips, T.; Reed, K.; Schneider, M.; Scofield, J.; Wong, K.; Vogel, D.; Zasadzinski, R. ); Wargelin, B. . Space Sciences Lab.); Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1991-06-26

    The Livermore electron beam ion trap (EBIT) is used to measure electron-ion interactions with high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy. Measurements are presented of the K{alpha} x-ray emission of heliumlike Fe{sup 24+} that demonstrate the effect of various processes on the spectrum of highly charged heliumlike ions. In particular, we have studied how dielectronic recombination into high-n Rydberg levels and resonance excitation processes contribute to the x-ray emission near threshold for direct electron-impact excitation. From these and other measurements we infer the cross sections for impact excitation of heliumlike titanium, chromium, manganese, and iron. Comparing the results with theoretical cross sections from distorted-wave calculations we find excellent agreement for all transitions but the heliumlike resonance transition from 1s2p {sup 1}P{sub 1} to ground, whose excitation cross section is measured to be 10%--20% smaller than calculated. 36 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Ultrafast soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at liquid water microjets.

    PubMed

    Faubel, M; Siefermann, K R; Liu, Y; Abel, B

    2012-01-17

    Since the pioneering work of Kai Siegbahn, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) has been developed into an indispensable analytical technique for surface science. The value of this powerful method of photoelectron spectroscopy (PES, also termed photoemission spectroscopy) and Siegbahn's contributions were recognized in the 1981 Nobel Prize in Physics. The need for high vacuum, however, originally prohibited PES of volatile liquids, and only allowed for investigation of low-vapor-pressure molecules attached to a surface (or close to a surface) or liquid films of low volatility. Only with the invention of liquid beams of volatile liquids compatible with high-vacuum conditions was PES from liquid surfaces under vacuum made feasible. Because of the ubiquity of water interfaces in nature, the liquid water-vacuum interface became a most attractive research topic, particularly over the past 10 years. PES studies of these important aqueous interfaces remained significantly challenging because of the need to develop high-pressure PES methods. For decades, ESCA or PES (termed XPS, for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, in the case of soft X-ray photons) was restricted to conventional laboratory X-ray sources or beamlines in synchrotron facilities. This approach enabled frequency domain measurements, but with poor time resolution. Indirect access to time-resolved processes in the condensed phase was only achieved if line-widths could be analyzed or if processes could be related to a fast clock, that is, reference processes that are fast enough and are also well understood in the condensed phase. Just recently, the emergence of high harmonic light sources, providing short-wavelength radiation in ultrashort light pulses, added the dimension of time to the classical ESCA or XPS technique and opened the door to (soft) X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with ultrahigh time resolution. The combination of high harmonic light sources (providing radiation with laserlike

  5. Ultrafast Excited State Relaxation of a Metalloporphyrin Revealed by Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shelby, Megan L; Lestrange, Patrick J; Jackson, Nicholas E; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Mara, Michael W; Stickrath, Andrew B; Zhu, Diling; Lemke, Henrik T; Chollet, Matthieu; Hoffman, Brian M; Li, Xiaosong; Chen, Lin X

    2016-07-20

    Photoexcited Nickel(II) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP), like many open-shell metalloporphyrins, relaxes rapidly through multiple electronic states following an initial porphyrin-based excitation, some involving metal centered electronic configuration changes that could be harnessed catalytically before excited state relaxation. While a NiTMP excited state present at 100 ps was previously identified by X-ray transient absorption (XTA) spectroscopy at a synchrotron source as a relaxed (d,d) state, the lowest energy excited state (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2007, 129, 9616 and Chem. Sci., 2010, 1, 642), structural dynamics before thermalization were not resolved due to the ∼100 ps duration of the available X-ray probe pulse. Using the femtosecond (fs) X-ray pulses of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the Ni center electronic configuration from the initial excited state to the relaxed (d,d) state has been obtained via ultrafast Ni K-edge XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) on a time scale from hundreds of femtoseconds to 100 ps. This enabled the identification of a short-lived Ni(I) species aided by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) methods. Computed electronic and nuclear structure for critical excited electronic states in the relaxation pathway characterize the dependence of the complex's geometry on the electron occupation of the 3d orbitals. Calculated XANES transitions for these excited states assign a short-lived transient signal to the spectroscopic signature of the Ni(I) species, resulting from intramolecular charge transfer on a time scale that has eluded previous synchrotron studies. These combined results enable us to examine the excited state structural dynamics of NiTMP prior to thermal relaxation and to capture intermediates of potential photocatalytic significance. PMID:27286410

  6. Probing buried interfaces with standing-wave excited photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Brian C.

    The experiments presented in this thesis are based on a few rather simple ideas that, when put together, can yield impressive amounts of information of relevance to nanoscience and nanotechnology. It is with this philosophy in mind that we will work our way through the generation of x-rays to their excitation of photoelectrons and x-rays to their final use to yield information about buried interfaces in a non-destructive manner. As a first idea, a strong soft x-ray standing wave can be created by irradiating a synthetic multilayer with a monochromatized synchrotron radiation beam at its first-order Bragg angle. The standing wave causes a strong modulation of the magnitude of the electric field inside and above the multilayer. This modulation in turn results in a modulation of the intensity of both photoelectrons and secondary x-rays emitted from the sample as a function of the depth of the emitting atoms below the surface. By growing one layer of the sample as a wedge on top of the multilayer and the other uniform-thickness layers of the sample on top of that, we can by translating the focused x-ray beam across the thickness of the wedge probe the stoichiometric and magnetic properties of the overlayers and their respective interfaces. These measured intensities can then be compared to theoretical calculations which include all x-ray optical effects. This standing wave/wedge approach, which we shall also term the "swedge" method, shows considerable promise for studying a variety of nanostructured materials and devices.

  7. Performance Characteristics Of An Intensity Modulated Advanced X-Ray Source (IMAXS) For Homeland Security Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Brown, Craig; Christensen, Phil. A.; Condron, Cathie; Hernandez, Michael; Ingle, Mike; Johnson, William A.; Owen, Roger D.; Ross, Randy; Schonberg, Russell G.

    2011-06-01

    X-ray cargo inspection systems for the detection and verification of threats and contraband must address stringent, competitive performance requirements. High x-ray intensity is needed to penetrate dense cargo, while low intensity is desirable to minimize the radiation footprint, i.e. the size of the controlled area, required shielding and the dose to personnel. In a collaborative effort between HESCO/PTSE Inc., XScell Corp., Stangenes Industries, Inc. and Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., an Intensity Modulated Advanced X-ray Source (IMAXS) was designed and produced. Cargo inspection systems utilizing such a source have been projected to achieve up to 2 inches steel-equivalent greater penetration capability, while on average producing the same or smaller radiation footprint as present fixed-intensity sources. Alternatively, the design can be used to obtain the same penetration capability as with conventional sources, but reducing the radiation footprint by about a factor of three. The key idea is to anticipate the needed intensity for each x-ray pulse by evaluating signal strength in the cargo inspection system detector array for the previous pulse. The IMAXS is therefore capable of changing intensity from one pulse to the next by an electronic signal provided by electronics inside the cargo inspection system detector array, which determine the required source intensity for the next pulse. We report on the completion of a 9 MV S-band (2998 MHz) IMAXS source and comment on its performance.

  8. Composition of RF-sputtered refractory compounds determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Brainard, W. A.

    1978-01-01

    RF-sputtered coatings of CrB2, MoSi2, Mo2C, TiC, and MoS2 were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Data on stoichiometry, impurity content, and chemical bonding were obtained. The influences of sputtering target history, deposition time, RF power level, and substrate bias were studied. Significant deviations from stoichiometry and high oxide levels were related to target outgassing. The effect of substrate bias depended on the particular coating material studied.

  9. Contact-free pyroelectric measurements using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehre, D.; Cohen, H.

    2013-07-01

    Non-contact pyroelectricity measurements based on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are presented. Applied to Lithium Tantalate crystals, we demonstrate how the XPS-derived surface potential provides a simple probe of the desired property, free of all top-contact related difficulties. In particular, the increase in Lithium Tantalate spontaneous polarization under cooling, an experimentally challenging feature, is evaluated. We further inspect the roll of surface contaminants and the control over trapped surface charge in the XPS vacuum environment. Our approach can be extended to other non-contact probes, as well as to measuring additional electrical properties, such as piezoelectricity and ferroelectricity.

  10. A study of synthetic and natural uranium oxides by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teterin, Yu. A.; Kulakov, V. M.; Baev, A. S.; Nevzorov, N. B.; Melnikov, I. V.; Streltsov, V. A.; Mashirov, L. G.; Suglobov, D. N.; Zelenkov, A. G.

    1981-09-01

    Synthetic and natural uranium oxides UO x (2≦×≦3) have been studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to determine the phase composition and content of uranium ions in uraninites with a varying degree of oxidation. A strong hybridization of U6 p and O2 s orbitals has been found which permits a quantitative assessment of the U-O bond lengths. The values of such bonds in some substances have been found to be smaller than those in synthetic U(VI) oxide. The oxides U2O5 and U3O8 contain two types of uranium ions with a varying degree of oxidation.

  11. Contact-free pyroelectric measurements using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ehre, D.; Cohen, H.

    2013-07-29

    Non-contact pyroelectricity measurements based on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are presented. Applied to Lithium Tantalate crystals, we demonstrate how the XPS-derived surface potential provides a simple probe of the desired property, free of all top-contact related difficulties. In particular, the increase in Lithium Tantalate spontaneous polarization under cooling, an experimentally challenging feature, is evaluated. We further inspect the roll of surface contaminants and the control over trapped surface charge in the XPS vacuum environment. Our approach can be extended to other non-contact probes, as well as to measuring additional electrical properties, such as piezoelectricity and ferroelectricity.

  12. Determination of protein orientation on surfaces with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Margalit, R; Vasquez, R P

    1990-02-01

    The use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for determination of the preferred orientation of proteins on metal surfaces is demonstrated. A myoglobin derivative in which a pentaamineruthenium (III) group is attached to a specific histidine (residue 81) is used for this purpose, with the Ru and Fe acting as a double marker. The relative intensities of the XPS photoelectron spectra for these two markers are shown to be a sensitive measure of orientation of the protein film. On both aluminum and indium-tin-oxide surfaces, XPS indicates that the Ru-Fe axis of the myoglobin derivative is preferentially oriented with the Ru furthest from the substrate. PMID:2340069

  13. High-Resolution Spectroscopy with the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    ScienceCinema

    Canizares, Claude R. [MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2010-01-08

    The capabilities of the Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton for high-resolution spectroscopy have brought tradition plasma diagnostic techniques to the study of cosmic plasma. Observations have probed nearly every class of astronomical object, from young proto-starts through massive O starts and black hole binaries, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and the intergalactic medium. Many of these sources show remarkable rich spectra that reveal new physical information, such as emission measure distributions, elemental abundances, accretion disk and wind signatures, and time variability. This talk will present an overview of the Chandra instrumentaton and selected examples of spectral observations of astrophysical and cosmological importance.

  14. X-ray spectroscopy of E2 and M3 transitions in Ni-like W

    SciTech Connect

    Clementson, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gu, M. F.

    2010-01-15

    The electric quadrupole (E2) and magnetic octupole (M3) ground-state transitions in Ni-like W{sup 46+} have been measured using high-resolution crystal spectroscopy at the LLNL electron-beam ion trap facility. The lines fall in the soft x-ray region near 7.93 A and were originally observed as an unresolved feature in tokamak plasmas. Using flat ammonium dihydrogen phosphate and quartz crystals, the wavelengths, intensities, and polarizations of the two lines have been measured for various electron-beam energies and compared to intensity and polarization calculations performed using the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC).

  15. X-ray Spectroscopy of E2 and M3 Transitions in Ni-like W

    SciTech Connect

    Clementson, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Gu, M F

    2009-11-09

    The electric quadrupole (E2) and magnetic octupole (M3) ground state transitions in Ni-like W{sup 46+} have been measured using high-resolution crystal spectroscopy at the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility. The lines fall in the soft x-ray region near 7.93 {angstrom} and were originally observed as an unresolved feature in tokamak plasmas. Using flat ADP and quartz crystals the wavelengths, intensities, and polarizations of the two lines have been measured for various electron beam energies and compared to intensity and polarization calculations performed using the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC).

  16. Slow dynamics of nanocomposite polymer aerogels as revealed by X-ray photocorrelation spectroscopy (XPCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández, Rebeca E-mail: aurora.nogales@csic.es; Mijangos, Carmen; Nogales, Aurora E-mail: aurora.nogales@csic.es; Ezquerra, Tiberio A.; Sprung, Michael

    2014-01-14

    We report on a novel slow dynamics of polymer xerogels, aerogels, and nanocomposite aerogels with iron oxide nanoparticles, as revealed by X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. The polymer aerogel and its nanocomposite aerogels, which are porous in nature, exhibit hyper-diffusive dynamics at room temperature. In contrast, non-porous polymer xerogels exhibit an absence of this peculiar dynamics. This slow dynamical process has been assigned to a relaxation of the characteristic porous structure of these materials and not to the presence of nanoparticles.

  17. Oxidation of stepped Pt(111) studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bandlow, Jochen; Kaghazchi, Payam; Jacob, Timo; Papp, C.; Traenkenschuh, B.; Streber, R.; Lorenz, M. P. A.; Fuhrmann, T.; Steinrueck, H.-P.; Denecke, R.

    2011-05-01

    In this comparative density functional theory and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on the interaction of oxygen with stepped Pt(111) surfaces, we show that both the initial adsorption and oxidation occur at the steps rather than terraces. An equivalent behavior was observed for the oxide formation at higher chemical potentials, where, after the formation of a one-dimensional PtO{sub 2}-type oxide at the steps, similar oxide chains form on the (111) terraces, indicating the initial stages of bulk oxide formation.

  18. Determination of the melting temperature of palladium nanoparticles by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasenko, V. G.; Podsukhina, S. S.; Kozinkin, A. V.; Zubavichus, Ya. V.

    2016-02-01

    The anharmonicity parameters of the interatomic potential in ~4-nm palladium nanoparticles deposited on poly(tetra)fluoroethylene microgranules 0.2-0.5 μm in average size were studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy from an analysis of temperature-dependent EXAFS Pd K edges. The parameters of the interatomic potential obtained were used to calculate melting temperature T melt = 1591 K and Debye temperature ΘD = 257 K of palladium nanoparticles; these temperatures are significantly lower than those in metallic palladium: 277 K and 1825 K, respectively.

  19. An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Cd binding onto a halophilic archaeon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Allison R.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and cadmium (Cd) isotherm experiments determine how Cd adsorbs to the surface of halophilic archaeon Halobacterium noricense. This archaeon, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico could be involved with the transport of toxic metals stored in the transuranic waste in the salt mine. The isotherm experiments show that adsorption is relatively constant across the tolerable pH range for H. noricense. The XAS results indicate that Cd adsorption occurs predominately via a sulfur site, most likely sulfhydryl, with the same site dominating all measured pH values.

  20. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Cuprous-Thiolate Clusters in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Metallothionein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Pickering, I.J.; Winge, D.R.; George, G.N.

    2009-05-28

    Copper (Cu) metallothioneins are cuprous-thiolate proteins that contain multimetallic clusters, and are thought to have dual functions of Cu storage and Cu detoxification. We have used a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density-functional theory (DFT) to investigate the nature of Cu binding to Saccharomyces cerevisiae metallothionein. We found that the XAS of metallothionein prepared, containing a full complement of Cu, was quantitatively consistent with the crystal structure, and that reconstitution of the apo-metallothionein with stoichiometric Cu results in the formation of a tetracopper cluster, indicating cooperative binding of the Cu ions by the metallothionein.

  1. Grazing incidence telescopes - A new class for soft X-ray and EUV spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hettrick, M. C.; Bowyer, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new class of grazing incidence telescopes is identified, and its advantages for stellar spectroscopy are discussed. In particular, three types of telescope geometry consisting of a primary and a secondary, both at grazing incidence, are proposed. Type I delivers a converging beam having a real focus; type II delivers a diverging beam from a virtual focus, and type III delivers a collimated beam concentrated relative to the primary aperture. The three telescope types are shown to possess unique properties which improve the efficiency and shorten the length of soft X-ray/EUV spectrographs.

  2. X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Studies of Cesium Antimonide Photocathodes for Photoinjector Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Irene; Chevallay, Eric; Fedosseev, Valentin; Hessler, Christoph; Neupert, Holger; Nistor, Valentin; Taborelli, Mauro

    Within the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project, feasibility studies of a photoinjector option for the drive beam as an alternative to its baseline design using a thermionic electron gun (Geschonke et al. [1]) are on-going. This R&D program covers both the laser and the photocathode side. Cesium antimonide cathodes were produced at CERN by co-deposition onto copper substrates and characterized by photoemission and by XPS (X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy) analysis. A systematic study on newly produced and used photocathodes was conducted in order to correlate the surface composition to the photoemissive properties.

  3. The Chemical Forms of Mercury in Human Hair: A Study using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    George, Graham N.; Singh, Satya P.; Myers, Gary J.; Watson, Gene E.; Pickering, Ingrid J.

    2013-01-01

    Human hair is frequently used as a bio-indicator of mercury exposure. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to examine the chemical forms of mercury in human hair samples taken from individuals with high fish consumption and concomitant exposure to methylmercury. The mercury is found to be predominantly methylmercury cysteine or closely related species, comprising approximately 80% of the total mercury with the remainder an inorganic thiolate-coordinated mercuric species. No appreciable role was found for selenium in coordinating mercury in hair. PMID:20225071

  4. Evaluation of Fe, Mn promoted sulfated zirconia catalyst by x-ray and infrared spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Tabora, J.E.; Davis, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    Sulfated zirconia promoted with Fe and Mn is two orders of magnitude more active than an unpromoted catalyst for butane isomerization at low temperature. In this work, the atomic structures of the unpromoted and promoted superacid catalysts were investigated using x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Zr and Fe K-edges. In addition, infrared spectroscopy was used to probe the structure of the surface sulfate groups on the superacids. Infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine and carbon monoxide was also used to determine the types and strengths of acid sites on the two samples. Results indicated that Fe atoms do not substitute into tetragonal zirconia and that both Bronsted and Lewis acid sites were present on the materials. Furthermore, no obvious difference in acid strength was observed. Implications of these results for catalysis by zirconia-based superacids will be discussed.

  5. X-Ray Calibration Facility/Advanced Video Guidance Sensor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, N. A. S.; Howard, R. T.; Watson, D. W.

    2004-01-01

    The advanced video guidance sensor was tested in the X-Ray Calibration facility at Marshall Space Flight Center to establish performance during vacuum. Two sensors were tested and a timeline for each are presented. The sensor and test facility are discussed briefly. A new test stand was also developed. A table establishing sensor bias and spot size growth for several ranges is detailed along with testing anomalies.

  6. Superconducting Cavity Design for Short-Pulse X-Rays at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Waldschmidt, R. Nassiri, G. Cheng, R.A. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2011-03-01

    Superconducting cavities have been analyzed for the short-pulse x-ray (SPX) project at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Due to the strong damping requirements in the APS storage ring, single-cell superconducting cavities have been designed. The geometry has been optimized for lower-order and higher-order mode damping, reduced peak surface magnetic fields, and compact size. The integration of the cavity assembly, with dampers and waveguide input coupler, into a cryomodule will be discussed.

  7. Pressure-induced structural distortion of TbMnO3 : A combined x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. M.; Chou, T. L.; Lee, J. M.; Chen, S. A.; Chan, T. S.; Chen, T. H.; Lu, K. T.; Chuang, W. T.; Sheu, H.-S.; Chen, S. W.; Lin, C. M.; Hiraoka, N.; Ishii, H.; Tsuei, K. D.; Yang, T. J.

    2009-04-01

    The variation of electronic states and structural distortion in highly compressed multiferroic TbMnO3 was probed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) using synchrotron radiation. Refined XRD data enabled observation of a reduced local Jahn-Teller (JT) distortion of Mn sites within MnO6 octahedra in TbMnO3 with increasing hydrostatic pressure. A progressively increasing intensity of the white line in MnK -edge x-ray absorption spectra of TbMnO3 was detected with increasing pressure. The absorption threshold of MnK -edge spectra of TbMnO3 is shifted toward higher energy, whereas the pre-edge peak is slightly shifted to lower energy with increasing hydrostatic pressure. We provide spectral evidence for pressure-induced bandwidth broadening for mangnites. The enhanced intensity of the white line and the shifted absorption threshold of MnK -edge spectra are explained in terms of a reduced JT distortion of MnO6 octahedra in compressed TbMnO3 . Comparison of XAS data with full-multiple-scattering calculations using code FDMNES shows satisfactory agreement between experimental and calculated MnK -edge spectra.

  8. Electronic structure of individual hybrid colloid particles studied by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy in the X-ray microscope.

    PubMed

    Henzler, Katja; Guttmann, Peter; Lu, Yan; Polzer, Frank; Schneider, Gerd; Ballauff, Matthias

    2013-02-13

    The electronic structure of individual hybrid particles was studied by nanoscale near-edge X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy. The colloidal particles consist of a solid polystyrene core and a cross-linked poly-N-(isopropylacrylamide) shell with embedded crystalline titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanoparticles (d = 6 ± 3 nm). The TiO(2) particles are generated in the carrier network by a sol-gel process at room temperature. The hybrid particles were imaged with photon energy steps of 0.1 eV in their hydrated environment with a cryo transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) at the Ti L(2,3)-edge. By analyzing the image stacks, the obtained near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of our individual hybrid particles show clearly that our synthesis generates TiO(2) in the anastase phase. Additionally, our spectromicroscopy method permits the determination of the density distribution of TiO(2) in single carrier particles. Therefore, NEXAFS spectroscopy combined with TXM presents a unique method to get in-depth insight into the electronic structure of hybrid materials. PMID:23360082

  9. Where Water Is Oxidized to Dioxygen: Structure of the Photosynthetic Mn4Ca Cluster from X-ray Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2014-01-01

    Light-driven oxidation of water to dioxygen in plants, algae, and cyanobacteria is catalyzed within photosystem II (PS II) by a Mn4Ca cluster. Although the cluster has been studied by many different methods, its structure and mechanism have remained elusive. X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies have been particularly useful in probing the electronic and geometric structures and the mechanism of the water oxidation reaction. Recent progress, reviewed here, includes polarized X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of PS II single crystals. Analysis of those results has constrained the Mn4Ca cluster geometry to a set of three similar high-resolution structures. The structure of the cluster from the present study is unlike either the 3.0- or 3.5-Å-resolution X-ray structures or other previously proposed models. The differences between the models derived from X-ray spectroscopy and crystallography are predominantly because of damage to the Mn4Ca cluster by X-rays under conditions used for the structure determination by X-ray crystallography. X-ray spectroscopy studies are also used for studying the changes in the structure of the Mn4Ca catalytic center as it cycles through the five intermediate states known as the Si states (i = 0–4). The electronic structure of the Mn4Ca cluster has been studied more recently using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy (RIXS), in addition to the earlier X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy methods. These studies are revealing that the assignment of formal oxidation states is overly simplistic. A more accurate description should consider the charge density on the Mn atoms, which includes the covalency of the bonds and delocalization of the charge over the cluster. The geometric and electronic structures of the Mn4Ca cluster in the S states derived from X-ray spectroscopy are leading to a detailed understanding of the mechanism of O–O bond formation

  10. A liquid flatjet system for solution phase soft-x-ray spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ekimova, Maria; Quevedo, Wilson; Faubel, Manfred; Wernet, Philippe; Nibbering, Erik T. J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a liquid flatjet system for solution phase soft-x-ray spectroscopy. The flatjet set-up utilises the phenomenon of formation of stable liquid sheets upon collision of two identical laminar jets. Colliding the two single water jets, coming out of the nozzles with 50 μm orifices, under an impact angle of 48° leads to double sheet formation, of which the first sheet is 4.6 mm long and 1.0 mm wide. The liquid flatjet operates fully functional under vacuum conditions (<10−3 mbar), allowing soft-x-ray spectroscopy of aqueous solutions in transmission mode. We analyse the liquid water flatjet thickness under atmospheric pressure using interferomeric or mid-infrared transmission measurements and under vacuum conditions by measuring the absorbance of the O K-edge of water in transmission, and comparing our results with previously published data obtained with standing cells with Si3N4 membrane windows. The thickness of the first liquid sheet is found to vary between 1.4–3 μm, depending on the transverse and longitudinal position in the liquid sheet. We observe that the derived thickness is of similar magnitude under 1 bar and under vacuum conditions. A catcher unit facilitates the recycling of the solutions, allowing measurements on small sample volumes (∼10 ml). We demonstrate the applicability of this approach by presenting measurements on the N K-edge of aqueous NH4+. Our results suggest the high potential of using liquid flatjets in steady-state and time-resolved studies in the soft-x-ray regime. PMID:26798824

  11. A liquid flatjet system for solution phase soft-x-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ekimova, Maria; Quevedo, Wilson; Faubel, Manfred; Wernet, Philippe; Nibbering, Erik T J

    2015-09-01

    We present a liquid flatjet system for solution phase soft-x-ray spectroscopy. The flatjet set-up utilises the phenomenon of formation of stable liquid sheets upon collision of two identical laminar jets. Colliding the two single water jets, coming out of the nozzles with 50 μm orifices, under an impact angle of 48° leads to double sheet formation, of which the first sheet is 4.6 mm long and 1.0 mm wide. The liquid flatjet operates fully functional under vacuum conditions (<10(-3) mbar), allowing soft-x-ray spectroscopy of aqueous solutions in transmission mode. We analyse the liquid water flatjet thickness under atmospheric pressure using interferomeric or mid-infrared transmission measurements and under vacuum conditions by measuring the absorbance of the O K-edge of water in transmission, and comparing our results with previously published data obtained with standing cells with Si3N4 membrane windows. The thickness of the first liquid sheet is found to vary between 1.4-3 μm, depending on the transverse and longitudinal position in the liquid sheet. We observe that the derived thickness is of similar magnitude under 1 bar and under vacuum conditions. A catcher unit facilitates the recycling of the solutions, allowing measurements on small sample volumes (∼10 ml). We demonstrate the applicability of this approach by presenting measurements on the N K-edge of aqueous NH4 (+). Our results suggest the high potential of using liquid flatjets in steady-state and time-resolved studies in the soft-x-ray regime. PMID:26798824

  12. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray absorption spectroscopy of novel magnetic thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, M.A.; Ju, H.L.; Krishnan, K.M.

    1997-04-01

    The optimization of the magnetic properties of materials for a wide range of applications requires a dynamic iteration between synthesis, property measurements and characterization at appropriate length scales. The authors interest arises both from the increased appreciation of the degree to which magnetic properties can be influenced by tailored microstructures and the ability to characterize them by x-ray scattering/dichroism techniques. Preliminary results of this work at the ALS on `giant` moment in {alpha}{double_prime}-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} and `colossal` magnetoresistance in manganite perovskites is presented here. It has recently been claimed that {alpha}{double_prime}-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} possesses a giant magnetization of 2.9 T ({approximately}2300 emu/cc) when grown on lattice-matched In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As(001) and Fe/GaAs(001). However, attempts at growth on simpler substrates have resulted in only a modest enhancement in moment and often in multiphase mixtures. Theoretical calculations based on the band structure of Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} predict values for the magnetization around 2.3 T ({approximately}1780 emu/cc), well below Sugita`s claims, but consistent with the magnetization reported by several other workers. Using appropriate sum rules applied to the integrated MCD spectrum, they hope to determine the magnetic moment of the iron species in the {alpha}{double_prime}-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} films and other phases and resolve the orbital and spin contributions to the moment. There is also rapidly growing interest in the `colossal magnetoresistance` effect observed in manganese oxides for both fundamental and commercial applications. To address some of these issues the authors have measured the electron energy loss spectra (EELS) of manganese perovskites at room temperature.

  13. X-ray emission and photoluminescence spectroscopy of nanostructured silica with implanted copper ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsepin, D. A.; Kortov, V. S.; Kurmaev, É. Z.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Wilks, R. G.; Moewes, A.

    2008-12-01

    Quartz glass samples and compacted SiO2 nanopowders have been studied by x-ray emission (Cu L 2, 3 transition 3 d4 s → 2 p 1/2, 3/2) and photoluminescence spectroscopy following pulsed Cu+ ion implantation (energy, 30 keV; pulse current up to 0.5 A; pulse duration, 400 μs; irradiation doses, 1015, 1016, and 2 × 1017 cm-2). It has been established that ion irradiation gives rise to the formation of glassy and compacted SiO2 samples of nanosized metallic and oxide phases in the structure. An analysis of Cu L x-ray emission spectra has shown that copper nanoparticles are thermodynamically metastable and chemically active because ion beam bombardment transfers them readily to the oxide form. This results from the radiation-stimulated fracture of regular Si-O-Si bonds in amorphous SiO2 and the formation of defective Si-Si bonds, followed by capture of oxygen by copper atoms. The enhanced degree of oxidation of copper ions in SiO2 nanostructured pellets can be reduced by coimplantation and thermal annealing. Optical spectroscopy studies suggest that, in glasses and SiO2 nanostructured pellets, there exist metallic Cu{/n 0} nanoclusters, which at low temperatures exhibit quantum-confined photoluminescence with a characteristic stepped excitation spectrum.

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopy on magnetic nanoscale systems for modern applications.

    PubMed

    Schmitz-Antoniak, Carolin

    2015-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy facilitated by state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation technology is presented as a powerful tool to study nanoscale systems, in particular revealing their static element-specific magnetic and electronic properties on a microscopic level. A survey is given on the properties of nanoparticles, nanocomposites and thin films covering a broad range of possible applications. It ranges from the ageing effects of iron oxide nanoparticles in dispersion for biomedical applications to the characterisation on a microscopic level of nanoscale systems for data storage devices. In this respect, new concepts for electrically addressable magnetic data storage devices are highlighted by characterising the coupling in a BaTiO(3)/CoFe(2)O(4) nanocomposite as prototypical model system. But classical magnetically addressable devices are also discussed on the basis of tailoring the magnetic properties of self-assembled ensembles of FePt nanoparticles for data storage and the high-moment material Fe/Cr/Gd for write heads. For the latter cases, the importance is emphasised of combining experimental approaches in x-ray absorption spectroscopy with density functional theory to gain a more fundamental understanding. PMID:26029938

  15. Impact of Oriented Clay Particles on X-Ray Spectroscopy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, A. J. M. S.; Syazwani, R. N.; Wijeyesekera, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the engineering properties of the mineralogy and microfabic of clayey soils is very complex and thus very difficult for soil characterization. Micromechanics of soils recognize that the micro structure and mineralogy of clay have a significant influence on its engineering behaviour. To achieve a more reliable quantitative evaluation of clay mineralogy, a proper sample preparation technique for quantitative clay mineral analysis is necessary. This paper presents the quantitative evaluation of elemental analysis and chemical characterization of oriented and random oriented clay particles using X-ray spectroscopy. Three different types of clays namely marine clay, bentonite and kaolin clay were studied. The oriented samples were prepared by placing the dispersed clay in water and left to settle on porous ceramic tiles by applying a relatively weak suction through a vacuum pump. Images form a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was also used to show the comparison between the orientation patterns of both the sample preparation techniques. From the quantitative analysis of the X-ray spectroscopy, oriented sampling method showed more accuracy in identifying mineral deposits, because it produced better peak intensity on the spectrum and more mineral content can be identified compared to randomly oriented samples.

  16. Raman and Mossbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry studies on quenched copper-ferri-aluminates.

    PubMed

    Modi, Kunal B; Raval, Pooja Y; Shah, Suraj J; Kathad, Chetan R; Dulera, Sonal V; Popat, Mansi V; Zankat, Kiritsinh B; Saija, Kiran G; Pathak, Tushar K; Vasoya, Nimish H; Lakhani, Vinay K; Chandra, Usha; Jha, Prafulla K

    2015-02-16

    Four spinel ferrite compositions of the CuAl(x)Fe(2-x)O4, x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, system prepared by usual double-sintering ceramic route and quenched (rapid thermal cooling) from final sintering temperature (1373 K) to liquid nitrogen temperature (80 K) were investigated by employing X-ray powder diffractometry, (57)Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy at 300 K. The Raman spectra collected in the wavenumber range of 100-1000 cm(-1) were analyzed in a systematic manner and showed five predicted modes for the spinel structure and splitting of A1g Raman mode into two/three energy values, attributed to peaks belonging to each ion (Cu(2+), Fe(3+), and Al(3+)) in the tetrahedral positions. The suppression of lower-frequency peaks was explained on the basis of weakening in magnetic coupling and reduction in ferrimagnetic behavior as well as increase in stress induced by square bond formation on Al(3+) substitution. The enhancement in intensity, random variation of line width, and blue shift for highest frequency peak corresponding to A1g mode were observed. The ferric ion (Fe(3+)) concentration for different compositions determined from Raman spectral analysis agrees well with that deduced by means of X-ray diffraction line-intensity calculations and Mossbauer spectral analysis. An attempt was made to determine elastic and thermodynamic properties from Raman spectral analysis and elastic constants from cation distribution. PMID:25594232

  17. Characterising legacy spent nuclear fuel pond materials using microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bower, W R; Morris, K; Mosselmans, J F W; Thompson, O R; Banford, A W; Law, K; Pattrick, R A D

    2016-11-01

    Analysis of a radioactive, coated concrete core from the decommissioned, spent nuclear fuel cooling pond at the Hunterston-A nuclear site (UK) has provided a unique opportunity to study radionuclides within a real-world system. The core, obtained from a dividing wall and sampled at the fill level of the pond, exhibited radioactivity (dominantly (137)Cs and (90)Sr) heterogeneously distributed across both painted faces. Chemical analysis of the core was undertaken using microfocus spectroscopy at Diamond Light Source, UK. Mapping of Sr across the surface coatings using microfocus X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that Sr was bound to TiO2 particles in the paint layers, suggesting an association between TiO2 and radiostrontium. Stable Sr and Cs sorption experiments using concrete coupons were also undertaken to assess their interactions with the bulk concrete in case of a breach in the coating layers. μXRF and scanning electron microscopy showed that Sr was immobilized by the cement phases, whilst at the elevated experimental concentrations, Cs was associated with clay minerals in the aggregates. This study provides a crucial insight into poorly understood infrastructural contamination in complex systems and is directly applicable to the UK's nuclear decommissioning efforts. PMID:27262277

  18. Evolution of Silver Nanoparticles in the Rat Lung Investigated by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Following a 6-h inhalation exposure to aerosolized 20 and 110 nm diameter silver nanoparticles, lung tissues from rats were investigated with X-ray absorption spectroscopy, which can identify the chemical state of silver species. Lung tissues were processed immediately after sacrifice of the animals at 0, 1, 3, and 7 days post exposure and the samples were stored in an inert and low-temperature environment until measured. We found that it is critical to follow a proper processing, storage and measurement protocol; otherwise only silver oxides are detected after inhalation even for the larger nanoparticles. The results of X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements taken in air at 85 K suggest that the dominating silver species in all the postexposure lung tissues were metallic silver, not silver oxide, or solvated silver cations. The results further indicate that the silver nanoparticles in the tissues were transformed from the original nanoparticles to other forms of metallic silver nanomaterials and the rate of this transformation depended on the size of the original nanoparticles. We found that 20 nm diameter silver nanoparticles were significantly modified after aerosolization and 6-h inhalation/deposition, whereas larger, 110 nm diameter nanoparticles were largely unchanged. Over the seven-day postexposure period the smaller 20 nm silver nanoparticles underwent less change in the lung tissue than the larger 110 nm silver nanoparticles. In contrast, silica-coated gold nanoparticles did not undergo any modification processes and remained as the initial nanoparticles throughout the 7-day study period. PMID:25517690

  19. Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy of Diamondoid Thiol Monolayers on Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T.M.; Fabbri, J.D.; Lee, J.R.I.; Schreiner, P.R.; Fokin, A.A.; Tkachenko, B.A.; Fokina, N.A.; Dahl, J.E.P.; Carlson, R.M.K.; Vance, A.L.; Yang, W.; Terminello, L.J.; Buuren, T.van; Melosh, N.A.

    2009-05-26

    Diamondoids, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures, have unique properties with potential value for nanotechnology. The availability and ability to selectively functionalize this special class of nanodiamond materials opens new possibilities for surface modification, for high-efficiency field emitters in molecular electronics, as seed crystals for diamond growth, or as robust mechanical coatings. The properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of diamondoids are thus of fundamental interest for a variety of emerging applications. This paper presents the effects of thiol substitution position and polymantane order on diamondoid SAMs on gold using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A framework to determine both molecular tilt and twist through NEXAFS is presented and reveals highly ordered diamondoid SAMs, with the molecular orientation controlled by the thiol location. C 1s and S 2p binding energies are lower in adamantane thiol than alkane thiols on gold by 0.67 {+-} 0.05 and 0.16 {+-} 0.04 eV, respectively. These binding energies vary with diamondoid monolayer structure and thiol substitution position, consistent with different degrees of steric strain and electronic interaction with the substrate. This work demonstrates control over the assembly, in particular the orientational and electronic structure, providing a flexible design of surface properties with this exciting new class of diamond nanoparticles.

  20. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy of Diamondoid Thiol Monolayers on Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T M; Fabbri, J; Lee, J I; Schreiner, P; Fokin, A A; Tkachenko, B A; Fokina, N A; Dahl, J; Carlson, B; Vance, A L; Yang, W; Terminello, L J; van Buuren, T; Melosh, N

    2007-11-27

    Diamondoids, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures, have unique properties with potential value for nanotechnology. The availability and ability to selectively functionalize this special class of nanodiamond materials opens new possibilities for surface-modification, for high-efficiency field emitters in molecular electronics, as seed crystals for diamond growth, or as robust mechanical coatings. The properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of diamondoids are thus of fundamental interest for a variety of emerging applications. This paper presents the effects of thiol substitution position and polymantane order on diamondoid SAMs on gold using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A framework to determine both molecular tilt and twist through NEXAFS is presented and reveals highly ordered diamondoid SAMs, with the molecular orientation controlled by the thiol location. C 1s and S 2p binding energies are lower in adamantane thiol than alkane thiols on gold by 0.67 {+-} 0.05 eV and 0.16 {+-} 0.04 eV respectively. These binding energies vary with diamondoid monolayer structure and thiol substitution position, consistent with different amounts of steric strain and electronic interaction with the substrate. This work demonstrates control over the assembly, in particular the orientational and electronic structure, providing a flexible design of surface properties with this exciting new class of diamond clusters.

  1. X-ray absorption spectroscopy on magnetic nanoscale systems for modern applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz-Antoniak, Carolin

    2015-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy facilitated by state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation technology is presented as a powerful tool to study nanoscale systems, in particular revealing their static element-specific magnetic and electronic properties on a microscopic level. A survey is given on the properties of nanoparticles, nanocomposites and thin films covering a broad range of possible applications. It ranges from the ageing effects of iron oxide nanoparticles in dispersion for biomedical applications to the characterisation on a microscopic level of nanoscale systems for data storage devices. In this respect, new concepts for electrically addressable magnetic data storage devices are highlighted by characterising the coupling in a BaTiO3/CoFe2O4 nanocomposite as prototypical model system. But classical magnetically addressable devices are also discussed on the basis of tailoring the magnetic properties of self-assembled ensembles of FePt nanoparticles for data storage and the high-moment material Fe/Cr/Gd for write heads. For the latter cases, the importance is emphasised of combining experimental approaches in x-ray absorption spectroscopy with density functional theory to gain a more fundamental understanding.

  2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of the {omega} phase in water quenched Ti-5553 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Dongyang; Lu, Yafeng; Zhang, Kong; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Lian

    2012-11-15

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to investigate the {omega} phase in water quenched Ti-5553 alloy with a nominal composition of Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr (wt.%), and the {omega} and the {beta} phase were distinguished by deconvoluting the XPS spectra of Al2p, V2p and Cr2p core level regions. In addition, it is found that the binding energy of core level electron of alloying elements shifts comparing with that of pure metals, and the fact was interpreted by charge redistribution model. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique could be used to characterize the nano-scale {omega} phase in {beta} alloys. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterize the {omega} phase in Ti-5553 alloy by XPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding energy of Al2p, V2p and Cr2p electron are different in the {omega} and {beta} phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural difference leads to the binding energy gap.

  3. Core and valence excitations in resonant X-ray spectroscopy using restricted excitation window time-dependent density functional theory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Healion, Daniel; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-01-01

    We report simulations of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and 1D stimulated X-ray Raman spectroscopy (SXRS) signals of cysteine at the oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur K and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal}\\begin{document}$\\textrm {L}_{2,3}$\\end{document}L2,3 edges. Comparison of the simulated XANES signals with experiment shows that the restricted window time-dependent density functional theory is more accurate and computationally less expensive than the static exchange method. Simulated RIXS and 1D SXRS signals give some insights into the correlation of different excitations in the molecule. PMID:23181305

  4. Research relative to high energy astrophysics. [large area modular array of reflectors, X-ray spectroscopy, and thermal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1984-01-01

    Various parameters which affect the design of the proposed large area modular array of reflectors (LAMAR) are considered, including thermal control, high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, pointing control, and mirror performance. The LAMAR instrument is to be a shuttle-launched X-ray observatory to carry out cosmic X-ray investigations. The capabilities of LAMAR are enumerated. Angular resolution performance of the mirror module prototype was measured to be 30 sec of ARC for 50% of the power. The LAMAR thermal pre-collimator design concepts and test configurations are discussed in detail.

  5. Core and Valence Excitations in Resonant X-ray Spectroscopy using Restricted Excitation Window Time-dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Healion, Daniel; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-11-21

    We report simulations of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and 1D stimulated X-ray Raman spectroscopy (SXRS) signals of cysteine at the oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur K and L2,3 edges. The simulated XANES signals from the restricted window time-dependent density functional theory (REW-TDDFT) and the static exchange (STEX) method are compared with experiments, showing that REW-TDDFT is more accurate and computationally less expensive than STEX. Simulated RIXS and 1D SXRS signals from REW-TDDFT give some insights on the correlation of different excitations in the molecule.

  6. Investigation of the amorphous to crystalline phase transition of chemical solution deposited Pb(Zr30Ti70)O3 thin films by soft x-ray absorption and soft x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schneller, T.; Schneller, T.; Kohlstedt, H.; Petraru, A.; Waser, R.; Guo, J.; Denlinger, J.; Learmonth, T.; Glans, Per-Andres; Smith, K. E.

    2008-08-01

    Chemical solution deposited (CSD) complex oxide thin films attract considerable interest in various emerging fields as for example, fuel cells, ferroelectric random access memories or coated conductors. In the present paper the results of soft-x-ray spectroscopy between 100 eV and 500 eV on the amorphous to crystalline phase transition of ferroelectric PbZr{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 0.7}O{sub 3} (PZT) thin films are presented. Five CSD samples derived from the same wafer coated with a PZT film pyrolyzed at 350 C were heat treated at different temperatures between 400 C and 700 C. At first the sample were morphologically and electrically characterized. Subsequently the soft-x-ray absorption and emission experiments were performed at the undulator beamline 8.0 of the Advanced Light Source of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Soft-x-ray absorption spectra were acquired for the Ti L{sub 2,3-}, O K-, and C K-edge thresholds by using simultaneously the total electron yield (TEY) and total fluorescence yield (TFY) detection methods. For two samples, annealed at 400 C and 700 C, respectively, the resonant inelastic soft-x-ray spectroscopy (RIXS) was applied for various excitation energies near the Ti L-, O K-edges. We observed clear evidence of a rutile phase at untypically low temperatures. This rutile phase transforms into the perovskite phase upon increasing annealing temperature. These results are discussed in the framework of current microscopic models of the PZT (111) texture selection.

  7. Correlated Single-Crystal Electronic Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Crystallography at NSLS Beamline X26-C

    SciTech Connect

    A Orville; R Buono; M Cowan; A Heroux; G Shea-McCarthy; D Schneider; J Skinner; M Skinner; D Stoner-Ma; R Sweet

    2011-12-31

    The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population.

  8. Correlated single-crystal electronic absorption spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography at NSLS beamline X26-C

    SciTech Connect

    Orville, A.M.; Buono, R.; Cowan, M.; Heroux, A.; Shea-McCarthy, G.; Schneider, D. K.; Skinner, J. M.; Skinner, M. J.; Stoner-Ma, D.; Sweet, R. M.

    2011-05-01

    The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population.

  9. Correlated single-crystal electronic absorption spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography at NSLS beamline X26-C

    PubMed Central

    Orville, Allen M.; Buono, Richard; Cowan, Matt; Héroux, Annie; Shea-McCarthy, Grace; Schneider, Dieter K.; Skinner, John M.; Skinner, Michael J.; Stoner-Ma, Deborah; Sweet, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population. PMID:21525643

  10. Energy Dispersive X-Ray and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopies for Performance and Corrosion Analysis of PEMWEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, S. M., Iii; Zhang, F.-Y.

    2014-11-01

    Proton exchange membrane water electrolyzers (PEMWEs) are a promising energy storage technology due to their high efficiency, compact design, and ability to be used in a renewable energy system. Before they are able to make a large commercial impact, there are several hurdles facing the technology today. Two powerful techniques for both in-situ and ex- situ characterizations to improve upon their performance and better understand their corrosion are electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, respectively. In this paper, the authors use both methods in order to characterize the anode gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a PEMWE cell and better understand the corrosion that occurs in the oxygen electrode during electrolysis.

  11. Uses of Auger and x ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the study of adhesion and friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1990-01-01

    Three studies are described characterizing the possible contributions of surface science to tribology. These include surface contamination formed by the interaction of a surface with the environment, contaminants obtained with diffusion of compounds, and surface chemical changes resulting from selective thermal evaporation. Surface analytical tools such as Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and x ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) incorporated directly into adhesion and friction systems are primarily used to define the nature of tribological surfaces before and after tribological experimentation and to characterize the mechanism of solid-to-solid interaction. Emphasis is on fundamental studies involving the role of surfaces in controlling the adhesion and friction properties of materials emerging as a result of the surface analyses. The materials which were studied include metals and ceramics such as elemental metals, amorphous alloys (metallic glasses), and silicon-based ceramics.

  12. Lunar sample analysis. [X-ray photoemission and Auger spectroscopy of lunar glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, R. M.; Grant, R. W.; Cirlin, E. H.

    1979-01-01

    The surface composition of two samples from the highly shocked, glass-coated lunar basalt (12054) and from four glass-coated fragments from the 1-2 mm (14161) fines were examined by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy to determine whether the agglutination process itself is responsible for the difference between their surface and bulk compositions. Auger electron spectroscopy of glass balls from the 15425 and 74001 fines were analyzed to understand the nature, extent, and behavior of volatile phases associated with lunar volcanism. Initial results indicate that (1) volatiles, in the outer few atomic layers sampled, vary considerably from ball to ball; (2) variability over the surface of individual balls is smaller; (3) the dominant volatiles on the balls are S and Zn; and (4) other volatiles commonly observed are P, Cl, and K.

  13. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy of astrophysical sources: current and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paerels, Frits

    High resolution spectroscopy of cosmic X-ray sources has become a well-established technique over the last decade, with the wide variety of investigations performed with the diffraction grating spectrometers on Chandra and XMM-Newton. I will review some of the common themes that have emerged from these studies, which comprises observations of "sources" as varied as the intergalactic medium and the atmospheres of hot neutron stars. With the microcalorimeter spectrometer array on Astro-H, we will be making two more big steps: true imaging spectroscopy, and extension of the high resolution to the Fe K band. I will outline some of the issues we will encounter, against the background of possible discoveries we may make.

  14. A Superbend X-Ray Microdiffraction Beamline at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, N.; Kunz, M.; Chen, K.; Celestre, R.S.; MacDowell, A.A.; Warwick, T.

    2009-03-10

    Beamline 12.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source is a newly commissioned beamline dedicated to x-ray microdiffraction. It operates in both monochromatic and polychromatic radiation mode. The facility uses a superconducting bending magnet source to deliver an X-ray spectrum ranging from 5 to 22 keV. The beam is focused down to {approx} 1 um size at the sample position using a pair of elliptically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors enclosed in a vacuum box. The sample placed on high precision stages can be raster-scanned under the microbeam while a diffraction pattern is taken at each step. The arrays of diffraction patterns are then analyzed to derive distribution maps of phases, strain/stress and/or plastic deformation inside the sample.

  15. Jitter Suppression Via Reaction Wheel Passive Isolation for the NASA Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergast, Karl J.; Schauwecker, Chris J.

    1998-01-01

    Text: Third in the series of NASA great observatories, the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) is scheduled for launch from the Space Shuttle in September 1998. Following in the path of the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, this telescope will image light at x-ray wavelengths, facilitating the detailed study of such phenomena as supernovae and quasars. The AXAF program is sponsored by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. Due to exacting requirements on the performance of the AXAF optical system, it is necessary to reduce the transmission of reaction wheel jitter disturbances to the observatory. This reduction is accomplished via use of a passive mechanical isolation system which acts as an interface between the reaction wheels and the spacecraft central structure.

  16. Micro-x-ray fluorescence, micro-x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and micro-x-ray diffraction investigation of lead speciation after the addition of different phosphorus amendments to a smelter-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lucas R; Pierzynski, Gary M; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M; Scheckel, Kirk G; Newville, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    The stabilization of Pb on additions of P to contaminated soils and mine spoil materials has been well documented. It is clear from the literature that different P sources result in different efficacies of Pb stabilization in the same contaminated material. We hypothesized that the differences in the efficacy of Pb stabilization in contaminated soils on fluid or granular P amendment addition is due to different P reaction processes in and around fertilizer granules and fluid droplets. We used a combination of several synchrotron-based techniques (i.e., spatially resolved micro-X-ray fluorescence, micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy, and micro-X-ray diffraction) to speciate Pb at two incubation times in a smelter-contaminated soil on addition of several fluid and granular P amendments. The results indicated that the Pb phosphate mineral plumbogummite was an intermediate phase of pyromorphite formation. Additionally, all fluid and granular P sources were able to induce Pb phosphate formation, but fluid phosphoric acid (PA) was the most effective with time and distance from the treatment. Granular phosphate rock and triple super phosphate (TSP) amendments reacted to generate Pb phosphate minerals, with TSP being more effective at greater distances from the point of application. As a result, PA and TSP were the most effective P amendments at inducing Pb phosphate formation, but caution needs to be exercised when adding large amounts of soluble P to the environment. PMID:25602650

  17. High-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy with transition-edge sensors: present performance and future potential.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, J; Doriese, W B; Fowler, J W; Swetz, D S; Jaye, C; Fischer, D A; Reintsema, C D; Bennett, D A; Vale, L R; Mandal, U; O'Neil, G C; Miaja-Avila, L; Joe, Y I; El Nahhas, A; Fullagar, W; Gustafsson, F Parnefjord; Sundström, V; Kurunthu, D; Hilton, G C; Schmidt, D R; Ullom, J N

    2015-05-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a powerful element-selective tool to analyze the oxidation states of atoms in complex compounds, determine their electronic configuration, and identify unknown compounds in challenging environments. Until now the low efficiency of wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometer technology has limited the use of XES, especially in combination with weaker laboratory X-ray sources. More efficient energy-dispersive detectors have either insufficient energy resolution because of the statistical limits described by Fano or too low counting rates to be of practical use. This paper updates an approach to high-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy that uses a microcalorimeter detector array of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs). TES arrays are discussed and compared with conventional methods, and shown under which circumstances they are superior. It is also shown that a TES array can be integrated into a table-top time-resolved X-ray source and a soft X-ray synchrotron beamline to perform emission spectroscopy with good chemical sensitivity over a very wide range of energies. PMID:25931095

  18. Advanced Solid State Pixel Detectors for Future High Energy X-ray Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Fiona

    We propose to advance the state of the art in solid state high energy X-ray pixel detectors for astrophysics. This program builds on advanced readout technology developed for suborbital and the NuSTAR space mission, and combines newly-developed CdTe PIN sensors and materials characterization techniques to achieve detectors broad band (1 - 200 keV), sub-keV energy resolution, and 300 micron spatial resolution. The low-noise readout technology will also be taken to the next generation with reduced pixel size, lower noise and significantly reduced dead time.

  19. Characterization of Metalloproteins by High-throughput X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    W Shi; M Punta; J Bohon; J Sauder; R DMello; M Sullivan; J Toomey; D Abel; M Lippi; et al.

    2011-12-31

    High-throughput X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to measure transition metal content based on quantitative detection of X-ray fluorescence signals for 3879 purified proteins from several hundred different protein families generated by the New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics. Approximately 9% of the proteins analyzed showed the presence of transition metal atoms (Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Fe, or Mn) in stoichiometric amounts. The method is highly automated and highly reliable based on comparison of the results to crystal structure data derived from the same protein set. To leverage the experimental metalloprotein annotations, we used a sequence-based de novo prediction method, MetalDetector, to identify Cys and His residues that bind to transition metals for the redundancy reduced subset of 2411 sequences sharing <70% sequence identity and having at least one His or Cys. As the HT-XAS identifies metal type and protein binding, while the bioinformatics analysis identifies metal-binding residues, the results were combined to identify putative metal-binding sites in the proteins and their associated families. We explored the combination of this data with homology models to generate detailed structure models of metal-binding sites for representative proteins. Finally, we used extended X-ray absorption fine structure data from two of the purified Zn metalloproteins to validate predicted metalloprotein binding site structures. This combination of experimental and bioinformatics approaches provides comprehensive active site analysis on the genome scale for metalloproteins as a class, revealing new insights into metalloprotein structure and function.

  20. Simulated 'On-Line' Wear Metal Analysis of Lubricating Oils by X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelliher, Warren C.; Partos, Richard D.; Nelson, Irina

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to assess the sensitivity of X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (XFS) for quantitative evaluation of metal particle content in engine oil suspensions and the feasibility of real-time, dynamic wear metal analysis. The study was focused on iron as the majority wear metal component. Variable parameters were: particle size, particle concentration and oil velocity. A commercial XFS spectrometer equipped with interchangeable static/dynamic (flow cell) sample chambers was used. XFS spectra were recorded for solutions of Fe-organometallic standard and for a series of DTE oil suspensions of high purity spherical iron particles of 2g, 4g, and 8g diameter, at concentrations from 5 ppm to 5,000 ppm. Real contaminated oil samples from Langley Air Force Base aircraft engines and NASA Langley Research Center wind tunnels were also analyzed. The experimental data conform the reliability of XFS as the analytical method of choice for this project. Intrinsic inadequacies of the instrument for precise analytic work at low metal concentrations were identified as being related to the particular x-ray beam definition, system geometry, and flow-cell materials selection. This work supports a proposal for the design, construction and testing of a conceptually new, miniature XFS spectrometer with superior performance, dedicated to on-line, real-time monitoring of lubricating oils in operating engines. Innovative design solutions include focalization of the incident x-ray beam, non-metal sample chamber, and miniaturization of the overall assembly. The instrument would contribute to prevention of catastrophic engine failures. A proposal for two-year funding has been presented to NASA Langley Research Center Internal Operation Group (IOG) Management, to continue the effort begun by this summer's project.

  1. Diagnosing implosions at the national ignition facility with X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; Hammel, B. A.; Suter, L. J.; Ralph, J.; Scott, H.; Barrios, M. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Collins, G. W.; Dixit, S. N.; Edwards, M. J.; Farley, D. R.; Glenzer, S. H.; Golovkin, I. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A.; Hicks, D. G.; Izumi, N.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; MacFarlane, J. J.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Mancini, R. C.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Meezan, N. B.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nikroo, A.; Peterson, K. J.; Sangster, T. C.; Springer, P.; Town, R. P. J.

    2012-05-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to diagnose plasma conditions in the hot spot and the compressed shell of ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. Ignition of an ICF target depends on the formation of a central hot spot with sufficient temperature and areal density. The concentric spherical layers of current NIF ignition targets consist of a plastic ablator surrounding a thin shell of cryogenic thermonuclear fuel (i.e., hydrogen isotopes), with fuel vapor filling the interior volume. A fraction of the ablator has a Ge dopant to minimize preheat of the ablator closest to the DT ice caused by Au M-band emission from the hohlraum x-ray drive. This paper concentrates on three spectral features of the implosion: Ge Heα emission, Ge Kα emission, and the Ge K edge. Hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by highmode (50 < ℓ < 200) ablator-surface perturbations on ignition-scale targets can cause mixing of Ge-doped ablator into the interior of the shell at the end of the acceleration phase. As the shell decelerates, it compresses the fuel vapor, forming a hot spot. K-shell line emission from the ionized Ge that has penetrated into the hot spot provides an experimental signature of hot-spot mix. The amount of hot-spot mix mass is estimated from the brightness and spectral line shape of the Ge Heα and satellite emission using a detailed atomic physics code. X-ray continuum from the hot spot is attenuated by the compressed shell, and the photoexcitation causes the shell to fluoresce in Ge Kα emission. The contrast at the Ge K edge and the brightness of Ge Kα emission are used to diagnose the shell areal density. The highlighted spectral features are presented.

  2. Characterization and speciation of mercury-bearing mine wastes using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, C.S.; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; Rytuba, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Mining of mercury deposits located in the California Coast Range has resulted in the release of mercury to the local environment and water supplies. The solubility, transport, and potential bioavailability of mercury are controlled by its chemical speciation, which can be directly determined for samples with total mercury concentrations greater than 100 mg kg-1 (ppm) using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). This technique has the additional benefits of being non-destructive to the sample, element-specific, relatively sensitive at low concentrations, and requiring minimal sample preparation. In this study, Hg L(III)-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra were collected for several mercury mine tailings (calcines) in the California Coast Range. Total mercury concentrations of samples analyzed ranged from 230 to 1060 ppm. Speciation data (mercury phases present and relative abundances) were obtained by comparing the spectra from heterogeneous, roasted (calcined) mine tailings samples with a spectral database of mercury minerals and sorbed mercury complexes. Speciation analyses were also conducted on known mixtures of pure mercury minerals in order to assess the quantitative accuracy of the technique. While some calcine samples were found to consist exclusively of mercuric sulfide, others contain additional, more soluble mercury phases, indicating a greater potential for the release of mercury into solution. Also, a correlation was observed between samples from hot-spring mercury deposits, in which chloride levels are elevated, and the presence of mercury-chloride species as detected by the speciation analysis. The speciation results demonstrate the ability of XAS to identify multiple mercury phases in a heterogeneous sample, with a quantitative accuracy of ??25% for the mercury-containing phases considered. Use of this technique, in conjunction with standard microanalytical techniques such as X-ray diffraction and electron probe microanalysis

  3. X-ray And EUV Spectroscopy Of Highly Charged Tungsten Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Christoph; Radtke, Rainer

    2009-09-01

    The Berlin EBIT has been established by the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik to generate atomic physics data in support of research in the field of controlled nuclear fusion, by measuring the radiation from highly charged ions in the x-ray, extreme ultraviolet and visible spectral ranges and providing valuable diagnostics for high temperature plasmas [1]. In future fusion devices, for example ITER, currently being constructed at Cadarache, France, the plasma facing components will be armored with high-Z materials, most likely tungsten, due to the favorable properties of this element [2]. At the same time the tremendous radiation cooling of these high-Z materials represents a threat to fusion and obliges one to monitor carefully the radiation. With EBIT a selected ensemble of ions in specific charge states can be produced, stored and excited for spectroscopic investigations. Employing this technique, we have for example resolved the wide structure observed around 5 nm at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak as originating from E1-transitions into the open 4d shell of tungsten ions in charge states 25+ to 37+ producing a band-like emission pattern [3]. Further, these ions emit well-separated M1 lines in the EUV range around 65 nm suitable for plasma diagnostics [4]. Kr-like to Cr-like tungsten ions (38+ to 50+) show strong soft-x-ray lines in the range 0.5 to 2 and 5 to 15 nm. Lines of even higher charged tungsten ions, up to Ne-like W64+, abundant in the core plasma of present and future fusion test devices, have been investigated with high resolution Bragg-crystal spectroscopy at 0.13 nm [5]. Recently, x-ray spectroscopic measurements of the dielectronic recombination LMn resonances of W60+ to W67+ ions have been preformed and compare well with atomic structure calculations.

  4. Characterization of metalloproteins by high-throughput X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wuxian; Punta, Marco; Bohon, Jen; Sauder, J. Michael; D'Mello, Rhijuta; Sullivan, Mike; Toomey, John; Abel, Don; Lippi, Marco; Passerini, Andrea; Frasconi, Paolo; Burley, Stephen K.; Rost, Burkhard; Chance, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to measure transition metal content based on quantitative detection of X-ray fluorescence signals for 3879 purified proteins from several hundred different protein families generated by the New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics. Approximately 9% of the proteins analyzed showed the presence of transition metal atoms (Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Fe, or Mn) in stoichiometric amounts. The method is highly automated and highly reliable based on comparison of the results to crystal structure data derived from the same protein set. To leverage the experimental metalloprotein annotations, we used a sequence-based de novo prediction method, MetalDetector, to identify Cys and His residues that bind to transition metals for the redundancy reduced subset of 2411 sequences sharing <70% sequence identity and having at least one His or Cys. As the HT-XAS identifies metal type and protein binding, while the bioinformatics analysis identifies metal- binding residues, the results were combined to identify putative metal-binding sites in the proteins and their associated families. We explored the combination of this data with homology models to generate detailed structure models of metal-binding sites for representative proteins. Finally, we used extended X-ray absorption fine structure data from two of the purified Zn metalloproteins to validate predicted metalloprotein binding site structures. This combination of experimental and bioinformatics approaches provides comprehensive active site analysis on the genome scale for metalloproteins as a class, revealing new insights into metalloprotein structure and function. PMID:21482623

  5. Resonant inelastic scattering in dilute magnetic semiconductors by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K. |; Jia, J.J.; Underwood, J.H.

    1997-04-01

    As modern, technologically important materials have become more complex, element specific techniques have become invaluable in studying the electronic structure of individual components from the system. Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) and absorption (SXA) spectroscopies provide a unique means of measuring element and angular momentum density of electron states, respectively, for the valence and conducting bands in complex materials. X-ray absorption and the decay through x-ray emission are generally assumed to be two independent one-photon processes. Recent studies, however have demonstrated that SXF excited near the absorption threshold generate an array of spectral features that depend on nature of materials, particularly on the localization of excited states in s and d-band solids and that these two processes can no be longer treated as independent. Resonant SXF offers thus the new way to study the dynamics of the distribution of electronic valence states in the presence of a hole which is bound to the electron low lying in the conduction band. This process can simulate the interaction between hole-electron pair in wide gap semiconductors. Therefore such studies can help in understanding of transport and optics phenomena in the wide gap semiconductors. The authors report the result of Mn and S L-resonant emission in Zn{sub 1{minus}x}Mn{sub x}S (with x=0.2 and 0.3) and MnS as the energy of exciting radiation is tuned across the Mn and S L{sub 3,2} absorption edge, along with the resonant excited spectra from elemental Mn as a reference.

  6. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    SciTech Connect

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-28

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk.

  7. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-01

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk

  8. Silver speciation in liver of marine mammals by synchrotron X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Emiko; Ikemoto, Tokutaka; Hokura, Akiko; Terada, Yasuko; Kunito, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takahito; Yamada, Tadasu K; Rosas, Fernando C W; Fillmann, Gilberto; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Nakai, Izumi

    2011-06-01

    The chemical form of Ag in the livers of five species of marine mammals was examined using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopies. The XAFS analysis suggested that Ag(2)Se was present in the livers of the Franciscana dolphin (Pontoporia blainvillei), Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli), and Baird's beaked whale (Berardius bairdii), whereas Ag(2)S was present in the livers of the striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) and pygmy killer whale (Feresa attenuata). XRF spectroscopy results revealed that the distribution patterns of Ag and Se in a thin section of the liver of the Franciscana dolphin were the same; this also implied that Ag was associated with Se in the liver. Thus, the interaction of Ag with Se or S may offer significant protection against the toxicity of Ag in marine mammals. The formation of either Ag(2)Se or Ag(2)S might depend on the Hg levels in the liver. Ag(2)Se was observed in liver samples with relatively high Ag/Hg ratio, whereas liver samples with low Ag/Hg ratio contained Ag(2)S. PMID:21491037

  9. A multi-channel monolithic Ge detector system for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bucher, J.J.; Allen, P.G.; Edelstein, N.M.; Shuh, D.K.; Madden, N.W.; Cork, C.; Luke, P.; Pehl, D.; Malone, D.

    1995-03-01

    Construction and performance of a monolithic quad-pixel Ge detector for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at synchrotron radiation sources are described. The detector semiconductor element has an active surface area of 4.0 cm{sup 2} which is electrically separated into four 1.0 cm{sup 2} pixels, with little interfacial dead volume. Spatial response of the array shows that cross-talk between adjacent pixels is < 10% for 5.9 keV photons that fall within 0.5 mm of the pixel boundaries. The detector electronics system uses pre-amplifiers built at LBNL with commercial Tennelec Model TC 244 amplifiers. Using an {sup 55}Fe test source (MnK{sub {alpha}}, 5.9 keV), energy resolution of better than 200 eV is achieved with a 4 {mu}sec peaking time. At 0.5 {mu}sec peaking time, pulse pileup results in a 75% throughput efficiency for an incoming count rate of 100 kHz. Initial XAS fluoresncece measurements at the beamline 4 wiggler end stations at SSRL show that the detector system has several advantages over commercial x-ray spectrometers for low-concentration counting.

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of lithium sulfur battery reaction intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wujcik, Kevin; Pascal, Tod; Prendergast, David; Balsara, Nitash

    2015-03-01

    Lithium sulfur batteries have a theoretical energy density nearly five times greater than current lithium ion battery standards, but questions still remain regarding the reaction pathways through which soluble lithium polysulfide (Li2Sx, ``x'' ranging from 2 to 8) reaction intermediates are formed. Complicating spectroelectrochemical approaches to elucidate redox pathways is the challenge of obtaining spectral standards for individual Li2Sx species. Lithium polysulfides cannot be isolated as individual component and exist only in solution as a distribution of different Li2Sx molecules formed via disproportionation reactions (e.g. 2Li2S4 goes to Li2S3 + Li2S5). X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the sulfur K-edge has recently been employed as a technique to study Li-S chemistry. We have recently obtained XAS standards for individual Li2Sx species via first principles DFT simulations and the excited electron and core hole approach. Here, experimental sulfur K-edge XAS of Li2Sx species dissolved in poly(ethylene oxide) are compared to spectra obtained from analogous theoretical calculations. The impact that polysulfide solution concentration and the presence of other lithium salts (e.g. LiNO3) have on X-ray spectra of Li2Sx species is explored via experiment and theory.

  11. Millisecond Kinetics of Nanocrystal Cation Exchange UsingMicrofluidic X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Emory M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine; Elnaggar,Mariam S.; Mathies, Richard A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-05-07

    We describe the use of a flow-focusing microfluidic reactorto measure the kinetics of theCdSe-to-Ag2Se nanocrystal cation exchangereaction using micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu XAS). The smallmicroreactor dimensions facilitate the millisecond mixing of CdSenanocrystal and Ag+ reactant solutions, and the transposition of thereaction time onto spatial coordinates enables the in situ observation ofthe millisecond reaction with mu XAS. XAS spectra show the progression ofCdSe nanocrystals to Ag2Se over the course of 100 ms without the presenceof long-lived intermediates. These results, along with supporting stoppedflow absorption experiments, suggest that this nanocrystal cationexchange reaction is highly efficient and provide insight into how thereaction progresses in individual particles. This experiment illustratesthe value and potential of in situ microfluidic X-ray synchrotrontechniques for detailed studies of the millisecond structuraltransformations of nanoparticles and other solution-phase reactions inwhich diffusive mixing initiates changes in local bond structures oroxidation states.

  12. Probing hot-electron effects in wide area plasmonic surfaces using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayas, Sencer; Cupallari, Andi; Dana, Aykutlu

    2014-12-01

    Plasmon enhanced hot carrier formation in metallic nanostructures increasingly attracts attention due to potential applications in photodetection, photocatalysis, and solar energy conversion. Here, hot-electron effects in nanoscale metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structures are investigated using a non-contact X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy based technique using continuous wave X-ray and laser excitations. The effects are observed through shifts of the binding energy of the top metal layer upon excitation with lasers of 445, 532, and 650 nm wavelength. The shifts are polarization dependent for plasmonic MIM grating structures fabricated by electron beam lithography. Wide area plasmonic MIM surfaces fabricated using a lithography free route by the dewetting of evaporated Ag on HfO2 exhibit polarization independent optical absorption and surface photovoltage. Using a simple model and making several assumptions about the magnitude of the photoemission current, the responsivity and external quantum efficiency of wide area plasmonic MIM surfaces are estimated as 500 nA/W and 11 × 10-6 for 445 nm illumination.

  13. Strontium localization in bone tissue studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl; Raffalt, Anders Christer; Stahl, Kenny

    2014-02-01

    Strontium has recently been introduced as a pharmacological agent for the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. We determined the localization of strontium incorporated into bone matrix from dogs treated with Sr malonate by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A new approach for analyzing the X-ray absorption spectra resulted in a compositional model and allowed the relative distribution of strontium in the different bone components to be estimated. Approximately 35-45% of the strontium present is incorporated into calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHA) by substitution of some of the calcium ions occupying highly ordered sites, and at least 30% is located at less ordered sites where only the first solvation shell is resolved, suggesting that strontium is surrounded by only oxygen atoms similar to Sr(2+) in solution. Strontium was furthermore shown to be absorbed in collagen in which it obtains a higher structural order than when present in serum but less order than when it is incorporated into CaHA. The total amount of strontium in the samples was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and the amount of Sr was found to increase with increasing dose levels and treatment periods, whereas the relative distribution of strontium among the different components appears to be independent of treatment period and dose level. PMID:24101232

  14. X-ray laser-induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Art J.; Dunn, James; van Buuren, Tony W.; Hunter, Jim; Smith, Ray F.; Hemmers, Oliver; Lindle, Dennis W.

    2003-12-01

    X-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to probe the core-level and valence band electronic structure of room-temperature bulk materials with picosecond time resolution. The LLNL COMET compact tabletop x-ray laser source provides the necessary high photon flux, high energy, monochromaticity, picosecond pulse duration, and coherence for probing ultrafast changes in the chemical and electronic structure of these materials. Valence band and core-level spectra were recorded for transition metal surfaces. In situ sputter etching with Ar ions at 30° incidence will be implemented to improve the surface purity and consequently increase core-level and valence-band photoemission intensity. This work demonstrates a powerful new technique for probing reaction dynamics and for probing changes of local order on surfaces on their fundamental timescales. Future work will include the study of fundamental phenomena such as non-thermal melting, chemical bond formation, intermediate reaction steps, and the existence of transient reaction products.

  15. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Investigation of the Nitrogen Species in Photoactive Perfluorophenylazide-Modified Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zorn, Gilad; Liu, Li-Hong; Árnadóttir, Líney; Wang, Hui; Gamble, Lara J.; Castner, David G.; Yan, Mingdi

    2014-01-01

    X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the nitrogen species in perfluorophenylazide (PFPA) self-assembled monolayers. PFPA chemistry is a novel immobilization method for tailoring the surface properties of materials. It is a simple route for the efficient immobilization of graphene, proteins, carbohydrates and synthetic polymers onto a variety of surfaces. Upon light irradiation, the azido group in PFPA is converted to a highly reactive singlet nitrene species that readily undergoes CH insertion and C=C addition reactions. Here, the challenge of characterizing the PFPA modified surfaces was addressed by detailed XPS experimental analyses. The three nitrogen peaks detected in the XPS N1s spectra were assigned to amine/amide (400.5 eV) and azide (402.1 and 405.6 eV) species. The observed 2:1 ratio of the areas from the 402.1 eV to 405.6 eV peaks suggests the assignment of the peak at 402.1 eV to the two outer nitrogen atoms in the azido group and assignment of the peak at 405.6 eV to the central nitrogen atom in the azido group. The azide decomposition as the function of x-ray exposure was also determined. Finally, XPS analyses were conducted on patterned graphene to investigate the covalent bond formation between the PFPA and graphene. This study provides strong evidence for the formation of covalent bonds during the PFPA photocoupling process. PMID:24535931

  16. Electronic structures of silicon monoxide film probed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao; Hirao, Norie

    2013-06-01

    Electronic structures of thin films of silicon monoxides (SiO) deposited on a solid surface have been in-situ investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). As a substrate, a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was used because the hybridization between molecules and substrate can be excluded due to the inertness of the surface. For thin films with less than monolayer, XPS spectrum showed that the binding energy of the Si 1s is located just between those of the elemental silicon (Si0) and SiO2 (Si4 +). The result indicates that the stable divalent silicon surely exists in the deposited SiO layer. For the Si K-edge XAFS spectrum of the SiO thin film, the energy of the core-to-valence resonance peak is also located between those of the elemental silicon (Si0) and SiO2 (Si4 +). The polarization dependence of the Si K-edge XAFS spectra for the SiO film revealed that the SiO molecules are well-ordered and almost perpendicularly oriented on HOPG surface. The XAFS results also support the existence of the silicon divalent states in the deposited SiO films. The obtained well-ordered SiO films with divalent silicon will become an excellent starting material for the synthesis of low-dimensional SiOx films.

  17. Characterization of indium tin oxide surfaces and interfaces using low intensity x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Y.; Lyon, J. E.; Beerbom, M. M.; Schlaf, R.

    2006-11-01

    Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopic (UPS) and x-ray photoemission spectroscopic (XPS) characterizations of indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces prepared in ambient environment significantly lower the work function of the ITO surface. This artifact complicates the investigation of ITO surfaces and interfaces using XPS and UPS. The presented results demonstrate that, while the exposure of the sample surface to standard UPS UV sources results in a reduction of the work function within a second or less, XPS measurements show a more gradual work function change over the course of hundreds of seconds. This allowed the design of a measurement protocol based on low intensity x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy work function measurements, which do not cause significant work function changes during the exposure time needed for characterization. Applying this technique, the orbital lineup between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the semiconducting polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and the valence and conduction bands of ITO were determined. The results indicate that it is appropriate to describe the ITO/P3HT junction as semiconductor heterojunction, and that hole injection most likely occurs between ITO conduction band minimum and P3HT HOMO.

  18. Americium characterization by X-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy in plutonium uranium mixed oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Claude; Cozzo, Cedric; Martin, Matthias; Grolimund, Daniel; Mieszczynski, Cyprian

    2013-06-01

    Plutonium uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels are currently used in nuclear reactors. The actinides in these fuels need to be analyzed after irradiation for assessing their behaviour with regard to their environment and the coolant. In this work the study of the atomic structure and next-neighbour environment of Am in the (Pu,U)O2 lattice in an irradiated (60 MW d kg-1) MOX sample was performed employing micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure (µ-XAFS) spectroscopy. The chemical bonds, valences and stoichiometry of Am (˜0.66 wt%) are determined from the experimental data gained for the irradiated fuel material examined in its peripheral zone (rim) of the fuel. In the irradiated sample Am builds up as Am3+ species within an [AmO8]13- coordination environment (e.g. >90%) and no (<10%) Am(IV) or (V) can be detected in the rim zone. The occurrence of americium dioxide is avoided by the redox buffering activity of the uranium dioxide matrix.

  19. High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of metal compounds in neurodegenerative brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Collingwood, J.F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.R.; Batich, C.; Streit, W.J.; Eskin, T.; Terry, J.; Barrea, R.; Underhill, R.S.; Dobson, J.

    2008-06-16

    Fluorescence mapping and microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to detect, locate and identify iron biominerals and other inorganic metal accumulations in neurodegenerative brain tissue at sub-cellular resolution (< 5 microns). Recent progress in developing the technique is reviewed. Synchrotron X-rays are used to map tissue sections for metals of interest, and XANES and XAFS are used to characterize anomalous concentrations of the metals in-situ so that they can be correlated with tissue structures and disease pathology. Iron anomalies associated with biogenic magnetite, ferritin and haemoglobin are located and identified in an avian tissue model with a pixel resolution {approx} 5 microns. Subsequent studies include brain tissue sections from transgenic Huntington's mice, and the first high-resolution mapping and identification of iron biominerals in human Alzheimer's and control autopsy brain tissue. Technical developments include use of microfocus diffraction to obtain structural information about biominerals in-situ, and depositing sample location grids by lithography for the location of anomalies by conventional microscopy. The combined techniques provide a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds and related metals in tissue. The information to be gained from this approach has implications for future diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration, and for our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  20. Detecting the Missing Metals and Missing Baryons Through X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; Miller, Matthew J.; Hodges-Kluck, Edmund J.

    2016-04-01

    About 90% of the metals produced in the universe and 50% of the baryons are unaccounted for through UV-IR and radio studies of stars and gas. This large amount of missing gas and metals likely lies in a hot phase (0.5-10x106 K) and must be enriched to about 0.2-0.3 of the solar metallicity, so it should be a good absorber of X-rays in the resonance lines of common elements. Both existing data and simulations predict that hot galactic halos have N(H) ~1-10x1019 cm-2 and EW(OVII) = 3-10 mÅ, which are best studied with instruments that can resolve the lines, as the estimated line widths are 100-200 km/s. This sort of resolution and sensitivity is possible with grating spectroscopy of the type envisioned for missions such as Arcus and X-Ray Surveyor. These same instruments can probe the dynamics of the gas, and when applied to the halo of the Milky Way, can determine the rates of rotation and infall (or outflow) and the degree of turbulence.

  1. The Chemistry os Spent Nuclear Fuel From X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    F.A. Fortner; A.J. Kropf; J.C. Cunnane

    2006-09-21

    Present and future nuclear fuel cycles will require an understanding of the complex chemistry of trace fission products and transuranium actinides in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Because of the unique analytical challenges presented by SNF to the materials scientist, many of its fundamental physical and chemical properties remain poorly understood, especially on the microscopic scale. Such an understanding of the chemical states of radionuclides in SNF would benefit development of technologies for fuel monitoring, fuel performance improvement and modeling, fuel reprocessing, and spent fuel storage and disposal. We have recently demonstrated the use of synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to examine crystal chemical properties of actinides and fission products in extracted specimens of SNF. Information obtained includes oxidation state, chemical bond coordination, and quantitative elemental concentration and distribution. We have also used XAS in a scanning mode to obtain x-ray spectral micrographs with resolution approaching 1 micron. A brief overview of the technique will be presented, along with findings on uranium, plutonium, neptunium, technetium, and molybdenum in commercial PWR SNF specimens.

  2. Determination of uranyl incorporation into biogenic manganese oxides using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scattering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, S.M.; Fuller, C.C.; Tebo, B.M.; Bargar, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides are common and an important source of reactive mineral surfaces in the environment that may be potentially enhanced in bioremediation cases to improve natural attenuation. Experiments were performed in which the uranyl ion, UO22+ (U(VI)), at various concentrations was present during manganese oxide biogenesis. At all concentrations, there was strong uptake of U onto the oxides. Synchrotron-based extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to determine the molecular-scale mechanism by which uranyl is incorporated into the oxide and how this incorporation affects the resulting manganese oxide structure and mineralogy. The EXAFS experiments show that at low concentrations (2 mol % U, >4 ??M U(VI) in solution), the presence of U(VI) affects the stability and structure of the Mn oxide to form poorly ordered Mn oxide tunnel structures, similar to todorokite. EXAFS modeling shows that uranyl is present in these oxides predominantly in the tunnels of the Mn oxide structure in a tridentate complex. Observations by XRD corroborate these results. Structural incorporation may lead to more stable U(VI) sequestration that may be suitable for remediation uses. These observations, combined with the very high uptake capacity of the Mn oxides, imply that Mn-oxidizing bacteria may significantly influence dissolved U(VI) concentrations in impacted waters via sorption and incorporation into Mn oxide biominerals. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  3. Mossbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction of samples from the Santa Catharina iron meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy-Poulsen, H.; Clarke, R. S., Jr.; Jensen, G. B.; Knudsen, J. M.; Larsen, L.; Roy-Poulsen, N. O.; Vistisen, L.

    1984-01-01

    Conversion electron Mossbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) of samples from the Santa Catharina iron meteorite shows the presence of the ordered iron-nickel phase with 50% Ni, tetrataenite, and of the paramagnetic iron-nickel phase with 25% Ni. The FeNi phase with 50% Ni amounts to 70% of the iron-nickel alloys. Futhermore, the CEM spectra show the presence of small peaks from one or more spinel compounds. These small peaks are more pronounced when regions near the rim of the samples are analyzed. The X-ray diffraction of different areas of the samples, both optically dark and optically light areas, shows the presence of a diffraction pattern from a single f.c.c. lattice with a lattice parameter of a=3.58A This means that the two different Fe-Ni phases seen in the CEMS analysis occupy the same lattice. The X-ray photographs also show the presence of super-structure reflections from the ordered FeNi phase, and that the orientation of the f.c.c. lattice is the same within the whole sample.

  4. In situ high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy - Fundamental insights in surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Christian; Steinrück, Hans-Peter

    2013-11-01

    Since the advent of third generation synchrotron light sources optimized for providing soft X-rays up to 2 keV, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been developed to be an outstanding tool to study surface properties and surface reactions at an unprecedented level. The high resolution allows identifying various surface species, and for small molecules even the vibrational fine structure can be resolved in the XP spectra. The high photon flux reduces the required measuring time per spectrum to the domain of a few seconds or even less, which enables to follow surface processes in situ. Moreover, it also provides access to very small coverages down to below 0.1% of a monolayer, enabling the investigation of minority species or processes at defect sites. The photon energy can be adjusted according to the requirement of a particular experiment, i.e., to maximize or minimize the surface sensitivity or the photoionization cross-section of the substrate or the adsorbate. For a few instruments worldwide, a next step forward was taken by combining in situ high-resolution spectrometers with supersonic molecular beams. These beams allow to control and vary the kinetic and internal energies of the incident molecules and provide a local pressure of up to ~10-5 mbar, which can be switched on and off in a controllable way, thus offering a well-defined time structure to study adsorption or reaction processes.

  5. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and EPR studies of oriented spinach thylakoid preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.C. |

    1995-08-01

    In this study, oriented Photosystem II (PS II) particles from spinach chloroplasts are studied with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to determine more details of the structure of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). The nature of halide binding to Mn is also studied with Cl K-edge and Mn EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) of Mn-Cl model compounds, and with Mn EXAFS of oriented PS II in which Br has replaced Cl. Attention is focused on the following: photosynthesis and the oxygen evolving complex; determination of mosaic spread in oriented photosystem II particles from signal II EPR measurement; oriented EXAFS--studies of PS II in the S{sub 2} state; structural changes in PS II as a result of treatment with ammonia: EPR and XAS studies; studies of halide binding to Mn: Cl K-edge and Mn EXAFS of Mn-Cl model compounds and Mn EXAFS of oriented Br-treated photosystem II.

  6. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of graphitic carbon nanomaterials doped with heteroatoms

    PubMed Central

    Pichler, Thomas; Ayala, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Summary X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is one of the best tools for studying the chemical modification of surfaces, and in particular the distribution and bonding of heteroatom dopants in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes. Although these materials have superb intrinsic properties, these often need to be modified in a controlled way for specific applications. Towards this aim, the most studied dopants are neighbors to carbon in the periodic table, nitrogen and boron, with phosphorus starting to emerge as an interesting new alternative. Hundreds of studies have used XPS for analyzing the concentration and bonding of dopants in various materials. Although the majority of works has concentrated on nitrogen, important work is still ongoing to identify its precise atomic bonding configurations. In general, care should be taken in the preparation of a suitable sample, consideration of the intrinsic photoemission response of the material in question, and the appropriate spectral analysis. If this is not the case, incorrect conclusions can easily be drawn, especially in the assignment of measured binding energies into specific atomic configurations. Starting from the characteristics of pristine materials, this review provides a practical guide for interpreting X-ray photoelectron spectra of doped graphitic carbon nanomaterials, and a reference for their binding energies that are vital for compositional analysis via XPS. PMID:25671162

  7. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of four active galaxies - Probing the intercloud medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, Kenneth S. K.; Canizares, Claude R.; Markert, Thomas H.; Arnaud, Keith A.

    1990-01-01

    The focal plane crystal spectrometer (FPCS) on the Einstein Observatory has been used to perform a high-resolution spectroscopic search for oxygen X-ray line emission from four active galaxies: Fairall 9, Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and PKS 0548 - 322. Specifically, O VIII Ly-alpha and Ly-beta, whose unredshifted energies are 653 and 775 eV, respectively, were sought. No narrow-line emission was detected within the energy bands searched. Upper limits are calculated on the line flux from these sources of 30 eV equivalent width and use a photoionization model to place corresponding upper limits on the densities of diffuse gas surrounding the active nuclei. The upper limits on gas density range from about 0.02-50/cu cm and probe various radial distances from the central source. This is the first time high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy has been used to place constraints on the intercloud medium in active galaxies.

  8. Design of Molecular Solar Cells via Feedback from Soft X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Himpsel, Franz J.

    2015-06-12

    Spectroscopy with soft X-rays was used to develop new materials and novel designs for solar cells and artificial photosynthesis. In order to go beyond the widely-used trial-and-error approach of gradually improving a particular design, we started from the most general layout of a solar cell (or a photo-electrochemical device) and asked which classes of materials are promising for best performance. For example, the most general design of a solar cell consists of a light absorber, an electron donor, and an electron acceptor. These are characterized by four energy levels, which were measured by a combination of spectroscopic X-ray techniques. Tuning synchrotron radiation to the absorption edges of specific elements provided element- and bond-selectivity. The spectroscopic results were complemented by state-of-the-art calculations of the electronic states. These helped explaining the observed energy levels and the orbitals associated with them. The calculations were extended to a large class of materials (for example thousands of porphyrin dye complexes) in order to survey trends in the energy level structure. A few highlights serve as examples: 1) Organic molecules combining absorber, donor, and acceptor with atomic precision. 2) Exploration of highly p-doped diamond films as inert, transparent electron donors. 3) Surface-sensitive characterization of nanorod arrays used as photoanodes in water splitting. 4) Computational design of molecular complexes for efficient solar cells using two photons.

  9. Detrended fluctuation analysis in x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy for determining coarsening dynamics in alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, Lorenz-M.; Sepiol, Bogdan; Pfau, Bastian; Vogl, Gero; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Weinkamer, Richard

    2006-10-15

    We study the dynamics of precipitate coarsening in phase-separating alloys at late stages of phase separation by x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). For analyzing time series of fluctuating speckle intensities from small-angle scattering of coherent x rays, the method of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), which is ideal for determining power-law correlations, is applied. We discuss the application of DFA with respect to XPCS data by means of simulated time series. In particular, the effects of different signal-to-noise ratios are examined. Results from measurements of the two model systems Al-6 at. % Ag at 140 deg. C and Al-9 at. % Zn at 0 deg. C are presented. Since the DFA effectively removes adulterating trends in the data, quantitative agreement with Monte Carlo simulations is obtained. It is verified that two different coarsening mechanisms are predominant in the two systems--coarsening either by diffusion of single atoms or by movement of whole precipitates.

  10. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy: the coming-of-age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaastra, J.

    2016-06-01

    Since the launch of Chandra and XMM-Newton, high-resolution X-ray spectra of cosmic sources of all kinds have become available. These spectra have resulted in major scientific breakthroughs. However, due to the techniques used, in general high-quality spectra can only be obtained for the brightest few sources of each class. Moreover, except for the most compact extended sources, like cool core clusters, grating spectra are limited to point sources. ASTRO-H makes another major step forward, in yielding for the first time high-quality spectra of extended sources, and improved spectral sensitivity in the Fe-K band. With the launch of Athena, X-ray spectroscopy will become mature. It allows us to extend the investigations from the few handful of brightest sources of each category to a large number of sources far away in space and time, or to get high time-resolution, high-spectral resolution spectra of bright time variable sources.

  11. Slumped glass optics for x-ray telescopes: advances in the hot slumping assisted by pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmaso, B.; Brizzolari, C.; Basso, S.; Civitani, M.; Ghigo, M.; Pareschi, G.; Spiga, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vecchi, G.

    2015-09-01

    Slumped Glass Optics is a viable solution to build future X-ray telescopes. In our laboratories we use a direct hot slumping approach assisted by pressure, in which the glass optical surface is in contact with the mould, and a pressure is applied to enforce the replication of the mould shape on the glass optical surface. Several prototypes have been already produced and tested in X-rays, showing a continuous improvement in our technology. In this paper, we present the advances in our technology, in terms of slumped glass foils quality and expected performances upon an ideal integration. By using Eagle XG glass foils and Zerodur K20 for the slumping mould, we have fine tuned several process parameters: we present a critical analysis correlating the changes in the process to the improvements in different spatial frequency ranges encompassing the profile and roughness measurements. The use of a re-polished K20 mould, together with the optimized process parameters, lead to the latest result of glass foils with expected performance of less than 3 arcsec in single reflection at 1 keV X-ray energy. This work presents all the relevant steps forward in the hot slumping technology assisted by pressure, aimed at reaching angular resolutions of 5 arcsec for the whole mirror assembly.

  12. Electronic Structures of Uranium Compounds Studied by Soft X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Okane, Tetsuo; Saitoh, Yuji; Fujimori, Atsushi; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Haga, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2016-06-01

    The electronic structures of uranium-based compounds have been studied by photoelectron spectroscopy with soft X-ray synchrotron radiation. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with soft X-rays has made it possible to directly observe their bulk band structures and Fermi surfaces. It has been shown that the band structures and Fermi surfaces of itinerant compounds such as UB2, UN, and UFeGa5 are quantitatively described by a band-structure calculation treating all U 5f electrons as itinerant. Furthermore, the overall electronic structures of heavy-fermion compounds such as UPd2Al3, UNi2Al3, and URu2Si2 are also explained by a band-structure calculation, although some disagreements exist, which might originate from the electron correlation effect. This suggests that the itinerant description of U 5f states is an appropriate starting point for the description of their electronic structures. The situation is similar for ferromagnetic superconductors such as UGe2, URhGe, UCoGe, and UIr, although the complications from their low-symmetry crystal structures make it more difficult to describe their detailed electronic structures. The local electronic structures of the uranium site have been probed by core-level photoelectron spectroscopy with soft X-rays. The comparisons of core-level spectra of heavy-fermion compounds with typical itinerant and localized compounds suggest that the local electronic structures of most itinerant and heavy-fermion compounds are close to the U 5f3 configuration except for UPd2Al3 and UPt3. The core-level spectrum of UPd2Al3 has similarities to those of both itinerant and localized compounds, suggesting that it is located at the boundary between the itinerant and localized states. Moreover, the spectrum of UPt3 is very close to that of the localized compound UPd3, suggesting that it is nearly localized, although there are narrow quasi-particle bands in the vicinity of EF.

  13. A quasi-realtime x-ray microtomography system at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    DeCarlo, F.; Foster, I.; Insley, J.; Kesselman, C.; Lane, P.; Mancini, D.; McNulty, I.; Su, M.; Tieman, B.; Wang, Y.; von Laszewski, G.

    1999-07-16

    The combination of high-brilliance x-ray sources, fast detector systems, wide-bandwidth networks, and parallel computers can substantially reduce the time required to acquire, reconstruct, and visualize high-resolution three-dimensional tomographic datasets. A quasi-realtime computed x-ray microtomography system has been implemented at the 2-BM beamline at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. With this system, a complete tomographic data set can be collected in about 15 minutes. Immediately after each projection is obtained, it is rapidly transferred to the Mathematics and Computing Sciences Division where preprocessing and reconstruction calculations are performed concurrently with the data acquisition by a SGI parallel computer. The reconstruction results, once completed, are transferred to a visualization computer that performs the volume rendering calculations. Rendered images of the reconstructed data are available for viewing back at the beamline experiment station minutes after the data acquisition was complete. The fully pipelined data acquisition and reconstruction system also gives us the option to acquire the tomographic data set in several cycles, initially with coarse then with fine angular steps. At present the projections are acquired with a straight-ray projection imaging scheme using 5-20 keV hard x rays in either phase or amplitude contrast mode at a 1-10 pm resolution. In the future, we expect to increase the resolution of the projections to below 100 nm by using a focused x-ray beam at the 2-ID-B beamline and to reduce the combined acquisition and computation time to the 1 min scale with improvements in the detectors, network links, software pipeline, and computation algorithms.

  14. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M.

    1997-04-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state.

  15. Local Structure Determination of Carbon/Nickel Ferrite Composite Nanofibers Probed by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nilmoung, Sukunya; Kidkhunthod, Pinit; Maensiri, Santi

    2015-11-01

    Carbon/NiFe2O4 composite nanofibers have been successfully prepared by electrospinning method using a various concentration solution of Ni and Fe nitrates dispersed into polyacrylonitride (PAN) solution in N,N' dimethylformamide. The phase and mophology of PAN/NiFe2O4 composite samples were characterized and investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The magnetic properties of the prepared samples were measured at ambient temperature by a vibrating sample magnetometer. It is found that all composite samples exhibit ferromagnetism. This could be local-structurally explained by the existed oxidation states of Ni2+ and Fe3+ in the samples. Moreover, local environments around Ni and Fe ions could be revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurement including X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). PMID:26726677

  16. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Optically Bright Planets using the Chandra Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, P. G.; Elsner, R. F.

    2005-01-01

    Since its launch in July 1999, Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) has observed several planets (Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn) and 6 comets. At 0.5 arc-second spatial resolution, ACIS detects individual x-ray photons with good quantum efficiency (25% at 0.6 KeV) and energy resolution (20% FWHM at 0.6 KeV). However, the ACIS CCDs are also sensitive to optical and near-infrared light, which is absorbed by optical blocking filters (OBFs) that eliminate optical contamination from all but the brightest extended sources, e.g., planets. .Jupiter at opposition subseconds approx.45 arc-seconds (90 CCD pixels.) Since Chandra is incapable of tracking a moving target, the planet takes 10 - 20 kiloseconds to move across the most sensitive ACIS CCD, after which the observatory must be re-pointed. Meanwhile, the OBF covering that CCD adds an opt,ical signal equivalent to approx.110 eV to each pixel that lies within thc outline of the Jovian disk. This has three consequences: (1) the observatory must be pointed away from Jupiter while CCD bias maps are constructed; (2) most x-rays from within the optical image will be misidentified as charged-particle background and ignored; and (3) those x-rays that are reported will bc assigned anomalously high energies. The same also applies to thc other planets, but is less serious since they are either dimmer at optical wavelengths, or they show less apparent motion across the sky, permitting reduced CCD exposure times: the optical contamination from Saturn acids approx.15 eV per pixel, and from Mars and Venus approx.31 eV. After analyzing a series of short .Jupiter observations in December 2000, ACIS parameters were optimized for the February 2003 opposition. CCD bias maps were constructed while Chandra pointed away from Jupiter, and the subsequent observations employed on-board software to ignore any pixel that contained less charge than that expected from optical leakage. In addition, ACIS was commanded to report 5 x 5

  17. Development of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectroscopy for fusion and light-source research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Pablant, N. A.; Efthimion, P.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Widmann, K.; Sanchez del Rio, M.

    2014-09-01

    One dimensional spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectroscopy with spherically bent crystals and 2D pixelated detectors is an established technique on magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) experiments world wide for Doppler measurements of spatial profiles of plasma ion temperature and flow velocity. This technique is being further developed for diagnosis of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) plasmas at laser-plasma facilities and synchrotron/x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facilities. Useful spatial resolution (micron scale) of such small-scale plasma sources requires magnification, because of the finite pixel size of x-ray CCD detectors (13.5 μm). A von-Hamos like spectrometer using spherical crystals is capable of magnification, as well as uniform sagittal focusing across the full x-ray spectrum, and is being tested in laboratory experiments using a tungsten-target microfocus (5-10 μm) x-ray tube and 13-μm pixel x-ray CCD. A spatial resolution better than 10 μm has been demonstrated. Good spectral resolution is indicated by small differences (0.02 - 0.1 eV) of measured line widths with best available published natural line widths. Progress and status of HEDP measurements and the physics basis for these diagnostics are presented. A new type of x-ray crystal spectrometer with a convex spherically bent crystal is also reported. The status of testing of a 2D imaging microscope using matched pairs of spherical crystals with x rays will also be presented. The use of computational x-ray optics codes in development of these instrumental concepts is addressed.

  18. Distribution and speciation of bromine in mammalian tissue and fluids by X-ray fluorescence imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ceko, Melanie J; Hummitzsch, Katja; Hatzirodos, Nicholas; Bonner, Wendy; James, Simon A; Kirby, Jason K; Rodgers, Raymond J; Harris, Hugh H

    2015-05-01

    Bromine is one of the most abundant and ubiquitous trace elements in the biosphere and until recently had not been shown to perform any essential biological function in animals. A recent study demonstrated that bromine is required as a cofactor for peroxidasin-catalysed formation of sulfilimine crosslinks in Drosophila. In addition, bromine dietary deficiency is lethal in Drosophila, whereas bromine replenishment restores viability. The aim of this study was to examine the distribution and speciation of bromine in mammalian tissues and fluids to provide further insights into the role and function of this element in biological systems. In this study we used X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to examine the distribution of bromine in bovine ovarian tissue samples, follicular fluid and aortic serum, as well as human whole blood and serum and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the chemical species of bromine in a range of mammalian tissue (bovine, ovine, porcine and murine), whole blood and serum samples (bovine, ovine, porcine, murine and human), and marine samples (salmon (Salmo salar), kingfish (Seriola lalandi) and Scleractinian coral). Bromine was found to be widely distributed across all tissues and fluids examined. In the bovine ovary in particular it was more concentrated in the sub-endothelial regions of arterioles. Statistical comparison of the near-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectra with a library of bromine standards led to the conclusion that the major form of bromine in all samples analysed was bromide. PMID:25675086

  19. Calculations and surface quality measurements of high-asymmetry angle x-ray crystal monochromators for advanced x-ray imaging and metrological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zápražný, Zdenko; Korytár, Dušan; Jergel, Matej; Šiffalovič, Peter; Dobročka, Edmund; Vagovič, Patrik; Ferrari, Claudio; Mikulík, Petr; Demydenko, Maksym; Mikloška, Marek

    2015-03-01

    We present the numerical optimization and the technological development progress of x-ray optics based on asymmetric germanium crystals. We show the results of several basic calculations of diffraction properties of germanium x-ray crystal monochromators and of an analyzer-based imaging method for various asymmetry factors using an x-ray energy range from 8 to 20 keV. The important parameter of highly asymmetric monochromators as image magnifiers or compressors is the crystal surface quality. We have applied several crystal surface finishing methods, including advanced nanomachining using single-point diamond turning (SPDT), conventional mechanical lapping, chemical polishing, and chemomechanical polishing, and we have evaluated these methods by means of atomic force microscopy, diffractometry, reciprocal space mapping, and others. Our goal is to exclude the chemical etching methods as the final processing technique because it causes surface undulations. The aim is to implement very precise deterministic methods with a control of surface roughness down to 0.1 nm. The smallest roughness (˜0.3 nm), best planarity, and absence of the subsurface damage were observed for the sample which was machined using an SPDT with a feed rate of 1 mm/min and was consequently polished using a fine polishing 15-min process with a solution containing SiO2 nanoparticles (20 nm).

  20. Depth-selective X-ray absorption spectroscopy by detection of energy-loss Auger electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Noritake; Soejima, Narumasa; Iwasaki, Shiro; Nomoto, Toyokazu; Murai, Takaaki; Kimoto, Yasuji

    2015-11-01

    A unique X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) method is proposed for depth profiling of chemical states in material surfaces. Partial electron yield mode detecting energy-loss Auger electrons, called the inelastic electron yield (IEY) mode, enables a variation in the probe depth. As an example, Si K-edge XAS spectra for a well-defined multilayer sample (Si3N4/SiO2/Si) have been investigated using this method at various kinetic energies. We found that the peaks assigned to the layers from the top layer to the substrate appeared in the spectra in the order of increasing energy loss relative to the Auger electrons. Thus, the probe depth can be changed by the selection of the kinetic energy of the energy loss electrons in IEY-XAS.